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Sample records for cell tumor metastatic

  1. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  2. Biomarker utility of circulating tumor cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Lorigan, Paul; Zhou, Cong; Lancashire, Matthew; Booth, Jessica; Cummings, Jeff; Califano, Raffaele; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Dive, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Advances in targeted agents and immunotherapy have improved outcomes in metastatic disease, but biomarkers are required to optimize treatment. We determined the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and explored their utility as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. A total of 101 patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were recruited prospectively. CTC number was determined using the CellSearch platform and melanoma kits in samples taken at baseline and serially during treatment. CTC numbers ranged between 0 and 36 per 7.5 ml blood; 26% of patients had ≥ 2 CTCs. Baseline CTC number was prognostic for median overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis (2.6 vs. 7.2 months (P<0.011) for patients with ≥ 2 CTCs vs. <2 CTCs, respectively). In multivariate analysis, CTC number was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.403, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.303-4.430, P=0.005). Patients receiving treatment in whom CTC number remained ≥ 2 CTCs during treatment had shorter median OS than those who maintained <2 CTCs (7 vs. 10 months, HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.81, log-rank test P=0.015). In conclusion, CTC number in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients is prognostic for OS with a cutoff of 2 CTCs per 7.5 ml blood. CTC number measured before and throughout treatment provided additional prognostic information. Larger studies are warranted to confirm CTC biomarker utility in melanoma patients. PMID:23223143

  3. Is the Blood-Brain Barrier Relevant in Metastatic Germ Cell Tumor?

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, Jose M. Schneider, Bryan P.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Germ cell tumors are uniquely chemosensitive and curable, even with advanced metastatic disease. Central nervous system recurrence can terminate a complete remission in other chemosensitive tumors, such as small cell lung cancer, because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We propose to document that the BBB is also relevant in germ cell tumors despite their dramatic chemosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We present five cases illustrating the concept of the BBB in patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy. Results: In our large series of patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy, we identified 5 unique patients. These patients were rendered free of disease only to experience relapse in the brain alone. This included 1 patient who initially had good-risk metastatic disease by means of the International Germ Cell Collaborative Group staging system at the onset of chemotherapy. Conclusions: The BBB is relevant in patients with metastatic testicular cancer.

  4. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  5. Optical Detection and Virotherapy of Live Metastatic Tumor Cells in Body Fluids with Vaccinia Strains

    PubMed Central

    Minev, Boris R.; Zimmermann, Martina; Aguilar, Richard J.; Zhang, Qian; Sturm, Julia B.; Fend, Falko; Yu, Yong A.; Cappello, Joseph; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells in body fluids are important targets for treatment, and critical surrogate markers for evaluating cancer prognosis and therapeutic response. Here we report, for the first time, that live metastatic tumor cells in blood samples from mice bearing human tumor xenografts and in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with cancer were successfully detected using a tumor cell-specific recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV). In contrast to the FDA-approved CellSearch system, VACV detects circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a cancer biomarker-independent manner, thus, free of any bias related to the use of antibodies, and can be potentially a universal system for detection of live CTCs of any tumor type, not limited to CTCs of epithelial origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that VACV was effective in preventing and reducing circulating tumor cells in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Importantly, a single intra-peritoneal delivery of VACV resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid from a patient with gastric cancer. Taken together, these results suggest VACV to be a useful tool for quantitative detection of live tumor cells in liquid biopsies as well as a potentially effective treatment for reducing or eliminating live tumor cells in body fluids of patients with metastatic disease. PMID:24019862

  6. Tumor cells disseminate early, but immunosurveillance limits metastatic outgrowth, in a mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Jo; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Wang, Xiaojie; Toh, Benjamin; Prakash, Celine; Hong, Michelle; Tan, Tze Guan; Zheng, Lin; Ong, Lai Chun; Jin, Yi; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Chow, Pierce; Yang, Henry; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Although metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death, it is not clear why some patients with localized cancer develop metastatic disease after complete resection of their primary tumor. Such relapses have been attributed to tumor cells that disseminate early and remain dormant for prolonged periods of time; however, little is known about the control of these disseminated tumor cells. Here, we have used a spontaneous mouse model of melanoma to investigate tumor cell dissemination and immune control of metastatic outgrowth. Tumor cells were found to disseminate throughout the body early in development of the primary tumor, even before it became clinically detectable. The disseminated tumor cells remained dormant for varying periods of time depending on the tissue, resulting in staggered metastatic outgrowth. Dormancy in the lung was associated with reduced proliferation of the disseminated tumor cells relative to the primary tumor. This was mediated, at least in part, by cytostatic CD8+ T cells, since depletion of these cells resulted in faster outgrowth of visceral metastases. Our findings predict that immune responses favoring dormancy of disseminated tumor cells, which we propose to be the seed of subsequent macroscopic metastases, are essential for prolonging the survival of early stage cancer patients and suggest that therapeutic strategies designed to reinforce such immune responses may produce marked benefits in these patients. PMID:20501944

  7. Circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madic, Jordan; Kiialainen, Anna; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Birzele, Fabian; Ramey, Guillemette; Leroy, Quentin; Rio Frio, Thomas; Vaucher, Isabelle; Raynal, Virginie; Bernard, Virginie; Lermine, Alban; Clausen, Inga; Giroud, Nicolas; Schmucki, Roland; Milder, Maud; Horn, Carsten; Spleiss, Olivia; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Weisser, Martin; Lebofsky, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a new circulating tumor biomarker which might be used as a prognostic biomarker in a way similar to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Here, we used the high prevalence of TP53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to compare ctDNA and CTC detection rates and prognostic value in metastatic TNBC patients. Forty patients were enrolled before starting a new line of treatment. TP53 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissues and in plasma DNA using two next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in parallel. Archived tumor tissue was sequenced successfully for 31/40 patients. TP53 mutations were found in 26/31 (84%) of tumor samples. The same mutation was detected in the matched plasma of 21/26 (81%) patients with an additional mutation found only in the plasma for one patient. Mutated allele fractions ranged from 2 to 70% (median 5%). The observed correlation between the two NGS approaches (R(2) = 0.903) suggested that ctDNA levels data were quantitative. Among the 27 patients with TP53 mutations, CTC count was ≥1 in 19 patients (70%) and ≥5 in 14 patients (52%). ctDNA levels had no prognostic impact on time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS), whereas CTC numbers were correlated with OS (p = 0.04) and marginally with TTP (p = 0.06). Performance status and elevated LDH also had significant prognostic impact. Here, absence of prognostic impact of baseline ctDNA level suggests that mechanisms of ctDNA release in metastatic TNBC may involve, beyond tumor burden, biological features that do not dramatically affect patient outcome.

  8. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Sita S.; Lawson, Corinne M.; Burton, Andrew G.; Rebhun, Robert B.; Steffey, Michele A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence. PMID:26933269

  9. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  10. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  11. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J.; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell—endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  12. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  13. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  14. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  15. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  16. A rare cause in etiology of left atrial mass: metastatic testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Huseyin, Serhat; Okyay, Ahmet; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tastekin, Ebru; Yılmaztepe, Mustafa; Taylan, Gökay; Canbaz, Suat; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Although intracardiac metastasis of germ cell tumors is rare, it can be localized in the right or left heart by disseminating spread and give their cardiac symptoms depending on the location of metastatic mass. We present a 38-year-old male patient with a preliminary diagnosis of testicular tumor who was followed by the medical oncology clinic with cerebrovascular event and heart failure symptoms. PMID:27212979

  17. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  18. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551–554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations. PMID:27403124

  19. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551-554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations. PMID:27403124

  20. Retroperitoneal metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Carrie A; De Las Casas, Luis E; Davis, Brian R

    2013-07-01

    Most testicular neoplasms are germ cell tumors, the vast majority of which represent seminomas. Most seminomas present localized to the testis, whereas nonseminomatous germ cell tumors more often present with lymph node metastases. Psoas abscesses generally arise from a contiguous intra-abdominal or pelvic infectious process, an adjacent focus of osteomyelitis or septic emboli from distant infectious foci. In this study, the case of a 24-year-old man who presented with a right psoas mass presumptively diagnosed as an abscess secondary to fever and leukocytosis is presented. The patient had a history of right testicular seminoma, and normal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and human chorionic gonadotropin. Surgical exploration and biopsy demonstrated seminoma metastasis. This case represents an extremely unusual clinical presentation of metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess. This unique case represents an unusual presentation of a recurrent germ cell tumor mimicking a psoas abscess. Awareness of possible metastatic testicular germ cell neoplasm as a psoas abscess could prevent diagnosis delay before retroperitoneal tumor debulking. PMID:23360792

  1. Characterization of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in paired primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma specimens

    PubMed Central

    Baine, Marina K.; Turcu, Gabriela; Zito, Christopher R.; Adeniran, Adebowale J.; Camp, Robert L.; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most chemo- and radio-resistant malignancies, with poor associated patient survival if the disease metastasizes. With recent advances in immunotherapy, particularly with PD-1/PD-L1 blockade, outcomes are improving, but a substantial subset of patients does not respond to the new agents. Identifying such patients and improving the therapeutic ratio has been a challenge, although much effort has been made to study PD-1/PD-L1 status in pre-treatment tumor. However, tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) content might also be predictive of response, and our goal was to characterize TIL content and PD-L1 expression in RCC tumors from various anatomic sites. Utilizing a quantitative immunofluorescence technique, TIL subsets were examined in matched primary and metastatic specimens. In metastatic specimens, we found an association between low CD8+ to Foxp3+ T-cell ratios and high levels of PD-L1. High PD-L1-expressing metastases were also found to be associated with tumors that were high in both CD4+ and Foxp3+ T-cell content. Taken together these results provide the basis for combining agents that target the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway with agonist of immune activation, particularly in treating RCC metastases with unfavorable tumor characteristics and microenvironment. In addition, CD8+ TIL density and CD8:Foxp3 T-cell ratio were higher in primary than metastatic specimens, supporting the need to assess distant sites for predictive biomarkers when treating disseminated disease. PMID:26317902

  2. Mutational analysis of single circulating tumor cells by next generation sequencing in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Galardi, Francesca; Pestrin, Marta; Gabellini, Stefano; Simi, Lisa; Mancini, Irene; Vannucchi, Alessandro Maria; Pazzagli, Mario; Di Leo, Angelo; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) represent a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor potentially allowing real-time monitoring of cancer biology and therapies in individual patients. The purpose of the study was to explore the applicability of a protocol for the molecular characterization of single CTCs by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) in order to investigate cell heterogeneity and provide a tool for a personalized medicine approach. CTCs were enriched and enumerated by CellSearch in blood from four metastatic breast cancer patients and singularly isolated by DEPArray. Upon whole genome amplification 3–5 single CTCs per patient were analyzed by NGS for 50 cancer-related genes. We found 51 sequence variants in 25 genes. We observed inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity in the mutational status of CTCs. The highest number of somatic deleterious mutations was found in the gene TP53, whose mutation is associated with adverse prognosis in breast cancer. The discordance between the mutational status of the primary tumor and CTCs observed in 3 patients suggests that, in advanced stages of cancer, CTC characteristics are more closely linked to the dynamic modifications of the disease status. In one patient the mutational profiles of CTCs before and during treatment shared only few sequence variants. This study supports the applicability of a non-invasive approach based on the liquid biopsy in metastatic breast cancer patients which, in perspective, should allow investigating the clonal evolution of the tumor for the development of new therapeutic strategies in precision medicine. PMID:27034166

  3. Tumor cell-driven extracellular matrix remodeling drives haptotaxis during metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Madeleine J.; Jonas, Oliver; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Broye, Liliane C.; Guido, Bruna C.; Wyckoff, Jeff; Riquelme, Daisy; Lamar, John M.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Whittaker, Charlie; Ma, Duanduan; Langer, Robert; Cima, Michael J.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Hynes, Richard O.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Keely, Patricia J.; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the tumor microenvironment, but its role in promoting metastasis is incompletely understood. Here we show that FN gradients elicit directional movement of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Haptotaxis on FN gradients requires direct interaction between α5β1 integrin and Mena, an actin regulator, and involves increases in focal complex signaling and tumor-cell-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Compared to Mena, higher levels of the pro-metastatic MenaINV isoform associate with α5, which enables 3D haptotaxis of tumor cells towards the high FN concentrations typically present in perivascular space and in the periphery of breast tumor tissue. MenaINV and FN levels were correlated in two breast cancer cohorts, and high levels of MenaINV were significantly associated with increased tumor recurrence as well as decreased patient survival. Our results identify a novel tumor-cell-intrinsic mechanism that promotes metastasis through ECM remodeling and ECM guided directional migration. PMID:26811325

  4. Whole-exome sequencing of circulating tumor cells provides a window into metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Jens G; Adalsteinsson, Viktor A; Cibulskis, Kristian; Choudhury, Atish D; Rosenberg, Mara; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Francis, Joshua M; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Shalek, Alex K; Satija, Rahul; Trombetta, John J; Lu, Diana; Tallapragada, Naren; Tahirova, Narmin; Kim, Sora; Blumenstiel, Brendan; Sougnez, Carrie; Lowe, Alarice; Wong, Bang; Auclair, Daniel; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Nakabayashi, Mari; Lis, Rosina T; Lee, Gwo-Shu M; Li, Tiantian; Chabot, Matthew S; Ly, Amy; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Clancy, Thomas E; Loda, Massimo; Regev, Aviv; Meyerson, Matthew; Hahn, William C; Kantoff, Philip W; Golub, Todd R; Getz, Gad; Boehm, Jesse S; Love, J Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Comprehensive analyses of cancer genomes promise to inform prognoses and precise cancer treatments. A major barrier, however, is inaccessibility of metastatic tissue. A potential solution is to characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs), but this requires overcoming the challenges of isolating rare cells and sequencing low-input material. Here we report an integrated process to isolate, qualify and sequence whole exomes of CTCs with high fidelity using a census-based sequencing strategy. Power calculations suggest that mapping of >99.995% of the standard exome is possible in CTCs. We validated our process in two patients with prostate cancer, including one for whom we sequenced CTCs, a lymph node metastasis and nine cores of the primary tumor. Fifty-one of 73 CTC mutations (70%) were present in matched tissue. Moreover, we identified 10 early trunk and 56 metastatic trunk mutations in the non-CTC tumor samples and found 90% and 73% of these mutations, respectively, in CTC exomes. This study establishes a foundation for CTC genomics in the clinic.

  5. Metastatic islet cell tumor with ACTH, gastrin, and glucagon secretion. Clinical and pathologic studies with multiple therapies.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J; Bothe, A; O'Hara, C; Federman, M

    1987-06-15

    A patient with metastatic islet cell carcinoma demonstrated multiple clinical syndromes simultaneously with secretion of ACTH, gastrin, glucagon, and serotonin. Hepatic arterial embolization resulted in an initial decrease in all secretory products, which was sustained for glucagon and serotonin. Recrudescence of the Cushings and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome was managed by surgical extirpation of the primary tumor and regional metastases as well as bilateral adrenalectomy. Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the primary tumor and the metastatic lesions revealed the presence of multiple types of granules within single cells and, different patterns of secretory profiles in different tumor sites.

  6. Metastatic spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with a reduced density of tumor-infiltrating T cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Rothschild, Sacha I; Arnold, Walter; Hirschmann, Petra; Horvath, Lukas; Bubendorf, Lukas; Savic, Spasenija; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes play an important role in cell-mediated immune destruction of cancer cells and tumor growth control. We investigated the heterogeneity of immune cell infiltrates between primary non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) and corresponding metastases. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumors and corresponding metastases from 34 NSCLC patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for CD4, CD8, CD11c, CD68, CD163 and PD-L1. The percentage of positively stained cells within the stroma and tumor cell clusters was recorded and compared between primary tumors and metastases. We found significantly fewer CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells within tumor cell clusters as compared with the stromal compartment, both in primary tumors and corresponding metastases. CD8(+) T cell counts were significantly lower in metastatic lesions than in the corresponding primary tumors, both in the stroma and the tumor cell islets. Of note, the CD8/CD4 ratio was significantly reduced in metastatic lesions compared with the corresponding primary tumors in tumor cell islets, but not in the stroma. We noted significantly fewer CD11c(+) cells and CD68(+) as well as CD163(+) macrophages in tumor cell islets compared with the tumor stroma, but no difference between primary and metastatic lesions. Furthermore, the CD8/CD68 ratio was higher in primary tumors than in the corresponding metastases. We demonstrate a differential pattern of immune cell infiltration in matched primary and metastatic NSCLC lesions, with a significantly lower density of CD8(+) T cells in metastatic lesions compared with the primary tumors. The lower CD8/CD4 and CD8/CD68 ratios observed in metastases indicate a rather tolerogenic and tumor-promoting microenvironment at the metastatic site.

  7. Durable Complete Response from Metastatic Melanoma after Transfer of Autologous T Cells Recognizing 10 Mutated Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Todd D; Crystal, Jessica S; Cohen, Cyrille J; Pasetto, Anna; Parkhurst, Maria R; Gartner, Jared J; Yao, Xin; Wang, Rong; Gros, Alena; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Trebska-McGowan, Kasia; Rosenberg, Steven A; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy treatment of patients with metastatic cancer has assumed a prominent role in the clinic. Durable complete response rates of 20% to 25% are achieved in patients with metastatic melanoma following adoptive cell transfer of T cells derived from metastatic lesions, responses that appear in some patients to be mediated by T cells that predominantly recognize mutated antigens. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the reactivity of T cells administered to a patient with metastatic melanoma who exhibited a complete response for over 3 years after treatment. Over 4,000 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified by whole-exome sequence analysis of the patient's autologous normal and tumor cell DNA. Autologous B cells transfected with 720 mutated minigenes corresponding to the most highly expressed tumor cell transcripts were then analyzed for their ability to stimulate the administered T cells. Autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes recognized 10 distinct mutated gene products, but not the corresponding wild-type products, each of which was recognized in the context of one of three different MHC class I restriction elements expressed by the patient. Detailed clonal analysis revealed that 9 of the top 20 most prevalent clones present in the infused T cells, comprising approximately 24% of the total cells, recognized mutated antigens. Thus, we have identified and enriched mutation-reactive T cells and suggest that such analyses may lead to the development of more effective therapies for the treatment of patients with metastatic cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 669-78. ©2016 AACR.

  8. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  9. Polyethylenimine-coated SPION exhibits potential intrinsic anti-metastatic properties inhibiting migration and invasion of pancreatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mulens-Arias, Vladimir; Rojas, José Manuel; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Morales, María del Puerto; Barber, Domingo F

    2015-10-28

    Due to its aggressive behavior, pancreatic cancer is one of the principal causes of cancer-related deaths. The highly metastatic potential of pancreatic tumor cells demands the development of more effective anti-metastatic approaches for this disease. Although polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEI-coated SPIONs) have been studied for their utility as transfection agents, little is known of their effect on tumor cell biology. Here we demonstrated that PEI-coated SPIONs have potent inhibitory effects on pancreatic tumor cell migration/invasion, through inhibition of Src kinase and decreased expression of MT1-MMP and MMP2 metalloproteinases. When treated with PEI-coated SPIONs, the pancreatic tumor cell line Pan02 showed reduced invadosome density and thus, a decrease in their ability to invade through basement membrane. These nanoparticles temporarily downmodulated microRNA-21, thereby upregulating the cell migration inhibitors PTEN, PDCD4 and Sprouty-1. PEI-coated SPIONs thus show intrinsic, possibly anti-metastatic properties for modulating pancreatic tumor cell migration machinery, which indicates their potential as anti-metastatic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Associated Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhaomei; Benali-Furet, Naoual; Uzan, Georges; Znaty, Anaëlle; Ye, Zhong; Paolillo, Carmela; Wang, Chun; Austin, Laura; Rossi, Giovanna; Fortina, Paolo; Yang, Hushan; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of blood-based diagnostic testing using a non-invasive technique holds promise for real-time monitoring of disease progression and treatment selection. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been used as a prognostic biomarker for the metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The molecular characterization of CTCs is fundamental to the phenotypic identification of malignant cells and description of the relevant genetic alterations that may change according to disease progression and therapy resistance. However, the molecular characterization of CTCs remains a challenge because of the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs and technological difficulties in the enrichment, isolation and molecular characterization of CTCs. In this pilot study, we evaluated circulating tumor associated cells in one blood draw by size exclusion technology and cytological analysis. Among 30 prospectively enrolled MBC patients, CTCs, circulating tumor cell clusters (CTC clusters), CTCs of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer associated macrophage-like cells (CAMLs) were detected and analyzed. For molecular characterization of CTCs, size-exclusion method for CTC enrichment was tested in combination with DEPArray™ technology, which allows the recovery of single CTCs or pools of CTCs as a pure CTC sample for mutation analysis. Genomic mutations of TP53 and ESR1 were analyzed by targeted sequencing on isolated 7 CTCs from a patient with MBC. The results of genomic analysis showed heterozygous TP53 R248W mutation from one single CTC and pools of three CTCs, and homozygous TP53 R248W mutation from one single CTC and pools of two CTCs. Wild-type ESR1 was detected in the same isolated CTCs. The results of this study reveal that size-exclusion method can be used to enrich and identify circulating tumor associated cells, and enriched CTCs were characterized for genetic alterations in MBC patients, respectively. PMID:27706044

  11. Expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule in carcinoma cells present in blood and primary and metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Rao, Chandra G; Chianese, David; Doyle, Gerald V; Miller, M Craig; Russell, Thomas; Sanders, Renouard A; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2005-07-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is involved in homophilic cell-cell adhesion in normal epithelia and is frequently overexpressed in primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas. It has been postulated that during detachment and dissemination of tumor cells, EpCAM may be down-regulated. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) may demonstrate this phenomenon as they have successfully escaped their local microenvironment and entered the circulation. EpCAM expression of CTC was compared to tumor cells in paraffin-embedded tissue arrays containing various benign diseases and carcinomas. EpCAM expression on CTC was determined by flow cytometry (FCM) and by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in paraffin-embedded tissue. To permit comparison of FCM results to those derived by IHC, EpCAM was quantified on cancer cell lines by FCM and then paraffin-embedded cell-blocks of these lines were used as staining guides for IHC analysis of tissue arrays. By IHC, 97% (384/397) of solid tissues analyzed had detectable EpCAM, with 72% of tissues showing antigen expression levels of > or =400,000 EpCAM molecules per cell. FCM analysis of CTC from 100 metastatic carcinoma patients with > or =2 CTC/90 microl blood showed EpCAM expression ranging from 9,900 to 246,000 (mean 49,700) antigens per cell. EpCAM expression was approximately 10-fold lower on CTC as compared to primary and metastatic tissues, suggesting that EpCAM expression is transient and dependent upon the local micro-environment. This supports the hypothesis that this adhesion molecule is down-regulated on carcinoma cells in the circulation.

  12. Large cell anaplastic medulloblastoma metastatic to the scalp: tumor and derived stem-like cells features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraneural metastases (ENM) rarely occur in medulloblastoma (MBL) patients and only few cases of subcutaneous localizations have been described. ENM indicate an aggressive disease associated with a worse prognosis. The characterization of metastatic tumours might be useful to understand their pathogenesis and to identify the most appropriate therapeutic strategies. Case presentation We present the case of a child with Large Cell Anaplastic (LC/A) MBL, who developed multiple subcutaneous metastases in the scalp area after a ventriculo-peritoneal shunting procedure. The disease rapidly progressed and the child died despite chemotherapy and primary tumour surgical debulking. We molecularly classified the tumour as a group 3 MBL; in addition, we derived stem-like cells (SLC) from a metastatic lesion. Primary tumour, metastases and SLC were further analysed, particularly focusing on features linked to the cutaneous dissemination. Indeed, molecules involved in angiogenesis, cell invasion and epidermal growth factor signalling resulted highly expressed. Conclusions The present report describes a very rare case of subcutaneous metastatic MBL. The tumour, metastases and SLC have been clinically, pathologically and molecularly characterized. Our case is an example of multidisciplinary approach aiming to characterize MBL aggressive behaviour. PMID:24739212

  13. In vivo quantification of metastatic tumor cell adhesion in the pulmonary microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, F; Kang, M L; Mees, S T; Haier, J; Gassmann, P

    2013-01-01

    In vivo and ex vivo fluorescence video microscopy used to be a well-established method in life science with a variety of applications, such as in inflammation or cancer research. In this book chapter, we describe a model of in vivo fluorescence microscopy of the rat's lung with the exclusive advantage of qualitative and quantitative in vivo analysis of cell adhesion within the complex microenvironment of the ventilated and perfused lung. Observation can include real-time, time-lapse, or fast-motion analysis. In our laboratory, we have used the model for qualitative and quantitative real-time analyses of metastatic colon cancer cell adhesion within the rat's pulmonary microcirculation. Using some modifications in another series, we have also applied the model to analyze thrombocyte and leucocyte adhesion within the pulmonary capillaries in experimental sepsis. For interventional studies, injected cells or animals may be pretreated with various reagents or drugs for further analysis of adhesion molecules involved in tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions. PMID:23955736

  14. FOXL2 molecular status in adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary: A study of primary and metastatic cases

    PubMed Central

    Zannoni, Gian Franco; Improta, Giuseppina; Petrillo, Marco; Pettinato, Angela; Scambia, Giovanni; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary are uncommon neoplasms, accounting for ~5% of all malignant ovarian tumors. GCTs are a relatively homogeneous group of tumors, categorized into two distinct subtypes, juvenile GCT and adult GCT (AGCT), likely arising from a limited set of molecular events usually involving the disruption of pathways that regulate granulosa cell proliferation. In the present study, the presence of forkheadbox L2 (FOXL2) c.402C>G mutation was investigated in a series of 42 samples of primary and metastatic AGCT of the ovary. The samples consisted of 37 primary and 5 metastatic ovarian AGCTs from 37 patients. FOXL2 mutational status was evaluated using a pyrosequencing approach on 2.5-µm sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. FOXL2 c.402C>G mutation was found in 33/37 (89.2%) primary AGCTs and in 4/5 (80.0%) metastases, with the molecular status of the metastases recapitulating that of the primary tumors (4 mutated cases and 1 wild-type case). Overall, FOXL2 mutation is present in the majority of primary and metastatic AGCTs, and could be used as a valid tool in the diagnosis of the disease and in cases of metastatic lesions from an unknown primary origin. Moreover the concordance of FOXL2 molecular status in primary and associated metastases suggests its early appearance and genomic stability in AGCT tumorigenesis. PMID:27446412

  15. Stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers are frequently overexpressed in circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Bahriye; Tewes, Mitra; Fehm, Tanja; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer patients might be associated with stem cell like tumor cells which have been suggested to be the active source of metastatic spread in primary tumors. Furthermore, these cells also may undergo phenotypic changes, known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows them to travel to the site of metastasis formation without getting affected by conventional treatment. Here we evaluated 226 blood samples of 39 metastatic breast cancer patients during a follow-up of palliative chemo-, antibody – or hormonal therapy for the expression of the stem cell marker ALDH1 and markers for EMT and correlated these findings with the presence of CTC and response to therapy. Methods 2 × 5 ml blood was analyzed for CTC with the AdnaTest BreastCancer (AdnaGen AG) for the detection of EpCAM, MUC-1 and HER2 transcripts. The recovered c-DNA was additionally multiplex tested for three EMT markers [Twist1, Akt2, PI3Kα] and separately for the tumor stem-cell markers ALDH1. The identification of EMT markers was considered positive if at least one marker was detected in the sample. Results 97% of 30 healthy donor samples investigated were negative for EMT and 95% for ALDH1 transcripts. CTC were detected in 69/226 (31%) cancer samples. In the CTC (+) group, 62% were positive for at least one of the EMT markers and 69% for ALDH1, respectively. In the CTC (-) group the percentages were 7% and 14%, respectively. In non-responders, EMT and ALDH1 expression was found in 62% and 44% of patients, in responders the rates were 10% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that a major proportion of CTC of metastatic breast cancer patients shows EMT and tumor stem cell characteristics. Further studies are needed to prove whether these markers might serve as an indicator for therapy resistant tumor cell populations and, therefore, an inferior prognosis. PMID:19589136

  16. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  17. Unbiased quantitative assessment of Her-2 expression of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ligthart, S T; Bidard, F-C; Decraene, C; Bachelot, T; Delaloge, S; Brain, E; Campone, M; Viens, P; Pierga, J-Y; Terstappen, L W M M

    2013-05-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide the basis for a liquid biopsy and may guide the use of targeted therapies. We report on unbiased quantification of Her-2 protein expression of CTCs. Patients and methods Her-2 assessment of CTCs was carried out using the CellSearch(®) system in 103 metastatic (M1) and 88 non-metastatic (M0) breast-cancer patients. Expression of Her-2 on CTCs was determined by a manual review and an automated algorithm using Her-2- fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence of leukocytes to determine the Her-2-expression threshold in each sample. Results Her-2 expression of CTCs varied greatly within and among patients compared with Her-2 expression of leukocytes. In M1 patients, a threshold of 75% of Her-2 positive CTCs in patients with ≥5 CTCs was set. Applying this threshold, 9% of M1 patients with Her-2-negative primary tumors had Her-2-positive CTC status and 29% of M1 patients with Her-2-positive primary tumors had Her-2-negative CTC status. No Her-2 discrepancy was observed between CTCs and primary tumors in M0 patients. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that Her-2 expression is heterogeneous among CTCs within each patient. We show the feasibility of unbiased quantitative and reproducible assessment of treatment targets on CTCs, opening a path towards personalized treatment.

  18. Surgical Outcomes of Hemorrhagic Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Heon; Jung, Eugene; Gwak, Ho Shin; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors are not rare, but little is known about the surgical outcome following treatment. We conducted this study to determine the result of the surgical outcome of hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors. Materials and Methods From July 2001 to December 2008, 21 patients underwent surgery for hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors at our institution. 15 patients had lung cancer, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, and the rest had rectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. 20 patients had macroscopic hemorrhage in the tumors, and one patient had intracerebral hemorrhage surrounding the tumor. A retrospective clinical review was conducted focusing on the patterns of presenting symptoms and signs, as well as local recurrence following surgery. Results Among 21 hemorrhagic brain metastases, local recurrence developed in two patients. The 12 month progression free survival rate was 86.1%. Mean time to progression was 20.8 months and median survival time after surgery was 11.7 months. Conclusion The results of our study showed that hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors rarely recurred after surgery. Surgery should be considered as a good treatment option for hemorrhagic brain metastasis, especially in cases with increased intracranial pressure or severe neurologic deficits. PMID:21811426

  19. Detection rate and prognostic value of circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA in metastatic uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bidard, François-Clément; Madic, Jordan; Mariani, Pascale; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Rampanou, Aurore; Servois, Vincent; Cassoux, Nathalie; Desjardins, Laurence; Milder, Maud; Vaucher, Isabelle; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lebofsky, Ronald; Stern, Marc-Henri; Lantz, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) have been recently investigated in several cancer types, but their respective clinical significance remains to be determined. In our prospective study, we compared the detection rate and the prognostic value of these two circulating biomarkers in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. GNAQ/GNA11 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissue. Using a highly sensitive and mutation-specific bidirectional pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization (bi-PAP) technique, GNAQ c.626A>T, GNAQ c.626A>C and GNA11 c.626A>T copy numbers were quantified in plasma from 12 mL of blood. CTCs were detected at the same time in 7.5 mL of blood by the CellSearch technique. Patient characteristics and outcome were prospectively collected. CTCs (≥1) were detected in 12 of the 40 included patients (30%, range 1-20). Among the 26 patients with known detectable mutations, ctDNA was detected and quantified in 22 (84%, range 4-11,421 copies/mL). CTC count and ctDNA levels were associated with the presence of miliary hepatic metastasis (p = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively), with metastasis volume (p = 0.005 and 0.004) and with each other (p < 0.0001). CTC count and ctDNA levels were both strongly associated with progression-free survival (p = 0.003 and 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.0009 and <0.0001). In multivariate analyses, ctDNA appeared to be a better prognostic marker than CTC. In conclusion, ctDNA and CTC are correlated and both have poor prognostic significance. CTC detection can be performed in every patient but, in patients with detectable mutations, ctDNA was more frequently detected than CTC and has possibly more prognostic value.

