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Sample records for cell tumor metastatic

  1. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. Blast cell aggregates simulating metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Rivera, G; Mirro, J; Stass, S; Peiper, S; Murphy, S B

    1985-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is a rare leukemia that can present diagnostic problems. We describe two children who have this disease and had clumps of blast cells in their bone marrow, a finding usually attributed to metastatic tumor. The megakaryocytic origin of the cells was supported by their cytochemical staining pattern (positive alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase resistant to sodium fluoride inhibition and negative alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase) and by the presence of factor VIII-related antigen. Ultrastructural studies of blast cells from one patient demonstrated platelet peroxidase. The mechanism of blast cell clump formation in these cases is unknown; nevertheless, awareness that this feature can occur in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia may avoid a misdiagnosis of metastatic solid tumor.

  2. MicroRNA expression profiles in metastatic and non-metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Mosakhani, Neda; Pazzaglia, Laura; Benassi, Maria Serena; Borze, Ioana; Quattrini, Irene; Picci, Piero; Knuutila, Sakari

    2013-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a skeletal neoplasm, a locally aggressive tumor that occasionally metastasizes to the lungs. To identify novel biomarkers associated with GCTB progression and metastasis, we performed a miRNA microarray on ten primary tumors of GCTB, of which five developed lung metastases and the rest remained metastasis-free. Between metastatic and non-metastatic GCTB, 12 miRNAs were differentially expressed (such as miR-136, miR-513a-5p, miR-494, miR-224, and miR-542-5p). A decreased level of miR-136 in metastatic versus non-metastatic GCTB was significantly confirmed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (p=0.04). To identify potential target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs, we used three target prediction databases. Then, to functionally validate the potential target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, we re-analyzed our previous gene expression data from the same ten patients. Eight genes such as NFIB, TNC, and FLRT2 were inversely expressed relative to their predicted miRNA regulators. NFIB expression correlated in metastatic GCTB with no or low expression of miR-136, and this gene was selected for further verification with qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Verification of NFIB mRNA and protein by qRT-PCR showed elevated expression levels in metastatic GCTBs. Further, the protein expression level of NFIB was tested in an independent validation cohort of 74 primary archival GCTB specimens. In the primary tumors that developed metastases compared to the disease-free group, NFIB protein was moderately to strongly expressed at a higher frequency. Thus, in GCTB, miR-136 and NFIB may serve as prognostic makers.

  3. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  4. Biomarker utility of circulating tumor cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Lorigan, Paul; Zhou, Cong; Lancashire, Matthew; Booth, Jessica; Cummings, Jeff; Califano, Raffaele; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Dive, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Advances in targeted agents and immunotherapy have improved outcomes in metastatic disease, but biomarkers are required to optimize treatment. We determined the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and explored their utility as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. A total of 101 patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were recruited prospectively. CTC number was determined using the CellSearch platform and melanoma kits in samples taken at baseline and serially during treatment. CTC numbers ranged between 0 and 36 per 7.5 ml blood; 26% of patients had ≥ 2 CTCs. Baseline CTC number was prognostic for median overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis (2.6 vs. 7.2 months (P<0.011) for patients with ≥ 2 CTCs vs. <2 CTCs, respectively). In multivariate analysis, CTC number was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.403, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.303-4.430, P=0.005). Patients receiving treatment in whom CTC number remained ≥ 2 CTCs during treatment had shorter median OS than those who maintained <2 CTCs (7 vs. 10 months, HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.81, log-rank test P=0.015). In conclusion, CTC number in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients is prognostic for OS with a cutoff of 2 CTCs per 7.5 ml blood. CTC number measured before and throughout treatment provided additional prognostic information. Larger studies are warranted to confirm CTC biomarker utility in melanoma patients.

  5. Heterogeneity of isozyme expression in tumor cells does not correlate with metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Siciliano, M J; Fidler, I J

    1986-01-01

    The major purpose of these studies was to determine whether the expression of isozymes by tumor cells was heterogeneous among tumor cell subpopulations within a neoplasm and whether expression of one or another isozyme correlated with metastatic potential of tumor cells. The expression levels of 40 isozymes were determined in 56 cell lines, many of them clonal, from nine different murine and human tumors. The enzymes chosen for study are involved in nucleotide, carbohydrate and pentose phosphate metabolism, and as such are indicators of the general metabolic and differentiational status of the cell. The tumors studied included two murine and two human malignant melanomas, four murine fibrosarcomas, and one human prostatic adenocarcinoma. The lines isolated from these tumors consisted of cells that are tumorigenic non-metastatic, tumorigenic low metastatic and tumorigenic highly metastatic. Clonally derived cell lines from a given tumor differed in their expression of a number of different isozymes, including adenosine deaminase, creatine phosphokinase-B and lactate dehydrogenase. Different patterns of isozyme expression were observed among different tumor types as well as between tumors of the same type; however, there were no differences in isozyme expression for any enzyme tested that correlated with metastatic ability of tumor cells.

  6. Gene expression profiles of circulating tumor cells versus primary tumors in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Weekhout, Marleen; Mostert, Bianca; Reijm, Esther A; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B; Peeters, Dieter J; Hamberg, Paul; Seynaeve, Caroline; Jager, Agnes; de Jongh, Felix E; Smid, Marcel; Dirix, Luc Y; Kehrer, Diederik F S; van Galen, Anne; Ramirez-Moreno, Raquel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; Gratama, Jan W; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Before using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as liquid biopsy, insight into molecular discrepancies between CTCs and primary tumors is essential. We characterized CellSearch-enriched CTCs from 62 metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients with ≥5 CTCs starting first-line systemic treatment. Expression levels of 35 tumor-associated, CTC-specific genes, including ESR1, coding for the estrogen receptor (ER), were measured by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and correlated to corresponding primary tumors. In 30 patients (48%), gene expression profiles of 35 genes were discrepant between CTCs and the primary tumor, but this had no prognostic consequences. In 15 patients (24%), the expression of ER was discrepant. Patients with ER-negative primary tumors and ER-positive CTCs had a longer median TTS compared to those with concordantly ER-negative CTCs (8.5 versus 2.1 months, P = 0.05). From seven patients, an axillary lymph node metastasis was available. In two patients, the CTC profiles better resembled the lymph node metastasis than the primary tumor. Our findings suggest that molecular discordances between CTCs and primary tumors frequently occur, but that this bears no prognostic consequences. Alterations in ER-status between primary tumors and CTCs might have prognostic implications.

  7. Circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madic, Jordan; Kiialainen, Anna; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Birzele, Fabian; Ramey, Guillemette; Leroy, Quentin; Rio Frio, Thomas; Vaucher, Isabelle; Raynal, Virginie; Bernard, Virginie; Lermine, Alban; Clausen, Inga; Giroud, Nicolas; Schmucki, Roland; Milder, Maud; Horn, Carsten; Spleiss, Olivia; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Weisser, Martin; Lebofsky, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a new circulating tumor biomarker which might be used as a prognostic biomarker in a way similar to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Here, we used the high prevalence of TP53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to compare ctDNA and CTC detection rates and prognostic value in metastatic TNBC patients. Forty patients were enrolled before starting a new line of treatment. TP53 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissues and in plasma DNA using two next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in parallel. Archived tumor tissue was sequenced successfully for 31/40 patients. TP53 mutations were found in 26/31 (84%) of tumor samples. The same mutation was detected in the matched plasma of 21/26 (81%) patients with an additional mutation found only in the plasma for one patient. Mutated allele fractions ranged from 2 to 70% (median 5%). The observed correlation between the two NGS approaches (R(2) = 0.903) suggested that ctDNA levels data were quantitative. Among the 27 patients with TP53 mutations, CTC count was ≥1 in 19 patients (70%) and ≥5 in 14 patients (52%). ctDNA levels had no prognostic impact on time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS), whereas CTC numbers were correlated with OS (p = 0.04) and marginally with TTP (p = 0.06). Performance status and elevated LDH also had significant prognostic impact. Here, absence of prognostic impact of baseline ctDNA level suggests that mechanisms of ctDNA release in metastatic TNBC may involve, beyond tumor burden, biological features that do not dramatically affect patient outcome.

  8. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Withers, Sita S; Lawson, Corinne M; Burton, Andrew G; Rebhun, Robert B; Steffey, Michele A

    2016-03-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence.

  9. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Sita S.; Lawson, Corinne M.; Burton, Andrew G.; Rebhun, Robert B.; Steffey, Michele A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence. PMID:26933269

  10. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  11. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Guilhem; El Bouchtaoui, Morad; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-08-07

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities.We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived.Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC.

  12. Metastatic Insulinoma Following Resection of Nonsecreting Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ilyssa O.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented to our clinic for recurrent hypoglycemia after undergoing resection of an incidentally discovered nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumor 6 years ago. She underwent a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, after which she developed diabetes and was placed on an insulin pump. Pathology showed a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm with negative islet hormone immunostains. Two years later, computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver lesions. Biopsy of a liver lesion showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm, consistent with pancreatic origin. Six years later, she presented to clinic with 1.5 years of recurrent hypoglycemia. Laboratory results showed elevated proinsulin, insulin levels, and c-peptide levels during a hypoglycemic episode. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen redemonstrated multiple liver lesions. Repeated transarterial catheter chemoembolization and microwave thermal ablation controlled hypoglycemia. The unusual features of interest of this case include the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumor to a metastatic insulinoma and the occurrence of atrial flutter after octreotide for treatment. PMID:26425568

  13. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  14. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J.; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell—endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  15. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  16. Golden bullet-denosumab: early rapid response of metastatic giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Demirsoy, Ugur; Karadogan, Meriban; Selek, Özgür; Anik, Yonca; Aksu, Görkem; Müezzinoglu, Bahar; Corapcioglu, Funda

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is usually a benign, locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. Histogenesis of GCTB is unknown and a correlation has not been found between histologic and clinical course. For this reason, many authors consider its prognosis unpredictable. Lung metastasis after GCTB treatment is well known and generally has unfavorable outcome, despite varied chemotherapy regimens. Denosumab, which inhibits RANK-RANKL interaction, is a new, promising actor among targeted therapeutic agents for GCTB. In this report, we emphasize on early rapid response to denosumab in metastatic GCTB.

  17. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  18. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5+ regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, E. C.; Hamilton, M. J.; Young, A.; Wadsworth, B. J.; LePard, N. E.; Lee, H. N.; Firmino, N.; Collier, J. L.; Bennewith, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C–C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C–C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80+ macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5+ Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth. PMID:27471618

  19. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  20. Netrin-1 expression confers a selective advantage for tumor cell survival in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitamant, Julien; Guenebeaud, Céline; Coissieux, Marie-May; Guix, Catherine; Treilleux, Isabelle; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bachelot, Thomas; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Netrin-1, an axon navigation cue was proposed to play a crucial role during colorectal tumorigenesis by regulating apoptosis. The netrin-1 receptors DCC and UNC5H were shown to belong to the family of dependence receptors that share the ability to induce apoptosis in the absence of their ligands. Such a trait confers on these receptors a tumor suppressor activity. Expression of one of these dependence receptors at the surface of a tumor cell is indeed speculated to render this cell dependent on ligand availability for its survival, hence inhibiting uncontrolled cell proliferation or metastasis. Consequently, it is a selective advantage for a tumor cell to lose this dependence receptor activity, as previously described with losses of DCC and UNC5H expression in human cancers. However, the model predicts that a similar advantage may be obtained by gaining autocrine expression of the ligand. We describe here that, unlike human nonmetastatic breast tumors, a large fraction of metastatic breast cancers overexpress netrin-1. Moreover, we show that netrin-1-expressing mammary metastatic tumor cell lines undergo apoptosis when netrin-1 expression is experimentally decreased or when decoy soluble receptor ectodomains are added. Such treatments prevent metastasis formation both in a syngenic mouse model of lung colonization of a mammary cancer cell line and in a model of spontaneous lung metastasis of xenografted human breast tumor. Thus, netrin-1 expression observed in a large fraction of human metastatic breast tumors confers a selective advantage for tumor cell survival and potentially represents a promising target for alternative anticancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:18353983

  1. Treatment of pulmonary metastatic tumors in mice using lentiviral vector-engineered stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Zhao, P; Kennedy, C; Chen, K; Wiegand, J; Washington, G; Marrero, L; Cui, Y

    2008-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy relies on functional tumor-specific effector T lymphocytes for tumor elimination. Dendritic cells (DCs), as most potent antigen-presenting cells, have been popularly employed in clinical and experimental tumor treatments. We have previously demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated transgene delivery to DC progenitors, including bone marrow cells and hematopoietic stem cells, followed by transplantation supports systemic generation of great numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs. These DCs subsequently stimulate marked and systemic immune activation. Here, we examined whether this level of immune activation is sufficient to overcome tumor-induced tolerogenic environment for treating an established aggressive epithelial tumor. We showed that a combination treatment of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and cytosine-phosphate-guanine-containing oligonucleotide stimulated large numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs in situ from transgene-modified stem cells. Moreover, these in situ generated and activated DCs markedly stimulated activation of antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells by augmenting their numbers, as well as function, even in a tumor-bearing tolerogenic environment. This leads to significant improvement in the therapeutic efficacy of established pulmonary metastases. This study suggests that lentiviral vector-modified stem cells as DC progenitors may be used as an effective therapeutic regimen for treating metastatic epithelial tumors. PMID:18084244

  2. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Poff, A M; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, T N; D'Agostino, D P

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use.

  3. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, AM; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, TN; D’Agostino, DP

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use. PMID:24615175

  4. Oncogenic LINE-1 Retroelements Sustain Prostate Tumor Cells and Promote Metastatic Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    RNA -sequencing data that we are part way through processing, but suggests so far significant activation of non-coding RNA sequences derived from RNA ...metastasis tumor tissues in the UTHSCSA tissue bank, however the RNA was not considered of sufficient quality to submit for RNA sequencing. We did RNA ...sequencing of LNCaP cell line RNA as this is derived from a prostate cancer lymph node metastatic deposit, although the bioinformatics analysis has

  5. Molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells resemble the liver metastasis more closely than the primary tumor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Mostert, Bianca; Lalmahomed, Zarina; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B.; van Galen, Anne; Smid, Marcel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; de Weerd, Vanja; Ramírez-Moreno, Raquel; Biermann, Katharina; Verhoef, Cornelis; Grünhagen, Dirk J.; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Gratama, Jan W.; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background CTCs are a promising alternative for metastatic tissue biopsies for use in precision medicine approaches. We investigated to what extent the molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) resemble the liver metastasis and/or the primary tumor from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Results The CTC profiles were concordant with the liver metastasis in 17/23 patients (74%) and with the primary tumor in 13 patients (57%). The CTCs better resembled the liver metastasis in 13 patients (57%), and the primary tumor in five patients (22%). The strength of the correlations was not associated with clinical parameters. Nine genes (CDH1, CDH17, CDX1, CEACAM5, FABP1, FCGBP, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, and MAPT) displayed significant differential expressions, all of which were downregulated, in CTCs compared to the tissues in the 23 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were retrospectively selected from a prospective study. Using the CellSearch System, CTCs were enumerated and isolated just prior to liver metastasectomy. A panel of 25 CTC-specific genes was measured by RT-qPCR in matching CTCs, primary tumors, and liver metastases. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and considered as continuous variables with r=1 representing absolute concordance and r= -1 representing absolute discordance. A cut-off of r>0.1 was applied in order to consider profiles to be concordant. Conclusions In the majority of the patients, CTCs reflected the molecular characteristics of metastatic cells better than the primary tumors. Genes involved in cell adhesion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were downregulated in the CTCs. Our results support the use of CTC characterization as a liquid biopsy for precision medicine. PMID:27340863

  6. Tumor Mutational Load and Immune Parameters across Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk Groups.

    PubMed

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H; Hakimi, A Ari; Hsieh, James J; Tannir, Nizar M; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-10-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared with patients with favorable or intermediate risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here, we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole-exome transcriptome data in renal cell carcinoma patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas who ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by the MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes-granzyme A and perforin-or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 820-2. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Alternative therapies for metastatic breast cancer: multimodal approach targeting tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Sambi, Manpreet; Haq, Sabah; Samuel, Vanessa; Qorri, Bessi; Haxho, Fiona; Hill, Kelli; Harless, William; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary challenges in developing effective therapies for malignant tumors is the specific targeting of a heterogeneous cancer cell population within the tumor. The cancerous tumor is made up of a variety of distinct cells with specialized receptors and proteins that could potentially be viable targets for drugs. In addition, the diverse signals from the local microenvironment may also contribute to the induction of tumor growth and metastasis. Collectively, these factors must be strategically studied and targeted in order to develop an effective treatment protocol. Targeted multimodal approaches need to be strategically studied in order to develop a treatment protocol that is successful in controlling tumor growth and preventing metastatic burden. Breast cancer, in particular, presents a unique problem because of the variety of subtypes of cancer that can arise and the multiple drug targets that could be exploited. For example, the tumor stage and subtypes often dictate the appropriate treatment regimen. Alternate multimodal therapies should consider the importance of time-dependent drug administration, as well as targeting the local and systemic tumor environment. Many reviews and papers have briefly touched on the clinical implications of this cellular heterogeneity; however, there has been very little discussion on the development of study models that reflect this diversity and on multimodal therapies that could target these subpopulations. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the origins of intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer subtypes, and its implications for tumor progression, metastatic potential, and treatment regimens. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing specific breast cancer models for research, including in vitro monolayer systems and three-dimensional mammospheres, as well as in vivo murine models that may have the capacity to encompass this heterogeneity. Lastly, we summarize some of the current

  8. Heterogeneous proliferative potential of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with solid epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Solakoglu, Oender; Maierhofer, Christine; Lahr, Georgia; Breit, Elisabeth; Scheunemann, Peter; Heumos, Isabella; Pichlmeier, Uwe; Schlimok, Günter; Oberneder, Ralph; Köllermann, Manfred W.; Köllermann, Jens; Speicher, Michael R.; Pantel, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow is a major homing site for circulating epithelial tumor cells. The present study was aimed to assess the proliferative capacity of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with operable solid tumors especially with regard to their clinical outcome. We obtained bone marrow aspirates from 153 patients with carcinomas of the prostate (n = 46), breast (n = 45), colon (n = 33), and kidney (n = 29). Most of the patients (87%) had primary disease with no clinical signs of overt metastases [tumor-node-metastasis (TNM)-stage UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) I-III]. After bone marrow was cultured for 21–102 days under special cell culture conditions, viable epithelial cells were detected by cytokeratin staining in 124 patients (81%). The cultured epithelial cells harbored Ki-ras2 mutations and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The highest median number of expanded tumor cells was observed in prostate cancer (2,619 per flask). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of expanded tumor cells and the UICC-stage of the patients (P = 0.03) or the presence of overt metastases (P = 0.04). Moreover, a strong expansion of tumor cells was correlated to an increased rate of cancer-related deaths (P = 0.007) and a reduced survival of the patients (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients have viable tumor cells in their bone marrow at primary tumor diagnosis, and the proliferative potential of these cells determines the clinical outcome. PMID:11854519

  9. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... them create an advance directive and power of attorney for health care. Support Groups You can ease ... surgery Brain tumor - children Breast cancer Increased intracranial pressure Lung cancer - small cell Melanoma Renal cell carcinoma ...

  10. Metastatic pancreatic polypeptide-secreting islet cell tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Cruz Cardona, Janice A; Wamsley, Heather L; Farina, Lisa L; Kiupel, Matti

    2010-09-01

    A 14-year-old female spayed Golden Retriever was presented to the University of Florida's Veterinary Medical Center with history of lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis, intermittent vomiting, watery diarrhea, and weight loss for over a year. CBC, biochemical profile, and urinalysis were within reference intervals. Abdominal ultrasonographic examination revealed mesenteric and jejunal lymphadenopathy and hyperechoic hepatic nodules. Cytologic examination of the enlarged lymph nodes revealed loosely cohesive cells with moderate nuclear pleomorphism and rare punctate eosinophilic cytoplasmic granules. The cytologic interpretation was metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasia. On surgical exploration, a mass was detected in the right lobe of the pancreas. Histologic evaluation determined the mass to be an islet cell tumor. Approximately 98% of cells were positive by immunolabeling for pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and only rare cells were positive for insulin or somatostatin. All cells were negative for glucagon, gastrin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, protein gene product 9.5, synaptophysin, and chromogranins A and B. Pancreatic tumors that primarily produce PP are rare in dogs, and this is the first report of both the cytologic and histologic features of an islet cell tumor predominantly secreting PP. Clinical signs for these tumors are typically absent or nonspecific; signs may include watery diarrhea, as noted in this dog, although the diarrhea may have resulted from lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis. Additional case studies are needed to further characterize the cytomorphologic features and clinical presentation of PP-secreting islet cell tumor, or polypeptidoma, in dogs.

  11. Relationship between primary and metastatic testicular germ cell tumors: a clinicopathologic analysis of 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, William P; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Guo, Charles C

    2013-10-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) commonly metastasize to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes (RPLNs). We evaluated 100 cases of RPLN dissection specimens with viable GCTs after chemotherapy and compared them with their corresponding orchiectomy specimens. The mean age of patients was 28 years (range, 15-58 years). The testicular tumors consisted of mixed GCT (n = 72), teratoma (n = 18), seminoma (n = 4), embryonal carcinoma (n = 3), yolk sac tumor (n = 1), and no viable tumor (n = 2). Somatic malignant components were found in 5 cases. The metastatic tumors in the RPLNs consisted of only teratoma (n = 77) and non-teratomatous GCT (n = 23). Twenty-one patients had only teratoma in the RPLNs but not in the testis, and 10 patients had metastatic non-teratomatous GCT components that were not observed in the testis. Six patients had somatic malignant components in the RPLNs, but only one of them had such a component in the testis. Overall, 13 patients died of disease in a mean of 42 months, and the patients with only teratoma in the RPLNs had a lower mortality rate (9%) than those with non-teratomatous components (26%) (P = .044). One patient with somatic components in the primary GCT and 3 patients with somatic components in the metastases died of disease. Our study demonstrates that there is frequent discordance of histologic composition between primary and metastatic testicular GCTs. Teratoma is the most common component in treated GCTs and is usually associated with a more favorable clinical outcome than non-teratomatous GCTs. The presence of somatic components in the RPLNs metastasis indicates a poor prognosis.

  12. Impact of Non-Pulmonary Visceral Metastases in the Prognosis and Practice of Metastatic Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Lorena; Martignano, Filippo; Gallà, Valentina; Maugeri, Antonio; Schepisi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Non-pulmonary visceral metastases, in bones, brain and liver, represent nearly the 10% of metastatic sites of advanced germ cell tumors and are associated with poor prognosis. This review article summarizes major evidences on the impact of different visceral sites on the prognosis, treatment and clinical outcome of patients with germ cell tumors. The clinic-biological mechanisms by which these metastatic sites are associated with poor clinical outcome remain unclear. The multimodality treatment showed a potential better survival, in particular in patients with relapsed disease. Patients with advanced germ cell tumors with visceral metastases should be referred to centers with high expertise in the clinical management of such disease. PMID:27471579

  13. Tumor cell-driven extracellular matrix remodeling drives haptotaxis during metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Madeleine J.; Jonas, Oliver; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Broye, Liliane C.; Guido, Bruna C.; Wyckoff, Jeff; Riquelme, Daisy; Lamar, John M.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Whittaker, Charlie; Ma, Duanduan; Langer, Robert; Cima, Michael J.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Hynes, Richard O.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Keely, Patricia J.; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the tumor microenvironment, but its role in promoting metastasis is incompletely understood. Here we show that FN gradients elicit directional movement of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Haptotaxis on FN gradients requires direct interaction between α5β1 integrin and Mena, an actin regulator, and involves increases in focal complex signaling and tumor-cell-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Compared to Mena, higher levels of the pro-metastatic MenaINV isoform associate with α5, which enables 3D haptotaxis of tumor cells towards the high FN concentrations typically present in perivascular space and in the periphery of breast tumor tissue. MenaINV and FN levels were correlated in two breast cancer cohorts, and high levels of MenaINV were significantly associated with increased tumor recurrence as well as decreased patient survival. Our results identify a novel tumor-cell-intrinsic mechanism that promotes metastasis through ECM remodeling and ECM guided directional migration. PMID:26811325

  14. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  15. Improved detection of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuske, Andra; Gorges, Tobias M.; Tennstedt, Pierre; Tiebel, Anne-Kathrin; Pompe, Raisa; Preißer, Felix; Prues, Sandra; Mazel, Martine; Markou, Athina; Lianidou, Evi; Peine, Sven; Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Riethdorf, Sabine; Beyer, Burkhard; Schlomm, Thorsten; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of blood-based assays to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD) in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) remains unclear. Proving that clinically relevant circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected with available technologies could address this. This study aimed to improve CTC detection in non-metastatic PCa patients by combining three independent CTC assays: the CellSearch system, an in vivo CellCollector and the EPISPOT. Peripheral blood samples from high-risk PCa patients were screened for CTCs before and three months after radical prostatectomy (RP). Combining the results of both time points, CTCs were detected in 37%, 54.9% and 58.7% of patients using CellSearch, CellCollector and EPISPOT, respectively. The cumulative positivity rate of the three CTC assays was 81.3% (87/107) with 21.5% (23/107) of patients harboring ≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml blood. Matched pair analysis of 30 blood samples taken before and after surgery indicated a significant decrease in CTCs captured by the CellCollector from 66% before RP to 34% after therapy (p = 0.031). CTC detection by EPISPOT before RP significantly correlated with PSA serum values (p < 0.0001) and clinical tumor stage (p = 0.04), while the other assays showed no significant correlations. In conclusion, CTC-based liquid biopsies have the potential to monitor MRD in patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:28000772

  16. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  17. Differing Von Hippel Lindau Genotype in Paired Primary and Metastatic Tumors in Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Susan A. J.; Tavares, Emmanuel J.; Golshayan, Ali R.; Rini, Brian I.; Aydin, Hakan; Zhou, Ming; Sercia, Linda; Wood, Laura; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K.; Bukowski, Ronald M.; Ganapathi, Ram

    2012-01-01

    In sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene is inactivated by mutation or methylation in the majority of primary (P) tumors. Due to differing effects of wild-type (WT) and mutant (MT) VHL gene on downstream signaling pathways regulating angiogenesis, VHL gene status could impact clinical outcome. In CCRCC, comparative genomic hybridization analysis studies have reported genetic differences between paired P and metastatic (M) tumors. We thus sequenced the VHL gene in paired tumor specimens from 10 patients to determine a possible clonal relationship between the P tumor and M lesion(s) in patients with CCRCC. Using paraffin-embedded specimens, genomic DNA from microdissected samples (>80% tumor) of paired P tumor and M lesions from all 10 patients, as well as in normal tissue from 6 of these cases, was analyzed. The DNA was used for PCR-based amplification of each of the 3 exons of the VHL gene. Sequences derived from amplified samples were compared to the wild-type VHL gene sequence (GenBank Accession No. AF010238). Methylation status of the VHL gene was determined using VHL methylation-specific PCR primers after DNA bisulfite modification. In 4/10 (40%) patients the VHL gene status differed between the P tumor and the M lesion. As expected, when the VHL gene was mutated in both the P tumor and M lesion, the mutation was identical. Further, while the VHL genotype differed between the primary tumor in different kidneys or multiple metastatic lesions in the same patient, the VHL germline genotype in the normal adjacent tissue was always wild-type irrespective of the VHL gene status in the P tumor. These results demonstrate for the first time that the VHL gene status can be different between paired primary and metastatic tissue in patients with CCRCC. PMID:22655276

  18. Polyethylenimine-coated SPION exhibits potential intrinsic anti-metastatic properties inhibiting migration and invasion of pancreatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mulens-Arias, Vladimir; Rojas, José Manuel; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Morales, María del Puerto; Barber, Domingo F

    2015-10-28

    Due to its aggressive behavior, pancreatic cancer is one of the principal causes of cancer-related deaths. The highly metastatic potential of pancreatic tumor cells demands the development of more effective anti-metastatic approaches for this disease. Although polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEI-coated SPIONs) have been studied for their utility as transfection agents, little is known of their effect on tumor cell biology. Here we demonstrated that PEI-coated SPIONs have potent inhibitory effects on pancreatic tumor cell migration/invasion, through inhibition of Src kinase and decreased expression of MT1-MMP and MMP2 metalloproteinases. When treated with PEI-coated SPIONs, the pancreatic tumor cell line Pan02 showed reduced invadosome density and thus, a decrease in their ability to invade through basement membrane. These nanoparticles temporarily downmodulated microRNA-21, thereby upregulating the cell migration inhibitors PTEN, PDCD4 and Sprouty-1. PEI-coated SPIONs thus show intrinsic, possibly anti-metastatic properties for modulating pancreatic tumor cell migration machinery, which indicates their potential as anti-metastatic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Natalie; Pestrin, Marta; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Malorni, Luca; Di Leo, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach. PMID:24670368

  20. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  1. Neural stem cell-based dual suicide gene delivery for metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Natsume, A; Lee, H J; Motomura, K; Nishimira, Y; Ohno, M; Ito, M; Kinjo, S; Momota, H; Iwami, K; Ohka, F; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2012-11-01

    In our previous works, we demonstrated that human neural stem cells (NSCs) transduced with the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on glioma and medulloblastoma cells after administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). In addition, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) is a widely studied enzyme used for suicide gene strategies, for which the prodrug is ganciclovir (GCV). To apply this strategy to brain metastasis treatment, we established here a human NSC line (F3.CD-TK) expressing the dual suicide genes CD and TK. We examined whether F3.CD-TK cells intensified the antitumor effect on lung cancer brain metastases. In vitro studies showed that F3.CD-TK cells exerted a marked bystander effect on human lung cancer cells after treatment with 5-FC and GCV. In a novel experimental brain metastases model, intravenously administered F3 cells migrated near lung cancer metastatic lesions, which were induced by the injection of lung cancer cells via the intracarotid artery. More importantly, F3.CD-TK cells in the presence of prodrugs 5-FC and GCV decreased tumor size and considerably prolonged animal survival. The results of the present study indicate that the dual suicide gene-engineered, NSC-based treatment strategy might offer a new promising therapeutic modality for brain metastases.

  2. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  3. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  4. Early detection of poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: tumor kinetics evaluated by circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Souza e Silva, Virgílio; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Abdallah, Emne A; Damascena, Aline; Paludo, Jociana; Chojniak, Rubens; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; de Mello, Celso Abdon Lopes; Alves, Vanessa S; Fanelli, Marcello F

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer worldwide. New prognostic markers are needed to identify patients with poorer prognosis, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) seem to be promising to accomplish this. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted by blood collection from patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), three times, every 2 months in conjunction with image examinations for evaluation of therapeutic response. CTC isolation and counting were performed by Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells (ISET). Results A total of 54 patients with mCRC with a mean age of 57.3 years (31–82 years) were included. Among all patients, 60% (n=32) were carriers of wild-type KRAS (WT KRAS) tumors and 90% of them (n=29) were exposed to monoclonal antibodies along with systemic treatment. Evaluating CTC kinetics, when we compared the baseline (pretreatment) CTC level (CTC1) with the level at first follow-up (CTC2), we observed that CTC1-positive patients (CTCs above the median), who became negative (CTCs below the median) had a favorable evolution (n=14), with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 14.7 months. This was higher than that for patients with an unfavorable evolution (CTC1− that became CTC2+; n=13, 6.9 months; P=0.06). Patients with WT KRAS with favorable kinetics had higher PFS (14.7 months) in comparison to those with WT KRAS with unfavorable kinetics (9.4 months; P=0.02). Moreover, patients whose imaging studies showed radiological progression had an increased quantification of CTCs at CTC2 compared to those without progression (P=0.04). Conclusion This study made possible the presentation of ISET as a feasible tool for evaluating CTC kinetics in patients with mCRC, which can be promising in their clinical evaluation. PMID:28008271

  5. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  6. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Daniel W.; Coppock, Joseph D.; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M.; Spanos, William C.; Onken, Michael D.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H.; Vermeer, Paola D.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60–80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes metastatic potential of breast cancer cells through Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Qiu, Zhu; Huang, Jing; Li, Yunhai; Huang, Hongyan; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Hui, Tianli; Lin, Yong; Li, Hongzhong; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer development and progression by releasing various cytokines and chemokines. Previously, we have found that the number of COX-2+ TAMs was associated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. However, the mechanism remains enigmatic. In this study, we show that COX-2 in breast TAMs enhances the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. COX-2 in TAMs induces MMP-9 expression and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells. In addition, COX-2/PGE2 induces IL-6 release in macrophages. Furthermore, we find that the activation of Akt pathway in cancer cells is crucial for the pro-metastatic effect of COX-2+ TAMs by regulating MMP-9 and EMT. These findings indicate that TAMs facilitate breast cancer cell metastasis through COX-2-mediated intercellular communication. PMID:27994517

  8. Combination of miR-21 with Circulating Tumor Cells Markers Improve Diagnostic Specificity of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Xiaoming; Shen, Hongyan; Deng, Rong; Xue, Kecheng

    2015-09-01

    Circulating miR-21 is upregulated in breast cancer. However, correlation of miR-21 expression with clinic pathologic characteristics remains questionable. In this study, we investigate whether combination of circulation miR-21 with circulating tumor cells (CTCs) marker (EpCAM, MUS1, HER2) could improve diagnostic specificity of metastatic breast cancer. Total 223 breast cancer patients were included. 89 % patients were associated with upregulation of miR-21 compared with health control. 20 % patients were detected for CTCs marker positive. For higher specificity purpose, triple marker positive samples were selected as true CTCs positive, which only occupied 59.5 % of total metastatic breast cancer patients. Specificity of detection of CTCs was 96.7 %. Furthermore, 59.5 % metastatic breast cancer patients were shown both abnormal miR-21 and true CTCs positive according to distribution of true CTCs positive and abnormal miR-21; Combination of miR-21 and CTCs was increased specificity of metastatic detection to 100 %. Our findings suggested that combination of miR-21 with CTCs marker could be used for better diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer in the future.

  9. Anti-tumor Properties of cis-Resveratrol Methylated Analogues in Metastatic Mouse Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valery L.; Toseef, Tayyaba; Nazumudeen, Fathima B.; Rivoira, Christian; Spatafora, Carmela; Tringali, Corrado; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (E-3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol found in red wine that has been shown to have multiple anti-cancer properties. Although cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers of resveratrol occur in nature, the cis form is not biologically active. However, methylation at key positions of the cis form results in more potent anti-cancer properties. This study determined that synthetic cis-polymethoxystilbenes (methylated analogues of cis-resveratrol) inhibited cancer-related phenotypes of metastatic B16 F10 and non-metastatic B16 F1 mouse melanoma cells. In contrast with cis or trans-resveratrol and trans-polymethoxystilbene which were ineffective at 10 μM, cis-polymethoxystilbenes inhibited motility and proliferation of melanoma cells with low micromolar specificity (IC50 <10 μM). Inhibitory effects by cis-polymethoxystilbenes were significantly stronger with B16 F10 cells and were accompanied by decreased expression of β-tubulin and pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein, a marker of metastatic B16 cells. Thus, cis-polymethoxystilbenes have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for metastatic melanoma. PMID:25567208

  10. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    study we have used 2 prostate cancer cell lines. The LNCaP human prostate cancer cells initially isolated from a lymph node biopsy are useful for...cell line is fast growing, poorly differentiated, and metastatic to the lungs and lymph nodes. To determine if this subcurative PDT- induced decrease in...5 – PDT increases the fraction of animals with lymph node metastases. At the time of sacrifice the lungs, pelvic lymph nodes, liver and spines

  11. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  12. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  13. Hypoxic Tumor Cell Modulates Its Microenvironment to Enhance Angiogenic and Metastatic Potential by Secretion of Proteins and Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Tan, Hon Sen; Datta, Arnab; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Zhang, Huoming; Meng, Wei; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxia, tumor cells produce a secretion that modulates their microenvironment to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here, we observed that hypoxic or reoxygenated A431 carcinoma cells exhibited enhanced angiogenic and metastatic potential such as reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, increased invasiveness, and production of a secretion with increased chorioallantoic membrane angiogenic activity. Consistent with these observations, quantitative proteomics revealed that under hypoxia the tumor cells secreted proteins involved in angiogenesis, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and immune cell recruitment. Unexpectedly, the secreted proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. Ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g precipitated 54% of the secreted proteins and enriched for many exosome-associated proteins such as the tetraspanins and Alix and also proteins with the potential to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. Two tetraspanins, CD9 and CD81, co-immunoprecipitated. Together, these data suggested that tumor cells secrete proteins and exosomes with the potential to modulate their microenvironment and facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:20124223

  14. Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    post-injection. It generally takes around 30- 60 days for MDA-MB-231 model to form brain metastasis in Rag 1 -/- mice. We have successfully finished...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0021 TITLE: Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain ...Cancer Brain Metastasis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Siyuan Zhang 5d. PROJECT

  15. Exploiting natural anti-tumor immunity for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A; James, Britnie R; Guan, Yue; Torry, Donald S; Wilber, Andrew; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations of spontaneous disease regression in some renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients implicate a role for tumor immunity in controlling this disease. Puzzling, however, are findings that high levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are common to RCC. Despite expression of activation markers by TILs, functional impairment of innate and adaptive immune cells has been consistently demonstrated contributing to the failure of the immune system to control RCC. Immunotherapy can overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor and provide an opportunity for long-term disease free survival. Unfortunately, complete response rates remain sub-optimal indicating the effectiveness of immunotherapy remains limited by tumor-specific factors and/or cell types that inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here we discuss immunotherapies and the function of multiple immune system components to achieve an effective response. Understanding these complex interactions is essential to rationally develop novel therapies capable of renewing the immune system's ability to respond to these tumors. PMID:25996049

  16. The inhibition of 45A ncRNA expression reduces tumor formation, affecting tumor nodules compactness and metastatic potential in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Penna, Ilaria; Gigoni, Arianna; Costa, Delfina; Vella, Serena; Russo, Debora; Poggi, Alessandro; Villa, Federico; Brizzolara, Antonella; Canale, Claudio; Mescola, Andrea; Daga, Antonio; Russo, Claudio; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio; Menichini, Paola; Pagano, Aldo

    2017-01-31

    We recently reported the in vitro over-expression of 45A, a RNA polymerase III-transcribed non-coding (nc)RNA, that perturbs the intracellular content of FE65L1 affecting cell proliferation rate, short-term response to genotoxic stress, substrate adhesion capacity and, ultimately, increasing the tumorigenic potential of human neuroblastoma cells. In this work, to deeply explore the mechanism by which 45A ncRNA contributes to cancer development, we targeted in vitro and in vivo 45A levels by the stable overexpression of antisense 45A RNA.45A downregulation leads to deep modifications of cytoskeleton organization, adhesion and migration of neuroblastoma cells. These effects are correlated with alterations in the expression of several genes including GTSE1 (G2 and S phase-expressed-1), a crucial regulator of tumor cell migration and metastatic potential. Interestingly, the downregulation of 45A ncRNA strongly affects the in vivo tumorigenic potential of SKNBE2 neuroblastoma cells, increasing tumor nodule compactness and reducing GTSE1 protein expression in a subcutaneous neuroblastoma mouse model. Moreover, intracardiac injection of neuroblastoma cells showed that downregulation of 45A ncRNA also influences tumor metastatic ability. In conclusion, our data highlight a key role of 45A ncRNA in cancer development and suggest that its modulation might represent a possible novel anticancer therapeutic approach.

  17. Crosstalk from non-cancerous mitochondria can inhibit tumor properties of metastatic cells by suppressing oncogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Ma, Yewei; Park, Jun Hyoung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Zhang, Yiqun; Yotnda, Patricia; Creighton, Chad J; Chan, Wai-Yee; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nucleus cross talks and mitochondrial retrograde regulation can play a significant role in cellular properties. Transmitochondrial cybrid systems (cybrids) are an excellent tool to study specific effects of altered mitochondria under a defined nuclear background. The majority of the studies using the cybrid model focused on the significance of specific mitochondrial DNA variations in mitochondrial function or tumor properties. However, most of these variants are benign polymorphisms without known functional significance. From an objective of rectifying mitochondrial defects in cancer cells and to establish mitochondria as a potential anticancer drug target, understanding the role of functional mitochondria in reversing oncogenic properties under a cancer nuclear background is very important. Here we analyzed the potential reversal of oncogenic properties of a highly metastatic cell line with the introduction of non-cancerous mitochondria. Cybrids were established by fusing the mitochondria DNA depleted 143B TK- ρ0 cells from an aggressive osteosarcoma cell line with mitochondria from benign breast epithelial cell line MCF10A, moderately metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 and 143B cells. In spite of the uniform cancerous nuclear background, as observed with the mitochondria donor cells, cybrids with benign mitochondria showed high mitochondrial functional properties including increased ATP synthesis, oxygen consumption and respiratory chain activities compared to cybrids with cancerous mitochondria. Interestingly, benign mitochondria could reverse different oncogenic characteristics of 143B TK(-) cell including cell proliferation, viability under hypoxic condition, anti-apoptotic properties, resistance to anti-cancer drug, invasion, and colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumor growth in nude mice. Microarray analysis suggested that several oncogenic pathways observed in cybrids with cancer mitochondria are inhibited in cybrids with

  18. Post-transcriptional Control of Tumor Cell Autonomous Metastatic Potential by CCR4-NOT Deadenylase CNOT7

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Farhoud; Hu, Ying; Yang, Howard H.; Lee, Maxwell P.; Winkler, G. Sebastian; Hafner, Markus; Hunter, Kent W.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the role of an aberrant transcriptome as a driver of metastatic potential. Deadenylation is a general regulatory node for post-transcriptional control by microRNAs and other determinants of RNA stability. Previously, we demonstrated that the CCR4-NOT scaffold component Cnot2 is an inherited metastasis susceptibility gene. In this study, using orthotopic metastasis assays and genetically engineered mouse models, we show that one of the enzymatic subunits of the CCR4-NOT complex, Cnot7, is also a metastasis modifying gene. We demonstrate that higher expression of Cnot7 drives tumor cell autonomous metastatic potential, which requires its deadenylase activity. Furthermore, metastasis promotion by CNOT7 is dependent on interaction with CNOT1 and TOB1. CNOT7 ribonucleoprotein-immunoprecipitation (RIP) and integrated transcriptome wide analyses reveal that CNOT7-regulated transcripts are enriched for a tripartite 3’UTR motif bound by RNA-binding proteins known to complex with CNOT7, TOB1, and CNOT1. Collectively, our data support a model of CNOT7, TOB1, CNOT1, and RNA-binding proteins collectively exerting post-transcriptional control on a metastasis suppressive transcriptional program to drive tumor cell metastasis. PMID:26807845

  19. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    undesirable side effects. The objective of this proposal is to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy ( PDT ) on prostate tumors in order to design...optimal treatment regimens. We have established subcurative PDT conditions in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. Using these conditions we observed a transient...Ab to detect circulating prostate cancer cells. The results obtained establishes that PDT alters cellular-molecular processes such as cell adhesion

  20. Allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation in metastatic colon cancer: tumor-specific T cells directed to a tumor-associated antigen are generated in vivo during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Cignetti, Alessandro; Capaldi, Antonio; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Vallario, Antonella; Ricchiardi, Alberto; Sperti, Elisa; Ferraris, Renato; Gatti, Marco; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Geuna, Massimo; Fizzotti, Marco; Sangiolo, Dario; Sottile, Antonino; De Rosa, Giovanni; Bucci, Anna Rosa; Lambertenghi-Deliliers, Giorgio; Benedetti, Edoardo; Nash, Richard; Aglietta, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    A pilot study was conducted to evaluate safety and activity of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and to determine whether a T-cell response to a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) was induced. Fifteen patients with metastatic CRC underwent HCT from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen. All patients engrafted with a median donor T-cell chimerism of 72% at day +56. Eight patients experienced grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Despite progressive disease before HCT, partial remission and disease stabilization longer than 90 days were observed in 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Induction of TAA-specific T cells was evaluated with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific HLA-A(*)0201 pentamer in 6 patients with CRC. CEA-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected in 3 of 3 patients concomitant with GHVD onset, but not in 3 of 3 patients without GVHD. They were also not detected in 9 of 9 control patients with GVHD who received transplants for diagnoses other than CRC. Antitumor activity of CEA-specific T cells was also validated in vitro. In one patient, the induction of CEA-specific T cells was associated with a decrease of serum CEA levels and a partial response. Thus, graft-versus-host reactions associated with allogeneic HCT can trigger the generation of T cells specific for CEA, and this may be associated with a clinical response.