  20. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Druggable Mutations in Primary Tumors, Metastatic Tissue, Circulating Tumor Cells, and Cell-Free Circulating DNA in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: The MIRROR Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Picornell, Antoni C; Alvarez, Enrique L; Martin, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the driver mutations in an individual metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patient is critical to selecting effective targeted therapies. Currently, it is believed that the limited efficacy of many targeted drugs may be due to the expansion of drug resistant clones with different genotypes that were already present in the primary tumor. Identifying the genomic alterations of these clones, and introducing combined or sequential targeted drug regimens, could lead to a significant increase in the efficacy of currently available targeted therapies. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess the concordance/discordance of mutations between the primary tumor and metastatic tissue in MBC patients. Secondary objectives include comparing the genomic profiles of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating free DNA (cfDNA) from peripheral blood with those of the primary tumor and metastatic tissue for each patient, evaluating these mutations in the signaling pathways that are relevant to the disease, and testing the feasibility of introducing liquid biopsy as a translational laboratory tool in clinical practice. Methods The multicenter, transversal, observational MIRROR study is currently ongoing in three participating hospitals. All consecutive patients with MBC confirmed by radiologic findings will be screened for eligibility, either at first relapse or if tumor regrowth occurs while on treatment for metastatic disease. Results Patient recruitment is currently ongoing. To date, 41 patients have a complete set of tissue samples available (plasma, CTCs, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumor and metastatic tumor). However, none of these samples have undergone nucleic acids extraction or targeted deep sequencing. Conclusions The results of this study may have a significant influence on the practical management of patients with MBC, and may provide clues to clinicians that lead towards a better stratification of patients

  1. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Daniel W; Coppock, Joseph D; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M; Spanos, William C; Onken, Michael D; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H; Vermeer, Paola D

    2016-04-26

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60-80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  2. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Daniel W.; Coppock, Joseph D.; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M.; Spanos, William C.; Onken, Michael D.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H.; Vermeer, Paola D.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60–80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  3. The anti-tumor effect of a polypeptide extracted from Tegillarca granosa Linnaeus on renal metastatic tumor OS-RC-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiaoying; Jiang, Changqing; Liu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Luo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Renal cell carcinoma is a type of malignant tumor often diagnosed in the urinary system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-tumor effects and mechanisms of a polypeptide, Haishengsu (TG-1), with different concentrations (125, 250, 500 mg/kg) on renal metastatic tumor OS-RC-2 cells. Material and methods We first established the renal metastatic tumor model. After being administered with TG-1, the weight of tumors was measured and the microstructural changes of renal carcinoma OS-RC-2 cells were compared using transmission electron microscopy before and after the therapy. The Ki67 expression in renal carcinoma OS-RC-2 cells was analyzed by RT-PCR and downstream signal molecule caspase-3 was measured by Western blot assay. Results After treatment with different doses of TG-1, the tumor weights in the positive control group and experimental groups were smaller than those in the untreated control group, suggesting that TG-1 could effectively inhibit tumor growth in mice. The transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry results indicated that TG-1 induces tumor cell apoptosis (p < 0.05). The tumor cells exhibited polymorphism changes and chromatin edge clustering. TG-1 also inhibited Ki67 expression and promoted caspase-3 expression in the tumor significantly (p < 0.05). Conclusions TG-1 inhibits the growth of the tumor and induces apoptosis of the tumor cells by inducing caspase-3 expression. The results provide a basis for clinical application of TG-1 in the future. PMID:26322097

  4. Anti-tumor Properties of cis-Resveratrol Methylated Analogues in Metastatic Mouse Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valery L.; Toseef, Tayyaba; Nazumudeen, Fathima B.; Rivoira, Christian; Spatafora, Carmela; Tringali, Corrado; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (E-3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol found in red wine that has been shown to have multiple anti-cancer properties. Although cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers of resveratrol occur in nature, the cis form is not biologically active. However, methylation at key positions of the cis form results in more potent anti-cancer properties. This study determined that synthetic cis-polymethoxystilbenes (methylated analogues of cis-resveratrol) inhibited cancer-related phenotypes of metastatic B16 F10 and non-metastatic B16 F1 mouse melanoma cells. In contrast with cis or trans-resveratrol and trans-polymethoxystilbene which were ineffective at 10 μM, cis-polymethoxystilbenes inhibited motility and proliferation of melanoma cells with low micromolar specificity (IC50 <10 μM). Inhibitory effects by cis-polymethoxystilbenes were significantly stronger with B16 F10 cells and were accompanied by decreased expression of β-tubulin and pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein, a marker of metastatic B16 cells. Thus, cis-polymethoxystilbenes have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for metastatic melanoma. PMID:25567208

  5. Comparative analysis of innate immune system function in metastatic breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer patients with circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Mark F; Mannam, Venkat K R; Craft, Barbara S; Puneky, Louis V; Sheehan, Natale T; Lewis, Robert E; Cruse, Julius M

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in metastatic cancer patients have been found to be a promising biomarker to predict overall survival and tumor progression in these patients. A relatively high number of CTCs has been correlated with disease progression and poorer prognosis. This study was designed to assess innate immune system function, known to be responsible for the immune defense against developing neoplasms, in metastatic cancer patients with CTCs. Our aim is to provide a link between indication of poorer prognosis, represented by the number of CTCs to the cytotoxic activity of natural killer cells, an important component of the innate immune system, and to represent a promising expanded approach to management of metastatic cancer patients with CTCs. Seventy-four patients, with metastatic breast, colorectal, or prostate cancer, were recruited for this study. Using a flow cytometric assay, we measured natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity against K562 target cells; and CTCs were enumerated using the CellSearch System. Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 expression was also determined by flow cytometry. We found that within each of our three metastatic cancer patient groups, NK cell cytotoxic activity was decreased in patients with a relatively high number of CTCs in peripheral blood compared to patients with a relatively low number of CTCs. In the breast and prostate cancer group, patients with CTCs greater than 5 had decreased NK cell cytotoxicity when compared to patients with less than 5 CTCs. In the colorectal cancer group, we found that 3 or more CTCs in the blood was the level at which NK cell cytotoxicity is diminished. Additionally, we found that the toll-like receptors 2 and 4 expression was decreased in intensity in all the metastatic cancer patients when compared to the healthy controls. Furthermore, within each cancer group, the expression of both toll-like receptors was decreased in the patients with relatively high number of CTCs, i

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells and Response to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer: SWOG S0500

    PubMed Central

    Smerage, Jeffrey B.; Barlow, William E.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Winer, Eric P.; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Srkalovic, Gordan; Tejwani, Sheela; Schott, Anne F.; O'Rourke, Mark A.; Lew, Danika L.; Doyle, Gerald V.; Gralow, Julie R.; Livingston, Robert B.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Increased circulating tumor cells (CTCs; five or more CTCs per 7.5 mL of whole blood) are associated with poor prognosis in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). A randomized trial of patients with persistent increase in CTCs tested whether changing chemotherapy after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy would improve the primary outcome of overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods Patients with MBC who did not have increased CTCs at baseline remained on initial therapy until progression (arm A). Patients with initially increased CTCs that decreased after 21 days of therapy remained on initial therapy (arm B). Patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of therapy were randomly assigned to continue initial therapy (arm C1) or change to an alternative chemotherapy (arm C2). Results Of 595 eligible and evaluable patients, 276 (46%) did not have increased CTCs (arm A). Of those with initially increased CTCs, 31 (10%) were not retested, 165 were assigned to arm B, and 123 were randomly assigned to arm C1 or C2. No difference in median OS was observed between arm C1 and C2 (10.7 and 12.5 months, respectively; P = .98). CTCs were strongly prognostic. Median OS for arms A, B, and C (C1 and C2 combined) were 35 months, 23 months, and 13 months, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion This study confirms the prognostic significance of CTCs in patients with MBC receiving first-line chemotherapy. For patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of first-line chemotherapy, early switching to an alternate cytotoxic therapy was not effective in prolonging OS. For this population, there is a need for more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy. PMID:24888818

  7. Complete Regression of Metastatic Cervical Cancer After Treatment With Human Papillomavirus–Targeted Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevanović, Sanja; Draper, Lindsey M.; Langhan, Michelle M.; Campbell, Tracy E.; Kwong, Mei Li; Wunderlich, John R.; Dudley, Mark E.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic cervical cancer is a prototypical chemotherapy-refractory epithelial malignancy for which better treatments are needed. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is emerging as a promising cancer treatment, but its study in epithelial malignancies has been limited. This study was conducted to determine if ACT could mediate regression of metastatic cervical cancer. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled onto this protocol were diagnosed with metastatic cervical cancer and had previously received platinum-based chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Patients were treated with a single infusion of tumor-infiltrating T cells selected when possible for human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 reactivity (HPV-TILs). Cell infusion was preceded by lymphocyte-depleting chemotherapy and was followed by administration of aldesleukin. Results Three of nine patients experienced objective tumor responses (two complete responses and one partial response). The two complete responses were ongoing 22 and 15 months after treatment, respectively. One partial response was 3 months in duration. The HPV reactivity of T cells in the infusion product (as measured by interferon gamma production, enzyme-linked immunospot, and CD137 upregulation assays) correlated positively with clinical response (P = .0238 for all three assays). In addition, the frequency of HPV-reactive T cells in peripheral blood 1 month after treatment was positively associated with clinical response (P = .0238). Conclusion Durable, complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer can occur after a single infusion of HPV-TILs. Exploratory studies suggest a correlation between HPV reactivity of the infusion product and clinical response. Continued investigation of this therapy is warranted. PMID:25823737

  8. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  9. Combination of NK Cells and Cetuximab to Enhance Anti-Tumor Responses in RAS Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Thijssen, Victor L.; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Natural Killer (NK) cells to kill tumor targets has been extensively studied in various hematological malignancies. However, NK cell therapy directed against solid tumors is still in early development. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as cetuximab and panitumumab are widely used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Still, the clinical efficacy of this treatment is hampered by mutations in RAS gene, allowing tumors to escape from anti-EGFR mAb therapy. It is well established that NK cells kill tumor cells by natural cytotoxicity and can in addition be activated upon binding of IgG1 mAbs through Fc receptors (CD16/FcγRIIIa) on their surface, thereby mediating antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In the current study, activated Peripheral Blood NK cells (PBNK) were combined with anti-EGFR mAbs to study their effect on the killing of EGFR+/- cancer cell lines, including those with RAS mutations. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments using colon cancer primary tumors and cell lines COLO320, Caco-2, SW620, SW480 and HT-29, demonstrated that PBNK cells are cytotoxic for a range of tumor cells, regardless of EGFR, RAS or BRAF status and at low E:T ratios. Cetuximab enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on EGFR+ tumor cells (either RASwt, RASmut or BRAFmut) in a CD16 dependent manner, whereas it could not increase the killing of EGFR- COLO320. Our study provides a rationale to strengthen NK cell immunotherapy through a combination with cetuximab for RAS and BRAF mutant mCRC patients. PMID:27314237

  10. Metastatic Malignant Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica; John, Veena S.; Liang, Sharon X.; D'Agostino, Catherine A.; Menzin, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of malignant ovarian steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified (NOS) in a 47-year-old female who presented with hirsutism, virilization, and amenorrhea. At the time of laparotomy, the tumor had already spread to the pelvic cul-de-sac. She underwent a total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and tumor resection with no residual disease. She received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) and is now free of disease 24 months after surgery. Literature review of ovarian steroid cell tumors NOS including clinicopathological features and clinical management was performed. PMID:27375912

  11. Efficacy of liposome-encapsulated indomethacin in response against metastatic 3LL and B16F1 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Aliño, S F; Unda, F J; Iruarrizaga, A; Alfaro, J; Hilario, E; Pérez-Yarza, G; Bobadilla, M; Lejarreta, M

    1992-06-01

    The ability of large liposomes to be taken up by tissue phagocytic cells, e.g., macrophages, has made it possible to increase the efficacy of several drugs as immunomodulating agents. In the present work, we have evaluated the effect of indomethacin, a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, both free and encapsulated in liposomes, on the spontaneous metastatic potential of 3LL and B16F1 tumor cells. Liposomes containing either carboxyfluorescein, indomethacin, or carboxyfluorescein plus indomethacin, were made in order to evaluate their in vitro plasma stability and in vivo clearance from the blood. The liposomes showed a high stability after 6 hours of plasma incubation and they were rapidly cleared in vivo. Liposomes encapsulating propidium iodide, a fluorescent DNA binding dye, were mainly taken up in vivo by hepatic and spleen macrophages 1 hour after intravenous injection, but not by lung macrophages. When C57BL/6 mice were intravenously inoculated with 10(5) 3LL or B16F1 tumor cells previously incubated with indomethacin (10(-7) M) for 48 hours, the number of experimental lung metastatic foci was increased with respect to their respective control groups. Also, in 3LL or B16F1 tumor-bearing mice, treatment with indomethacin (0.5 mg/kg weight/day) for 10 days enhanced the number of lung metastases, but not significantly. However, when mice received indomethacin encapsulated in liposomes, the number of metastases was significantly reduced. In addition, encapsulated indomethacin (0.5 mg/kg weight/day) inhibits prostaglandin E2 production by peritoneal and spleen macrophages, whereas no significant inhibitory effect was observed with control-liposomes or equivalent doses of free indomethacin. We conclude that intravenous administration of liposome-encapsulated indomethacin has an antimetastatic effect on tumor-bearing mice. Use of indomethacin in liposomes may avoid the stimulation of metastases observed when the drug is administered alone.

  12. Gene silencing in primary and metastatic tumors by small interfering RNA delivery in mice: quantitative analysis using melanoma cells expressing firefly and sea pansy luciferases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-20

    Silencing of oncogenes or other genes contributing to tumor malignancy or progression by RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising approach to treating tumor patients. To achieve RNAi-based tumor therapy, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) or siRNA-expressing vector needs to be delivered to tumor cells, but little information about its in vivo delivery has been reported. In this study, we examined whether the expression of the target gene in tumor cells can be suppressed by the delivery of RNAi effectors to primary and metastatic tumor cells. To quantitatively evaluate the RNAi effects in tumor cells, mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with both firefly (a model target gene) and sea pansy (an internal standard gene) luciferase genes to obtain B16-BL6/dual Luc cells. The target gene expression in subcutaneous primary tumors of B16-BL6/dual Luc cells was significantly suppressed by direct injection of the RNAi effectors followed by electroporation. The expression in metastatic hepatic tumors was also significantly reduced by an intravenous injection of either RNAi effector by the hydrodynamics-based procedure. These results indicate that the both RNAi effectors have a potential to silence target gene in tumor cells in vivo when successfully delivered to tumor cells. PMID:15936841

  13. TGF-β blockade depletes T regulatory cells from metastatic pancreatic tumors in a vaccine dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Kevin C.; Rucki, Agnieszka A.; Kim, Victoria; Foley, Kelly; Solt, Sara; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Our neoadjuvant clinical trial of a GM-CSF secreting allogeneic pancreas tumor vaccine (GVAX) revealed the development of tertiary lymphoid aggregates (TLAs) within the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) tumor microenvironment 2 weeks after GVAX treatment. Microarray studies revealed that multiple components of the TGF-β pathway were suppressed in TLAs from patients who survived greater than 3 years and who demonstrated vaccine-enhanced mesothelin-specific T cell responses. We tested the hypothesis that combining GVAX with TGF-β inhibitors will improve the anti-tumor immune response of vaccine therapy. In a metastatic murine model of pancreatic cancer, combination therapy with GVAX vaccine and a TGF-β blocking antibody improved the cure rate of PDA-bearing mice. TGF-β blockade in combination with GVAX significantly increased the infiltration of effector CD8+ T lymphocytes, specifically anti-tumor-specific IFN-γ producing CD8+ T cells, when compared to monotherapy controls (all p < 0.05). TGF-β blockade alone did not deplete T regulatory cells (Tregs), but when give in combination with GVAX, GVAX induced intratumoral Tregs were depleted. Therefore, our PDA preclinical model demonstrates a survival advantage in mice treated with an anti-TGF-β antibody combined with GVAX therapy and provides strong rational for testing this combinational therapy in clinical trials. PMID:26515728

  14. HER2 status of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer: a prospective, multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Fehm, Tanja; Müller, Volkmar; Aktas, Bahriye; Janni, Wolfgang; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Stickeler, Elmar; Lattrich, Claus; Löhberg, Christian R; Solomayer, Erich; Rack, Brigitte; Riethdorf, Sabine; Klein, Christoph; Schindlbeck, Christian; Brocker, Kerstin; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Pantel, Klaus

    2010-11-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that HER2 status can change during disease recurrence or progression in breast cancer patients. In this context, re-evaluation of HER2 status by assessment of HER2 expression on circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a strategy with potential clinical application. The aim of this trial was to determine the HER2 status of CTCs in metastatic breast cancer patients comparing two CTC assays. A total of 254 patients with metastatic breast cancer from nine German university breast cancer centers were enrolled in this prospective study. HER2 status of CTCs was assessed using both the FDA-approved CellSearch® assay and AdnaTest BreastCancer™. Using the CellSearch assay, 122 of 245 (50%) patients had ≥5 CTCs, and HER2-positive CTCs were observed in 50 (41%) of these patients. Ninety of 229 (39%) patients were CTC positive using AdnaTest BreastCancer, and HER2 positivity rate was 47% (42 of 90). The rate of breast cancer patients with HER2-negative primary tumors but HER2-positive CTCs was 32% (25 of 78) and 49% (28 of 57) using the CellSearch assay and AdnaTest BreastCancer, respectively. Considering only those patients who had CTCs on both tests (n = 62), concordant results regarding HER2 positivity were obtained in 50% of the patients (31/62) (P = 0.96, κ = -0.006). HER2-positive CTCs can be detected in a relevant number of patients with HER2 negative primary tumors. Therefore, it will be mandatory to correlate the assay-dependent HER2 status of CTCs to the clinical response on HER2-targeted therapies.

  15. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  16. Dissecting the Heterogeneity of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Going Far Beyond the Needle in the Haystack

    PubMed Central

    Bulfoni, Michela; Turetta, Matteo; Del Ben, Fabio; Di Loreto, Carla; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Although the enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTC) defined as expressing both epithelial cell adhesion molecule and cytokeratins (EpCAM+/CK+) can predict prognosis and response to therapy in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer, its clinical utility (i.e., the ability to improve patient outcome by guiding therapy) has not yet been proven in clinical trials. Therefore, scientists are now focusing on the molecular characterization of CTC as a way to explore its possible use as a “surrogate” of tumor tissues to non-invasively assess the genomic landscape of the cancer and its evolution during treatment. Additionally, evidences confirm the existence of CTC in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characterized by a variable loss of epithelial markers. Since the EMT process can originate cells with enhanced invasiveness, stemness and drug-resistance, the enumeration and characterization of this population, perhaps the one truly responsible of tumor recurrence and progression, could be more clinically useful. For these reasons, several devices able to capture CTC independently from the expression of epithelial markers have been developed. In this review, we will describe the types of heterogeneity so far identified and the key role played by the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in driving CTC heterogeneity. The clinical relevance of detecting CTC-heterogeneity will be discussed as well. PMID:27783057

  17. Detection of metastatic tumors after γ-irradiation using longitudinal molecular imaging and gene expression profiling of metastatic tumor nodules.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Choe, Jae Gol; Lim, Sang Moo

    2016-04-01

    A few recent reports have indicated that metastatic growth of several human cancer cells could be promoted by radiotherapy. C6-L cells expressing the firefly luciferase (fLuc) gene were implanted subcutaneously into the right thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice. C6-L xenograft mice were treated locally with 50-Gy γ-irradiation (γ-IR) in five 10-Gy fractions. Metastatic tumors were evaluated after γ-IR by imaging techniques. Total RNA from non-irradiated primary tumor (NRPT), γ-irradiated primary tumor (RPT), and three metastatic lung nodule was isolated and analyzed by microarray. Metastatic lung nodules were detected by BLI and PET/CT after 6-9 weeks of γ-IR in 6 (17.1%) of the 35 mice. The images clearly demonstrated high [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG uptake into metastatic lung nodules. Whole mRNA expression patterns were analyzed by microarray to elucidate the changes among NRPT, RPT and metastatic lung nodules after γ-IR. In particular, expression changes in the cancer stem cell markers were highly significant in RPT. We observed the metastatic tumors after γ-IR in a tumor-bearing animal model using molecular imaging methods and analyzed the gene expression profile to elucidate genetic changes after γ-IR. PMID:26892334

  18. Peptide-based method for detection of metastatic transformation in primary tumors of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Huang, Yue; Yu, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2015-09-15

    Detection of metastatic activity before the onset of the actual metastasis can be a promising method to combat metastasis, the foremost cause of death in cancer. Therefore, in this work, we have developed an assay method for the detection of metastatic tumor cells in primary tumor, by using a protein of the metastatic cell signaling as the biomarker. In this assay, a peptide-based probe targeting the marker protein and a sensitive nanoparticle doped graphene nanolabel are combined to enable the detection of metastatic cells. Consequently, the metastatic cells can be specifically detected and discriminated from primary tumor cells. By applying this assay method to clinical samples of primary tumor, a low amount of metastatic activity can be detected in the tumor sites, which may suggest the activity of local metastatic transformation. So, these results may point to the prospect of using the proposed method for controlling metastatic cancer.

  19. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells Detected by the CellSearch System in Patients with Metastatic Breast Colorectal and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, M Craig; Doyle, Gerald V; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2010-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created a concomitant need for new methods to monitor their use. Ideally, these modalities would be noninvasive, be independent of treatment, and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. We developed the CellSearch System to enumerate CTC from 7.5 mL of venous blood. In this review we compare the outcomes from three prospective multicenter studies investigating the use of CTC to monitor patients undergoing treatment for metastatic breast (MBC), colorectal (MCRC), or prostate cancer (MPC) and review the CTC definition used in these studies. Evaluation of CTC at anytime during the course of disease allows assessment of patient prognosis and is predictive of overall survival.

  20. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells Detected by the CellSearch System in Patients with Metastatic Breast Colorectal and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M. Craig; Doyle, Gerald V.; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M

    2010-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created a concomitant need for new methods to monitor their use. Ideally, these modalities would be noninvasive, be independent of treatment, and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. We developed the CellSearch System to enumerate CTC from 7.5 mL of venous blood. In this review we compare the outcomes from three prospective multicenter studies investigating the use of CTC to monitor patients undergoing treatment for metastatic breast (MBC), colorectal (MCRC), or prostate cancer (MPC) and review the CTC definition used in these studies. Evaluation of CTC at anytime during the course of disease allows assessment of patient prognosis and is predictive of overall survival. PMID:20016752

  1. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase) and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery. PMID:27293952

  2. Adoptive T-cell Therapy Using Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes for Metastatic Melanoma: Current Status and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard; Forget, Marie-Andree; Chacon, Jessica; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Chen, Jie Qing; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy using autologous T-cells has emerged to be a powerful treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma. These include the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), T-cells transduced with high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) against major melanosomal tumor antigens, and T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) composed of hybrid immunoglobulin light chains with endo-domains of T-cell signaling molecules. Among these and other options for T-cell therapy, TIL together with high-dose IL-2 has had the longest clinical history with multiple clinical trials in centers across the world consistently demonstrating durable clinical response rates near 50% or more. A distinct advantage of TIL therapy making it still the T-cell therapy of choice is the broad nature of the T-cell recognition against both defined as well as un-defined tumors antigens against all possible MHC, rather than the single specificity and limited MHC coverage of the newer TCR and CAR transduction technologies. In the past decade, significant inroads have been made in defining the phenotypes of T cells in TIL mediating tumor regression. CD8+ T cells are emerging to be critical, although the exact subset of CD8+ T cells exhibiting the highest clinical activity in terms of memory and effector markers is still controversial. We present a model in which both effector-memory and more differentiated effector T cells ultimately may need to cooperate to mediate long-term tumor control in responding patients. Although TIL therapy has shown great potential to treat metastatic melanoma, a number of issues have emerged that need to be addressed to bring it more into the mainstream of melanoma care. First, we have a reached the point where a pivotal phase II or phase III trials are needed in an attempt to gain regulatory approval of TIL as standard-of-care. Second, improvements in how we expand TIL for therapy are needed, that minimize the time the T-cells

  3. Pulmonary tumor thrombotic microangiopathy from metastatic epithelioid angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Ebru; Yazici, Ulku; Tastepe, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    The lung is most common site for metastatic disease via hematogenous route. Tumor emboli of the vessels of the lung induces fibrocellular and fibromuscular intimal proliferation. These histopathological changes may cause pulmonary tumor trombotic microangiopaty. Few cases are diagnosed antemortem. We report a 60 year old woman with by metastatic epithelioid angiosarcoma involving the lung. Tumor cells were positive for VEGF and topoisomerase II. VEGF may be involved in the pathogenesis pulmonary tumor trombotic microangioapy and topoisomerase II positivity showed sensitivity against catalytic topoisomerase II inhibitors. PMID:23825782

  4. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Local Tumor Control: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Estimated Cost-effectiveness for Palliation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Adam, Barbara; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS), and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multisite cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods A total of 60 computed tomography- and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 72 tumors in 27 patients (three women and 24 men). Average patient age was 63 years. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Established surgical selection criteria graded patient status. Median OS was determined by Kaplan–Meier method and defined life-years gained (LYGs). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomic site are as follows: nephrectomy bed, 11 and 11; adrenal gland, nine and eight; paraaortic, seven and six; lung, 14 and 13; bone, 13 and 13; superficial, 12 and nine; intraperitoneal, five and three; and liver, one and one. A mean of 2.2 procedures per patient were performed, with a median clinical follow-up of 16 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 2% (one of 60) and 3% (two of 72), respectively. No patients were graded as having good surgical risk, but median OS was 2.69 years, with an estimated 5-year survival rate of 27%. Cryoablation remained cost-effective with or without the presence of systemic therapies according to historical cost comparisons, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio of $28,312–$59,554 per LYG. Conclusions MCA was associated with very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, with apparent increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligometastatic RCC. PMID:22538119

  5. Case Report: Detection and quantification of tumor cells in peripheral blood and ascitic fluid from a metastatic esophageal cancer patient using the CellSearch (®) technology.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qian; Bittencourt, Marcelo De Carvalho; Cai, Huili; Bastien, Claire; Lemarie-Delaunay, Camille; Bene, Marie C; Faure, Gilbert C

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of ascitic fluid should help to identify and characterize malignant cells in gastrointestinal cancer. However, despite a high specificity, the sensitivity of traditional ascitic fluid cytology remains insufficient, at around 60%. Since 2004 the CellSearch (®) technology has shown its advantages in the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood, which can perform an accurate diagnosis and molecular analysis at the same time. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored the potential utility of this technology for the detection and quantification of tumor cells in ascitic fluid samples. Herein we report a case of metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma in a 70-year-old man presenting with dysphagia and a large amount of fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Analysis of a peripheral blood sample and ascites sample with the CellSearch (®) technology both revealed the presence of putative tumor cells that were positive for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and cytokeratin (CK) expression. This study confirmed the hematogenous dissemination of esophageal cancer by the detection of circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood, and is the first to demonstrate that tumor cells can be identified in ascitic fluid by using CellSearch (®) technology. PMID:25075284

  6. [Haemoabdomen and haemothorax in a cow with metastatic granulosa cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Trösch, L; Müller, K; Brosinski, K; Braun, U

    2015-06-01

    This case report describes the clinical, ultrasonographic, pathological and histological findings in a two-year-old Swiss Braunvieh cow with granulosa cell tumor and metastases in the abdomen and thorax. The cow was ill and had tachycardia, coughing, increased breath sounds, positive reticular foreign body tests and a tense abdominal wall. Ultrasonography revealed a massive accumulation of hypoechoic fluid in the thorax and abdomen, and abdomino- and thoracocentesis yielded red fluid indicative of abdominal and thoracic haemorrhage. Because of a poor prognosis, the cow was euthanized and examined postmortem. Multiple nodular lesions were seen in the omentum, liver, spleen and lungs. The left ovary was grossly enlarged and nodular in appearance. Histological examination of the lesions revealed granulosa cell tumour of the left ovary and metastases in the omentum, liver, spleen and lungs.

  7. High Immune Response Rates and Decreased Frequencies of Regulatory T Cells in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients after Tumor Cell Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Pohla, Heike; Buchner, Alexander; Stadlbauer, Birgit; Frankenberger, Bernhard; Stevanovic, Stefan; Walter, Steffen; Frank, Ronald; Schwachula, Tim; Olek, Sven; Kopp, Joachim; Willimsky, Gerald; Stief, Christian G; Hofstetter, Alfons; Pezzutto, Antonio; Blankenstein, Thomas; Oberneder, Ralph; Schendel, Dolores J

    2012-01-01

    Our previously reported phase I clinical trial with the allogeneic gene–modified tumor cell line RCC-26/CD80/IL-2 showed that vaccination was well tolerated and feasible in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients. Substantial disease stabilization was observed in most patients despite a high tumor burden at study entry. To investigate alterations in immune responses that might contribute to this effect, we performed an extended immune monitoring that included analysis of reactivity against multiple antigens, cytokine/chemokine changes in serum and determination of the frequencies of immune suppressor cell populations, including natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cell subsets (MDSCs). An overall immune response capacity to virus-derived control peptides was present in 100% of patients before vaccination. Vaccine-induced immune responses to tumor-associated antigens occurred in 75% of patients, demonstrating the potent immune stimulatory capacity of this generic vaccine. Furthermore, some patients reacted to peptide epitopes of antigens not expressed by the vaccine, showing that epitope-spreading occurred in vivo. Frequencies of nTregs and MDSCs were comparable to healthy donors at the beginning of study. A significant decrease of nTregs was detected after vaccination (p = 0.012). High immune response rates, decreased frequencies of nTregs and a mixed T helper 1/T helper 2 (TH1/TH2)-like cytokine pattern support the applicability of this RCC generic vaccine for use in combination therapies. PMID:23269976

  8. Establishment and evaluation of a new highly metastatic tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Imamura, Takeshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Although advances in diagnostic imaging for early detection, surgical techniques and chemotherapy have improved overall survival, the prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor. Understanding cancer cell dynamics in the metastatic process is important to develop new therapeutic strategies. Experimental animal models and imaging would be powerful tools for understanding of the molecular events of multistep process of metastasis. In the present study, to develop a new cancer cell line that is applicable to bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we transfected the expression vector of a green fluorescent protein ZsGreen1 into a metastatic cell line 5a-D-Luc, which is a subclone of the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing luciferase, and established a new tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and ZsGreen1. The 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells proliferate more rapidly and have a more invasive phenotype compared with 5a-D-Luc cells following intracardiac injection. Metastasis sites were easily detected in the whole body by bioluminescence imaging and in excised tissues by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells was not lost after formalin fixation and decalcification. It enabled us to easily evaluate tumor spread and localization at the cellular level in microscopic analysis. The strong fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells allowed for real-time imaging of circulating tumor cells in cerebral blood vessels of live animals immediately after intracardiac injection of cells using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. These findings suggest that the 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells would be a useful tool for research on mechanisms of metastatic process in animal models. PMID:26691676

  9. Establishment and evaluation of a new highly metastatic tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Imamura, Takeshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Although advances in diagnostic imaging for early detection, surgical techniques and chemotherapy have improved overall survival, the prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor. Understanding cancer cell dynamics in the metastatic process is important to develop new therapeutic strategies. Experimental animal models and imaging would be powerful tools for understanding of the molecular events of multistep process of metastasis. In the present study, to develop a new cancer cell line that is applicable to bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we transfected the expression vector of a green fluorescent protein ZsGreen1 into a metastatic cell line 5a-D-Luc, which is a subclone of the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing luciferase, and established a new tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and ZsGreen1. The 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells proliferate more rapidly and have a more invasive phenotype compared with 5a-D-Luc cells following intracardiac injection. Metastasis sites were easily detected in the whole body by bioluminescence imaging and in excised tissues by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells was not lost after formalin fixation and decalcification. It enabled us to easily evaluate tumor spread and localization at the cellular level in microscopic analysis. The strong fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells allowed for real-time imaging of circulating tumor cells in cerebral blood vessels of live animals immediately after intracardiac injection of cells using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. These findings suggest that the 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells would be a useful tool for research on mechanisms of metastatic process in animal models.

  10. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  11. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Srijan; Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-08-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  12. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26567111

  13. Detection of live circulating tumor cells by a class of near-infrared heptamethine carbocyanine dyes in patients with localized and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chen; Liao, Chun-Peng; Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Chia-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Bui, Matthew H T; Ng, Christopher S; Josephson, David Y; Knudsen, Beatrice; Tighiouart, Mourad; Kim, Hyung L; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Wang, Ruoxiang; Posadas, Edwin M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells are inherently heterogeneous and often exhibit diminished adhesion, resulting in the shedding of tumor cells into the circulation to form circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A fraction of these are live CTCs with potential of metastatic colonization whereas others are at various stages of apoptosis making them likely to be less relevant to understanding the disease. Isolation and characterization of live CTCs may augment information yielded by standard enumeration to help physicians to more accurately establish diagnosis, choose therapy, monitor response, and provide prognosis. We previously reported on a group of near-infrared (NIR) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes that are specifically and actively transported into live cancer cells. In this study, this viable tumor cell-specific behavior was utilized to detect live CTCs in prostate cancer patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 40 patients with localized prostate cancer together with 5 patients with metastatic disease were stained with IR-783, the prototype heptamethine cyanine dye. Stained cells were subjected to flow cytometric analysis to identify live (NIR(+)) CTCs from the pool of total CTCs, which were identified by EpCAM staining. In patients with localized tumor, live CTC counts corresponded with total CTC numbers. Higher live CTC counts were seen in patients with larger tumors and those with more aggressive pathologic features including positive margins and/or lymph node invasion. Even higher CTC numbers (live and total) were detected in patients with metastatic disease. Live CTC counts declined when patients were receiving effective treatments, and conversely the counts tended to rise at the time of disease progression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of applying of this staining technique to identify live CTCs, creating an opportunity for further molecular interrogation of a more biologically relevant CTC population. PMID:24551200

  14. Detection of live circulating tumor cells by a class of near-infrared heptamethine carbocyanine dyes in patients with localized and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chen; Liao, Chun-Peng; Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Chia-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Bui, Matthew H T; Ng, Christopher S; Josephson, David Y; Knudsen, Beatrice; Tighiouart, Mourad; Kim, Hyung L; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Wang, Ruoxiang; Posadas, Edwin M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells are inherently heterogeneous and often exhibit diminished adhesion, resulting in the shedding of tumor cells into the circulation to form circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A fraction of these are live CTCs with potential of metastatic colonization whereas others are at various stages of apoptosis making them likely to be less relevant to understanding the disease. Isolation and characterization of live CTCs may augment information yielded by standard enumeration to help physicians to more accurately establish diagnosis, choose therapy, monitor response, and provide prognosis. We previously reported on a group of near-infrared (NIR) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes that are specifically and actively transported into live cancer cells. In this study, this viable tumor cell-specific behavior was utilized to detect live CTCs in prostate cancer patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 40 patients with localized prostate cancer together with 5 patients with metastatic disease were stained with IR-783, the prototype heptamethine cyanine dye. Stained cells were subjected to flow cytometric analysis to identify live (NIR(+)) CTCs from the pool of total CTCs, which were identified by EpCAM staining. In patients with localized tumor, live CTC counts corresponded with total CTC numbers. Higher live CTC counts were seen in patients with larger tumors and those with more aggressive pathologic features including positive margins and/or lymph node invasion. Even higher CTC numbers (live and total) were detected in patients with metastatic disease. Live CTC counts declined when patients were receiving effective treatments, and conversely the counts tended to rise at the time of disease progression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of applying of this staining technique to identify live CTCs, creating an opportunity for further molecular interrogation of a more biologically relevant CTC population.