  1. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  2. Dissecting the Heterogeneity of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Going Far Beyond the Needle in the Haystack

    PubMed Central

    Bulfoni, Michela; Turetta, Matteo; Del Ben, Fabio; Di Loreto, Carla; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Although the enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTC) defined as expressing both epithelial cell adhesion molecule and cytokeratins (EpCAM+/CK+) can predict prognosis and response to therapy in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer, its clinical utility (i.e., the ability to improve patient outcome by guiding therapy) has not yet been proven in clinical trials. Therefore, scientists are now focusing on the molecular characterization of CTC as a way to explore its possible use as a “surrogate” of tumor tissues to non-invasively assess the genomic landscape of the cancer and its evolution during treatment. Additionally, evidences confirm the existence of CTC in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characterized by a variable loss of epithelial markers. Since the EMT process can originate cells with enhanced invasiveness, stemness and drug-resistance, the enumeration and characterization of this population, perhaps the one truly responsible of tumor recurrence and progression, could be more clinically useful. For these reasons, several devices able to capture CTC independently from the expression of epithelial markers have been developed. In this review, we will describe the types of heterogeneity so far identified and the key role played by the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in driving CTC heterogeneity. The clinical relevance of detecting CTC-heterogeneity will be discussed as well. PMID:27783057

  3. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase) and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery. PMID:27293952

  4. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  5. Microenvironment-Modulated Metastatic CD133+/CXCR4+/EpCAM- Lung Cancer-Initiating Cells Sustain Tumor Dissemination and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giulia; D'Amico, Lucia; Moro, Massimo; Landoni, Elena; Perego, Paola; Miceli, Rosalba; Gatti, Laura; Andriani, Francesca; Wong, Donald; Caserini, Roberto; Tortoreto, Monica; Milione, Massimo; Ferracini, Riccardo; Mariani, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Roato, Ilaria; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for lung cancer-related mortality, but little is known about specific determinants of successful dissemination from primary tumors and metastasis initiation. Here, we show that CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cancer-initiating cells (CIC) directly isolated from patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of non-small cell lung cancer are endowed with superior ability to seed and initiate metastasis at distant organs. We additionally report that CXCR4 inhibition successfully prevents the increase of cisplatin-resistant CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cells in residual tumors and their metastatization. Immunophenotypic analysis of lung tumor cells intravenously injected or spontaneously disseminated to murine lungs demonstrated the survival advantage and increased colonization ability of a specific subset of CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) with reduced expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(-)), which also shows the greatest in vitro invasive potential. We next prove that recovered disseminated cells from lungs of PDX-bearing mice enriched for CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) CICs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic. Importantly, microenvironment stimuli eliciting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts, are able to increase the dissemination potential of lung cancer cells through the generation of the CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) subset. These findings also have correlates in patient samples where disseminating CICs are enriched in metastatic lymph nodes (20-fold, P = 0.006) and their detection in primary tumors is correlated with poor clinical outcome (disease-free survival: P = 0.03; overall survival: P = 0.05). Overall, these results highlight the importance of specific cellular subsets in the metastatic process, the need for in-depth characterization of disseminating tumor cells, and the potential of therapeutic strategies targeting both primary tumor and tumor-microenvironment interactions.

  6. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits events related with the metastatic process in breast tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    López-Marure, Rebeca; Zapata-Gómez, Estrella; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Aguilar, María Cecilia; Espinosa Castilla, Magali; Meléndez Zajgla, Jorge; Meraz-Cruz, Noemí; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; Gamboa-Ávila, Ricardo; Gómez-González, Erika Olivia

    2016-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal hormone, has a protective role against cancer. We previously shown that DHEA inhibits the proliferation and migration of cell lines derived from breast cancer; however, the role of DHEA in others events related with these effects are unknown. We hypothesized that DHEA inhibits the expression of proteins and some events related with cell migration and metastasis. We determined the migration in Boyden chambers, the invasion in matrigel, anchorage-independent growth and the formation of spheroids in 3 cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-30) derived from breast cancer exposed to DHEA. The secretion of metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and several pro-inflammatory molecules in the secretome of these cells was also evaluated.  DHEA inhibited the migration in transwells and the invasion in matrigel of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Besides, DHEA inhibited the anchorage-independent growth on agar and decreased the size of spheroids, and also reduced the secretion of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in all cell lines. Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) secretion was slightly decreased by DHEA treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results also showed that inhibition of migration and invasion induced by DHEA in breast cancer cells is correlated with the decrease of cytokine/chemokine secretion and the diminution of tumor cells growth.  MCF-7 cells were the most responsive to the exposure to DHEA, whereas ZR-75-30 cells responded less to this hormone, suggesting that DHEA could be used in the treatment of breast cancer in early stages.

  7. Case Report: Detection and quantification of tumor cells in peripheral blood and ascitic fluid from a metastatic esophageal cancer patient using the CellSearch ® technology

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qian; Bittencourt, Marcelo De Carvalho; Cai, Huili; Bastien, Claire; Lemarie-Delaunay, Camille; Bene, Marie C; Faure, Gilbert C

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of ascitic fluid should help to identify and characterize malignant cells in gastrointestinal cancer. However, despite a high specificity, the sensitivity of traditional ascitic fluid cytology remains insufficient, at around 60%. Since 2004 the CellSearch ® technology has shown its advantages in the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood, which can perform an accurate diagnosis and molecular analysis at the same time. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored the potential utility of this technology for the detection and quantification of tumor cells in ascitic fluid samples. Herein we report a case of metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma in a 70-year-old man presenting with dysphagia and a large amount of fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Analysis of a peripheral blood sample and ascites sample with the CellSearch ® technology both revealed the presence of putative tumor cells that were positive for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and cytokeratin (CK) expression. This study confirmed the hematogenous dissemination of esophageal cancer by the detection of circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood, and is the first to demonstrate that tumor cells can be identified in ascitic fluid by using CellSearch ® technology. PMID:25075284

  8. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs.

  9. Critical hypercalcemia following discontinuation of denosumab therapy for metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Gossai, Nathan; Hilgers, Megan V; Polgreen, Lynda E; Greengard, Emily G

    2015-06-01

    We report a 14 year-old female with Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, successfully treated with denosumab, who developed critical hypercalcemia after completion of therapy. Five months after her last denosumab treatment, serum calcium rose to 16.5 mg/dL (normal 8.7-10.8 mg/dL), nearly double her prior level of 8.4 mg/dL while receiving denosumab. She required emergent intervention to treat her hypercalcemia, which was attributed to rebound osteoclast activity and osteopetrotic bone. Denosumab is widely used in adults and increasingly in pediatric oncology populations and our experience demonstrates the need for close monitoring for electrolyte derangements following discontinuation.

  10. Reduced Expression of the ROCK Inhibitor Rnd3 Is Associated with Increased Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential in Mesenchymal Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Frapolli, Roberta; Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Chiodi, Ilaria; Favero, Francesco; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Dei Tos, Angelo P.; Giulotto, Elena; Taraboletti, Giulia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Mondello, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal and amoeboid movements are two important mechanisms adopted by cancer cells to invade the surrounding environment. Mesenchymal movement depends on extracellular matrix protease activity, amoeboid movement on the RhoA-dependent kinase ROCK. Cancer cells can switch from one mechanism to the other in response to different stimuli, limiting the efficacy of antimetastatic therapies. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the acquisition and molecular regulation of the invasion capacity of neoplastically transformed human fibroblasts, which were able to induce sarcomas and metastases when injected into immunocompromised mice. We found that neoplastic transformation was associated with a change in cell morphology (from fibroblastic to polygonal), a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, a decrease in the expression of several matrix metalloproteases and increases in cell motility and invasiveness. In a three-dimensional environment, sarcomagenic cells showed a spherical morphology with cortical actin rings, suggesting a switch from mesenchymal to amoeboid movement. Accordingly, cell invasion decreased after treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, but not with the matrix protease inhibitor Ro 28-2653. The increased invasiveness of tumorigenic cells was associated with reduced expression of Rnd3 (also known as RhoE), a cellular inhibitor of ROCK. Indeed, ectopic Rnd3 expression reduced their invasive ability in vitro and their metastatic potential in vivo. Conclusions These results indicate that, during neoplastic transformation, cells of mesenchymal origin can switch from a mesenchymal mode of movement to an amoeboid one. In addition, they point to Rnd3 as a possible regulator of mesenchymal tumor cell invasion and to ROCK as a potential therapeutic target for sarcomas. PMID:21209796

  11. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 promotes metastatic tumor colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Huei; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Chang, Po-Chiao; Chau, Lee-Young

    2015-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme degradation enzyme with antioxidant and immune-modulatory functions. HO-1 promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Whether HO-1 has an effect on cancer progression through stromal compartments is less clear. Here we show that the growth of tumor engrafted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice was not affected by host HO-1 expression. However, lung metastasis arisen from subcutaneous tumor or circulating tumor cells was significantly reduced in HO-1(+/-) mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice. The reduced lung metastasis was also observed in B6 mice bearing HO-1(+/-) bone marrow as comparing to WT chimeras, indicating that HO-1 expression in hematopoietic cells impacts tumor colonization at the metastatic site. Further experiments demonstrated that the numbers of myeloid cells recruited to pulmonary premetastatic niches and metastatic loci were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice than in WT mice. Likewise, the extents of tumor cell extravasation and colonization at the metastatic loci in the early phase of metastasis were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that HO-1 impacted chemoattractant-induced myeloid cell migration by modulating p38 kinase signaling. Moreover, myeloid HO-1-induced expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-10 promoted tumor cell transendothelial migration and STAT3 activation in vitro. These data support a pathological role of myeloid HO-1 in metastasis and suggest a possibility of targeting myeloid HO-1 for cancer treatment.

  12. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  13. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer.

  14. Detection of Live Circulating Tumor Cells by a Class of Near-Infrared Heptamethine Carbocyanine Dyes in Patients with Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Chia-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Bui, Matthew H. T.; Ng, Christopher S.; Josephson, David Y.; Knudsen, Beatrice; Tighiouart, Mourad; Kim, Hyung L.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W. K.; Wang, Ruoxiang; Posadas, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells are inherently heterogeneous and often exhibit diminished adhesion, resulting in the shedding of tumor cells into the circulation to form circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A fraction of these are live CTCs with potential of metastatic colonization whereas others are at various stages of apoptosis making them likely to be less relevant to understanding the disease. Isolation and characterization of live CTCs may augment information yielded by standard enumeration to help physicians to more accurately establish diagnosis, choose therapy, monitor response, and provide prognosis. We previously reported on a group of near-infrared (NIR) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes that are specifically and actively transported into live cancer cells. In this study, this viable tumor cell-specific behavior was utilized to detect live CTCs in prostate cancer patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 40 patients with localized prostate cancer together with 5 patients with metastatic disease were stained with IR-783, the prototype heptamethine cyanine dye. Stained cells were subjected to flow cytometric analysis to identify live (NIR+) CTCs from the pool of total CTCs, which were identified by EpCAM staining. In patients with localized tumor, live CTC counts corresponded with total CTC numbers. Higher live CTC counts were seen in patients with larger tumors and those with more aggressive pathologic features including positive margins and/or lymph node invasion. Even higher CTC numbers (live and total) were detected in patients with metastatic disease. Live CTC counts declined when patients were receiving effective treatments, and conversely the counts tended to rise at the time of disease progression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of applying of this staining technique to identify live CTCs, creating an opportunity for further molecular interrogation of a more biologically relevant CTC population. PMID:24551200

  15. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop in patients with underlying NF1, and usually arise as a result of malignant transformation of a pre-existing plexiform neurofibroma. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities reported in primary MPNST include complex karyotypes with chromosome numbers in the triploid or tetraploid range with recurrent abnormalities of several chromosomes including losses or imbalances. As a prelude to cell biological, pharmacological, and functional studies to investigate pathways and gene(s) associated with multistep tumorigenesis, which includes progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy in MPNST, detailed molecular cytogenetic and genetic analyses of cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent MPNST with underlying NF1 disorder have been performed. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities detected in the primary tumor cell line were similar to those observed in primary cultures of this tumor. Due to the complexity of the rearrangements seen by G-banded karyotype analysis, further characterization of the clonal abnormalities in these three cell lines was performed by molecular cytogenetic techniques, including CGH and SKY. CGH analysis detected recurrent deletions of 9p, 12q21-q32, complete losses of the X-chromosome, and gains of the chromosomal segment 17q25 in all three cell lines. SKY analysis detected extensive clonal abnormalities in these cell lines. The nature and the alterations of the cell cycle regulators, particularly those associated with G1-S checkpoints and known to be deregulated in MPNST, were studied. These cell cycle regulators included those associated with Rb1-cyclin D1 and the p53 pathways. The findings are consistent with the argument that an imbalance between the cyclin activators of CDKs and inhibitory proteins such as p16 result in uncontrollable proliferation in the cell lines, associated with progression of the disease. LOH and expression of the p53 gene in metastatic and recurrent cell

  16. Metastatic Tumors of the Penis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Da, Jun; Yao, Hai-jun; Zheng, Da-chao; Cai, Zhi-kang; Jiang, Yue-qing; Xu, Ming-xi; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of secondary penile cancers and review the literature of this rare condition. The records of 8 patients with metastatic penile cancer treated at our hospital from 2006 to 2013 were analyzed. A search of medical databases was conducted. Patient symptoms included penile mass (n = 7, 5 had concomitant pain) and acute urine retention (n = 1). The primary cancers included bladder, lung, gastric, liver, and prostate malignancies and 1 case of pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The longest time from diagnosis of the primary cancer to metastatic penile cancer was 16 years and the shortest was 7 months. Six patients were treated with phallectomy, 1 with resection of the mass, and 1 with only a biopsy because of advanced metastatic disease. Five patients are deceased at the time of this report, and the longest and shortest survival times (from the diagnosis of primary cancer to the death) were 16 years and 9 months, respectively. The literature review identified 17 cases reported since 2011, bringing the total number of reported cases to 480. Genitourinary cancer, primarily bladder and prostate, account for approximately 70 of the primary cancer sites and gastrointestinal cancers account for approximately 21%. Approximately half of the patients had died of their disease within 1 year of the diagnosis of penile metastasis. The prognosis of metastatic penile cancer is poor. Most primary cancers are in the urologic or gastrointestinal systems. Surgery and adjunctive therapy may improve symptoms, but fail to prolong survival. PMID:25569637

  17. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  18. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-14

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  19. Circulating Tumor Cells Following First Chemotherapy Cycle: An Early and Strong Predictor of Outcome in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Custodio, Sara; de las Casas, Maria-Luisa Maestro; García-Sáenz, José-Ángel; de la Torre, Julio-César; Bellón-Cano, Jose-María; López-Tarruella, Sara; Vidaurreta-Lazaro, Marta; de la Orden, Virginia; Jerez, Yolanda; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Casado, Antonio; Sastre, Javier; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) determined immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The CTC counts were taken at baseline, before the first cycle of chemotherapy (CTC-0), and on day 21 before commencing the second cycle of chemotherapy (CTC-21) in consecutive MBC patients. The study's primary objectives were to analyze relationships between CTC-21 count and overall survival (OS). Based on the current literature, the CTC measurements were dichotomized as 0–4 versus ≥5 CTCs. Of 117 patients recruited, 99 were evaluable. Patients with 0–4 CTCs on day 21 had a significantly better OS than those with ≥5 CTCs (median OS: 38.5 months vs. 8.7 months). They also had a significantly better progression-free survival (PFS; median: 9.4 months vs. 3.0 months) and clinical benefit rate (77% vs. 44%). The OS of patients whose baseline CTCs were ≥5 but dropped to <5 on day 21 was apparently similar to those who had <5 CTCs at baseline. In a Cox regression analysis, CTC-21 was the only independent variable significantly predicting OS and PFS. Our data indicate that CTCs determined immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy is an early and strong predictor of treatment outcome in MBC patients. PMID:23873719

  20. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis.

  1. Efficacy of Lapatinib in Therapy-Resistant HER2-Positive Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markomanolaki, Harris; Papadaki, Maria A.; Kallergi, Galatea; Hatzidaki, Dora; Kalbakis, Kostas; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of lapatinib, a dual EGFR and HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in therapy-resistant HER2-positive CTCs in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and Methods Patients with MBC and HER2-positive CTCs despite disease stabilization or response to prior therapy, received lapatinib 1500 mg daily in monthly cycles, till disease progression or CTC increase. CTC monitoring was performed by immunofluorescent microscopy using cytospins of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) double stained for HER2 or EGFR and cytokeratin. Results A total of 120 cycles were administered in 22 patients; median age was 62.5 years, 15 (68.2%) patients were post-menopausal and 20 (90.1%) had HER2-negative primary tumors. At the end of the second course, HER2-positive CTC counts decreased in 76.2% of patients; the median number of HER2-positive CTCs/patient also declined significantly (p = 0.013), however the decrease was significant only among patients presenting disease stabilization (p = 0.018) but not among those with disease progression during lapatinib treatment. No objective responses were observed. All CTC-positive patients harbored EGFR-positive CTCs on progression compared to 62.5% at baseline (p = 0.054). The ratio of EGFR-positive CTCs/total CTCs detected in all patients increased from 17.1% at baseline to 37.6% on progression, whereas the mean percentage of HER2-negative CTCs/patient increased from 2.4% to 30.6% (p = 0.03). Conclusions The above results indicate that lapatinib is effective in decreasing HER2-positive CTCs in patients with MBC irrespectively of the HER2 status of the primary tumor and imply the feasibility of monitoring the molecular changes on CTCs during treatment with targeted agents. Trial Registration Clinical trial.gov NCT00694252 PMID:26083256

  2. Desperation Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection for Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Carver, Brett S

    2015-08-01

    Patients with persistently elevated serum tumor markers should be monitored for marker kinetics and evaluated for nonviable cancer causes of marker elevation. Desperation postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is performed in select patients following second-line chemotherapy. Adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy is not indicated in patients following second-line chemotherapy.

  3. Serum Galectin-3 Levels in Dogs with Metastatic and Non-metastatic Mammary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Cláudia; Santos, Mariana Sá; DE Matos, Augusto J; Barros, Rita; Gärtner, Fátima; Rutteman, Gerard R; DE Oliveira, Joana T

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. High levels of galectin-3 have been reported in intravasated cells in primary and metastatic tumor sites of canine malignant mammary tumors (CMMT). Nevertheless, it is still unknown whether this increase is limited to the site of the lesion or if it is a systemic feature. To better understand the pattern of the expression of galectin-3 and to investigate the possibility of using serum galectin-3 levels as a relevant biomarker in this disease, galectin-3 concentrations were determined in a series of sera from CMMT-bearing female dogs. None of the dogs included in the study had detectable metastases at the time of presentation. Animals were retrospectively divided into two groups dependent on whether or not they developed metastatic lesions during a 25-month follow-up period. Samples were collected from all dogs before surgery, 1 month after resection of the primary tumor and every 3 months during the postoperative period. Galectin-3 levels were significantly higher 1 month after than at the time of surgery (p=0.0058). Higher galectin-3 was found in samples collected 7 (p=0.0007), 10 (p=0.0061) and 13 months (p=0.0052) after surgery from dogs of the metastatic group when compared to those remaining free of development of detectable metastases. In conclusion, increased serum galectin-3 levels seem to be present in both metastatic and non-metastatic cases during the postoperative period, however, while in non-metastatic cases the values tend to return to baseline levels after surgery, in metastatic cases, levels remain persistently elevated.

  4. Circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients: a valuable prognostic and predictive biomarker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was initiated to investigate the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration and the predictive value of CTC HER2 expression for efficient anti-HER2 therapy in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Methods Sixty HER2-positive MBC patients were enrolled in the present study. Before the initiation of systemic treatment, CTCs from 7.5 ml of blood were analyzed using the CellSearch system. The progression-free survival (PFS) of the patients was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results CTCs were detected in 45% (27/60) of the patients, who had shorter median PFS than those without CTCs (2.5 vs. 7.5 months, P = 0.0125). Furthermore, referring to the standard HER2 testing that uses immunohistochemistry (IHC), we proposed a CTC HER2-positive criterion, defined as >30% of CTCs over-expressing HER2. Among patients undergoing anti-HER2 therapy, those with HER2-positive CTCs had longer PFS (8.8 vs. 2.5 months, P = 0.002). Among patients with HER2-positive CTCs, the median PFS for those receiving anti-HER2 therapy was significantly longer than those who were not (8.8 vs. 1.5 months, P = 0.001). Notably, up to 52% (14/27) of the HER2-positive patients were CTC HER2-negative, and anti-HER2 therapy did not significantly improve the median PFS in these patients (2.5 vs. 0.9 months, P = 0.499). Conclusions Our findings underscore the necessity of a comprehensive CTC analysis, which may provide valuable prognostic and predictive information for optimizing individually tailored therapies in HER2-positive MBC patients. To test this idea, additional large cohort, multi-center and prospective clinical trials are needed. PMID:23617715

  5. Role of parathymic lymph nodes in metastatic tumor development.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2012-06-01

    Parathymic lymph nodes as potential sites of tumor progression have been neglected in humans. We have established a rat renal capsule-parathymic lymph node model to study in vivo metastasis. Epithelial liver carcinoma (HeDe) and mesenchymal mesoblastic nephroma (NeDe) cell lines have been established after inducing chemical carcinogenesis in newborn Fisher 344 inbred rats by N-nitrosodimethylamine. Implanting the exact number of tumor cells (HeDe, NeDe) under the renal capsule allowed the standardization and timing of metastatic development. Tumor cells released from the primary tumor in the peritoneal cavity were drained to the parathymic lymph nodes (PTNs) as sentinel lymph nodes. Similarly, tumor cells injected i.p. were engulfed by macrophages, drained through the transdiaphragmatic channels, and transported to the thoracal lymphatics, primarily to PTNs. Tumor cells after transdiaphragmic drainage can enter both anterior mammary and parathymic sentinel lymph nodes. The potential common origin can shed new light on the metastatic cell progression of PTNs and mammary tumors.

  6. Biology and Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R.; Nasir, Aejaz; Kvols, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine malignancies of the gastroenteropancreatic axis include carcinoid and pancreatic endocrine tumors. These heterogeneous neoplasms arise from the enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract and the islet cells of the pancreas. Histologically, most well-differentiated endocrine tumors consist of small, round, monomorphic cells, arranged in islands or trabeculae, with a distinct “salt-and-pepper” pattern of nuclear chromatin. Chromogranin and synaptophysin are useful as immunohistochemical markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. Other common features include the capacity to secrete peptide hormones and biogenic amines. A relatively indolent growth rate is characteristic of most gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, with the exception of poorly differentiated tumors which are usually aggressive. Treatment strategies are designed to limit tumor progression and palliate hormonal syndromes. This article reviews the diverse biologic characteristics of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors and current treatment options for metastatic disease. PMID:19259290

  7. PD-L1, PD-L2 and PD-1 expression in metastatic melanoma: Correlation with tumor-infiltrating immune cells and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Joseph M; Erdag, Gulsun; Smolkin, Mark E; Deacon, Donna H; Patterson, James W; Chen, Leiping; Bullock, Timothy N; Slingluff, Craig L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 can have dramatic therapeutic benefit in some patients; however, the prognostic associations of PD-1 and its ligands, in the absence of therapeutic blockade have not been definitively addressed. In particular, associations of PD-L2 with immune infiltrates and with outcome have yet to be explored. We hypothesized that surface expression of both PD-L1 and PD-L2 by melanoma cells would be associated with immune cell infiltration and with overall patient survival, independent of checkpoint blockade therapy. We also characterized the heterogeneity of their distribution within a tumor and within tumors of the same patient. Tissue microarrays of metastatic melanoma samples from 147 patients were quantified for CD8(+), CD45, CD4(+), CD3, CD163, CD20, CD138, FoxP3, PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 markers by immunohistochemistry. Relationships between the proportions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressing tumor cells with the immune cell count, distribution (immunotype) and patient survival were studied. Expressions of both PD-L1 and PD-L2 correlated significantly with increasing densities of immune cells in the tumor specimens and with immunotype. Positive PD-L2 expression was associated with improved overall survival and the simultaneous positive expression of both PD-1 ligands showed a higher association with survival. Significant heterogeneity of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressions within tumors were observed, however, they were less pronounced with PD-L2. In conclusion, both are markers of immune infiltration and PD-L2, alone or in combination with PD-L1, is a marker for prognosis in metastatic melanoma patients. Larger tumor samples yield more reliable assessments of PD-L1/L2 expression.

  8. Primary Tr1 cells from metastatic melanoma eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages through granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongxia; Zhang, Ping; Kong, Xue; Hou, Xianglian; Zhao, Li; Li, Tianhang; Yuan, Xiaozhou; Fu, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-associated macrophages play multiple roles in promoting tumor growth, such as inducing the transformation of melanocytes under ultraviolet irradiation, increasing angiogenesis in melanomas, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Because granzyme B- and perforin-expressing Tr1 cells could specifically eliminate antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, we examined whether Tr1 cells in melanoma could eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages and how the interaction between Tr1 cells and macrophages could affect the growth of melanoma cells. Tr1 cells were characterized by high interleukin 10 secretion and low Foxp3 expression and were enriched in the CD4(+)CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) T-cell fraction. Macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of modified melanoma-conditioned media demonstrated tumor-promoting capacity, exemplified by improving the proliferation of cocultured A375 malignant melanoma cells. But when primary Tr1 cells were present in the macrophage-A375 coculture, the growth of A375 cells was abrogated. The conventional CD25(+) Treg cells, however, were unable to inhibit macrophage-mediated increase in tumor cell growth. Further analyses showed that Tr1 cells did not directly eliminate A375 cells, but mediated the killing of tumor-promoting macrophages through the secretion of granzyme B and perforin. The tumor-infiltrating interleukin 10(+)Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells expressed very low levels of granzyme B and perforin, possibly suggested the downregulation of Tr1 cytotoxic capacity in melanoma tumors. Together, these data demonstrated an antitumor function of Tr1 cells through the elimination of tumor-promoting macrophages, which was not shared by conventional Tregs.

  9. Glucocorticoid Receptor Knockdown Decreases the Antioxidant Protection of B16 Melanoma Cells: An Endocrine System-Related Mechanism that Compromises Metastatic Cell Resistance to Vascular Endothelium-Induced Tumor Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Pellicer, José A.; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F.; Estrela, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2−-generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium. PMID:24802641

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  11. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  12. Targeting Mortalin by Embelin Causes Activation of Tumor Suppressor p53 and Deactivation of Metastatic Signaling in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Nupur; Grover, Abhinav; Goyal, Sukriti; Katiyar, Shashank P.; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Wang, Pi-Chao; Sundar, Durai; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Embelin, a natural quinone found in the fruits of Embelia ribes, is commonly used in Ayurvedic home medicine for a variety of therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammation, anti-fever, anti-bacteria and anti-cancer. Molecular mechanisms of these activities and cellular targets have not been clarified to-date. We demonstrate that the embelin inhibits mortalin-p53 interactions, and activates p53 protein in tumor cells. We provide bioinformatics, molecular docking and experimental evidence to the binding affinity of embelin with mortalin and p53. Binding of embelin with mortalin/p53 abrogates their complex resulted in nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation function of p53 causing growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, analyses of growth factors and metastatic signaling using antibody membrane array revealed their downregulation in embelin-treated cells. We also found that the embelin causes transcriptional attenuation of mortalin and several other proteins involved in metastatic signaling in cancer cells. Based on these molecular dynamics and experimental data, it is concluded that the anticancer activity of embelin involves targeting of mortalin, activation of p53 and inactivation of metastatic signaling. PMID:26376435

  13. Cannibalism: a way to feed on metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Fais, Stefano

    2007-12-18

    Cannibalism of tumors is an old story for pathologists, but it remained a mystery for at least one century. Recent data highlighted tumor cannibalism as a key advantage in tumor malignancy, possibly involved in resistance of tumors to the specific immune reaction. However, new data suggests also that metastatic tumor cells may use this peculiar function to feed in conditions of low nutrient supply. This makes malignant cancer cells more similar to microorganisms, rather than to normal cells undergoing malignant transformation. In cytological or histological samples of human tumors it is common to detect cells with one or many vacuoles, possibly containing cells under degradation, that push the nucleus to the periphery giving it the shape of a crescent moon. The cannibal cells may feed on sibling tumor cells, but also of the lymphocytes that should kill them. Cannibal cells eat everything without distinguishing between the feeding materials, with a mechanism that mostly differ from typical phagocytosis. Despite such phenomenon is considered mainly non-selective, a molecular framework of factors that contribute to cannibalism has been described. This machinery includes the presence of an acidic environment that allows a continuous activation of specific lytic enzymes, such as cathepsin B. Cannibalism occurs in apparently well defined structures whose main actors are big caveolar-like vacuoles and a connection between caveolin-1 and the actin cytoskeleton through the actin-linker molecule ezrin. Each of the components of the cannibal framework may represent specific tumor targets for future new strategies against cancer.

  14. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  15. Pulmonar collision tumor: metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; García-Fontán, E; Ríos, J; Rivo, J E; Fernández-Martín, R; Cañizares, M A

    2012-01-01

    We report an extraordinary case of collision tumor consisting of a lung adenocarcinoma and a metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma in a 56 year-old man. He was diagnosed with a pulmonary nodule 11 years after treatment of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the right maxillary sinus. A non-small cell carcinoma was observed when a transbronchial biopsy was performed. The other component of the nodule was only diagnosed with pathological examination of the resection specimen.

  16. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic tumors to the periampullary region.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, H; Halpern, N B; Aldrete, J S

    1999-01-01

    Although operative resection of metastatic lesions to the liver, lung, and brain has proved to be useful, only recently have there been a few reports of pancreaticoduodenectomies in selected cases of metastases to the periampullary region. In this report we present four cases of proven metastatic disease to the periampullary region in which the lesions were treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Metastatic tumors corresponded to a melanoma of unknown primary site, choriocarcinoma, high-grade liposarcoma of the leg, and a small cell cancer of the lung. All four patients survived the operation and had no major complications. Two patients died of recurrence of their tumors, 6 and 63 months, respectively, after operation; the other two patients are alive 21 and 12 months, respectively, after operation. It can be inferred from this small but documented experience, as well as a review of the literature, that pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic disease can be considered in selected patients, as long as this operation is performed by experienced surgeons who have achieved minimal or no morbidity and mortality with it.

  17. Effects on Tumor Development and Metastatic Dissemination by the NKG2D Lymphocyte Receptor Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Gazzar, Ahmed; Cai, Xin; Reeves, Rebecca S.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Caballero-Benitez, Andrea; McDonald, David L.; Vazquez, Julio; Gooley, Ted A.; Sale, George E.; Spies, Thomas; Groh, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension wherein cancer cells themselves coopt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNAi-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may impact immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete. PMID:24141776

  18. Effects on tumor development and metastatic dissemination by the NKG2D lymphocyte receptor expressed on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El-Gazzar, A; Cai, X; Reeves, R S; Dai, Z; Caballero-Benitez, A; McDonald, D L; Vazquez, J; Gooley, T A; Sale, G E; Spies, T; Groh, V

    2014-10-09

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension, wherein cancer cells themselves co-opt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self-stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor-promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may have an impact on immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete.

  19. Correlation of PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells with Survival Outcomes after Radical Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Non-Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Victor H. F.; Lo, Anthony W. I.; Leung, Chun-Yin; Shek, Wai-Hung; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Lam, Ka-On; Tong, Chi-Chung; Sze, Chun-Kin; Leung, To-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated if programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression levels were prognostic of survival outcomes after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials 104 patients with non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT were investigated for their PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) which were correlated with survival endpoints including locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.6 years, 21 (20.2%), 19 (18.3%) and 31 (29.8%) patients suffered from locoregional failure, distant metastases and overall disease progression, respectively, and 31 (29.8%) patients died. Patients whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 2+ (moderate to strong membrane staining in ≥ 25% of tumor cells) enjoyed longer LRFFS (5-year 100% vs. 74.4%, Hazard ratio [HR], 0.159, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.021–0.988; P = 0.042) and marginally longer PFS (5-year 95.0% vs. 65.2%, HR, 0.351, 95% CI, 0.08–0.999, P = 0.067) compared to those whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 0 (minimal membrane staining with PD-L1 in < 5% tumor cells or no staining with PD-L1) or 1+ (minimal to moderate membrane staining with PD-L1 in between 5–24% tumor cells). PD-L1 IHC 2+ was independently prognostic of both LRFFS (P = 0.014) and PFS (P = 0.045) in multivariable analyses. Only induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation was prognostic of DMFS (P = 0.003) and no prognostic factor for OS was identified. Conclusion PD-L1 expression levels correlated with LRRFS and PFS in non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT. It may play a role in radiosensitivity for NPC, which should be further confirmed in prospective studies using immunotherapy together with IMRT. PMID:27341634

  20. Combination of circulating tumor cell enumeration and tumor marker detection in predicting prognosis and treatment effect in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun; Kong, Yun-Yi; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yue; Jia, Zhong-Wei; Li, Gao-Xiang

    2015-12-08

    Although circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration in peripheral blood has already been validated as a reliable biomarker in predicting prognosis in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), patients with favorable CTC counts (CTC < 5/7.5 ml) still experience various survival times. Assays that can reduce patients' risks are urgently needed. In this study, we set up a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method to detect epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell gene expression status in peripheral blood to validate whether they could complement CTC enumeration. From January 2013 to June 2014 we collected peripheral blood from 70 mCRPC patients and enumerated CTC in these blood samples using CellSearch system. At the same time, stem cell-related genes (ABCG2, PROM1 and PSCA) and EMT-related genes (TWIST1 and vimentin) were detected in these peripheral blood samples using an RT-qPCR assay. Patient overall survival (OS) and treatment methods were recorded in the follow-up. For patients who received first-line chemotherapy, docetaxel plus prednisone, PSA progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) and PSA response rate were recorded. At the time of analysis, 35 patients had died of prostate cancer with a median follow-up of 16.0 months. Unfavorable CTC enumerations (CTC ≥5/7.5 ml) were predictive of shorter OS (p = 0.01). Also, positive stem cell gene expression indicated poor prognosis in mCRPC patients (p = 0.01). However, EMT gene expression status failed to show any prognostic value in OS (p = 0.78). A multivariate analysis indicated that serum albumin (p = 0.04), ECOG performance status (p < 0.01), CTC enumeration (p = 0.02) and stem cell gene expression status (p = 0.01) were independent prognostic factors for OS. For the 40 patients categorized into the favorable CTC enumeration group, positive stem cell gene expression also suggested poor prognosis (p < 0.01). A combined prognostic model consisting of stem cell gene

  1. Primary Tumor Characteristics Are Important Prognostic Factors for Sorafenib-Treated Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sohee; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Sang Eun; Seo, Ill Young; Kim, Tae Nam; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Seo, Seong Il; Song, Kanghyon; Kwak, Cheol

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify prognostic factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients treated with sorafenib. We investigated 177 patients, including 116 who received sorafenib as first-line therapy, using the Cox regression model. During a median follow-up period of 19.2 months, the PFS and OS were 6.4 and 32.6 months among all patients and 7.4 months and undetermined for first-line sorafenib-treated patients, respectively. Clinical T3-4 stage (hazard ratio [HR] 2.56) and a primary tumor size >7 cm (HR 0.34) were significant prognostic factors for PFS among all patients, as were tumor size >7 cm (HR 0.12), collecting system invasion (HR 5.67), and tumor necrosis (HR 4.11) for OS (p < 0.05). In first-line sorafenib-treated patients, ≥4 metastatic lesions (HR 28.57), clinical T3-4 stage (HR 4.34), collecting system invasion (univariate analysis HR 2.11; multivariate analysis HR 0.07), lymphovascular invasion (HR 13.35), and tumor necrosis (HR 6.69) were significant prognosticators of PFS, as were bone metastasis (HR 5.49) and clinical T3-4 stages (HR 4.1) for OS (p < 0.05). Our study thus identified a number of primary tumor-related characteristics as important prognostic factors in sorafenib-treated mRCC patients. PMID:28271073

  2. KBF1 (p50 NF-kappa B homodimer) acts as a repressor of H-2Kb gene expression in metastatic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression is causally related to high malignancy and low immunogenicity of certain murine tumors. In this study, we have analyzed the roles of the nuclear factors KBF1/p50 and p65 in regulation of class I expression in high and low metastatic tumor cells. Low class I-expressing cells show at higher levels of KBF1/p50 and NF-kappa B (p50/p65) binding activity than high class I-expressing cells. However, an excess of KBF1 over NF- kappa B is observed in low expressing cells, while an excess of NF- kappa B over KBF1 is observed in high expressing cells. Stable transfection of a p65 expression vector into low class I-expressing cells activated H-2 transcription and cell surface expression, while stable transfection of p50 expression vector into high expressing cells suppressed H-2Kb transcription and cell surface expression. Our studies suggest that KBF1 has the potential of downregulating class I gene expression, whereas dimers containing the p65 subunit are activators of class I gene expression. PMID:8496683

  3. Osteoprotegerin Contributes to the Metastatic Potential of Cells with a Dysfunctional TSC2 Tumor-Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Steagall, Wendy K.; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Glasgow, Connie G.; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Lin, Jing-Ping; Zheng, Gang; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its effects on bone metabolism, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble member of the tumor necrosis factor family of receptors, promotes smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration and may act as a survival factor for tumor cells. We hypothesized that these cellular mechanisms of OPG may be involved in the growth and proliferation of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) cells, abnormal smooth muscle-like cells with mutations in one of the tuberous sclerosis complex tumor-suppressor genes (TSC1/TSC2) that cause LAM, a multisystem disease characterized by cystic lung destruction, lymphatic infiltration, and abdominal tumors. Herein, we show that OPG stimulated proliferation of cells cultured from explanted LAM lungs, and selectively induced migration of LAM cells identified by the loss of heterozygosity for TSC2. Consistent with these observations, cells with TSC2 loss of heterozygosity expressed the OPG receptors, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, syndecan-1, and syndecan-2. LAM lung nodules showed reactivities to antibodies to tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, syndecan-1, and syndecan-2. LAM lung nodules also produced OPG, as shown by expression of OPG mRNA and colocalization of reactivities to anti-OPG and anti-gp100 (HMB45) antibodies in LAM lung nodules. Serum OPG was significantly higher in LAM patients than in normal volunteers. Based on these data, it appears that OPG may have tumor-promoting roles in the pathogenesis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis, perhaps acting as both autocrine and paracrine factors. PMID:23867796

  4. MART-1 adenovirus-transduced dendritic cell immunization in a murine model of metastatic central nervous system tumor.

    PubMed

    Broder, Howard; Anderson, Andrea; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to play a critical role in the initiation of host immune responses against tumor antigens. In this study, a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding the melanoma-associated antigen, MART-1, was used to transduce murine DCs, which were then tested for their ability to activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and induce protective immunity against B16 melanoma tumor cells implanted intracranially. Genetic modifications of murine bone marrow-derived DCs to express MART-1 was achieved through the use of an E1-deficient, recombinant adenovirus vector. Sixty-two C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously with AdVMART-1-transduced DCs (n = 23), untransduced DCs (n = 17), or sterile saline (n = 22). Using the B16 murine melanoma, which naturally expresses the MART-1 antigen, all the mice were then challenged intracranially with viable, unmodified syngeneic B16 tumor cells 7 days later. Splenocytes from representative animals in each group were harvested for standard cytotoxicity (CTL) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. The remaining mice were followed for survival. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with DCs transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding the MART-1 antigen elicited the development of antigen-specific CTL responses. As evidenced by a prolonged survival curve when compared to control-immunized mice with intracranial B16 tumors, AdMART-1-DC vaccination was able to elicit partial protection against central nervous system tumor challenge in vivo.

  5. Metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor involving the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rowe, J Jordi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases from malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast are a rare occurrence. We report a patient with a malignant phyllodes tumor of the right breast which subsequently metastasized to the right lower lobe of the lung 1 year after initial presentation, and to the right cerebellar hemisphere 2 years after diagnosis of her breast mass. After both chemotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy the patient is tumor free at most recent follow-up, 116 months after the breast tumor diagnosis was made. The literature is briefly reviewed and the differential diagnosis of malignant spindle cell brain tumors is discussed.

  6. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-01-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma. PMID:27418876

  7. Elevated TAK1 augments tumor growth and metastatic capacities of ovarian cancer cells through activation of NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Patty C.H.; Shi, Lei; Liu, Vincent W.S.; Tang, Hermit W.M.; Liu, Iris J.; Leung, Thomas H.Y.; Chan, Karen K.L.; Yam, Judy W.P.; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Ngan, Hextan Y.S.; Chan, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1) is a serine/threonine kinase which is frequently associated with human cancer progression. However, its functional role in tumorigenesis is still controversial. Here, we report that TAK1 enhances the oncogenic capacity of ovarian cancer cells through the activation of NF-κB signaling. We found that TAK1 is frequently upregulated and significantly associated with high-grade and metastatic ovarian cancers. Mechanistic studies showed that Ser412 phosphorylation is required for TAK1 in activating NF-κB signaling and promotes aggressiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Conversely, suppression of TAK1 activity by point mutation at Ser412, RNAi mediated gene knockdown or TAK1 specific inhibitor ((5Z) -7-Oxozeaenol) remarkably impairs tumor growth and metastasis in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Our study underscores the importance of targeting TAK1 as a promising therapeutic approach to counteract the ovarian cancer progression. PMID:25277189

  8. A Study of Epacadostat in Combination With a PD-1 Inhibitor and Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors (ECHO-207)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors; Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (CRC); Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC; Squamous or Nonsquamous); Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) Inhibitor; Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Inhibitor

  9. Metastatic carcinoid tumor--atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Pleşa, Alina; Sarca, Emanuela; Maxim, Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is a slow-growing type of neuroendocrine tumor, originating in the enterochromaffin cells and secreting mainly serotonin. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are found throughout the intestinal tract, the appendix and terminal ileum being the most common locations, and are classified by site of origin and by degree of differentiation, with well-differentiated lesions representing those tumors formerly referred to as carcinoid tumors. The clinical symptoms are characterized by flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and/or bronchial constriction and occur almost exclusively in patients with liver metastases due to the release of bioactive peptides and amines directly into the systemic circulation. We report the clinical, serological and histological diagnosis of a 67-years-old male patient with congestive heart failure secondary to carcinoid heart disease in the context of liver metastases of an ileum carcinoid tumor.

  10. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  11. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0072 TITLE: Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Julie...Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0072 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...heterogeneity in PTEN loss in tumor tissue and prostate cancer prognosis. Aim 2 aimed to compare gene expression profiles between primary and lymph

  12. Separation of high and low metastatic subpopulations from solid tumors by centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Nelson, K K; Grossi, I M; Umbarger, L A; Taylor, J D; Honn, K V

    1988-02-01

    We have isolated from murine solid tumors (B16a) subpopulations of cells possessing high and low metastatic potential. Tumors were dispersed by collagenase treatment. The resulting heterogeneous population of cells (i.e., viable and non-viable tumor cells and host cells) were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Four of the fractions (100, 180, 260, 340) contained tumor cells of high viability (greater than 95%) and high purity (less than 1% host cell contamination). The four fractions were characterized by flow cytometry and found to differ in distribution of cells in G1, S and G2. The cell populations were also found to differ in metastatic potential as determined by their ability to form lung colonies following intravenous injection. The 340 fraction was approximately 5-fold more metastatic than the 100 fraction. We also observed that cells from the 100 fraction failed to induce platelet aggregation whereas cells from the 340 fraction induced significant platelet aggregation. These observations demonstrate that cells of B16a tumors are heterogeneous for phenotypic characteristics (i.e., metastatic potential; platelet aggregation, etc.) and that their ability to induce platelet aggregation is positively correlated with metastatic potential.

  13. Bone marrow adipocytes promote the Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate tumors via HIF-1α activation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Jonathan D.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Mahapatra, Gargi; Hüttemann, Maik; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation is increasingly recognized as a key factor in tumor progression, yet its involvement in metastatic bone disease is not understood. Bone is as an adipocyte-rich organ, and a major site of metastasis from prostate cancer. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active cells capable of shaping tumor metabolism via lipolysis and lipid transfer. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo models of marrow adiposity, we demonstrate that marrow fat cells promote Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate cancer cells. We show increased expression of glycolytic enzymes, increased lactate production, and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes that require paracrine signaling between the two cell types. We also reveal that prostate cancer cells are capable of inducing adipocyte lipolysis as a postulated mechanism of sustenance. We provide evidence that adipocytes drive metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells via oxygen-independent mechanism of HIF-1α activation that can be reversed by HIF-1α downregulation. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the observed metabolic signature in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes mimics the expression patterns seen in patients with metastatic disease. Together, our data provide evidence for a functional relationship between marrow adipocytes and tumor cells in bone that has likely implications for tumor growth and survival within the metastatic niche. PMID:27588494

  14. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  15. Reconstitution of a metastatic-resistant tumor microenvironment with cancer-associated fibroblasts enables metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takuya; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tumor microenvironment is critical for metastasis to occur. Subcutaneous xenografts of tumors in immunodeficient mice are usually encapsulated and rarely metastasize as opposed to orthotopic tumors which metastasize if the original tumor was metastatic. In the present report, we were able to reconstitute a metastatic tumor microenvironment by subcutaneously co-transplanting a human cervical cancer cell line and human cervical cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), in athymic mice, which resulted in lymph node metastasis in 40% of the animals. In contrast, no metastasis occurred from the cervical cancer without CAFs. These results suggest that CAFs can overcome an anti-metastatic tumor environment and are a potential target to prevent metastasis. PMID:28103135

  16. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  17. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  18. Tumor-suppressive p53 Signaling Empowers Metastatic Inhibitor KLF17-dependent Transcription to Overcome Tumorigenesis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Shah, Abdus Saboor; Duong, Hong-Quan; Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Mohammad, Shah Faisal; Khan, Rahmat Ali; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2015-08-28

    Metastasis, which is controlled by concerted action of multiple genes, is a complex process and is an important cause of cancer death. Krüppel-like factor 17 (KLF17) is a negative regulator of metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanism and biological relevance of KLF17 in cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an integral role to induce KLF17 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). p53 is recruited to the KLF17 promoter and results in the formation of p53-DNA complex. p53 enhances binding of p300 and favors histone acetylation on the KLF17 promoter. Mechanistically, p53 physically interacts with KLF17 and thereby enhances the anti-metastatic function of KLF17. p53 empowers KLF17-mediated EMT genes transcription via enhancing physical association of KLF17 with target gene promoters. Nutlin-3 recruits KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters and results in the formation of KLF17-DNA complex via a p53-dependent pathway. p53 depletion abrogates DNA binding affinity of KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters. KLF17 is critical for p53 cellular activities in NSCLC. Importantly, KLF17 enhances p53 transcription to generate a novel positive feedback loop. KLF17 depletion accelerates lung cancer cell growth in response to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we found that KLF17 increases the expression of tumor suppressor genes p53, p21, and pRB. Functionally, KLF17 required p53 to suppress cancer cell invasion and migration in NSCLC. In conclusion, our study highlights a novel insight into the anti-EMT effect of KLF17 via a p53-dependent pathway in NSCLC, and KLF17 may be a new therapeutic target in NSCLC with p53 status.

  19. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Caffe, Jordan R.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Azarin, Samira M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. PMID:26844426

  20. A Randomized Phase II Trial Investigating the Effect of Platelet Function Inhibition on Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roop, Ryan P.; Naughton, Michael J.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Schneider, Jochen G.; Lammers, Philip E.; Pluard, Timothy J.; Johnson, Farley; Eby, Charles S.; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blockade of platelet activation and aggregation can inhibit metastasis in preclinical models and is associated with cancer prevention. To test whether disruption of platelet function with clopidogrel and aspirin would decrease the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients with metastatic breast cancer, a randomized phase II study was performed. Methods Patients with metastatic breast cancer who were not currently receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive either clopidogrel and aspirin or to a control group receiving no treatment. Phlebotomy was performed at baseline, at 2 and 4 weeks, and monthly thereafter to obtain specimens to assess CTC, platelet aggregation, and thrombin activity. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with detectable CTCs at 1 month. Results Forty-eight patients were enrolled and 42 were evaluable at 1 month. Baseline CTC numbers were ≥ 5 in 13% and ≥ 1 in 65% of patients. Despite adequate platelet function inhibition in the treatment group, the proportion of patients with detectable CTCs was similar between the clopidogrel/aspirin and control groups at baseline (P = .21) and 4 weeks (P = .75), showing no treatment effect. Measured endogenous thrombin potential did not correlate with CTC number. No bleeding-related serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred. Conclusion The baseline CTC numbers were lower than expected, decreasing the ability to detect an impact of platelet inhibition on CTCs. Clopidogrel and aspirin were well tolerated. Future studies evaluating the potential therapeutic role of antiplatelet therapy in breast cancer remain of interest, and they may be informed by these results. PMID:24267729

  1. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Lorena; Bronte, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-04-19

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition.Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC.

  2. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  3. Cancer-related ectopic expression of the bone-related transcription factor RUNX2 in non-osseous metastatic tumor cells is linked to cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic breast cancer cells frequently and ectopically express the transcription factor RUNX2, which normally attenuates proliferation and promotes maturation of osteoblasts. RUNX2 expression is inversely regulated with respect to cell growth in osteoblasts and deregulated in osteosarcoma cells. Methods Here, we addressed whether the functional relationship between cell growth and RUNX2 gene expression is maintained in breast cancer cells. We also investigated whether the aberrant expression of RUNX2 is linked to phenotypic parameters that could provide a selective advantage to cells during breast cancer progression. Results We find that, similar to its regulation in osteoblasts, RUNX2 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells is enhanced upon growth factor deprivation, as well as upon deactivation of the mitogen-dependent MEK-Erk pathway or EGFR signaling. Reduction of RUNX2 levels by RNAi has only marginal effects on cell growth and expression of proliferation markers in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Thus, RUNX2 is not a critical regulator of cell proliferation in this cell type. However, siRNA depletion of RUNX2 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduces cell motility, while forced exogenous expression of RUNX2 in MCF7 cells increases cell motility. Conclusions Our results support the emerging concept that the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 functions as a metastasis-related oncoprotein in non-osseous cancer cells. PMID:21029421

  4. Frequent detection of PIK3CA mutations in single circulating tumor cells of patients suffering from HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasch, Christin; Oldopp, Theresa; Mauermann, Oliver; Gorges, Tobias M; Andreas, Antje; Coith, Cornelia; Müller, Volkmar; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    Modern technologies enable detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood samples. Thus, CTC have attracted interest as markers for therapeutic response in breast cancer. First studies have incorporated CTC analyses to guide therapeutic interventions and stratification of breast cancer patients. Aim of this study was to analyze characteristic features of CTC as biomarker for predicting resistance to HER2-targeted therapies. Therefore, CTC from metastatic breast cancer patients with HER2-negative primary tumors screened for the prospective randomized phase III trial DETECT III were explored for their HER2 status and the presence of PIK3CA mutations. Detection and characterization of HER2 expression of CTC were conducted with the CellSearch(®) system. Fifteen of 179 CTC-positive patients (8.4%) contained ≥1 CTC with strong HER2 expression. Genomic DNA from individual CTC isolated by micromanipulation was propagated by whole genome amplification and analyzed for PIK3CA mutations in exons 9 and 20 by Sanger sequencing. One or more CTC/7.5 mL were detected in 179/290 patients (61.7%). In 109 patients (34.8%), ≥5 CTC/7.5 mL were found. We detected at least one CTC with the mutation p.E542K, p.E545K, p.H1047R, p.H1047L or p.M1043V in 12/33 patients (36.4%). Thirty six of 114 CTC (31.6%) harbored one of these mutations. CTC in individual patients exhibited heterogeneity concerning PIK3CA mutations and HER2 expression. In conclusion, clinically relevant genomic aberrations such as mutations in the hotspot regions of exon 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene can be detected in single CTC and might provide insights into mechanisms of resistance to HER2-targeted therapies.

  5. Limitation of liver function tests in metastatic carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moinuddin, M.; Dean, P.; Vander Zwaag, R.; Dragutsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of liver function tests (LFT) as indicators of metastatic carcinoid tumors, a retrospective study was performed. The LFT results of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were compared with 17 patients with other malignant tumors. In the noncarcinoid group, 82.4% of the patients had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), whereas only 28.6% of carcinoid patients had abnormal enzymes. The medians of all LFT values were significantly higher in noncarcinoid patients than in the carcinoid group, except for glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Our data indicate that LFT are helpful in screening for liver metastases in patients with noncarcinoid tumors, but are unreliable in carcinoid tumors. Imaging tests should be used to rule out liver metastases in carcinoid tumors, irrespective of LFT results.

  6. The dual role of TLR3 in metastatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Tanja; Pavelic, Jasminka

    2011-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are members of transmembrane proteins that recognize conserved molecular motifs of viral and bacterial origin and initiate innate immune response. As the role of TLRs in tumors cells is still not clear, our aim was to investigate the role of TLR3 in primary tumor and metastatic cells (SW480, SW620, FaDu and Detroit 562). We have reported here on the dual role of TLR3 in pharynx metastatic cell line (Detroit 562); on one hand TLR3 activation drove cells to apoptosis while on the other its stimulation contributed to tumor progression by altering the expression of tumor promoting genes (PLAUR, RORB) and enhancing the cell migration potential. In addition, we have shown TLR3 signaling pathway is functional in another metastatic cancer cell line (SW620) suggesting TLR3 might be important in the process of tumor metastasis. Since TLR3 agonists have been used in tumor therapy with the aim to activate immune system, scientific contribution of this work is drawing attention to the importance of further work on this topic, especially pro-tumor effect of TLR3, in order to avoid possible side-effects.

  7. Ifosfamide in combination with paclitaxel or doxorubicin: regimens which effectively mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells while demonstrating anti-tumor activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Prince, H M; Gardyn, J; Millward, M J; Rischin, D; Francis, P; Gates, P; Chapple, P; Quinn, M; Juneja, S; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, E H; Richardson, G; Scarlett, J; Briggs, P; Brettell, M; Toner, G C

    1999-03-01

    For patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who undergo high-dose therapy with autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation, an important prerequisite is a mobilization regimen that efficiently mobilizes PBPCs while producing an effective anti-tumor effect. We prospectively evaluated ifosfamide-based chemotherapy for mobilization efficiency, toxicity and disease response in 37 patients. Patients received two cycles of the ifosfamide-based regimen; ifosfamide (5 g/m2 with conventional-dose cycle and 6 g/m2 with mobilization cycle) with either 50 mg/m2 doxorubicin (if limited prior anthracycline and/or progression more than 12 months after an anthracycline-based regimen) or 175 mg/m2 paclitaxel. For the mobilization cycle, all patients received additional G-CSF (10 microg/kg SC, daily) commencing 24 h after completion of chemotherapy. The target yield was >6x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, sufficient to support the subsequent three cycles of high-dose therapy. The mobilization therapy was well tolerated and the peak days for peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells were days 10-13 with no significant differences in the PB CD34+ cells mobilization kinetics between the ifosfamide-doxorubicin vs. ifosfamide-paclitaxel regimens. The median PBPC CD34+ cell content ranged from 2.9 to 4.0x10(6)/kg per day during days 9-14. After a median of 3 (range 1-5) collection days, the median total CD34+ cell, CFU-GM and MNC for all 44 individual sets of collections was 9.2x10(6)/kg (range 0.16-54.9), 37x10(4)/kg (range 5.7-247) and 7.3x10(8)/kg (range 2.1-26.1), respectively. The PBPC target yield was achieved in 35 of the 37 patients. The overall response rate for the 31 evaluable patients was 68% with 10% having progressive disease. Thirty-three patients have subsequently received high-dose therapy consisting of three planned cycles of high-dose ifosfamide, thiotepa and paclitaxel with each cycle supported with PBPCs. Rapid neutrophil and platelet recovery has been

  8. Oncolytic Reovirus in Combination With Chemotherapy in Metastatic or Recurrent Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With KRAS-Activated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Lam, Elaine; Otterson, Gregory A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Timmons, Matthew; Subramaniam, Deepa; Hade, Erinn M.; Gill, George M.; Coffey, Matthew; Selvaggi, Giovanni; Bertino, Erin; Chao, Bo; Knopp, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The type 3 Dearing reovirus (Reolysin) is a naturally occurring virus that preferentially infects and causes oncolysis in tumor cells with a Ras-activated pathway. It induces host immunity and cell cycle arrest and acts synergistically with cytotoxic agents. METHODS This study evaluated Reolysin combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with metastatic/recurrent KRAS-mutated or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mutated/amplified non–small cell lung cancer. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients were treated. Molecular alterations included 20 KRAS mutations, 10 EGFR amplifications, 3 EGFR mutations, and 4 BRAF-V600E mutations. In total, 242 cycles (median, 4; range, 1-47) were completed. The initial doses were area under the curve (AUC) 6 mg/mL/min for carboplatin, 200 mg/m2 for paclitaxel on day 1, and 3×1010 50% tissue culture infective dose for Reolysin on days 1 to 5 of each 21-day cycle. Because of diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (in the first 2 patients), subsequent doses were reduced to 175 mg/m2 for paclitaxel and AUC 5 mg/mL/min for carboplatin. Toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, neutropenia, arthralgia/myalgia, anorexia, and electrolyte abnormalities. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 responses included the following: partial response for 11 patients, stable disease (SD) for 20 patients, progressive disease for 4 patients, and not evaluable for 2 patients (objective response rate, 31%; 90% 1-sided lower confidence interval, 21%). Four SD patients had >40% positron emission tomography standardized uptake value reductions. The median progression-free survival, median overall survival, and 12-month overall survival rate were 4 months, 13.1 months, and 57%, respectively. Seven patients were alive after a median follow-up of 34.2 months; they included 2 patients without disease progression at 37 and 50 months. CONCLUSIONS Reolysin in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin was well tolerated. The

  9. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  10. T Cells Induce Pre-Metastatic Osteolytic Disease and Help Bone Metastases Establishment in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Leal, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Mercadante, Ana Carolina T.; Kestelman, Fabiola; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Monteiro, João P.; Bonomo, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases, present in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer, lead to skeletal disease, fractures and intense pain, which are all believed to be mediated by tumor cells. Engraftment of tumor cells is supposed to be preceded by changes in the target tissue to create a permissive microenvironment, the pre-metastatic niche, for the establishment of the metastatic foci. In bone metastatic niche, metastatic cells stimulate bone consumption resulting in the release of growth factors that feed the tumor, establishing a vicious cycle between the bone remodeling system and the tumor itself. Yet, how the pre-metastatic niches arise in the bone tissue remains unclear. Here we show that tumor-specific T cells induce osteolytic bone disease before bone colonization. T cells pro-metastatic activity correlate with a pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine profile, including RANKL, a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo inhibition of RANKL from tumor-specific T cells completely blocks bone loss and metastasis. Our results unveil an unexpected role for RANKL-derived from T cells in setting the pre-metastatic niche and promoting tumor spread. We believe this information can bring new possibilities for the development of prognostic and therapeutic tools based on modulation of T cell activity for prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:23935856

  11. Clinical Significance of Early Changes in Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients Receiving First-Line Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy for Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Emanuela; Necchi, Andrea; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Colecchia, Maurizio; Raggi, Daniele; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic paradigm of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) is rapidly shifting and new biomarkers are needed to enhance patient selection. Objective: Early identification of dynamic predictors of outcome may be a key to optimize the sequence of effective therapies in metastatic UC patients. Methods: Blood samples from patients receiving first-line MVAC chemotherapy were collected at baseline (T0) and after 2 cycles (T2). Samples were processed by immunomagnetic beads (AdnaTest ProstateCancerSelect kit) and the expression of EPCAM, MUC1 and ERBB2 was studied using multiplex-PCR. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) positivity and cutoffs, obtained by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis in healthy donors, were: ≥1 positive marker among EPCAM (≥0.40 ng/μl), MUC1 (≥0.10 ng/μl) and ERBB2 (≥0.20 ng/μl). CTC variation (T0/T2) was split in favorable (+/–, –/–, –/+) and unfavorable groups (+/+). Cox regression analyses evaluated associations with clinical factors. Results: In this pilot study to assess a new CTC detection method, among 31 evaluable patients, 17 (54.8%) were CTC-positive at T0. No association was found between CTC and objective response to MVAC. CTC dynamic changes better predicted 3-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to CTC status assessed at single time points. Unfavorable trend was univariably detrimental on 3-year PFS (10% vs. 49.2%, p = 0.006) and OS (20% vs. 63.5%, p = 0.017). Significance was maintained after controlling for liver metastases (p = 0.031 and p = 0.025 for PFS and OS) and MSKCC score (p = 0.014 and 0.025). Conclusions: Newly described early CTC changes during chemotherapy might be useful to improve our prognostic ability. Pending validation, these results could fulfill the promise to help accelerating therapeutic sequences. PMID:28035320

  12. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  13. Alternating electric fields (TTFields) inhibit metastatic spread of solid tumors to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Kirson, Eilon D; Giladi, Moshe; Gurvich, Zoya; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Wasserman, Yoram; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Palti, Yoram

    2009-01-01

    Tumor treating fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields used to treat cancerous tumors. This novel treatment modality effectively inhibits the growth of solid tumors in vivo and has shown promise in pilot clinical trials in patients with advanced stage solid tumors. TTFields were tested for their potential to inhibit metastatic spread of solid tumors to the lungs in two animal models: (1) Mice injected with malignant melanoma cells (B16F10) into the tail vein, (2) New Zealand White rabbits implanted with VX-2 tumors within the kidney capsule. Mice and rabbits were treated using two-directional TTFields at 100-200 kHz. Animals were either monitored for survival, or sacrificed for pathological and histological analysis of the lungs. The total number of lung surface metastases and the absolute weight of the lungs were both significantly lower in TTFields treated mice then in sham control mice. TTFields treated rabbits survived longer than sham control animals. This extension in survival was found to be due to an inhibition of metastatic spread, seeding or growth in the lungs of TTFields treated rabbits compared to controls. Histologically, extensive peri- and intra-tumoral immune cell infiltration was seen in TTFields treated rabbits only. These results raise the possibility that in addition to their proven inhibitory effect on the growth of solid tumors, TTFields may also have clinical benefit in the prevention of metastatic spread from primary tumors.

  14. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  15. Detection of circulating tumor cells in blood of metastatic breast cancer patients using a combination of cytokeratin and EpCAM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are detectable in peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC). In this paper we evaluate a new CTC separation method based on a combination of anti-EpCAM- and anti-cytokeratin magnetic cell separation with the aim to improve CTC detection with low target antigen densities. Methods Blood samples of healthy donors spiked with breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used to determine accuracy and precision of the method. 10 healthy subjects were examined to evaluate specificity. CTC counts in 59 patients with MBC were measured to evaluate the prognostic value on overall survival. Results Regression analysis of numbers of recovered vs. spiked HCC1937 cells yielded a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.957. The average percentage of cell recovery was 84%. The average within-run coefficient of variation for spiking of 185, 85 and 30 cells was 14%. For spiking of 10 cells the within-run CV was 30%. No CTCs were detected in blood of 10 healthy subjects examined. A standard threshold of 5 CTC/7.5 ml blood as a cut-off point between risk groups led to a highly significant prognostic marker (p < 0.001). To assess the prognostic value of medium CTC levels we additionally considered a low (CTC-L: 0 CTC), a medium (CTC-M: 1–4 CTC) and a high risk group (CTC-H: ≥5 CTC). The effect of this CTC-LMH marker on overall survival was significant as well (p < 0.001). A log-ratio test performed to compare the model with 3 vs. the model with 2 risk groups rejected the model with 2 risk groups (p = 0.026). For CTC as a count variable, we propose an offset reciprocal transformation 1/(1 + x) for overall survival prediction (p < 0.001). Conclusions We show that our CTC detection method is feasible and leads to accurate and reliable results. Our data suggest that a refined differentiation between patients with different CTC levels is reasonable. PMID:22646670

  16. Giant metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bognet, Rachel; Thompson, Christina; Campanelli, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with a rapidly growing, asymptomatic mass on his left mid-back for the past 3 months. The patient's medical history revealed an intentional 60-pound weight loss over the previous 2 years along with smoking approximately 1 pack of cigarettes per day. On physical examination, a fungating, 11-cm red tumor with palpable broader underlying extension (23 cm total) was present on the left mid-back with distinct red dermal nodules in a dermatomal distribution. In close proximity were two ulcerated nodules, proven histologically to be basal cell carcinomas. In the left groin was massive, fixed lymphadenopathy. A punch biopsy of the tumor was performed, which showed a dense infiltrate of small, round hyperchromatic blue cells that stained positive for CD 56 and pancytokeratin in a perinuclear dot pattern. Tumor cells were negative for CK20, TTF, CK7, and LCA.

  17. Tumoral Melanosis Associated with Pembrolizumab-Treated Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-01-01

    Tumoral melanosis is a form of completely regressed melanoma that usually presents as darkly pigmented lesions suspicious for malignant melanoma. Histology reveals dense dermal and subcutaneous infiltration of melanophages. Pembrolizumab is an antibody directed against programmed death receptor-1 (PD1) and is frontline treatment for advanced melanoma. An 81-year-old man with metastatic melanoma treated with pembrolizumab who developed tumoral melanosis at previous sites of metastases is described. The PubMed database was searched with the key words: antibody, immunotherapy, melanoma, melanosis, metastasis, pembrolizumab, and tumoral. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. The patient was initially diagnosed with lentigo maligna melanoma on the left cheek three years earlier, and he was treated with wide local excision. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with epidermotropic metastatic malignant melanoma on the left parietal scalp 14 months later and was treated with wide local excision. Three months later, the patient was found to have metastatic melanoma in the same area of the scalp and was started on pembrolizumab immunotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with tumoral melanosis in the site of previous metastases nine months later. The patient remained free of disease 13 months after starting pembrolizumab. Tumoral melanosis may mimic malignant melanoma; hence a workup, including skin biopsy, should be undertaken. Extensive tumoral melanosis has been reported with ipilimumab, and we add a case following treatment with pembrolizumab. Additional cases of tumoral melanosis may present since immunotherapy has become frontline therapy for advanced melanoma.  PMID:28348944

  18. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  19. Multiple 'Brown Tumors' Masquerading as Metastatic Bone Disease.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Singh, Harsh; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-12-23

    'Brown tumors' are known as 'osteitis fibrosa cystica' or 'Von Recklinghausen's disease' of the bone. A high index of suspicion is required by the treating doctor for diagnosing a 'brown tumor' in its early stage. Clinical suspicion, along with laboratory and radiological investigations, is required to diagnose this condition. We present a case of a 65-year-old woman who had multiple bony lesions and a thyroid nodule, which was initially considered as a metastatic bone disease, but later turned out to be 'brown tumors.' In all cases with multiple osteolytic lesions, a possibility of 'brown tumor' must be kept in mind.

  20. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  1. Identification of high independent prognostic value of nanotechnology based circulating tumor cell enumeration in first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ran; Shao, Bin; Peng, Jia-Xi; Li, Hui-Ping; Yang, Yan-Lian; Kong, Wei-Yao; Song, Guo-Hong; Jiang, Han-Fang; Liang, Xu; Yan, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a promising tool in the management of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This study investigated the capturing efficiency and prognostic value of our previously reported peptide-based nanomagnetic CTC isolation system (Pep@MNPs). We counted CTCs in blood samples taken at baseline (n = 102) and later at patients' first clinical evaluation after starting firstline chemotherapy (n = 72) in a cohort of women treated for MBC. Their median follow-up was 16.3 months (range: 9.0-31.0 months). The CTC detection rate was 69.6 % for the baseline samples. Patients with ≤2 CTC/2 ml at baseline had longer median progression-free survival (PFS) than did those with >2 CTC/2 ml (17.0 months vs. 8.0 months; P = 0.002). Patients with ≤2 CTC/2 ml both at baseline and first clinical evaluation had longest PFS (18.2 months) among all patient groups (P = 0.004). Particularly, among patients with stable disease (SD; per imaging evaluation) our assay could identify those with longer PFS (P < 0.001). Patients with >2 CTC/2 ml at baseline were also significantly more likely to suffer liver metastasis (P = 0.010). This study confirmed the prognostic value of Pep@MNPs assays for MBC patients who undergo firstline chemotherapy, and offered extra stratification regarding PFS for patients with SD, and a possible indicator for patients at risk for liver metastasis.

  2. The Added Value of Circulating Tumor Cell Enumeration to Standard Markers in Assessing Prognosis in a Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Population.

    PubMed

    Heller, Glenn; Fizazi, Karim; McCormack, Robert; Molina, Arturo; MacLean, David; Webb, Iain J; Saad, Fred; de Bono, Johann S; Scher, Howard I

    2016-09-27

    Purpose: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is a heterogeneous disease for which better prognostic models for survival are needed. We examined the added value of circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration relative to common prognostic laboratory measures from patients with CRPC.Methods: Utility of CTC enumeration as a baseline and postbaseline prognostic biomarker was examined using data from two prospective randomized registration-directed trials (COU-AA-301 and ELM-PC4) within statistical models used to estimate risk for survival. Discrimination and calibration were used to measure model predictive accuracy and the added value for CTC enumeration in the context of a Cox model containing albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), PSA, hemoglobin, and alkaline phosphatase (ALK). Discrimination quantifies how accurately a risk model predicts short-term versus long-term survivors. Calibration measures the closeness of actual survival time to the predicted survival time.Results: Adding CTC enumeration to a model containing albumin, LDH, PSA, hemoglobin, and ALK ("ALPHA") improved its discriminatory power. The weighted c-index for ALPHA without CTCs was 0.72 (SE, 0.02) versus 0.75 (SE, 0.02) for ALPHA + CTCs. The increase in discrimination was restricted to the lower-risk cohort. In terms of calibration, adding CTCs produced a more accurate model-based prediction of patient survival. The absolute prediction error for ALPHA was 3.95 months (SE, 0.28) versus 3.75 months (SE, 0.22) for ALPHA + CTCs.Conclusion: Addition of CTC enumeration to standard measures provides more accurate assessment of patient risk in terms of baseline and postbaseline prognosis in the mCRPC population. Clin Cancer Res; 1-7. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Marine algal fucoxanthin inhibits the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Choi, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Jeong, Han-Sol; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Joo, Myungsoo; Choi, Jun-Yong; Han, Chang-Woo; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Sue; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2013-10-04

    Metastasis is major cause of malignant cancer-associated mortality. Fucoxanthin has effect on various pharmacological activities including anti-cancer activity. However, the inhibitory effect of fucoxanthin on cancer metastasis remains unclear. Here, we show that fucoxanthin isolated from brown alga Saccharina japonica has anti-metastatic activity. To check anti-metastatic properties of fucoxanthin, in vitro models including assays for invasion, migration, actin fiber organization and cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction were used. Fucoxanthin inhibited the expression and secretion of MMP-9 which plays a critical role in tumor invasion and migration, and also suppressed invasion of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells as evidenced by transwell invasion assay. In addition, fucoxanthin diminished the expressions of the cell surface glycoprotein CD44 and CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) which play roles in migration, invasion and cancer-endothelial cell adhesion. Fucoxanthin markedly suppressed cell migration in wound healing assay and inhibited actin fiber formation. The adhesion of B16-F10 melanoma cells to the endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by fucoxanthin. Moreover, in experimental lung metastasis in vivo assay, fucoxanthin resulted in significant reduction of tumor nodules. Taken together, we demonstrate, for the first time, that fucoxanthin suppresses metastasis of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  5. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  6. [Testicular germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Dourthe, L M; Ouachet, M; Fizazi, K; Droz, J P

    1998-09-01

    Testicle germ cells tumors are the most common young men neoplasm. The incidence is maximal in Scandinavian countries. Cryptorchidism is a predisposing factor. Diagnosis is clinic, first treatment is radical orchidectomy by inguinal incision, after study of tumor markers. Histology shows seminoma or non seminomatous tumor. Carcinoma in situ is the precursor of invasive germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors have no p53 mutation, and have isochrome of the short arm of chromosome 12 as a specific marker. With the results of histological, biochemical and radiographic evaluation, patient are classified as follows: good, intermediate and poor risk prognosis. Standard treatment of stage I seminoma is prophylactic irradiation. Stage II with less than 3 cm lymph node too. Other situations need a cisplatin based chemotherapy. In case of metastatic residuals masses more than 3 cm, surgery need to be discussed. Stage I non seminomatous germ cell tumors are treated by retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, by surveillance or by two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (BEP). Standard treatment of good prognosis stage II and III is three cycles of BEP, four for poor prognosis. Residual mass need surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary in presence of viable germ cell. Standard treatment for relapses is chemotherapy with cisplatin, ifosfamide and vinblastine with a 30% remission rate. The place of high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation is not yet standardised. New drugs, as paclitaxel, are under studies.

  7. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  8. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  9. [Surgery of metastatic brain tumors with new surgical instruments].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Shibui, S; Matsuoka, K; Watanabe, T; Nakamura, O

    1987-05-01

    The risk of damages of neurological function by the operation of metastatic brain tumors was reduced considerably after introduction of neurosurgical apparatuses, such as ultrasonograph, ultrasonic surgical aspirator and laser scalpel. Of these, ultrasonograph is useful to indicate the exact location of brain tumor at real time during the operation. Ultrasonic surgical aspirator reduced the risk of damage on important brain structures due to the selectivity of fragmentation and the safety of the dissection in the vicinity of important vessels and nerve tissues. Laser scalpel is also useful to extirpate the hemorrhagic tumor with hard consistency. Cases introduced in this paper were: case 1, brain metastasis from lung cancer located just under the left motor area in brain; case 2, metastasis with abundant neovascularization from renal cancer to orbital cavity which showed invasion to orbital roof and frontal bone; case 3, radiation induced sarcoma after the treatment of retinoblastoma; case 4, a large cerebellar metastatic tumor; case 5, neurogenic sarcoma which were successfully removed by using one of or combination of ultrasonograph, ultrasonic aspirator and laser scalpel. Advantage of these new instruments for the surgery on metastatic brain tumor was mentioned here. However, it is necessarily to get a custom before we use these apparatuses at operation efficiently.

  10. Mathematical modeling of tumor growth and metastatic spreading: validation in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Niklas; Mollard, Séverine; Barbolosi, Dominique; Benabdallah, Assia; Chapuisat, Guillemette; Henry, Gerard; Giacometti, Sarah; Iliadis, Athanassios; Ciccolini, Joseph; Faivre, Christian; Hubert, Florence

    2014-11-15

    Defining tumor stage at diagnosis is a pivotal point for clinical decisions about patient treatment strategies. In this respect, early detection of occult metastasis invisible to current imaging methods would have a major impact on best care and long-term survival. Mathematical models that describe metastatic spreading might estimate the risk of metastasis when no clinical evidence is available. In this study, we adapted a top-down model to make such estimates. The model was constituted by a transport equation describing metastatic growth and endowed with a boundary condition for metastatic emission. Model predictions were compared with experimental results from orthotopic breast tumor xenograft experiments conducted in Nod/Scidγ mice. Primary tumor growth, metastatic spread and growth were monitored by 3D bioluminescence tomography. A tailored computational approach allowed the use of Monolix software for mixed-effects modeling with a partial differential equation model. Primary tumor growth was described best by Bertalanffy, West, and Gompertz models, which involve an initial exponential growth phase. All other tested models were rejected. The best metastatic model involved two parameters describing metastatic spreading and growth, respectively. Visual predictive check, analysis of residuals, and a bootstrap study validated the model. Coefficients of determination were [Formula: see text] for primary tumor growth and [Formula: see text] for metastatic growth. The data-based model development revealed several biologically significant findings. First, information on both growth and spreading can be obtained from measures of total metastatic burden. Second, the postulated link between primary tumor size and emission rate is validated. Finally, fast growing peritoneal metastases can only be described by such a complex partial differential equation model and not by ordinary differential equation models. This work advances efforts to predict metastatic spreading

  11. Scoring system for prediction of metastatic spine tumor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Uei, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masashi; Ajiro, Yasumitsu

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the prognosis before treatment for metastatic spine tumor is extremely important in therapy selection. Therefore, we review some prognostic scoring systems and their outcomes. Articles with combinations of two keywords among “metastatic spine tumor” and “prognosis”, “score”, “scoring system”, “predicting”, or “life expectancy” were searched for in PubMed. As a result, 236 articles were extracted. Those referring to representative scoring systems about predicting the survival of patients with metastatic spine tumors were used. The significance and limits of these scoring systems, and the future perspectives were described. Tokuhashi score, Tomita score, Baur score, Linden score, Rades score, and Katagiri score were introduced. They are all scoring systems prepared by combining factors that affect prognosis. The primary site of cancer and visceral metastasis were common factors in all of these scoring systems. Other factors selected to influence the prognosis varied. They were useful to roughly predict the survival period, such as, “more than one year or not” or “more than six months or not”. In particular, they were utilized for decision-making about operative indications and avoidance of excessive medical treatment. Because the function depended on the survival period in the patients with metastatic spine tumor, it was also utilized in assessing functional prognosis. However, no scoring system had more than 90% consistency between the predicted and actual survival periods. Future perspectives should adopt more oncological viewpoints with adjustment of the process of treatment for metastatic spine tumor. PMID:25035829

  12. Liver transplantation for metastatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, H; Oldhafer, K J; Weimann, A; Schlitt, H J; Scheumann, G F; Flemming, P; Ringe, B; Pichlmayr, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the experience with liver transplantation in patients with irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver transplantation has become an established therapy in primary liver cancer. On contrast, there is little experience with liver transplantation in secondary hepatic tumors. So far, in the majority of patients being transplanted for irresectable liver metastases, long-term results have been disappointing because of early tumor recurrence. Because of their biologically less aggressive nature, the metastases of neuroendocrine tumors could represent a justified indication for liver grafting. METHODS: In a retrospective study, the data of 12 patients who underwent liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases were analyzed regarding survival, tumor recurrence, and symptomatic relief. RESULTS: Nine of 12 patients currently are alive with a median survival of 55 months (range, 11.0 days to 103.5 months). The operative mortality was 1 of 12, 2 patients died because of septic complications or tumor recurrences or both 6.5 months and 68.0 months after transplantation. all patients had good symptomatic relief after hepatectomy and transplantation. Four of the nine patients who are alive have no evidence of tumor with a follow-up of 2.0, 57.0, 58.0, and 103.5 months after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases may provide not only long-term palliation but even cure. Regarding the shortage of donor organs, liver grafting for neuroendocrine metastases should be considered solely in patients without evidence of extrahepatic tumor manifestation and in whom all other treatment methods are no longer effective. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:9114792

  13. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  14. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  15. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process. PMID:27683421

  16. Perioperative Considerations in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Kate; Vasdev, Nikhil; Ashead, Jim; Lane, Tim; Hanbury, Damian; Nathan, Paul; Gowrie-Mohan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma are complex, with the potential for significant complications, and require extensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative management. This article discusses, in depth, the necessary considerations in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27833463

  17. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P.; Rimm, David L.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  18. Endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement: metastatic versus primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Benjamin K; Chow, Vincent E; Adams, Sheila C; Letson, G Douglas; Temple, H Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of underlying diagnosis on the functional and oncologic outcomes following endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement (PFR). We performed a retrospective review of 61 consecutive cemented bipolar PFR in 59 patients for treatment neoplastic lesions with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Twenty-two patients had primary bone tumors and 39 had metastatic disease. Average follow-up for the 30 surviving patients was 55.4 months and the mean postoperative survival for the 29 patients who died was 12.2 months. Patients with primary tumors demonstrated significantly better functional outcomes than those with metastatic disease, with mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores of 80.2 and 66.8%, respectively (p=0.0002). Age correlated inversely with functional scores (r=-0.48; p=0.0002), while femoral resection length did not. Preoperative pathologic fracture did not appear to adversely impact final functional outcomes. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year implant survival estimate was 92.5%, with aseptic loosening as the endpoint. Both functional results and survival are increased for primary tumors versus metastatic disease following PFR. However, PFR results in excellent local disease control, reliable pain relief and good functional results in both groups, with prosthesis survival exceeding that of the patient in many cases.

  19. External optical imaging of freely moving mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing metastatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-04-01

    We report here a new approach to genetically engineering tumors to become fluorescence such that they can be imaged externally in freely-moving animals. We describe here external high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical imaging of metastatic tumors in live mice. Stable high-level green flourescent protein (GFP)-expressing human and rodent cell lines enable tumors and metastasis is formed from them to be externally imaged from freely-moving mice. Real-time tumor and metastatic growth were quantitated from whole-body real-time imaging in GFP-expressing melanoma and colon carcinoma models. This GFP optical imaging system is highly appropriate for high throughput in vivo drug screening.

  20. Unusual primary tumors presenting as papillary carcinomas metastatic to the neck.

    PubMed

    Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Wilt, Marc; Kennel, Pierre; Charpiot, Anne; Rodier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastatic papillary carcinoma in the neck is presumptive evidence of a primary thyroid neoplasm since neck metastases of other primary tumors are uncommon. Immunohistochemical studies may be required to diagnose these metastases. We report 2 cases in which an unrelated tumor mimicked a thyroid malignancy. Both patients had been referred for evaluation of enlarged lymph neck nodes without any other symptoms. In both cases, a lymph node biopsy identified a metastatic papillary adenocarcinoma that was believed to be consistent with a thyroid primary. Thyroidectomy was not performed in either case. Further investigations led to the diagnosis of other primary tumors that were unrelated to the thyroid; the unrelated primaries were an ovarian serous tumor in one patient and a papillary renal cell carcinoma in the other.

  1. Tumor biology of non-metastatic stages of clear cell renal cell carcinoma; overexpression of stearoyl desaturase-1, EPO/EPO-R system and hypoxia-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoyanoff, Tania Romina; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Todaro, Juan Santiago; Espada, Joaquín Diego; Colavita, Juan Pablo Melana; Brandan, Nora Cristina; Torres, Adriana Mónica; Aguirre, María Victoria

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype of renal carcinomas. There is great interest to know the molecular basis of the tumor biology of ccRCC that might contribute to a better understanding of the aggressive biological behavior of this cancer and to identify early biomarkers of disease. This study describes the relationship among proliferation, survival, and apoptosis with the expression of key molecules related to tumoral hypoxia (hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)), their receptors (EPO-R, VEGFR-2), and stearoyl desaturase-1 (SCD-1) in early stages of ccRCC. Tissue samples were obtained at the Urology Unit of the J.R. Vidal Hospital (Corrientes, Argentina), from patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cancer between 2011 and 2014. Four experimental groups according to pathological stage and nuclear grade were organized: T1G1 (n = 6), T2G1 (n = 4), T1G2 (n = 7), and T2G2 (n = 7). The expression of HIF-1α, EPO, EPO-R, VEGF, VEGFR-2, Bcl-xL, and SCD-1 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and/or RT-PCR. Apoptosis was assessed by the TUNEL in situ assay, and tumor proliferation was determined by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Data revealed that HIF-1α, EPO, EPO-R, VEGF, and VEGF-R2 were overexpressed in most samples. The T1G1 group showed the highest EPO levels, approximately 200 % compared with distal renal tissue. Bcl-xL overexpression was concomitant with the enhancement of proliferative indexes. SCD-1 expression increased with the tumor size and nuclear grade. Moreover, the direct correlations observed between SCD-1/HIF-1α and SCD-1/Ki-67 increments suggest a link among these molecules, which would determine tumor progression in early stages of ccRCC. Our results demonstrate the relationship among proliferation, survival, and apoptosis with the expression of key molecules related to tumoral hypoxia (HIF-1α, EPO, VEGF), their

  2. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-10-20

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis.

  4. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  5. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  6. Paired Tumor and Normal Whole Genome Sequencing of Metastatic Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Glen J.; Liang, Winnie S.; Izatt, Tyler; Arora, Shilpi; Cherni, Irene; Raju, Robert N.; Hostetter, Galen; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Christoforides, Alexis; Sinari, Shripad; Baker, Angela S.; Metpally, Raghu; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Phillips, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare cancer of the sinonasal tract with little molecular characterization. We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on paired normal and tumor DNA from a patient with metastatic-ONB to identify the somatic alterations that might be drivers of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA was isolated from fresh frozen tissue from a metastatic lesion and whole blood, followed by WGS at >30X depth, alignment and mapping, and mutation analyses. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm selected mutations. Sixty-two somatic short nucleotide variants (SNVs) and five deletions were identified inside coding regions, each causing a non-synonymous DNA sequence change. We selected seven SNVs and validated them by Sanger sequencing. In the metastatic ONB samples collected several months prior to WGS, all seven mutations were present. However, in the original surgical resection specimen (prior to evidence of metastatic disease), mutations in KDR, MYC, SIN3B, and NLRC4 genes were not present, suggesting that these were acquired with disease progression and/or as a result of post-treatment effects. Conclusions/Significance This work provides insight into the evolution of ONB cancer cells and provides a window into the more complex factors, including tumor clonality and multiple driver mutations. PMID:22649506

  7. [Metastatic tumors in the ovary, difficulties of histologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tamás, Judit; Vereczkey, Ildikó; Tóth, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The ovary is a common site of metastases. Secondary tumors account for 3-40% of all ovarian malignancies. Most ovarian metastases arise from the colon, although tumors of the breast, stomach and endometrium are also common places of origin. Clinical and histological features of metastatic tumors frequently mimic primary ovarian malignancies, causing serious diagnostic problems for the surgical pathologist. However, differentiation between primary ovarian cancer and ovarian metastasis is important in order to prevent inappropriate management and suboptimal treatment. The distinction between primary and secondary ovarian malignancies is especially difficult in cases when the metastasis is diagnosed before the primary tumor. Frozen section is widely used in the intra-operative assessment of patients with ovarian tumors but it can be very difficult to distinguish certain types of primary ovarian tumors and metastases from other sites. We examined 152 cases of secondary ovarian neoplasm diagnosed at the National Institute of Oncology, Hungary from 2000 to 2014. Colorectal cancer was the most common primary tumor (58 cases), followed by breast (33 cases), endometrium (30 cases) and stomach cancer (13 cases). The differential diagnosis proved the most difficult in cases when endometrioid and mucinous tumors were present in the ovaries. Metastases of colorectal and gastric adenocarcinomas may simulate benign or borderline cystadenomas too. In these cases the knowledge of the patient's history and immunohistochemical stains were helpful. In our study we discuss the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasms and the limits of the intraoperative frozen sections.