  15. The use of circulating tumor cells in guiding treatment decisions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Onstenk, Wendy; de Klaver, Willemijn; de Wit, Ronald; Lolkema, Martijn; Foekens, John; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has drastically changed over the past decade with the advent of several new anti-tumor agents. Oncologists increasingly face dilemmas concerning the best treatment sequence for individual patients since most of the novel compounds have been investigated and subsequently positioned either pre- or post-docetaxel. A currently unmet need exists for biomarkers able to guide treatment decisions and to capture treatment resistance at an early stage thereby allowing for an early change to an alternative strategy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have in this context intensively been investigated over the last years. The CTC count, as determined by the CellSearch System (Janssen Diagnostics LLC, Raritan, NJ), is a strong, independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with mCRPC at various time points during treatment and, as an early response marker, outperforms traditional response evaluations using serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, scintigraphy as well as radiography. The focus of research is now shifting toward the predictive value of CTCs and the use of the characterization of CTCs to guide the selection of treatments with the highest chance of success for individual patients. Recently, the presence of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been shown to be a promising predictive factor. In this review, we have explored the clinical value of the enumeration and characterization of CTCs for the treatment of mCRPC and have put the results obtained from recent studies investigating the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs into clinical perspective. PMID:27107266

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  17. Circulating Tumor Cells Following First Chemotherapy Cycle: An Early and Strong Predictor of Outcome in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Custodio, Sara; de las Casas, Maria-Luisa Maestro; García-Sáenz, José-Ángel; de la Torre, Julio-César; Bellón-Cano, Jose-María; López-Tarruella, Sara; Vidaurreta-Lazaro, Marta; de la Orden, Virginia; Jerez, Yolanda; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Casado, Antonio; Sastre, Javier; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) determined immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The CTC counts were taken at baseline, before the first cycle of chemotherapy (CTC-0), and on day 21 before commencing the second cycle of chemotherapy (CTC-21) in consecutive MBC patients. The study's primary objectives were to analyze relationships between CTC-21 count and overall survival (OS). Based on the current literature, the CTC measurements were dichotomized as 0–4 versus ≥5 CTCs. Of 117 patients recruited, 99 were evaluable. Patients with 0–4 CTCs on day 21 had a significantly better OS than those with ≥5 CTCs (median OS: 38.5 months vs. 8.7 months). They also had a significantly better progression-free survival (PFS; median: 9.4 months vs. 3.0 months) and clinical benefit rate (77% vs. 44%). The OS of patients whose baseline CTCs were ≥5 but dropped to <5 on day 21 was apparently similar to those who had <5 CTCs at baseline. In a Cox regression analysis, CTC-21 was the only independent variable significantly predicting OS and PFS. Our data indicate that CTCs determined immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy is an early and strong predictor of treatment outcome in MBC patients. PMID:23873719

  18. Tumor-associated antigen/IL-21-transduced dendritic cell vaccines enhance immunity and inhibit immunosuppressive cells in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Aravindaram, K; Wang, P-H; Yin, S-Y; Yang, N-S

    2014-05-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine approaches are being actively evaluated for developing immunotherapeutic agents against cancers. In this study, we investigated the use of engineered DCs expressing transgenic tumor-associated antigen hgp100 and the regulatory cytokine interleukin-21, namely DC-hgp100/mIL-21, as a therapeutic vaccine against melanoma. Tumor-bearing mice were injected intratumorally with transgenic DCs followed by three booster injections. Transgenic DC-hgp100/mIL-21 showed significant reduction in primary tumor growth and metastasis compared with DC-hgp100 alone and DC-mIL-21 alone. In vivo depletion of specific immune cell types (CD8(+) T, CD4(+) T and Natural killer (NK)-1.1(+) cells) effectively blocked the protective effect of this combinational vaccine. In adoptive transfer experiments, a survival rate of nearly 90% was observed at 60 days post-tumor inoculation for the combinational vaccine group. In contrast, all mice in the DC-hgp100 and DC-mIL-21-only groups died within 43-46 days after tumor challenge. Considerably increased levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were detected with the combination vaccine group compared with other individual treatment groups. In comparison with the DC-hgp100 or mIL-21 groups, the combinational DC-hgp100/mIL-21 vaccine also drastically suppressed the myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and T-regulatory (Treg) cell populations. Our findings suggest that a combinational DC- and gene-based hgp100 and mIL-21 vaccine therapy strategy warrants further evaluation as a clinically relevant cancer vaccine approach for human melanoma patients.

  19. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  20. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, I. Vijay; Jain, S. K.; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  1. Serum-derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of "checkpoint blockade" disrupting an effective, tumor-directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long-term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this difference. We measured the frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of tumor bearers, as well as lung/liver and draining lymph nodes. In some cases mice received infusions of exosomes from nontumor controls, or tumor bearers, with/without additional infusions of anticytokine antibodies. The measured frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood was equivalent in the two models in WT and CD200R1KO mice. Increased metastasis in EMT6 tumor bearers was seen in vivo following adoptive transfer of serum, or serum-derived exosomes, from 4THM tumor bearers, an effect which was attenuated by anti-IL-6, and anti-IL-17, but not anti-TNFα, antibody. Anti-IL-6 also attenuated enhanced migration of EMT6 cells in vitro induced by 4THM serum or exosomes, or recombinant IL-6. Exosome cytokine proteomic profiles responses in 4THM and EMT6 tumor-bearing mice were regulated by CD200:CD200R interactions, with attenuation of both IL-6 and IL-17 in 4THM CD200(tg) mice, and enhanced levels in 4THM CD200R1KO mice. We suggest these cytokines act on the microenvironment at sites within the host, and/or directly on tumor cells themselves, to increase metastatic potential. PMID:26725371

  2. Serum-derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of "checkpoint blockade" disrupting an effective, tumor-directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long-term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this difference. We measured the frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of tumor bearers, as well as lung/liver and draining lymph nodes. In some cases mice received infusions of exosomes from nontumor controls, or tumor bearers, with/without additional infusions of anticytokine antibodies. The measured frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood was equivalent in the two models in WT and CD200R1KO mice. Increased metastasis in EMT6 tumor bearers was seen in vivo following adoptive transfer of serum, or serum-derived exosomes, from 4THM tumor bearers, an effect which was attenuated by anti-IL-6, and anti-IL-17, but not anti-TNFα, antibody. Anti-IL-6 also attenuated enhanced migration of EMT6 cells in vitro induced by 4THM serum or exosomes, or recombinant IL-6. Exosome cytokine proteomic profiles responses in 4THM and EMT6 tumor-bearing mice were regulated by CD200:CD200R interactions, with attenuation of both IL-6 and IL-17 in 4THM CD200(tg) mice, and enhanced levels in 4THM CD200R1KO mice. We suggest these cytokines act on the microenvironment at sites within the host, and/or directly on tumor cells themselves, to increase metastatic potential.

  3. Improved Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer by the Combination of the CellSearch® System and the AdnaTest®.

    PubMed

    Gorges, Tobias M; Stein, Alexander; Quidde, Julia; Hauch, Siegfried; Röck, Katharina; Riethdorf, Sabine; Joosse, Simon A; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related death and reliable blood-based prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed. The enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has gained increasing interest in clinical practice. CTC detection by CellSearch® has already been correlated to an unfavorable outcome in metastatic CRC. However, the CTC detection rate in mCRC disease is low compared to other tumor entities. Thus, the use of alternative (or supplementary) assays might help to itemize the prognostic use of CTCs as blood-based biomarkers. In this study, blood samples from 47 mCRC patients were screened for CTCs using the FDA-cleared CellSearch® technology and / or the AdnaTest®. 38 samples could be processed in parallel. We demonstrate that a combined analysis of CellSearch® and the AdnaTest® leads to an improved detection of CTCs in our mCRC patient cohort (positivity rate CellSearch® 33%, AdnaTest® 30%, combined 50%). While CTCs detected with the CellSearch® system were significantly associated with progression-free survival (p = 0.046), a significant correlation regarding overall survival could be only seen when both assays were combined (p = 0.013). These findings could help to establish improved tools to detect CTCs as on-treatment biomarkers for clinical routine in future studies. PMID:27182774

  4. Improved Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer by the Combination of the CellSearch® System and the AdnaTest®

    PubMed Central

    Quidde, Julia; Hauch, Siegfried; Röck, Katharina; Riethdorf, Sabine; Joosse, Simon A.; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related death and reliable blood-based prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed. The enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has gained increasing interest in clinical practice. CTC detection by CellSearch® has already been correlated to an unfavorable outcome in metastatic CRC. However, the CTC detection rate in mCRC disease is low compared to other tumor entities. Thus, the use of alternative (or supplementary) assays might help to itemize the prognostic use of CTCs as blood-based biomarkers. In this study, blood samples from 47 mCRC patients were screened for CTCs using the FDA-cleared CellSearch® technology and / or the AdnaTest®. 38 samples could be processed in parallel. We demonstrate that a combined analysis of CellSearch® and the AdnaTest® leads to an improved detection of CTCs in our mCRC patient cohort (positivity rate CellSearch® 33%, AdnaTest® 30%, combined 50%). While CTCs detected with the CellSearch® system were significantly associated with progression-free survival (p = 0.046), a significant correlation regarding overall survival could be only seen when both assays were combined (p = 0.013). These findings could help to establish improved tools to detect CTCs as on-treatment biomarkers for clinical routine in future studies. PMID:27182774

  5. Melphalan-induced enhancement of tumor cell immunostimulatory capacity as a mechanism for the appearance of potent antitumor immunity in the spleen of mice bearing a large metastatic MOPC-315 tumor.

    PubMed

    Bocian, R C; Dray, S; Ben-Efraim, S; Mokyr, M B

    1985-01-01

    potent antitumor immune potential in tumor bearer splenic cells containing metastatic tumor cells.

  6. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  7. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  8. Targeting Mortalin by Embelin Causes Activation of Tumor Suppressor p53 and Deactivation of Metastatic Signaling in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Nupur; Grover, Abhinav; Goyal, Sukriti; Katiyar, Shashank P.; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Wang, Pi-Chao; Sundar, Durai; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Embelin, a natural quinone found in the fruits of Embelia ribes, is commonly used in Ayurvedic home medicine for a variety of therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammation, anti-fever, anti-bacteria and anti-cancer. Molecular mechanisms of these activities and cellular targets have not been clarified to-date. We demonstrate that the embelin inhibits mortalin-p53 interactions, and activates p53 protein in tumor cells. We provide bioinformatics, molecular docking and experimental evidence to the binding affinity of embelin with mortalin and p53. Binding of embelin with mortalin/p53 abrogates their complex resulted in nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation function of p53 causing growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, analyses of growth factors and metastatic signaling using antibody membrane array revealed their downregulation in embelin-treated cells. We also found that the embelin causes transcriptional attenuation of mortalin and several other proteins involved in metastatic signaling in cancer cells. Based on these molecular dynamics and experimental data, it is concluded that the anticancer activity of embelin involves targeting of mortalin, activation of p53 and inactivation of metastatic signaling. PMID:26376435

  9. iTRAQ Quantitative Proteomic Comparison of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Uveal Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, John W.; Hu, Bo; Crabb, John S.; Triozzi, Pierre; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Singh, Arun D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common malignancy of the adult eye. The overall mortality rate is high because this aggressive cancer often metastasizes before ophthalmic diagnosis. Quantitative proteomic analysis of primary metastasizing and non-metastasizing tumors was pursued for insights into mechanisms and biomarkers of uveal melanoma metastasis. Methods Eight metastatic and 7 non-metastatic human primary uveal melanoma tumors were analyzed by LC MS/MS iTRAQ technology with Bruch’s membrane/choroid complex from normal postmortem eyes as control tissue. Tryptic peptides from tumor and control proteins were labeled with iTRAQ tags, fractionated by cation exchange chromatography, and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Protein identification utilized the Mascot search engine and the human Uni-Prot/Swiss-Protein database with false discovery ≤ 1%; protein quantitation utilized the Mascot weighted average method. Proteins designated differentially expressed exhibited quantitative differences (p ≤ 0.05, t-test) in a training set of five metastatic and five non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression models developed from the training set were used to classify the metastatic status of five independent tumors. Results Of 1644 proteins identified and quantified in 5 metastatic and 5 non-metastatic tumors, 12 proteins were found uniquely in ≥ 3 metastatic tumors, 28 were found significantly elevated and 30 significantly decreased only in metastatic tumors, and 31 were designated differentially expressed between metastatic and non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression modeling of differentially expressed collagen alpha-3(VI) and heat shock protein beta-1 allowed correct prediction of metastasis status for each of five independent tumor specimens. Conclusions The present data provide new clues to molecular differences in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanoma tumors. While sample size is limited and validation required, the results support collagen alpha-3(VI) and

  10. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  11. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  12. Establishment and characterization of SUIT-58 pancreas cancer cell line and its subline S58-SF adapted to serum-free condition derived from metastatic liver tumor.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuyasu; Aoyama, Fumiyo; Ohuchida, Jiro; Sameshima, Naoki; Asada, Yujiro; Sawaguchi, Akira

    2015-10-01

    A new pancreas cancer cell line, SUIT-58, was established from metastatic liver tumor. The cultured cells exhibited polygonal shape, and proliferated in a form of sheet-structure showing prominent nucleoli and frequent mitotic features. Chromosome count ranged from 54 to 73 with modal chromosome numbers 72 and 73. It was noteworthy that this cell line grew in the serum-free media and maintained in this condition for 30 passages (designated as S58-SF). Both SUIT-58 and S58-SF cell lines were successfully transplanted into nude mice, and their tumor doubling times in xenografts were calculated as 5.4 and 2.8 days, respectively. Histopathologically, the xenografts formed glandular structure that resembled the original tumor. In culture media, the doubling time of SUIT-58 and S58-SF cell lines was calculated as 32 and 35.7 h, respectively. Although the cellular arrangements of SUIT-58 and S58-SF cell lines are different to some extent, their subcellular structures under electron microscope were similar with a large number of lysosomes and distinct desmosomes at cell-cell adhesion sites. The present SUIT-58 and its derivative cell line S58-SF will be applicable for biological studies to develop a new clinical treatment of refractory pancreatic cancer.

  13. Pulmonar collision tumor: metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; García-Fontán, E; Ríos, J; Rivo, J E; Fernández-Martín, R; Cañizares, M A

    2012-01-01

    We report an extraordinary case of collision tumor consisting of a lung adenocarcinoma and a metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma in a 56 year-old man. He was diagnosed with a pulmonary nodule 11 years after treatment of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the right maxillary sinus. A non-small cell carcinoma was observed when a transbronchial biopsy was performed. The other component of the nodule was only diagnosed with pathological examination of the resection specimen. PMID:21802893

  14. Pulmonar collision tumor: metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; García-Fontán, E; Ríos, J; Rivo, J E; Fernández-Martín, R; Cañizares, M A

    2012-01-01

    We report an extraordinary case of collision tumor consisting of a lung adenocarcinoma and a metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma in a 56 year-old man. He was diagnosed with a pulmonary nodule 11 years after treatment of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the right maxillary sinus. A non-small cell carcinoma was observed when a transbronchial biopsy was performed. The other component of the nodule was only diagnosed with pathological examination of the resection specimen.

  15. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy.

  16. A nanoparticle formulation that selectively transfects metastatic tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Hendricks, William; Liu, Guosheng; McCaffery, J. Michael; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Huso, David L.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of malignant disease in light of the large number of potent, tumor-specific therapeutic payloads potentially available for delivery. To be effective, gene therapy vehicles must be able to deliver their therapeutic payloads to metastatic lesions after systemic administration. Here we describe nanoparticles comprised of a core of high molecular weight linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) complexed with DNA and surrounded by a shell of polyethyleneglycol-modified (PEGylated) low molecular weight LPEI. Compared with a state-of-the-art commercially available in vivo gene delivery formulation, i.v. delivery of the core/PEGylated shell (CPS) nanoparticles provided more than a 16,000-fold increase in the ratio of tumor to nontumor transfection. The vast majority of examined liver and lung metastases derived from a colorectal cancer cell line showed transgene expression after i.v. CPS injection in an animal model of metastasis. Histological examination of tissues from transfected mice revealed that the CPS nanoparticles selectively transfected neoplastic cells rather than stromal cells within primary and metastatic tumors. However, only a small fraction of neoplastic cells (<1%) expressed the transgene, and the extent of delivery varied with the tumor cell line, tumor site, and host mouse strain used. Our results demonstrate that these CPS nanoparticles offer substantial advantages over previously described formulations for in vivo nanoparticle gene therapeutics. At the same time, they illustrate that major increases in the effectiveness of such approaches are needed for utility in patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:23959886

  17. Correlation of PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells with Survival Outcomes after Radical Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Non-Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Victor H. F.; Lo, Anthony W. I.; Leung, Chun-Yin; Shek, Wai-Hung; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Lam, Ka-On; Tong, Chi-Chung; Sze, Chun-Kin; Leung, To-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated if programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression levels were prognostic of survival outcomes after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials 104 patients with non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT were investigated for their PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) which were correlated with survival endpoints including locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.6 years, 21 (20.2%), 19 (18.3%) and 31 (29.8%) patients suffered from locoregional failure, distant metastases and overall disease progression, respectively, and 31 (29.8%) patients died. Patients whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 2+ (moderate to strong membrane staining in ≥ 25% of tumor cells) enjoyed longer LRFFS (5-year 100% vs. 74.4%, Hazard ratio [HR], 0.159, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.021–0.988; P = 0.042) and marginally longer PFS (5-year 95.0% vs. 65.2%, HR, 0.351, 95% CI, 0.08–0.999, P = 0.067) compared to those whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 0 (minimal membrane staining with PD-L1 in < 5% tumor cells or no staining with PD-L1) or 1+ (minimal to moderate membrane staining with PD-L1 in between 5–24% tumor cells). PD-L1 IHC 2+ was independently prognostic of both LRFFS (P = 0.014) and PFS (P = 0.045) in multivariable analyses. Only induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation was prognostic of DMFS (P = 0.003) and no prognostic factor for OS was identified. Conclusion PD-L1 expression levels correlated with LRRFS and PFS in non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT. It may play a role in radiosensitivity for NPC, which should be further confirmed in prospective studies using immunotherapy together with IMRT. PMID:27341634

  18. Combination of circulating tumor cell enumeration and tumor marker detection in predicting prognosis and treatment effect in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kun; Kong, Yun-Yi; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yue; Jia, Zhong-Wei; Li, Gao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration in peripheral blood has already been validated as a reliable biomarker in predicting prognosis in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), patients with favorable CTC counts (CTC < 5/7.5 ml) still experience various survival times. Assays that can reduce patients' risks are urgently needed. In this study, we set up a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method to detect epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell gene expression status in peripheral blood to validate whether they could complement CTC enumeration. From January 2013 to June 2014 we collected peripheral blood from 70 mCRPC patients and enumerated CTC in these blood samples using CellSearch system. At the same time, stem cell-related genes (ABCG2, PROM1 and PSCA) and EMT-related genes (TWIST1 and vimentin) were detected in these peripheral blood samples using an RT-qPCR assay. Patient overall survival (OS) and treatment methods were recorded in the follow-up. For patients who received first-line chemotherapy, docetaxel plus prednisone, PSA progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) and PSA response rate were recorded. At the time of analysis, 35 patients had died of prostate cancer with a median follow-up of 16.0 months. Unfavorable CTC enumerations (CTC ≥5/7.5 ml) were predictive of shorter OS (p = 0.01). Also, positive stem cell gene expression indicated poor prognosis in mCRPC patients (p = 0.01). However, EMT gene expression status failed to show any prognostic value in OS (p = 0.78). A multivariate analysis indicated that serum albumin (p = 0.04), ECOG performance status (p < 0.01), CTC enumeration (p = 0.02) and stem cell gene expression status (p = 0.01) were independent prognostic factors for OS. For the 40 patients categorized into the favorable CTC enumeration group, positive stem cell gene expression also suggested poor prognosis (p < 0.01). A combined prognostic model consisting of stem cell gene

  19. Combination of circulating tumor cell enumeration and tumor marker detection in predicting prognosis and treatment effect in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun; Kong, Yun-Yi; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yue; Jia, Zhong-Wei; Li, Gao-Xiang

    2015-12-01

    Although circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration in peripheral blood has already been validated as a reliable biomarker in predicting prognosis in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), patients with favorable CTC counts (CTC < 5/7.5 ml) still experience various survival times. Assays that can reduce patients' risks are urgently needed. In this study, we set up a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method to detect epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell gene expression status in peripheral blood to validate whether they could complement CTC enumeration. From January 2013 to June 2014 we collected peripheral blood from 70 mCRPC patients and enumerated CTC in these blood samples using CellSearch system. At the same time, stem cell-related genes (ABCG2, PROM1 and PSCA) and EMT-related genes (TWIST1 and vimentin) were detected in these peripheral blood samples using an RT-qPCR assay. Patient overall survival (OS) and treatment methods were recorded in the follow-up. For patients who received first-line chemotherapy, docetaxel plus prednisone, PSA progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) and PSA response rate were recorded. At the time of analysis, 35 patients had died of prostate cancer with a median follow-up of 16.0 months. Unfavorable CTC enumerations (CTC ≥5/7.5 ml) were predictive of shorter OS (p = 0.01). Also, positive stem cell gene expression indicated poor prognosis in mCRPC patients (p = 0.01). However, EMT gene expression status failed to show any prognostic value in OS (p = 0.78). A multivariate analysis indicated that serum albumin (p = 0.04), ECOG performance status (p < 0.01), CTC enumeration (p = 0.02) and stem cell gene expression status (p = 0.01) were independent prognostic factors for OS. For the 40 patients categorized into the favorable CTC enumeration group, positive stem cell gene expression also suggested poor prognosis (p < 0.01). A combined prognostic model consisting of stem cell gene

  20. Emerging role of tumor-associated macrophages as therapeutic targets in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Matteo; Massari, Francesco; Amantini, Consuelo; Nabissi, Massimo; Maines, Francesca; Burattini, Luciano; Berardi, Rossana; Santoni, Giorgio; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) derived from peripheral blood monocytes recruited into the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) microenvironment. In response to inflammatory stimuli, macrophages undergo M1 (classical) or M2 (alternative) activation. M1 cells produce high levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-23 and IL-6, while M2 cells produce anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10, thus contributing to RCC-related immune dysfunction. The presence of extensive TAM infiltration in RCC microenvironment contributes to cancer progression and metastasis by stimulating angiogenesis, tumor growth, and cellular migration and invasion. Moreover, TAMs are involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition of RCC cancer cells and in the development of tumor resistance to targeted agents. Interestingly, macrophage autophagy seems to play an important role in RCC. Based on this scenario, TAMs represent a promising and effective target for cancer therapy in RCC. Several strategies have been proposed to suppress TAM recruitment, to deplete their number, to switch M2 TAMs into antitumor M1 phenotype and to inhibit TAM-associated molecules. In this review, we summarize current data on the essential role of TAMs in RCC angiogenesis, invasion, impaired anti-tumor immune response and development of drug resistance, thus describing the emerging TAM-centered therapies for RCC patients.

  1. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Atar, Yavuz; Topaloglu, Ilhan; Ozcan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient's clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment. PMID:23924557

  2. Prospective blinded study of somatic mutation detection in cell-free DNA utilizing a targeted 54-gene next generation sequencing panel in metastatic solid tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Won-Suk; Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie; Zill, Oliver A; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Kang, Won Ki; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jeeyun; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-11-24

    Sequencing of the mutant allele fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from tumors is increasingly utilized to detect actionable genomic alterations in cancer. We conducted a prospective blinded study of a comprehensive cfDNA sequencing panel with 54 cancer genes. To evaluate the concordance between cfDNA and tumor DNA (tDNA), sequencing results were compared between cfDNA from plasma and genomic tumor DNA (tDNA). Utilizing next generation digital sequencing technology (DST), we profiled approximately 78,000 bases encoding 512 complete exons in the targeted genes in cfDNA from plasma. Seventy-five patients were prospectively enrolled between February 2013 and March 2014, including 61 metastatic cancer patients and 14 clinical stage II CRC patients with matched plasma and tissue samples. Using the 54-gene panel, we detected at least one somatic mutation in 44 of 61 tDNA (72.1%) and 29 of 44 (65.9%) cfDNA. The overall concordance rate of cfDNA to tDNA was 85.9%, when all detected mutations were considered. We collected serial cfDNAs during cetuximab-based treatment in 2 metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC patients, one with acquired resistance and one with primary resistance. We demonstrate newly emerged KRAS mutation in cfDNA 1.5 months before radiologic progression. Another patient had a newly emerged PIK3CA H1047R mutation on cfDNA analysis at progression during cetuximab/irinotecan chemotherapy with gradual increase in allele frequency from 0.8 to 2.1%. This blinded, prospective study of a cfDNA sequencing showed high concordance to tDNA suggesting that the DST approach may be used as a non-invasive biopsy-free alternative to conventional sequencing using tumor biopsy.

  3. Establishment of two hormone-responsive mouse mammary carcinoma cell lines derived from a metastatic mammary tumor.

    PubMed

    Efeyan, Alejo; Fabris, Victoria; Merani, Susana; Lanari, Claudia; Molinolo, Alfredo A

    2004-02-01

    We report the establishment of two mouse mammary cancer cell lines, MC7-2A and MC7-2B obtained from a mouse mammary carcinoma induced by medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and maintained by syngeneic transplantation in BALB/c mice. They are epithelial (express cytokeratins) and express both estrogen receptors alpha (ERalpha) and progesterone receptors (PRs) isoforms A and B (western blots). In vitro, MPA inhibited 3H-thymidine uptake, starting from concentrations as low as 10(-13) M in MC7-2A and 10(10) M in MC7-2B; the antiprogestin RU 486 exerted a stimulatory effect at 10(-14) M in both cell lines; 17-beta-estradiol (E2) also exerted a stimulatory effect starting at 10(-10) M in MC7-2A and at 10(-13) M in MC7-2B. When transplanted in syngeneic mice, both cell lines originated adenocarcinomas that gave rise to lung metastases within 3 months. In in vivo studies, in MC7-2A, the antiprogestin inhibited completely tumor growth, E2 induced a slight although significant ( p < 0.05) stimulatory effect and MPA stimulated tumor growth while MC7-2B cells were unresponsive to all treatments. ER and PR were also expressed in tumors as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Two marker chromosomes were identified by FISH as translocations between chromosomes 4 and 7, and between chromosomes X and 2; the third marker chromosome remains unidentified. All these markers were also present in the parental tumor. A new marker, a centric fusion of chromosomes 2, was acquired in both cell lines. Considering that there are very few murine breast carcinoma responsive cell lines, these cells represent new tools in which the regulatory effect of hormones can be studied. PMID:14758093

  4. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Expression in Disseminated Tumor Cells and Micrometastasis in Bone Marrow of Patients with Nonmetastatic and Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Theoretical Considerations and Clinical Implications—An Immunocytochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Reyes, Eduardo; Tapia, Pablo; Badínez, Leonardo; Orellana, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is important in the dissemination and invasion of tumor cells and activates angiogenesis. We present an immunocytochemical study of MMP-2 expression in circulating prostate cells (CPCs), disseminated tumor cells (DTCs), and micrometastasis (mM) in bone marrow of men with prostate cancer. Methods and Patients. Tumor cells were identified with anti-PSA immunocytochemistry. Positive samples underwent processing with anti-MMP-2, its expression was compared with Gleason score, concordance of expression, and metastatic and nonmetastatic disease. Results. 215 men participated, CPCs were detected in 62.7%, DTCs in 62.2%, and mM in 71.4% in nonmetastatic cancer; in metastatic cancer all had CPCs, DTCs, and mM detected. All CPCs and DTCs expressed MMP-2; in mM MMP-2 expression was positively associated with increasing Gleason score. MMP-2 expression in CPCs and DTCs showed concordance. In low grade tumors, mM and surrounding stromal cells were MMP-2 negative, with variable expression in high grade tumors; in metastatic disease, both mM and stromal cells were MMP-2 positive. Conclusions. CPCs and DTCs are different from mM, with inhibition of MMP-2 expression in mM of low grade tumors. With disease progression, MMP-2 expression increases in both mM and surrounding stromal cells, with implications for the use of bisphosphonates or MMP-2 inhibitors. PMID:23227342

  5. [Palliative radiotherapy for metastatic bone tumor].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hiratsuka, Junichi

    2006-04-01

    Bone metastases are one of the most common conditions requiring radiation therapy today. Its main aim is relief of bone pain, prevention of pathological bone fractures as well as its healing, with anticipated effect upon improving mobility, function, and quality of life. For localized bone pain, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) will be successful in reducing pain in some 80% of patients. However, optimal fraction dose and total doses of EBRT required for pain relief have been unknown. According to the recent reports, carbon ion radiotherapy seems to be a safe and effective modality in the management of metastatic bone tumor not eligible for conventional EBRT. For scattered painful metastases, the systemic administration of radioisotopes is thought to be effective. PMID:16582516

  6. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  7. Sunitinib as Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in the Management of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking a Glomus Vagale Tumor in the Head and Neck: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Serkan; Somner, Jessica; Rajan, Gunesh P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of the head and neck with intracranial extension is rare and may pose difficulties to the diagnosis and management. Method We describe a unique case of a 76-year-old man with a metastatic RCC to the neck and lateral skull base with intracranial extension presenting with Collet-Sicard syndrome 8 years after initial diagnosis. The radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of a glomus vagale tumor on the basis of clinical and radiologic features. Results Despite radiotherapy, the intracranial extension progressed in size, resulting in early hydrocephalus. Sunitinib, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was instituted to treat the glomus vagale tumor with a marked reduction in tumor volume and resolution of the early hydrocephalus. The surgical resection of the tumor with its intracranial extension was achieved without additional postoperative morbidity. The histopathologic diagnosis surprisingly demonstrated metastatic RCC. Conclusion We present a case of metastatic RCC to the head and neck region mimicking a glomus vagale tumor and describe the first use of sunitinib as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy to achieve a single-stage radical en bloc resection of the tumor mass. PMID:27247912

  8. Hydroxyethyl starch 200/0.5 decreases circulating tumor cells of colorectal cancer patients and reduces metastatic potential of colon cancer cell line through inhibiting platelets activation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hua; Yang, Chengxiang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Hanbing; Liu, Hongzhen; Zhao, Zhenlong; Zhang, Zhiming; Wen, Xianjie; Lai, Xiaohong

    2015-05-01

    Platelets play an important role in metastasis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). It has been demonstrated that hydroxyethyl starch (HES) inhibits platelets function. However, the effect of HES on CTCs in patients with colorectal cancer remains unclear. We compared the effects of HES 200/0.5 and HES 130/0.4 on CTCs and platelets activation of colorectal patients in this study. Additionally, the effects of HES 200/0.5 or HES 130/0.4 on metastasis ability of colon cancer cell line that stimulated by activated platelets have been explored. In vivo, 90 patients undergoing colorectal cancer radical surgery received randomly 15 mL/kg of HES 200/0.5 (n = 45) or HES 130/0.4 (n = 45) infusion before surgery. Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa), CD62P and platelets aggregation rate (PAR) were evaluated pre-, intra- and postoperatively. Cytokeratin-20 (CK-20) mRNA was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction before and after surgery. In vitro, colon cancer SW480 cells were incubated with activated platelets in the presence or absence HES 200/0.5 or HES 130/0.4. The metastasis ability of SW480 cells was assessed by Transwell assay. The results showed that CK-20 mRNA positive rate in HES 200/0.5 group after surgery was decreased significantly as compared to group HES 130/0.4 (χ (2) = 6.164, P = 0.013). Simultaneously, a more pronounced inhibition of platelets activation was observed in group HES 200/0.5. A positive correlation between platelets activation marker and CK-20 mRNA positive rate was found. In vitro, HES 200/0.5, but not HES 130/0.4, decreased the invasion and migration ability of SW480 cells that induced by activated platelets. Besides, the expression of GPIIb/IIIa, CD62P and PAR was inhibited more strongly in group HES 200/0.5 than those in group HES 130/0.4. In summary, we found that HES 200/0.5 significantly decreased CTCs of patients undergoing colorectal cancer radical surgery as compared to HES 130/0.4, which might be associated

  9. Dendritic Versus Tumor Cell Presentation of Autologous Tumor Antigens for Active Specific Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma: Impact on Long-Term Survival by Extent of Disease at the Time of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Edward F.; Barth, Neil M.; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Mahdavi, Khosrow; de Leon, Cristina; Ellis, Robin E.; DePriest, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In patients with metastatic melanoma, sequential single-arm and randomized phase II trials with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with antigens from self-renewing, proliferating, irradiated autologous tumor cells (DC-TC) showed superior survival compared with similar patients immunized with irradiated tumor cells (TC). We wished to determine whether this difference was evident in cohorts who at the time of treatment had (1) no evidence of disease (NED) or (2) had detectable disease. Eligibility criteria and treatment schedules were the same for all three trials. Pooled data confirmed that overall survival (OS) was longer in 72 patients treated with DC-TC compared with 71 patients treated with TC (median OS 60 versus 22 months; 5-year OS 51% versus 32%, p=0.004). Treatment with DC-TC was associated with longer OS in both cohorts. Among 70 patients who were NED at the time that treatment was started, OS was better for DC-TC: 5-year OS 73% versus 43% (p=0.015). Among 73 patients who had detectable metastases, OS was better for DC-TC: median 38.8 months versus 14.7 months, 5-year OS 33% versus 20% (p=0.025). This approach is promising as an adjunct to other therapies in patients who have had metastatic melanoma. PMID:26083950

  10. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs.

  11. Tumor progression: analysis of the instability of the metastatic phenotype, sensitivity to radiation and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The major complications for tumor therapy are 1) tumor spread (metastasis); 2) the mixed nature of tumors (heterogeneity); and 3) the capacity of tumors to evolve (progress). To study these tumor characteristics, the rat 13762NF mammary adenocarcinoma was cloned and studied for metastatic properties and sensitivities to therapy (chemotherapy, radiation and hyperthermia). The cell clones were heterogeneous and no correlation between metastatic potential and therapeutic sensitivities was observed. Further, these phenotypes were unstable during pasage in vitro; yet, the changes were clone dependent and reproducible using different cryoprotected cell stocks. To understand the phenotypic instability, subclones were isolated from low and high passage cell clones. The results demonstrated that 1) tumor cells are heterogeneous for multiple phenotypes; 2) tumor cells are unstable for multiple phenotypes; 3) the magnitude, direction and time of occurrence of phenotypic drift is clone dependent; 4) the sensitivity of cell clones to ionizing radiation (..gamma.. or heat) and chemotherapy agents is independent of their metastatic potential; 5) shifts in metastatic potential and sensitivity to therapy may occur simultaneously but are not linked; and 6) tumor cells independently diverge to form several subpopulations with unique phenotypic profiles.

  12. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O; Gabordi, Robert C; Smith, Prudence V; Toloza, Eric M

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed.

  13. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O; Gabordi, Robert C; Smith, Prudence V; Toloza, Eric M

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed. PMID:27293861

  14. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Gabordi, Robert C.; Smith, Prudence V.

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed. PMID:27293861

  15. Targeting Inhibition of Fibroblast Activation Protein-α and Prolyl Oligopeptidase Activities on Cells Common to Metastatic Tumor Microenvironments1

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Victoria J; Jackson, Kenneth W; Lee, Kyung N; Downs, Tamyra D; McKee, Patrick A

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), a membrane prolyl-specific proteinase with both dipeptidase and endopeptidase activities, is overexpressed by reactive stromal fibroblasts during epithelial-derived cancer growth. FAP digests extracellular matrix as tissue is remodeled during cancer expansion and may also promote an immunotolerant tumor microenvironment. Recent studies suggest that nonspecific FAP inhibitors suppress human cancer xenografts in mouse models. Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP), another prolyl-specific serine proteinase, is also elevated in many cancers and may have a regulatory role in angiogenesis promotion. FAP and POP cell-associated activities may be targets for diagnosis and treatment of various cancers, but their accessibilities to highly effective specific inhibitors have not been shown for cells important to cancer growth. Despite their frequent simultaneous expression in many cancers and their overlapping activities toward commonly used substrates, precise, separate measurement of FAP or POP activity has largely been ignored. To distinguish each of the two activities, we synthesized highly specific substrates and inhibitors for FAP or POP based on amino acid sequences surrounding the scissile bonds of their respective putative substrates. We found varying amounts of FAP and POP protein and activities on activated fibroblasts, mesenchymal cells, normal breast cells, and one breast cancer cell line, with some cells exhibiting more POP than FAP activity. Replicating endothelial cells (ECs) expressed POP but not FAP until tubulogenesis began. Targeting FAP-positive cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts for inactivation or destruction, and inhibiting POP-producing EC may abrogate stromal invasion and angiogenesis simultaneously and thereby diminish cancer growth. PMID:23555181

  16. Metastatic stem cells: sources, niches, and vital pathways.

    PubMed

    Oskarsson, Thordur; Batlle, Eduard; Massagué, Joan

    2014-03-01

    Metastasis is powered by disseminated cancer cells that re-create a full-fledged tumor in unwelcoming tissues, away from the primary site. How cancer cells moving from a tumor into the circulation manage to infiltrate distant organs and initiate metastatic growth is of interest to cancer biologists and clinical oncologists alike. Recent findings have started to define the sources, phenotypic properties, hosting niches, and signaling pathways that support the survival, self-renewal, dormancy, and reactivation of cancer cells that initiate metastasis: metastatic stem cells. By dissecting the biology of this process, vulnerabilities are being exposed that could be exploited to prevent metastasis.