  8. Cure of mice with established metastatic friend leukemia cell tumors by a combined therapy with tumor cells expressing both interferon-alpha 1 and herpes simplex thymidine kinase followed by ganciclovir.

    PubMed

    Santodonato, L; Ferrantini, M; Gabriele, L; Proietti, E; Venditti, M; Musiani, P; Modesti, A; Modica, A; Lupton, S D; Belardelli, F

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of the murine interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) gene into various malignant mouse tumor cells has resulted in the loss of tumorigenicity and an acquired capacity to induce long-lasting antitumor immunity following their injection into immunocompetent syngeneic mice. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of IFN-alpha-producing tumor cells in the therapy of mice with established mouse tumors. In DBA/2 mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c.) Friend erythroleukemia cell (FLC) tumors, we found that to achieve some antitumor response (i) it was necessary to inject high numbers of IFN-alpha-producing FLC, which occasionally lead to the formation of slowly growing tumors; and, that (ii) repeated injections of irradiated IFN-alpha-FLC did not result in any antitumor effect. The therapeutic potential of IFN-alpha-producing FLC rendered sensitive to ganciclovir (GCV), by transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) gene, was investigated. Complete tumor rejection and cure was observed in > or = 70% of the animals after injection of high numbers (10(7)) of IFN-alpha-producing tk-expressing tumor cells followed 4 days later by repeated GCV treatments, whereas only a slight increase in survival time was obtained after administration of control tk-expressing tumor cells (not producing IFN) and GCV. Tumor rejection was associated with a dramatic destruction of tumor tissue and with the subsequent development of a potent and long-lasting antitumor immunity. No therapeutic effect was observed in immunosuppressed nude mice. These data indicate that this approach may represent an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for antitumor cytokine gene therapy.

  9. Ghost Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Jason; Cohen, Molly D; Ramer, Naomi; Payami, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Ghost cell tumors are a family of lesions that range in presentation from cyst to solid neoplasm and in behavior from benign to locally aggressive or metastatic. All are characterized by the presence of ameloblastic epithelium, ghost cells, and calcifications. This report presents the cases of a 14-year-old girl with a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and a 65-year-old woman with a peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) with dysplastic changes, a rare locally invasive tumor of odontogenic epithelium. The first patient presented with a 1-year history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph displayed a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion. An incisional biopsy yielded a diagnosis of CCOT. Decompression of the mass was completed; after 3 months, it was enucleated and immediately grafted with bone harvested from the anterior iliac crest. The second patient presented with a 3-month history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph depicted a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion with saucerization of the buccal mandibular cortex. An incisional biopsy examination suggested a diagnosis of DGCT because of the presence of ghost cells, dentinoid, and islands of ameloblastic epithelium. Excision of the mass with peripheral ostectomy was completed. At 6 and 12 months of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was noted.

  10. Heparan Sulfate Degradation: Relation to Tumor Invasive and Metastatic Properties of Mouse B16 Melanoma Sublines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Motowo; Irimura, Tatsuro; di Ferrante, Daniela; di Ferrante, Nicola; Nicolson, Garth L.

    1983-05-01

    After transport in the blood and implantation in the microcirculation, metastatic tumor cells must invade the vascular endothelium and underlying basal lamina. Mouse B16 melanoma sublines were used to determine the relation between metastatic properties and the ability of the sublines to degrade enzymatically the sulfated glycosaminoglycans present in the extracellular matrix of cultured vascular endothelial cells. Highly invasive and metastatic B16 sublines degraded matrix glycosaminoglycans faster than did sublines of lower metastatic potential. The main products of this matrix degradation were heparan sulfate fragments. Intact B16 cells (or their cell-free homogenates) with a high potential for lung colonization degraded purified heparan sulfate from bovine lung at higher rates than did B16 cells with a poor potential for lung colonization. Analysis of the degradation fragments indicated that B16 cells have a heparan sulfate endoglycosidase. Thus the abilities of B16 melanoma cells to extravasate and successfully colonize the lung may be related to their capacities to degrade heparan sulfate in the walls of pulmonary blood vessels.

  11. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-05

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, DNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (P<0.05). The metastatic tumors were more common in control mice than the treated groups in the lung, the liver and the sternum tissues. Animals treated with DNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Final mean tumor volume reached to approximately 1.11, 0.31 and 0.27cm(3) in the control, and 40 and 80mg/kg DNC groups, respectively (P<0.05). Furthermore, suppression of NF-κB expression by DNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products.

  12. Mixed Testicular Germ Cell Tumor Presenting as Metastatic Pure Choriocarcinoma Involving Multiple Lung Metastases That Was Effectively Treated with High-dose Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Nam Su; Park, Hee Sook

    2009-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma in the testis is very rare, and it represents less than 1% (0.3%) of all the testicular germ cell tumors. It is a particularly aggressive variant of non-seminoma tumor, which is characterized by a high serum β-HCG level and multiple lung metastases. The optimal management for this disease remains undefined. We report here on a case of choriocarcinoma with multiple lung metastases, and the patient has achieved continuous remission for 2 years after combination chemotherapy of BEP (bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin) and sequential high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral stem cell rescue. PMID:20057969

  13. Metastatic melanoma mimicking solitary fibrous tumor: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bekers, Elise M; van Engen-van Grunsven, Adriana C H; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Westdorp, Harm; Koornstra, Rutger H T; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; Flucke, Uta; Blokx, Willeke A M

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanomas are known for their remarkable morphological variation and aberrant immunophenotype with loss of lineage-specific markers, especially in recurrences and metastases. Hot spot mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 and mutations in KIT are oncogenic events in melanomas. Therefore, genotyping can be a useful ancillary diagnostic tool. We present one case each of recurrent and metastatic melanoma, both showing histological and immunohistochemical features of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Mutational analysis detected BRAF and NRAS mutations in the primary and secondary lesions, respectively. This result confirmed the diagnosis of recurrent/metastastic melanoma.

  14. Applications for quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA in the plasma of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schreuer, Max; Meersseman, Geert; van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Bott, Ambre; Chevolet, Ines; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Maertens, Geert; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Small fragments of cell-free DNA that are shed by normal and tumor cells can be detected in the plasma of patients with advanced melanoma. Quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant DNA within the cell-free DNA holds promise as a tumor-specific biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with BRAF V600 mutant melanoma. Allele-specific quantitative PCR analysis for BRAF V600 E/E2/D/K/R/M mutations on DNA extracted from 1 ml of plasma is currently under evaluation in a number of ongoing prospective clinical studies. We report five patient cases that indicate the potential applications and utility of quantitative measurements of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA as a diagnostic test and as a therapeutic monitoring tool in stage IV melanoma patients treated with BRAF-targeted therapy or immunotherapy. Finally, we offer novel insights into the dynamics of cell-free tumor DNA in melanoma.

  15. QW-1624F2-2, a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, enhances the response to other deltanoids and suppresses the invasiveness of human metastatic breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Sujatha; Beckman, Matthew J; Bajwa, Amandeep; Wei, Jeffrey; Smith, Kathleen M; Posner, Gary H; Gewirtz, David A

    2006-11-01

    The enzyme 24-hydroxylase, also known as CYP24, metabolizes 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)] and is an established marker of vitamin D activity. Our studies evaluated the influence of a low-calcemic 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) analogue, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), on the regulation of CYP24 expression in MKL-4 cells, a metastatic mammary tumor cell model. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and its analogue, EB 1089, stimulated CYP24 induction at both protein and transcript levels. In contrast, QW failed to produce a sustained stimulation of CYP24, due, in large part, to a reduction in the stability of the CYP24 message. QW enhanced the capacity of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and EB 1089 to inhibit tumor cell proliferation by approximately 2-fold. QW also blocked the sustained induction of CYP24 expression by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and EB 1089, increased the potency of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and EB 1089, and inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation and invasion.

  16. Circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:24521660

  17. Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    regulate the development of anti-tumor immune responses . Importantly, our results show that, compared to unfused DC and tumor cells, the DC/ breast tumor...AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0487 TITLE: Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer ...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

  18. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  19. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  20. Modulation of the Metastatic Activity of Melanoma Cells by Laminin and Fibronectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Victor P.; Williams, Jeannette E.; Liotta, Lance A.; Martin, George R.

    1984-11-01

    Metastatic mouse melanoma cells have a high affinity for the basement membrane and the ability to degrade it; these properties may allow tumor cells to invade the membrane and disseminate. In this study it was found that the metastatic potential of mouse melanoma cells varied when the cells were exposed in culture to fibronectin or laminin. After removal of fibronectin or exposure to laminin, the cells had an increased affinity for basement membrane collagen, were more invasive of basement membranes in vitro, and produced more lung colonies in vivo. These changes are correlated with and may be due to an increase in the laminin-binding capacity of the tumor cell surface.

  1. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-27

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities - a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy.

  2. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  3. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL­1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment. PMID:28230778

  4. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  5. Identification of an aptamer through whole cell-SELEX for targeting high metastatic liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yin, Chang-Qing; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human cancers due to its ability of invasion and metastasis. Thus, the approaches to identify potential compounds that inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC are critical for treatment of this disease. In the present study, we used HCCLM9 cells with high metastatic potential and MHCC97L with low metastatic potential as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis. By applying cell- Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) against living cells, we used HCCLM9 as target cells and MHCC97L cells as control to screen a group of HCC metastasis- and cell-specific DNA aptamers. One of selected aptamers, LY-1, could specifically bind to metastatic HCC with a dissociation constant (Kd) in nanomolar range. In vitro studies demonstrated that LY-1 can recognize and bind to membrane protein of metastatic HCC cells. Furthermore, QD605 labeled LY-1 aptamer could recognize HCC cells in both local liver cancer tissues and pulmonary metastatic sites in a xenograft model of HCC with pulmonary metastasis. Further biochemical and immunostaining studies showed that LY-1 could selectively bind to a subpopulation of more metastatic cells in HCCLM9 cells, which express more CK19 and vimentin. Finally, treatment of highly metastatic cells with LY-1 led to reduced migration and invasiveness of HCCLM9 cells in vitro and suppression of xenograft growth in vivo. Taken together, the present study demonstrated the tumor targeting and tumor suppressive effects of LY-1, which could be a promising molecular probe for metastatic HCC and a potential candidate of chemotherapy for metastatic HCC. PMID:26882565

  6. Phase I active immunotherapy with combination of two chimeric, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, B-cell epitopes fused to a promiscuous T-cell epitope in patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu; Garrett, Joan; Rawale, Sharad V; Vicari, Daniele; Thurmond, Jennifer M; Lamb, Tammy; Mani, Aruna; Kane, Yahaira; Balint, Catherine R; Chalupa, Donald; Otterson, Gregory A; Shapiro, Charles L; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Grever, Michael R; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Carson, William E

    2009-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety profile, and immunogenicity of two chimeric, B-cell epitopes derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) extracellular domain in a combination vaccine with a promiscuous T-cell epitope (ie, MVF) and nor-muramyl-dipeptide as adjuvant emulsified in SEPPIC ISA 720. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors received three inoculations on days 1, 22, and 43 at doses of total peptide that ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mg. Immunogenicity was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and HER2 signaling assays. Results Twenty-four patients received three inoculations at the intended dose levels, which elicited antibodies able to recognize native HER2 receptor and inhibited both the proliferation of HER2-expressing cell lines and phosphorylation of the HER2 protein. The MTD was determined to be the highest dose level of 3.0 mg of the combination vaccine. There was a significant increase from dose level 1 (0.5 mg) to dose level 4 (3.0 mg) in HER2-specific antibodies. Four patients (one each with adrenal, colon, ovarian, and squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary) were judged to have stable disease; two patients (one each with endometrial and ovarian cancer) had partial responses; and 11 patients had progressive disease. Patients with stable disease received 6-month boosts, and one patient received a 20-month boost. CONCLUSION The combination vaccines were safe and effective in eliciting antibody responses in a subset of patients (62.5%) and were associated with no serious adverse events, autoimmune disease, or cardiotoxicity. There was preliminary evidence of clinical activity in several patients.

  7. Tumor Reduction in Primary and Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Lesions With nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Kunzmann, Volker; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Goldstein, David; Liu, Helen; Ferrara, Stefano; Lu, Brian; Renschler, Markus F.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Results from the phase 3 Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial (MPACT) led to approval of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine for first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. The current analysis evaluated the effects of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine on primary pancreatic and metastatic lesions. Methods In this analysis of the previously described MPACT trial, changes in pancreatic and metastatic tumor burden were assessed using independently measured diameters of lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. Changes in the sums of longest tumor diameters were summarized using descriptive statistics and were included in a multivariate analysis of overall survival. Results Primary pancreatic lesion measurement was feasible. Reductions in primary pancreatic tumor burden and metastatic burden from baseline to nadir were significantly greater with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine. Baseline pancreatic tumor burden was independently predictive of survival. Both regimens elicited linear reductions in primary pancreatic and metastatic tumor burden through time. There was a high within-patient concordance of tumor changes between primary pancreatic lesions and metastatic lesions. Conclusions This analysis of MPACT demonstrated significant tumor shrinkage benefit for nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in both primary pancreatic and metastatic lesions, supporting ongoing evaluation of this regimen in locally advanced disease. PMID:27841795

  8. Chemokine axes in breast cancer: factors of the tumor microenvironment reshape the CCR7-driven metastatic spread of luminal-A breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Kossover, Olga; Körner, Cindy; Meshel, Tsipi; Wiemann, Stefan; Seliktar, Dror; Legler, Daniel F; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine axes have been shown to mediate site-specific metastasis in breast cancer, but their relevance to different subtypes has been hardly addressed. Here, with the focus on the CCR7-CCL21 axis, patient datasets demonstrated that luminal-A tumors express relatively low CCR7 levels compared with more aggressive disease subtypes. Furthermore, lymph node metastasis was not associated with high CCR7 levels in luminal-A patients. The metastatic pattern of luminal-A breast tumors may be influenced by the way luminal-A tumor cells interpret signals provided by factors of the primary tumor microenvironment. Thus, CCR7-expressing human luminal-A cells were stimulated simultaneously by factors representing 3 tumor microenvironment arms typical of luminal-A tumors, hormonal, inflammatory, and growth stimulating: estrogen + TNF-α + epidermal growth factor. Such tumor microenvironment stimulation down-regulated the migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells toward CCL21 and inhibited the formation of directional protrusions toward CCL21 in a novel 3-dimensional hydrogel system. CCL21-induced migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells depended on PI3K and MAPK activation; however, when CCR7-expressing cancer cells were prestimulated by tumor microenvironment factors, CCL21 could not effectively activate these signaling pathways. In vivo, pre-exposure of the tumor cells to tumor microenvironment factors has put restraints on CCL21-mediated lymph node-homing cues and shifted the metastatic pattern of CCR7-expressing cells to the aggressive phenotype of dissemination to bones. Several of the aspects were also studied in the CXCR4-CXCL12 system, demonstrating similar patient and in vitro findings. Thus, we provide novel evidence to subtype-specific regulation of the CCR7-CCL21 axis, with more general implications to chemokine-dependent patterns of metastatic spread, revealing differential regulation in the luminal-A subtype.

  9. Establishment of a multimarker qPCR panel for the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in blood samples of metastatic breast cancer patients during the course of palliative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bredemeier, Maren; Edimiris, Philippos; Tewes, Mitra; Mach, Pawel; Aktas, Bahriye; Schellbach, Doreen; Wagner, Jenny; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are discussed to be an ideal surrogate marker for individualized treatment in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) since metastatic tissue is often difficult to obtain for repeated analysis. We established a nine gene qPCR panel to characterize the heterogeneous CTC population in MBC patients including epithelial CTC, their receptors (EPCAM, ERBB2, ERBB3, EGFR) CTC in Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition [(EMT); PIK3CA, AKT2), stem cell-like CTC (ALDH1) as well as resistant CTC (ERCC1, AURKA] to identify individual therapeutic targets. Results At TP0, at least one marker was detected in 84%, at TP1 in 74% and at TP2 in 79% of the patients, respectively. The expression of ERBB2, ERBB3 and ERCC1 alone or in combination with AURKA was significantly associated with therapy failure. ERBB2 + CTC were only detected in patients not receiving ERBB2 targeted therapies which correlated with no response. Furthermore, patients responding at TP2 had a significantly prolonged overall-survival than patients never responding (p = 0.0090). Patients and Methods 2 × 5 ml blood of 62 MBC patients was collected at the time of disease progression (TP0) and at two clinical staging time points (TP1 and TP2) after 8–12 weeks of chemo-, hormone or antibody therapy for the detection of CTC (AdnaTest EMT-2/StemCell Select™, QIAGEN Hannover GmbH, Germany). After pre-amplification, multiplex qPCR was performed. Establishment was performed using various cancer cell lines. PTPRC (Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type C) and GAPDH served as controls. Conclusions Monitoring MBC patients using a multimarker qPCR panel for the characterization of CTC might help to treat patients accordingly in the future. PMID:27223437

  10. Primary Tumor-Secreted Lymphangiogenic Factors Induce Pre-Metastatic Lymphvascular Niche Formation at Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wakisaka, Naohiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Miura, Kouki; Shiotani, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Junkichi; Sugasawa, Masashi; Moriyama-Kita, Makiko; Endo, Kazuhira; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to evaluate the formation of lymphvascular niches in lymph nodes of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and investigate the roles of lymphangiogenic and angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D, expressed in the primary tumors. Materials and Methods Forty-four patients with previously untreated clinically late T2 or T3 OSCC of cN0 were evaluated for primary tumors and 166 sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Primary tumors were immunohistochemically analyzed for expressions of VEGFs. Densities of lymphatic vessels (LVDpodoplanin) and high endothelial venules (HEVD) in the SLNs were also calculated using antibodies for each marker, podoplanin and MECA-79, respectively. Results In 25 patients, all lymph nodes were metastasis-negative, whereas, in 19 patients, metastasis was positive for at least one lymph node (either at SLN, non-SLN, or nodal recurrence). From the analyses of 140 SLNs without metastasis, LVDpodoplanin in 50 SLNs of metastasis-positive cases was significantly higher than that in 90 SLNs of metastasis-negative cases (p = 0.0025). HEVD was not associated with lymph node metastasis. The patients with VEGF-A-High or VEGF-D-High tumors had significantly higher LVDpodoplanin than patients with their Low counterparts (p = 0.0233 and p = 0.0209, respectively). In cases with lymph node metastasis, the VEGF-D-expression score was significantly higher than in those without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0006). Conclusions These results suggest that lymph node lymphangiogenesis occurs before metastasis in OSCC. VEGF-A and VEGF-D play critical roles in this process. VEGF-D is a potential predictive marker of positive lymph node metastasis in cN0 patients. PMID:26630663

  11. Dietary Selenium Supplementation Modulates Growth of Brain Metastatic Tumors and Changes the Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Brain Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Wolff, Gretchen; Xiao, Rijin; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Various dietary agents can modulate tumor invasiveness. The current study explored whether selenoglycoproteins (SeGPs) extracted from selenium-enriched yeast affect tumor cell homing and growth in the brain. Mice were fed diets enriched with specific SeGPs (SeGP40 or SeGP65, 1 mg/kg Se each), glycoproteins (GP40 or GP65, 0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se each) or a control diet (0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se) for 12 weeks. Then, murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells were infused into the brain circulation. Analyses were performed at early (48 h) and late stages (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Imaging of tumor progression in the brain revealed that mice fed SeGP65-enriched diet displayed diminished metastatic tumor growth, fewer extravasating tumor cells and smaller metastatic lesions. While administration of tumor cells resulted in a significant upregulation of adhesion molecules in the early stage of tumor progression, overexpression of VCAM-1 (vascular call adhesion molecule-1) and ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) messenger RNA (mRNA) was diminished in SeGP65 supplemented mice. Additionally, mice fed SeGP65 showed decreased expression of acetylated NF-κB p65, 48 h post tumor cell infusion. The results indicate that tumor progression in the brain can be modulated by specific SeGPs. Selenium-containing compounds were more effective than their glycoprotein controls, implicating selenium as a potential negative regulator of metastatic process.

  12. Different growth and metastatic phenotypes associated with a cell-intrinsic change of Met in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Eri; Sakai, Katsuya; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Imamura, Ryu; Sato, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic phenotypic change contributes to the metastatic progression and drug resistance in malignant melanoma. Nevertheless, mechanisms for a phenotypic change have remained to be addressed. Here, we show that Met receptor expression changes in a cell-autonomous manner and can distinguish phenotypical differences in growth, as well as in metastatic and drug-resistant characteristics. In metastatic melanoma, the cells are composed of Met-low and Met-high populations. Met-low populations have stem-like gene expression profiles, are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, and have shown abundant angiogenesis and rapid tumor growth in subcutaneous inoculation. Met-high populations have a differentiated phenotype, are relatively resistant to B-RAF inhibitor, and are highly metastatic to the lungs. Met plays a definitive role in lung metastasis because the lung metastasis of Met-high cells requires Met, and treatment of mice with the Met-containing exosomes from Met-high cells facilitates lung metastasis by Met-low cells. Clonal cell fate analysis showed the hierarchical phenotypical changes from Met-low to Met-high populations. Met-low cells either showed self-renewal or changed into Met-high cells, whereas Met-high cells remained Met-high. Clonal transition from Met-low to Met-high cells accompanied changes in the gene expression profile, in tumor growth, and in metastasis that were similar to those in Met-high cells. These findings indicate that malignant melanoma has the ability to undergo phenotypic change by a cell-intrinsic/autonomous mechanism that can be characterized by Met expression. PMID:27683122

  13. Lymph Node-Targeted Immunotherapy Mediates Potent Immunity Resulting in Regression of Isolated or Metastatic HPV-Transformed Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kent A.; Meisenburg, Brenna L.; Tam, Victor L.; Pagarigan, Robb R.; Wong, Raymond; Joea, Diljeet K.; Lantzy, Liz; Carrillo, Mayra A.; Gross, Todd M.; Malyankar, Uriel M.; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Da Silva, Diane M.; Kündig, Thomas M.; Kast, W. Martin; Qiu, Zhiyong; Bot, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of a novel immunotherapy strategy resulting in immunity to localized or metastatic HPV 16-transformed murine tumors. Experimental design Animals bearing E7-expressing tumors were co-immunized by lymph node injection with E7 49-57 antigen and TLR3-ligand (synthetic dsRNA). Immune responses were measured by flow cytometry and anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated by tumor size and survival. In situ cytotoxicity assays and identification of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and T regulatory cells were used to assess the mechanisms of treatment resistance in bulky disease. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide was explored to augment immunotherapy in late-stage disease. Results In therapeutic and prophylactic settings, immunization resulted in a considerable expansion of E7 49-57 antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the range of 1/10 CD8+ T cells. The resulting immunity was effective in suppressing disease progression and mortality in a pulmonary metastatic disease model. Therapeutic immunization resulted in control of isolated tumors up to a certain volume, and correlated with anti-tumor immune responses measured in blood. In situ analysis showed that within bulky tumors, T cell function was affected by negative regulatory mechanisms linked to an increase in T regulatory cells and could be overcome by cyclophosphamide treatment in conjunction with immunization. Conclusions This study highlights a novel cancer immunotherapy platform with potential for translatability to the clinic and suggests its potential usefulness for controlling metastatic disease, solid tumors of limited size, or larger tumors when combined with cytotoxic agents that reduce the number of tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells. PMID:19789304

  14. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  15. New therapeutic approaches to metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: A glimpse into the future

    PubMed Central

    Cidon, Esther Una

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) gastroenteropancreatic tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasias arising from neuroendocrine cells of the embryological gut. Their incidence have increased significantly over the past 3 decades probably due to the improvements in imaging and diagnosis. The recent advances in molecular biology have translated into an expansion of therapeutic approaches to these patients. Somatostatin analogs, which initially were approved for control of hormonal syndromes, have recently been proven to inhibit tumor growth. Several new drugs such as antiangiogenics and others targeting mammalian target of rapamycin pathways have been approved to treat progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) although their role in non-pancreatic is still controversial. The treatment of NETs requires a coordinated multidisciplinary approach. The management of localized NETs primarily involves surgical resection followed by surveillance. However, the treatment of unresectable and/or metastatic disease may involve a combination of surgical resection, systemic therapy, and liver-directed therapies with the goal of alleviating symptoms of peptide release and controlling tumor growth. This article will review the current therapeutic strategies for metastatic gastroenteropancreatic NETs and will take a glimpse into the future approaches. PMID:28144395

  16. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Errami, Mounir; Margulis, Vitali; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Because of the asymptomatic natural history of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), by the time a diagnosis is made, metastatic disease is present in about one third of the cases. Thus, the overall survival of patients with RCC remains poor. Ultimately up to 50% of patients with RCC will develop metastases. Metastatic lesions from RCC are usually observed in the lungs, liver or bone. Metastases to the brain or the skin from RCC are rare. Here we present a patient diagnosed with RCC, found to have no evidence of metastases at the time of nephrectomy, who presented two years later with metastases to the scalp. We review the literature of patients with this rare site of metastasis and outline the overall prognosis of this lesion compared to other site of metastases from RCC. PMID:28191289

  17. Proteome profiling of exosomes derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells reveal differential expression of key metastatic factors and signal transduction components.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Greening, David W; Barnes, Thomas W; Lim, Justin W; Tauro, Bow J; Rai, Alin; Xu, Rong; Adda, Christopher; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular 40-100 nm diameter membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that can mediate intercellular transfer of RNAs and proteins to assist premetastatic niche formation. Using primary (SW480) and metastatic (SW620) human isogenic colorectal cancer cell lines we compared exosome protein profiles to yield valuable insights into metastatic factors and signaling molecules fundamental to tumor progression. Exosomes purified using OptiPrep™ density gradient fractionation were 40-100 nm in diameter, were of a buoyant density ~1.09 g/mL, and displayed stereotypic exosomal markers TSG101, Alix, and CD63. A major finding was the selective enrichment of metastatic factors (MET, S100A8, S100A9, TNC), signal transduction molecules (EFNB2, JAG1, SRC, TNIK), and lipid raft and lipid raft-associated components (CAV1, FLOT1, FLOT2, PROM1) in exosomes derived from metastatic SW620 cells. Additionally, using cryo-electron microscopy, ultrastructural components in exosomes were identified. A key finding of this study was the detection and colocalization of protein complexes EPCAM-CLDN7 and TNIK-RAP2A in colorectal cancer cell exosomes. The selective enrichment of metastatic factors and signaling pathway components in metastatic colon cancer cell-derived exosomes contributes to our understanding of the cross-talk between tumor and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  19. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation.

  20. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  1. Optical redox ratio identifies metastatic potential-dependent changes in breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alhallak, Kinan; Rebello, Lisa G.; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    The development of prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic risk could reduce the number of patients receiving chemotherapy for tumors with low metastatic potential. Recent evidence points to a critical role for cell metabolism in driving breast cancer metastasis. Endogenous fluorescence intensity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) can provide a label-free method for assessing cell metabolism. We report the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD + NADH) of four isogenic triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with varying metastatic potential. Under normoxic conditions, the redox ratio increases with increasing metastatic potential (168FARN>4T07>4T1), indicating a shift to more oxidative metabolism in cells capable of metastasis. Reoxygenation following acute hypoxia increased the redox ratio by 43 ± 9% and 33 ± 4% in the 4T1 and 4T07 cells, respectively; in contrast, the redox ratio decreased 14 ± 7% in the non-metastatic 67NR cell line. These results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio is sensitive to the metabolic adaptability of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential and could potentially be used to measure dynamic functional changes that are indicative of invasive or metastatic potential. PMID:27895979

  2. Hypoxia-induced lysyl oxidase is a critical mediator of bone marrow cell recruitment to form the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Erler, Janine T.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Cox, Thomas R.; Lang, Georgina; Bird, Demelza; Koong, Albert; Le, Quynh-Thu; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tumor cell metastasis is facilitated by “pre-metastatic niches” formed in destination organs by invading bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs). Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is critical for pre-metastatic niche formation. LOX secreted by hypoxic breast tumor cells accumulates at pre-metastatic sites, cross-links collagen-IV in the basement membrane, and is essential for CD11b+ myeloid cell recruitment. CD11b+ cells adhere to cross-linked collagen-IV and produce matrix metalloproteinase-2 which cleaves collagen, enhancing the invasion and recruitment of BMDCs and metastasizing tumor cells. LOX inhibition prevents CD11b+ cell recruitment and metastatic growth. CD11b+ cells and LOX also co-localize in biopsies of human metastases. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for LOX in pre-metastatic niche formation and support targeting LOX for the treatment and prevention of metastatic disease. PMID:19111879

  3. Dasatinib, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Malignant Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-10

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Current Treatment Algorithms for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell, Non-Squamous Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The treatment paradigm for metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer is continuously evolving due to new treatment options and our increasing knowledge of molecular signal pathways. As a result of treatments becoming more efficacious and more personalized, survival for selected groups of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is increasing. In this paper, three algorithms will be presented for treating patients with metastatic non-squamous, NSCLC. These include treatment algorithms for NSCLC patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations, ALK rearrangements, or wild-type/wild-type tumors. As the world of immunotherapy continues to evolve quickly, a future algorithm will also be presented. PMID:28373963

  5. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  6. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  7. Isolation and sequencing of a cDNA clone encoding the 85 kDa human lysosomal sialoglycoprotein (hLGP85) in human metastatic pancreas islet tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Takata, Y; Kono, A; Tanaka, Y; Takahashi, T; Himeno, M; Kato, K

    1992-04-30

    A full length cDNA for a human lysosomal membrane sialoglycoprotein (hLGP85) was isolated as a probe of the cDNA of rat LGP85 (rLGP85) from the cDNA library prepared from total mRNA of QGP-1NL cells, a human pancreatic islet tumor cell with a high metastatic activity. The deduced amino acid sequence shows that hLGP85 consists of 478 amino acid residues (MW. 54,289). The protein has 10 putative N-glycosylation sites and 2 hydrophobic regions at the NH2- and near the COOH-termini, respectively. Thus, both domains probably constitute putative transmembrane domains. It exhibits 86% and 79% sequence similarities in amino acids and nucleic acids to rat lysosomal membrane sialoglycoprotein (rLGP85), respectively. The protein contained the short cytoplasmic tail at the COOH-terminus which does not form the glycine-tyrosine sequence (GY motif), the so-called lysosomal targetting signal.

  8. Fourier analysis of cell motility: correlation of motility with metastatic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Partin, A W; Schoeniger, J S; Mohler, J L; Coffey, D S

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a computerized, mathematical system for quantitating the various types of cell motility. This Fourier analysis method simultaneously quantifies for individual cells (i) temporal changes in cell shape represented by cell ruffling, undulation, and pseudopodal extension, (ii) cell translation, and (iii) average cell size and shape. This spatial-temporal Fourier analysis was tested on a series of well-characterized animal tumor cell lines of rat prostatic cancer to study in a quantitative manner the correlation of cell motility with increasing in vivo metastatic potential. Fourier motility coefficients measuring pseudopodal extension correlated best with metastatic potential in the cell lines studied. This study demonstrated that Fourier analysis provides quantitative measurement of cell motility that may be applied to the study of biological processes. This analysis should aid in the study of the motility of individual cells in various areas of cellular and tumor biology. Images PMID:2919174

  9. In Vivo Bioluminescence Tomography for Monitoring Breast Tumor Growth and Metastatic Spreading: Comparative Study and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mollard, Séverine; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Giacometti, Sarah; Serdjebi, Cindy; Benzekry, Sebastien; Ciccolini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the reliability and precision of Diffuse Luminescent Imaging Tomography (DLIT) for monitoring primary tumor and metastatic spreading in breast cancer mice, and to develop a biomathematical model to describe the collected data. Using orthotopic mammary fat pad model of breast cancer (MDAMB231-Luc) in mice, we monitored tumor and metastatic spreading by three-dimensional (3D) bioluminescence and cross-validated it with standard bioluminescence imaging, caliper measurement and necropsy examination. DLIT imaging proved to be reproducible and reliable throughout time. It was possible to discriminate secondary lesions from the main breast cancer, without removing the primary tumor. Preferential metastatic sites were lungs, peritoneum and lymph nodes. Necropsy examinations confirmed DLIT measurements. Marked differences in growth profiles were observed, with an overestimation of the exponential phase when using a caliper as compared with bioluminescence. Our mathematical model taking into account the balance between living and necrotic cells proved to be able to reproduce the experimental data obtained with a caliper or DLIT imaging, because it could discriminate proliferative living cells from a more composite mass consisting of tumor cells, necrotic cell, or inflammatory tissues. DLIT imaging combined with mathematical modeling could be a powerful and informative tool in experimental oncology. PMID:27812027

  10. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  11. Exosomes secreted from human colon cancer cells influence the adhesion of neighboring metastatic cells: Role of microRNA-210

    PubMed Central

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Guasti, Daniele; Cinci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer-secreted exosomes influence tumor microenvironment and support cancer growth and metastasis. MiR-210 is frequently up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues and correlates with metastatic disease. We investigated whether exosomes are actively released by HCT-8 colon cancer cells, the role of exosomal miR-210 in the cross-talk between primary cancer cells and neighboring metastatic cells and its contribution in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). After 7 d of culture, a subpopulation of viable HCT-8 cells detached the monolayer and started to grow in suspension, suggesting anoikis resistance and a metastatic potential. The expression of key proteins of EMT revealed that these cells were E-cadherin negative and vimentin positive further confirming their metastatic phenotype and the acquisition of anoikis resistance. Metastatic cells, in the presence of adherently growing HCT-8, continued to grow in suspension whereas only if seeded in cell-free wells, were able to adhere again and to form E-cadherin positive and vimentin negative new colonies, suggesting the occurrence of MET. The chemosensitivity to 5 fluorouracil and to FOLFOX-like treatment of metastatic cells was significantly diminished compared to adherent HCT-8 cells. Of note, adherent new colonies undergoing MET, were insensitive to both chemotherapeutic strategies. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that adherently growing HCT-8, actually secreted exosomes and that exosomes in turn were taken up by metastatic cells. When exosomes secreted by adherently growing HCT-8 were administered to metastatic cells, MET was significantly inhibited. miR-210 was significantly upregulated in exosomes compared to its intracellular levels in adherently growing HCT-8 cells and correlated to anoikis resistance and EMT markers. Exosomes containing miR-210 might be considered as EMT promoting signals that preserve the local cancer

  12. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  13. The effect of Neovastat (AE-941) on an experimental metastatic bone tumor model.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael H; Lee, Joanne; Orr, F William

    2002-02-01

    Bone metastases are generally associated with bone destruction which occurs in response to factors secreted by metastatic cells. Some of these factors secreted by the metastatic cells activate osteoclats while others are proteases that degrade bone collagen. To determine if Neovastat (AE-941), a naturally occurring multi-functional inhibitor of angiogenesis, is able to regulate properties that are thought to have relevance to their propensity to form bone metastases in vivo, we used the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line which can metastasize to bone. We showed that Neovastat prevented the degradation of osteoid-like radiolabeled extracellular matrices which was induced by incubation of human SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells with MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, Neovastat was demonstrated to inhibit the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expressed by MDA-MB-231 cells. The potential of Neovastat to retard the spread, growth, and osteolysis of MDA-MB-231 cells was then estimated in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the vertebral bodies indicated that MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated in nude mice (intracardiac) successfully generate osteolytic metastases with an 83% reduction of the volume of medullary bone (p< or =0.01). However, when tumor-bearing animals were treated orally with Neovastat, there was only a 19% decrease in medullary bone thus indicating that Neovastat can prevent bone metastasis in this model. Consistent with histological results, radiographic analysis indicated that Neovastat decreased the number of osteolytic lesions by 33% (p< or =0.3). Moreover, a decrease in the tumor volume in bone was observed in Neovastat-treated animals. These results indicate that Neovastat may be useful in preventing bone metastasis in cancer patients.

  14. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland.

  15. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  16. Transfusion of sickle cells may be a therapeutic option for patients suffering metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease will sickle under conditions of hypoxemia and acidosis which is a similar milieu found in malignant tumors. While control of tumor angiogenesis has long been a goal of cancer therapy, selective occlusion of tumor blood supply may be achieved by transfusion of sickle cells into patients who suffer metastatic cancer. Although this potential therapy has not been previously reported in the medical literature, the concept may have been elusive to medical mainstream thinking because it requires transfusion of diseased cells. For this therapy to be effective, other environmental factors may need to be manipulated such inducing mild hypoxemia or hypercarbia (respiratory acidosis) to induce red cell sickling. Preliminary evidence supportive of this therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is provided by case evidence that sickle cell occlusion of a malignant brain tumor (glioma) produced tumor necrosis. Also sickle cells have been successfully transfused into primates. Furthermore, donor blood is crossmatched and transfused into patients suffering from sickle cell disease regularly in clinics and this procedure is associated with acceptable morbidity. Most importantly, animal models of sickle cell disease and cancer currently exist, and this theory could be tried with available technologies including ultrasound detection of vaso-occlusion. While the proposed therapy may not cure metastatic cancer, this treatment could prove useful for decreasing the size and perhaps the pain from metastatic tumor burden. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ABO Rh compatible crossmatched sickle cells transfused into patients who suffer metastatic cancer under controlled conditions of blood oxygenation and pH will selectively produce vaso-occlusive infarcts in malignant tumors and be a useful therapy. The author hopes for further investigations.

  17. Metastatic tumors to the penis: a report of 17 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Amin, Mahul; Cubilla, Antonio L; Young, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    This study presents clinicopathologic and outcome features of 17 patients with metastatic tumor to the penis. Primary sites and histological types were as follows: 6 urothelial carcinomas of urinary bladder, 4 prostatic carcinomas (2 adenocarcinomas and 2 adenosquamous carcinomas), 2 colorectal adenocarcinomas, 2 pulmonary carcinomas (1 squamous cell carcinoma and 1 small cell carcinoma), 1 squamous cell carcinoma of base of the tongue, 1 cutaneous malignant melanoma, and 1 acute myeloid leukemia. Literature review revealed similar distribution of organ sites in 437 cases. Most of our tumors were metachronous. Interval between primary and penile metastasis ranged from 3 to 60 months (mean 16 months). Most of the patients presented with a penile mass. Priapism was observed in 4 patients. The shaft was the commonest anatomical site involved (12 cases). Tumor emboli were usually found in the erectile tissues (14 cases), mainly corpora cavernosa. A total of 14 patients died of disseminated disease. Time interval between primary tumor and penile metastasis ranged from 3 to 60 months (mean 19 months) and between diagnosis of penile metastasis and death ranged from 0.25 to 18 months (mean 6 months), significantly shorter (P = .0058). Patients presented a median survival of 18 months from primary treatment and 5 months after diagnosis of penile metastasis. None of the patients who died of disseminated cancer lived more than 18 months after pathological diagnosis. Clinical evidence of penile involvement in a patient with a known malignancy is an ominous sign and should alert the clinicians to the dismal prognosis.

  18. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents.

  19. An animal model for colon cancer metastatic cell line with enhanced metastasizing ability. Establishment and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Cheng, J Y; Tzeng, C C; Yeh, M Y; Meng, C L

    1991-06-01

    We have developed an animal model for colon cancer metastasis and produced a metastasizing tumor after using a microinjection technique to inject SW480 cells into the cecal wall of athymic nude mice during "minilaparotomy." After the metastatic foci formed in murine lung, an in vitro primary culture was performed and a new metastatic cancer cell line, which was designated as CC-ML3, was established. The studies included: 1) the comparison between SW 480 and CC-ML3 in morphology, growth kinetics, seeding and plating efficiency, and karyotype; and 2) carcino-embryonic antigen determination, origination, and metastatic ability of CC-ML3. The results showed that CC-ML3 was significantly different from SW480 in vitro and possessed a high metastatic potential in vivo. This newly developed animal model may thus be useful for studying the biology and pathogenesis of metastasis of human colonic cancer.

  20. Automatic metastatic brain tumor segmentation for stereotactic radiosurgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Hrycushko, Brian; Wardak, Zabi; Lu, Weiguo; Yan, Yulong; Jiang, Steve B.; Timmerman, Robert; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Nedzi, Lucien; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an automatic segmentation strategy for efficient and accurate metastatic brain tumor delineation on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1c) magnetic resonance images (MRI) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The proposed four-step automatic brain metastases segmentation strategy is comprised of pre-processing, initial contouring, contour evolution, and contour triage. First, T1c brain images are preprocessed to remove the skull. Second, an initial tumor contour is created using a multi-scaled adaptive threshold-based bounding box and a super-voxel clustering technique. Third, the initial contours are evolved to the tumor boundary using a regional active contour technique. Fourth, all detected false-positive contours are removed with geometric characterization. The segmentation process was validated on a realistic virtual phantom containing Gaussian or Rician noise. For each type of noise distribution, five different noise levels were tested. Twenty-one cases from the multimodal brain tumor image segmentation (BRATS) challenge dataset and fifteen clinical metastases cases were also included in validation. Segmentation performance was quantified by the Dice coefficient (DC), normalized mutual information (NMI), structural similarity (SSIM), Hausdorff distance (HD), mean value of surface-to-surface distance (MSSD) and standard deviation of surface-to-surface distance (SDSSD). In the numerical phantom study, the evaluation yielded a DC of 0.98  ±  0.01, an NMI of 0.97  ±  0.01, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 2.2  ±  0.8 mm, an MSSD of 0.1  ±  0.1 mm, and an SDSSD of 0.3  ±  0.1 mm. The validation on the BRATS data resulted in a DC of 0.89  ±  0.08, which outperform the BRATS challenge algorithms. Evaluation on clinical datasets gave a DC of 0.86  ±  0.09, an NMI of 0.80  ±  0.11, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 8

  1. Automatic metastatic brain tumor segmentation for stereotactic radiosurgery applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Hrycushko, Brian; Wardak, Zabi; Lu, Weiguo; Yan, Yulong; Jiang, Steve B; Timmerman, Robert; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Nedzi, Lucien; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-12-21

    The objective of this study is to develop an automatic segmentation strategy for efficient and accurate metastatic brain tumor delineation on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1c) magnetic resonance images (MRI) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The proposed four-step automatic brain metastases segmentation strategy is comprised of pre-processing, initial contouring, contour evolution, and contour triage. First, T1c brain images are preprocessed to remove the skull. Second, an initial tumor contour is created using a multi-scaled adaptive threshold-based bounding box and a super-voxel clustering technique. Third, the initial contours are evolved to the tumor boundary using a regional active contour technique. Fourth, all detected false-positive contours are removed with geometric characterization. The segmentation process was validated on a realistic virtual phantom containing Gaussian or Rician noise. For each type of noise distribution, five different noise levels were tested. Twenty-one cases from the multimodal brain tumor image segmentation (BRATS) challenge dataset and fifteen clinical metastases cases were also included in validation. Segmentation performance was quantified by the Dice coefficient (DC), normalized mutual information (NMI), structural similarity (SSIM), Hausdorff distance (HD), mean value of surface-to-surface distance (MSSD) and standard deviation of surface-to-surface distance (SDSSD). In the numerical phantom study, the evaluation yielded a DC of 0.98  ±  0.01, an NMI of 0.97  ±  0.01, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 2.2  ±  0.8 mm, an MSSD of 0.1  ±  0.1 mm, and an SDSSD of 0.3  ±  0.1 mm. The validation on the BRATS data resulted in a DC of 0.89  ±  0.08, which outperform the BRATS challenge algorithms. Evaluation on clinical datasets gave a DC of 0.86  ±  0.09, an NMI of 0.80  ±  0.11, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 8

  2. Establishment and characterization of a novel human cholangiocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic activity.

    PubMed

    Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Seubwai, Wunchana; Talabnin, Chutima; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Obchoei, Sumalee; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Okada, Seiji; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly metastatic tumor, and the lung is a common site of metastasis. A greater understanding of the biology of metastases is needed to improve treatment outcomes. Herein, a highly metastatic human CCA subline, KKU-213L5 from an original cell line, KKU-213 that has marginally metastatic ability, was established and characterized. KKU-213L5 was selected in vivo through the fifth serial passage of pulmonary metastasized tissues via tail-vein injection in NOD/scid/Jak3 mice. The metastatic abilities of the KKU-213L5 cells were compared with the parental line in vitro and in vivo. The expression profile of this metastatic cell line was determined using real-time PCR. KKU-213L5 cells were found to possess higher metastatic phenotypes, i.e., growth rates, stem cell surface markers (CD133), migration and invasion characteristics when compared with the parental cells. Compared to the KKU-213 cells, KKU-213L5 cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous xenografted mice and had a >10-fold increase in lung metastases in the tail-vein injected metastatic mouse model. Mice injected intravenously with KKU-213L5 cells had a significantly shorter survival. Analysis of the expressed genes related to progression of cancer revealed significant upregulation of anterior gradient protein-2 (AGR2) and suppression of KiSS-1 in the KKU-213L5 cells. The association of these two genes with metastasis was affirmed in CCA patient tissues since increased AGR2 expression and decreased KiSS-1 expression were found in higher stage patient tumors. In conclusion, a highly metastatic human CCA cell line was established and characterized. It is plausible that the differential expression between the parental KKU-213 and highly metastatic KKU-213L5 cells may be beneficial to classify novel genes associated with metastasis. The KKU-213L5 cell line should serve as a valued device for discovering the molecular mechanisms of CCA metastasis and enabling the search for an

  3. [Disseminated metastatic tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata presenting intractable hiccups. A case report].

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichirou

    2011-04-01

    We report the case of disseminated metastatic tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata presenting intractable hiccups. A 73-year-old man has a history of for metastatic lung tumor of the left tempral lobe. Although 3 surgeries and 4 radiotherapies were performed in the last 8 years, residual tumor grew slowly. He presented with intractable hiccups. His hiccups continued for 30 minutes, sometimes for 3 hours with obstruction of eating. Contrast-enhanced Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated the dissemination of metastatic lung tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata and ventral surface of midbrain. Some literatures reported the patients with intractable hiccups caused by dorsal medullary lesions. Therefore, we thought that the small disseminated tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata caused the hiccups. Evaluation of dorsal medullay area by MR imaging is important to reveal the cause of intractable hiccups.

  4. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Weight, Ryan M; Viator, John A; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Lisle, Allison E

    2006-10-15

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  5. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weight, Ryan M.; Viator, John A.; Dale, Paul S.; Caldwell, Charles W.; Lisle, Allison E.

    2006-10-01

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  6. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  7. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Staal, Jerome A; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R

    2016-10-19

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  8. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Jerome A.; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities. PMID:27775567

  9. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  10. Resection of Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Right Ventricle and Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam R; Wang, Andrew; Kim, Han; Milano, Carmelo A

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoid tumors rarely metastasize to the heart, and previous reports involved the myocardium only. We present a case of carcinoid tumor metastatic to the right ventricle (RV) and tricuspid valve. Preoperative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) showed the tumor arising from the right ventricular free wall and involving the tricuspid valve apparatus. The tumor was resected through a right atriotomy and required tricuspid valve replacement.

  11. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    S. CHAHAL, MANPREET; TERESA KU, H.; ZHANG, ZHIHONG; M. LEGASPI, CHRISTIAN; LUO, ANGELA; M. HOPKINS, MANDI; E. MEIER, KATHRYN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Materials and Methods: Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Results: Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and metastatic cell lines. One of the most striking new findings was up-regulation of mRNA for the matricellular protein WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) in metastatic cells; increased protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Other differentially expressed genes included those for reproductive homeobox 5 (Rhox5; increased in metastatic) and cystatin 7 (Cst7; decreased in metastatic). Differences between PLD2-expressing and parental cell lines were limited but included the signaling proteins Ras guanyl releasing protein 1 (RGS18; increased with PLD2) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2; decreased with PLD2). Conclusion: The results provide insights into signaling pathways potentially involved in conferring metastatic ability on lymphoma cells. PMID:27807066

  12. Anti-tumor activity and the mechanism of SIP-S: A sulfated polysaccharide with anti-metastatic effect.

    PubMed

    Zong, Aizhen; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yan; Song, Xinlei; Shi, Yikang; Cao, Hongzhi; Liu, Chunhui; Cheng, Yanna; Jiang, Wenjie; Du, Fangling; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-09-20

    Our previous studies demonstrated that SIP-S had anti-metastatic activity and inhibited the growth of metastatic foci. Here we report the anti-tumor and immunoregulatory potential of SIP-S. SIP-S could significantly inhibit tumor growth in S180-bearing mice, and the inhibition rates was 43.7% at 30 mg/kg d. Besides, SIP-S could improve the thymus and spleen indices of S180-bearing mice and the mice treated with CTX. The combination of SIP-S (15 mg/kg d) with CTX (12.5 mg/kg d) showed higher anti-tumor potency than CTX (25 mg/kg d) alone. These results indicated that SIP-S had immunoenhancing and anticancer activity, and the immunoenhancing activity might be one mechanism for its anti-tumor activity. Flow cytometry results showed that SIP-S could induce tumor cells apoptosis. Western blot analysis indicated that SIP-S could upregulate the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, caspase-3, -8, -9 and Bax, and downregulate the expression of anti-apoptotic protein PARP-1 in tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, SIP-S has anti-tumor activity, which may be associated with its immunostimulating and pro-apoptotic activity.

  13. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    melatonin levels, sleep disruption, and risk of prostate cancer in elderly men. European Urology 2014 Advance online publication. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo...multi-focal and metastatic prostate cancer . Aim 1 focuses on a 4-gene signature of prostate cancer prognosis, and whether the signature differs...involved in metastatic progression of prostate cancer . Scope: In year 1, Dr. Batista has received IRB approval, completed a series of courses to augment

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joachims, Zohar; Feinmesser, Raphael; Purim, Ofer; Halpern, Marisa; Brenner, Baruch; Fenig, Eyal; Roizman, Pepi; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Feinmesser, Meora

    2008-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the development and progression of many tumors, and its inhibition has been shown to block tumor growth. This study examined COX-2 expression in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 26 primary MCCs and 7 lymph node metastases were stained immunohistochemically with a monoclonal antibody directed against COX-2, and the percentage and intensity of staining were analyzed semiquantitatively. Immunopositivity for COX-2 was found in 20 primary tumors (77%), and was diffuse in 16 of them (80%). Staining intensity was strong in 5 tumors (19%), moderate in 6 (23%), and weak in 9 (35%). Five metastases (71%) showed similar staining. Prominent mitotic activity was associated with more diffuse COX-2 immunopositivity. No association was found between COX-2 expression and outcome. This study confirms that most MCCs express COX-2 and shows that COX-2 expression is related to one parameter of aggressive behavior--a high mitotic rate--but not to any others. The possibility of treating MCC with COX-2 inhibitors should be considered.

  15. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John M.; Agrawal, Manish; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Doshi, Gury; Fleming, Mark T.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network’s Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future. PMID:28326277

  16. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Bear, Adham S; Kennedy, Laura C; Young, Joseph K; Perna, Serena K; Mattos Almeida, Joao Paulo; Lin, Adam Y; Eckels, Phillip C; Drezek, Rebekah A; Foster, Aaron E

    2013-01-01

    Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT) are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+)Ly-6G/C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  17. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  18. Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Hiroyuki Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

  19. Paranuclear blue inclusions in metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Wittchow, R; Laszewski, M; Walker, W; Dick, F

    1992-09-01

    Paranuclear blue inclusions (PBIs) are frequently identified within metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma (SCC) cells on air-dried bone marrow aspirates stained with Wright's stain. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this finding, 116 bone marrow aspirates containing metastatic neoplasms were evaluated for the presence and frequency of PBIs. Bone marrow specimens included 47 cases of metastatic SCC of the lung, 13 cases of large cell lymphoma, 19 cases of neuroblastoma, five cases of small, noncleaved cell lymphoma, seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma, three cases of Ewing's sarcoma, three cases of other sarcomas, and 19 cases of non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). PBIs were identified in 40 of 47 (85%) cases of SCC and their frequency varied from 0 to 24% of tumor cells among different cases. In approximately half the cases of SCC, PBIs were identified in 1 to 4% tumor cells; and in eight cases, PBIs were present in 5% or more of tumor cells. PBIs were also identified in two of seven (29%) cases of rhabdomyosarcoma and one case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, but they were not seen in Ewing's sarcoma, small non-cleaved cell lymphoma, large cell lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or non-small cell carcinoma. In addition, PBIs were not seen in alcohol-fixed, Papanicolaou-stained cytology specimens containing SCC. Ultrastructurally, PBIs may represent phagocytized nuclear/cellular material. PBIs are a feature of small cell carcinoma on air-dried, cytologic material stained with Romanowsky type stains. Their presence may provide diagnostic information with regard to the differential diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the bone marrow. Future studies evaluating non-bone marrow Wright's stained fine-needle aspiration specimens are needed to determine if PBIs are useful in distinguishing SCC from other poorly differentiated tumors in the cytology laboratory.

  20. Papillary thyroid carcinoma with extensive squamous dedifferentiation metastatic to the lung: BRAF mutational analysis as a useful tool to rule out tumor to tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Pins, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Tumors containing elements of both papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are rare but well documented. When they present initially as metastatic disease in an organ that can harbor a primary SCC, the possibility of a tumor to tumor metastasis (TTM) must be considered. The aim of this case study is to illustrate how BRAF mutational analysis can be used to help differentiate between these two diagnoses. We report a 63-year-old male with a longstanding history of PTC metastatic to the brain and lymph nodes who presented to our institution with a right lower lobe lung mass after a 2-year recurrence-free interval. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a composite neoplasm with distinct elements of both PTC and SCC. We performed BRAF (V600E) (c.1799 T > A) mutational analysis to help elucidate the origin of each component. This is the first time that BRAF sequencing has been used to discriminate between dedifferentiated PTC and TTM, to the best of our knowledge. In the context of metastatic PTC with SCC dedifferentiation, the presence of the identical BRAF (V600E) (c.1799 T > A) mutation in both components might help rule out tumor to tumor metastasis.

  1. IGFBP‐3 inhibits Wnt signaling in metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zingariello, Maria; Sancillo, Laura; Panasiti, Vincenzo; Polinari, Dorina; Martella, Marianna; Rosa Alba, Rana; Londei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    In previous works, we have shown that insulin‐like growth factor‐binding protein‐3 (IGFBP‐3), a tissue and circulating protein able to bind to IGFs, decreases drastically in the blood serum of patients with diffuse metastatic melanoma. In agreement with the clinical data, recombinant IGFBP‐3 was found to inhibit the motility and invasiveness of cultured metastatic melanoma cells and to prevent growth of grafted melanomas in mice. The present work was aimed at identifying the signal transduction pathways underlying the anti‐tumoral effects of IGFBP‐3. We show that the anti‐tumoral effect of IGFBP‐3 is due to inhibition of the Wnt pathway and depends upon the presence of CD44, a receptor protein known to modulate Wnt signaling. Once it has entered the cell, IGFBP‐3 binds the Wnt signalosome interacting specifically with its component GSK‐3β. As a consequence, the β‐catenin destruction complex dissociates from the LRP6 Wnt receptor and GSK‐3β is activated through dephosphorylation, becoming free to target cytoplasmic β‐catenin which is degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Altogether, the results suggest that IGFBP‐3 is a novel and effective inhibitor of Wnt signaling. As IGFBP‐3 is a physiological protein which has no detectable toxic effects either on cultured cells or live mice, it might qualify as an interesting new therapeutic agent in melanoma, and potentially many other cancers with a hyperactive Wnt signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27377812

  2. Minimal residual disease and circulating tumor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cell dissemination in bone marrow or other organs is thought to represent an important step in the metastatic process. The detection of bone marrow disseminated tumor cells is associated with worse outcome in early breast cancer. Moreover, the detection of peripheral blood circulating tumor cells is an adverse prognostic factor in metastatic breast cancer, and emerging data suggest that this is also true for early disease. Beyond enumeration, the characterization of these cells has the potential to improve risk assessment, treatment selection and monitoring, and the development of novel therapeutic agents, and to advance our understanding of the biology of metastasis. PMID:22078011

  3. Minimal residual disease and circulating tumor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Reinholz, Monica

    2011-10-25

    Tumor cell dissemination in bone marrow or other organs is thought to represent an important step in the metastatic process. The detection of bone marrow disseminated tumor cells is associated with worse outcome in early breast cancer. Moreover, the detection of peripheral blood circulating tumor cells is an adverse prognostic factor in metastatic breast cancer, and emerging data suggest that this is also true for early disease. Beyond enumeration, the characterization of these cells has the potential to improve risk assessment, treatment selection and monitoring, and the development of novel therapeutic agents, and to advance our understanding of the biology of metastasis.

  4. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  5. Different deficiencies in the prevention of tumorigenic-low-metastatic murine K-1735b melanoma cells from producing metastases.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Price, J E; Fidler, I J

    1986-10-01

    To produce metastasis, malignant tumor cells must be able to complete a sequence of many steps that depend not only on tumor cell properties but also on ability of the tumor cells to interact effectively with host homeostatic mechanisms to avoid destruction. Therefore, it should be possible to isolate clonal populations non- or low metastatic. In a study of K-1735 clones introduced into normal syngeneic hosts, the reasons for the lack of or low ability of metastasis production did indeed differ among different clones. Some clones were identified that were low metastatic in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice because of antigenic characteristics. Others failed to give rise to metastases because they could not survive and grow once arrested in the lung parenchyma. These data suggested that the success of future studies dealing with genetic analysis of the metastatic phenotype could depend on the use of appropriate tumor cell populations.

  6. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field.

  7. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field. PMID:27494901

  8. Successful combination chemotherapy for metastatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    INADOMI, KYOKO; KUMAGAI, HOZUMI; TAKAYOSHI, KOTOE; ARIYAMA, HIROSHI; KUSABA, HITOSHI; NISHIE, AKIHIRO; YAMAMOTO, HIDETAKA; TAKASE, KEN; TANAKA, MAMORU; SAGARA, KOSUKE; OKUMURA, YUTA; NIO, KENTA; NAKANO, MICHITAKA; ARITA, SHUJI; ODA, YOSHINAO; AKASHI, KOICHI; BABA, EISHI

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old male presented with increased abdo-minal fullness and fever. Radiological examination revealed moderate ascites, a tumor with a diameter of 12.5 cm in the mesenteric region, as well as multiple tumors in the thoracic and abdominal para-aortic regions and in the left supraclavicular regions. Pathohistological findings of the biopsy specimen revealed atypical spindle cells accompanied by infiltration of lymphocytes. The plasmacytes were positive for CD68, murine double minute 2 and S-100, while they were negative for α-smooth muscle actin, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Clinically, the patient presented systemic symptoms and laboratory results indicated an elevation in the inflammatory response, while the CT and MRI findings were consistent with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Based on the clinical and histological findings, the patient was diagnosed with IMT. In total, 4 cycles of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide were administered. Tumor size reduction by 50% was achieved subsequent to the 4th chemotherapy cycle. In conclusion, successful control of this rare metastatic IMT was achieved by systemic chemotherapy. PMID:26722275

  9. Successful combination chemotherapy for metastatic inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Inadomi, Kyoko; Kumagai, Hozumi; Takayoshi, Kotoe; Ariyama, Hiroshi; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Nishie, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Hidetaka; Takase, Ken; Tanaka, Mamoru; Sagara, Kosuke; Okumura, Yuta; Nio, Kenta; Nakano, Michitaka; Arita, Shuji; Oda, Yoshinao; Akashi, Koichi; Baba, Eishi

    2015-11-01

    A 64-year-old male presented with increased abdo-minal fullness and fever. Radiological examination revealed moderate ascites, a tumor with a diameter of 12.5 cm in the mesenteric region, as well as multiple tumors in the thoracic and abdominal para-aortic regions and in the left supraclavicular regions. Pathohistological findings of the biopsy specimen revealed atypical spindle cells accompanied by infiltration of lymphocytes. The plasmacytes were positive for CD68, murine double minute 2 and S-100, while they were negative for α-smooth muscle actin, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Clinically, the patient presented systemic symptoms and laboratory results indicated an elevation in the inflammatory response, while the CT and MRI findings were consistent with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT). Based on the clinical and histological findings, the patient was diagnosed with IMT. In total, 4 cycles of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide were administered. Tumor size reduction by 50% was achieved subsequent to the 4th chemotherapy cycle. In conclusion, successful control of this rare metastatic IMT was achieved by systemic chemotherapy.

  10. High Throughput Sequencing of Germline and Tumor from Men With Early-Onset Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    challenge, Dr. Tomlins has continued to develop state of the art technologies to use formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostate cancer specimens...men with early-onset, metastatic prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kathleen A. Cooney, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...High-Throughput Sequencing of Germline and Tumor From Men with Early-Onset Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0371 5c

  11. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Bhakta, Nirav R; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are initiated

  12. [Therapy progress of spinal cord compression by metastatic spinal tumor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-sheng; He, Qi-zhen; Liu, Shu-bin; Jiang, Wei-gang; Lei, Ming-xing

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural compression of the spinal cord is a significant source of morbidity in patients with systemic cancer. With improvment of oncotheray, survival period in the patients is improving and metastatic cord compression is en- countered increasingly often. Surgical management performed for early circumferential decompression for the spinal cord com- pression with spine instability, and spine reconstruction performed. Patients with radiosensitive tumours without spine instabili- ty, radiotherapy is an effective therapy. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery and minimally invasive techniques, such as vertebro- plasty and kyphoplasty, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, radiofrequency ablation are promising options for treatment of cer- tain selected patients with spinal metastases.

  13. NLRP1 promotes tumor growth by enhancing inflammasome activation and suppressing apoptosis in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Z; Liu, W; Kaur, M; Luo, Y; Domenico, J; Samson, J M; Shellman, Y G; Norris, D A; Dinarello, C A; Spritz, R A; Fujita, M

    2017-03-06

    Inflammasomes are mediators of inflammation, and constitutively activated NLRP3 inflammasomes have been linked to interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-mediated tumorigenesis in human melanoma. Whereas NLRP3 regulation of caspase-1 activation requires the adaptor protein ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (caspase recruitment domain)), caspase-1 activation by another danger-signaling sensor NLRP1 does not require ASC because NLRP1 contains a C-terminal CARD domain that facilitates direct caspase-1 activation via CARD-CARD interaction. We hypothesized that NLRP1 has additional biological activities besides IL-1β maturation and investigated its role in melanoma tumorigenesis. NLRP1 expression in melanoma was confirmed by analysis of 216 melanoma tumors and 13 human melanoma cell lines. Unlike monocytic THP-1 cells with prominent nuclear localization of NLRP1, melanoma cells expressed NLRP1 mainly in the cytoplasm. Knocking down NLRP1 revealed a tumor-promoting property of NLRP1 both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies showed that caspase-1 activity, IL-1β production, IL-1β secretion and nuclear factor-kB activity were reduced by knocking down of NLRP1 in human metastatic melanoma cell lines 1205Lu and HS294T, indicating that NLRP1 inflammasomes are active in metastatic melanoma. However, unlike previous reports showing that NLRP1 enhances pyroptosis in macrophages, NLRP1 in melanoma behaved differently in the context of cell death. Knocking down NLRP1 increased caspase-2, -9 and -3/7 activities and promoted apoptosis in human melanoma cells. Immunoprecipitation revealed interaction of NLRP1 with CARD-containing caspase-2 and -9, whereas NLRP3 lacking a CARD motif did not interact with the caspases. Consistent with these findings, NLRP1 activation but not NLRP3 activation reduced caspase-2, -9 and -3/7 activities and provided protection against apoptosis in human melanoma cells, suggesting a suppressive role of NLRP1 in caspase-3/7 activation

  14. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  15. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  16. Combination of an Integrin-Targeting NIR Tracer and an Ultrasensitive Spectroscopic Device for Intraoperative Detection of Head and Neck Tumor Margins and Metastatic Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Younghyoun; Mohs, Aaron M.; Mancini, Michael C.; Nie, Shuming; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    Despite major advances in targeted drug therapy and radiation therapy, surgery remains the most effective treatment for most solid tumors. The single most important predictor of patient survival is a complete surgical resection of the primary tumor, draining lymph nodes, and metastatic lesions. Presently, however, 20%–30% of patients with head and neck cancer who undergo surgery still leave the operating room without complete resection because of missed lesions. Thus, major opportunities exist to develop advanced imaging tracers and intraoperative instrumentation that would allow surgeons to visualize microscopic tumors during surgery. The cell adhesion molecule integrin αvβ3 is specifically expressed by tumor neovasculature and invading tumor cells, but not by quiescent vessels or normal cells. Here we report the combined use of an integrin-targeting near-infrared tracer (RGD-IRDye800CW) and a handheld spectroscopic device, an integrated point spectroscopy with wide-field imaging system, for highly sensitive detection of integrin overexpression on infiltrating cancer cells. By using an orthotopic head and neck cancer animal model, we show that this tracer–device combination allows intraoperative detection of not only invasive tumor margins but also metastatic lymph nodes. Correlated histological analysis further reveals that microscopic clusters of 50–100 tumor cells can be detected intraoperatively with high sensitivity and specificity, raising new possibilities in guiding surgical resection of microscopic tumors and metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:27738656

  17. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  18. Metastatic potential of cloned murine melanoma cells transfected with activated c-Ha-ras.

    PubMed

    Price, J E; Aukerman, S L; Ananthaswamy, H N; McIntyre, B W; Schackert, G; Schackert, H K; Fidler, I J

    1989-08-01

    We sought to determine whether the transfection of tumorigenic but not metastatic cells with the activated c-Ha-ras oncogene was invariably associated with acquisition of the metastatic phenotype. Three clonally derived lines of the K-1735 murine melanoma, characterized as nonmetastatic or poorly metastatic, were transfected with plasmids containing the 6.6-kilobase BamHI fragment of the mutant human c-Ha-ras gene and the neo gene, that confers resistance to neomycin (pSV2neoEJ). Cells transfected with pSV2neo, a plasmid containing the neo gene, served as controls for the procedure of Polybrene-mediated transfection. All cell lines were injected into syngeneic C3H/HeN and into athymic mice, and the results were compared with those produced by highly metastatic K-1735 M-2 cells. Although the pSV2neoEJ-transfected cells produced more rapidly growing s.c. tumors than the control cell lines did, the incidence of spontaneous metastasis was not increased. Following i.v. inoculation, the c-Ha-ras transfectants were retained in lung vasculature in greater proportions than pSV2neo counterpart transfectants were. The c-Ha-ras transfectants also produced significantly more lung tumor colonies, which grew faster than the few lung tumor colonies in mice given injections of control melanoma cells. We concluded that transfection of the activated c-Ha-ras oncogene into nonmetastatic K-1735 melanoma cells leads to accelerated tumor growth in vivo and can confer the ability to form lung colonies after i.v. injection but not the ability to metastasize from a primary s.c. tumor.

  19. Metastatic Tumor of the Spermatic Cord in Adults: A Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Daisaku; Ohkawa, Mizuho; Hasegawa, Ryo; Okada, Norimichi; Ishizuka, Naoki; Kusumi, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic spermatic cord (SC) tumor is extremely rare. Recently, we experienced a case of late-onset metastatic SC tumor from cecal cancer. This case is a 68-year-old man presenting with a painless right SC mass. He had undergone a right hemicolectomy for cecal cancer 6 years ago. Radical orchiectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1 were performed. No recurrence was found after one year of follow-up. We identified a total of 25 cases, including our case, on a literature search via PubMed from January 2000 to April 2015. The most frequent primary sites of the tumors metastasizing to the SC were the stomach (8 cases, 32%) and the colon (8 cases, 32%), next the liver (2 cases, 8%), and kidney (2 cases, 8%). The majority of the cases underwent radical orchiectomy for the metastatic tumors of the SC. Over half of the cases received adjuvant interventions based on the regimens for the primary tumors. Prognosis in the patients with metastatic tumor of the SC was unfavorable except for late-onset metastasis. In patients with a mass in the SC and a history of neoplasm, especially in gastrointestinal tract, the possibility of metastasis from the primary cancer should be considered. PMID:26770863

  20. Metabolism, Excretion, and Pharmacokinetics of Oral Brivanib in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Eric; Fischer, Bruce S.; Gong, Jiachang; Iyer, Ramaswamy; Gan, Jinping; Pursley, Janice; Patricia, Daniel; Williams, Daphne; Ganapathi, Ram

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, mass balance, metabolism, routes and extent of elimination, and safety of a single oral dose of 14C-labeled brivanib alaninate and the safety and tolerability of brivanib after multiple doses in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. This was a two-part, single-center, open-label, single oral-dose (part A) followed by multiple-dose (part B) study in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors. In part A, patients received a single dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate and in part B patients received 800 mg of nonradiolabeled brivanib alaninate every day. Four patients (two white, two black: two with non–small-cell lung cancer, one with ovarian cancer, and one with renal cell carcinoma) were treated in both parts. The median time to reach the maximal plasma concentration of brivanib was 1 h, geometric mean maximal plasma concentration was 6146 ng/ml, mean terminal half-life was 13.8 h, and geometric mean apparent oral clearance was 14.7 l/h. After a single oral dose of [14C]brivanib alaninate, 12.2 and 81.5% of administered radioactivity was recovered in urine and feces, respectively. Brivanib alaninate was completely converted to the active moiety, brivanib, and the predominant route of elimination was fecal. Renal excretion of unchanged brivanib was minimal. Brivanib was well tolerated; fatigue was the most frequent adverse event occurring in all patients and the most frequent treatment-related adverse event in three (75%). The best clinical response in one patient was stable disease; the other three had progressive disease. Brivanib alaninate was rapidly absorbed and extensively metabolized after a single 800-mg oral dose; the majority of drug-related radioactivity was excreted in feces. PMID:20671097

  1. Androgen Regulated SPARCL1 in the Tumor Microenvironment Inhibits Metastatic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Paula J.; Hughes, Robert M.; Simons, Brian W.; Huang, Jessie; Miller, Rebecca M.; Shinder, Brian; Haffner, Michael C.; Esopi, David; Kimura, Yasunori; Jabbari, Javaneh; Ross, Ashley E.; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A.; Faraj, Sheila F.; Davicioni, Elai; Netto, George J.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; An, Steven S.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in men due to the subset of cancers that progress to metastasis. Prostate cancers are thought to be hardwired to androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but AR-regulated changes in the prostate that facilitate metastasis remain poorly understood. We previously noted a marked reduction in Secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) expression during invasive phases of androgen-induced prostate growth, suggesting that this may be a novel invasive program governed by AR. Herein, we show that SPARCL1 loss occurs concurrently with AR amplification or overexpression in patient based data. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that SPARCL1 expression is directly suppressed by androgen-induced AR activation and binding at the SPARCL1 locus via an epigenetic mechanism, and these events can be pharmacologically attenuated with either AR antagonists or HDAC inhibitors. We establish using the Hi-Myc model of prostate cancer that in Hi-Myc/Sparcl1−/− mice, SPARCL1 functions to suppress cancer formation. Moreover, metastatic progression of Myc-CaP orthotopic allografts is restricted by SPARCL1 in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, we show that SPARCL1 both tethers to collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and binds to the cell's cytoskeleton. SPARCL1 directly inhibits the assembly of focal adhesions thereby constraining the transmission of cell traction forces. Our findings establish a new insight into AR-regulated prostate epithelial movement and provide a novel framework whereby, SPARCL1 in the ECM microenvironment restricts tumor progression by regulating the initiation of the network of physical forces that may be required for metastatic-invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:26294211

  2. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy with cor pulmonale due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Sadimin, Evita T; Collier, Adrienne G; Gaffney, Joseph W; Fyfe, Billie

    2012-04-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented acutely after an episode of syncope with perioral cyanosis. He died 19 hours after admission due to cor pulmonale as a complication of metastatic desmoplastic small round cell tumor in the lungs with associated tumor thrombotic microangiopathy.

  3. Malignant thoracopulmonary small-cell (Askin) tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, I.J.; Kurtz, D.W.; Cazenave, L.; Lieber, M.R.; Miser, J.S.; Chandra, R.; Triche, T.J.

    1985-09-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of 10 patients with documented malignant small-cell tumor of the thoracopulmonary region (Askin tumor) were reviewed. The tumor represents a distinct pathologic entity of neuroectodermal origin. Clinically, it presents as a chest-wall mass with or without pain. Its radiographic appearance is that of a soft-tissue mass with or without pleural or rib involvement, often with metastatic disease - to the skeletal system, bone marrow, thorax, and sympathetic chain. Two patients developed metastases to the adrenal gland and liver, one after autologous bone marrow transplantation. The radiologist should be aware of this entity and its pattern of metastatic spread since metastases are treated aggressively.

  4. Renal Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Uvea, Medial Rectus Muscle, and the Contralateral Lacrimal Gland.

    PubMed

    Kiratli, Hayyam; Uzun, Salih; Tarlan, Berçin; Ateş, Deniz; Baydar, Dilek Ertoy; Söylemezoğlu, Figen

    2015-01-01

    Renal carcinoid tumor is an exceedingly rare malignancy. A 57-year-old man with a renal carcinoid tumor discovered after metastasizing to intraocular and bilateral orbital structures is described. The patient presented with a blind painful OS and a right superotemporal subconjunctival mass. Imaging studies revealed a large left intraocular tumor, a mass in the left medial rectus muscle, and right lacrimal gland enlargement. The OS was enucleated, and incisional biopsies were performed from the other 2 lesions. Histopathological studies demonstrated metastatic neuroendocrine tumor with chromogranin and synaptophysin positivity. Systemic work up revealed a right renal mass and multiple hepatic metastatic lesions. Radical nephrectomy was performed, and octreotide, capecitabine, and temozolomide were administered. Removal of the primary tumor and the eye that had no prospect for useful vision and further treatment with octreotide, capecitabine, and temozolomide provided a disease progression-free period of 24 months and allowed the patient to function normally.

  5. Halofuginone inhibits angiogenesis and growth in implanted metastatic rat brain tumor model--an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Rinat; Itzik, Anna; Harel, Hila; Nagler, Arnon; Vlodavsky, Israel; Siegal, Tali

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF) is a potent inhibitor of collagen type alpha1(I). In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001). Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001). In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05). Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03). Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  6. CREATE: Cross-tumoral Phase 2 With Crizotinib

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-06

    Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma Type 1; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Clear Cell Sarcoma; Locally Advanced and/or Metastatic Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

  7. Efficient Gene Silencing in Metastatic Tumor by siRNA Formulated in Surface-modified Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shyh-Dar; Chono, Sumio; Huang, Leaf

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) formulation for systemically delivering siRNA into metastatic tumors. The NP, composed of nucleic acids, a polycationic peptide and cationic liposome, was prepared in a self-assembling process. The NP was then modified by PEG-lipid containing a targeting ligand, anisamide, and thus was decorated for targeting sigma receptor expressing B16F10 tumor. The activity of the targeted NP was compared with the naked NP (no PEGylation) and non-targeted NP (no ligand). The delivery efficiency of the targeted NP was 4-fold higher than the non-targeted NP and could be competed by excess free ligand. Luciferase siRNA was used to evaluate the gene silencing activity in the B16F10 cells, which were stably transduced with a luciferase gene, in a lung metastasis model. The gene silencing activity of the targeted NP was significantly higher than the other formulations and lasted for 4 days. While confocal microscopy showed the naked NP provided no tissue selectivity and non-targeted NP was ineffective for tumor uptake, the targeted NP effectively penetrated the lung metastasis, but not the liver. It resulted in 70-80% gene silencing in the metastasis model after a single i.v. injection (150 μg siRNA/kg). This effective formulation also showed very little immunotoxicity. PMID:18083264

  8. Nonfunctioning Juxtaglomerular Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryoko; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Kenichi; Nagashima, Yoji; Yao, Masahiro; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) is a rare renal tumor characterized by excessive renin secretion causing intractable hypertension and hypokalemia. However, asymptomatic nonfunctioning JGCT is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of nonfunctioning JGCT in a 31-year-old woman. The patient presented with a left renal tumor without hypertension or hypokalemia. Under a clinical diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumor was located in the middle portion adjacent to the renal pelvis, measuring 2 cm in size. Pathologically, the tumor was composed of cuboidal cells forming a solid arrangement, immunohistochemically positive for renin. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as JGCT. In cases with hyperreninism, preoperative diagnosis of JGCT is straightforward but difficult in nonfunctioning case. Generally, JGCT presents a benign biological behavior. Therefore, we should take nonfunctioning JGCT into the differential diagnoses for renal tumors, especially in younger patients to avoid excessive surgery. PMID:23607027

  9. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  10. Prophylactic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines Efficiently Inhibit Metastases in Murine Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Markov, Oleg V; Mironova, Nadezhda L; Sennikov, Sergey V; Vlassov, Valentin V; Zenkova, Marina A

    2015-01-01

    Recent data on the application of dendritic cells (DCs) as anti-tumor vaccines has shown their great potential in therapy and prophylaxis of cancer. Here we report on a comparison of two treatment schemes with DCs that display the models of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination using three different experimental tumor models: namely, Krebs-2 adenocarcinoma (primary tumor), melanoma (B16, metastatic tumor without a primary node) and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC, metastatic tumor with a primary node). Dendritic cells generated from bone marrow-derived DC precursors and loaded with lysate of tumor cells or transfected with the complexes of total tumor RNA with cationic liposomes were used for vaccination. Lipofectamine 2000 and liposomes consisting of helper lipid DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) and cationic lipid 2D3 (1,26-Bis(1,2-de-O-tetradecyl-rac-glycerol)-7,11,16,20-tetraazahexacosan tetrahydrocloride) were used for RNA transfection. It was shown that DCs loaded with tumor lysate were ineffective in contrast to tumor-derived RNA. Therapeutic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/Lipofectamine 2000 was the most efficient for treatment of non-metastatic Krebs-2, where a 1.9-fold tumor growth retardation was observed. Single prophylactic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/2D3 was the most efficient to treat highly aggressive metastatic tumors LLC and B16, where 4.7- and 10-fold suppression of the number of lung metastases was observed, respectively. Antimetastatic effect of single prophylactic DC vaccination in metastatic melanoma model was accompanied by the reductions in the levels of Th2-specific cytokines however the change of the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 master regulators was not found. Failure of double prophylactic vaccination is explained by Th17-response polarization associated with autoimmune and pro-inflammatory reactions. In the case of therapeutic DC vaccine the polarization of Th1-response was found nevertheless

  11. Comparative Gene Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Stem Cell-Like Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna M.; Lewicki, Sławomir; Helbrecht, Igor; Brodaczewska, Klaudia; Koch, Irena; Zdanowski, Robert; Król, Magdalena; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advancement in cancer research has shown that tumors are highly heterogeneous, and multiple phenotypically different cell populations are found in a single tumor. Cancer development and tumor growth are driven by specific types of cells—stem cell-like cancer cells (SCLCCs)—which are also responsible for metastatic spread and drug resistance. This research was designed to verify the presence of SCLCCs in renal cell cancer cell lines. Subsequently, we aimed to characterize phenotype and cell biology of CD105+ cells, defined previously as renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells. The main goal of the project was to describe the gene-expression profile of stem cell-like cancer cells of primary tumor and metastatic origin. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR analysis of stemness genes (Oct-4, Nanog and Ncam) and soft agar colony formation assay were conducted to check the stemness properties of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. FACS analysis of CD105+ and CD133+ cells was performed on RCC cells. Isolated CD105+ cells were verified for expression of mesenchymal markers—CD24, CD146, CD90, CD73, CD44, CD11b, CD19, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR and alkaline phosphatase. Hanging drop assay was used to investigate CD105+ cell-cell cohesion. Analysis of free-floating 3D spheres formed by isolated CD105+ was verified, as spheres have been hypothesized to contain undifferentiated multipotent progenitor cells. Finally, CD105+ cells were sorted from primary (Caki-2) and metastatic (ACHN) renal cell cancer cell lines. Gene-expression profiling of sorted CD105+ cells was performed with Agilent’s human GE 4x44K v2 microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were further categorized into canonical pathways. Network analysis and downstream analysis were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results Metastatic RCC cell lines (ACHN and Caki-1) demonstrated higher colony-forming ability in comparison to primary RCC cell lines. Metastatic RCC cell lines harbor

  12. An optofluidic constriction chip for monitoring metastatic potential and drug response of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez Vazquez, R; Nava, G; Veglione, M; Yang, T; Bragheri, F; Minzioni, P; Bianchi, E; Di Tano, M; Chiodi, I; Osellame, R; Mondello, C; Cristiani, I

    2015-04-01

    Cellular mechanical properties constitute good markers to characterize tumor cells, to study cell population heterogeneity and to highlight the effect of drug treatments. In this work, we describe the fabrication and validation of an integrated optofluidic chip capable of analyzing cellular deformability on the basis of the pressure gradient needed to push a cell through a narrow constriction. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to discriminate between tumorigenic and metastatic breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB231) and between human melanoma cells with different metastatic potential (A375P and A375MC2). Moreover, we show that this chip allows highlighting the effect of drugs interfering with microtubule organization (paclitaxel, combretastatin A-4 and nocodazole) on cancer cells, which leads to changes in the pressure-gradient required to push cells through the constriction. Our single-cell microfluidic device for mechanical evaluation is compact and easy to use, allowing for an extensive use in different laboratory environments.

  13. Interleukin-4 Expressed By Neoplastic Cells Provokes an Anti-Metastatic Myeloid Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Connie S.; Kim, Hyeyeon; Mullins, Graeme; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; LeBrun, David P.; Elliott, Bruce E.; Greer, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-4 (IL-4) can induce macrophages to undergo alternative activation and polarize toward an M2-like or wound healing phenotype. Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are thought to assume M2-like properties, and it has been suggested they promote tumor growth and metastasis through effects on the tumor stroma, including extracelluar matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. IL-4 also promotes macrophage survival and formation of multinucleated giant cells, which have enhanced phagocytic behavior. This study was designed to explore the effect of cancer cell derived IL-4 on the tumor immune stroma and metastasis. Methods The metastatic mouse mammary carcinoma cell line AC2M2 was transduced with control or IL-4 encoding retroviruses and employed in orthotopic engraftment models. Tumor growth and metastasis were assessed. The cellular composition and biomarker expression of tumors were examined by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry; the transcriptome of the immune stroma was analyzed by nanoString based transcript quantitation; and in vivo and in vitro interactions between cancer cells and macrophages were assessed by flow cytometry and co-culture with video-time lapse microscopy, respectively. Results Unexpectedly, tumors from IL-4 expressing AC2M2 engrafted cells grew at reduced rates, and most surprising, they lost all metastatic potential relative to tumors from control AC2M2 cells. Myeloid cell numbers were not increased in IL-4 expressing tumors, but their expression of the M2 marker arginase I was elevated. Transcriptome analysis revealed an immune signature consistent with IL-4 induced M2 polarization of the tumor microenvironment and a generalized increase in myeloid involvement in the tumor stroma. Flow cytometry analysis indicated enhanced cancer cell phagocytosis by TAMs from IL-4 expressing tumors, and co-culture studies showed that IL-4 expressing cancer cells supported the survival and promoted the in vitro phagocytic behavior of

  14. Dose Escalation for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Relatively Radioresistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla; Bajrovic, Amira; Basic, Hiba; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors such as renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and malignant melanoma. However, the results of the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy/10 fractions need to be improved with respect to functional outcome. This study investigated whether a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy can improve treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients receiving 30 Gy/10 fractions were retrospectively compared to 115 patients receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 40 Gy/20 fractions) for motor function and local control of MSCC. Ten further potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 18% of patients after 30 Gy and in 22% after higher doses (p = 0.81). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.030), interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.010), and time developing motor deficits (p < 0.001). The 1-year local control rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 80% after higher doses, respectively (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, local control was significantly associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.029) and number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy/10 fractions did not significantly improve motor function and local control of MSCC in patients with relatively radioresistant tumors.

  15. Role of stromal cell-derived factor 1α pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nisha; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. The primary site of metastasis from prostate cancers is the bone. During the last decade, multiple studies have pointed to the role of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α)/CXCR4 axis in the metastatic spread of the disease, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect are still incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of the SDF1α/CXCR4 pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of disrupting the interaction between prostate tumor cells and bone environment with focus on the SDF1α pathway. PMID:27533927

  16. Mesenchymal Cancer Cell-Stroma Crosstalk Promotes Niche Activation, Epithelial Reversion, and Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo Martin, Yaiza; Park, Danielle; Ramachandran, Anassuya; Ombrato, Luigi; Calvo, Fernando; Chakravarty, Probir; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Derzsi, Stefanie; Hill, Caroline S.; Sahai, Erik; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary During metastatic colonization, tumor cells must establish a favorable microenvironment or niche that will sustain their growth. However, both the temporal and molecular details of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we found that metastatic initiating cells (MICs) exhibit a high capacity for lung fibroblast activation as a result of Thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) expression. Importantly, inhibiting the mesenchymal phenotype of MICs by blocking the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated kinase AXL reduces THBS2 secretion, niche-activating ability, and, consequently, metastatic competence. Subsequently, disseminated metastatic cells revert to an AXL-negative, more epithelial phenotype to proliferate and decrease the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β-dependent SMAD2-3 in favor of BMP/SMAD1-5 signaling. Remarkably, newly activated fibroblasts promote this transition. In summary, our data reveal a crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment whereby the EMT status initially triggers and then is regulated by niche activation during metastatic colonization. PMID:26670048

  17. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  18. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  19. OX40+ regulatory T cells in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma suppress effector T cell responses and associate with metastatic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chester; August, Suzannah; Albibas, Amel; Behar, Ramnik; Cho, Shin-Young; Polak, Marta E; Theaker, Jeff; MacLeod, Amanda S; French, Ruth R; Glennie, Martin J; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Healy, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the most common human cancer with metastatic potential. Despite T cells accumulating around cSCCs, these tumors continue to grow and persist. To investigate reasons for failure of T cells to mount a protective response in cSCC, we focused on regulatory T cells (Tregs) as this suppressive population is well represented among the infiltrating lymphocytes. Experimental Design Flow cytometry was conducted on cSCC lymphocytes and in vitro functional assays were performed using sorted tumoral T cells. Lymphocyte subsets in primary cSCCs were quantified immunohistochemically. Results FOXP3+ Tregs were more frequent in cSCCs than in peripheral blood (p<0.0001, n=86 tumors). Tumoral Tregs suppressed proliferation of tumoral effector CD4+ (p=0.005, n=10 tumors) and CD8+ T cells (p=0.043, n=9 tumors) and inhibited interferon-γ secretion by tumoral effector T cells (p=0.0186, n=11 tumors). The costimulatory molecule OX40 was expressed predominantly on tumoral Tregs (p<0.0001, n=15 tumors) and triggering OX40 with an agonist anti-OX40 antibody overcame the suppression exerted by Tregs, leading to increased tumoral effector CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation (p=0.0098, n=10 tumors). Tregs and OX40+ lymphocytes were more abundant in primary cSCCs which metastasized than in primary cSCCs which had not metastasized (n=48 and n=49 tumors respectively). Conclusions Tregs in cSCCs suppress effector T cell responses and are associated with subsequent metastasis, suggesting a key role for Tregs in cSCC development and progression. OX40 agonism reversed the suppressive effects of Tregs in vitro, suggesting that targeting OX40 could benefit the subset of cSCC patients at high risk of metastasis. PMID:27034329

  20. Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cells in the testicles that release the male hormone, testosterone . ... seem to be linked to undescended testes . Leydig cell tumors make up a very small number of all testicular tumors. They are most often found in men between 30 and 60 years of age. This ...