  17. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth by targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Hyoudou, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yuki; Umeyama, Yukari; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    To develop effective anti-metastatic therapy, targeted or sustained delivery of catalase was examined in mice. We found that mouse lung with metastatic colonies of adenocarcinoma colon26 cells exhibited reduced catalase activity. The interaction of the tumor cells with macrophages or hepatocytes generated detectable amounts of ROS, and increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Hepatocyte-targeted delivery of catalase was successfully achieved by galactosylation, which was highly effective in inhibiting the hepatic metastasis of colon26 cells. PEGylation, which increased the retention of catalase in the circulation, effectively inhibited the pulmonary metastasis of the cells. To examine which processes in tumor metastasis are inhibited by catalase derivatives, the tissue distribution and proliferation of tumor cells in mice was quantitatively analyzed using firefly luciferase-expressing tumor cells. An injection of PEG-catalase just before the inoculation of melanoma B16-BL6/Luc cells significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells in the lung at 24 h. Daily dosing of PEG-catalase greatly inhibited the proliferation of the tumor cells, and increased the survival rate of the tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that targeted or sustained delivery of catalase to sites where tumor cells metastasize is a promising approach for inhibiting metastatic tumor growth. PMID:16256238

  18. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  19. Tumor attributes predicting cutaneous metastatic destiny: a report of two interesting cases.

    PubMed

    Gurumurthi, Ravichandran; Thirumalai, Raja; Easow, Jose M; Mohan, Subhashini

    2014-07-01

    Cutaneous metastases are the result of complex interaction between the tumor cells ("seed") and the host environment ("soil"). Metastases to the skin can be an early sign of internal malignancy or represent recurrence of the primary tumor and portends a poorer prognosis. Invasion and metastasis are the hallmarks of on cogenesis. Skin is the largest organ in the body, but the incidence of metastases is low. With advances in molecular biology, factors responsible for the initiation and perpetuation of metastatic tumor cells at distant sites are being elucidated. The concept of "pre-metastatic niche" and interaction between various chemokines has given a new outlook in understanding the organ specificity of metastatic tumor cells. We present two cases of cutaneous metastases with interesting clinical findings correlating with its biologic subtypes.

  20. Tumor-suppressive p53 Signaling Empowers Metastatic Inhibitor KLF17-dependent Transcription to Overcome Tumorigenesis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Shah, Abdus Saboor; Duong, Hong-Quan; Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Mohammad, Shah Faisal; Khan, Rahmat Ali; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2015-08-28

    Metastasis, which is controlled by concerted action of multiple genes, is a complex process and is an important cause of cancer death. Krüppel-like factor 17 (KLF17) is a negative regulator of metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanism and biological relevance of KLF17 in cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an integral role to induce KLF17 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). p53 is recruited to the KLF17 promoter and results in the formation of p53-DNA complex. p53 enhances binding of p300 and favors histone acetylation on the KLF17 promoter. Mechanistically, p53 physically interacts with KLF17 and thereby enhances the anti-metastatic function of KLF17. p53 empowers KLF17-mediated EMT genes transcription via enhancing physical association of KLF17 with target gene promoters. Nutlin-3 recruits KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters and results in the formation of KLF17-DNA complex via a p53-dependent pathway. p53 depletion abrogates DNA binding affinity of KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters. KLF17 is critical for p53 cellular activities in NSCLC. Importantly, KLF17 enhances p53 transcription to generate a novel positive feedback loop. KLF17 depletion accelerates lung cancer cell growth in response to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we found that KLF17 increases the expression of tumor suppressor genes p53, p21, and pRB. Functionally, KLF17 required p53 to suppress cancer cell invasion and migration in NSCLC. In conclusion, our study highlights a novel insight into the anti-EMT effect of KLF17 via a p53-dependent pathway in NSCLC, and KLF17 may be a new therapeutic target in NSCLC with p53 status.

  1. [Cancer cell plasticity and metastatic dissemination].

    PubMed

    Moyret-Lalle, Caroline; Pommier, Roxane; Bouard, Charlotte; Nouri, Ebticem; Richard, Geoffrey; Puisieux, Alain

    Metastatic dissemination consists of a sequence of events resulting in the invasion by cancer cells of tissues located away from the primary tumour. This process is highly inefficient, since each event represents an obstacle that only a limited number of cells can overcome. However, two biological phenomena intrinsically linked with tumour development facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the body and promote the formation of metastases, namely the genetic diversity of cancer cells within a given tumour, which arises from their genetic instability and from successive clonal expansions, and cellular plasticity conveyed to the cells by micro-environmental signals. Genetic diversity increases the probability of selecting cells that are intrinsically resistant to biological and physical constraints encountered during metastatic dissemination, whereas cellular plasticity provides cells with the capacity to adapt to stressful conditions and to changes in the microenvironment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an embryonic trans-differentiation process frequently reactivated during tumour development, plays an important role in that context by endowing tumor cells with a unique capacity of motility, survival and adaptability to the novel environments and stresses encountered during the invasion-metastasis cascade. PMID:27615180

  2. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Lorena; Bronte, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-04-19

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition.Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC.

  3. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  4. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  5. Applicability of Pulmonary Lobectomy in Treating Metastatic Lung Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kitahara, Hirokazu; Shimamatsu, Shinichiro; Morodomi, Yosuke; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Although metastases to the lung from other organs are usually removed with limited lung resections (e.g., wedge resections or segmentectomies), pulmonary lobectomies are often required to remove whole pulmonary tumors. This study investigated the clinical applicability of pulmonary lobectomies to treat metastatic lung tumors. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical records of 143 consecutive patients with metastatic tumors in the lung who underwent surgery in our department, including data sets for 100 patients treated for their first metastatic lung tumors. Results: Of the 100 patients, 23 received pulmonary lobectomies, 69 received wedge resections and eight received segmentectomies. Patients in the lobectomy group were more likely to be younger, have larger and/or multiple tumors, and to have tumors of musculoskeletal origin (sarcomas) than those who underwent segmentectomies or wedge resections (the limited resection group). The two groups did not significantly differ in survival (3-year survival rate; lobectomy vs limited resection: 75.2% vs 80.4%, P = 0.15), or post-operative morbidity, although the only post-operative morbidity was associated with post-operative prognosis in the lobectomy group. Conclusions: Pulmonary lobectomy is a safe and applicable surgical procedure for metastatic lung tumors when long survival is expected after the tumor resection. PMID:25641034

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) are shed from primary or secondary tumors. Prior studies have demonstrated that enumeration of CTC is a robust independent prognostic factor of progression free and overall survival in patients with early and metastatic breast cancer. CTC, as well as other circulating tumor markers, have the appealing advantages over tissue biopsy of (1) ease of collection, (2) serial evaluation, and (3) interrogation of the entire tumor burden instead of just a limited part of the tumor. Advances have been recently made in phenotyping and genotyping of CTC, which should provide insights into the predictive role of CTC for sensitivity or resistance to therapies. In addition, CTC phenotypic marker changes during the course of treatment may serve as pharmacodynamic monitoring tools. Therefore, CTC may be considered "liquid biopsies," providing prognostic and predictive clinical information as well as additional understanding of tumor heterogeneity.

  7. Serial enumeration of circulating tumor cells predicts treatment response and prognosis in metastatic breast cancer: a prospective study in 393 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To prospectively assess circulating tumor cell (CTC) status at baseline (CTCBL) and after one cycle of a new line of systemic therapy (CTC1C), and changes from CTCBL to CTC1C (CTC kinetics, CTCKIN) for their utility in predicting response, progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Methods CTCBL and CTC1C status was determined as negative (-) or positive (+) for < 5 or ≥ 5 CTCs/7.5 ml blood using CellSearch™ (Veridex). CTCKIN was categorized as favorable (CTC1C-) or unfavorable (CTC1C+). Tumor response was to be assessed every 2–3 months using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Statistical analysis focused on the relation between CTC status and CTCKIN, and response, PFS, and OS. Results 133/393 (34%) patients enrolled were CTCBL+. CTC1C status after one cycle and radiological tumor response were assessed after median (range) periods of 1.2 (0.5–3.2) and 2.9 (0.5–4.8) months, respectively. 57/201 (28%) were CTC1C+. Median [95% confidence interval] PFS and OS (months) were significantly reduced in CTCBL+ vs. CTCBL- patients (PFS 4.7 [3.7–6.1] vs. 7.8 [6.4–9.2]; OS 10.4 [7.9–15.0] vs. 27.2 [22.3–29.9]), and for CTC1C+ vs. CTC1C- patients (PFS 4.3 [3.6–6.0] vs. 8.5 [6.6–10.4]; OS 7.7 [6.4–13.9] vs. 30.6 [22.6–not available]). Unfavorable CTCKIN was significantly associated with progressive disease. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed prognostic factors for shorter PFS (CTCBL+, persistent CTCs after one cycle, ≥ 3rd-line therapy, and triple-negative receptor status) and shorter OS (CTCBL+, persistent CTCs after one cycle, bone-and-visceral/local metastases, ≥ 3rd-line therapy, and triple-negative receptor status). Conclusions CTCBL, CTC1C, and CTCKIN are predictive of outcome in MBC. Serial CTC enumeration is useful in tailoring systemic treatment of MBC. Trial registration Not applicable. PMID:25015676

  8. Metastatic tumors to the pancreas: The role of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sperti, Cosimo; Moletta, Lucia; Patanè, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic metastases from other primary malignancies are a rare entity. By far, the most common primary cancer site resulting in an isolated pancreatic metastasis is the kidney, followed by colorectal cancer, melanoma, breast cancer, lung carcinoma and sarcoma. Only few data on the surgical outcome of pancreatic resections performed for metastases from other primary tumor have been published, and there are no guidelines to address the surgical treatment for these patients. In this study, we performed a review of the published literature, focusing on the early and long-term results of surgery for the most frequent primary tumors metastasizing to the pancreas. Results for the Literature’s analysis show that in last years an increasing number of surgical resections have been performed in selected patients with limited pancreatic disease. Pancreatic resection for metastatic disease can be performed with acceptable mortality and morbidity rates. The usefulness of pancreatic resection is mainly linked to the biology of the primary tumor metastasizing to the pancreas. The benefit of metastasectomy in terms of patient survival has been observed for metastases from renal cell cancer, while for other primary tumors, such as lung and breast cancers, the role of surgery is mainly palliative. PMID:25320654

  9. Cytokeratin-20 and Survivin-Expressing Circulating Tumor Cells Predict Survival in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients by a Combined Immunomagnetic qRT-PCR Approach.

    PubMed

    Ning, Yan; Hanna, Diana L; Zhang, Wu; Mendez, Angela; Yang, Dongyun; El-Khoueiry, Rita; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Sunakawa, Yu; Stremitzer, Stefan; Parekh, Anish; Okazaki, Satoshi; Berger, Martin D; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2015-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) express epithelial and stem cell-like genes, though current approved detection methods mainly use epithelial markers. We optimized a CTC isolation method that could capture their molecular heterogeneity and predict overall survival (OS) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients receiving various chemotherapy regimens. We combined immunomagnetic enrichment of CD45-negative, EpCAM-positive circulating cancer cells with qRT-PCR amplification of CK20 and survivin expression in 88 mCRC patients and 20 healthy controls. We then evaluated the prognostic value of baseline CTC CK20 and survivin expression in mCRC patients. The presence of elevated CTC CK20 or survivin expression distinguished mCRC patients from controls with sufficient sensitivity (79.6%) and specificity (85%). In univariate analysis, patients with high CTC-CK20 expression (9 vs. 33.2+ months, log-rank P < 0.001) or high CTC-survivin expression (10 vs. 33.2+ months, log-rank P = 0.032) had a significantly worse median OS than those with low expression of either marker. In multivariable analysis, the high CTC-CK20 group had significantly shortened OS (HR, 3.11; adjusted P = 0.01), and there was a trend toward inferior OS in the high CTC-survivin group (HR, 1.76; adjusted P = 0.099). Patients with either high CTC CK20 or survivin expression had inferior OS compared with those with low expression of both markers (HR, 4.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.56-12.35; adjusted P = 0.005). Colorectal cancer CTCs can be reliably isolated using epithelial and stem cell markers. CTC CK20 and survivin expression may effectively predict OS in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy.

  10. Oncolytic Reovirus in Combination With Chemotherapy in Metastatic or Recurrent Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With KRAS-Activated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Lam, Elaine; Otterson, Gregory A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Timmons, Matthew; Subramaniam, Deepa; Hade, Erinn M.; Gill, George M.; Coffey, Matthew; Selvaggi, Giovanni; Bertino, Erin; Chao, Bo; Knopp, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The type 3 Dearing reovirus (Reolysin) is a naturally occurring virus that preferentially infects and causes oncolysis in tumor cells with a Ras-activated pathway. It induces host immunity and cell cycle arrest and acts synergistically with cytotoxic agents. METHODS This study evaluated Reolysin combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with metastatic/recurrent KRAS-mutated or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mutated/amplified non–small cell lung cancer. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients were treated. Molecular alterations included 20 KRAS mutations, 10 EGFR amplifications, 3 EGFR mutations, and 4 BRAF-V600E mutations. In total, 242 cycles (median, 4; range, 1-47) were completed. The initial doses were area under the curve (AUC) 6 mg/mL/min for carboplatin, 200 mg/m2 for paclitaxel on day 1, and 3×1010 50% tissue culture infective dose for Reolysin on days 1 to 5 of each 21-day cycle. Because of diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (in the first 2 patients), subsequent doses were reduced to 175 mg/m2 for paclitaxel and AUC 5 mg/mL/min for carboplatin. Toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, neutropenia, arthralgia/myalgia, anorexia, and electrolyte abnormalities. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 responses included the following: partial response for 11 patients, stable disease (SD) for 20 patients, progressive disease for 4 patients, and not evaluable for 2 patients (objective response rate, 31%; 90% 1-sided lower confidence interval, 21%). Four SD patients had >40% positron emission tomography standardized uptake value reductions. The median progression-free survival, median overall survival, and 12-month overall survival rate were 4 months, 13.1 months, and 57%, respectively. Seven patients were alive after a median follow-up of 34.2 months; they included 2 patients without disease progression at 37 and 50 months. CONCLUSIONS Reolysin in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin was well tolerated. The

  11. Possible epigenetic mechanisms of tumor progression: induction of high-frequency heritable but phenotypically unstable changes in the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of tumor cell populations by 5-azacytidine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, R S; Frost, P; Liteplo, R; Carlow, D A; Elliott, B E

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of a variety of highly tumorigenic mouse lines in vitro with chemical mutagens, such as ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), can result in extraordinarily high frequencies (sometimes in excess of 90%) of strongly immunogenic clones unable to grow progressively in normal syngeneic hosts. These clones will, however, grow in immunosuppressed hosts and gradually regain tumorigenic ability in normal mice if maintained in long-term (several months-1 year) culture, i.e., they are often phenotypically unstable. These features--phenotypic drift and high frequency--make it unlikely that point mutations are the underlying mechanism involved in the generation of the variants. Results presented here demonstrate that these observations can be reproduced on the same tumor lines using 5-azacytidine--an analogue of cytidine which can be incorporated into DNA causing subsequent extensive hypomethylation of cytosine residues in the absence of any significant mutagenic effects. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment of a nonmetastatic mouse mammary tumor led to the emergence of a small number of heritable but unstable tumor clones capable of spontaneous metastatic spread. Because it is known that DNA hypomethylation can lead to transcriptional activation of normally silent genes, that altered methylation patterns can be somatically replicated with a high but not perfect fidelity, and that mutagens can cause DNA hypomethylation, we propose that DNA hypomethylation followed by de novo methylation represents a plausible mechanism to account not only for the induction of the nontumorigenic variants but for a number of aspects of tumor progression and tumor heterogeneity, as well. In particular, we refer to heritable phenotypic alterations in tumor cell populations which occur at very high frequency but which are not necessarily stable over very long periods of time.

  12. Macrophage depletion reduces postsurgical tumor recurrence and metastatic growth in a spontaneous murine model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Muly; Khoo, Karen; Yeo, Kim Pin; Kato, Masashi; Prevost-Blondel, Amelle; Angeli, Veronique; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Surgical resection of tumors is often followed by regrowth at the primary site and metastases may emerge rapidly following removal of the primary tumor. Macrophages are important drivers of tumor growth, and here we investigated their involvement in postoperative relapse as well as explore macrophage depletion as an adjuvant to surgical resection. RETAAD mice develop spontaneous metastatic melanoma that begins in the eye. Removal of the eyes as early as 1 week of age did not prevent the development of metastases; rather, surgery led to increased proliferation of tumor cells locally and in distant metastases. Surgery-induced increase in tumor cell proliferation correlated with increased macrophage density within the tumor. Moreover, macrophages stimulate tumor sphere formation from tumor cells of post-surgical but not control mice. Macrophage depletion with a diet containing the CSF-1R specific kinase inhibitor Ki20227 following surgery significantly reduced postoperative tumor recurrence and abrogated enhanced metastatic outgrowth. Our results confirm that tumor cells disseminate early, and show that macrophages contribute both to post-surgical tumor relapse and growth of metastases, likely through stimulating a population of tumor-initiating cells. Thus macrophage depletion warrants exploration as an adjuvant to surgical resection. PMID:25762633

  13. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Is a Prognostic Factor in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients Receiving First-Line Chemotherapy Plus Bevacizumab: A Spanish Cooperative Group for the Treatment of Digestive Tumors Study

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, M. Luisa; Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Rivera, Fernando; Valladares, Manuel; Massuti, Bartomeu; Benavides, Manuel; Gallén, Manuel; Marcuello, Eugenio; Abad, Albert; Arrivi, Antonio; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; González, Encarnación; Tabernero, Josep M.; Vidaurreta, Marta; Aranda, Enrique; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background. The Maintenance in Colorectal Cancer trial was a phase III study to assess maintenance therapy with single-agent bevacizumab versus bevacizumab plus chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. An ancillary study was conducted to evaluate the circulating tumor cell (CTC) count as a prognostic and/or predictive marker for efficacy endpoints. Patients and Methods. One hundred eighty patients were included. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and after three cycles. CTC enumeration was carried out using the CellSearch® System (Veridex LLC, Raritan, NJ). Computed tomography scans were performed at cycle 3 and 6 and every 12 weeks thereafter for tumor response assessment. Results. The median progression-free survival (PFS) interval for patients with a CTC count ≥3 at baseline was 7.8 months, versus the 12.0 months achieved by patients with a CTC count <3 (p = .0002). The median overall survival (OS) time was 17.7 months for patients with a CTC count ≥3, compared with 25.1 months for patients with a lower count (p = .0059). After three cycles, the median PFS interval for patients with a low CTC count was 10.8 months, significantly longer than the 7.5 months for patients with a high CTC count (p = .005). The median OS time for patients with a CTC count <3 was significantly longer than for patients with a CTC count ≥3, 25.1 months versus 16.2 months, respectively (p = .0095). Conclusions. The CTC count is a strong prognostic factor for PFS and OS outcomes in metastatic colorectal cancer patients. PMID:22643538

  14. Identification of Molecular Determinants of Primary and Metastatic Tumor Re-Initiation in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jason B.; Huh, Doowon; Noble, Lisa B.; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2015-01-01

    Through in vivo selection of multiple ER-negative human breast cancer populations for enhanced tumor-forming capacity, we have derived sub-populations that generate tumors more efficiently than their parental populations at low cell numbers. Tumorigenic-enriched (TE) sub-populations displayed increased expression of LAMA4, FOXQ1 and NAP1L3—genes that are also expressed at greater levels by independently derived metastatic sub-populations. These genes promote metastatic efficiency. FOXQ1 promotes LAMA4 expression, while LAMA4 enhances clonal expansion upon substratum-detachment in vitro, tumor re-initiation in multiple organs, and disseminated metastatic cell proliferation and colonization. LAMA4’s promotion of cancer cell proliferation and tumor re-initiation requires β1-integrin. Increased LAMA4 expression marks the transition of human pre-malignant breast lesions to malignant carcinomas, while tumoral LAMA4 over-expression predicts reduced relapse-free survival in ER-negative patients. Our findings reveal common features that govern primary and metastatic tumor re-initiation and identify a key molecular determinant of these processes. PMID:25866923

  15. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  16. GPI/AMF inhibition blocks the development of the metastatic phenotype of mature multi-cellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Rivero-Segura, Nadia Alejandra; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cellular invasiveness are two pivotal processes for the development of metastatic tumor phenotypes. The metastatic profile of non-metastatic MCF-7 cells growing as multi-cellular tumor microspheroids (MCTSs) was analyzed by determining the contents of the EMT, invasive and migratory proteins, as well as their migration and invasiveness potential and capacity to secrete active cytokines such as the glucose phosphate isomerase/AMF (GPI/AMF). As for the control, the same analysis was also performed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 (highly metastatic, MDA) monolayer cells, and in stage IIIB and IV human metastatic breast biopsies. The proliferative cell layers (PRL) of mature MCF-7 MCTSs, MDA monolayer cells and metastatic biopsies exhibited increased cellular contents (2-15 times) of EMT (β-catenin, SNAIL), migratory (vimentin, cytokeratin, and fibronectin) and invasive (MMP-1, VEGF) proteins versus MCF-7 monolayer cells, quiescent cell layers of mature MCF-7 MCTS and non-metastatic breast biopsies. The increase in metastatic proteins correlated with substantially elevated cellular abilities for migration (18-times) and invasiveness (13-times) and with the higher level (6-times) of the cytokine GPI/AMF in the extracellular medium of PRL, as compared to MCF-7 monolayer cells. Interestingly, the addition of the GPI/AMF inhibitors erythrose-4-phosphate or 6-phosphogluconate at micromolar doses significantly decreased its extracellular activity (>80%), with a concomitant diminution in the metastatic protein content and migratory tumor cell capacity, and with no inhibitory effect on tumor lactate production or toxicity on 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. The present findings provide new insights into the discovery of metabolic inhibitors to be used as complementary therapy against metastatic and aggressive tumors.

  17. Detection of circulating tumor cells in blood of metastatic breast cancer patients using a combination of cytokeratin and EpCAM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are detectable in peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC). In this paper we evaluate a new CTC separation method based on a combination of anti-EpCAM- and anti-cytokeratin magnetic cell separation with the aim to improve CTC detection with low target antigen densities. Methods Blood samples of healthy donors spiked with breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used to determine accuracy and precision of the method. 10 healthy subjects were examined to evaluate specificity. CTC counts in 59 patients with MBC were measured to evaluate the prognostic value on overall survival. Results Regression analysis of numbers of recovered vs. spiked HCC1937 cells yielded a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.957. The average percentage of cell recovery was 84%. The average within-run coefficient of variation for spiking of 185, 85 and 30 cells was 14%. For spiking of 10 cells the within-run CV was 30%. No CTCs were detected in blood of 10 healthy subjects examined. A standard threshold of 5 CTC/7.5 ml blood as a cut-off point between risk groups led to a highly significant prognostic marker (p < 0.001). To assess the prognostic value of medium CTC levels we additionally considered a low (CTC-L: 0 CTC), a medium (CTC-M: 1–4 CTC) and a high risk group (CTC-H: ≥5 CTC). The effect of this CTC-LMH marker on overall survival was significant as well (p < 0.001). A log-ratio test performed to compare the model with 3 vs. the model with 2 risk groups rejected the model with 2 risk groups (p = 0.026). For CTC as a count variable, we propose an offset reciprocal transformation 1/(1 + x) for overall survival prediction (p < 0.001). Conclusions We show that our CTC detection method is feasible and leads to accurate and reliable results. Our data suggest that a refined differentiation between patients with different CTC levels is reasonable. PMID:22646670

  18. LIMD2 Is a Small LIM-Only Protein Overexpressed in Metastatic Lesions That Regulates Cell Motility and Tumor Progression by Directly Binding to and Activating the Integrin-Linked Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Michael J.; Prokop, Jeremy W.; McDonald, Paul C.; Karar, Jayashree; Hou, Zhaoyuan; He, Mei; Kebebew, Electron; Orntoft, Torben; Herlyn, Meenhard; Caton, Andrew J.; Fredericks, William; Malkowicz, Bruce; Paterno, Christopher S.; Carolin, Alexandra S.; Speicher, David W.; Skordalakes, Emmanuel; Huang, Qihong; Dedhar, Shoukat; Borden, Katherine L.B.; Rauscher, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Proteins that communicate signals from the cytoskeleton to the nucleus are prime targets for effectors of metastasis as they often transduce signals regulating adhesion, motility, and invasiveness. LIM domain proteins shuttle between the cytoplasm and the nucleus, and bind to partners in both compartments, often coupling changes in gene expression to extracellular cues. In this work, we characterize LIMD2, a mechanistically undefined LIM-only protein originally found to be overexpressed in metastatic lesions but absent in the matched primary tumor. LIMD2 levels in fresh and archival tumors positively correlate with cell motility, metastatic potential, and grade, including bladder, melanoma, breast, and thyroid tumors. LIMD2 directly contributes to these cellular phenotypes as shown by overexpression, knockdown, and reconstitution experiments in cell culture models. The solution structure of LIMD2 that was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance revealed a classic LIM-domain structure that was highly related to LIM1 of PINCH1, a core component of the integrin-linked kinase–parvin–pinch complex. Structural and biochemical analyses revealed that LIMD2 bound directly to the kinase domain of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) near the active site and strongly activated ILK kinase activity. Cells that were null for ILK failed to respond to the induction of invasion by LIMD2. This strongly suggests that LIMD2 potentiates its biologic effects through direct interactions with ILK, a signal transduction pathway firmly linked to cell motility and invasion. In summary, LIMD2 is a new component of the signal transduction cascade that links integrin-mediated signaling to cell motility/metastatic behavior and may be a promising target for controlling tumor spread. PMID:24590809

  19. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  20. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  1. Capnocytophaga lung abscess in a patient with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Raghu; Rappo, Urania; Babady, N Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  2. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  3. Detection of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Sanne; van Dalum, Guus; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements.

  4. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  5. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  6. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  7. Retroviral transduction of interferon-γ cDNA into a nonimmunogenic murinefibrosarcoma: generation of T cells in draining lymph nodes capable of treating established parental metastatic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Shiloni, Eitan; Karp, Stephen E.; Custer, Mary C.; Shilyansky, Joel; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Mulé, James J.

    2008-01-01

    Gene modification of tumor cells with the cDNA for interferon γ (IFNγ) has been shown to increase the immunogenicity of some tumor cells. In order to explore further the possible therapeutic relevance of these previous findings, two clones of the nonimmunogenic MCA-102 fibrosarcoma of C57BL/6 origin were retrovirally transduced with the cDNA encoding murine IFNγ. 102.4JK (4JK), a clone with relatively high major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression, and 102.24JK (24JK), a clone with low expression of surface MHC class I molecules. Retroviral transduction of tumor cells with the cDNA encoding for IFNγ resulted in a substantial up-regulation of MHC class I surface expression in the 24JK clone but little change of class I in the 4JK clone. In an attempt to generate antitumor lymphocytes, these gene-modified cells were inoculated into mouse footpads and draining lymph nodes (DLN) were removed, dispersed, and cultured in vitro for 10 days with irradiated tumor cells and interleukin-2. DLN from mice bearing either unmodified tumor or tumor transduced with cDNA encoding neomycin resistance (NeoR) or IFNγ, were used to treat recipients harboring 3-day pulmonary metastases induced by the parental, unmodified tumor. Treatment with DLN cells obtained following the injection of 24JK tumor cells modified with the gene for IFNγ significantly reduced the number of pulmonary metastases in four separate experiments, compared to groups treated by DLN cells generated from inoculation of either the unmodified, parental 24JK clone or the same clone transduced with the NeoR gene only. In contrast, DLN cells induced either by IFNγ-transduced 4JK (high expression of MHC class I) or an unmodified 4JK tumor (moderate expression of MHC class I) had significant but equal therapeutic efficacy. Although the in vitro growth rate of tumor cell lines was unaffected by the insertion of the mouse IFNγ cDNA, their in vivo (s.c.) growth rates were significantly slower than those

  8. Evaluation of response from axitinib per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors versus Choi criteria in previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Nott, Louise; Joshi, Abhishek; Kannourakis, George; Tarazi, Jamal; Alam, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background Axitinib, a selective and potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, was available to patients from Canada and Australia, prior to regulatory approval of axitinib in these countries, for treatment of clear-cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) after failure of one prior systemic regimen. Methods This single-arm, open-label study of axitinib evaluated the efficacy, safety, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with mRCC whose disease progressed after one prior systemic first-line regimen. Primary objective was objective response rate evaluated per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and Choi criteria. Progression-free survival, overall survival, safety, and QoL were secondary end points. Due to the small study size, analyses comprised of descriptive statistics. Results Fifteen patients were recruited, five from Canada and ten from Australia, over a limited recruitment period. Thirteen patients received sunitinib as prior therapy. All patients had clear-cell carcinoma, eleven had prior nephrectomy. Liver, lung, and lymph nodes were the most frequent sites of metastases; one patient had brain metastasis. Median time on axitinib was 118.0 days (range: 3.5–645.0 days); estimated survival probability at 12 months was 57.8%. Two (13.3%) patients had objective responses per RECIST versus nine (60.0%) per Choi criteria. Six patients had progressive disease based on RECIST versus three per Choi criteria. Nine (60.0%) events of progression or death occurred by the end of study, and three patients continued to receive the study drug. Fatigue (33%) and diarrhea (20%) were the most common grade ≥3 all-causality, treatment-emergent adverse events. The mean change in European Quality of Life – 5 Dimensions score from baseline to end of treatment was −0.0837. Conclusion The small number of patients and lack of a comparator arm limit the ability to draw definitive conclusions; however, safety and

  9. Metastatic brain tumor from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Kohei; Oda, Masashi; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Saiki, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urothelial carcinoma occurs in the bladder, upper urinary tract, and lower urinary tract, including prostatic urethra. A majority of the reported cases of intracranial metastasis from urothelial carcinoma originates from the bladder and upper urinary tract. Brain metastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra has not yet been reported in the literature. Case Description: A 72-year-old male presented with a metastatic brain tumor and a 3-year history of urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra treated with cystourethrectomy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine-cisplatin. Pathological diagnosis for tumor removal was compatible with metastatic brain tumor from urothelial carcinoma. Conclusion: Brain metastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra has not yet been reported in the literature. It is an extremely rare case, however, we should be careful of brain metastasis during follow-up for urothelial carcinoma in the lower urinary tract. PMID:27512612

  10. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  11. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda; Terstappen, Leon Wmm

    2012-10-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process.

  12. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process. PMID:27683421

  13. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process.

  14. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  15. Cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chery, Lisly J; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher G

    2016-09-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma is increasing, with up to one-third of patients presenting with metastatic disease. Combination therapy is used to prolong survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, which carries a poor prognosis. Although two pivotal phase 3 trials have demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy after cytoreductive nephrectomy for metastatic disease, for now, targeted therapy has replaced immunotherapy as the preferred systemic treatment in these patients. Two ongoing phase 3 trials are evaluating the role of cytoreductive nephrectomy prior to targeted therapy. Proper patient selection is paramount in achieving successful outcomes. PMID:27673288

  16. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P.; Rimm, David L.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  17. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Rimm, David L; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-23

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  18. Gene expression patterns associated with the metastatic phenotype in rodent and human tumors.

    PubMed

    Nestl, A; Von Stein, O D; Zatloukal, K; Thies, W G; Herrlich, P; Hofmann, M; Sleeman, J P

    2001-02-15

    Using subtractive technology, we have generated metastasis-associated gene expression profiles for rat mammary and pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Several genes whose expression is thought to be related to tumor progression such as c-Met, urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor, ezrin, HMG-1, oncomodulin, cathepsin, and caveolin were thereby isolated. Half of the metastasis-associated clones showed no significant homology to genes with known function. Notably, several of the metastasis-associated clones were also expressed in metastatic lines but not in nonmetastatic lines of other tumor models. Furthermore, in situ hybridization using selected clones documents the relevance of these results for human cancer because strong expression in tumor cells including metastases was detected in human colorectal cancer samples and, to a lesser extent, in mammary cancer samples. These data support the concept that tumors express a "metastatic program" of genes. PMID:11245467

  19. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  1. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-10-20

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  2. Metastatic Hip Tumor in a Middle-Aged Woman.