  1. The adoptive transfer of cultured T cells for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, James C

    2013-01-01

    T cells have been shown to be capable of rejecting a patient's tumor. Weak responses to current vaccines and the toxicity of exogenously administered cytokines limit the intensity of the T-cell response that can be actively generated in vivo. Adoptive T-cell transfer enhances an intrinsically weak immune response to cancer by activating and expanding tumor reactive T cells in vitro and manipulating the environment of the host at the time of transfer. One can frequently find tumor-reactive T cells in metastatic lesions in patients with melanoma, and expand them in vitro for readministration. When successful, this adoptive cellular immunotherapy has resulted in sustainable curative outcomes. Subsequently, the applicability of adoptive T-cell transfer has been greatly expanded by the development of methods to genetically engineer open-repertoire human T-cells to confer tumor reactivity. This re-direction of T-cell specificity can be achieved by introducing a variety of receptors that ligate tumor-associated antigens and then trigger the normal activation mechanism of T cells. Future T-cell engineering will add a new dimension by reprogramming T-cell functions for optimal tumor rejection. The antigens recognized by T cells, the techniques to procure and grow tumor reactive T cells, the conditioning of the recipient to optimize efficacy, and the results of clinical protocols are reviewed herein.

  2. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  3. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  4. Merkel cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, M; Watanabe, H; Kobayashi, H; Ohnishi, Y; Shitara, A; Nitto, H

    1987-06-01

    A Merkel cell tumor appeared on the left cheek of an 83-year-old female was reported. The tumor was located mainly in the dermis and infiltrated to the subcutaneous adipose tissue with an involvement of the blood vessels and lymphatics at the periphery. Electron-microscopically, few of the dense-cored granules and the single globular aggregates of intermediate filaments at the nuclear indentations were observed. Electron-microscopic uranaffin reaction proved positive reaction on the dense-cored granules. Half of the cytoplasmic border was smooth, while the rest had short projections. Desmosomes or junctional complexes were not detected among the tumor cells. Immunohistochemically, the cytoplasm of tumor cell showed positive reaction to both neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and keratin. The single globular positive spots of the latter were localized in accordance with the aggregates of intermediate filaments. These findings suggested a neurogenic origin with double differentiation, epithelial and neuroendocrine, of the Merkel cell tumor.

  5. MHC class I-deficient metastatic tumor variants immunoselected by T lymphocytes originate from the coordinated downregulation of APM components.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lora, Angel; Martinez, Marisol; Algarra, Ignacio; Gaforio, Jose Juan; Garrido, Federico

    2003-09-10

    Previous reports from our group indicated that the MHC class I phenotype of metastatic lung colonies produced by a mouse fibrosarcoma tumor clone (B9) were, depending on the immune status of the host, MHC class I negative in immunocompetent mice and MHC class I positive in immunodeficient athymic nude/nude mice. Now we report the identification of the molecular alterations responsible for the changes of MHC class I molecules in both situations. Metastatic nodes were analyzed for the mRNA level of H-2 class I and beta2-microglobulin genes, and several gene components of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen-processing machinery (APM). These included the genes coding for the low-molecular-weight proteins LMP2, LMP7, LMP10, the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP-1, TAP-2), and calnexin, calreticulin, tapasin, PA-28-alpha, PA-28-beta, ERP-59 and ER-60. Analyses with RT-PCR showed that TAP-1, TAP2, LMP-2, LMP7, LMP10, tapasin and calnexin mRNA specific for these genes was absent in metastases produced in immunocompetent mice. In contrast, similar techniques with mRNA preparations obtained from metastatic nodes from immunodeficient mice showed that the mRNA expression level of these genes was highly positive. Interestingly, the MHC class I-positive or negative phenotypes of the metastatic colonies correlated with in vivo immunogenicity. H-2 positive metastasis grew more slowly than the H-2 negative ones when injected intrafootpat in syngeneic immunocompetent animals and were finally rejected. These results provide evidence of the role of T cells in immune surveillance against tumors and identify a mechanism targeted by antitumor T lymphocytes to generate MHC class I-negative tumor escape variants.

  6. Total enbloc spondylectomy for metastatic high grade spinal tumors: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda S; Nene, Abhay M

    2016-01-01

    Background: High grade metastatic spinal tumors are most common and are invasive. These patients can succumb to disease progression if not treated timely. Although considered as invasive and morbid, total enbloc spondylectomy (TES) in selected cases has better survival rates. The authors describe the results of TES for high grade metastatic spinal tumors. Materials and Methods: Five patients (four females and one male) underwent TES for solitary metastatic vertebral lesion between November 2012 and January 2014. These patients presented to us with spinal instability, unrelenting severe spinal pain and/or with severe progressive radiculopathy. Average age was 46.2 years (range 39–62 years). After complete investigations, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan and positron emission tomography (PET) scan, it was confirmed that these patients had high grade solitary vertebral metastatic tumor. Results: Average duration of followup was 18 months (range 16–20 months). The average preoperative visual analog scale score of 9.4 (range 9–10) improved to 2 (range 1–4) at last followup. Average blood loss was 1440 mL (range 1000–2000 mL). Average duration of surgery was 198 min (range 180–240 min). Significant pain relief was noticed in each patient in the immediate postoperative period and during followups. These patients attained complete functional activities of daily living with in a month. The imaging showed implants in situ, no recurrence of tumor, and no activity on PET scan at the final followup. Conclusion: The present series shows favorable short term results of TES for solitary, metastatic, high grade vertebral body tumors by a team approach. PMID:27512215

  7. Circulating tumor DNA as an early marker of therapeutic response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tie, J.; Kinde, I.; Wang, Y.; Wong, H. L.; Roebert, J.; Christie, M.; Tacey, M.; Wong, R.; Singh, M.; Karapetis, C. S.; Desai, J.; Tran, B.; Strausberg, R. L.; Diaz, L. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Gibbs, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early indicators of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could conceivably be used to optimize treatment. We explored early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. Patients and methods This prospective study involved 53 mCRC patients receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Both ctDNA and CEA were assessed in plasma collected before treatment, 3 days after treatment and before cycle 2. Computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out at baseline and 8–10 weeks and were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Tumors were sequenced using a panel of 15 genes frequently mutated in mCRC to identify candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis. For each patient, one tumor mutation was selected to assess the presence and the level of ctDNA in plasma samples using a digital genomic assay termed Safe-SeqS. Results Candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis were identified in 52 (98.1%) of the tumors. These patient-specific candidate tissue mutations were detectable in the cell-free DNA from the plasma of 48 of these 52 patients (concordance 92.3%). Significant reductions in ctDNA (median 5.7-fold; P < 0.001) levels were observed before cycle 2, which correlated with CT responses at 8–10 weeks (odds ratio = 5.25 with a 10-fold ctDNA reduction; P = 0.016). Major reductions (≥10-fold) versus lesser reductions in ctDNA precycle 2 were associated with a trend for increased progression-free survival (median 14.7 versus 8.1 months; HR = 1.87; P = 0.266). Conclusions ctDNA is detectable in a high proportion of treatment naïve mCRC patients. Early changes in ctDNA during first-line chemotherapy predict the later radiologic response. PMID:25851626

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Primary, Recurrent, and Metastatic Tumors in the Head-and-Neck Region

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Patel, Mehul; Khan, Mumtaz; McLean, Scott; Dragovic, Jadranka; Jin, J.-Y.; Movsas, Benjamin; Ryu, Samuel

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as radiosurgery, in patients with head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven malignant lesions in the head-and-neck region were treated using single-dose SBRT (S-SBRT) or fractionated SBRT (F-SBRT). Radiation doses were either single-fraction 13-18 Gy for S-SBRT or 36-48 Gy in five to eight fractions for F-SBRT. Response evaluation was based on clinical examinations and computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging scans. Pre- and post-SBRT tumor dimensions were measured in three axes, and tumor volumes were calculated. Response evaluation also was performed using World Health Organization criteria. Results: Fifty-five lesions were treated in 44 patients (25 men, 19 women). There were three groups of patients: those with primary (n = 10), recurrent (n = 21), and metastatic tumors (n = 13). The predominant histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma (n = 33). The majority of lesions were treated using F-SBRT (n = 37). Based on radiographic and clinical assessment, a 77% (complete + partial response) response rate was noted. Percentage of reduction in tumor volume was 52% {+-} 38% based on follow-up scans in 24 patients. Tumor control rates at 1 year were 83.3% and 60.6% in the primary and recurrent groups, respectively. Median overall survival was 28.7, 6.7, and 5.6 months for the primary, recurrent, and metastatic groups, respectively. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 1-2 mucositis was noted in all patients treated for oropharyngeal or laryngeal lesions. Conclusions: The SBRT in single or fractionated doses offers a viable treatment option for selected patients with primary, recurrent, and metastatic head-and-neck cancers with functional preservation.

  9. Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma) in the lung: 3 cases of misdiagnosis as primary lung tumor with a unique growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Bi, Rui; Shen, Lei; Zhu, Xiongzeng; Xu, Xiaoli

    2015-07-25

    Malignant ameloblastoma (metastatic ameloblastoma, MA) is currently defined as a distinct pathologic entity, MA, despite its histologically benign appearance. According to the new criteria, the histological and clinical features of MA are more homogenous. Here, we report three cases of histologically confirmed pulmonary MA. Two of the three patients complained of chest pain as the primary symptom, and the other case was detected upon the evaluation of pulmonary nodules found during a health examination after a local recurrence of mandible ameloblastoma. All three patients were female with an average age of 48 years. The intervals between the primary ameloblastoma and metastasis to the lung were 14 years, 19 years and 10 years, averaging 14.3 years. Prior to metastasis to the lung, only one patient experienced local recurrences, at 5 and 19 years after the primary tumor resection, while the other two patients both remained disease-free. Computed tomography (CT) or X-ray evaluation demonstrated multiple bilateral lung nodules ranging in size from several millimeters up to 2 cm. Histologically, the pulmonary metastatic tumors showed a unique growth pattern: the tumor cells grew among the interstitial alveoli but did not appear to destructively infiltrate the surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemically, the MA cells expressed squamous differentiation markers, such as CK10/13 and p63, while the alveolar epithelial cells stained for TTF1 and PE10. In this paper, we discuss the clinical behavior, differential diagnosis and unique growth pattern of pulmonary MA.

  10. Mechanosensitive pannexin-1 channels mediate microvascular metastatic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Zhang, Steven; Soong, T David; Halberg, Nils; Goodarzi, Hani; Mangrum, Creed; Wu, Y Gloria; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-07-01

    During metastatic progression, circulating cancer cells become lodged within the microvasculature of end organs, where most die from mechanical deformation. Although this phenomenon was first described over a half-century ago, the mechanisms enabling certain cells to survive this metastasis-suppressive barrier remain unknown. By applying whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing technology to isogenic cancer cells of differing metastatic capacities, we identified a mutation encoding a truncated form of the pannexin-1 (PANX1) channel, PANX1(1-89), as recurrently enriched in highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PANX1(1-89) functions to permit metastatic cell survival during traumatic deformation in the microvasculature by augmenting ATP release from mechanosensitive PANX1 channels activated by membrane stretch. PANX1-mediated ATP release acts as an autocrine suppressor of deformation-induced apoptosis through P2Y-purinergic receptors. Finally, small-molecule therapeutic inhibition of PANX1 channels is found to reduce the efficiency of breast cancer metastasis. These data suggest a molecular basis for metastatic cell survival on microvasculature-induced biomechanical trauma.

  11. Circulating tumor cells: finding the needle in the haystack

    PubMed Central

    Zhe, Xiaoning; Cher, Michael L; Bonfil, R Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Localized and metastatic cancers give rise to circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which are detectable in the bloodstream. Recent studies have highlighted the prognostic significance of the presence and number of CTCs, particularly in patients with metastatic disease. Future studies are designed not only to detect CTCs, but also to characterize them. This review discusses current and developing methodologies for the isolation and characterization of CTCs as well as recent studies focusing on the clinical relevance of CTC detection and characterization. PMID:22016824

  12. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  13. Stimulation of Hepatoma Cell Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential by Proteins Secreted From Irradiated Nonparenchymal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Leyuan; Wang Zhiming; Gao Yabo; Wang Lingyan; Zeng Zhaochong

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether factors secreted by irradiated liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) may influence invasiveness and/or metastatic potential of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to elucidate a possible mechanism for such effect. Methods and Materials: Primary rat NPCs were cultured and divided into irradiated (10-Gy X-ray) and nonirradiated groups. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, conditioned medium from irradiated (SR) or nonirradiated (SnonR) cultures were collected and added to sublethally irradiated cultures of the hepatoma McA-RH7777 cell line. Then, hepatoma cells were continuously passaged for eight generations (RH10Gy-SR and RH10Gy-SnonR). The invasiveness and metastatic potential of McA-RH7777, RH10Gy-SnonR, and RH10Gy-SR cells were evaluated using an in vitro gelatinous protein (Matrigel) invasion and an in vivo metastasis assay. In addition, SR and SnonR were tested using rat cytokine antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In vitro gelatinous protein invasion assay indicated that the numbers of invading cells was significantly higher in RH10Gy-SR (40 {+-} 4.74) than in RH10Gy-SnonR (30.6 {+-} 3.85) cells, and lowest in McA-RH7777 (11.4 {+-} 3.56) cells. The same pattern was observed in vivo in a lung metastasis assay, as evaluated by number of metastatic lung nodules seen with RH10Gy-SR (28.83 {+-} 5.38), RH10Gy-SnonR (22.17 {+-} 4.26), and McA-RH7777 (8.3 {+-} 3.8) cells. Rat cytokine antibody arrays and ELISA demonstrated that metastasis-promoting cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6), circulating growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor), and metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were upregulated in SR compared with SnonR. Conclusions: Radiation can increase invasiveness and metastatic potential of sublethally irradiated hepatoma cells, and soluble mediators released from irradiated NPCs promote this potential. Increased secretion of

  14. Alvespimycin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-09

    and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  15. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa masquerading as a salivary gland neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Ranjini; Nayal, Bhavna; Kantipudi, Swarna; Ray, Satadru

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the oral cavity is a rare occurrence with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) being the third most common tumor to metastasize to this location. Buccal mucosa is rarely involved and in the absence of a known primary, such lesions pose a diagnostic challenge to the pathologist. The histomorphological features may mimic a primary salivary gland neoplasm adding to the dilemma. We present one such case of metastatic RCC of the buccal mucosa. PMID:27721630

  16. Vaccine Therapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Adults With Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-19

    Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. CD44 integrates signaling in normal stem cell, cancer stem cell and (pre)metastatic niches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karin; Motiani, Karan; Giridhar, Premkumar Vummidi; Kasper, Susan

    2013-03-01

    The stem cell niche provides a regulatory microenvironment for cells as diverse as totipotent embryonic stem cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs) which exhibit stem cell-like characteristics and have the capability of regenerating the bulk of tumor cells while maintaining self-renewal potential. The transmembrane glycoprotein CD44 is a common component of the stem cell niche and exists as a standard isoform (CD44s) and a range of variant isoforms (CD44v) generated though alternative splicing. CD44 modulates signal transduction through post-translational modifications as well as interactions with hyaluronan, extracellular matrix molecules and growth factors and their cognate receptor tyrosine kinases. While the function of CD44 in hematopoietic stem cells has been studied in considerable detail, our knowledge of CD44 function in tissue-derived stem cell niches remains limited. Here we review CD44s and CD44v in both hematopoietic and tissue-derived stem cell niches, focusing on their roles in regulating stem cell behavior including self-renewal and differentiation in addition to cell-matrix interactions and signal transduction during cell migration and tumor progression. Determining the role of CD44 and CD44v in normal stem cell, CSC and (pre)metastatic niches and elucidating their unique functions could provide tools and therapeutic strategies for treating diseases as diverse as fibrosis during injury repair to cancer progression.

  18. Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumor G1 with a Solitary Hepatic Metastatic Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Kohei; Tajiri, Kazuto; Shimada, Seitarou; Ando, Takayuki; Hosokawa, Ayumu; Matsui, Koshi; Imura, Joji; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) is a relatively rare tumor. NET is classified as G1, G2, or G3 according to the degree of mitosis or Ki-67 proliferation index, which reflect the malignant potential of the tumor, such as metastasis. Advanced cases with metastasis are indicated for chemotherapy treatment. However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited. Therefore, resection is considered, even in metastatic cases, if complete resection is possible. We herein report a case of small rectal NET discovered with hepatic metastasis classified as G1. The patient showed good progress with no recurrence after undergoing hepatectomy and endoscopic resection of rectal NET. PMID:28154272

  19. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  20. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... The Sertoli cells are normally located in the male reproductive glands (the testes). They feed sperm cells. The Leydig cells, also ...

  1. Clinical relevance and biology of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer patients die due to metastases, and the early onset of this multistep process is usually missed by current tumor staging modalities. Therefore, ultrasensitive techniques have been developed to enable the enrichment, detection, isolation and characterization of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. There is increasing evidence that the presence of these cells is associated with an unfavorable prognosis related to metastatic progression in the bone and other organs. This review focuses on investigations regarding the biology and clinical relevance of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer. PMID:22114869

  2. A ‘silent’ skull metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma mimicking as a benign scalp tumor in a pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tsung-Chun; Cheng, Yu-Kai; Chen, Tsung-Wei; Hsu, Yung-Chang; Liu, En-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Summary Thyroid cancer with cranial metastasis in a pregnant woman is very rare. In the literature, most cases are diagnosed early from neurogenic signs or symptomatic thyroid gland. Pregnancy also contributes to a hesitation toward early surgical and medical treatments. We reported a scalp tumor in a physically healthy 37-year-old pregnant female with a follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC) with lung, bone and cranial metastasis in initial presentation. Silent neurogenic and physical examinations make an early diagnosis very challenging. Resection of scalp and intracranial tumor, a thyroidectomy, post-operative radioactive iodine therapy and tyrosine kinase inhibitors were employed as treatment. The scalp tumor was confirmed as a metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma via positive immunoreactivity for thyroglobulin and thyroid transcription factor 1 in tumor cells. Blood examination revealed an elevated thyroglobulin level (>5335 ng/mL). The patient was discharged without any neurological deficit. An asymptomatic scalp tumor in a pregnant woman with a normal thyroid disease history needs differential diagnosis from intracranial origin. Rapid progression and an elevated thyroglobulin level are the indicators that further image study is needed. Aggressive surgical excision of resectable thyroid gland and metastatic tumor are essential for a longer survival rate. There is nothing to indicate that a post-partum operation will worsen prognosis. Learning points: Follicular thyroid cancer with cranial metastasis in initial presentation can be asymptomatic. Follicular thyroid cancer with cranial metastasis in a pregnant woman can be treated after delivery. Rapid enlargement of scalp tumor is indicated for further image study even in a patient without any neurological deficit. PMID:28203373

  3. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  4. CD8+ enriched “young” tumor infiltrating lymphocytes can mediate regression of metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Mark E.; Gross, Colin A.; Langhan, Michelle M.; Garcia, Marcos R.; Sherry, Richard M.; Yang, James C.; Phan, Giao Q.; Kammula, Udai S.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Wunderlich, John; Prieto, Peter A.; Hong, Jenny J.; Langan, Russell C.; Zlott, Daniel A.; Morton, Kathleen E.; White, Donald E.; Laurencot, Carolyn; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and interleukin (IL)-2 administered following lymphodepletion can cause the durable complete regression of bulky metastatic melanoma in patients refractory to approved treatments. However, the generation of a unique tumor-reactive TIL culture for each patient may be prohibitively difficult. We therefore investigated the clinical and immunological impact of unscreened, CD8+ enriched “young” TIL. Experimental Design Methods were developed for generating TIL that minimized the time in culture and eliminated the individualized tumor-reactivity screening step. Thirty-three patients were treated with these CD8+ enriched young TIL and IL-2 following non-myeloablative lymphodepletion (NMA). Twenty-three additional patients were treated with CD8+ enriched young TIL and IL-2 after lymphodepletion with NMA and 6Gy of total body irradiation (TBI). Results Young TIL cultures for therapy were successfully established from 83% of 122 consecutive melanoma patients. Nineteen of 33 patients (58%) treated with CD8+ enriched young TIL and NMA had an objective response (RECIST) including three complete responders. Eleven of 23 patients (48%) treated with TIL and 6Gy TBI had an objective response including two complete responders. At one month after TIL infusion the absolute CD8+ cell numbers in the periphery were highly correlated with response. Conclusion This study shows that a rapid and simplified method can be used to reliably generate CD8+ enriched young TIL for administration as an individualized therapy for advanced melanoma, and may allow this potentially effective treatment to be applied at other institutions and to reach additional patients. PMID:20668005

  5. (-)-Gossypol reduces invasiveness in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquisition of metastatic ability by prostatic cancer cells is the most lethal aspect of prostatic cancer progression. (-)-Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound present in cottonseeds, possesses anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects in various cancer cells. In this study, the differences betwee...

  6. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  7. Anemia and jejunal intussusception: An unusual presentation for a metastatic phyllodes breast tumor

    PubMed Central

    Schechet, Sidney A.; Askenasy, Erik P.; Dhamne, Sagar; Scott, Bradford G.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Phyllodes tumor of the breast is a rare cause of breast cancer, accounting for less than 0.5% of breast cancers. These tumors are classified as benign, borderline, or malignant, with malignant tumors compromising nearly 25% of cases. Metastases occur in 20% of malignant tumors, lungs, bones, liver and brain being the frequent sites of metastases. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a metastatic phyllodes tumor to the small bowel causing jejunal intussusception, symptomatic anemia, and small bowel obstruction. DISCUSSION Patients with phyllodes tumor of the breast can develop disease recurrence even years after initial treatment. Phyllodes tumor metastasizing to the small bowel is extremely rare, with only three known previously described case reports in the literature. CONCLUSION High risk patients, with a past medical history of phyllodes breast cancer, should be monitored closely. Even years after breast cancer treatment, these patients may present with gastrointestinal complaints such as obstruction or bleeding, and therefore metastatic disease to the small bowel should be considered on the differential with subsequent abdominal imaging obtained. PMID:22288047

  8. Dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complex as a potential drug for metastatic bone tumor.

    PubMed

    Nakatake, Hidetoshi; Ekimoto, Hisao; Aso, Mariko; Ogawa, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Asami; Suemune, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have high affinity for hydroxyapatite (HA), which is abundantly present in bone. Also, platinum complexes are known that have a wide spectrum of antitumor activities. The conjugate of bisphosphonate and a platinum complex might have HA affinity and antitumor activity, and become a drug for metastatic bone tumor. In this study, the authors synthesized platinum complexes that had dialkyl bisphosphonic acid as a ligand, and evaluated the possibility of the synthesized complexes as a drug for metastatic bone tumor. The synthesized dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complex was characterized, and its stability in an aqueous solution was also confirmed. The synthesized platinum complex showed higher HA affinity than other platinum complexes such as cisplatin and carboplatin in an experiment of adsorption to HA. In vitro, the platinum complex showed tumor growth inhibitory effect stronger than or equal to cisplatin, which is the most commonly used antitumor agent. Moreover, the platinum complex showed a bone absorption inhibitory effect on the osteoclast. These results suggest potential of dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complexes as a drug for metastatic bone tumor.

  9. Role of partial nephrectomy as cytoreduction in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karam, J A; Babaian, K N; Tannir, N M; Matin, S F; Wood, C G

    2015-06-01

    In this review, we describe the role, feasibility and safety of partial nephrectomy in the setting of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Partial nephrectomy is currently the preferred therapeutic modality in patients with localized renal tumors, while radical cytoreductive nephrectomy is the standard of care for appropriately selected patients with metastatic disease. Several studies have shown the prognostic value of percentage tumor removed when cytoreductive nephrectomy is done. This concept of percentage tumor removal and the associated benefit should also be applied when considering patients for cytoreductive partial nephrectomy; however, the potential adverse events after partial nephrectomy should be kept in mind, as these, when they occur, could delay time to starting systemic therapy. Several small retrospective studies have shown the feasibility of this approach in carefully selected patient groups. In well-selected patients with metastatic disease and primary tumors that are amenable to nephron sparing approaches, partial nephrectomy could offer an alternative to radical nephrectomy, with manageable adverse events, and good renal functional outcomes. Preserving renal function in this population could allow these patients to participate in clinical trial that they otherwise might not qualify for.

  10. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: report of two cases of renal cell carcinoma metastasizing to microcystic serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shah, Lopa; Tiesi, Gregory; Bamboat, Zubin; McCain, Donald; Siegel, Andrew; Mannion, Ciaran

    2015-02-01

    Metastatic cancer to the pancreas accounts for less than 2% of all pancreatic malignancies. In contrast to other metastatic tumors, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has a propensity to metastasize as a solitary pancreatic lesion. While symptomatic patients may present with obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain, or gastrointestinal bleeding, the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic involvement is often made in asymptomatic patients, during follow-up evaluation in the aftermath of an initial diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Microcystic serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is an uncommon pancreatic exocrine neoplasm that morphologically resembles conventional (clear cell) RCC, in so far as both tumors are characterized by neoplastic cells with clear cytoplasm, relatively uniform nuclei and scant associated tumor stroma. Herein, we report 2 immunohistochemically confirmed cases of unsuspected metastatic RCC to the pancreas, with the metastatic tumor in each case confined to a preexisting microcystic serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.

  11. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  12. Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Seth, Abhishek; Palmer, Thomas R; Campbell, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice from metastatic lung cancer is extremely rare. Most reported cases have had small cell cancer of lung or adenocarcinoma of lung as primary malignancy metastasizing to the biliary system. We report the case of a patient presenting with symptoms of obstructive jaundice found to have metastatic involvement of hepatobiliary system from squamous cell cancer (SCC) of lung. ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) with biliary stenting is the procedure of choice in such patients. Our case is made unique by the fact that technical difficulties made it difficult for the anesthesiologists to intubate the patient for an ERCP. As a result percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram (PTC) with internal-external biliary drainage was performed.

  13. [Circulating tumor cells: liquid biopsy].

    PubMed

    Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The detection and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are one of the most active areas of translational cancer research, with more than 400 clinical studies having included CTCs as a biomarker. The aims of research on CTCs include: a) estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse or metastatic progression (prognostic information); b) stratification and real-time monitoring of therapies; c) identification of therapeutic targets and resistance mechanisms; and d) understanding metastasis development in cancer patients. This review focuses on the technologies used for the enrichment and detection of CTCs. We outline and discuss the current technologies that are based on exploiting the physical and biological properties of CTCs. A number of innovative technologies to improve methods for CTC detection have recently been developed, including CTC microchips, filtration devices, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR assays, and automated microscopy systems. Molecular characterization studies have indicated, however, that CTCs are very heterogeneous, a finding that underscores the need for multiplex approaches to capture all of the relevant CTC subsets. We therefore emphasize the current challenges of increasing the yield and detection of CTCs that have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Increasing assay analytical sensitivity may lead, however, to a decrease in analytical specificity (e.g., through the detection of circulating normal epithelial cells). A considerable number of promising CTC detection techniques have been developed in recent years. The analytical specificity and clinical utility of these methods must be demonstrated in large prospective multicenter studies to reach the high level of evidence required for their introduction into clinical practice.

  14. Inoculated Cell Density as a Determinant Factor of the Growth Dynamics and Metastatic Efficiency of a Breast Cancer Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gregório, Ana C.; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Moura, Vera; Lacerda, Manuela; Figueiredo, Paulo; Simões, Sérgio; Dias, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2016-01-01

    4T1 metastatic breast cancer model have been widely used to study stage IV human breast cancer. However, the frequent inoculation of a large number of cells, gives rise to fast growing tumors, as well as to a surprisingly low metastatic take rate. The present work aimed at establishing the conditions enabling high metastatic take rate of the triple-negative murine 4T1 syngeneic breast cancer model. An 87% 4T1 tumor incidence was observed when as few as 500 cancer cells were implanted. 4T1 cancer cells colonized primarily the lungs with 100% efficiency, and distant lesions were also commonly identified in the mesentery and pancreas. The drastic reduction of the number of inoculated cells resulted in increased tumor doubling times and decreased specific growth rates, following a Gompertzian tumor expansion. The established conditions for the 4T1 mouse model were further validated in a therapeutic study with peguilated liposomal doxorubicin, in clinical used in the setting of metastatic breast cancer. Inoculated cell density was proven to be a key methodological aspect towards the reproducible development of macrometastases in the 4T1 mouse model and a more reliable pre-clinical assessment of antimetastatic therapies. PMID:27820870

  15. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  16. Does hormonal therapy have a therapeutic role in metastatic primary small cell neuroendocrine breast carcinoma? Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alkaied, Homam; Harris, Kassem; Brenner, Arnold; Awasum, Michael; Varma, Seema

    2012-06-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of breast (NECB) is a very rare tumor; the World Health Organization(WHO) subcategorized these tumors into 3 major histologic subtypes: solid, small cell carcinoma (SMCC), and large cell NE carcinoma. The SMCC subtype is the least common and most aggressive and has been reported to be as aggressive as its pulmonary counterpart. SMCC is usually confirmed based on clinical, pathologic,and imaging studies. Local disease is usually managed in a fashion similar to that of the usual ductal breast cancer; in the metastatic SMCC setting, regimens that are implemented in small cell lung cancer are usually attempted, according to case reports and published small case series. Hormone receptors can be expressed in more than 90% of the solid tumor subtype; however its expression is manifested in about 50% of cases of SMCC. Although hormonal therapy can be used successfully to treat the usual metastatic ductal breast cancer,its utility in metastatic SMCC has not been reported. We report an impressive response to hormonal therapy in a patient with late relapse of breast carcinoma with a metastatic SMCC subtype that expressed hormone receptors. The response to hormonal therapy was sustained for about 12 months. The response to hormonal therapy is definitely an interesting finding that, to our knowledge, has not been described before in the setting of metastatic SMCC. We suggest considering adding hormonal therapy to the treatment pipeline for primary SMCC of the breast that express hormone receptors.

  17. Preventing postoperative metastatic disease by inhibiting surgery-induced dysfunction in natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Bélanger, Simon; Ly, Lundi; Alkayyal, Almohanad A; Zhang, Jiqing; Rintoul, Julia L; Ananth, Abhirami A; Lam, Tiffany; Breitbach, Caroline J; Falls, Theresa J; Kirn, David H; Bell, John C; Makrigiannis, Andrew P; Auer, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell clearance of tumor cell emboli following surgery is thought to be vital in preventing postoperative metastases. Using a mouse model of surgical stress, we transferred surgically stressed NK cells into NK-deficient mice and observed enhanced lung metastases in tumor-bearing mice as compared with mice that received untreated NK cells. These results establish that NK cells play a crucial role in mediating tumor clearance following surgery. Surgery markedly reduced NK cell total numbers in the spleen and affected NK cell migration. Ex vivo and in vivo tumor cell killing by NK cells were significantly reduced in surgically stressed mice. Furthermore, secreted tissue signals and myeloid-derived suppressor cell populations were altered in surgically stressed mice. Significantly, perioperative administration of oncolytic parapoxvirus ovis (ORFV) and vaccinia virus can reverse NK cell suppression, which correlates with a reduction in the postoperative formation of metastases. In human studies, postoperative cancer surgery patients had reduced NK cell cytotoxicity, and we show for the first time that oncolytic vaccinia virus markedly increases NK cell activity in patients with cancer. These data provide direct in vivo evidence that surgical stress impairs global NK cell function. Perioperative therapies aimed at enhancing NK cell function will reduce metastatic recurrence and improve survival in surgical cancer patients.

  18. Percutaneous biliary drainage catheter insertion in patients with extensive hepatic metastatic tumor burden

    PubMed Central

    Langman, Eun L.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Morse, Michael A.; Burbridge, Rebecca A.; Smith, Tony P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with metastatic disease of the liver can have hyperbilirubinemia due to a number of reasons, including biliary obstruction. The purpose of this study was to analyze patient outcomes after percutaneous biliary drainage (PBD) catheter insertion in patients with extensive hepatic metastatic tumor burden. Methods Out of 746 PBD insertions, 44 patients (24 males, 20 females, mean age 57.4 years, range, 34–80 years) had metastatic malignancy with a hepatic tumor burden of greater than 20% parenchymal volume based on pre-procedure computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laboratory data before and after PBD insertion were compared. Survival and outcomes analysis performed. A subanalysis was performed on patients with CT-demonstrated catheter traversal of tumoral tissue. Results A PBD catheter was successfully inserted in all patients. The mean serum bilirubin level decreased significantly from 10.9±6.4 mg/dL immediately prior to PBD insertion to 7.1±5.6 mg/dL (P<0.001) within one month post PBD insertion. Four patients (11%) demonstrated normalization of bilirubin levels to less than 1.6 mg/dL. Of the 14 patients with a post-procedure CT or MRI, the PBD catheter traversed a tumor in 11 (79%). One of these patients required a transfusion after the procedure and one had recurrent catheter exchanges due to pericatheter leakage. The 30-day overall survival was 41% with a median survival of 19 days. The percentage decrease in serum bilirubin after PBD insertion and pre-procedure international normalized ratio (INR) were correlated with improved survival (OR =3.7, P=0.010 and OR =4.9, P=0.028 respectively). The PBD-associated major complication rate was 16%. Conclusions In patients with hyperbilirubinemia and extensive hepatic metastatic disease burden, survival was dismal after PBD catheter insertion. Serum bilirubin level normalization occurred rarely. PMID:28078111

  19. Molecular Heterogeneity in Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    PSMA ) and prostate cancer-specific mortality, Kasperzyk et al. found that PSMA was positively correlated with...expressed  in  prostate  tissue:  prostate  specific   membrane  antigen  ( PSMA ).  Utilizing  archival  prostate  tumor  tissue...from  two  US-­‐based  cohort   studies,  Kasperzyk  et  al.  found  that   PSMA  protein  expression  measured

  20. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  1. Comparison of MMP2 and MMP9 expression levels between primary and metastatic regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Kensuke; Motozawa, Keiko; Omagari, Daisuke; Gojoubori, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takayuki; Asano, Masatake; Gionhaku, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play important roles in tumor growth. The present study investigated the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 in relation to the distribution of TAMs in the primary and metastatic regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-nine cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with regional lymph node metastasis were selected from available documents in the archives of the Department of Pathology, Nihon University School of Dentistry. Four-micrometer-thick sections were prepared from the primary and metastatic regions. Each section was subjected to immunohistochemical staining using anti-MMP2, anti-MMP9, and anti-CD68 antibodies. The distribution and localization of MMPs and TAMs were compared between primary and metastatic regions. The expression levels of both MMPs were higher in the metastatic regions of lingual and gingival cancers. Statistically significant differences were observed in both T1 and T2 cases. In contrast to the higher expression of MMPs in metastatic regions, a higher number of TAMs were distributed in the primary regions. From these results, MMP expression levels and the numbers of TAMs were expected to have an inverse relationship between the primary and metastatic regions of OSCC. (J Oral Sci 58, 59-65, 2016).

  2. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  3. Current detection technologies for circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-04-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that circulate in the blood stream after being naturally shed from original or metastatic tumors, and can lead to a new fatal metastasis. CTCs have become a hotspot research field during the last decade. Detection of CTCs, as a liquid biopsy of tumors, can be used for early diagnosis of cancers, earlier evaluation of cancer recurrence and chemotherapeutic efficacy, and choice of individual sensitive anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, CTC detection is a crucial tool to fight against cancer. Herein, we classify the currently reported CTC detection technologies, introduce some representative samples for each technology, conclude the advantages and limitations, and give a future perspective including the challenges and opportunities of CTC detection.

  4. ESR1 mutations in circulating plasma tumor DNA from metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David; Paoletti, Costanza; Gersch, Christina; VanDenBerg, Dustin A.; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Toro, Patricia Valda; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Erlanger, Bracha; Cravero, Karen; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Button, Berry; Parsons, Heather; Dalton, W. Brian; Gillani, Riaz; Medford, Arielle; Aung, Kimberly; Tokudome, Nahomi; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Schott, Anne; Robinson, Dan; Jacks, Karen S.; Lauring, Josh; Hurley, Paula; Hayes, Daniel F.; Rae, James; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER) gene, ESR1, have been identified in breast cancer metastases after progression on endocrine therapies. Due to limitations of metastatic biopsies, the reported frequency of ESR1 mutations may be underestimated. Here, we show a high frequency of ESR1 mutations using circulating plasma tumor DNA (ptDNA) from metastatic breast cancer patients. Experimental Design We retrospectively obtained plasma samples from eight patients with known ESR1 mutations and three patients with wild type ESR1 identified by next generation sequencing (NGS) of biopsied metastatic tissues. Three common ESR1 mutations were queried for using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). In a prospective cohort, metastatic tissue and plasma were collected contemporaneously from eight ER-positive and four ER-negative patients. Tissue biopsies were sequenced by NGS and ptDNA ESR1 mutations were analyzed by ddPCR. Results In the retrospective cohort, all corresponding mutations were detected in ptDNA, with two patients harboring additional ESR1 mutations not present in their metastatic tissues. In the prospective cohort, three ER-positive patients did not have adequate tissue for NGS, and no ESR1 mutations were identified in tissue biopsies from the other nine patients. In contrast, ddPCR detected seven ptDNA ESR1 mutations in six of twelve patients (50%). Conclusions We show that ESR1 mutations can occur at a high frequency and suggest that blood can be used to identify additional mutations not found by sequencing of a single metastatic lesion. PMID:26261103

  5. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  6. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  7. BRAFV600 mutations in solid tumors, other than metastatic melanoma and papillary thyroid cancer, or multiple myeloma: a screening study

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Allen L; Day, Bann-Mo; Abhyankar, Sarang; McKenna, Edward; Riehl, Todd; Puzanov, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Background Mutations in the BRAF gene have been implicated in several human cancers. The objective of this screening study was to identify patients with solid tumors (other than metastatic melanoma or papillary thyroid cancer) or multiple myeloma harboring activating BRAFV600 mutations for enrollment in a vemurafenib clinical study. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and sent to a central laboratory to identify activating BRAFV600 mutations by bidirectional direct Sanger sequencing. Results Overall incidence of BRAFV600E mutation in evaluable patients (n=548) was 3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7–4.7): 11% in colorectal tumors (n=75), 6% in biliary tract tumors (n=16), 3% in non-small cell lung cancers (n=71), 2% in other types of solid tumors (n=180), and 3% in multiple myeloma (n=31). There were no BRAFV600 mutations in this cohort of patients with ovarian tumors (n=68), breast cancer (n=86), or prostate cancer (n=21). Conclusion This multicenter, national screening study confirms previously reported incidences of BRAFV600 mutations from single-center studies. Patients identified with BRAFV600 mutations were potentially eligible for enrollment in the VE-BASKET study. PMID:28255242

  8. Differential vimentin expression in ovarian and uterine corpus endometrioid adenocarcinomas: diagnostic utility in distinguishing double primaries from metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Desouki, Mohamed M; Kallas, Sarah J; Khabele, Dineo; Crispens, Marta A; Hameed, Omar; Fadare, Oluwole

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of vimentin expression in differentiating endometrioid adenocarcinoma of primary uterine corpus and ovarian origin. Immunohistochemical analyses for the expression of vimentin in tumoral epithelial cells were performed on 149 endometrioid adenocarcinomas wherein the primary sites were not in question, including whole tissue sections of 27 carcinomas of uterine corpus origin (and no synchronous ovarian tumor), 7 carcinomas of ovarian origin (and no synchronous uterine corpus tumor) and a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 91 primary uterine corpus and 24 primary ovarian carcinomas. We also assessed 15 cases that synchronously involved the uterine corpus and ovary, 15 cases of metastasis to organs/tissues other than uterine corpus or ovary as well as 7 lymph node metastases. Vimentin was negative in 97% (30/31) of primary ovarian carcinomas. In contrast, 82% (97/118) of primary uterine corpus carcinomas were vimentin-positive. Vimentin expression was discordant in 53% of synchronous tumors. The sensitivity and specificity of negative vimentin staining in predicting an ovarian primary were 97% and 82%, respectively, whereas parallel values for positive vimentin staining in predicting a primary uterine tumor were 82% and 97%, respectively. The pattern of vimentin expression in all cases was maintained in their respective regional lymph nodes and distant metastases. In conclusion, ovarian and uterine corpus endometrioid adenocarcinomas have different patterns of vimentin expression. If validated in larger and/or different data sets, these findings may have diagnostic value in distinguishing metastatic lesions from double primary tumors involving both sites.

  9. Cetuximab strongly enhances immune cell infiltration into liver metastatic sites in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuka; Hazama, Shoichi; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Tokumitsu, Yukio; Kanekiyo, Shinsuke; Tomochika, Shinobu; Tsunedomi, Ryouichi; Tokuhisa, Yoshihiro; Iida, Michihisa; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Shigeru; Ueno, Tomio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-03-01

    Cetuximab has activity against colorectal cancers. Recent studies demonstrated that cetuximab induces antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity via immune cells, and a new immune-related mechanism of inducing immunogenic cell death. This study aimed to evaluate the immune responses induced by cetuximab in tumor microenvironments at liver metastasis sites of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We assessed immune cell infiltration in the liver metastatic sites of 53 colorectal cancer patients. These patients were divided into three groups according to the treatment before operation: chemotherapy with cetuximab, chemotherapy without cetuximab, and no chemotherapy. The inflammatory cells in the liver metastatic sites were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, focusing on the invasive margin. The overall inflammatory reaction and number of lymphoid cells were assessed with a four-point scoring system. We then assessed immune cell infiltration (CD3, CD8 and CD56) in 15 liver metastatic sites. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated more inflammatory cells in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group than in the other groups (P < 0.001). Of note, inflammatory cells were found in intratumoral areas, and the destruction of cancer cell foci was observed in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group. Moreover, a higher infiltration of CD3+ (P = 0.003), CD8+ (P = 0.003) and CD56+ (P = 0.001) cells was observed in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group than in the other groups. These results suggest that cetuximab might have an immune-enhancing effect. As such, the immune-related mechanism of action of cetuximab may enhance the efficacy of combination therapy, such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy using therapeutic peptides.

  10. Signet cell adenocarcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Charles, Norman C; Ng, Diana D; Zoumalan, Christopher I

    2012-01-01

    A 24-year-old man developed abdominal carcinomatosis from signet cell carcinoma of the rectum. His only distal metastasis involved the superior orbit. Orbital pathology showed signet cells with a characteristic immunopathologic pattern. No hereditary syndrome was found. The authors identified only 5 cases in the literature describing colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the orbit, with 2 showing histopathology. The authors believe that this rare case represents the first illustrating bona fide signet cell colorectal cancer involving the orbit.