    PubMed

    Callan, Brad

    2016-05-01

    A 44-year-old woman was referred to physical therapy by a podiatrist for "iliotibial band syndrome." No imaging had been done, and she denied all constitutional symptoms, but reported having breast cancer 5 years earlier. Following an increase in pain, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging were performed, and biopsy confirmed a metastatic breast cancer tumor. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):400. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0407. PMID:27133943

  3. Induction of the metastatic phenotype in a mouse tumor model by 5-azacytidine, and characterization of an antigen associated with metastatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, L; Forchhammer, J

    1984-01-01

    The murine Lewis lung carcinoma is a long-term grafted tumor that, after subcutaneous inoculation, forms metastases to the lungs. Forty-two cell lines were established from a primary tumor site and 40 were established from lung metastatic foci. Cloned sublines were established from the original 82 lines, and 2 sublines among 405 were found to be tumorigenic but not metastatic (T+/M-), whereas the remaining 403 sublines were both tumorigenic and metastatic (T+/M+). The T+/M- phenotype was shown to be stable for greater than 2 yr. However, treatment of the T+/M- cell lines for 3 days with 3 microM 5-azacytidine resulted in reexpression of the metastatic phenotype in otherwise stable T+/M- lines. Also, 5-azacytidine treatment could result in loss of the metastatic phenotype in lines that had been stable T+/M+. The changes in tumorigenic and metastatic phenotypes were not associated with altered immunogenicity of the cells. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against T+/M+ cells, and one antibody ( M36D3 ) was found to bind only to T+/M+ cells. Reactivity of the antibody was found to co-vary with expression of the metastatic phenotype. The antigen recognized by M36D3 antibody thus seems to be associated with metastatic capability. The antigen was found by two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis to be a cellular protein of Mr approximately equal to 45,000 and pI approximately equal to 6.7. Images PMID:6203119

  4. Pulmonary Metastatic Choriocarcinoma from a Burned-out Testicular Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Hirofumi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Takemoto, Yu; Miura, Hiroshi; Yanai, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takehito; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of progressive dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed multiple nodular shadows with a peripheral ground-glass halo. His clinical condition continued to deteriorate with the development of progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. A histological examination of a transbronchial lung biopsy revealed choriocarcinoma. The patient died within nine days of admission. A histological examination of the right testis during an autopsy revealed a burned-out testicular tumor consisting of a teratoma and a fibrous scar. We herein report a rare case of pulmonary multiple metastatic choriocarcinoma originating from a burned-out testicular tumor. PMID:27250057

  5. Autoantibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens in metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Martin; Taylor, Samuel; Shaffer, James

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-established effector functions of IgGs, including direct cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, some populations of IgGs may exert anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we describe a population of antibodies that form in the natural course of metastatic cancer and contain glycans that terminate with sialic acid. We demonstrate that both the titer of these antibodies and their level of sialylation are relatively stable throughout the progression of metastatic melanoma. The sialylation pattern of these antibodies somehow correlates with their specificity for tumor-associated antigens, as IgGs targeting several antigens associated with infectious agents are relatively poor of sialic acid. We also show that some antibodies targeting the melanoma-associated antigen NY-ESO-1 bind to the human C-type lectin CD209 (DC-SIGN). We propose that these antibodies are candidate anti-inflammatory antibodies. The presence of anti-inflammatory antibodies in cancer patients may explain, at least in part, why tumors persist and spread in the host despite strong tumor-specific humoral responses. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the induction of anti-inflammatory antibodies specific for tumor-associated antigens and their function may yield important insights into how tumors evade immune detection and progress. PMID:23894724

  6. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Pontes, Flavia Sirotheau Correa; Miyahara, Ligia Akiko Ninokata; Guerreiro, Marcella Yasmin Reis; de Almeida, Maria Clara Lopes; Pontes, Helder Antonio Rebelo; Pinto, Decio Dos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are extremely rare events, representing less than 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma constitutes about 3% of solid tumors in adults, and it is the most frequent kidney neoplasm, representing about 90% of kidney malignancies. Due to the silent growth of this neoplasm, most patients have no symptoms and the diagnosis is belated, usually after metastases. The present study reports an additional patient of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the oral cavity regarding the clinical and pathologic features. PMID:27607131

  7. p63 immunohistochemistry differentiates salivary gland oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Jonathan B; Hoschar, Aaron P; Dvorakova, Mari; Parwani, Anil V; Barnes, E Leon; Seethala, Raja R

    2007-12-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) can pose diagnostic challenges in the head and neck often resembling benign and malignant oncocytic lesions. Immunohistochemical panels have been reported to help with this differential but are not entirely specific or sensitive. We have noticed that p63 routinely stains salivary gland oncocytomas but not metastatic RCC. Nineteen oncocytomas, 9 cases of oncocytosis, 9 oncocytic carcinomas and 16 head and neck metastatic RCC were studied. Morphologic features evaluated were cytoplasmic character (clear versus oncocytic), Fuhrman nuclear grade, mitotic rate, growth pattern, presence of lumens/blood lakes and stromal characteristics. Tumors were stained with antibodies to p63, renal cell carcinoma marker (RCCm), CD10, and vimentin. Eight benign oncocytic tumors (29%) had clear cell features while 6 metastatic RCC (37%) had oncocytic features. Median Fuhrman nuclear grade was 2 in oncocytoma and oncocytosis and 3 both oncocytic carcinoma and metastatic RCC. Mitotic rates were only significantly different between benign oncocytic tumors and metastatic RCC. All oncocytomas had lumina compared to half of metastatic RCC, all of which also demonstrated blood lakes. Seven benign oncocytic tumors (25%) and 5 oncocytic carcinomas (56%) had RCC-like vascular stroma. All primary salivary gland tumors were positive for p63, predominately in basal cell-type distribution. None of the metastatic RCC was positive. RCCm was entirely specific but lacked sensitivity for metastatic RCC while CD10 and vimentin showed variable sensitivity and specificity. While clinical history and morphology usually are adequate, demonstration of p63 staining can definitively exclude metastatic RCC from the differential diagnosis of similar appearing tumors in salivary glands, namely oncocytoma and oncocytic carcinoma, with 100% specificity and sensitivity. While RCCm, CD10, and vimentin performed adequately, they were significantly less reliable than p63 with both

  8. Identification and cloning of a novel isoform of mouse secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, mSLPI-beta, overexpressed in murine leukemias and a highly liver metastatic tumor, IMC-HA1 cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, M; Arakawa, H; Nishimura, S

    1999-01-01

    Several genes showing transcriptional alteration in a highly liver metastatic murine carcinoma cell line, IMC-HA1, were identified by mRNA differential display system. Among them, a gene identical to mSLPI was isolated as mSLPI-alpha and -beta. They were produced through an alternative splicing. Their full-length cDNA sequences were determined, and their expression in various murine tumors and normal tissues was analysed. The deduced translation product of mSLPI-alpha showed 59% identity to hSLPI. Although mSLPI-beta had the same 103-amino-acid sequence from the carboxyl terminus, the amino terminus showed hydrophilicity opposite mSLPI-alpha or hSLPI. The mSLPI-alpha was expressed ubiquitously in various tumor cell lines. Interestingly, however, mSLPI-beta expression was only observed in P388 and L1210 leukemias and IMC-HA1 cells, and in lower amounts in three normal tissues (thymus, lung and spleen), suggesting that mSLPI, and in particular the unusual splicing product, mSLPI-beta, plays a specific role in these cells, including malignant processes of tumor cells.

  9. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, DNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (P<0.05). The metastatic tumors were more common in control mice than the treated groups in the lung, the liver and the sternum tissues. Animals treated with DNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Final mean tumor volume reached to approximately 1.11, 0.31 and 0.27cm(3) in the control, and 40 and 80mg/kg DNC groups, respectively (P<0.05). Furthermore, suppression of NF-κB expression by DNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products. PMID:25863259

  10. Tumor homogeneity between primary and metastatic sites for BRAF status in metastatic melanoma determined by immunohistochemical and molecular testing.

    PubMed

    Boursault, Lucile; Haddad, Véronique; Vergier, Béatrice; Cappellen, David; Verdon, Severine; Bellocq, Jean-Pierre; Jouary, Thomas; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors have demonstrated improvement of overall survival in patients with metastatic melanoma and BRAF(V600) mutations. In order to evaluate BRAF tumor heterogeneity between primary and metastatic site, we have evaluated the performance of immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an anti-BRAF(V600E) antibody in both localization by comparison with high resolution melting analysis followed by Sanger sequencing in a parallel blinded study. A total of 230 samples distributed as primary melanoma (n = 88) and different types of metastatic samples (n = 142) were studied in 99 patients with advanced or metastatic melanoma (stage III or IV). The prevalence of each BRAF mutation was c.1799T>A, BRAF(V600E) (45.2%), c.1799_1800TG>AA, BRAF(V600E2) (3.0%), c.1798_1799GT>AA, BRAF(V600K) (3.0%), c.1801 A>G, BRAF(K601E) (1.3%), c.1789_1790CT>TC, BRAF(L597S) (0.4%), c.1780G>A, BRAF(D594N) (0.9%) respectively. IHC was positive in 109/112 samples harboring BRAF(V600E/E2) mutations and negative in other cases. The cytoplasmic staining was either strongly positive in tumor cells of BRAF(V600E) mutated cases. It appeared strong brown, different from the vesicular grey cytoplasmic pigmentation of melanophages. Concordance between the two techniques was 96.4%. Sensitivity of IHC for detecting the BRAF(V600E/E2) mutations was 97.3%, while specificity was 100%. Both our IHC and molecular study demonstrated homogeneity between primary and metastatic sites for BRAF status in melanoma. This study also provides evidence that IHC may be a cost-effective first-line method for BRAF(V600E) detection. Thereafter, molecular techniques should be used in negative, ambiguous or non-contributive cases.

  11. Metastatic melanoma mimicking solitary fibrous tumor: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bekers, Elise M; van Engen-van Grunsven, Adriana C H; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Westdorp, Harm; Koornstra, Rutger H T; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; Flucke, Uta; Blokx, Willeke A M

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanomas are known for their remarkable morphological variation and aberrant immunophenotype with loss of lineage-specific markers, especially in recurrences and metastases. Hot spot mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 and mutations in KIT are oncogenic events in melanomas. Therefore, genotyping can be a useful ancillary diagnostic tool. We present one case each of recurrent and metastatic melanoma, both showing histological and immunohistochemical features of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Mutational analysis detected BRAF and NRAS mutations in the primary and secondary lesions, respectively. This result confirmed the diagnosis of recurrent/metastastic melanoma.

  12. Single cell metastatic phenotyping using pulsed nanomechanical indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babahosseini, Hesam; Strobl, Jeannine S.; Agah, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The existing approach to characterize cell biomechanical properties typically utilizes switch-like models of mechanotransduction in which cell responses are analyzed in response to a single nanomechanical indentation or a transient pulsed stress. Although this approach provides effective descriptors at population-level, at a single-cell-level, there are significant overlaps in the biomechanical descriptors of non-metastatic and metastatic cells which precludes the use of biomechanical markers for single cell metastatic phenotyping. This study presents a new promising marker for biosensing metastatic and non-metastatic cells at a single-cell-level using the effects of a dynamic microenvironment on the biomechanical properties of cells. Two non-metastatic and two metastatic epithelial breast cell lines are subjected to a pulsed stresses regimen exerted by atomic force microscopy. The force-time data obtained for the cells revealed that the non-metastatic cells increase their resistance against deformation and become more stiffened when subjected to a series of nanomechanical indentations. On the other hand, metastatic cells become slightly softened when their mechanical microenvironment is subjected to a similar dynamical changes. This distinct behavior of the non-metastatic and metastatic cells to the pulsed stresses paradigm provided a signature for single-cell-level metastatic phenotyping with a high confidence level of ∼95%.

  13. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  14. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  15. In vivo capture and label-free detection of early metastatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Gower, Robert M.; Aguado, Brian A.; Sullivan, Megan E.; Goodman, Ashley G.; Jiang, Eric J.; Rao, Shreyas S.; Ren, Yinying; Tucker, Susan L.; Backman, Vadim; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women, with mortality resulting from metastasis. Metastases are often detected once tumor cells affect the function of solid organs, with a high disease burden limiting effective treatment. Here we report a method for the early detection of metastasis using an implanted scaffold to recruit and capture metastatic cells in vivo, which achieves high cell densities and reduces the tumor burden within solid organs 10-fold. Recruitment is associated with infiltration of immune cells, which include Gr1hiCD11b+ cells. We identify metastatic cells in the scaffold through a label-free detection system using inverse-spectroscopic optical coherence tomography, which identifies changes to nanoscale tissue architecture associated with the presence of tumor cells. For patients at risk of recurrence, scaffold implantation following completion of primary therapy has the potential to identify metastatic disease at the earliest stage, enabling initiation of therapy while the disease burden is low. PMID:26348915

  16. Function of immunoadjuvants in laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic breast tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-06-01

    Tumor cell destruction usually induces host immune responses, such as local inflammation and increased activities of macrophages and neutrophils. Use of immunoadjuvant can usually enhance such immune activities. Laser immunotherapy is designed to use the combination of laser photothermal and immunological interactions to induce long-term antitumor immunity with the help of immunoadjuvant. It uses a selective hyperthermia for acute tumor destruction through an intratumor administration of indocyanine green and a noninvasive irradiation by an 805-nm laser. The concurrent in situ administration of immunoadjuvant helped achieve the desired effect: tumor eradication and antitumor immunity. The current study further explores the function of immunoadjuvants in laser immunotherapy by testing four different adjuvants: glycated chitosan, complete Freund's adjuvant, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and c-parvum. Each adjuvant provided long-term tumor cure in the treatment of a metastatic mammary tumor model in rats. However, glycated chitosan and complete Freund's adjuvant were most effective with 25% and 18% long- term cure rates, respectively. Different concentrations of glycated chitosan were also used in treatment of rats bearing metastatic breast tumors.

  17. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  18. Vascular endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) regulates advanced metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    DeLisser, Horace; Liu, Yong; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Thor, Ann; Briasouli, Paraskevei; Handumrongkul, Chakrapong; Wilfong, Jonathon; Yount, Garret; Nosrati, Mehdi; Fong, Sylvia; Shtivelman, Emma; Fehrenbach, Melane; Cao, Gaoyuan; Moore, Dan H.; Nayak, Shruti; Liggitt, Denny; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Debs, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Most patients who die from cancer succumb to treatment-refractory advanced metastatic progression. Although the early stages of tumor metastasis result in the formation of clinically silent micrometastatic foci, its later stages primarily reflect the progressive, organ-destructive growth of already advanced metastases. Early-stage metastasis is regulated by multiple factors within tumor cells as well as by the tumor microenvironment (TME). In contrast, the molecular determinants that control advanced metastatic progression remain essentially uncharacterized, precluding the development of therapies targeted against it. Here we show that the TME, functioning in part through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), drives advanced metastatic progression and is essential for progression through its preterminal end stage. PECAM-1–KO and chimeric mice revealed that its metastasis-promoting effects are mediated specifically through vascular endothelial cell (VEC) PECAM-1. Anti–PECAM-1 mAb therapy suppresses both end-stage metastatic progression and tumor-induced cachexia in tumor-bearing mice. It reduces proliferation, but not angiogenesis or apoptosis, within advanced tumor metastases. Because its antimetastatic effects are mediated by binding to VEC rather than to tumor cells, anti–PECAM-1 mAb appears to act independently of tumor type. A modified 3D coculture assay showed that anti–PECAM-1 mAb inhibits the proliferation of PECAM-1–negative tumor cells by altering the concentrations of secreted factors. Our studies indicate that a complex interplay between elements of the TME and advanced tumor metastases directs end-stage metastatic progression. They also suggest that some therapeutic interventions may target late-stage metastases specifically. mAb-based targeting of PECAM-1 represents a TME-targeted therapeutic approach that suppresses the end stages of metastatic progression, until now a refractory clinical entity. PMID:20926749

  19. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  20. Identification of an aptamer through whole cell-SELEX for targeting high metastatic liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yin, Chang-Qing; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human cancers due to its ability of invasion and metastasis. Thus, the approaches to identify potential compounds that inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC are critical for treatment of this disease. In the present study, we used HCCLM9 cells with high metastatic potential and MHCC97L with low metastatic potential as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis. By applying cell- Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) against living cells, we used HCCLM9 as target cells and MHCC97L cells as control to screen a group of HCC metastasis- and cell-specific DNA aptamers. One of selected aptamers, LY-1, could specifically bind to metastatic HCC with a dissociation constant (Kd) in nanomolar range. In vitro studies demonstrated that LY-1 can recognize and bind to membrane protein of metastatic HCC cells. Furthermore, QD605 labeled LY-1 aptamer could recognize HCC cells in both local liver cancer tissues and pulmonary metastatic sites in a xenograft model of HCC with pulmonary metastasis. Further biochemical and immunostaining studies showed that LY-1 could selectively bind to a subpopulation of more metastatic cells in HCCLM9 cells, which express more CK19 and vimentin. Finally, treatment of highly metastatic cells with LY-1 led to reduced migration and invasiveness of HCCLM9 cells in vitro and suppression of xenograft growth in vivo. Taken together, the present study demonstrated the tumor targeting and tumor suppressive effects of LY-1, which could be a promising molecular probe for metastatic HCC and a potential candidate of chemotherapy for metastatic HCC. PMID:26882565

  1. BM-12CEREBRAL INFARCTION SECONDARY TO PULMONARY VEIN COMPRESSION AND LEFT ATRIAL APPENDAGE TUMOR INFILTRATION AS THE PRESENTING SIGN OF METASTATIC SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF THE BASE OF THE TONGUE

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn; Siegel, Jason; Jaeckle, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue has been documented to metastasize to the lungs and rarely involve the heart. The majority of documented cases of cardiac metastases are from postmortem analysis. Cases of sudden death, syncope, and dyspnea have been reported. However, stroke and tumor embolization to the brain as the initial clinical presentation has not been documented in the English literature. METHODS: Case Report. RESULTS: This case addresses a 61-year-old male with Stage IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue base, believed to be in remission after systemic chemotherapy and local radiation, who presented with acute cerebral infarctions involving multiple vascular territories. Cardiac CT obtained during stroke etiology evaluation displayed metastatic disease compressing the pulmonary vein resulting in virtual pulmonary vein thrombus. Transthoracic echocardiogram was negative for cardiac valvular pathology. Anticoagulation was initiated. Twelve days later he returned with recurrent strokes and suspected tumor embolization to the brain. Imaging displayed left atrial appendage structural abnormality highly suggestive of tumor infiltration. CONCLUSION: Cardiac metastases are rare and non-myxomatous tumor embolization to the brain even rarer especially in the setting of cerebral infarction due to pulmonary vein thrombus. Here we describe a case of multiple acute cerebral infarctions appearing from a proximal source refractory to anticoagulation. Thromboembolism from the pulmonary vein and tumor embolization from cardiac metastases are the likely mechanisms for his clinical presentation and radiographic findings. This case demonstrates the complexity of multiple stroke etiologies in one patient and the importance of cardiac imaging in stroke evaluation, particularly in the setting of a patient with a history of cancer.

  2. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Photothermal and immunological reactions against metastatic tumors using laser photosensitizer immunoadjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; El-Samad, Ahmad; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1999-06-01

    Photothermal tissue interaction is the most common phenomenon when laser energy is deposited in tissue. Because of the sensitivity of cancer cells to temperature increase, photothermal reaction can be an effective mechanism of direct cancer destruction using lasers. Tumor-specific immune response is crucial in achieving systemic and long-term cures for cancers, particularly for metastatic cancers. Can photothermal interaction induce sufficient immunological reaction when the local destruction of tumor cells occurs? To achieve selective photothermal destruction, indocyanine green as a photosensitizer was directly injected into rat mammary tumors, followed by irradiation of 805 nm laser light. Although extensive photothermal tumor killing was achieved and tumor growth was slowed down immediately following the treatment, photothermal reaction alone was shown not sufficient in controlling the treated primary tumors and their metastases. When an immunoadjuvant was used with the indocyanine green, however, the same laser treatment not only could eventually eradicate the treated primary tumors but also eradicate the untreated metastases at remote sites. The tumor eradication went through a growth-regression process over a period of six to nine weeks post-treatment, indicating an induced immune response. The Western Blot analysis using the serum from a laser-immunotherapy cured rat showed that the tumor-specific antibody induced by the treatment had a long- lasting effect. Our experimental data indicated that photothermal interaction alone was not sufficient to slow and eventually reverse tumor growth. However, it can reduce the tumor burden and at the same time release tumor antigens to be recognized by the host immune system. Therefore, in conjunction with specific immunological stimulation using in situ immunoadjuvants, the selective thermal injury to tumors plays an important and a direct role in this laser immunotherapy.

  4. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition leads to loss of EpCAM and different physical properties in circulating tumor cells from metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyunju; Sohn, Joohyuk; Choi, Wonshik; Kim, Seung-Il; Jung, Hyo-Il; Kim, You-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) requires the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal transition (EMT), in which cells lose their epithelial characteristics and acquire more mesenchymal-like phenotypes. Current isolation of CTCs relies on affinity-based approaches reliant on the expression of Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM). Here we show EMT-induced breast cancer cells maintained in prolonged mammosphere culture conditions possess increased EMT markers and cancer stem cell markers, as well as reduced cell mass and size by quantitative phase microscopy; however, EpCAM expression is dramatically decreased in these cells. Moreover, CTCs isolated from breast cancer patients using a label-free microfluidic flow fractionation device had differing expression patterns of EpCAM, indicating that affinity approaches reliant on EpCAM expression may underestimate CTC number and potentially miss critical subpopulations. Further characterization of CTCs, including low-EpCAM populations, using this technology may improve detection techniques and cancer diagnosis, ultimately improving cancer treatment. PMID:27013581

  5. Breast cancer cells condition lymphatic endothelial cells within pre-metastatic niches to promote metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Fertig, Elana J.; Jin, Kideok; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis involves lymphatic dissemination in addition to hematogenous spreading. Although stromal lymphatic vessels (LVs) serve as initial metastatic routes, roles of organ-residing LVs are under-investigated. Here we show that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), a component of LVs within pre-metastatic niches, are conditioned by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells to accelerate metastasis. LECs within the lungs and lymph nodes, conditioned by tumor-secreted factors express CCL5 that is not expressed either in normal LECs or cancer cells, and direct tumor dissemination into these tissues. Moreover, tumor-conditioned LECs promote angiogenesis in these organs, allowing tumor extravasation and colonization. Mechanistically, tumor cell-secreted IL6 causes Stat3 phosphorylation in LECs. This pStat3 induces HIF-1α and VEGF, and a pStat3-pc-Jun-pATF-2 ternary complex induces CCL5 expression in LECs. This study demonstrates anti-metastatic activities of multiple repurposed drugs, blocking a self-reinforcing paracrine loop between breast cancer cells and LECs. PMID:25178650

  6. Cannibalism of live lymphocytes by human metastatic but not primary melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lugini, Luana; Matarrese, Paola; Tinari, Antonella; Lozupone, Francesco; Federici, Cristina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Gentile, Massimo; Luciani, Francesca; Parmiani, Giorgio; Rivoltini, Licia; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of cell cannibalism, which generally refers to the engulfment of cells within other cells, was described in malignant tumors, but its biological significance is still largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence, the in vivo relevance, and the underlying mechanisms of cannibalism in human melanoma. As first evidence, we observed that tumor cannibalism was clearly detectable in vivo in metastatic lesions of melanoma and often involved T cells, which could be found in a degraded state within tumor cells. Then, in vitro experiments confirmed that cannibalism of T cells was a property of metastatic melanoma cells but not of primary melanoma cells. In particular, morphologic analyses, including time-lapse cinematography and electron microscopy, revealed a sequence of events, in which metastatic melanoma cells were able to engulf and digest live autologous melanoma-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, this cannibalistic activity significantly increased metastatic melanoma cell survival, particularly under starvation condition, supporting the evidence that tumor cells may use the eating of live lymphocytes as a way to "feed" in condition of low nutrient supply. The mechanism underlying cannibalism involved a complex framework, including lysosomal protease cathepsin B activity, caveolae formation, and ezrin cytoskeleton integrity and function. In conclusion, our study shows that human metastatic melanoma cells may eat live T cells, which are instead programmed to kill them, suggesting a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape. Moreover, our data suggest that cannibalism may represent a sort of "feeding" activity aimed at sustaining survival and progression of malignant tumor cells in an unfavorable microenvironment. PMID:16585188

  7. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  8. Near-infrared pH-activatable fluorescent probes for imaging primary and metastatic breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter; Bhushan, Kumar; Bloch, Sharon; Sudlow, Gail; Tang, Rui; Achilefu, Samuel

    2011-04-20

    Highly tumor selective near-infrared (NIR) pH-activatable probe was developed by conjugating pH-sensitive cyanine dye to a cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) peptide targeting α(v)β(3) integrin (ABIR), a protein that is highly overexpressed in endothelial cells during tumor angiogenesis. The NIR pH-sensitive dye used to construct the probe exhibits high spectral sensitivity with pH changes. It has negligible fluorescence above pH 6 but becomes highly fluorescent below pH 5, with a pK(a) of 4.7. This probe is ideal for imaging acidic cell organelles such as tumor lysosomes or late endosomes. Cell microscopy data demonstrate that binding of the cRGD probe to ABIR facilitated the endocytosis-mediated lysosomal accumulation and subsequent fluorescence enhancement of the NIR pH-activatable dye in tumor cells (MDA-MB-435 and 4T1/luc). A similar fluorescence enhancement mechanism was observed in vivo, where the tumors were evident within 4 h post injection. Moreover, lung metastases were also visualized in an orthotopic tumor mouse model using this probe, which was further confirmed by histologic analysis. These results demonstrate the potential of using the new integrin-targeted pH-sensitive probe for the detection of primary and metastatic cancer.

  9. Duodenal bleeding from metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-04-20

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested.

  10. Duodenal Bleeding from Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Rangasamy, Priya; Versland, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to malignancy is relatively uncommon and the duodenum is the least frequently involved site. Duodenal metastasis is rare in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and early detection, especially in case of a solitary mass, helps in planning further therapy. We report a case of intractable upper gastrointestinal bleeding from metastatic RCC to the duodenum. The patient presented with melena and anemia, 13 years after nephrectomy for RCC. On esophagogastroduodenoscopy, a submucosal mass was noted in the duodenum, biopsies of which revealed metastatic RCC. In conclusion, metastasis from RCC should be considered in nephrectomized patients presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms and a complete evaluation, especially endoscopic examination followed by biopsy, is suggested. PMID:21577373

  11. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  12. Heat shock protein 27 regulates human prostate cancer cell motility and metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Voll, Eric A; Ogden, Irene M; Pavese, Janet M; Huang, XiaoKe; Xu, Li; Jovanovic, Borko D; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common form of cancer in American men. Mortality from PCa is caused by the movement of cancer cells from the primary organ to form metastatic tumors at distant sites. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is known to increase human PCa cell invasion and its overexpression is associated with metastatic disease. The role of HSP27 in driving PCa cell movement from the prostate to distant metastatic sites is unknown. Increased HSP27 expression increased metastasis as well as primary tumor mass. In vitro studies further examined the mechanism of HSP27-induced metastatic behavior. HSP27 did not affect cell detachment, adhesion, or migration, but did increase cell invasion. Cell invasion was dependent upon matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), whose expression was increased by HSP27. In vivo, HSP27 induced commensurate changes in MMP-2 expression in tumors. These findings demonstrate that HSP27 drives metastatic spread of cancer cells from the prostate to distant sites, does so across a continuum of expression levels, and identifies HSP27-driven increases in MMP-2 expression as functionally relevant. These findings add to prior studies demonstrating that HSP27 increases PCa cell motility, growth and survival. Together, they demonstrate that HSP27 plays an important role in PCa progression. PMID:24798191

  13. Is There a Role for PET/CT Parameters to Characterize Benign, Malignant, and Metastatic Parotid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karagulle; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Corey, Amanda; Galt, James R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, J. Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Schuster, David M.; Saba, Nabil F.; Hudgins, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of benign and malignant lesions of the parotid gland, including metastatic lesions, is challenging with current imaging methods. Fluorine-18 FDG PET/CT is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides both anatomic and metabolic information. Semiquantitative data obtained from PET/CT, also known as PET/CT parameters, are maximum, mean, or peak standardized uptake values (SUVs); metabolic tumor volume; total lesion glycolysis; standardized added metabolic activity; and normalized standardized added metabolic activity. Our aim was to determine whether FDG PET/CT parameters can differentiate benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-four patients with parotid neoplasms underwent PET/CT before parotidectomy; maximum SUV, mean SUV, peak SUV, total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity were calculated on a dedicated workstation. Univariate analyses were performed. A ROC analysis was used to determine the ability of PET/CT parameters to predict pathologically proven benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid gland neoplasms. RESULTS Fourteen patients had a benign or malignant primary parotid tumor. Twenty had metastases to the parotid gland. When the specificity was set to at least 85% for each parameter to identify cut points, the corresponding sensitivities ranged from 15% to 40%. Assessment of benign versus malignant lesions of parotid tumors, as well as metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma versus other metastatic causes, revealed that none of the PET/CT parameters has enough power to differentiate among these groups. CONCLUSION PET/CT parameters, including total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity, are not able to differentiate benign from malignant parotid tumors, primary parotid tumors from metastasis, or metastasis

  14. Methyl Sulfone Blocked Multiple Hypoxia- and Non-Hypoxia-Induced Metastatic Targets in Breast Cancer Cells and Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joan McIntyre; Caron, Jane McIntyre

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancer causes 90% of cancer deaths. Unlike many primary tumors, metastatic tumors cannot be cured by surgery alone. Metastatic cancer requires chemotherapy. However, metastatic cells are not easily killed by chemotherapy. These problems with chemotherapy are caused in part by the metastatic cell niche: hypoxia. Here we show that the molecule, methyl sulfone, normalized metastatic metabolism of hypoxic breast cancer and melanoma cells by altering several metabolic functions of the cells. Under hypoxia, methyl sulfone decreased expression of the master regulator of hypoxia, HIF-1α, and reduced levels of the glycolytic enzymes, PKM2, LDHA, GLUT1, the pro-angiogenic protein, VEGF, and the iron-sulfur metabolism molecules, miR-210 and transferrin, all of which promote metastasis. Conversely, methyl sulfone increased levels of ISCU1/2 and ferroportin, proteins associated with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis in normal cells. These data identify methyl sulfone as a multi-targeting molecule that blocks the survival/proliferative effect of hypoxia on metastatic cells and brings normality back to cellular metabolism. PMID:26536104

  15. Dasatinib, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Malignant Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. Metastatic clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma of the mandible: Review and case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajaz; Jahan, Shahi; Najar, Latief; Hassan, Shahid; Mohammad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the mandible is reported. A 22-year-old man consulted us for hypoesthesia of the right lower lip. Panorama X-ray film showed a radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body. A diagnosis of a metastatic tumor to the mandible from the right kidney was made after evaluation by computed tomography and bone scan with Tc99 methyl diphosphonate which also revealed multiple bone metastases. Histologically diagnosis was clear cell variant of RCC. Patient has been put on radiotherapy for symptomatic treatment and a molecularly targeted drug. The therapy effectively stopped the progressive growth of oral and other metastatic lesions. The quality of life is relatively well maintained with tolerable adverse effects. The patient is still on our follow-up with an improved quality of life. PMID:27563625

  17. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer.

  18. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  19. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  20. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  1. Exosomes secreted from human colon cancer cells influence the adhesion of neighboring metastatic cells: Role of microRNA-210

    PubMed Central

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Guasti, Daniele; Cinci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer-secreted exosomes influence tumor microenvironment and support cancer growth and metastasis. MiR-210 is frequently up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues and correlates with metastatic disease. We investigated whether exosomes are actively released by HCT-8 colon cancer cells, the role of exosomal miR-210 in the cross-talk between primary cancer cells and neighboring metastatic cells and its contribution in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). After 7 d of culture, a subpopulation of viable HCT-8 cells detached the monolayer and started to grow in suspension, suggesting anoikis resistance and a metastatic potential. The expression of key proteins of EMT revealed that these cells were E-cadherin negative and vimentin positive further confirming their metastatic phenotype and the acquisition of anoikis resistance. Metastatic cells, in the presence of adherently growing HCT-8, continued to grow in suspension whereas only if seeded in cell-free wells, were able to adhere again and to form E-cadherin positive and vimentin negative new colonies, suggesting the occurrence of MET. The chemosensitivity to 5 fluorouracil and to FOLFOX-like treatment of metastatic cells was significantly diminished compared to adherent HCT-8 cells. Of note, adherent new colonies undergoing MET, were insensitive to both chemotherapeutic strategies. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that adherently growing HCT-8, actually secreted exosomes and that exosomes in turn were taken up by metastatic cells. When exosomes secreted by adherently growing HCT-8 were administered to metastatic cells, MET was significantly inhibited. miR-210 was significantly upregulated in exosomes compared to its intracellular levels in adherently growing HCT-8 cells and correlated to anoikis resistance and EMT markers. Exosomes containing miR-210 might be considered as EMT promoting signals that preserve the local cancer

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  3. Deficiency for endoglin in tumor vasculature weakens the endothelial barrier to metastatic dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Charlotte; Cunha, Sara I.; Zhai, Zhenhua; Cortez, Eliane; Pardali, Evangelia; Johnson, Jill R.; Franco, Marcela; Páez-Ribes, Marta; Cordiner, Ross; Fuxe, Jonas; Johansson, Bengt R.; Goumans, Marie-José; Casanovas, Oriol; ten Dijke, Peter; Arthur, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Therapy-induced resistance remains a significant hurdle to achieve long-lasting responses and cures in cancer patients. We investigated the long-term consequences of genetically impaired angiogenesis by engineering multiple tumor models deprived of endoglin, a co-receptor for TGF-β in endothelial cells actively engaged in angiogenesis. Tumors from endoglin-deficient mice adapted to the weakened angiogenic response, and refractoriness to diminished endoglin signaling was accompanied by increased metastatic capability. Mechanistic studies in multiple mouse models of cancer revealed that deficiency for endoglin resulted in a tumor vasculature that displayed hallmarks of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process of previously unknown significance in cancer biology, but shown by us to be associated with a reduced capacity of the vasculature to avert tumor cell intra- and extravasation. Nevertheless, tumors deprived of endoglin exhibited a delayed onset of resistance to anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents, illustrating the therapeutic utility of combinatorial targeting of multiple angiogenic pathways for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23401487

  4. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  5. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:26155388

  6. Tumor lysis syndrome in metastatic breast cancer after a single dose of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Gaurang Nandkishor; Acevedo, Russell

    2015-02-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is an oncologic emergency characterized by spillage of intracellular material into the blood caused by disruption of massive load of tumor cells. It is more commonly reported in hematological cancers and can have fatal consequences due to renal and multi-organ failure and arrhythmias due to electrolyte imbalance. We describe a case with metastatic breast cancer who presented with TLS after a single dose of paclitaxel, second such case in literature. The development of a risk stratification score to assess the need for hospitalization or close observation of these patients and the documentation of appropriate preventive strategies could help prevent such fatal occurrences. TLS should be included in the differential when cancer patients on treatment present with acute decompensation. PMID:25178848

  7. Tumor Therapeutic Response and Vessel Tortuosity: Preliminary Report in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bullitt, Elizabeth; Lin, Nancy U.; Ewend, Matthew G.; Zeng, Donglin; Winer, Eric P.; Carey, Lisa A.; Smith, J. Keith

    2008-01-01

    No current non-invasive method is capable of assessing the efficacy of brain tumor therapy early during treatment. We outline an approach that evaluates tumor activity via statistical analysis of vessel shape using vessels segmented from MRA. This report is the first to describe the changes in vessel shape that occur during treatment of metastatic brain tumors as assessed by sequential MRA. In this preliminary study of 16 patients undergoing treatment for metastatic breast cancer we conclude that vessel shape may predict tumor response several months in advance of traditional methods. PMID:17354817

  8. Metastatic solitary fibrous tumor of the meninges. Case report.

    PubMed

    Ng, H K; Choi, P C; Wong, C W; To, K F; Poon, W S

    2000-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a unique tumor composed of interstitial dendritic cells that was first described in the thorax and subsequently reported in diverse organs. Extrathoracic SFTs are predominantly benign but rare malignant cases have been documented. In the nervous system, SFT has been described as a meningeal lesion although all 14 previously reported cases were benign. The authors report the first case of a meningeal SFT occurring in a 55-year-old woman. The tumor first presented as a meningeal lesion that after three recurrences over a 10-year period metastasized to the soft tissues and lungs. The potentially malignant nature of cranial SFTs, especially those with atypical histological features and high mitotic counts, should be recognized.

  9. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Ravinder S; Kufuor-Mensah, Eric

    2007-02-01

    A 7-year-old, spayed female Persian cat was referred for evaluation of progressive paraplegia. The cat was thin, cachectic and paraplegic on presentation. The survey radiographs showed a left caudal pulmonary lesion and lytic skeletal lesions at the right iliac crest and left distal scapula. Due to a poor prognosis for complete recovery, the owner opted for euthanasia. Post-mortem examination revealed bilaterally small and irregular kidneys, lysis of the left iliac crest and left distal scapula and a dilated left ventricular lumen with a thin interventricular septum. Histologically, all the lesions were determined to be squamous cell carcinoma. It appears that the origin or the primary site of the malignancy in this case is pulmonary as cardiac and skeletal tissues are primarily mesenchymal in origin and are less likely to develop a primary epithelial malignancy. To the best of our knowledge, there is no description of cardiac or skeletal metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in a cat. PMID:16859943

  10. Establishment and characterization of a novel human cholangiocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic activity.

    PubMed

    Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Seubwai, Wunchana; Talabnin, Chutima; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Obchoei, Sumalee; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Okada, Seiji; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly metastatic tumor, and the lung is a common site of metastasis. A greater understanding of the biology of metastases is needed to improve treatment outcomes. Herein, a highly metastatic human CCA subline, KKU-213L5 from an original cell line, KKU-213 that has marginally metastatic ability, was established and characterized. KKU-213L5 was selected in vivo through the fifth serial passage of pulmonary metastasized tissues via tail-vein injection in NOD/scid/Jak3 mice. The metastatic abilities of the KKU-213L5 cells were compared with the parental line in vitro and in vivo. The expression profile of this metastatic cell line was determined using real-time PCR. KKU-213L5 cells were found to possess higher metastatic phenotypes, i.e., growth rates, stem cell surface markers (CD133), migration and invasion characteristics when compared with the parental cells. Compared to the KKU-213 cells, KKU-213L5 cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous xenografted mice and had a >10-fold increase in lung metastases in the tail-vein injected metastatic mouse model. Mice injected intravenously with KKU-213L5 cells had a significantly shorter survival. Analysis of the expressed genes related to progression of cancer revealed significant upregulation of anterior gradient protein-2 (AGR2) and suppression of KiSS-1 in the KKU-213L5 cells. The association of these two genes with metastasis was affirmed in CCA patient tissues since increased AGR2 expression and decreased KiSS-1 expression were found in higher stage patient tumors. In conclusion, a highly metastatic human CCA cell line was established and characterized. It is plausible that the differential expression between the parental KKU-213 and highly metastatic KKU-213L5 cells may be beneficial to classify novel genes associated with metastasis. The KKU-213L5 cell line should serve as a valued device for discovering the molecular mechanisms of CCA metastasis and enabling the search for an

  11. Efficient inhibition of growth of metastatic cancer cells after resection of primary colorectal cancer by soluble Flt-1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Ao; Peng, Weizhen; Sun, Jue; Xu, Fangming; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-09-01

    Removal of primary tumors often leads to increases in growth of metastatic tumor cells. Thus, development of an efficient treatment to inhibit the growth of metastatic tumor cells after resection of primary tumors appears to be critical for cancer therapy. Here, we reported that administration of a Chinese medicine Shiquandabutao (SQDBT) after removal of the primary cancer significantly inhibited the growth of metastatic cancer cells in mouse liver. Further analyses showed that the effect of SQDBT resulted from one of its main component, Siwutang (SWT), rather than from another main component, Sijunzitang (SJZT). Moreover, we found that the soluble Flt-1 from SWT neutralized the increased placental growth factor (PLGF) secreted by the metastatic cancer cells after primary cancer resection and subsequently inhibited the cancer neovascularization to suppress the metastatic cancer growth. Thus, our study reveals an essential role of SQDBT in inhibiting the growth of metastatic cancer after removal of primary cancer and further highlights PLGF as a potential target for metastatic cancer treatment.

  12. Cell transfer immunotherapy for metastatic solid cancer--what clinicians need to know.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Steven A

    2011-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy using the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes results in objective cancer regression in 49-72% of patients with metastatic melanoma. In a pilot trial combining cell transfer with a maximum lymphodepleting regimen, complete durable responses were seen in 40% of patients, with complete responses ongoing beyond 3 to 7 years. Current approaches to cell transfer therapy using autologous cells genetically engineered to express conventional or chimeric T-cell receptors have mediated cancer regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, synovial sarcoma, neuroblastoma and refractory lymphoma. Adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy is a rapidly developing new approach to the therapy of metastatic cancer in humans. This Review will emphasize the current available applications of cell transfer immunotherapy for patients with cancer.

  13. Targeted treatments for metastatic esophageal squamous cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2013-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma, one of the two major sub-types of esophageal carcinomas, constitutes the great majority of tumors in the upper and middle third of the organ. Declining in incidence in western countries, it continues to be a significant public health problem in the far east. Targeted treatments are novel therapies introduced in the clinical therapeutic armamentarium of oncology in the last 10-15 years. They represent a rational way of treating various cancers based on their molecular lesions. Although no such agent has been approved so far for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC), several are in clinical trials and several others have displayed pre-clinical activity that would justify the efforts and risks of pursuing their clinical development in this disease. This paper discusses some of these targeted agents in more advanced development in metastatic ESCC, as well as some promising drugs with pre-clinical or initial clinical data in the disease. PMID:23799158

  14. A paracrine loop between tumor cells and macrophages is required for tumor cell migration in mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Wang, Weigang; Lin, Elaine Y; Wang, Yarong; Pixley, Fiona; Stanley, E Richard; Graf, Thomas; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Segall, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John

    2004-10-01

    Invasion of tumor cells into the surrounding connective tissue and blood vessels is a key step in the metastatic spread of breast tumors. Although the presence of macrophages in primary tumors is associated with increased metastatic potential, the mechanistic basis for this observation is unknown. Using a chemotaxis-based in vivo invasion assay and multiphoton-based intravital imaging, we show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells facilitates the migration of carcinoma cells in the primary tumor. Gradients of either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) stimulate collection into microneedles of tumor cells and macrophages even though tumor cells express only EGF receptor and macrophages express only CSF-1 receptor. Intravital imaging shows that macrophages and tumor cells migrate toward microneedles containing either EGF or CSF-1. Inhibition of either CSF-1- or EGF-stimulated signaling reduces the migration of both cell types. This work provides the first direct evidence for a synergistic interaction between macrophages and tumor cells during cell migration in vivo and indicates a mechanism for how macrophages may contribute to metastasis.

  15. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC): a rapid autopsy report of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Udager, Aaron M; Alva, Ajjai; Chen, Ying-Bei; Siddiqui, Javed; Lagstein, Amir; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Chinnaiyian, Arul M; Mehra, Rohit

    2014-04-01

    Rapid ("warm") autopsies of patients with advanced metastatic cancer provide invaluable insight into the natural history, pathobiology, and morphology of advanced and treatment-resistant tumors. Here, we report a rapid autopsy case of a hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) patient with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-the first such case described for either a primary renal tumor or HLRCC-related cancer. Mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene underlie HLRCC, a rare syndrome involving cutaneous and uterine leiomyomata and aggressive kidney tumors. Loss of heterozygosity at the wild-type FH gene locus results in profound cellular metabolic derangement, "pseudohypoxic" upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-dependent transcription, and aberrant protein succination; these molecular changes drive oncogenesis of kidney tumors in HLRCC patients. The current index patient had a high-grade RCC with classic morphologic features of HLRCC, including large nuclei with prominent eosinophilic nucleoli and perinucleolar clearing. In addition, this patient's RCC demonstrated extensive sarcomatoid and rhabdoid features-morphologies not previously well described in HLRCC-associated kidney tumors. Here, we report the extent of metastatic dissemination and supplement this unique tumor morphology with mitochondrial enzyme histochemistry and extended immunohistochemical analysis. Tumor cells strongly expressed PAX8, vimentin, CD10, and the HIF target GLUT1 and showed increased nuclear p53 accumulation; the expression of other RCC markers was negative. We also detail microscopic tubular epithelial changes in the grossly uninvolved ipsilateral renal parenchyma and demonstrate sporadic, aberrant upregulation of the HIF targets GLUT1 and CAIX in dysplastic peritumoral tubules. PMID:24625422

  16. Total En Bloc Spondylectomy for Primary and Metastatic Spine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Addisu; El Dafrawy, Mostafa H; Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-11-01

    This study reports the surgical and clinical outcomes of spinal tumors managed with total en bloc spondylectomy. The authors searched their prospectively maintained database for patients undergoing total en bloc spondylectomy between 2001 and 2013. Ten patients (9 men, 1 woman; average age, 50.7 years; range, 42-68 years) were identified. The authors obtained demographic information, surgical outcomes (estimated blood loss, complications), and clinical outcomes (recurrence, survival). All patients had pain and were classified as American Spinal Injury Association grade E. The lesions were located in the thoracic (8 patients) and lumbar (2 patients) spine. Anterior column reconstruction was performed with strut allograft (7 patients), mesh cage (2 patients), and polymethyl methacrylate (1 patient). An average of 2.3 (range, 2-4) of 6 portions of the vertebrae were involved, according to the Kostuik classification. Mean estimated blood loss, operative time, and hospital stay were 3.5 L, 500 minutes, and 7.8 days, respectively. Perioperative complications included pleural tear (2 patients) and aortic tear, vena cava tear, retained sponge, pulmonary embolism, urinary tract infection, pneumothorax, anterior column support failure, and prominent instrumentation requiring removal (1 patient each). Postoperatively, all patients remained classified as American Spinal Injury Association grade E. Two patients had recurrence at distant spinal segments, and 1 had a new lesion in the thigh. Five patients had died (mean, 34.5 months after surgery), and 5 were alive a mean of 19.6 months after surgery (range, 6-48 months). Total en bloc spondylectomy is challenging, but in appropriately selected patients, it can be used to treat primary and metastatic spinal lesions.

  17. Protein kinase Cepsilon is linked to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha ectodomain shedding and the development of metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in protein kinase Cepsilon transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Deric L; Ness, Kristin J; Oberley, Terry D; Verma, Ajit K

    2003-10-01

    Protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon), a Ca(2+)-independent, phospholipid-dependent serine/threonine kinase, is among the PKC isoforms expressed in mouse epidermis. We reported that FVB/N transgenic mice that overexpress ( approximately 18-fold) PKCepsilon protein in basal epidermal cells and cells of the hair follicle develop papilloma-independent metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (mSCC) elicited by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-initiation and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promotion protocol. We now present that PKCepsilon transgenic mice elicit elevated serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha levels during skin tumor promotion by TPA, and this increase may be linked to the development of mSCC. A single topical application of TPA (5 nmol) to the skin, as early as 2.5 h after treatment, resulted in a significant (P < 0.01) increase (2-fold) in epidermal TNFalpha and more than a 6-fold increase in ectodomain shedding of TNFalpha into the serum of PKCepsilon transgenic mice relative to their wild-type littermates. Furthermore, this TPA-stimulated TNFalpha shedding was proportional to the level of expression of PKCepsilon in the epidermis. Using the TNF-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) inhibitor, TAPI-1, TPA-stimulated TNFalpha shedding could be completely prevented in PKCepsilon transgenic mice and isolated keratinocytes. These results indicate that PKCepsilon signal transduction pathways to TPA-stimulated TNFalpha ectodomain shedding are mediated by TACE, a transmembrane metalloprotease. Using the superoxide dismutase mimetic CuDIPs and the glutathione reductase mimetic ebselen, TPA-stimulated TNFalpha shedding from PKCepsilon transgenic mice could be completely attenuated, implying the role of reactive oxygen species. Finally, i.p. injection of a TNFalpha synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline, during skin tumor promotion completely prevented the development of mSCC in PKCepsilon transgenic mice. Taken together, these results indicate that: (a) PKCepsilon

  18. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Jerome A.; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities. PMID:27775567

  19. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  20. Metastatic growth from dormant cells induced by a col-I-enriched fibrotic environment.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Dalit; El Touny, Lara H; Michalowski, Aleksandra M; Smith, Jane Ann; Chu, Isabel; Davis, Anne Sally; Webster, Joshua D; Hoover, Shelley; Simpson, R Mark; Gauldie, Jack; Green, Jeffrey E

    2010-07-15

    Breast cancer that recurs as metastatic disease many years after primary tumor resection and adjuvant therapy seems to arise from tumor cells that disseminated early in the course of disease but did not develop into clinically apparent lesions. These long-term surviving, disseminated tumor cells maintain a state of dormancy, but may be triggered to proliferate through largely unknown factors. We now show that the induction of fibrosis, associated with deposition of type I collagen (Col-I) in the in vivo metastatic microenvironment, induces dormant D2.0R cells to form proliferative metastatic lesions through beta1-integrin signaling. In vitro studies using a three-dimensional culture system modeling dormancy showed that Col-I induces quiescent D2.0R cells to proliferate through beta1-integrin activation of SRC and focal adhesion kinase, leading to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent myosin light chain phosphorylation by myosin light chain kinase and actin stress fiber formation. Blocking beta1-integrin, Src, ERK, or myosin light chain kinase by short hairpin RNA or pharmacologic approaches inhibited Col-I-induced activation of this signaling cascade, cytoskeletal reorganization, and proliferation. These findings show that fibrosis with Col-I enrichment at the metastatic site may be a critical determinant of cytoskeletal reorganization in dormant tumor cells, leading to their transition from dormancy to metastatic growth. Thus, inhibiting Col-I production, its interaction with beta1-integrin, and downstream signaling of beta1-integrin may be important strategies for preventing or treating recurrent metastatic disease.

  1. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  2. MET Expression in Primary and Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma: Implications of Correlative Biomarker Assessment to MET Pathway Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Falbo, Ryan; Parisi, Fabio; Adeniran, Adebowale; Kluger, Yuval; Kluger, Harriet M.; Jilaveanu, Lucia B.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Inhibitors of the MET pathway hold promise in the treatment for metastatic kidney cancer. Assessment of predictive biomarkers may be necessary for appropriate patient selection. Understanding MET expression in metastases and the correlation to the primary site is important, as distant tissue is not always available. Methods and Results. MET immunofluorescence was performed using automated quantitative analysis and a tissue microarray containing matched nephrectomy and distant metastatic sites from 34 patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Correlations between MET expressions in matched primary and metastatic sites and the extent of heterogeneity were calculated. The mean expression of MET was not significantly different between primary tumors when compared to metastases (P = 0.1). MET expression weakly correlated between primary and matched metastatic sites (R = 0.5) and a number of cases exhibited very high levels of discordance between these tumors. Heterogeneity within nephrectomy specimens compared to the paired metastatic tissues was not significantly different (P = 0.39). Conclusions. We found that MET expression is not significantly different in primary tumors than metastatic sites and only weakly correlates between matched sites. Moderate concordance of MET expression and significant expression heterogeneity may be a barrier to the development of predictive biomarkers using MET targeting agents. PMID:26448928

  3. Reprogramming metastatic melanoma cells to assume a neural crest cell-like phenotype in an embryonic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kulesa, Paul M.; Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C.; Teddy, Jessica M.; Margaryan, Naira V.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Seftor, Richard E. B.; Hendrix, Mary J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Human metastatic melanoma cells express a dedifferentiated, plastic phenotype, which may serve as a selective advantage, because melanoma cells invade various microenvironments. Over the last three decades, there has been an increased focus on the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression, with the goal of reversing the metastatic phenotype. Here, using an embryonic chick model, we explore the possibility of reverting the metastatic melanoma phenotype to its cell type of origin, the neural-crest-derived melanocyte. GFP-labeled adult human metastatic melanoma cells were transplanted in ovo adjacent to host chick premigratory neural crest cells and analyzed 48 and 96 h after egg reincubation. Interestingly, the transplanted melanoma cells do not form tumors. Instead, we find that transplanted melanoma cells invade surrounding chick tissues in a programmed manner, distributing along host neural-crest-cell migratory pathways. The invading melanoma cells display neural-crest-cell-like morphologies and populate host peripheral structures, including the branchial arches, dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia. Analysis of a melanocyte-specific phenotype marker (MART-1) and a neuronal marker (Tuj1) revealed a subpopulation of melanoma cells that invade the chick periphery and express MART-1 and Tuj1. Our results demonstrate the ability of adult human metastatic melanoma cells to respond to chick embryonic environmental cues, a subset of which may undergo a reprogramming of their metastatic phenotype. This model has the potential to provide insights into the regulation of tumor cell plasticity by an embryonic milieu, which may hold significant therapeutic promise. PMID:16505384

  4. Stromal myofibroblasts in nonmetastatic and metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Sridhara, Sudheendra Udyavara; Choudaha, Nidhi; Kasetty, Sowmya; Joshi, Prathamesh Satish; Kallianpur, Shreenivas; Tijare, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Myofibroblasts are one of the important components of the tumor microenvironment which could possibly play an important role in tumor progression. The purpose of this study was to compare the presence of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and CD34 positive fibroblasts in nonmetastatic and metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma and to evaluate their role in tumor metastasis. Materials and Methods: Ten cases each of histologically proven metastatic and nonmetastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma formed the study group. The tissue sections were stained immunohistochemically for α-SMA and CD34. The stromal spindle cells positive for these markers in the study groups were counted and compared. Results: α-SMA positive cases were more in the metastatic group and CD34 positive cases were found to be more in the nonmetastatic tumors. Conclusions: Though difference in the staining pattern was statistically nonsignificant, the inverse relationship between α-SMA and CD34 positive cells is indicative of dynamic nature and the influence of tumor stroma in tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:24250077

  5. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  6. Imaging changes following stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic intracranial tumors: differentiating pseudoprogression from tumor progression and its effect on clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has become standard adjuvant treatment for patients with metastatic intracranial lesions. There has been a growing appreciation for benign imaging changes following radiation that are difficult to distinguish from true tumor progression. These imaging changes, termed pseudoprogression, carry significant implications for patient management. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of pseudoprogression in metastatic brain lesions, research to differentiate pseudoprogression from true progression, and clinical implications of pseudoprogression on treatment decisions. PMID:24233257

  7. Imaging Mitochondrial Redox Potential and Its Possible Link to Tumor Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin Z.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular redox states can regulate cell metabolism, growth, differentiation, motility, apoptosis, signaling pathways, and gene expressions etc. Growing body of literature suggest importance of redox status for cancer progression. While most studies on redox state were done on cells and tissue lysates, it is important to understand the role of redox state in tissue in vivo/ex vivo and image its heterogeneity. Redox scanning is a clinically-translatable method for imaging tissue mitochondrial redox potential with a submillimeter resolution. Redox scanning data in mouse models of human cancers demonstrate a correlation between mitochondrial redox state and tumor metastatic potential. I will discuss the significance of this correlation and possible directions for future research. PMID:22895837

  8. [Two Surgical Techniques for Metastatic Brain Tumors:Minimum Resection and Removal with Safety Margin].

    PubMed

    Nakasu, Yoko; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Ito, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    Successful resection of cerebral metastases is based on good basic neurosurgical techniques, in conjunction with technologies for tumor localization. A clear understanding about the border zone pathology of metastatic lesions leads to two different techniques for safe and effective tumor removal. There is no capsule or pseudocapsule around the metastatic brain tumors. The border zone is widely heterogeneous, especially in lesions after stereotactic irradiation. Resection can be performed in a circumferential and en bloc fashion with sufficient safety margin of the normal brain in non-eloquent area. However, enucleation should be done without surrounding brain damage in and near eloquent areas.

  9. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  10. Design and use of an artificial capillary in the study of metastatic cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafi, Adam; Peramo, Antonio; Boren, Rebecca; Heim, August; Matthews, William G.

    2006-03-01

    To improve the quality of life of patients with cancer, treatments will need to both minimize existing tumors and reduce the metastasis of cancer cells. The effectiveness of potential treatments on existing tumors can be directly probed, but anti-metastasis treatments are difficult to quantify. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the metastatic process is required for drug design. Details of the metastatic deposition of tumor cells in the circulatory system are not well understood. We are investigating the binding of tumor cells to an artificial endothelium. The model system allows for control over molecular composition at the interface, presenting the proteoglycans (PGs) found in the glycocalyx to tumor cells under shear flow conditions. Whether rolling or static adhesion is preferred, as well as what mechanical properties of the interaction between the cells and the PGs are important is to be determined. The outcomes of these experiments will help guide the search for pharmaceuticals that can disrupt the metastatic process at the endothelial adhesion step.

  11. Management of the Primary Tumor and Limited Metastases in Patients With Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Herman, Joseph M; Hoffman, John P; Thayer, Sarah P; Wolff, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    New combinations of cytotoxic chemotherapy have been proven to increase response rates and survival times compared with single-agent gemcitabine for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. These responses have been dramatic for a subset of patients, therefore raising questions about the management of limited metastatic disease with surgery or other ablative methods. Similarly, for patients having a complete radiographic response to chemotherapy in the metastatic compartment, whether to consider local therapy in the form of radiation or surgery for the primary tumor is now an appropriate question. Therefore, collaboration among experts in surgery, medical oncology, and radiation oncology has led to the development of guiding principles for local therapies to the primary intact pancreatic tumor for patients with limited metastatic disease and those who have had a significant response after systemic therapy.

  12. Tumor-specific Anti-Nucleosome Antibody Improves Therapeutic Efficacy of Doxorubicin-Loaded Long-Circulating Liposomes against Primary and Metastatic Tumor in Mice

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be significantly enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands to their surface. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells via the surface-bound nucleosomes released from the apoptotically dying neighboring tumor cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Antibody coupling to PEGylated doxorubicin-liposomes was performed by the “post-insertion” technique. The pharmacokinetics of plain and immuno-targeted Doxil®-mimicking liposomes, as well as their accumulation in primary Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumors in mice was followed by real-time gamma-scintigraphy upon liposomal membrane labeling with 111In. Therapeutic action of various liposomal formulations was followed by registering primary tumor growth, determining tumor weigh upon mice sacrifice, and by counting the number of metastases in the liver and lungs. 2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate significantly enhanced accumulation in LLC tumors. Targeted doxorubicin-loaded PEG-liposomes were significantly more effective in inhibiting tumor growth and metastatic process in the LLC tumor models in mice. Our results clearly show the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumor manifestations (solid and metastatic) significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19049322

  13. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Bhakta, Nirav R; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are initiated

  14. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Devon A.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D.; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality1. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours2–5. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown2. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are

  15. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Li, Dan; Ghazaryan, Seda; Shu, Limin; Wu, Lizhao

    2014-01-01

    Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145), it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP). In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:24937171

  16. Primary tumor prevalence has an impact on the constituent ratio of metastases to the jaw but not on metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fu-gui; Hua, Cheng-ge; Shen, Mo-lun; Tang, Xiu-fa

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of metastases to jaws (MJ), mainly concerning the differences between American and Chinese patients, and exploring the relationship between the primary tumors' prevalence (PTP) and constituent ratio of MJ. Information concerning of 399 MJ cases in 215 papers, including one new case in our hospital, was subjected to statistic analysis. The main clinical features of MJ, such as constituent ratio of PTP and that of MJ, metastatic sites, treatments, and prognosis were summarized. Breast, lung, kidney, prostate and thyroid (in descending order) were the leading primary sites of MJ. Furthermore, the constituent ratio of MJ was found to be correlated with that of PTP in all subjects including American and Chinese subjects in our study. As to metastatic sites in the mandible, a specific “M” shaped pattern appeared regardless of the tumor type or constituent ratios of MJ were in all subjects. Almost all subjects received traditionally palliative treatments, and the prognosis was quite poor. The PTP had a significant impact on the constituent ratio of MJ. However, it was the properties of the microenvironment rather than characteristics or constituent ratios of tumor cells, that decided the metastatic sites in various tumor subjects. PMID:21789963

  17. Sweets for a bitter end: lung cancer cell surface protein glycosylation mediates metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Nguyen, Don X.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Glycosylation is one of the most predominant forms of cell surface protein modifications and yet its de-regulation in cancer and contribution to tumor microenvironment interactions remains poorly understood. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Reticker-Flynn and Bhatia characterize an enzymatic switch in lung cancer cells that triggers aberrant surface protein glycosylation patterns, adhesion to lectins on the surface of inflammatory cells, and subsequent metastatic colonization of the liver. PMID:25656895

  18. Clear cell tumors of the lower respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, M J; Mills, S E; Ritter, J H

    1997-11-01

    Clear cell tumors of the lower respiratory tract comprise a diverse group of lesions. The prototypical lesion is the benign clear cell tumor or "sugar tumor," a tumor of enigmatic histogenesis, whose name derives from the high glycogen content of the cells. Analogous to the salivary gland lesion of the same name, acinic cell tumors may also occur in the tracheobroncheal tree. The topic of "clear cell carcinoma" is discussed, which in the opinion of the authors does not constitute a distinct tumor entity. A discussion of potential lesion metastatic to the lung with clear cell histology is also presented. Histological details of the various entities are discussed, as well as the significant histochemical, immunohistological, and electron microscopic features; in particular, such findings that are relevant to differential diagnosis are stressed, including the distinction of primary and metastatic lesions.

  19. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of zoledronic acid and radiotherapy against metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morii, Kazuhiko; Aoyama, Yuhki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Okushin, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 72-year-old man with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma and decompensated hepatitis C virus-related cirrhosis suffered from a metastatic femoral fracture. After undergoing radiotherapy, he was only treated with supportive care, except for the administration of zoledronic acid (ZA). Thereafter, the initially elevated serum α-fetoprotein and des-gamma carboxyprothrombin levels declined to within the normal ranges. Hepatic and metastatic adrenal tumors, distant from the radiation field, exhibited a surprising regression. ZA is known to inhibit the activity of osteoclasts, bone-residential macrophages, and has been reported to have a direct anti-tumor effect. ZA may adjust the immunological milieu in tumor microenvironments by inhibiting the tumor-associated macrophages. Because radiotherapy can enhance the presentation of tumor-associated antigens, ZA and radiotherapy may exert synergistic anti-tumor effects. PMID:26466697

  20. Differentiation of Reactive and Tumor Metastatic Lymph Nodes with Diffusion-weighted and SPIO Enhanced MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Xinglu; Niu, Gang; Chen, Siouan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Determination of lymphatic metastasis is of great importance for both treatment planning and patient prognosis. We aim to distinguish tumor metastatic lymph nodes (TLNs) and reactive lymph nodes (RLNs) with diffusion-weighted and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods Ipsilateral popliteal lymph node metastasis or lymphadenitis model was established by hock injection of either luciferase-expressing 4T1 murine breast cancer cells or Complete Freund Adjuvant (CFA) in male Balb/C mice. At different time points after inoculation, bioluminescence imaging, T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted and SPIO enhanced MRI were performed. Imaging findings were confirmed by histopathological staining. Results Size enlargement was observed in both TLNs and RLNs. At day 28, TLNs showed strong bioluminescence signal and bigger size than RLNs (p < 0.01). At early stages up to day 21, both TLNs and RLNs appeared homogeneous on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). At day 28, TLNs showed heterogeneous apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map with significantly higher average ADC value of 0.41 ± 0.03 × 10−3 mm2/s than that of RLNs (0.34 ± 0.02 10−3 mm2/s, p < 0.05). On SPIO enhanced MRI, both TLNs and RLNs showed distinct T2 signal reduction at day 21 after inoculation. At day 28, TLNs demonstrated partial uptake of the iron oxide particles, which was confirmed by Prussian blue staining. Conclusions Both diffusion-weighted and SPIO enhanced MRI can distinguish tumor metastatic lymph nodes from reactive lymph nodes. However, neither method is able to detect tumor metastasis to the draining lymph nodes at early stages. PMID:22588595

  1. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  2. Combination of an Integrin-Targeting NIR Tracer and an Ultrasensitive Spectroscopic Device for Intraoperative Detection of Head and Neck Tumor Margins and Metastatic Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Younghyoun; Mohs, Aaron M.; Mancini, Michael C.; Nie, Shuming; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    Despite major advances in targeted drug therapy and radiation therapy, surgery remains the most effective treatment for most solid tumors. The single most important predictor of patient survival is a complete surgical resection of the primary tumor, draining lymph nodes, and metastatic lesions. Presently, however, 20%–30% of patients with head and neck cancer who undergo surgery still leave the operating room without complete resection because of missed lesions. Thus, major opportunities exist to develop advanced imaging tracers and intraoperative instrumentation that would allow surgeons to visualize microscopic tumors during surgery. The cell adhesion molecule integrin αvβ3 is specifically expressed by tumor neovasculature and invading tumor cells, but not by quiescent vessels or normal cells. Here we report the combined use of an integrin-targeting near-infrared tracer (RGD-IRDye800CW) and a handheld spectroscopic device, an integrated point spectroscopy with wide-field imaging system, for highly sensitive detection of integrin overexpression on infiltrating cancer cells. By using an orthotopic head and neck cancer animal model, we show that this tracer–device combination allows intraoperative detection of not only invasive tumor margins but also metastatic lymph nodes. Correlated histological analysis further reveals that microscopic clusters of 50–100 tumor cells can be detected intraoperatively with high sensitivity and specificity, raising new possibilities in guiding surgical resection of microscopic tumors and metastatic lymph nodes. PMID:27738656

  3. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice.

  4. Androgen-Regulated SPARCL1 in the Tumor Microenvironment Inhibits Metastatic Progression.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Paula J; Hughes, Robert M; Simons, Brian W; Huang, Jessie; Miller, Rebecca M; Shinder, Brian; Haffner, Michael C; Esopi, David; Kimura, Yasunori; Jabbari, Javaneh; Ross, Ashley E; Erho, Nicholas; Vergara, Ismael A; Faraj, Sheila F; Davicioni, Elai; Netto, George J; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; An, Steven S; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2015-10-15

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in men due to the subset of cancers that progress to metastasis. Prostate cancers are thought to be hardwired to androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but AR-regulated changes in the prostate that facilitate metastasis remain poorly understood. We previously noted a marked reduction in secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (SPARCL1) expression during invasive phases of androgen-induced prostate growth, suggesting that this may be a novel invasive program governed by AR. Herein, we show that SPARCL1 loss occurs concurrently with AR amplification or overexpression in patient-based data. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that SPARCL1 expression is directly suppressed by androgen-induced AR activation and binding at the SPARCL1 locus via an epigenetic mechanism, and these events can be pharmacologically attenuated with either AR antagonists or HDAC inhibitors. We establish using the Hi-Myc model of prostate cancer that in Hi-Myc/Sparcl1(-/-) mice, SPARCL1 functions to suppress cancer formation. Moreover, metastatic progression of Myc-CaP orthotopic allografts is restricted by SPARCL1 in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, we show that SPARCL1 both tethers to collagen in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and binds to the cell's cytoskeleton. SPARCL1 directly inhibits the assembly of focal adhesions, thereby constraining the transmission of cell traction forces. Our findings establish a new insight into AR-regulated prostate epithelial movement and provide a novel framework whereby SPARCL1 in the ECM microenvironment restricts tumor progression by regulating the initiation of the network of physical forces that may be required for metastatic invasion of prostate cancer. PMID:26294211

  5. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  6. Prophylactic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines Efficiently Inhibit Metastases in Murine Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Markov, Oleg V; Mironova, Nadezhda L; Sennikov, Sergey V; Vlassov, Valentin V; Zenkova, Marina A

    2015-01-01

    Recent data on the application of dendritic cells (DCs) as anti-tumor vaccines has shown their great potential in therapy and prophylaxis of cancer. Here we report on a comparison of two treatment schemes with DCs that display the models of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination using three different experimental tumor models: namely, Krebs-2 adenocarcinoma (primary tumor), melanoma (B16, metastatic tumor without a primary node) and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC, metastatic tumor with a primary node). Dendritic cells generated from bone marrow-derived DC precursors and loaded with lysate of tumor cells or transfected with the complexes of total tumor RNA with cationic liposomes were used for vaccination. Lipofectamine 2000 and liposomes consisting of helper lipid DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) and cationic lipid 2D3 (1,26-Bis(1,2-de-O-tetradecyl-rac-glycerol)-7,11,16,20-tetraazahexacosan tetrahydrocloride) were used for RNA transfection. It was shown that DCs loaded with tumor lysate were ineffective in contrast to tumor-derived RNA. Therapeutic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/Lipofectamine 2000 was the most efficient for treatment of non-metastatic Krebs-2, where a 1.9-fold tumor growth retardation was observed. Single prophylactic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/2D3 was the most efficient to treat highly aggressive metastatic tumors LLC and B16, where 4.7- and 10-fold suppression of the number of lung metastases was observed, respectively. Antimetastatic effect of single prophylactic DC vaccination in metastatic melanoma model was accompanied by the reductions in the levels of Th2-specific cytokines however the change of the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 master regulators was not found. Failure of double prophylactic vaccination is explained by Th17-response polarization associated with autoimmune and pro-inflammatory reactions. In the case of therapeutic DC vaccine the polarization of Th1-response was found nevertheless

  7. Prophylactic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines Efficiently Inhibit Metastases in Murine Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sennikov, Sergey V.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Zenkova, Marina A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data on the application of dendritic cells (DCs) as anti-tumor vaccines has shown their great potential in therapy and prophylaxis of cancer. Here we report on a comparison of two treatment schemes with DCs that display the models of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination using three different experimental tumor models: namely, Krebs-2 adenocarcinoma (primary tumor), melanoma (B16, metastatic tumor without a primary node) and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC, metastatic tumor with a primary node). Dendritic cells generated from bone marrow-derived DC precursors and loaded with lysate of tumor cells or transfected with the complexes of total tumor RNA with cationic liposomes were used for vaccination. Lipofectamine 2000 and liposomes consisting of helper lipid DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) and cationic lipid 2D3 (1,26-Bis(1,2-de-O-tetradecyl-rac-glycerol)-7,11,16,20-tetraazahexacosan tetrahydrocloride) were used for RNA transfection. It was shown that DCs loaded with tumor lysate were ineffective in contrast to tumor-derived RNA. Therapeutic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/Lipofectamine 2000 was the most efficient for treatment of non-metastatic Krebs-2, where a 1.9-fold tumor growth retardation was observed. Single prophylactic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/2D3 was the most efficient to treat highly aggressive metastatic tumors LLC and B16, where 4.7- and 10-fold suppression of the number of lung metastases was observed, respectively. Antimetastatic effect of single prophylactic DC vaccination in metastatic melanoma model was accompanied by the reductions in the levels of Th2-specific cytokines however the change of the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 master regulators was not found. Failure of double prophylactic vaccination is explained by Th17-response polarization associated with autoimmune and pro-inflammatory reactions. In the case of therapeutic DC vaccine the polarization of Th1-response was found nevertheless

  8. Efficient gene silencing in metastatic tumor by siRNA formulated in surface-modified nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Shyh-Dar; Chono, Sumio; Huang, Leaf

    2008-02-18

    We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) formulation for systemically delivering siRNA into metastatic tumors. The NP, composed of nucleic acids, a polycationic peptide and cationic liposome, was prepared in a self-assembling process. The NP was then modified by PEG-lipid containing a targeting ligand, anisamide, and thus was decorated for targeting sigma receptor expressing B16F10 tumor. The activity of the targeted NP was compared with the naked NP (no PEGylation) and non-targeted NP (no ligand). The delivery efficiency of the targeted NP was 4-fold higher than the non-targeted NP and could be competed by excess free ligand. Luciferase siRNA was used to evaluate the gene silencing activity in the B16F10 cells, which were stably transduced with a luciferase gene. The gene silencing activity of the targeted NP was significantly higher than the other formulations and lasted for 4 days. While confocal microscopy showed that the naked NP provided no tissue selectivity and non-targeted NP was ineffective for tumor uptake, the targeted NP effectively penetrated the lung metastasis, but not the liver. It resulted in 70-80% gene silencing in the metastasis model after a single i.v. injection (150 microg siRNA/kg). This effective formulation also showed very little immunotoxicity.