  11. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  12. Transcriptional Targeting of Primary and Metastatic Tumor Neovasculature by an Adenoviral Type 5 Roundabout4 Vector in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Sohn, Rebecca E.; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Curiel, David T.; Arbeit, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    New approaches targeting metastatic neovasculature are needed. Payload capacity, cellular transduction efficiency, and first-pass cellular uptake following systemic vector administration, motivates persistent interest in tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) adenoviral (Ad) vector targeting. While EC transductional and transcriptional targeting has been accomplished, vector administration approaches of limited clinical utility, lack of tumor-wide EC expression quantification, and failure to address avid liver sequestration, challenged prior work. Here, we intravenously injected an Ad vector containing 3 kb of the human roundabout4 (ROBO4) enhancer/promoter transcriptionally regulating an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter into immunodeficient mice bearing 786-O renal cell carcinoma subcutaneous (SC) xenografts and kidney orthotopic (KO) tumors. Initial experiments performed in human coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (hCAR) transgenic:Rag2 knockout mice revealed multiple ECs with high-level Ad5ROBO4-EGFP expression throughout KO and SC tumors. In contrast, Ad5CMV-EGFP was sporadically expressed in a few tumor vascular ECs and stromal cells. As the hCAR transgene also facilitated Ad5ROBO4 and control Ad5CMV vector EC expression in multiple host organs, follow-on experiments engaged warfarin-mediated liver vector detargeting in hCAR non-transgenic mice. Ad5ROBO4-mediated EC expression was undetectable in most host organs, while the frequencies of vector expressing intratumoral vessels and whole tumor EGFP protein levels remained elevated. In contrast, AdCMV vector expression was only detectable in one or two stromal cells throughout the whole tumor. The Ad5ROBO4 vector, in conjunction with liver detargeting, provides tractable genetic access for in-vivo EC genetic engineering in malignancies. PMID:24376772

  13. Transcriptional targeting of primary and metastatic tumor neovasculature by an adenoviral type 5 roundabout4 vector in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2013-01-01

    New approaches targeting metastatic neovasculature are needed. Payload capacity, cellular transduction efficiency, and first-pass cellular uptake following systemic vector administration, motivates persistent interest in tumor vascular endothelial cell (EC) adenoviral (Ad) vector targeting. While EC transductional and transcriptional targeting has been accomplished, vector administration approaches of limited clinical utility, lack of tumor-wide EC expression quantification, and failure to address avid liver sequestration, challenged prior work. Here, we intravenously injected an Ad vector containing 3 kb of the human roundabout4 (ROBO4) enhancer/promoter transcriptionally regulating an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter into immunodeficient mice bearing 786-O renal cell carcinoma subcutaneous (SC) xenografts and kidney orthotopic (KO) tumors. Initial experiments performed in human coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (hCAR) transgenic:Rag2 knockout mice revealed multiple ECs with high-level Ad5ROBO4-EGFP expression throughout KO and SC tumors. In contrast, Ad5CMV-EGFP was sporadically expressed in a few tumor vascular ECs and stromal cells. As the hCAR transgene also facilitated Ad5ROBO4 and control Ad5CMV vector EC expression in multiple host organs, follow-on experiments engaged warfarin-mediated liver vector detargeting in hCAR non-transgenic mice. Ad5ROBO4-mediated EC expression was undetectable in most host organs, while the frequencies of vector expressing intratumoral vessels and whole tumor EGFP protein levels remained elevated. In contrast, AdCMV vector expression was only detectable in one or two stromal cells throughout the whole tumor. The Ad5ROBO4 vector, in conjunction with liver detargeting, provides tractable genetic access for in-vivo EC genetic engineering in malignancies.

  14. High OCT4A levels drive tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Teixeira Dos Santos, Márcia Cristina; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Leite Pereira, Márcia Cristina; Furukawa, Gabriela; Gimenes da Cruz, Daniel Sanzio; Goldfeder, Mauricio Barbugiani; Reily Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rosenberg, Carla; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2017-02-07

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive pediatric brain tumor, in which sporadic expression of the pluripotency factor OCT4 has been recently correlated with poor patient survival. However the contribution of specific OCT4 isoforms to tumor aggressiveness is still poorly understood. Here, we report that medulloblastoma cells stably overexpressing the OCT4A isoform displayed enhanced clonogenic, tumorsphere generation, and invasion capabilities. Moreover, in an orthotopic metastatic model of medulloblastoma, OCT4A overexpressing cells generated more developed, aggressive and infiltrative tumors, with tumor-bearing mice attaining advanced metastatic disease and shorter survival rates. Pro-oncogenic OCT4A effects were expression-level dependent and accompanied by distinct chromosomal aberrations. OCT4A overexpression in medulloblastoma cells also induced a marked differential expression of non-coding RNAs, including poorly characterized long non-coding RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. Altogether, our findings support the relevance of pluripotency-related factors in the aggravation of medulloblastoma traits classically associated with poor clinical outcome, and underscore the prognostic and therapeutic value of OCT4A in this challenging type of pediatric brain cancer.

  15. Interleukin-34 promotes tumor progression and metastatic process in osteosarcoma through induction of angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment.

    PubMed

    Ségaliny, Aude I; Mohamadi, Amel; Dizier, Blandine; Lokajczyk, Anna; Brion, Régis; Lanel, Rachel; Amiaud, Jérôme; Charrier, Céline; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Heymann, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) was recently characterized as the M-CSF "twin" cytokine, regulating the proliferation/differentiation/survival of myeloid cells. The implication of M-CSF in oncology was initially suspected by the reduced metastatic dissemination in knock-out mice, due to angiogenesis impairment. Based on this observation, our work studied the involvement of IL-34 in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. The in vivo effects of IL-34 were assessed on tissue vasculature and macrophage infiltration in a murine preclinical model based on a paratibial inoculation of human osteosarcoma cells overexpressing or not IL-34 or M-CSF. In vitro investigations using endothelial cell precursors and mature HUVEC cells were performed to analyse the involvement of IL-34 in angiogenesis and myeloid cell adhesion. The data revealed that IL-34 overexpression was associated with the progression of osteosarcoma (tumor growth, lung metastases) and an increase of neo-angiogenesis. In vitro analyses demonstrated that IL-34 stimulated endothelial cell proliferation and vascular cord formation. Pre-treatment of endothelial cells by chondroitinases/heparinases reduced the formation of vascular tubes and abolished the associated cell signalling. In addition, IL-34 increased the in vivo recruitment of M2 tumor-associated macrophages into the tumor tissue. IL-34 increased in vitro monocyte/CD34(+) cell adhesion to activated HUVEC monolayers under physiological shear stress conditions. This work also demonstrates that IL-34 is expressed by osteosarcoma cells, is regulated by TNF-α, IL-1β, and contributes to osteosarcoma growth by increasing the neo-angiogenesis and the recruitment of M2 macrophages. By promoting new vessel formation and extravasation of immune cells, IL-34 may play a key role in tumor development and inflammatory diseases.

  16. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  17. Radiation-induced increase in expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin in melanoma cells: effects on metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Piechocki, M P; Honn, K V

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effects of nonlethal gamma radiation on the metastatic potential of the murine tumor cell line, B16 melanoma. The ability of B16 cells to adhere to fibronectin, which is in part mediated by the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin receptor, is predictive of metastatic potential. We determined that exposure to 0.25-2.5 Gy gamma radiation significantly enhanced B16 cell adhesion to fibronectin. The radiation-enhanced adhesion was dependent on enhanced expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin. We observed that 15 min after 0.5 Gy radiation, 99% of irradiated B16 tumor cells were positively labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against alpha IIb beta 3 compared to 22% of sham-irradiated cells. Radiation-enhanced expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 receptor is reversible and down-regulation begins within 2-4 h postirradiation. Finally, we found that irradiation significantly enhanced the ability of B16 cells to form metastases in a lung colony assay. It is concluded that a relationship exists between radiation effects on the B16 tumor cells, alpha IIb beta 3 receptor expression, adhesion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. We suggest that low-dose radiation, at levels comparable to those used in fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy, may alter the metastatic phenotype and potential of surviving tumor cells via a rapid alteration in their surface expression of alpha IIb beta 3 integrin receptors.

  18. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  19. Establishment of an animal model of spontaneous cervical lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and obtaining laryngocarcinoma cells with high metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, L W; Wang, J L; Zhang, L Y; Yang, S M; Li, C S; Yu, N; Zhao W, J D; Zhao, L D; Li, K; Liu, M B; Zhai, S Q

    2013-01-01

    To establish an animal model of spontaneous cervical lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and obtain laryngocarcinoma cells with high metastatic potential, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line HEP-2 in logarithmic phase were inoculated under the lingual margin mucosa of nude mice. HEP-2 cells metastasized to the cervical lymph nodes were isolated, cultured, and re-inoculated under the lingual margin mucosa of nude mice twice. The tumor formation in the tongue and in the cervical lymph nodes was confirmed by pathological examination. Carcinoma cells' ability of invasion and migration was detected by transwell assay. Human specific Alu sequences were detected by PCR, which indicated that the tumor cells originated from human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line HEP-2. Finally, an animal model of spontaneous lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was successfully established. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells with high metastatic potential to lymph nodes were obtained through repeated inoculations. .

  20. Cofilin drives cell-invasive and metastatic responses to TGF-β in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Joanne; Zhu, Beibei; Larkin, Spencer; Martin, Sarah K; Pu, Hong; Horbinski, Craig; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-04-15

    Cofilin (CFL) is an F-actin-severing protein required for the cytoskeleton reorganization and filopodia formation, which drives cell migration. CFL binding and severing of F-actin is controlled by Ser3 phosphorylation, but the contributions of this step to cell migration during invasion and metastasis of cancer cells are unclear. In this study, we addressed the question in prostate cancer cells, including the response to TGF-β, a critical regulator of migration. In cells expressing wild-type CFL, TGF-β treatment increased LIMK-2 activity and cofilin phosphorylation, decreasing filopodia formation. Conversely, constitutively active CFL (SerAla) promoted filipodia formation and cell migration mediated by TGF-β. Notably, in cocultures of prostate cancer epithelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, active CFL promoted invasive migration in response to TGF-β in the microenvironment. Further, constitutively active CFL elevated the metastatic ability of prostate cancer cells in vivo. We found that levels of active CFL correlated with metastasis in a mouse model of prostate tumor and that in human prostate cancer, CFL expression was increased significantly in metastatic tumors. Our findings show that the actin-severing protein CFL coordinates responses to TGF-β that are needed for invasive cancer migration and metastasis.

  1. Molecular Biomarker Analyses Using Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A.; Atwal, Siminder K.; Spoerke, Jill M.; Savage, Heidi; Pandita, Ajay; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Pirzkall, Andrea; Fine, Bernard M.; Amler, Lukas C.; Chen, Daniel S.; Lackner, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evaluation of cancer biomarkers from blood could significantly enable biomarker assessment by providing a relatively non-invasive source of representative tumor material. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) isolated from blood of metastatic cancer patients hold significant promise in this regard. Methodology/Principal Findings Using spiked tumor-cells we evaluated CTC capture on different CTC technology platforms, including CellSearch® and two biochip platforms, and used the isolated CTCs to develop and optimize assays for molecular characterization of CTCs. We report similar performance for the various platforms tested in capturing CTCs, and find that capture efficiency is dependent on the level of EpCAM expression. We demonstrate that captured CTCs are amenable to biomarker analyses such as HER2 status, qRT-PCR for breast cancer subtype markers, KRAS mutation detection, and EGFR staining by immunofluorescence (IF). We quantify cell surface expression of EGFR in metastatic lung cancer patient samples. In addition, we determined HER2 status by IF and FISH in CTCs from metastatic breast cancer patients. In the majority of patients (89%) we found concordance with HER2 status from patient tumor tissue, though in a subset of patients (11%), HER2 status in CTCs differed from that observed in the primary tumor. Surprisingly, we found CTC counts to be higher in ER+ patients in comparison to HER2+ and triple negative patients, which could be explained by low EpCAM expression and a more mesenchymal phenotype of tumors belonging to the basal-like molecular subtype of breast cancer. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggests that molecular characterization from captured CTCs is possible and can potentially provide real-time information on biomarker status. In this regard, CTCs hold significant promise as a source of tumor material to facilitate clinical biomarker evaluation. However, limitations exist from a purely EpCAM based capture system and addition of antibodies

  2. Systemic taxotere chemotherapy for metastatic tumor pleurisy in cats with spontaneous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yakunina, M N; Treshalina, E M

    2011-03-01

    Systemic and intrapleural chemotherapy for metastatic tumor pleurisy was carried out in cats with breast carcinoma. The animals (n=18) were divided into 2 groups. Cats of the systemic chemotherapy group received 3-6 courses of taxotere (30 mg/m(2); n=7) or 3 courses of taxotere (20 mg/m(2)) in combination with doxorubicin (20 mg/m(2)at 21-day intervals (n=5) during the adjuvant period of therapy for metastatic tumor pleurisy. Objective effect was attained in 10 (84.6%) cats: partial remission in 3 (25%) and complete remission in 7 (58.3%, p>0.05) cats. Metastatic pleurisy progressed in 2 (16.7%) cats. The median time to progression reached 1.79 months, median lifespan 2.8 months. The animals of intrapleural chemotherapy group (n=6) received 1-4 courses of cyclophosphamide (250 mg/m(2)) at 1-week interval during the adjuvant period without therapy for malignant pleurisy. Malignant pleurisy progressed in all cats. The median time to progression was equal to median lifespan (0.6 months). The therapy for malignant pleurisy in cats with breast cancer is regarded as the second-line chemotherapy with taxotere preferable as a monotherapy or in combination with doxorubicin.

  3. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  4. Immunoadjuvants in treatment of metastatic breast tumors using selective laser photothermal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Barker, Shawn L.; Gandhi, Punit; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2001-07-01

    A novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan, has been used in combinations with a near-infrared laser and a laser- absorbing dye to treat metastatic tumors in rats. The laser-dye combination provides selective photothermal tumor destruction. The addition of the in situ immunoadjuvant works in tandem with the photothermal interaction to induce a host antitumor immunity. Our previous experiments have shown the efficacy of this novel modality against a metastatic breast cancer in rat model, using the three components. The current study is to investigate the roles of different components, namely, the laser, the dye and the immunoadjuvant. Firs, the selective photothermal laser- tissue interactions are studied in vivo using rat leg muscles and rat tumors. Our results showed that with appropriate combination of laser parameter and dye does, an optimal selective photothermal tissue interaction could be achieved. The immune response is crucial in control of tumor metastasis and the immunoadjuvant has played pivotal role in the induction of the immunity in our experiment. Therefore, the role of immunoadjuvants in the laser cancer treatment is also investigated in the current study. Specifically, three different concentrations of glycated chitosan solutions - 0.5%, 1% and 2% - were used. In comparison, the 1% solution provided the best treatment outcome. Two additional immunoadjuvants, incomplete Freund's adjuvant and complete Freund's adjuvant were also used in the same laser-dye-adjuvant treatment protocol. The functions of different adjuvants are compared.

  5. Metastatic tumors to the urinary bladder: clinicopathologic study of 11 cases.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Chow, Jonathan; Unger, Pamela D

    2012-08-01

    Secondary neoplasms of the urinary bladder are uncommon, with metastatic tumors being an even rarer event. The authors studied the clinicopathology of 11 cases of metastatic tumors to bladder, which were collected from their archives between 1995 and 2010. The most common metastases in this series were breast. Some unusual metastases, including several not being previously reported, were also presented, namely, ileal carcinoid tumor, ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor, ovarian squamous carcinoma, pancreatic gastrinoma, and renal collecting duct carcinoma. Vast majority of these patients (10/11, 91%) were female. Ninety percent of the patients presented with hematuria and/or obstructive urinary symptom as well as bladder lesions in the area of trigone, posterior wall, and/or bladder neck. Seven of the 11 patients had a known history of other metastases besides the bladder. Most of the patients (4/7, 57%) died within 1 year after diagnosis of bladder metastasis. Metastasis must be distinguished from a primary bladder neoplasm. Morphology and clinical correlation supplemented with immunohistochemical study is critical for the correct diagnosis.

  6. InCVAX - A novel strategy for treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers through photoimmunotherapy induced tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Du, Nan; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, promising potential cancer vaccine strategy was proposed to use a two-injection procedure for solid tumors to prompt the immune system to identify and systemically eliminate the primary and metastatic cancers. The two-injection procedure consists of local photothermal application on a selected tumor intended to liberate whole cell tumor antigens, followed by a local injection of an immunoadjuvant that consists of a semi-synthetic functionalized glucosamine polymer, N-dihydro-galacto-chitosan (GC), which is intended to activate antigen presenting cells and facilitate an increased uptake of tumor antigens. This strategy is thus proposed as an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that may activate antigen presenting cells and expose them to tumor antigens in situ, with the intention of inducing a systemic tumor specific T-cell response. Here, the development of inCVAX for the treatment of metastatic cancers in the past decades are systematically reviewed. The antitumor immune responses of local photothermal treatment and immunological stimulation with GC are also discussed. This treatment approach is also commonly referred to as laser immunotherapy (LIT). PMID:25633839

  7. Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization Using Drug-Eluting Beads in Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Shantanu K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Ayyagari, Rajasekhara; Binkert, Christoph A.; Schenker, Matthew P.; Kulke, Matthew; Baum, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate short (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) follow-up in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver who underwent hepatic arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads at a single institution. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective review. All patients who were treated with 100-300 or 300-500 {mu}m drug-eluting LC Beads (Biocompatibles, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (range, 50-100 mg) for GI neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver from June 2004 to June 2009 were included. CT and MRI were evaluated for progression using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Short-term (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) imaging response was determined and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. Results: Thirty-eight drug-eluting bead chemoembolization procedures were performed on 32 hepatic lobes, comprising 21 treatment cycles in 18 patients. All procedures were technically successful with two major complications (biliary injuries). At short-term follow-up (<3 months), 22 of 38 (58%) procedures and 10 of 21 (48%) treatment cycles produced an objective response (OR) with the remainder having stable disease (SD). At intermediate-term follow-up (mean, 445 days; range, 163-1247), 17 of 26 (65%) procedures and 8 of 14 (57%) treatment cycles produced an OR. Probability of progressing was approximately 52% at 1 year with a median time to progression of 419 days. Conclusions: Drug-eluting bead chemoembolization is a reasonable alternative to hepatic arterial embolization and chemoembolization for the treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver.

  8. Role of Receptor Sialylation in the Ovarian Tumor Cell Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    transit through the peritoneal cavity. Additionally, ST6Gal-I appears to contribute to metastatic targeting of omentum and resistance to cisplatin ...protection of tumor cells against cisplatin - mediated cell death (Task 3). Progress: We have by far made the most progress on Aim 3 and research...ovarian cancer resistance to cisplatin -mediated cell death, as well as death receptor signaling by ovarian cancer cells within the peritoneal cavity

  9. Optical Imaging of Mesenchymal Epithelial Transition Factor (MET) for Enhanced Detection and Characterization of Primary and Metastatic Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Shadi A.; Heidari, Pedram; Kim, Sun A.; Ogino, Shuji; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess optical imaging of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition factor (MET) for delineation and characterization of intrahepatic models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and thereby demonstrate its potential use in precision oncology. Materials and Methods: MET expression in human CRC and HCC was assessed in tissue microarrays. We used GE-137, a modified cyanine 5-tagged peptide for MET targeting. HepG2 and Huh-7 (HCC) and HT-29 (CRC) cells with MET overexpression, and LNCaP cells (negative control) with minimal MET expression were incubated with the probe. Correlation between the relative fluorescence signal intensity and cellular MET expression level was assessed. Flow cytometry was used to assess probe specific binding and dissociation constant (Kd). Orthotopic xenograft models of human HCC and metastatic CRC were generated in nu/nu mice by subcapsular implantation of cells. Epifluorescence imaging was performed to capture the changes in deferential probe accumulation at different time points after injection. Target-to-liver background ratio (TBR) was calculated and the probe biodistribution within different organs was assessed. Histopathologic analysis of extracted xenografts was performed to correlate the tumors MET expression with probe uptake by cancer cells. Results: Approximately 91.5% of HCC and 81% of CRC microarray cores showed MET expression. HCC and CRC cells incubated with the probe showed substantial fluorescence compared to control LNCaP, with strong correlation between fluorescence signal and MET expression (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.001). Probe binding affinity to MET (Kd) was measured to be 2.9 ± 0.36 nM. Epifluorescence imaging showed intense uptake in subcapsular tumors with peak TBR of 5.46 ± 0.46 in Huh-7, 3.55 ± 0.38 in HepG2, and 15.93 ± 0.61 in HT-29 orthotopic xenografts at 4 hours post-injection (mean ± standard deviation). We demonstrated that in vivo probe uptake in xenografts is

  10. Busulfan, Melphalan, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and a Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Solid Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Solid Tumor; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  11. The rationale for liquid biopsy in colorectal cancer: a focus on circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Carletti, Raffaella; di Gioia, Cira; Gradilone, Angela; Cortesi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Capturing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and/or circulating tumor DNA from blood, which represents a precious source of biological material derived from both primary and metastatic tumors, has been named a 'liquid biopsy'. While the circulating tumor DNA might be more representative of the bulk of the metastatic tumor, CTCs are thought to reflect more of the metastases-initiating cells. Consequently, a liquid biopsy made of tumor cells and tumor DNA that is able to track cancer evolution, as a fingerprint of the patient's individual tumor, and is easy to perform at every stage of the disease course, sounds attractive. This article mainly focuses on the applications of CTCs to track tumor dynamics in real time using colorectal cancer as a model system. The analysis of viable CTCs at DNA, RNA and protein levels, as well as their expansion in vitro, may allow deep investigation of the features of metastases-initiating cells.

  12. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  13. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, R; Jafri, S Z; Gibson, D P; Bis, K G; Ali-Reza

    1995-01-01

    Juxtaglomerular (JG) cell tumor is a rare benign neoplasm of the kidney that typically presents with hypertension, secondary hyperaldosteronism, hypocalcemia, and hyperreninism. We describe a case of JG cell tumor diagnosed with MRI.

  14. Interstitial laser irradiation of metastatic mammary tumors in combination with intratumoral injection of immunoadjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chet; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Goddard, Jessica; Li, Xiaosong; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed to treat metastatic cancers using a combination of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. The original design of LIT employs a non-invasive, selective laser photothermal interaction, using an in situ light-absorbing dye. However, this non-invasive treatment mode faces challenges in treating deep, large tumors. Furthermore, it has difficulties in the cases of highly pigmented skin overlying target tumors. To overcome these limitations, interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) was proposed. In ILIT, a cylindrical, side-fire fiber diffuser is placed inside the target tumor to induce thermal damage. To enhance the interstitial irradiation induced photothermal interaction, an immunological modifier, glycated chitosan (GC), is injected into the tumor after the laser treatment. In this study, a cylindrical diffuser with an active length of 1 cm was used to treat tumors of 1 to 1.5 cm in size. Different laser powers (1 to 3 watts) and different irradiation durations (10 to 30 minutes) were used to test the thermal effects of ILIT. Different doses of the GC (1.0%, 0.1 to 0.6 ml per rat) were used to determine the immunological effects of ILIT. Our results show that the animal survival depends on both laser dose and GC dose. A dose of 0.2 ml per tumor appeared to result in the highest survival rate under interstitial laser irradiation with 2.5 watts and 20 minutes. While the results in this study are not conclusive, they indicate that interstitial laser irradiation can be combined with immunotherapy to treat metastatic cancers. Furthermore, our results suggest that an optimal combination of laser dose and GC dose could be obtained for future clinical protocols using interstitial laser immunotherapy.

  15. Ploidy pattern of megakaryocytes in patients with metastatic tumors with and without paraneoplastic thrombosis and in controls.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, M; Stöckler, J; Grassmuck, J; Pfitzer, P; Schneider, W

    1984-01-01

    In order to measure megakaryocyte DNA content in a greater number of well-defined patients, the use of bone marrow aspirates obtained postmortem is a basic requirement. We could show that the distinction between the ploidy classes in DNA histograms is possible until 18 h postmortem. Thus, bone marrow aspirates obtained up to 12 h after death can be expected to give reliable results. Megakaryocytes of the following patient groups were studied: 15 patients with metastatic tumors and paraneoplastic thrombosis, 15 patients with metastatic tumors without paraneoplastic thrombosis and 10 controls. A higher ploidy of the megakaryocytes was found in all 30 patients with metastatic tumors, independently of whether these patients suffer from thrombosis or not. Higher megakaryocyte ploidy, however, is correlated with a larger cytoplasmic mass of megakaryocytes, which leads to an increased platelet production. Besides an overcompensation for increased platelet consumption, a mitogenic or thrombopoietin-like factor produced by the tumor itself must be considered.

  16. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte-tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  17. Stem cell-like transcriptional reprogramming mediates metastatic resistance to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mateo, F; Arenas, E J; Aguilar, H; Serra-Musach, J; de Garibay, G Ruiz; Boni, J; Maicas, M; Du, S; Iorio, F; Herranz-Ors, C; Islam, A; Prado, X; Llorente, A; Petit, A; Vidal, A; Català, I; Soler, T; Venturas, G; Rojo-Sebastian, A; Serra, H; Cuadras, D; Blanco, I; Lozano, J; Canals, F; Sieuwerts, A M; de Weerd, V; Look, M P; Puertas, S; García, N; Perkins, A S; Bonifaci, N; Skowron, M; Gómez-Baldó, L; Hernández, V; Martínez-Aranda, A; Martínez-Iniesta, M; Serrat, X; Cerón, J; Brunet, J; Barretina, M P; Gil, M; Falo, C; Fernández, A; Morilla, I; Pernas, S; Plà, M J; Andreu, X; Seguí, M A; Ballester, R; Castellà, E; Nellist, M; Morales, S; Valls, J; Velasco, A; Matias-Guiu, X; Figueras, A; Sánchez-Mut, J V; Sánchez-Céspedes, M; Cordero, A; Gómez-Miragaya, J; Palomero, L; Gómez, A; Gajewski, T F; Cohen, E E W; Jesiotr, M; Bodnar, L; Quintela-Fandino, M; López-Bigas, N; Valdés-Mas, R; Puente, X S; Viñals, F; Casanovas, O; Graupera, M; Hernández-Losa, J; Ramón Y Cajal, S; García-Alonso, L; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Esteller, M; Sierra, A; Martín-Martín, N; Matheu, A; Carracedo, A; González-Suárez, E; Nanjundan, M; Cortés, J; Lázaro, C; Odero, M D; Martens, J W M; Moreno-Bueno, G; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Villanueva, A; Gomis, R R; Pujana, M A

    2016-12-19

    Inhibitors of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) are currently used to treat advanced metastatic breast cancer. However, whether an aggressive phenotype is sustained through adaptation or resistance to mTOR inhibition remains unknown. Here, complementary studies in human tumors, cancer models and cell lines reveal transcriptional reprogramming that supports metastasis in response to mTOR inhibition. This cancer feature is driven by EVI1 and SOX9. EVI1 functionally cooperates with and positively regulates SOX9, and promotes the transcriptional upregulation of key mTOR pathway components (REHB and RAPTOR) and of lung metastasis mediators (FSCN1 and SPARC). The expression of EVI1 and SOX9 is associated with stem cell-like and metastasis signatures, and their depletion impairs the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. These results establish the mechanistic link between resistance to mTOR inhibition and cancer metastatic potential, thus enhancing our understanding of mTOR targeting failure.Oncogene advance online publication, 19 December 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.427.

  18. Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Howlin, Jillian; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Dahlgren, Malin; Schulz, Ralph; Grabau, Dorthe; van Westen, Danielle; Fernö, Mårten; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Rydén, Lisa; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Jernström, Helena; Saal, Lao H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow-up. Using an approach combining low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor-specific rearrangements in plasma by droplet digital PCR, we identify for the first time that ctDNA monitoring is highly accurate for postsurgical discrimination between patients with (93%) and without (100%) eventual clinically detected recurrence. ctDNA-based detection preceded clinical detection of metastasis in 86% of patients with an average lead time of 11 months (range 0–37 months), whereas patients with long-term disease-free survival had undetectable ctDNA postoperatively. ctDNA quantity was predictive of poor survival. These findings establish the rationale for larger validation studies in early breast cancer to evaluate ctDNA as a monitoring tool for early metastasis detection, therapy modification, and to aid in avoidance of overtreatment. PMID:25987569

  19. Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Howlin, Jillian; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Dahlgren, Malin; Schulz, Ralph; Grabau, Dorthe; van Westen, Danielle; Fernö, Mårten; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Rydén, Lisa; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Jernström, Helena; Saal, Lao H

    2015-08-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow-up. Using an approach combining low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor-specific rearrangements in plasma by droplet digital PCR, we identify for the first time that ctDNA monitoring is highly accurate for postsurgical discrimination between patients with (93%) and without (100%) eventual clinically detected recurrence. ctDNA-based detection preceded clinical detection of metastasis in 86% of patients with an average lead time of 11 months (range 0-37 months), whereas patients with long-term disease-free survival had undetectable ctDNA postoperatively. ctDNA quantity was predictive of poor survival. These findings establish the rationale for larger validation studies in early breast cancer to evaluate ctDNA as a monitoring tool for early metastasis detection, therapy modification, and to aid in avoidance of overtreatment.

  20. Microfluidic Device for Studying Tumor Cell Extravasation in Cancer Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry K; Thundat, Thomas George; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Datar, Ram H; Reese, Benjamin E; Zheng, Siyang

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads to form secondary tumors at downstream locations throughout the body. This uncontrolled spreading is the leading cause of death in patients with epithelial cancers and is the main reason that suppressing and targeting cancer has proven to be so challenging. Tumor cell extravasation is one of the key steps in cancer s progression towards a metastatic state. This occurs when circulating tumor cells found within the blood stream are able to transmigrate through the endothelium lining and basement membrane of the vasculature to form metastatic tumors at secondary sites within the body. Predicting the likelihood of this occurrence in patients, or being able to determine specific markers involved in this process could lead to preventative measures targeting these types of cancer; moreover, this may lead to the discovery of novel anti-metastatic drugs. We have developed a microfluidic device that has shown the extravasation of fluorescently labeled tumor cells across an endothelial cell lined membrane coated with matrigel followed by the formation of colonies. This device provides the advantages of combining a controlled environment, mimicking that found within the body, with real-time monitoring capabilities allowing for the study of these biomarkers and cellular interactions along with other potential mechanisms involved in the process of extravasation.

  1. Orthotopic mouse models of tumor metastasis expressing fluorescent reporters produce imageable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are of high importance, since they are potential metastatic precursors and are readily available for prognostic analysis and treatment testing. In this review, we demonstrate the great power that green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling and orthotopic mouse models of cancer confer to the study of CTCs for isolation and characterization, including metastatic testing in mice and the chick embryo as well as drug response testing in vitro. We also describe a facile method to label patient CTCs ex vivo using a telomerase-expressing GFP-containing adenovirus that will allow the CTC studies described in this review to be translated clinically.

  2. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Nuclear dynamics in metastatic cells studied by quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We used a new quantitative high spatiotemporal resolution phase imaging tool to explore the nuclear structure and dynamics of individual cells. We used a novel analysis tool to quantify the diffusion outside and inside the nucleus of live cells. We also obtained information about the nuclear spatio temporal mass density in metastatic cells. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (direct, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). We calculated the standard deviation of velocities in active transport and the diffusion coefficient for passive transport.

  4. Blocking TNF-α inhibits angiogenesis and growth of IFIT2-depleted metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Chu; Liu, Chung-Ji; Lin, Tsung-Jen; Mar, Ai-Chung; Wang, Hsiu-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Hong, Zi-Xuan; Lee, Te-Chang

    2016-01-28

    Our previous study demonstrated that the depletion of interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (IFIT2) promoted metastasis and was associated with a poor prognosis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our current study explores the major downstream signaling involved in IFIT2 depletion-induced OSCC metastasis. To this end, we used two cell lines (designated sh-control-xeno and sh-IFIT2-xeno) derived from human OSCC xenografts expressing sh-control and sh-IFIT2, respectively, and one metastatic OSCC subline (sh-IFIT2-meta) from an IFIT2-depleted metastatic tumor. We found that the sh-IFIT2-meta cells proliferated more slowly than the sh-control-xeno cells but exhibited higher migration and chemoresistance. Using microarray technology and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, we found that TNF-α was one of the major downstream targets in IFIT2-depleted OSCC cells. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting, and ELISA results confirmed that TNF-α was upregulated in the sh-IFIT2-meta cells. Blocking TNF-α abolished the angiogenic activity induced by the sh-IFIT2-meta cells. Furthermore, the human-specific TNF-α antibody golimumab significantly inhibited in vivo angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis of sh-IFIT2-meta cells. These results demonstrate that IFIT2 depletion results in TNF-α upregulation, leading to angiogenesis and metastasis of OSCC cells.

  5. Differential potency of regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression in kidney tumors compared to subcutaneous tumors

    PubMed Central

    Devaud, Christel; Westwood, Jennifer A; Teng, Michele WL; John, Liza B; Yong, Carmen SM; Duong, Connie PM; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    In many cancers, regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in suppressing the effector immune response thereby permitting tumor development. Indeed, in mouse models, their depletion can promote the regression of tumors of various origins, including renal cell carcinoma when located subcutaneous (SC). In the present study, we aimed to assess the importance of Treg immunosuppression in the physiologic context of metastatic renal carcinoma (Renca) disease. To that purpose we inoculated renal tumors orthotopically, intra-kidney (IK), in mice. Treg depletions were performed using anti-CD4 antibody in wild type mice or diphtheria toxin (DT) in Foxp3DTR transgenic mice. Our main observation was that Treg were not the key immunosuppressive component of the IK tumoral microenvironment, compared to the same tumors located SC. We demonstrated that the CD8+ effector immune response was still suppressed in IK tumors when compared to SC tumors, following Treg depletion. Furthermore, the level of program cell death protein (PD)-1 was increased on the surface of CD4+ T cells infiltrating IK tumors compared to SC tumors. Finally, the Treg-independent immunosuppression, occurring in IK tumors, was potent enough to inhibit regression of concomitant SC tumors, normally responsive to Treg depletion. Our findings provide further insight into the immunosuppressive nature of the immune response generated in the kidney microenvironment, suggesting that it can have additional mechanisms in addition to Treg. These observations might help to identify better targets from the kidney tumor microenvironment for future cancer therapies. PMID:25941590

  6. Differential potency of regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression in kidney tumors compared to subcutaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Christel; Westwood, Jennifer A; Teng, Michele Wl; John, Liza B; Yong, Carmen Sm; Duong, Connie Pm; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    In many cancers, regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in suppressing the effector immune response thereby permitting tumor development. Indeed, in mouse models, their depletion can promote the regression of tumors of various origins, including renal cell carcinoma when located subcutaneous (SC). In the present study, we aimed to assess the importance of Treg immunosuppression in the physiologic context of metastatic renal carcinoma (Renca) disease. To that purpose we inoculated renal tumors orthotopically, intra-kidney (IK), in mice. Treg depletions were performed using anti-CD4 antibody in wild type mice or diphtheria toxin (DT) in Foxp3(DTR) transgenic mice. Our main observation was that Treg were not the key immunosuppressive component of the IK tumoral microenvironment, compared to the same tumors located SC. We demonstrated that the CD8(+) effector immune response was still suppressed in IK tumors when compared to SC tumors, following Treg depletion. Furthermore, the level of program cell death protein (PD)-1 was increased on the surface of CD4(+) T cells infiltrating IK tumors compared to SC tumors. Finally, the Treg-independent immunosuppression, occurring in IK tumors, was potent enough to inhibit regression of concomitant SC tumors, normally responsive to Treg depletion. Our findings provide further insight into the immunosuppressive nature of the immune response generated in the kidney microenvironment, suggesting that it can have additional mechanisms in addition to Treg. These observations might help to identify better targets from the kidney tumor microenvironment for future cancer therapies.

  7. Defining Tumor Cell and Immune Cell Behavior in Vivo during Pulmonary Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    outcome of which is still to be determined. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Lung Metastasis, Intravital Imaging , Tumor Immunology, Tumor Microparticles 16. SECURITY...metastatic fitness in the lung. 2) KEYWORDS: Metastasis, Intravital Imaging , Lung, Breast Cancer, 3) ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the... intravital imaging of Lung Metastasis b) Characterization of Tumor Cell Behavior During Pulmonary Seeding via 2-photon microscopy c) Characterization of

  8. Lactoferrin selectively triggers apoptosis in highly metastatic breast cancer cells through inhibition of plasmalemmal V-H+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Guedes, Joana P.; Gonçalves, Marília; Loureiro, Luís; Castro, Lisandra; Gerós, Hernâni; Rodrigues, Lígia R.; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women. Despite the good prognosis when detected early, significant challenges remain in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. The recruitment of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-H+-ATPase) to the plasma membrane, where it mediates the acidification of the tumor microenvironment (TME), is a recognized feature involved in the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype in breast cancer. Therefore, inhibitors of this pump have emerged as promising anticancer drugs. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a natural pro-apoptotic iron-binding glycoprotein with strong anticancer activity whose mechanism of action is not fully understood. Here, we show that bovine Lf (bLf) preferentially induces apoptosis in the highly metastatic breast cancer cell lines Hs 578T and MDA-MB-231, which display a prominent localisation of V-H+-ATPase at the plasma membrane, but not in the lowly metastatic T-47D or in the non-tumorigenic MCF-10-2A cell lines. We also demonstrate that bLf decreases the extracellular acidification rate and causes intracellular acidification in metastatic breast cancer cells and, much like the well-known proton pump inhibitors concanamycin A and bafilomycin A1, inhibits V-H+-ATPase in sub-cellular fractions. These data further support that bLf targets V-H+-ATPase and explain the selectivity of bLf for cancer cells, especially for highly metastatic breast cancer cells. Altogether, our results pave the way for more rational in vivo studies aiming to explore this natural non-toxic compound for metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:27556694

  9. Testicular germ cell tumors: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christian; Albers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors represent the most common solid malignancy of young men aged 15-40 years. Histopathologically, testicular germ cell tumors are divided into two major groups: pure seminoma and nonseminoma. The pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumors remains unknown; however, cryptorchidism is the main risk factor, and molecular studies have shown strong evidence of an association between genetic alterations and testicular germ cell tumors. In cases of suspicion for testicular germ cell tumor, a surgical exploration with orchiectomy is obligatory. After completion of diagnostic procedures, levels of serum tumor markers and the clinical stage based on the International Union Against Cancer tumor-node-metastasis classification should be defined. Patients with early-stage testicular germ cell tumors are treated by individualized risk stratification within a multidisciplinary approach. The individual management (surveillance, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) has to be balanced according to clinical features and the risk of short-term and long-term toxic effects. Treatment for metastatic tumors is based on risk stratification according to International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group classification and is performed with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and residual tumor resection in cases of residual tumor lesion. High-dose chemotherapy represents a curative option for patients with second or subsequent relapses.

  10. Control of the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome by excision of primary and metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Landor, J H

    1984-03-01

    In a patient with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, control of the peptic ulcer diathesis was attempted by excision of a small duodenal gastrinoma and removal of three lymph nodes containing metastases. The patient has been asymptomatic for 2.5 years with basal achlorhydria, a normal serum gastrin level and a negative gastrin response to secretin. Our experience with this patient emphasizes the fact that the presence of metastatic disease does not preclude the possibility of long-term control of hypergastrinemia by resection of the tumor. Attempts to cure the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome by tumor resection alone, however, should only be made in patients whose hypersecretion is adequately controlled by antisecretory drugs.

  11. 131 I-MIBG Therapy in a Metastatic Small Bowel Neuroendocrine Tumor Patient Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Behruz; Makis, William; Riauka, Terence A; McEwan, Alexander J B; Morrish, Don

    2017-02-24

    Systemic radioisotope therapy with I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-MIBG) is an effective form of targeted therapy for neuroendocrine tumors. One of the absolute contraindications to administering I-MIBG therapy listed in the 2008 European Association of Nuclear Medicine guidelines is renal insufficiency requiring dialysis, although this contraindication is not evidence based. We describe a 68-year-old woman with a metastatic small bowel neuroendocrine tumor who developed renal insufficiency requiring hemodialysis. Imaging and dosimetry with I-MIBG were performed and showed that the radiation doses to the whole body and lungs were within safe limits. She was treated with 1820 MBq of I-MIBG with no short-term adverse reactions.

  12. Tumor growth delay studies in patients with multiple metastatic nodules: practical difficulties

    SciTech Connect

    Urtasun, R.C.; Band, P.; Ferri, H.

    1980-07-01

    The tumor growth delay assay is a well accepted technique in experimental animal tumor models for the measurement of response to treatment when comparing new treatment modalities. Patients have several measurabe metastatic nodules provide a good opportunity to measure the effects of new treatments as the patient can be used as his own matched control. Regression and regrowth of the treated lesions can be measured and differences can be assessed in terms of growth delay. The present material consists of a group of patients treated with fixed, single doses of radiation and single doses of the radiosensitizer, Metronidazole. The same amount of radiation was delivered to the test and control lesions; the test lesion was treated in combination with the drug. An unexpected high number of invalidations and occasional lack of reproducibility have been encountered with the first six patients. Investigation using this mehod for the first time should be aware of some of its pitfalls.

  13. Malignant insulinoma presenting as metastatic liver tumor. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, R; Ettorre, G; Vennarecci, G; Pasimeni, G; Carboni, F; Lorusso, R; Barnabei, A; Appetecchia, M

    2007-12-01

    Insulin-secreting tumors are the commonest hormone-producing neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. They occur with an incidence of 4 cases per million per year. About 10% of them are metastatic and malignant insulinomas very rarely observed in children and in elderly. We report a rare case of very large malignant insulinoma in a 71-year-old woman admitted in our Oncological Institute on October 2005. She presented with fasting hypoglicemia (blood glucose 35 mg/dl) and high serum insulin levels (insulin 115.9 microU/ml). A computerized tomographic scan showed a pancreatic tail lesion of about 6 cm in max diameter and multiple liver metastases. A whole body scintiscan using 111In-DTPA-D-Phe1-octreotide was made and an increased uptake in the tail of the pancreas has been found. The patient was submitted to liver biopsy and the diagnosis of a metastatic insulin-secreting tumor was immunoistochemically confirmed. Due to the presence of some hypoglicemic episodes uncontrolled by medical treatment, on December 2005 the patient was admitted to surgical intervention with a body and tail pancreatic resection. Post-operatively the patient experienced again syncope with hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. It was then decided to start a schedule of treatment with somatostatin analog (octreotide subcutaneously 500 microg three times a day) with a good control of blood glucose levels (101 mg/dl). A trans-arterial chemioembolization was planned but the patient died for pancreatic and cardiovascular complications before this treatment started.

  14. Granular cell tumor of trachea.

    PubMed

    Bekteshi, Edgar; Toth, Jennifer W; Benninghoff, Michael G; Kang, Jason; Betancourt, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Granular cell tumors of the tracheobronchial tree are rare benign lesions of neurogenic origin. These benign tumors mostly involve the skin, oral cavity, or esophagus. There is no consensus regarding treatment of granular cell tumors. Treatment varies from simple observation to different bronchoscopic interventions, such as laser therapy or fulguration to surgical resection.

  15. A portable circulating tumor cell capture microdevice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, Ram H.

    2009-03-01

    Sensitive detection of earliest metastatic spread of tumors in a minimally invasive and user-friendly manner will revolutionize the clinical management of cancer patients. The current methodologies for circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture and identification have significant limitations including time, cost, limited capture efficiency and lack of standardization. We have developed and optimized a novel parylene membrane filter-based portable microdevice for size-based isolation of CTC from human peripheral blood. Following characterization with a model system to study the recovery rate and enrichment factor, a comparison of the microdevice with the commercially available system using blood from cancer patients demonstrated superior recovery rate and the promise of clinical utility of the microdevice. The development of the microdevice and its potential clinical applicability will be discussed.

  16. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  17. [A case of metastatic pulmonary cancer from renal cell carcinoma masquerading as pulmonary vein varix].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kotaro; Endo, Katsuhiko; Fukai, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    A 66-year-old woman underwent nephrectomy to treat renal cell carcinoma 5 years previously. Enhanced CT to locate the tumor revealed a lesion very close to the right upper pulmonary vein. Six months later, the nodule grew to 14mm in maximum dimension and it seemed to be a varix of the right upper pulmonary vein on 3D-CT. However, pulmonary artery angiography (PAG) denied this possibility. PET-CT revealed the nodule to be positive for FDG uptake (maxSUV 2.7 in the early phase and 2.2 in the late phase), suggesting that it contained solid tissue with malignant characteristics. Eventually, right upper lobectomy was performed. The nodule was a metastatic renal cell carcinoma with extremely abundant vascular components. This conspicuous feature of the tumor appeared to mimic a pulmonary vein varix on enhanced CT scan and 3D angiogram.