  9. Efficient Gene Silencing in Metastatic Tumor by siRNA Formulated in Surface-modified Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shyh-Dar; Chono, Sumio; Huang, Leaf

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) formulation for systemically delivering siRNA into metastatic tumors. The NP, composed of nucleic acids, a polycationic peptide and cationic liposome, was prepared in a self-assembling process. The NP was then modified by PEG-lipid containing a targeting ligand, anisamide, and thus was decorated for targeting sigma receptor expressing B16F10 tumor. The activity of the targeted NP was compared with the naked NP (no PEGylation) and non-targeted NP (no ligand). The delivery efficiency of the targeted NP was 4-fold higher than the non-targeted NP and could be competed by excess free ligand. Luciferase siRNA was used to evaluate the gene silencing activity in the B16F10 cells, which were stably transduced with a luciferase gene, in a lung metastasis model. The gene silencing activity of the targeted NP was significantly higher than the other formulations and lasted for 4 days. While confocal microscopy showed the naked NP provided no tissue selectivity and non-targeted NP was ineffective for tumor uptake, the targeted NP effectively penetrated the lung metastasis, but not the liver. It resulted in 70-80% gene silencing in the metastasis model after a single i.v. injection (150 μg siRNA/kg). This effective formulation also showed very little immunotoxicity. PMID:18083264

  10. S100 and annexin proteins identify cell membrane damage as the Achilles heel of metastatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Jyoti K; Nylandsted, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical activity of cells and the stress imposed on them by extracellular environment is a constant source of injury to the plasma membrane (PM). In invasive tumor cells, increased motility together with the harsh environment of the tumor stroma further increases the risk of PM injury. The impact of these stresses on tumor cell plasma membrane and mechanism by which tumor cells repair the PM damage are poorly understood. Ca2+ entry through the injured PM initiates repair of the PM. Depending on the cell type, different organelles and proteins respond to this Ca2+ entry and facilitate repair of the damaged plasma membrane. We recently identified that proteins expressed in various metastatic cancers including Ca2+-binding EF hand protein S100A11 and its binding partner annexin A2 are used by tumor cells for plasma membrane repair (PMR). Here we will discuss the involvement of S100, annexin proteins and their regulation of actin cytoskeleton, leading to PMR. Additionally, we will show that another S100 member – S100A4 accumulates at the injured PM. These findings reveal a new role for the S100 and annexin protein up regulation in metastatic cancers and identify these proteins and PMR as targets for treating metastatic cancers. PMID:25565331

  11. An optofluidic constriction chip for monitoring metastatic potential and drug response of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez Vazquez, R; Nava, G; Veglione, M; Yang, T; Bragheri, F; Minzioni, P; Bianchi, E; Di Tano, M; Chiodi, I; Osellame, R; Mondello, C; Cristiani, I

    2015-04-01

    Cellular mechanical properties constitute good markers to characterize tumor cells, to study cell population heterogeneity and to highlight the effect of drug treatments. In this work, we describe the fabrication and validation of an integrated optofluidic chip capable of analyzing cellular deformability on the basis of the pressure gradient needed to push a cell through a narrow constriction. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to discriminate between tumorigenic and metastatic breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB231) and between human melanoma cells with different metastatic potential (A375P and A375MC2). Moreover, we show that this chip allows highlighting the effect of drugs interfering with microtubule organization (paclitaxel, combretastatin A-4 and nocodazole) on cancer cells, which leads to changes in the pressure-gradient required to push cells through the constriction. Our single-cell microfluidic device for mechanical evaluation is compact and easy to use, allowing for an extensive use in different laboratory environments.

  12. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  13. Mesenchymal Cancer Cell-Stroma Crosstalk Promotes Niche Activation, Epithelial Reversion, and Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo Martin, Yaiza; Park, Danielle; Ramachandran, Anassuya; Ombrato, Luigi; Calvo, Fernando; Chakravarty, Probir; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Derzsi, Stefanie; Hill, Caroline S.; Sahai, Erik; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary During metastatic colonization, tumor cells must establish a favorable microenvironment or niche that will sustain their growth. However, both the temporal and molecular details of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we found that metastatic initiating cells (MICs) exhibit a high capacity for lung fibroblast activation as a result of Thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) expression. Importantly, inhibiting the mesenchymal phenotype of MICs by blocking the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated kinase AXL reduces THBS2 secretion, niche-activating ability, and, consequently, metastatic competence. Subsequently, disseminated metastatic cells revert to an AXL-negative, more epithelial phenotype to proliferate and decrease the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β-dependent SMAD2-3 in favor of BMP/SMAD1-5 signaling. Remarkably, newly activated fibroblasts promote this transition. In summary, our data reveal a crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment whereby the EMT status initially triggers and then is regulated by niche activation during metastatic colonization. PMID:26670048

  14. Increased estrogen sulfation of estradiol 17beta-D-glucuronide in metastatic tumor rat livers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huadong; Liu, Lichuan; Pang, K Sandy

    2006-11-01

    Changes in the disposition of estradiol 17beta-d-glucuronide (E(2)17G), a substrate of the organic anion-transporting polypeptide family (Oatp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), were examined in livers of male Wag/Rij rats that were injected with CC531 cells intraportally to induce metastatic tumors (n = 5) or with phosphate-buffered saline for sham-operated controls (n = 4). Multiple indicator dilution, single-pass liver perfusions revealed extremely high influx clearances of [(3)H]E(2)17G (>190 ml/min) in both groups. In recirculating liver perfusions, [(3)H]E(2)17G decayed monoexponentially in the reservoir perfusate, and the total (9.19 +/- 1.33 versus 8.18 +/- 0.94 ml/min) and biliary (4.94 +/- 1.07 versus 4.60 +/- 0.86 ml/min) clearances were similar in both groups (P > 0.05). The metabolic clearance of E(2)17G was higher in the tumor group (4.60 +/- 0.64 versus 3.23 +/- 0.23 ml/min, P < 0.05). E(2)3S17G, the 3-sulfate metabolite, whose identity was confirmed by mass spectrometry, appeared only in bile and not perfusate. Liver microsomal incubations of E(2)3(35)S17G and [(3)H]estrone sulfate revealed similar sulfatase activities between the tumor and sham livers, albeit the activities were much lower for E(2)3(35)S17G. Oatp1a1 and Oatp1b2 protein expression in liver membrane fragments was reduced by 42% and 38%, respectively, whereas that of cytosolic estrogen sulfotransferase (Sult1e1) was significantly increased (41%) with tumor (P < 0.05). All of the observations were captured by modeling. From modeling, we showed that reduction of the high influx clearance (546 to 283 ml/min) failed to lower the total clearance of E(2)17G, whereas up-regulation of Sult1e1 increased the E(2)17G sulfation clearance (2.56 to 3.69 ml/min) in livers with metastatic tumors. PMID:16895976

  15. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  16. Microenvironmental Influences on Metastasis Suppressor Expression and Function during a Metastatic Cell's Journey.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Vivian, Carolyn J; Brinker, Amanda E; Hampton, Kelsey R; Lianidou, Evi; Welch, Danny R

    2014-12-01

    Metastasis is the process of primary tumor cells breaking away and colonizing distant secondary sites. In order for a tumor cell growing in one microenvironment to travel to, and flourish in, a secondary environment, it must survive a series of events termed the metastatic cascade. Before departing the primary tumor, cells acquire genetic and epigenetic changes that endow them with properties not usually associated with related normal differentiated cells. Those cells also induce a subset of bone marrow-derived stem cells to mobilize and establish pre-metastatic niches [1]. Many tumor cells undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), where they transiently acquire morphologic changes, reduced requirements for cell-cell contact and become more invasive [2]. Invasive tumor cells eventually enter the circulatory (hematogenous) or lymphatic systems or travel across body cavities. In transit, tumor cells must resist anoikis, survive sheer forces and evade detection by the immune system. For blood-borne metastases, surviving cells then arrest or adhere to endothelial linings before either proliferating or extravasating. Eventually, tumor cells complete the process by proliferating to form a macroscopic mass [3].Up to 90 % of all cancer related morbidity and mortality can be attributed to metastasis. Surgery manages to ablate most primary tumors, especially when combined with chemotherapy and radiation. But if cells have disseminated, survival rates drop precipitously. While multiple parameters of the primary tumor are predictive of local or distant relapse, biopsies remain an imperfect science. The introduction of molecular and other biomarkers [4, 5] continue to improve the accuracy of prognosis. However, the invasive procedure introduces new complications for the patient. Likewise, the heterogeneity of any tumor population [3, 6, 7] means that sampling error (i.e., since it is impractical to examine the entire tumor) necessitates further improvements.In the

  17. Dose Escalation for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression in Patients With Relatively Radioresistant Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Freundt, Katja; Meyners, Thekla; Bajrovic, Amira; Basic, Hiba; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Wildfang, Ingeborg; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy alone is the most common treatment for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) from relatively radioresistant tumors such as renal cell carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and malignant melanoma. However, the results of the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy/10 fractions need to be improved with respect to functional outcome. This study investigated whether a dose escalation beyond 30 Gy can improve treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: A total of 91 patients receiving 30 Gy/10 fractions were retrospectively compared to 115 patients receiving higher doses (37.5 Gy/15 fractions, 40 Gy/20 fractions) for motor function and local control of MSCC. Ten further potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, tumor type, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, visceral or other bone metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy, pretreatment ambulatory status, and time developing motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 18% of patients after 30 Gy and in 22% after higher doses (p = 0.81). On multivariate analysis, functional outcome was associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.030), interval from tumor diagnosis to radiotherapy (p = 0.010), and time developing motor deficits (p < 0.001). The 1-year local control rates were 76% after 30 Gy and 80% after higher doses, respectively (p = 0.64). On multivariate analysis, local control was significantly associated with visceral metastases (p = 0.029) and number of involved vertebrae (p = 0.043). Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, escalation of the radiation dose beyond 30 Gy/10 fractions did not significantly improve motor function and local control of MSCC in patients with relatively radioresistant tumors.

  18. Inflammatory cell infiltration of tumors: Jekyll or Hyde.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, James E; Donkor, Moses; Scholar, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Inflammatory cell infiltration of tumors contributes either positively or negatively to tumor invasion, growth, metastasis, and patient outcomes, creating a Dr. Jekyll or Mr. Hyde conundrum when examining mechanisms of action. This is due to tumor heterogeneity and the diversity of the inflammatory cell phenotypes that infiltrate primary and metastatic lesions. Tumor infiltration by macrophages is generally associated with neoangiogenesis and negative outcomes, whereas dendritic cell (DC) infiltration is typically associated with a positive clinical outcome in association with their ability to present tumor antigens (Ags) and induce Ag-specific T cell responses. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) also infiltrate tumors, inhibiting immune responses and facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. In contrast, T cell infiltration of tumors provides a positive prognostic surrogate, although subset analyses suggest that not all infiltrating T cells predict a positive outcome. In general, infiltration by CD8(+) T cells predicts a positive outcome, while CD4(+) cells predict a negative outcome. Therefore, the analysis of cellular phenotypes and potentially spatial distribution of infiltrating cells are critical for an accurate assessment of outcome. Similarly, cellular infiltration of metastatic foci is also a critical parameter for inducing therapeutic responses, as well as establishing tumor dormancy. Current strategies for cellular, gene, and molecular therapies are focused on the manipulation of infiltrating cellular populations. Within this review, we discuss the role of tumor infiltrating, myeloid-monocytic cells, and T lymphocytes, as well as their potential for tumor control, immunosuppression, and facilitation of metastasis. PMID:17717638

  19. Current challenges in metastasis: disseminated and circulating tumor cells detection.

    PubMed

    Shahneh, Fatemeh Zare

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of the primary tumor is responsible for the majority of cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood is associated with early metastatic recurrence in cancer. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the site of disease in metastatic or primary tumor that can be recognized and enriched in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. The detection of rare circulating tumor cells (CTC) is an objective of numerous oncologists' researches. Circulating tumor cells have the potential to help to detect cancer recurrence at its earlier stage, determine therapy resistance before full blown progression, distinguish molecular changes during treatment, monitor efficacy therapy during treatment, guide therapy choice, and predict clinical outcome. In future perspective, standardization of the different enrichment methods in clinical trial is integrated. Developments in CTC detection methods will improve a wide range of clinical applications, as well as the discovery of biomarkers to predict treatment responses and disease progression. In order to identifying, several techniques have been applied to detect and isolate CTC in a heterogeneous population for management and monitoring response to therapy in clinical course in patients with localized or metastatic disease.

  20. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  1. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  2. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  3. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  4. Microenvironmental Influences on Metastasis Suppressor Expression and Function during a Metastatic Cell's Journey.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Vivian, Carolyn J; Brinker, Amanda E; Hampton, Kelsey R; Lianidou, Evi; Welch, Danny R

    2014-12-01

    Metastasis is the process of primary tumor cells breaking away and colonizing distant secondary sites. In order for a tumor cell growing in one microenvironment to travel to, and flourish in, a secondary environment, it must survive a series of events termed the metastatic cascade. Before departing the primary tumor, cells acquire genetic and epigenetic changes that endow them with properties not usually associated with related normal differentiated cells. Those cells also induce a subset of bone marrow-derived stem cells to mobilize and establish pre-metastatic niches [1]. Many tumor cells undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), where they transiently acquire morphologic changes, reduced requirements for cell-cell contact and become more invasive [2]. Invasive tumor cells eventually enter the circulatory (hematogenous) or lymphatic systems or travel across body cavities. In transit, tumor cells must resist anoikis, survive sheer forces and evade detection by the immune system. For blood-borne metastases, surviving cells then arrest or adhere to endothelial linings before either proliferating or extravasating. Eventually, tumor cells complete the process by proliferating to form a macroscopic mass [3].Up to 90 % of all cancer related morbidity and mortality can be attributed to metastasis. Surgery manages to ablate most primary tumors, especially when combined with chemotherapy and radiation. But if cells have disseminated, survival rates drop precipitously. While multiple parameters of the primary tumor are predictive of local or distant relapse, biopsies remain an imperfect science. The introduction of molecular and other biomarkers [4, 5] continue to improve the accuracy of prognosis. However, the invasive procedure introduces new complications for the patient. Likewise, the heterogeneity of any tumor population [3, 6, 7] means that sampling error (i.e., since it is impractical to examine the entire tumor) necessitates further improvements.In the

  5. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  6. A metastatic glomus jugulare tumor. A temporal bone report

    SciTech Connect

    El Fiky, F.M.; Paparella, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The clinicopathologic findings in the temporal bone of a patient with a highly malignant metastasizing glomus jugulare tumor are reported. The patient exhibited all the symptoms of primary malignant tumors of the ear, including facial paralysis, otorrhea, pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and vertigo. He was treated with cobalt irradiation followed by radium implant in the ear canal for a residual tumor; then a left-sided radical mastoidectomy was performed.

  7. Metastatic cardiac tumor manifested by persistent ST-segment elevation with coexisting reciprocal changes on electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Dae Young; Park, Kyoung-Ha; Hong, Seong Eun; Lee, Soo Haeng; Jang, Seung Hun; Park, Woo Jung

    2014-01-01

    In cases with metastatic invasion of the heart, electrocardiographic abnormalities are commonly seen. However, most of these electrocardiographic changes are nonspecific; certain findings may be highly suggestive of myocardial involvement of the tumor. We report a patient with lung cancer who presented with persistent ST-segment elevation with coexisting reciprocal changes on electrocardiography due to myocardial invasion of the lung cancer.

  8. Polymethylmethacrylate-augmented screw fixation for stabilization in metastatic spinal tumors. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jee Soo; Lee, Sang Ho; Rhee, Chang Hun; Lee, Seung Hoon

    2002-01-01

    Screw fixation augmented with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or some other biocompatible bone cement has been used in patients with osteoporosis requiring spinal fusion. No clinical studies have been conducted on PMMA-augmented screw fixation for stabilization of the vertebral column in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether screw fixation augmented with PMMA might be suitable in patients treated for multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. Ten patients with metastatic spinal tumors involving multiple vertebral levels underwent stabilization procedures in which PMMA was used to augment screw fixation after decompression of the spinal cord. Within 15 days, partial or complete relief from pain was obtained in all patients postoperatively. Two of four patients in whom neurological deficits caused them to be nonambulatory before surgery were able to ambulate postoperatively. Neither collapse of the injected vertebral bodies nor failure of the screw fixation was observed during the mean follow-up period of 6.7 months. Screw fixation augmented with PMMA may offer stronger stabilization and facilitate the instrumentation across short segments in the treatment of multilevel metastatic spinal tumors. PMID:11795702

  9. Bronchial carcinoid tumors metastatic to the sella turcica and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Moshkin, Olga; Rotondo, Fabio; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Soares, Mark; Coire, Claire; Smyth, Harley S; Goth, Miklos; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2012-06-01

    We review here the literature on neuroendocrine neoplasms metastatic to the pituitary and present an example of the disease. Metastasis of bronchial carcinoid tumors to the sellar region are rare. Herein, we describe the case of a 63-year-old woman who presented with constant cough and headaches. She had previously been operated for carcinoid tumor of the lung. During the preoperative investigation, a CT scan of the head revealed a sellar mass. Six months after a left lower lobectomy, the sellar lesion was removed by transsphenoidal surgery. The two tumors were evaluated by histology, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Both showed identical morphologic features, those of carcinoid tumor. Immunohistochemistry revealed immunoreactivity for the endocrine markers, synaptophysin and chromogranin, as well as CD-56, serotonin, bombesin and vascular endothelial growth factor. The sellar neoplasm showed nuclear immunopositivity for thyroid transcription factor-1, supporting the diagnosis of a metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumor. In conclusion, this is the first report of a serotonin- and bombesin-immunopositive atypical bronchial carcinoid tumor metastatic to the sella. PMID:22485018

  10. Durable Complete Responses in Heavily Pretreated Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Using T Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Phan, Giao Q.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Robbins, Paul F.; Wunderlich, John R.; Morton, Kathleen E.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.; Steinberg, Seth M.; White, Donald E.; Dudley, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Most treatments for patients with metastatic melanoma have a low rate of complete regression and thus overall survival in these patients is poor. We have investigated the ability of adoptive cell transfer utilizing autologous, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes to mediate durable complete regressions in heavily pre-treated patients with metastatic melanoma. Experimental Design Ninety-three patients with measurable metastatic melanoma were treated with the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes administered in conjunction with interleukin-2 following a lymphodepleting preparative regimen on three sequential clinical trials. Ninety-five percent of these patients had progressive disease following a prior systemic treatment. Median potential followup was 62 months. Results Objective response rates by RECIST criteria in the three trials using lymphodepleting preparative regimens (chemotherapy alone or with 2Gy or 12Gy irradiation) were 49%, 52% and 72%. Twenty of the 93 patients (22%) achieved a complete tumor regression and 19 have ongoing complete regressions beyond three years The actuarial three and five year survivals for the entire group were 36% and 29% respectively but for the 20 complete responders were 100% and 93%. The likelihood of achieving a complete response was similar regardless of prior therapy. Factors associated with objective response included longer telomeres of the infused cells, the number of CD8+ CD27+ cells infused and the persistence of the infused cells in the circulation at one month (all p2<0.001). Conclusions Cell transfer therapy with autologous tumor infiltrating can mediate durable complete responses in patients with metastatic melanoma and has similar efficacy irrespective of prior treatment. PMID:21498393

  11. Mechanosensitive pannexin-1 channels mediate microvascular metastatic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Zhang, Steven; Soong, T David; Halberg, Nils; Goodarzi, Hani; Mangrum, Creed; Wu, Y Gloria; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-07-01

    During metastatic progression, circulating cancer cells become lodged within the microvasculature of end organs, where most die from mechanical deformation. Although this phenomenon was first described over a half-century ago, the mechanisms enabling certain cells to survive this metastasis-suppressive barrier remain unknown. By applying whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing technology to isogenic cancer cells of differing metastatic capacities, we identified a mutation encoding a truncated form of the pannexin-1 (PANX1) channel, PANX1(1-89), as recurrently enriched in highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PANX1(1-89) functions to permit metastatic cell survival during traumatic deformation in the microvasculature by augmenting ATP release from mechanosensitive PANX1 channels activated by membrane stretch. PANX1-mediated ATP release acts as an autocrine suppressor of deformation-induced apoptosis through P2Y-purinergic receptors. Finally, small-molecule therapeutic inhibition of PANX1 channels is found to reduce the efficiency of breast cancer metastasis. These data suggest a molecular basis for metastatic cell survival on microvasculature-induced biomechanical trauma. PMID:26098574

  12. In vitro assays for determining the metastatic potential of melanoma cell lines with characterized in vivo invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Giang, Ut-Binh T; Xu, Lei; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2016-10-01

    The metastatic potential of cancer cells is an elusive property that is indicative of the later stages of cancer progression. The ability to distinguish between poorly and highly metastatic cells is invaluable for understanding the basic biology of cancer and to develop more treatments. In this paper, we exploit a A375 melanoma cell line series (A375P, A375MA1, A375MA2) that vary in metastatic potential, to demonstrate an in vitro screening assay using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microbubble well arrays that can distinguish these cell lines by their growth characteristics in including morphology, migratory potential, and clonogenic potential. These cell lines cannot be distinguished by their growth characteristics when cultured on standard tissue culture plastic or planar PDMS. Results show that the more metastatic cell lines (A375MA1, A375MA2) have a higher proliferative potential and a distinctive radial spreading growth pattern out of the microbubble well. The A375MA2 cell line also has a higher tendency to form multicellular spheroids. The ability to successfully correlate the metastatic potential of cancer cells with their growth characteristics is essential first step toward developing a high-throughput screening assay to identify aggressive tumor cells in primary samples. The capability to culture and recover aggressive cells from microbubble wells will enable identification of candidate metastatic biomarkers which has immense clinical significance. PMID:27620628

  13. Circulating tumor DNA as an early marker of therapeutic response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tie, J.; Kinde, I.; Wang, Y.; Wong, H. L.; Roebert, J.; Christie, M.; Tacey, M.; Wong, R.; Singh, M.; Karapetis, C. S.; Desai, J.; Tran, B.; Strausberg, R. L.; Diaz, L. A.; Papadopoulos, N.; Kinzler, K. W.; Vogelstein, B.; Gibbs, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early indicators of treatment response in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) could conceivably be used to optimize treatment. We explored early changes in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels as a marker of therapeutic efficacy. Patients and methods This prospective study involved 53 mCRC patients receiving standard first-line chemotherapy. Both ctDNA and CEA were assessed in plasma collected before treatment, 3 days after treatment and before cycle 2. Computed tomography (CT) scans were carried out at baseline and 8–10 weeks and were centrally assessed using RECIST v1.1 criteria. Tumors were sequenced using a panel of 15 genes frequently mutated in mCRC to identify candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis. For each patient, one tumor mutation was selected to assess the presence and the level of ctDNA in plasma samples using a digital genomic assay termed Safe-SeqS. Results Candidate mutations for ctDNA analysis were identified in 52 (98.1%) of the tumors. These patient-specific candidate tissue mutations were detectable in the cell-free DNA from the plasma of 48 of these 52 patients (concordance 92.3%). Significant reductions in ctDNA (median 5.7-fold; P < 0.001) levels were observed before cycle 2, which correlated with CT responses at 8–10 weeks (odds ratio = 5.25 with a 10-fold ctDNA reduction; P = 0.016). Major reductions (≥10-fold) versus lesser reductions in ctDNA precycle 2 were associated with a trend for increased progression-free survival (median 14.7 versus 8.1 months; HR = 1.87; P = 0.266). Conclusions ctDNA is detectable in a high proportion of treatment naïve mCRC patients. Early changes in ctDNA during first-line chemotherapy predict the later radiologic response. PMID:25851626

  14. Total enbloc spondylectomy for metastatic high grade spinal tumors: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda S; Nene, Abhay M

    2016-01-01

    Background: High grade metastatic spinal tumors are most common and are invasive. These patients can succumb to disease progression if not treated timely. Although considered as invasive and morbid, total enbloc spondylectomy (TES) in selected cases has better survival rates. The authors describe the results of TES for high grade metastatic spinal tumors. Materials and Methods: Five patients (four females and one male) underwent TES for solitary metastatic vertebral lesion between November 2012 and January 2014. These patients presented to us with spinal instability, unrelenting severe spinal pain and/or with severe progressive radiculopathy. Average age was 46.2 years (range 39–62 years). After complete investigations, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan and positron emission tomography (PET) scan, it was confirmed that these patients had high grade solitary vertebral metastatic tumor. Results: Average duration of followup was 18 months (range 16–20 months). The average preoperative visual analog scale score of 9.4 (range 9–10) improved to 2 (range 1–4) at last followup. Average blood loss was 1440 mL (range 1000–2000 mL). Average duration of surgery was 198 min (range 180–240 min). Significant pain relief was noticed in each patient in the immediate postoperative period and during followups. These patients attained complete functional activities of daily living with in a month. The imaging showed implants in situ, no recurrence of tumor, and no activity on PET scan at the final followup. Conclusion: The present series shows favorable short term results of TES for solitary, metastatic, high grade vertebral body tumors by a team approach. PMID:27512215

  15. Stimulation of Hepatoma Cell Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential by Proteins Secreted From Irradiated Nonparenchymal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Leyuan; Wang Zhiming; Gao Yabo; Wang Lingyan; Zeng Zhaochong

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether factors secreted by irradiated liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) may influence invasiveness and/or metastatic potential of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to elucidate a possible mechanism for such effect. Methods and Materials: Primary rat NPCs were cultured and divided into irradiated (10-Gy X-ray) and nonirradiated groups. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, conditioned medium from irradiated (SR) or nonirradiated (SnonR) cultures were collected and added to sublethally irradiated cultures of the hepatoma McA-RH7777 cell line. Then, hepatoma cells were continuously passaged for eight generations (RH10Gy-SR and RH10Gy-SnonR). The invasiveness and metastatic potential of McA-RH7777, RH10Gy-SnonR, and RH10Gy-SR cells were evaluated using an in vitro gelatinous protein (Matrigel) invasion and an in vivo metastasis assay. In addition, SR and SnonR were tested using rat cytokine antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In vitro gelatinous protein invasion assay indicated that the numbers of invading cells was significantly higher in RH10Gy-SR (40 {+-} 4.74) than in RH10Gy-SnonR (30.6 {+-} 3.85) cells, and lowest in McA-RH7777 (11.4 {+-} 3.56) cells. The same pattern was observed in vivo in a lung metastasis assay, as evaluated by number of metastatic lung nodules seen with RH10Gy-SR (28.83 {+-} 5.38), RH10Gy-SnonR (22.17 {+-} 4.26), and McA-RH7777 (8.3 {+-} 3.8) cells. Rat cytokine antibody arrays and ELISA demonstrated that metastasis-promoting cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6), circulating growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor), and metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were upregulated in SR compared with SnonR. Conclusions: Radiation can increase invasiveness and metastatic potential of sublethally irradiated hepatoma cells, and soluble mediators released from irradiated NPCs promote this potential. Increased secretion of

  16. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  17. Salvage Therapy for Patients With Germ Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Rashdan, Sawsan; Einhorn, Lawrence H

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of cisplatin combination chemotherapy, 40 years ago, transformed metastatic testicular germ cell tumors from an almost uniformly fatal disease into a model for a curable neoplasm. Before the era of platinum combination chemotherapy, the 5-year survival rate among men with metastatic testicular germ cell tumors was 5% to 10%. Currently, the 5-year survival rate is 80% for patients with metastatic disease and 95% overall. Despite the substantial advances in the treatment of germ cell tumors, 20% to 30% of patients will relapse after first-line chemotherapy and will require additional salvage therapies. Standard-dose or high-dose chemotherapy can cure ≤ 50% of these patients. Relapses after high-dose chemotherapy generally carry a poor prognosis; however, cure is still possible in a small percentage of patients by using further salvage chemotherapy or salvage surgery. PMID:27170693

  18. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa masquerading as a salivary gland neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Ranjini; Nayal, Bhavna; Kantipudi, Swarna; Ray, Satadru

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the oral cavity is a rare occurrence with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) being the third most common tumor to metastasize to this location. Buccal mucosa is rarely involved and in the absence of a known primary, such lesions pose a diagnostic challenge to the pathologist. The histomorphological features may mimic a primary salivary gland neoplasm adding to the dilemma. We present one such case of metastatic RCC of the buccal mucosa.

  19. Alvespimycin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-09

    and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  20. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  1. Vaccine Therapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Adults With Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-19

    Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  2. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of metastatic transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dey, Pranab; Amir, Thasneem; Jogai, Sanjay; Al Jussar, Aisha

    2005-04-01

    In this article we described the fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of five cases of metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). There were four cases of metastatic lymph nodes and one case of metastatic skin lesion. All of the TCC cases were primarily in the urinary bladder and were high grade on histopathology (grade 3). Three cases showed bladder muscle involvement and two cases showed superficial TCC at the time of primary diagnosis. FNAC smears showed abundant cellularity. The cells were present in discrete and small syncytial clusters. Nuclear position of the cell was central to eccentric. Many cells showed prominent nucleoli. Cercariform cells (CCs) were noted in four cases. These cells are malignant cells with a nucleated globular body and a unipolar nontapering cytoplasmic process. Two cases showed intranuclear inclusions. Prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles were noted in three cases. In addition, cell cannibalism and attempted pearl formations were noted in two cases.In conclusion, clinical history along with the certain cytological features such as the presence of CCs, cells with eccentric nuclei, and intranuclear inclusions are helpful to diagnose metastatic TCC on FNAC material. PMID:15754372

  3. Acute cholecystitis or metastatic renal cell carcinoma? a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, L H; Coffman, L M

    1996-05-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is known to metastasize to many different organ systems. Lung and bone are clearly the most common sites of metastasis, but the symptoms at presentation may simulate those of other diseases of the organ system involved. The patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma described here had symptoms of acute cholecystitis.

  4. Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  5. Metastatic testicular tumor presenting as a scrotal hydrocele: An initial manifestation of pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    KIM, YEON WOOK; KIM, JIN WON; KIM, JEE-HYUN; LEE, JUNGSIL; LEE, EUIJAE; KIM, MOON YOUNG; YANG, HYUN KYUNG; CHANG, HYUN

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma involving the testis is a rare condition with a poor prognosis. The current study describes the case of a 69-year-old male who presented with a painful swelling of the left scrotum. Scrotal ultrasonography revealed hydroceles in the scrotal sacs, with the left one being larger in size. The patient underwent left hydrocelectomy and was eventually diagnosed with metastatic adenocarcinoma. Abdominal computed tomography, which was performed to detect the primary cancer, showed a pancreatic tail carcinoma with liver and multiple lymph node metastases, and peritoneal carcinomatosis. The patient received gemcitabine-based chemotherapy but resulted in progressive disease. This case shows that in a patient in whom a primary testicular tumor is unusual due to their age, a testicular mass or hydrocele should be a suspect for possible metastatic disease. PMID:24932235

  6. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies.

  7. Interstitial laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Daniel; Joshi, Chet; Wolf, Roman F.; Walla, Jonny; Goddard, Jessica; Martin, Mallory; Kosanke, Stanley D.; Broach, Fred S.; Pontius, Sean; Brown, Destiny; Li, Xiaosong; Howard, Eric; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2011-03-01

    Thermal therapy has been used for cancer treatment for more than a century. While thermal effect can be direct, immediate, and controllable, it is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors, particularly when tumors have metastasized locally or to the distant sites. Metastases are the major cause of treatment failure and cancer deaths. Current available therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, only have limited curative effects in patients with late-stage, metastatic cancers. Immunotherapy has been considered as the ultimate approach for cancer treatment since a systemic, anti-tumor, immunological response can be induced. Using the combination of photothermal therapy and immunotherapy, laser immunotherapy (LIT),a novel immunotherapy modality for late-stage cancer treatment, has been developed. LIT has shown great promise in pre-clinical studies and clinical breast cancer and melanoma pilot trials. However, the skin color and the depth of the tumor have been challenges for effective treatment with LIT. To induce a thermal destruction zone of appropriate size without causing thermal damage on the skin, we have developed interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) using a cylindrical diffuser. To determine the effectiveness of ILIT, we treated the DMBA-4 metastatic tumors in rats. The thermal damage in tumor tissue was studied using TTC immersion and hematoxolin and eosin (H & E) staining. Also observed was the overall survival of the treated animals. Our results demonstrated that the ILIT could impact a much larger tumor area, and it significantly reduced the surface damage compared with the early version of non-invasive LIT. The survival data also indicate that ILIT has the potential to become an effective tool for the treatment of deeper, larger, and metastatic tumors, with reduced side effects.

  8. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  9. Ablation techniques for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J; Willatt, Jonathon; Majdalany, Bill S; Kielar, Ania Z; Chong, Suzanne; Ruma, Julie A; Pandya, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Ablative treatment methods have emerged as safe and effective therapies for patients with primary and secondary liver tumors who are not surgical candidates at the time of diagnosis. This article reviews the current literature and describes the techniques, complications and results for radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation. PMID:26839642

  10. β-Actin-binding Complementarity-determining Region 2 of Variable Heavy Chain from Monoclonal Antibody C7 Induces Apoptosis in Several Human Tumor Cells and Is Protective against Metastatic Melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Denise C.; Santos, Luana C. P.; Melo, Filipe M.; Pereira, Felipe V.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Mortara, Renato A.; Juliano, Maria A.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2012-01-01

    Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) from monoclonal antibodies tested as synthetic peptides display anti-infective and antitumor activities, independent of the specificity of the native antibody. Previously, we have shown that the synthetic peptide C7H2, based on the heavy chain CDR 2 from monoclonal antibody C7, a mAb directed to a mannoprotein of Candida albicans, significantly reduced B16F10 melanoma growth and lung colony formation by triggering tumor apoptosis. The mechanism, however, by which C7H2 induced apoptosis in tumor cells remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that C7H2 interacts with components of the tumor cells cytoskeleton, being rapidly internalized after binding to the tumor cell surface. Mass spectrometry analysis and in vitro validation revealed that β-actin is the receptor of C7H2 in the tumor cells. C7H2 induces β-actin polymerization and F-actin stabilization, linked with abundant generation of superoxide anions and apoptosis. Major phenotypes following peptide binding were chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, annexin V binding, lamin disruption, caspase 8 and 3 activation, and organelle alterations. Finally, we evaluated the cytotoxic efficacy of C7H2 in a panel of human tumor cell lines. All tumor cell lines studied were equally susceptible to C7H2 in vitro. The C7H2 amide without further derivatization significantly reduced lung metastasis of mice endovenously challenged with B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells. No significant cytotoxicity was observed toward nontumorigenic cell lines on short incubation in vitro or in naïve mice injected with a high dose of the peptide. We believe that C7H2 is a promising peptide to be developed as an anticancer drug. PMID:22334655

  11. Biomechanics of vertebral level, geometry, and transcortical tumors in the metastatic spine.

    PubMed

    Tschirhart, Craig E; Finkelstein, Joel A; Whyne, Cari M

    2007-01-01

    Metastatic involvement can disrupt the mechanical integrity of the spine, rendering vertebrae susceptible to burst fracture and neurologic damage. Fracture risk assessment for patients with spinal metastases is important in considering prophylactic treatment options. Stability of thoracic vertebrae affected by metastatic disease has been shown to be dependent on tumor size and bone density, but additional structural and geometric factors may also play a role in fracture risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use parametric finite element modeling to determine the effects of vertebral level, geometry, and metastatic compromise to the cortical shell on the risk of burst fracture in the thoracic spine. Analysis of vertebral level and geometry was assessed by investigation of seven scenarios ranging in geometry from T2-T4 to T10-T12. The effects of cortical shell compromised were assessed by comparison of four transcortical scenarios to a fully contained central vertebral body tumor scenario. Results demonstrated that upper thoracic vertebrae are at greater risk of burst fracture and that kyphotic motion segments are at decreased risk of burst fracture. Vertebrae with transcortical lesions are up to 30% less likely to lead to burst fracture initiation. The findings of this study are important for improving the understanding of burst fracture mechanics in metastatically involved vertebrae and guiding future modeling efforts.