  18. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register MRI volumes to the cryo bright field reference, we used our standard mutual information, non-rigid registration which proceeded: preprocess --> affine --> B-spline non-rigid 3D registration. In this report, we created two modified approaches: mask where we registered locally over a smaller rectangular solid, and sliding organ. Briefly, in sliding organ, we segmented the organ, registered the organ and body volumes separately and combined results. Though sliding organ required manual annotation, it provided the best result as a standard to measure other registration methods. Regularization parameters for standard and mask methods were optimized in a grid search. Evaluations consisted of DICE, and visual scoring of a checkerboard display. Standard had accuracy of 2 voxels in all regions except near the kidney, where there were 5 voxels sliding. After mask and sliding organ correction, kidneys sliding were within 2 voxels, and Dice overlap increased 4%-10% in mask compared to standard. Mask generated comparable results with sliding organ and allowed a semi-automatic process.

  19. Characterization of a Novel Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cell Line of LNCaP Origin

    PubMed Central

    Castanares, Mark A.; Copeland, Ben T.; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Liu, Minzhi M.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Pomper, Martin G.; Lupold, Shawn E.; Foss, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The LNCaP cell line was originally isolated from the lymph node of a patient with metastatic prostate cancer. Many cell lines have been derived from LNCaP by selective pressures to study different aspects of prostate cancer progression. When injected subcutaneously into male athymic nude mice, LNCaP and its derivatives rarely metastasize. Methods Here, we describe the characteristics of a new LNCaP derivative, JHU-LNCaPSM, which was generated by long term passage in normal cell culture conditions. Results Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis and genomic sequencing verified JHU-LNCaP-SM derivation from parental LNCaP cells. JHU-LNCaP-SM cells express the same mutated androgen receptor (AR) but unlike LNCaP, are no longer androgen dependent for growth. The cells demonstrate an attenuated androgen responsiveness in transcriptional assays and retain androgen sensitive expression of PSA, AR, and PSMA. Unlike parental LNCaP, JHU-LNCaP-SM cells quickly form subcutaneous tumors in male athymic nude mice, reliably metastasize to the lymph nodes and display a striking intra-tumoral and spreading hemorrhagic phenotype as tumor xenografts. Conclusions The JHU-LNCaP-SM cell line is a new isolate of LNCaP, which facilitates practical, preclinical studies of spontaneous metastasis of prostate cancer through lymphatic tissues. PMID:26499105

  20. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer.

  1. The Metastatic Potential and Chemoresistance of Human Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J.; Bishop, J. Michael; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) typically have the capacity to evade chemotherapy and may be the principal source of metastases. CSCs for human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) have been identified, but neither the metastatic potential nor the chemoresistance of these cells has been adequately evaluated. We have addressed these issues by examining side-population (SP) cells isolated from the Panc-1 and BxPC3 lines of human PDAC cells, the oncogenotypes of which differ. SP cells could be isolated from monolayers of Panc-1, but only from spheroids of BxPC3. Using orthotopic xenografts into the severely immunocompromised NSG mouse, we found that SP cells isolated from both cell lines produced tumors that were highly metastatic, in contrast to previous experience with PDAC cell lines. SP cells derived from both cell lines expressed the ABCG2 transporter, which was demonstrably responsible for the SP phenotype. SP cells gave rise to non-SP (NSP) cells in vitro and in vivo, a transition that was apparently due to posttranslational inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter. Twenty-two other lines of PDAC cells also expressed ABCG2. The sensitivity of PDAC SP cells to the vinca alkaloid vincristine could be greatly increased by verapamil, a general inhibitor of transporters. In contrast, verapamil had no effect on the killing of PDAC cells by gemcitabine, the current first-line therapeutic for PDAC. We conclude that the isolation of SP cells can be a convenient and effective tool for the study of PDAC CSCs; that CSCs may be the principal progenitors of metastasis by human PDAC; that the ABCG2 transporter is responsible for the SP phenotype in human PDAC cells, and may be a ubiquitous source of drug-resistance in PDAC, but does not confer resistance to gemcitabine; and that inhibition of ABCG2 might offer a useful adjunct in a therapeutic attack on the CSCs of PDAC. PMID:26859746

  2. Phagocytosis of dying tumor cells by human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Britta Janina; Lindau, Dennis; Ripper, Dagmar; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Glatzle, Jörg; Witte, Maria; Beck, Henning; Keppeler, Hildegard; Lauber, Kirsten; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2011-05-15

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is an advanced form of metastatic disease characterized by cancer cell dissemination onto the peritoneum. It is commonly observed in ovarian and colorectal cancers and is associated with poor patient survival. Novel therapies consist of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, aiming at tumor cell death induction. The resulting dying tumor cells are considered to be eliminated by professional as well as semi-professional phagocytes. In the present study, we have identified a hitherto unknown type of 'amateur' phagocyte in this environment: human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HMCs). We demonstrate that HMCs engulf corpses of dying ovarian and colorectal cancer cells, as well as other types of apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric, confocal and electron microscopical analyses revealed that HMCs ingest dying cell fragments in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the internalized material subsequently traffics into late phagolysosomes. Regarding the mechanisms of prey cell recognition, our results show that HMCs engulf apoptotic corpses in a serum-dependent and -independent fashion and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that diverse opsonin receptor systems orchestrating dying cell clearance are expressed in HMCs at high levels. Our data strongly suggest that HMCs contribute to dying cell removal in the peritoneum, and future studies will elucidate in what manner this influences tumor cell dissemination and the antitumor immune response.

  3. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  4. Clinical significance of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Pantel, K

    2001-01-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumor cells to the organism is increasingly considered a hallmark in cancer progression, as emerging data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies to epithelial cytokeratins or tumor-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected on cytologic bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of these immunostained cells in bone marrow, as a frequent site of overt metastases, is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival. This screening approach may be, therefore, used to improve tumor staging and guide the stratification of patients for adjuvant therapy in clinical trials. Another promising application is monitoring the response of micrometastatic cells to adjuvant therapies, which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up. The present review summarizes the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic breast cancer cells in bone marrow.

  5. Metastatic Breast Cancer With ESR1 Mutation: Clinical Management Considerations From the Molecular and Precision Medicine (MAP) Tumor Board at Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iafrate, John A.; Sundaresan, Tilak; Younger, Jerry; Nardi, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    and mediate resistance to aromatase inhibitors. ESR1 mutations may be detected by genomic sequencing of tissue biopsies of the metastatic tumor or by sequencing the circulating tumor cells or tumor DNA (ctDNA). Sequencing results may lead to a therapeutic “match” with an existing FDA-approved drug or match with an experimental agent that fits the clinical setting. PMID:27551012

  6. Reconstruction of the natural history of metastatic cancer and assessment of the effects of surgery: Gompertzian growth of the primary tumor.

    PubMed

    Hanin, Leonid; Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with retrospective reconstruction of the individual natural history of solid cancer and assessment of the effects of treatment on metastatic progression. This is achieved through a mathematical model of cancer progression accounting for the growth of the primary tumor, shedding of metastases, their dormancy and growth at secondary sites. To describe dynamics of the primary tumor, we used the Gompertz law, a parsimonious model of tumor growth accounting for its saturation. Parameters of the model were estimated from the age and volume of the primary tumor at surgery and volumes of detectable bone metastases collected from one breast cancer patient and one prostate cancer patient. This allowed us to estimate, for each patient, the ages at cancer onset and inception of all detected metastases, the expected metastasis latency time, parameters of the Gompertzian growth of the primary tumor, and the rates of growth of metastases before and after surgery. We found that for both patients: (1) onset of metastasis occurred when primary tumor was undetectable; (2) inception of all surveyed metastases except one occurred before surgery; and most importantly, (3) resection of the primary tumor led to a dramatic increase in the rate of growth of metastases. The model provides an excellent fit to the observed volumes of bone metastases in both patients. Our results agree well with those obtained previously based on exponential growth of the primary tumor, which serves as model validation. Our findings support the notion of metastatic dormancy and indirectly confirm the existence of stem-like cancer cells in breast and prostate tumors. We also explored the logistic law of primary tumor growth; however, it degenerated into the exponential law for both patients analyzed. The conclusions of this work are supported by a vast body of experimental, clinical and epidemiological knowledge accumulated over the last century.

  7. Effect of pedicle fixation combined with 125I seed implantation for metastatic thoracolumbar tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiale; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy in treating metastatic thoracolumbar tumors. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of seven metastatic thoracolumbar tumor patients who received pedicle fixation combined with radioactive 125I seed implantation brachytherapy in our department between January 2009 and December 2013 was performed. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were observed and recorded. The changes in the scores at each time point were compared. Results All the patients underwent a successful operation, without any complications during their hospitalization. All the patients received postoperative follow-up, and the duration of follow-up was 15–50 months, with an average of 32.2 months. One pancreatic cancer patient died of liver failure and hypoproteinemia 28 months post surgery. The VAS scores of patients before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were 7.43±0.98, 2.71±0.49, 3.00±0.82, and 4.29±0.98, respectively; the KPS scores were 52.9±9.5, 84.3±5.3, 75.7±5.3, and 72.9±4.9, respectively. These results suggest that the VAS score at each time point was significantly decreased compared with that before the operation, while the KPS score was significantly increased compared with that before the operation. Both differences had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion As a therapy for advanced malignant tumors with thoracolumbar metastasis, pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy can effectively relieve short-term pain and improve patient’s quality of life. PMID:27274307

  8. A Trial of PT2977 Tablets In Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-22

    Advanced Solid Tumors; Solid Tumor; Solid Carcinoma; Solid Tumor, Adult; ccRCC; RCC, Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; RCC; Kidney Cancer; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma, Metastatic; Renal Cell Carcinoma Recurrent; Renal Cell Carcinoma, Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma

  9. [Successful therapy of metastatic basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib].

    PubMed

    Zutt, M; Mazur, F; Bergmann, M; Lemke, A J; Kaune, K M

    2014-11-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with giant basal cell carcinoma on the abdomen which had metastasized. He was treated with oral vismodegib. Both the primary ulcerated tumor on the abdomen and the metastases responded. Vismodegib was well tolerated without significant side effects. The tumor recurred promptly after vismodegib was discontinued, and then was resistant to therapy when vismodegib was re-administered.

  10. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 expression enhances the metastatic collective migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaminota, Teppei; Yano, Hajime; Shiota, Kohei; Nomura, Noriko; Yaguchi, Haruna; Kirino, Yui; Ohara, Kentaro; Tetsumura, Issei; Sanada, Tomoyoshi; Ugumori, Toru; Tanaka, Junya; Hato, Naohito

    2017-04-22

    Cancer cells can migrate as collectives during invasion and/or metastasis; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of this form of migration are less clear compared with single cell migration following epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger1 (NHE1) expression has been suggested to have malignant roles in a number of cancer cell lines and in vivo tumor models. Furthermore, a metastatic human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line (SASL1m) that was isolated based on its increased metastatic potential also exhibited higher NHE1 expression than its parental line SAS. Time-lapse video recordings indicated that both cell lines migrate as collectives, although with different features, e.g., SASL1m was much more active and changed the direction of migration more frequently than SAS cells, whereas locomotive activities were comparable. SASL1m cells also exhibited higher invasive activity than SAS in Matrigel invasion assays. shRNA-mediated NHE1 knockdown in SASL1m led to reduced locomotive and invasive activities, suggesting a critical role for NHE1 in the collective migration of SASL1m cells. SASL1m cells also exhibited a higher metastatic rate than SAS cells in a mouse lymph node metastasis model, while NHE1 knockdown suppressed in vivo SASL1m metastasis. Finally, elevated NHE1 expression was observed in human HNSCC tissue, and Cariporide, a specific NHE1 inhibitor, reduced the invasive activity of SASL1m cells, implying NHE1 could be a target for anti-invasion/metastasis therapy.

  11. Management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma – mini review

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Himanshu; Sood, Swapan

    2015-01-01

    The management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has evolved considerably in the last decade. A number of different systemic molecular targeted agents that have been recently approved have improved the survival of patients with mRCC. This mini-review focuses on the implementation of multi-modality therapy in the management of mRCC and the approved indications of the various available novel agents. These novel agents have expanded our armamentarium and improved clinical outcomes of this challenging disease that has considerable biological heterogeneity and clinical variability. PMID:28326262

  12. α-Tubulin acetylation elevated in metastatic and basal-like breast cancer cells promotes microtentacle formation, adhesion, and invasive migration.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Amanda E; Vitolo, Michele I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Charpentier, Monica S; Goloubeva, Olga G; Ioffe, Olga B; Tuttle, Kimberly C; Slovic, Jana; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Martin, Stuart S

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cases of breast cancer pose the primary challenge in clinical management of this disease, demanding the identification of effective therapeutic strategies that remain wanting. In this study, we report that elevated levels of α-tubulin acetylation are a sufficient cause of metastatic potential in breast cancer. In suspended cell culture conditions, metastatic breast cancer cells exhibited high α-tubulin acetylation levels that extended along microtentacle (McTN) protrusions. Mutation of the acetylation site on α-tubulin and enzymatic modulation of this posttranslational modification exerted a significant impact on McTN frequency and the reattachment of suspended tumor cells. Reducing α-tubulin acetylation significantly inhibited migration but did not affect proliferation. In an analysis of more than 140 matched primary and metastatic tumors from patients, we found that acetylation was maintained and in many cases increased in lymph node metastases compared with primary tumors. Proteomic analysis of an independent cohort of more than 390 patient specimens further documented the relationship between increased α-tubulin acetylation and the aggressive behaviors of basal-like breast cancers, with a trend toward increased risk of disease progression and death in patients with high-intensity α-tubulin acetylation in primary tumors. Taken together, our results identify a tight correlation between acetylated α-tubulin levels and aggressive metastatic behavior in breast cancer, with potential implications for the definition of a simple prognostic biomarker in patients with breast cancer.

  13. CXCR3 as a molecular target in breast cancer metastasis: inhibition of tumor cell migration and promotion of host anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiquan; Yan, H Hannah; Pang, Yanli; Jian, Jiang; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Liang, Xinhua; Weiss, Jonathan M; Wiltrout, Robert H; Hollander, M Christine; Yang, Li

    2015-12-22

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors have critical roles in cancer metastasis and have emerged as one of the targeting options in cancer therapy. However, the treatment efficacy on both tumor and host compartments needs to be carefully evaluated. Here we report that targeting CXCR3 decreased tumor cell migration and at the same time improved host anti-tumor immunity. We observed an increased expression of CXCR3 in metastatic tumor cells compared to those from non-metastatic tumor cells. Knockdown (KD) of CXCR3 in metastatic tumor cells suppressed tumor cell migration and metastasis. Importantly, CXCR3 expression in clinical breast cancer samples correlated with progression and metastasis. For the host compartment, deletion of CXCR3 in all host cells in 4T1 mammary tumor model significantly decreased metastasis. The underlying mechanisms involve a decreased expression of IL-4, IL-10, iNOs, and Arg-1 in myeloid cells and an increased T cell response. IFN-γ neutralization diminished the metastasis inhibition in the CXCR3 knockout (KO) mice bearing 4T1 tumors, suggesting a critical role of host CXCR3 in immune suppression. Consistently, targeting CXCR3 using a small molecular inhibitor (AMG487) significantly suppressed metastasis and improved host anti-tumor immunity. Our findings demonstrate that targeting CXCR3 is effective in both tumor and host compartments, and suggest that CXCR3 inhibition is likely to avoid adverse effects on host cells.

  14. Monotherapy with a tumor-targeting mutant of Salmonella typhimurium cures orthotopic metastatic mouse models of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Geller, Jack; Ma, Huaiyu; Yang, Meng; Penman, Sheldon; Hoffman, Robert M

    2007-06-12

    Bacterial infection occasionally has a marked therapeutic effect on malignancies, as noted as early as the 19th century. Recently, there have been attempts to develop cancer treatment by using tumor-targeting bacteria. These treatments were developed to deliver therapeutic molecules specifically to tumors. Researchers used anaerobic microorganisms that preferentially grew in necrotic tumor areas. However, the resulting tumor killing was, at best, limited. We have developed a far more effective bacterial cancer therapy by targeting viable tumor tissue by using Salmonella typhimurium leu-arg auxotrophs. Although these bacteria grow in viable as well as necrotic areas of tumors, the nutritional auxo trophy severely restricts growth in normal tissue. In the current study, we measured the antitumor efficacy of the S. typhimurium A1-R mutant, which is auxotrophic for leu-arg and has increased antitumor virulence selected by tumor passage. A1-R was used to treat metastatic PC-3 human prostate tumors that had been orthotopically implanted in nude mice. GFP was used to image tumor and metastatic growth. Of the 10 mice with the PC-3 tumors that were injected weekly with S. typhimurium A1-R, 7 were alive and well at the time the last untreated mouse died. Four A1-R-treated mice remain alive and well 6 months after implantation. Ten additional nontumor-bearing mice were injected weekly to determine the toxicity of S. typhimurium A1-R. No toxic effects were observed. The approach described here, where bacterial monotherapy effectively treats metastatic prostate tumors, is a significant improvement over previous bacterial tumor-therapy strategies that require combination with toxic chemotherapy.

  15. Multimodal Approach to the Management of Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (MESCC) Due to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tancioni, Flavio; Navarria, Pierina; Lorenzetti, Martin A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Masci, Giovanna; Mancosu, Pietro; Alloisio, Marco; Morenghi, Emanuela; Santoro, Armando; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a multidisciplinary approach for treatment of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression in terms of feasibility, local control, and survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine consecutive patients treated between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. The most common primary cancers were lung, breast, and kidney cancers. Ninety-eight surgical procedures were performed. Radiotherapy was performed within the first month postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated by modified visual analog scale for pain, Frankel scale for neurologic deficit, and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. Nearly all patients (93%) had back pain before treatment, whereas major or minor preoperative neurologic deficit was present in 62 cases (63%). Results: Clinical remission of pain was obtained in the vast majority of patients (91%). Improvement of neurologic deficit was observed in 45 cases (72.5%). Local relapse occurred in 10%. Median survival was 11 months (range, 0-46 months). Overall survival at 1 year was 43.6%. Type of primary tumor significantly affected survival. Conclusions: In patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression, the combination of surgery plus radiotherapy is feasible and provides clinical benefit in most patients. The discussion of each single case within a multidisciplinary team has been of pivotal importance in implementing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  16. The Cancer Stem Cell Niche: How Essential is the Niche in Regulating Stemness of Tumor Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Plaks, Vicki; Kong, Niwen; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are tumor cells that have the principal properties of self-renewal, clonal tumor initiation capacity and clonal long-term repopulation potential. CSCs reside in niches, which are anatomically distinct regions within the tumor microenvironment. These niches maintain the principle properties of CSCs, preserve their phenotypic plasticity, protect them from the immune system and facilitate their metastatic potential. In this perspective, we focus on the CSC niche and discuss its contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Since CSCs survive many commonly employed cancer therapies, we examine the prospects of targeting the niche components as preferable therapeutic targets. PMID:25748930

  17. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to gallbladder: a survival advantage to simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hellenthal, Nicholas J; Stewart, Gregory S; Cambio, Angelo J; Delair, Sean M

    2007-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a relatively uncommon cancer. Patients presenting with a renal adenocarcinoma are often found to have evidence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Herein, we describe the case of a 39-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma and a synchronous metastatic focus to the gallbladder. The patient underwent a successful simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy and is doing well 30 months after surgery without evidence of disease recurrence. A thorough metastatic work-up along with aggressive surgical intervention in patients with renal cell carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci can provide a long-term favorable outcome.

  18. Metastatic cervical adenopathy from tumors of unknown origin: the role of CT

    SciTech Connect

    Muraki, A.S.; Mancuso, A.A.; Harnsberger, H.R.

    1984-09-01

    A prospective CT study of seventeen patients with metastatic cervical adenopathy from tumors at an unknown primary site, believed most likely to be in the upper aerodigestive tract, was performed. CT suggested a primary site in ten cases, of which four were confirmed by surgery or biopsy. In four cases, CT did not identify a suspicious site and no primary site was identified during triple endoscopy, sometimes with blind biopsies. CT was able to suggest correct causes other than carcinoma in three cases and gave useful information about the extent of nodal disease. CT should be used as part of the routine evaluation of patients with this clinical problem. A diagnostic algorithm is suggested in which CT is integrated with modern endoscopic and aspiration cytologic techniques.

  19. Von Hippel Lindau disease with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hatipoglu, Esra; Kepicoglu, Hasan; Rusen, Elif; Kabasakal, Levent; Gundogdu, Sadi; Kadioglu, Pinar

    2013-01-01

    We present a 39-year-old woman who was previously diagnosed with Von Hippel Lindau Disease (VHLD). She had surgery and radiotherapy for cranial hemangioblastoma (HA) 11 years ago and had unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma in another hospital 6 month prior to her admission to our center. Moon face, buffalo hump, central obesity, progressive weight gain and menstrual irregularities persisted after adrenalectomy. Her laboratory results were consistent with ectopic Cushing's syndrome (ECS). A pancreatic solid mass with a nodule on the left lung were revealed upon computed tomography. In addition, Gallium-68 Somatostatin Receptor PET confirmed the pancreatic involvement and demonstrated additional lesions on the left lung and in the aortocaval lymphatic system on the right side, suggesting metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with [177Lutetium-DOTA0,Tyr3] octreotate was performed on the patient, with no side effects observed. She was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the first cycle.

  20. Sarcosine Up-Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle Progression of Metastatic Models of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Zbynek; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Michalek, Petr; Polanska, Hana; Masarik, Michal; Vit, Vitezslav; Plevova, Mariana; Pacik, Dalibor; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The effects of sarcosine on the processes driving prostate cancer (PCa) development remain still unclear. Herein, we show that a supplementation of metastatic PCa cells (androgen independent PC-3 and androgen dependent LNCaP) with sarcosine stimulates cells proliferation in vitro. Similar stimulatory effects were observed also in PCa murine xenografts, in which sarcosine treatment induced a tumor growth and significantly reduced weight of treated mice (p < 0.05). Determination of sarcosine metabolism-related amino acids and enzymes within tumor mass revealed significantly increased glycine, serine and sarcosine concentrations after treatment accompanied with the increased amount of sarcosine dehydrogenase. In both tumor types, dimethylglycine and glycine-N-methyltransferase were affected slightly, only. To identify the effects of sarcosine treatment on the expression of genes involved in any aspect of cancer development, we further investigated expression profiles of excised tumors using cDNA electrochemical microarray followed by validation using the semi-quantitative PCR. We found 25 differentially expressed genes in PC-3, 32 in LNCaP tumors and 18 overlapping genes. Bioinformatical processing revealed strong sarcosine-related induction of genes involved particularly in a cell cycle progression. Our exploratory study demonstrates that sarcosine stimulates PCa metastatic cells irrespectively of androgen dependence. Overall, the obtained data provides valuable information towards understanding the role of sarcosine in PCa progression and adds another piece of puzzle into a picture of sarcosine oncometabolic potential. PMID:27824899

  1. Immunohistochemical molecular gene expression profile of metastatic brain tumor as a potent personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yasutaka; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Yuzawa, Sayaka; Mohri, Hiromi; Kanno, Hiromi; Hatanaka, Yutaka; Kimura, Taichi; Tanino, Mishie; Tanaka, Shinya

    2013-07-01

    Recent progress in molecule-targeting therapy may yield personalized therapeutic strategies for patients with metastatic brain tumors (MBT), the most frequently encountered intracranial tumors. For this purpose, we investigated the molecular expression profile of MBT to establish the pathological basis for personalized diagnosis. We studied 166 MBT specimens including 70 cases of lung cancer and 34 cases of breast cancer, and performed immunostaining for EGFR, COX-2, and O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), among others, which could be target molecules for therapeutic agents or enable prediction of drug efficacy. Loss of MGMT expression was observed in approximately 20-40% of MBT derived from lung, breast, and gastrointestinal cancers, indicating the possibility of treatment of MBT patients with temozolomide. In addition, MBT expressed a variety of receptor tyrosine kinases, for example EGFR and HER2, and signal transduction molecules, for example phospho-mTOR and COX-2, irrespective of tumor origin, enabling individualized medication with molecule-targeting drugs. We also identified alteration of molecular expression profile in 4 MBT cases during recurrence. Our results not only reveal the molecular characteristics of MBT but also suggest the possibility of potent personalized medicine for MBT patients.

  2. Neoadjuvant antiangiogenic therapy reveals contrasts in primary and metastatic tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ebos, John M L; Mastri, Michalis; Lee, Christina R; Tracz, Amanda; Hudson, John M; Attwood, Kristopher; Cruz-Munoz, William R; Jedeszko, Christopher; Burns, Peter; Kerbel, Robert S

    2014-10-31

    Thousands of cancer patients are currently in clinical trials evaluating antiangiogenic therapy in the neoadjuvant setting, which is the treatment of localized primary tumors prior to surgical intervention. The rationale is that shrinking a tumor will improve surgical outcomes and minimize growth of occult micrometastatic disease-thus delaying post-surgical recurrence and improving survival. But approved VEGF pathway inhibitors have not been tested in clinically relevant neoadjuvant models that compare pre- and post-surgical treatment effects. Using mouse models of breast, kidney, and melanoma metastasis, we demonstrate that primary tumor responses to neoadjuvant VEGFR TKI treatment do not consistently correlate with improved post-surgical survival, with survival worsened in certain settings. Similar negative effects did not extend to protein-based VEGF pathway inhibitors and could be reversed with altered dose, surgical timing, and treatment duration, or when VEGFR TKIs are combined with metronomic 'anti-metastatic' chemotherapy regimens. These studies represent the first attempt to recapitulate the complex clinical parameters of neoadjuvant therapy in mice and identify a novel tool to compare systemic antiangiogenic treatment effects on localized and disseminated disease.

  3. Modulating the vascular behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells by curcumin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Anna L.; Mascolo, Daniele Di; Singh, Jaykrishna; Franceschi, Maria S. De; Carallo, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The spreading of tumor cells to secondary sites (tumor metastasis) is a complex process that involves multiple, sequential steps. Vascular adhesion and extravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one, critical step. Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa, is known to have anti-tumoral, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory properties and affect the expression of cell adhesion molecules, mostly by targeting the NF-κB transcription factor. Here, upon treatment with curcumin, the vascular behavior of three different estrogen receptor negative (ER–) breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) is analyzed using a microfluidic system. First, the dose response to curcumin is characterized at 24, 48, and 72 h using a XTT assay. For all three cell lines, an IC50 larger than 20 µM is observed at 72 h; whereas no significant reduction in cell viability is detected for curcumin concentrations up to 10 µM. Upon 24 h treatment at 10 µM of curcumin, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells show a decrease in adhesion propensity of 40% (p = 0.02) and 47% (p = 0.001), respectively. No significant change is documented for the less metastatic MDA-MB-468 cells. All three treated cell lines show a 20% increase in rolling velocity from 48.3 to 58.7 µm/s in SK-BR-3, from 64.1 to 73.77 µm/s in MDA-MB-231, and from 57.5 to 74.4 µm/s in MDA-MB-468. Collectively, these results suggest that mild curcumin treatments could limit the metastatic potential of these adenocarcinoma cell lines, possibly by altering the expression of adhesion molecules, and the organization and stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton. Future studies will elucidate the biophysical mechanisms regulating this curcumin-induced behavior and further explore the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:23162792

  4. Functional EpoR Pathway Utilization Is Not Detected in Primary Tumor Cells Isolated from Human Breast, Non-Small Cell Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Tumor Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Scott D.; Rossi, John M.; Paweletz, Katherine L.; Fitzpatrick, V. Dan; Begley, C. Glenn; Busse, Leigh; Elliott, Steve; McCaffery, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials in oncology have reported increased mortality or disease progression associated with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. One hypothesis proposes that erythropoiesis-stimulating agents directly stimulate tumor proliferation and/or survival through cell-surface receptors. To test this hypothesis and examine if human tumors utilize the erythropoietin receptor pathway, the response of tumor cells to human recombinant erythropoietin was investigated in disaggregated tumor cells obtained from 186 patients with colorectal, breast, lung, ovarian, head and neck, and other tumors. A cocktail of well characterized tumor growth factors (EGF, HGF, and IGF-1) were analyzed in parallel as a positive control to determine whether freshly-isolated tumor cells were able to respond to growth factor activation ex vivo. Exposing tumor cells to the growth factor cocktail resulted in stimulation of survival and proliferation pathways as measured by an increase in phosphorylation of the downstream signaling proteins AKT and ERK. In contrast, no activation by human recombinant erythropoietin was observed in isolated tumor cells. Though tumor samples exhibited a broad range of cell-surface expression of EGFR, c-Met, and IGF-1R, no cell-surface erythropoietin receptor was detected in tumor cells from the 186 tumors examined (by flow cytometry or Western blot). Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents did not act directly upon isolated tumor cells to stimulate pathways known to promote proliferation or survival of human tumor cells isolated from primary and metastatic tumor tissues. PMID:25807104

  5. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of stomach acid. Tumors that arise from islet ... try and shrink the tumors. If the abnormal production of hormones is causing symptoms, you may receive ...

  6. Gastric type endocervical adenocarcinoma: an aggressive tumor with unusual metastatic patterns and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S.; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R.; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C.; Soslow, Robert A.; Park, Kay J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV-associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of three institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (one Li-Fraumeni, one Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II–IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least one site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 months); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS vs. 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon. PMID:26457350

  7. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy. PMID:27795755

  8. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  9. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altissimi, Giancarlo; Turchetta, Rosaria; Rigante, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy. PMID:28168075

  10. Registered report: Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, Francesca; Doroudchi, M Mehdi; Ismail, Nawfal; Carreno, Alberto; Griner, Erin; Anna Lim, Minyoung; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by replicating selected results from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology published between 2010 and 2012. This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization’ by Malanchi and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Malanchi et al., 2012). The key experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2H, 3A, 3B, and S13. In these experiments, Malanchi and colleagues analyze messenger RNA levels of periostin (POSTN) in pulmonary fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells isolated from mice with micrometastases to determine which cell type is producing POSTN in the metastatic niche (Figure 2H; Malanchi et al., 2012). Additionally, they examine MMTV-PyMT control or POSTN null mice to test the effect of POSTN on primary tumor growth and metastasis (Figures 3A, 3B, and S13; Malanchi et al., 2012). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06938.001 PMID:26086719

  11. Hitting the Bull’s-Eye in Metastatic Cancers—NSAIDs Elevate ROS in Mitochondria, Inducing Malignant Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stephen John; Pritchard, Rhys; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ralph, Raymond Keith

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastases that impede the function of vital organs are a major cause of cancer related mortality. Mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by hypoxia, low nutrient levels, or other stresses, such as genotoxic events, act as key drivers of the malignant changes in primary tumors to enhance their progression to metastasis. Emerging evidence now indicates that mitochondrial modifications and mutations resulting from oxidative stress, and leading to OxPhos stimulation and/or enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, are essential for promoting and sustaining the highly metastatic phenotype. Moreover, the modified mitochondria in emerging or existing metastatic cancer cells, by their irreversible differences, provide opportunities for selectively targeting their mitochondrial functions with a one-two punch. The first blow would block their anti-oxidative defense, followed by the knockout blow—promoting production of excess ROS, capitulating the terminal stage—activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), specifically killing metastatic cancer cells or their precursors. This review links a wide area of research relevant to cellular mechanisms that affect mitochondria activity as a major source of ROS production driving the pro-oxidative state in metastatic cancer cells. Each of the important aspects affecting mitochondrial function are discussed including: hypoxia, HIFs and PGC1 induced metabolic changes, increased ROS production to induce a more pro-oxidative state with reduced antioxidant defenses. It then focuses on how the mitochondria, as a major source of ROS in metastatic cancer cells driving the pro-oxidative state of malignancy enables targeting drugs affecting many of these altered processes and why the NSAIDs are an excellent example of mitochondria-targeted agents that provide a one-two knockout activating the mPTP and their efficacy as selective anticancer metastasis drugs. PMID:25688484

  12. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pukazhendhi, Geetha; Glück, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) measurement in peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer offers prognostic information. In this review, we will try to identify evidence that could be used for prognosis, predictive power to draw this tool to clinical utility. We reviewed 81 manuscripts, and categorized those in discovery datasets, prognostic factors in metastatic breast cancer, identification of clinical utility in early breast cancer and in novel approaches. With each patient responding differently to chemotherapy, more efficient markers would improve clinical outcome. Current CTC diagnostic techniques use epithelial markers predominantly; however, the most appropriate method is the measurement of circulating DNA. It has been hypothesized that micrometastasis occurs early in the development of tumors. That implies the presence of CTCs in nonmetastatic setting. The origin of stimulus for malignant transformation is yet unknown. The role of microenvironment as a stimulus is also being investigated. It has been shown that CTCs vary in numbers with chemotherapy. The markers, which are followed-up in the primary tumors, are also being studied on the CTCs. There is discordance of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status between the primary tumor and CTCs. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the CTCs. With genetic profiling and molecular characterization of CTCs, it is possible to overcome the diagnostic difficulties. Evidence for clinical utility of CTC as prognostic and predictive marker is increasing. Appropriate patient stratification according to CTC determination among other tests, would make personalized cancer therapy more feasible. PMID:25191136

  13. Tumor Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a dynamic cellular “organ” that controls passage of nutrients into tissues, maintains the flow of blood, and regulates the trafficking of leukocytes. In tumors, factors such as hypoxia and chronic growth factor stimulation result in endothelial dysfunction. For example, tumor blood vessels have irregular diameters; they are fragile, leaky, and blood flow is abnormal. There is now good evidence that these abnormalities in the tumor endothelium contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, determining the biological basis underlying these abnormalities is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of tumor progression and facilitating the design and delivery of effective antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:22393533

  14. Ribociclib and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients Metastatic or Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-30

    Metastatic Angiosarcoma; Metastatic Epithelioid Sarcoma; Metastatic Fibrosarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Liposarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Undifferentiated (Embryonal) Sarcoma

  15. Systemic Delivery of Fusogenic Membrane Glycoprotein-expressing Neural Stem Cells to Selectively Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Detu; Lam, Dang Hoang; Purwanti, Yovita Ida; Goh, Sal Lee; Wu, Chunxiao; Zeng, Jieming; Fan, Weimin; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenously injected neural stem cells (NSCs) can infiltrate both primary and metastatic tumor sites; thus, they are attractive tumor-targeting vehicles for delivering anticancer agents. However, because the systemic distribution of the injected NSCs involves normal organs and might induce off-target actions leading to unintended side effects, clinical applications of this approach is impeded. Given that the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can promote the formation of multinucleated syncytia to kill cells in a pH-dependent manner, we engineered a pH sensor of VSV-G and generated a novel VSV-G mutant that efficiently promotes syncytium formation at the tumor extracellular pH (pHe) but not at pH 7.4. Using transduced NSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the VSV-G mutant was delivered into mice with metastatic breast cancers in the lung through tail vein injection. Compared with the conventional stem cell-based gene therapy that uses the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene, this treatment did not display toxicity to normal non-targeted organs while retaining therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing organs. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of a new approach for achieving tumor-selective killing effects following systemic stem cell administration. Its potential in stem cell-based gene therapy for metastatic cancer is worthy of further exploration. PMID:23752308

  16. Atlas of hepatic tumors and focal lesions: Arteriographic and tomographic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, O.; Schwartz, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes the diagnosis of liver tumors. Topics considered include general considerations, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma, mesenchyomoma, sarcoma, hemangioma, hepatic cell adenoma, focal nodular hyperlasia (FNH), hamartoma, echinococcus cyst, abscess, AV fistula, hepatic artery aneurysm, metastatic carcinoma-colon, metastatic cholangiocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, metastatic merkel cell and extrahepatic tumor.

  17. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase overexpression increases metastatic growth of B16 melanoma cells in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Carretero, Julian; Ortega, Angel; Medina, Ignacio; Rodilla, Vicente; Pellicer, José A; Estrela, José M

    2002-01-01

    B16 melanoma (B16M) cells with high glutathione (GSH) content show rapid proliferation in vitro and high metastatic activity in the liver in vivo. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-mediated extracellular GSH cleavage and intracellular GSH synthesis were studied in vitro in B16M cells with high (F10) and low (F1) metastatic potential. GGT activity was modified by transfection with the human GGT gene (B16MF1/Tet-GGT cells) or by acivicin-induced inhibition. B16MF1/Tet-GGT and B16MF10 cells exhibited higher GSH content (35 +/- 6 and 40 +/- 5 nmol/10(6) cells, respectively) and GGT activity (89 +/- 9 and 37 +/- 7 mU/10(6) cells, respectively) as compared (P <.05) with B16MF1 cells (10 +/- 3 nmol GSH and 4 mU GGT/10(6) cells). Metastasis (number of foci/100 mm(3) of liver) increased in B16MF1 cells pretreated with GSH ester ( approximately 3-fold, P <.01), and decreased in B16MF1/Tet-GGT and B16MF10 cells pretreated with the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine (S,R)-sulphoximine ( approximately 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, P <.01). Liver, kidney, brain, lung, and erythrocyte GSH content in B16MF1/Tet-GGT- or B16MF10-bearing mice decreased as compared with B16MF1- and non-tumor-bearing mice. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1-independent sinusoidal GSH efflux from hepatocytes increased in B16MF1/Tet-GGT- or B16MF10-bearing mice ( approximately 2-fold, P <.01) as compared with non-tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicate that tumor GGT activity and an intertissue flow of GSH can regulate GSH content of melanoma cells and their metastatic growth in the liver.

  18. Revisiting Seed and Soil: Examining the Primary Tumor and Cancer Cell Foraging in Metastasis.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Amber E; Roy, Sounak; Brown, Joel S; Pienta, Kenneth J; Amend, Sarah R

    2017-02-16

    Metastasis is the consequence of a cancer cell that disperses from the primary tumor, travels throughout the body, and invades and colonizes a distant site.  Based on Paget's 1889 hypothesis, the majority of modern metastasis research focuses on the properties of the metastatic "seed and soil," but the implications of the primary tumor "soil" have been largely neglected. The rare lethal metastatic "seed" arises as a result of the selective pressures in the primary tumor. Optimal foraging theory describes how cancer cells adopt a mobile foraging strategy to balance predation risk and resource reward. Further selection in the dispersal corridors leading out of the primary tumor enhances the adaptive profile of the potentially metastatic cell. This review focuses on the selective pressures of the primary tumor "soil" that generate lethal metastatic "seeds" which is essential to understanding this critical component of prostate cancer metastasis.  Implications: Elucidating the selective pressures of the primary tumor "soil" that generate lethal metastatic "seeds" is essential to understand how and why metastasis occurs in prostate cancer.

  19. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  20. Optimization of a Neural Stem-Cell-Mediated Carboxylesterase/Irinotecan Gene Therapy for Metastatic Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gutova, Margarita; Goldstein, Leanne; Metz, Marianne; Hovsepyan, Anahit; Tsurkan, Lyudmila G; Tirughana, Revathiswari; Tsaturyan, Lusine; Annala, Alexander J; Synold, Timothy W; Wan, Zesheng; Seeger, Robert; Anderson, Clarke; Moats, Rex A; Potter, Philip M; Aboody, Karen S

    2017-03-17

    Despite improved survival for children with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma (NB), recurrent disease is a significant problem, with treatment options limited by anti-tumor efficacy, patient drug tolerance, and cumulative toxicity. We previously demonstrated that neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing a modified rabbit carboxylesterase (rCE) can distribute to metastatic NB tumor foci in multiple organs in mice and convert the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to the 1,000-fold more toxic topoisomerase-1 inhibitor SN-38, resulting in significant therapeutic efficacy. We sought to extend these studies by using a clinically relevant NSC line expressing a modified human CE (hCE1m6-NSCs) to establish proof of concept and identify an intravenous dose and treatment schedule that gave maximal efficacy. Human-derived NB cell lines were significantly more sensitive to treatment with hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan as compared with drug alone. This was supported by pharmacokinetic studies in subcutaneous NB mouse models demonstrating tumor-specific conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Furthermore, NB-bearing mice that received repeat treatment with intravenous hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan showed significantly lower tumor burden (1.4-fold, p = 0.0093) and increased long-term survival compared with mice treated with drug alone. These studies support the continued development of NSC-mediated gene therapy for improved clinical outcome in NB patients.

  1. Differential Inhibition of Ex-Vivo Tumor Kinase Activity by Vemurafenib in BRAF(V600E) and BRAF Wild-Type Metastatic Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tahiri, Andliena; Røe, Kathrine; Ree, Anne H.; de Wijn, Rik; Risberg, Karianne; Busch, Christian; Lønning, Per E.; Kristensen, Vessela; Geisler, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Background Treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma patients harboring BRAF(V600E) has improved drastically after the discovery of the BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib. However, drug resistance is a recurring problem, and prognoses are still very bad for patients harboring BRAF wild-type. Better markers for targeted therapy are therefore urgently needed. Methodology In this study, we assessed the individual kinase activity profiles in 26 tumor samples obtained from patients with metastatic malignant melanoma using peptide arrays with 144 kinase substrates. In addition, we studied the overall ex-vivo inhibitory effects of vemurafenib and sunitinib on kinase activity status. Results Overall kinase activity was significantly higher in lysates from melanoma tumors compared to normal skin tissue. Furthermore, ex-vivo incubation with both vemurafenib and sunitinib caused significant decrease in phosphorylation of kinase substrates, i.e kinase activity. While basal phosphorylation profiles were similar in BRAF wild-type and BRAF(V600E) tumors, analysis with ex-vivo vemurafenib treatment identified a subset of 40 kinase substrates showing stronger inhibition in BRAF(V600E) tumor lysates, distinguishing the BRAF wild-type and BRAF(V600E) tumors. Interestingly, a few BRAF wild-type tumors showed inhibition profiles similar to BRAF(V600E) tumors. The kinase inhibitory effect of vemurafenib was subsequently analyzed in cell lines harboring different BRAF mutational status with various vemurafenib sensitivity in-vitro. Conclusions Our findings suggest that multiplex kinase substrate array analysis give valuable information about overall tumor kinase activity. Furthermore, intra-assay exposure to kinase inhibiting drugs may provide a useful tool to study mechanisms of resistance, as well as to identify predictive markers. PMID:24023633

  2. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  3. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  5. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  6. Eradication of metastatic mouse cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade by suppression of myeloid-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, KiBem; Skora, Andrew D; Li, Zhaobo; Liu, Qiang; Tam, Ada J; Blosser, Richard L; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2014-08-12

    Impressive responses have been observed in patients treated with checkpoint inhibitory anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) or anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibodies. However, immunotherapy against poorly immunogenic cancers remains a challenge. Here we report that treatment with both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies was unable to eradicate large, modestly immunogenic CT26 tumors or metastatic 4T1 tumors. Cotreatment with epigenetic-modulating drugs and checkpoint inhibitors markedly improved treatment outcomes, curing more than 80% of the tumor-bearing mice. Functional studies revealed that the primary targets of the epigenetic modulators were myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). A PI3K inhibitor that reduced circulating MDSCs also eradicated 4T1 tumors in 80% of the mice when combined with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Thus, cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade can be cured by eliminating MDSCs.

  7. Right ventricular metastatic tumor from a primary carcinoma of uterine cervix: A cause of pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Han, Gwan Hee; Kwon, Do Youn; Ulak, Roshani; Lee, Jong-Min; Lee, Seon-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    The presence of intracavitary cardiac metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is extremely rare. The diagnosis is made almost exclusively postmortem. Apart from causing intracardiac obstruction, it can present as pulmonary emboli and the prognosis is extremely poor. It is important to suspect this diagnosis in patient with recurrent pulmonary emboli. Due to