  12. Synergistic antitumor responses by combined GITR activation and sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nengwang; Fu, Shuai; Xu, Zhonghua; Liu, Yi; Hao, Junwen; Zhang, Aimin; Wang, Baocheng

    2016-01-15

    Sunitinib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for renal and gastrointestinal cancers. In view of its well-documented proapoptotic and immunoadjuvant properties, we speculate that combination of Sunitinib and immunotherapy would provide a synergistic antitumor effect. Here, we report that a remarkably synergistic antitumor responses elicited by the combined treatment of Sunitinib and an agonistic antibody against glucocorticoid-induced TNFR related protein (GITR) in a model of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Sunitinib significantly increased the infiltration, activation, and proliferation and/or cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells and NK cells in liver metastatic foci when combined with the anti (α)-GITR agonist, which was associated with treatment-induced prominent upregulation of Th1-biased immune genes in the livers from mice receiving combined therapy versus single treatment. Sunitinib/α-GITR treatment also markedly promoted the maturation, activation and cytokine production of liver-resident macrophages and DCs compared with that achieved by α-GITR or Sunitinib treatment alone in mice. Cell depletion experiments demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells, NK cells and macrophage infiltrating liver metastatic foci all contribute to the antitumor effect induced by combined treatment. Furthermore, mechanistic investigation revealed that Sunitinib treatment reprograms tumor-associated macrophages toward classically activated or "M1" polarization upon GITR stimulation and consequently mounts an antitumor CD8(+) T and NK cell response via inhibiting STAT3 activity. Thus, our findings provide a proof of concept that Sunitinib can synergize with α-GITR treatment to remodel the tumor immune microenvironment to trigger regressions of an established metastatic cancer. PMID:26239999

  13. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells can be detected from the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Their prognostic value has been established in the last 10 years for metastatic colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer. On the contrary their presence in patients affected by sarcomas has been poorly investigated. The discovery of EpCAM mRNA expression in different sarcoma cell lines and in a small cohort of metastatic sarcoma patients supports further investigations on these rare tumors to deepen the importance of CTC isolation. Although it is not clear whether EpCAM expression might be originally present on tumor sarcoma cells or acquired during the mesenchymal-epithelial transition, the discovery of EpCAM on circulating sarcoma cells opens a new scenario in CTC detection in patients affected by a rare mesenchymal tumor. PMID:26167450

  14. Subtractive Cell-SELEX Selection of DNA Aptamers Binding Specifically and Selectively to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with High Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Yang, Yi-Fei; Yin, Chang-Qing; Guan, Qing; Wang, Fu-Bing; Tu, Jian-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Relapse and metastasis are two key risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) prognosis; thus, it is emergent to develop an early and accurate detection method for prognostic evaluation of HCC after surgery. In this study, we sought to acquire oligonucleotide DNA aptamers that specifically bind to HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Two HCC cell lines derived from the same genetic background but with different metastatic potential were employed: MHCC97L (low metastatic properties) as subtractive targets and HCCLM9 (high metastatic properties) as screening targets. To mimic a fluid combining environment, initial DNA aptamers library was firstly labelled with magnetic nanoparticles using biotin-streptavidin system and then applied for aptamers selection. Through 10-round selection with subtractive Cell-SELEX, six aptamers, LY-1, LY-13, LY-46, LY-32, LY-27/45, and LY-7/43, display high affinity to HCCLM9 cells and do not bind to MHCC97L cells, as well as other tumor cell lines, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colon adenocarcinoma, gastric cancer, and cervical cancer, suggesting high specificity for HCCLM9 cells. Thus, the aptamers generated here will provide solid basis for identifying new diagnostic targets to detect HCC metastasis and also may provide valuable clues for developing new targeted therapeutics. PMID:27119081

  15. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  16. [Role of the voltage-gated sodium channels in the metastatic capacity of cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Plata, Everardo

    2012-01-01

    The functional expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(v)) in cancer cells is associated with an increase of metastatic potential. The activity of Na(v) channels modulates different cellular processes related to the development of the malignant phenotype, such as adhesion, galvanotaxis, motility and invasiveness. Among the great diversity of cancerous phenotypes, Na(v) channels expression is common in highly metastatic cells with their distribution following a primary tumor-specific pattern. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature, regarding to: the types of Na(v) channels expressed by different types of cancer cells, the cancer cellular processes in which they play important roles, and the molecular mechanisms by which these channels promote metastasis.

  17. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  18. Matrix Rigidity Induces Osteolytic Gene Expression of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Martin, T. John; Sterling, Julie A.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 70% of breast cancer patients with advanced disease will develop bone metastases. Once established in bone, tumor cells produce factors that cause changes in normal bone remodeling, such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). While enhanced expression of PTHrP is known to stimulate osteoclasts to resorb bone, the environmental factors driving tumor cells to express PTHrP in the early stages of development of metastatic bone disease are unknown. In this study, we have shown that tumor cells known to metastasize to bone respond to 2D substrates with rigidities comparable to that of the bone microenvironment by increasing expression and production of PTHrP. The cellular response is regulated by Rho-dependent actomyosin contractility mediated by TGF-ß signaling. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) using both pharmacological and genetic approaches decreased PTHrP expression. Furthermore, cells expressing a dominant negative form of the TGF-ß receptor did not respond to substrate rigidity, and inhibition of ROCK decreased PTHrP expression induced by exogenous TGF-ß. These observations suggest a role for the differential rigidity of the mineralized bone microenvironment in early stages of tumor-induced osteolysis, which is especially important in metastatic cancer since many cancers (such as those of the breast and lung) preferentially metastasize to bone. PMID:21085597

  19. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology. PMID:23980681

  20. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  1. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  2. Signaling between tumor cells and the host bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Natasa; Croucher, Peter I; McDonald, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells with high skeletal homing affinity express numerous cell surface receptors that bind ligands produced in bone. Upon arrival, these cells survive in the host environment, encompassed in close proximity to bone marrow cells. Interactions between tumor cells and cells of the host microenvironment are essential to not only tumor cell survival but also their activation and proliferation into environment-modifying tumors. Through the production of RANKL, PTHrP, cytokines, and integrins, activated tumor cells stimulate osteoclastogenesis, enhance bone resorption, and subsequently release matrix-bound proteins that further promote tumor growth and bone resorption. In addition, alterations in the TGF-β/BMP and Wnt signaling pathways via tumor cell growth can either stimulate or suppress osteoblastic bone formation and function, leading to sclerotic or lytic bone disease, respectively. Hence, the presence of tumor cells in bone dysregulates bone remodeling, dramatically impairing skeletal integrity. Furthermore, through complex mechanisms, cells of the immune system interact with tumor cells to further impact bone remodeling. Lastly, with alterations in bone cell activity, the environment is permissive to promoting tumor growth further, suggesting an interdependence between tumor cells and bone cells in metastatic bone disease and multiple myeloma.

  3. Metastatic extra-abdominal presentation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in a young Hispanic male: a case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Anna; Paulo-Malave, Liza; Alayon-Laguer, Diogenes; Baez, Luis; Conde, Daniel; William, Caceres

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the medical history and management of a 44-year-old Hispanic male with metastatic extra-abdominal gastrointestinal stromal tumor including a literature review on this rare clinical presentation.

  4. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  5. The initial hours of metastasis: the importance of cooperative host-tumor cell interactions during hematogenous dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Labelle, Myriam; Hynes, Richard O.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cells transit from the primary tumor via the blood circulation to form metastases in distant organs. During this process, tumor cells encounter a number of environmental challenges and stimuli that profoundly impact their metastatic potential. Here, we review the cooperative and dynamic host-tumor cell interactions that support and promote the hematogenous dissemination of cancer cells to sites of distant metastasis. In particular, we discuss what is known about the crosstalk occurring among tumor cells, platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells and how these cell-cell interactions are organized both temporally and spatially at sites of extravasation and in the early metastatic niche. PMID:23166151

  6. Her-2 overexpression increases the metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Herring, Jeanne M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Weil, Robert J; Stark, Andreas M; Kurek, Raffael; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Halverson, Douglas; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Steinberg, Seth M; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2007-05-01

    Retrospective studies of breast cancer patients suggest that primary tumor Her-2 overexpression or trastuzumab therapy is associated with a devastating complication: the development of central nervous system (brain) metastases. Herein, we present Her-2 expression trends from resected human brain metastases and data from an experimental brain metastasis assay, both indicative of a functional contribution of Her-2 to brain metastatic colonization. Of 124 archival resected brain metastases from breast cancer patients, 36.2% overexpressed Her-2, indicating an enrichment in the frequency of tumor Her-2 overexpression at this metastatic site. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser capture microdissected epithelial cells, Her-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in a cohort of 12 frozen brain metastases were increased up to 5- and 9-fold, respectively, over those of Her-2-amplified primary tumors. Co-overexpression of Her-2 and EGFR was also observed in a subset of brain metastases. We then tested the hypothesis that overexpression of Her-2 increases the colonization of breast cancer cells in the brain in vivo. A subclone of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells that selectively metastasizes to brain (231-BR) overexpressed EGFR; 231-BR cells were transfected with low (4- to 8-fold) or high (22- to 28-fold) levels of Her-2. In vivo, in a model of brain metastasis, low or high Her-2-overexpressing 231-BR clones produced comparable numbers of micrometastases in the brain as control transfectants; however, the Her-2 transfectants yielded 3-fold greater large metastases (>50 microm(2); P < 0.001). Our data indicate that Her-2 overexpression increases the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in the brain in this model system. PMID:17483330

  7. [Systemic therapy of metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Maute, Luise; Bergmann, Lothar

    2016-04-01

    In metastatic ccRCC , the treatment options in 1st line treatment are still the tyrosinkinase inhibitors (TKI) pazopanib and sunitinib, for patients with low or intermediate risk additionally IFNα/bevacizumab and for high risk patients the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. In 2nd line following cytokine therapy, axitinib or pazopanib and following TKI /VEGF directed therapy axitinib or everolimus may be administered. New upcoming agents in RCC are the PD1 antibody nivolumab and the multikinase inhibitor Cabozantinib, which both showed an OS advantage compared to everolimus. After marketing authorization in Europe, these agents should therefore be preferred in 2nd and 3rd line therapy. Further agents are under investigation. PMID:27031198

  8. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  9. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  10. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  11. The Enhanced Metastatic Potential of Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Cells with Sorafenib Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Ariel Ka-Man; Ng, Lui; Lam, Colin Siu-Chi; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Wan, Timothy Ming-Hun; Cheng, Nathan Shiu-Man; Yau, Thomas Chung-Cheung; Poon, Ronnie Tung-Ping; Pang, Roberta Wen-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Acquired resistance towards sorafenib treatment was found in HCC patients, which results in poor prognosis. To investigate the enhanced metastatic potential of sorafenib resistance cells, sorafenib-resistant (SorR) cell lines were established by long-term exposure of the HCC cells to the maximum tolerated dose of sorafenib. Cell proliferation assay and qPCR of ABC transporter genes (ABCC1-3) were first performed to confirm the resistance of cells. Migration and invasion assays, and immunoblotting analysis on the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) regulatory proteins were performed to study the metastatic potential of SorR cells. The expression of CD44 and CD133 were studied by flow cytometry and the gene expressions of pluripotency factors were studied by qPCR to demonstrate the enrichment of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in SorR cells. Control (CTL) and SorR cells were also injected orthotopically to the livers of NOD-SCID mice to investigate the development of lung metastasis. Increased expressions of ABCC1-3 were found in SorR cells. Enhanced migratory and invasive abilities of SorR cells were observed. The changes in expression of EMT regulatory proteins demonstrated an activation of the EMT process in SorR cells. Enriched proportion of CD44+ and CD44+CD133+ cells were also observed in SorR cells. All (8/8) mice injected with SorR cells demonstrated lung metastasis whereas only 1/8 mouse injected with CTL cells showed lung metastasis. HCC cells with sorafenib resistance demonstrated a higher metastatic potential, which may be due to the activated EMT process. Enriched CSCs were also demonstrated in the sorafenib resistant cells. This study suggests that advanced HCC patients with acquired sorafenib resistance may have enhanced tumor growth or distant metastasis, which raises the concern of long-term sorafenib treatment in advanced HCC patients who have developed resistance of sorafenib. PMID:24244338

  12. Comparison of assay methods for detection of circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer: AdnaGen AdnaTest BreastCancer Select/Detect™ versus Veridex CellSearch™ system.

    PubMed

    Andreopoulou, E; Yang, L-Y; Rangel, K M; Reuben, J M; Hsu, L; Krishnamurthy, S; Valero, V; Fritsche, H A; Cristofanilli, M

    2012-04-01

    The detection of CTCs prior to and during therapy is an independent and strong prognostic marker, and it is predictive of poor treatment outcome. A major challenge is that different technologies are available for isolation and characterization of CTCs in peripheral blood (PB). We compare the CellSearch system and AdnaTest BreastCancer Select/Detect, to evaluate the extent that these assays differ in their ability to detect CTCs in the PB of MBC patients. CTCs in 7.5 ml of PB were isolated and enumerated using the CellSearch, before new treatment. Two cutoff values of ≥2 and ≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml were used. AdnaTest requires 5 ml of PB to detect gene transcripts of tumor markers (GA733-2, MUC-1, and HER2) by RT-PCR. AdnaTest was scored positive if ≥1 of the transcript PCR products for the 3 markers were detected at a concentration ≥0.15 ng/μl. A total of 55 MBC patients were enrolled. 26 (47%) patients were positive for CTCs by the CellSearch (≥2 cutoff), while 20 (36%) were positive (≥5 cutoff). AdnaTest was positive in 29 (53%) with the individual markers being positive in 18% (GA733-2), 44% (MUC-1), and 35% (HER2). Overall positive agreement was 73% for CTC≥2 and 69% for CTC≥5. These preliminary data suggest that the AdnaTest has equivalent sensitivity to that of the CellSearch system in detecting 2 or more CTCs. While there is concordance between these 2 methods, the AdnaTest complements the CellSearch system by improving the overall CTC detection rate and permitting the assessment of genomic markers in CTCs.

  13. Proteome characterization of melanoma exosomes reveals a specific signature for metastatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Ikrame; Clement, Emily; Ducoux-Petit, Manuelle; Denat, Laurence; Soldan, Vanessa; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Balor, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Larue, Lionel; Muller, Catherine; Nieto, Laurence

    2015-07-01

    Exosomes are important mediators in cell-to-cell communication and, recently, their role in melanoma progression has been brought to light. Here, we characterized exosomes secreted by seven melanoma cell lines with varying degrees of aggressivity. Extensive proteomic analysis of their exosomes confirmed the presence of characteristic exosomal markers as well as melanoma-specific antigens and oncogenic proteins. Importantly, the protein composition differed among exosomes from different lines. Exosomes from aggressive cells contained specific proteins involved in cell motility, angiogenesis, and immune response, while these proteins were less abundant or absent in exosomes from less aggressive cells. Interestingly, when exposed to exosomes from metastatic lines, less aggressive cells increased their migratory capacities, likely due to transfer of pro-migratory exosomal proteins to recipient cells. Hence, this study shows that the specific protein composition of melanoma exosomes depends on the cells' aggressivity and suggests that exosomes influence the behavior of other tumor cells and their microenvironment.

  14. Inhibition of primary and metastatic tumors in mice by E-selectin-targeted polymer-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Raviv, Lior; Golan, Moran; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N; David, Ayelet

    2015-11-10

    There is currently no effective means to prevent or control metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. E-selectin, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively on inflamed and angiogenic blood vessels, plays an important role in several rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis. In this study, we assessed the in vivo antitumor efficacy of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers conjugated to an E-selectin binding peptide (Esbp, DITWDQLWDLMK) and equipped with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (P-(Esbp)-DOX) or with the proapoptotic peptide D(KLAKLAK)2 (P-(Esbp)-KLAK). Following a single intravenous injection, P-(Esbp)-DOX reduced tumor growth rate and prolonged the survival of mice bearing primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors significantly more than treatment with a non-targeted copolymer (P-DOX) or with free DOX. In an experimental B16-F10 lung metastasis model, a single intravenous dose of P-(Esbp)-DOX or P-(Esbp)-KLAK prolonged mice survival time significantly more than the non-targeted copolymers or the free drugs, and the percentage of complete tumor regression increased with increasing doses and with dosing frequency. In addition, mice pretreated with an E-selectin-targeted "drug-free" copolymer (P-(Esbp)-FITC) exhibited significantly fewer B16-F10 tumor foci in the lungs as compared with non-treated mice, demonstrating the anti-metastatic properties of the copolymer and its ability to control cancer spread through E-selectin-mediated interactions. Biodistribution analysis further confirmed the preferential accumulation of the E-selectin-targeted near-infrared fluorescently-labeled copolymer P-(Esbp)-IR783 in B16-F10 lung metastases. Taken together, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that the E-selectin targeted copolymer-drug conjugates can inhibit primary tumor growth and prevent metastases in vivo. PMID:26297207

  15. Inhibition of primary and metastatic tumors in mice by E-selectin-targeted polymer-drug conjugates.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Raviv, Lior; Golan, Moran; Voronov, Elena; Apte, Ron N; David, Ayelet

    2015-11-10

    There is currently no effective means to prevent or control metastatic dissemination of cancer cells. E-selectin, an adhesion molecule expressed exclusively on inflamed and angiogenic blood vessels, plays an important role in several rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis. In this study, we assessed the in vivo antitumor efficacy of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers conjugated to an E-selectin binding peptide (Esbp, DITWDQLWDLMK) and equipped with the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (P-(Esbp)-DOX) or with the proapoptotic peptide D(KLAKLAK)2 (P-(Esbp)-KLAK). Following a single intravenous injection, P-(Esbp)-DOX reduced tumor growth rate and prolonged the survival of mice bearing primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors significantly more than treatment with a non-targeted copolymer (P-DOX) or with free DOX. In an experimental B16-F10 lung metastasis model, a single intravenous dose of P-(Esbp)-DOX or P-(Esbp)-KLAK prolonged mice survival time significantly more than the non-targeted copolymers or the free drugs, and the percentage of complete tumor regression increased with increasing doses and with dosing frequency. In addition, mice pretreated with an E-selectin-targeted "drug-free" copolymer (P-(Esbp)-FITC) exhibited significantly fewer B16-F10 tumor foci in the lungs as compared with non-treated mice, demonstrating the anti-metastatic properties of the copolymer and its ability to control cancer spread through E-selectin-mediated interactions. Biodistribution analysis further confirmed the preferential accumulation of the E-selectin-targeted near-infrared fluorescently-labeled copolymer P-(Esbp)-IR783 in B16-F10 lung metastases. Taken together, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that the E-selectin targeted copolymer-drug conjugates can inhibit primary tumor growth and prevent metastases in vivo.

  16. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  17. Vorinostat in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Solid Tumors and HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-11

    HIV Infection; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Metastatic dormancy: a complex network between cancer stem cells and their microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bleau, Anne-Marie; Agliano, Alice; Larzabal, Leyre; de Aberasturi, Arrate Lopez; Calvo, Alfonso

    2014-12-01

    Metastasis represents the major threat of cancer progression and generally emerges years after the detection of the primary tumor. An important rate-limiting step resides in cellular dormancy, where a disseminated tumor cell remains in a quiescent state at a remote organ. Herein we review the molecular mechanisms leading to tumor dormancy, mainly in regards to cellular quiescence and the tumor microenvironment. Based on the current published literature, we provide evidence that links the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory with dormancy and metastasis. Once a disseminated tumor cell reaches a target tissue, a tight regulation imposed by the foreign microenvironment will dictate the fate of these cells, which implies a balance in the secretion of soluble factors, modulation of the extracellular matrix and the angiogenic switch. We investigate thoroughly whether the CSC theory could also apply to metastasis initiation. In fact, the resistance of CSCs to therapy, leading to the minimal residual disease and cellular quiescence phenotypes, predisposes for the development of metastases. Finally, we describe the new technologies available for the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), as well as their clinical relevance in dormancy of metastatic cancer patients. PMID:24887025

  19. Metastatic cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma shows frequent deletion in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D gene.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sally R; Harwood, Catherine A; Purdie, Karin J; Gulati, Abha; Matin, Rubeta N; Romanowska, Malgorzata; Cerio, Rino; Kelsell, David P; Leigh, Irene M; Proby, Charlotte M

    2012-08-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), and its incidence is increasing rapidly. Metastatic cSCC accounts for the majority of deaths associated with NMSC, but the genetic basis for cSCC progression remains poorly understood. A previous study identified small deletions (typically <1 Mb) in the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Type D (PTPRD) gene that segregated with more aggressive cSCC. To investigate the apparent association between deletion within PTPRD and cSCC metastasis, a series of 74 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors from 31 patients was analyzed using a custom Illumina 384 SNP microarray. Deletions were found in 37% of patients with metastatic cSCC and were strongly associated with metastatic tumors when compared to those that had not metastasized (p = 0.007). Subsequent mutation analysis revealed a higher mutation rate for PTPRD than has been reported in any other cancer type, with 37% of tumors harboring a somatic mutation. Conversely, bisulfite sequencing showed that methylation was not a mechanism of PTPRD disruption in cSCC. This is the first report to observe an association between deletion within PTPRD and metastatic disease and highlights the potential use of these deletions as a diagnostic biomarker for tumor progression. Combined with the high mutation rate observed in our study, PTPRD is one of the most commonly altered genes in cSCC and warrants further investigation to determine its significance for metastasis in other tumor types.

  20. A Novel Nanoprobe for Multimodal Imaging Is Effectively Incorporated into Human Melanoma Metastatic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Aasen, Synnøve Nymark; Pospisilova, Aneta; Eichler, Tilo Wolf; Panek, Jiri; Hruby, Martin; Stepanek, Petr; Spriet, Endy; Jirak, Daniel; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Thorsen, Frits

    2015-01-01

    To facilitate efficient drug delivery to tumor tissue, several nanomaterials have been designed, with combined diagnostic and therapeutic properties. In this work, we carried out fundamental in vitro and in vivo experiments to assess the labeling efficacy of our novel theranostic nanoprobe, consisting of glycogen conjugated with a red fluorescent probe and gadolinium. Microscopy and resazurin viability assays were used to study cell labeling and cell viability in human metastatic melanoma cell lines. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (FLCS) was done to investigate nanoprobe stability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to study T1 relaxivity in vitro, and contrast enhancement in a subcutaneous in vivo tumor model. Efficient cell labeling was demonstrated, while cell viability, cell migration, and cell growth was not affected. FLCS showed that the nanoprobe did not degrade in blood plasma. MRI demonstrated that down to 750 cells/μL of labeled cells in agar phantoms could be detected. In vivo MRI showed that contrast enhancement in tumors was comparable between Omniscan contrast agent and the nanoprobe. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that a non-toxic glycogen-based nanoprobe may effectively visualize tumor cells and tissue, and, in future experiments, we will investigate its therapeutic potential by conjugating therapeutic compounds to the nanoprobe. PMID:26370983

  1. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge. PMID:21470128

  2. Metastatic cancer stem cells: new molecular targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Leirós, G J; Balañá, M E

    2011-11-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, predicts that a small subpopulation of cancer cells that possess "stem-like" characteristics, are responsible for initiating and maintaining cancer growth. According to the CSC model the many cell populations found in a tumour might represent diverse stages of differentiation. From the cellular point of view metastasis is considered a highly inefficient process and only a subset of tumour cells is capable of successfully traversing the entire metastatic cascade and eventually re-initiates tumour growth at distant sites. Some similar features of both normal and malignant stem cells suggest that CSCs are not only responsible for tumorigenesis, but also for metastases. The CSC theory proposes that the ability of a tumour to metastasize is an inherent property of a subset of CSCs. The similar biological characteristics shared by normal stem cells (NSCs) and CSCs mainly implicate self-renewal and differentiation potential, survival ability, niche-specific microenvironment requirements and specific homing to metastatic sites and may have important implications in terms of new approaches to cancer therapy in the metastatic setting. There are several agents targeting many of these CSC features that have shown to be effective both in vitro and in vivo. Although clinical trials results are still preliminary and continue under investigation, these new therapies are very promising. The identification of new therapeutic targets and drugs based on CSC model constitutes a great challenge.

  3. [Combined use of lentinan with X-ray therapy in an experimental mouse tumor system (Part 3). Combined effect on metastatic tumors].

    PubMed

    Shiio, T; Ohishi, K; Niitsu, I; Hayashibara, H; Tsuchiya, Y; Yoshihama, T; Moriyuki, H

    1988-03-01

    Combination effect of lentinan with X-ray irradiation on the metastatic mouse tumors, L1210, KLN205 and Lewis lung carcinoma were studied. Combination use of lentinan with X-ray therapy prolonged the life of BDF1 mice bearing L1210 leukemia in the suitable combination conditions. Combination effects of lentinan with X-ray therapy were also observed on the suppression of the growth of KLN205 squamous cell carcinoma and on the suppression of the metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma. Especially, in the case that lentinan was administered before or after X-ray local irradiation in the pulmonary metastasis system of Lewis lung carcinoma, a marked suppression of pulmonary metastasis was observed and 2 to 4 mice among 8 tested mice were tumor free.

  4. Identification of VEGF-regulated genes associated with increased lung metastatic potential: functional involvement of tenascin-C in tumor growth and lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, A; Catena, R; Noble, MS; Carbott, D; Gil-Bazo, I; Gonzalez-Moreno, O; Huh, J-I; Sharp, R; Qiu, T-H; Anver, MR; Merlino, G; Dickson, RB; Johnson, MD; Green, JE

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in patients with breast cancer. Overexpression of c-myc in humans correlates with metastases, but transgenic mice only show low rates of micrometastases. We have generated transgenic mice that overexpress both c-myc and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (Myc/VEGF) in the mammary gland, which develop high rates of pulmonary macrometastases. Gene expression profiling revealed a set of deregulated genes in Myc/VEGF tumors compared to Myc tumors associated with the increased metastatic phenotype. Cross-comparisons between this set of genes with a human breast cancer lung metastasis gene signature identified five common targets: tenascin-C (TNC), matrix metalloprotease-2, collagen-6-A1, mannosidase-α-1A and HLA-DPA1. Signaling blockade or knockdown of TNC in MDA-MB-435 cells resulted in a significant impairment of cell migration and anchorage-independent cell proliferation. Mice injected with clonal MDA-MB-435 cells with reduced expression of TNC demonstrated a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in (1) primary tumor growth; (2) tumor relapse after surgical removal of the primary tumor and (3) incidence of lung metastasis. Our results demonstrate that VEGF induces complex alterations in tissue architecture and gene expression. The TNC signaling pathway plays an important role in mammary tumor growth and metastases, suggesting that TNC may be a relevant target for therapy against metastatic breast cancer. PMID:18504437

  5. InCVAX - A novel strategy for treatment of late-stage, metastatic cancers through photoimmunotherapy induced tumor-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feifan; Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E.; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Du, Nan; Shi, Lei; Wang, Xiuli; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, promising potential cancer vaccine strategy was proposed to use a two-injection procedure for solid tumors to prompt the immune system to identify and systemically eliminate the primary and metastatic cancers. The two-injection procedure consists of local photothermal application on a selected tumor intended to liberate whole cell tumor antigens, followed by a local injection of an immunoadjuvant that consists of a semi-synthetic functionalized glucosamine polymer, N-dihydro-galacto-chitosan (GC), which is intended to activate antigen presenting cells and facilitate an increased uptake of tumor antigens. This strategy is thus proposed as an in situ autologous cancer vaccine (inCVAX) that may activate antigen presenting cells and expose them to tumor antigens in situ, with the intention of inducing a systemic tumor specific T-cell response. Here, the development of inCVAX for the treatment of metastatic cancers in the past decades are systematically reviewed. The antitumor immune responses of local photothermal treatment and immunological stimulation with GC are also discussed. This treatment approach is also commonly referred to as laser immunotherapy (LIT). PMID:25633839

  6. Reassessing the need for primary tumor surgery in unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer: overview and perspective.

    PubMed

    Poultsides, George A; Paty, Phillip B

    2011-01-01

    In the absence of symptoms, primary tumor resection in patients who present with unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer is of uncertain benefit. Prophylactic surgery has been traditionally considered in this setting in order to prevent subsequent complications of perforation, obstruction, or bleeding later during the treatment course, which may require urgent surgery associated with higher mortality. However, recent data have called into question the efficacy of this upfront surgical strategy. We provide a brief overview of how current combinations of systemic chemotherapy including fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and targeted biologic agents have allowed improved local (in addition to distant) tumor control, significantly decreasing the incidence of late primary-related complications requiring surgery from roughly 20% in the era of single-agent fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy to almost 7% in the era of modern triple-drug chemotherapy. In addition, we attempt to highlight those factors most associated with subsequent primary tumor-related complications in an effort to identify the subset of patients with synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer who might benefit from a surgery-first approach. Finally, we discuss modern nonsurgical options available for palliation of the primary colorectal tumor and review the outcome of patients for which emergent surgery is eventually required to address primary-related symptoms. PMID:21789154

  7. Busulfan, Melphalan, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and a Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed Solid Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Solid Tumor; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Brain Stem Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebellar Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Cerebral Astrocytoma; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Pineoblastoma; Recurrent Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway and Hypothalamic Glioma; Recurrent Childhood Visual Pathway Glioma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Extragonadal Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Electrotransfer of Plasmid DNA Encoding an Anti-Mouse Endoglin (CD105) shRNA to B16 Melanoma Tumors with Low and High Metastatic Potential Results in Pronounced Anti-Tumor Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dolinsek, Tanja; Sersa, Gregor; Prosen, Lara; Bosnjak, Masa; Stimac, Monika; Razborsek, Urska; Cemazar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Endoglin overexpression is associated with highly proliferative tumor endothelium and also with some tumors, including melanoma. Its targeting has anti-tumor effectiveness, which can also be obtained by RNA interference. The aim of our study was to explore the anti-tumor effectiveness of endoglin silencing by electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding short hairpin RNA against endoglin in two murine B16 melanoma variants with different metastatic potential on cells, spheroids and subcutaneous tumors in mice. The results demonstrate that endoglin silencing with gene electrotransfer reduces the proliferation, survival and migration of melanoma cells and also has anti-tumor effectiveness, as the therapy resulted in a high percentage of tumor cures (23% and 58% on B16F1 and B16F10 tumors, respectively). The effectiveness of the therapy correlated with endoglin expression in melanoma cells; in vitro the effects were more pronounced in B16F1 cells, which express more endoglin than B16F10. However, the opposite was observed in vivo in tumors, where there was a higher expression of endoglin and better anti-tumor effectiveness in the B16F10 tumor. In conclusion, targeting endoglin for the treatment of melanoma seems to be a concept worthy of further exploration due to the increased therapeutic effect of the therapy based on simultaneous vascular targeting and its direct effect on tumor cells. PMID:26712792

  9. Optical Imaging of Mesenchymal Epithelial Transition Factor (MET) for Enhanced Detection and Characterization of Primary and Metastatic Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Shadi A.; Heidari, Pedram; Kim, Sun A.; Ogino, Shuji; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess optical imaging of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition factor (MET) for delineation and characterization of intrahepatic models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and thereby demonstrate its potential use in precision oncology. Materials and Methods: MET expression in human CRC and HCC was assessed in tissue microarrays. We used GE-137, a modified cyanine 5-tagged peptide for MET targeting. HepG2 and Huh-7 (HCC) and HT-29 (CRC) cells with MET overexpression, and LNCaP cells (negative control) with minimal MET expression were incubated with the probe. Correlation between the relative fluorescence signal intensity and cellular MET expression level was assessed. Flow cytometry was used to assess probe specific binding and dissociation constant (Kd). Orthotopic xenograft models of human HCC and metastatic CRC were generated in nu/nu mice by subcapsular implantation of cells. Epifluorescence imaging was performed to capture the changes in deferential probe accumulation at different time points after injection. Target-to-liver background ratio (TBR) was calculated and the probe biodistribution within different organs was assessed. Histopathologic analysis of extracted xenografts was performed to correlate the tumors MET expression with probe uptake by cancer cells. Results: Approximately 91.5% of HCC and 81% of CRC microarray cores showed MET expression. HCC and CRC cells incubated with the probe showed substantial fluorescence compared to control LNCaP, with strong correlation between fluorescence signal and MET expression (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.001). Probe binding affinity to MET (Kd) was measured to be 2.9 ± 0.36 nM. Epifluorescence imaging showed intense uptake in subcapsular tumors with peak TBR of 5.46 ± 0.46 in Huh-7, 3.55 ± 0.38 in HepG2, and 15.93 ± 0.61 in HT-29 orthotopic xenografts at 4 hours post-injection (mean ± standard deviation). We demonstrated that in vivo probe uptake in xenografts is

  10. Optical Imaging of Mesenchymal Epithelial Transition Factor (MET) for Enhanced Detection and Characterization of Primary and Metastatic Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Shadi A.; Heidari, Pedram; Kim, Sun A.; Ogino, Shuji; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess optical imaging of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition factor (MET) for delineation and characterization of intrahepatic models of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC), and thereby demonstrate its potential use in precision oncology. Materials and Methods: MET expression in human CRC and HCC was assessed in tissue microarrays. We used GE-137, a modified cyanine 5-tagged peptide for MET targeting. HepG2 and Huh-7 (HCC) and HT-29 (CRC) cells with MET overexpression, and LNCaP cells (negative control) with minimal MET expression were incubated with the probe. Correlation between the relative fluorescence signal intensity and cellular MET expression level was assessed. Flow cytometry was used to assess probe specific binding and dissociation constant (Kd). Orthotopic xenograft models of human HCC and metastatic CRC were generated in nu/nu mice by subcapsular implantation of cells. Epifluorescence imaging was performed to capture the changes in deferential probe accumulation at different time points after injection. Target-to-liver background ratio (TBR) was calculated and the probe biodistribution within different organs was assessed. Histopathologic analysis of extracted xenografts was performed to correlate the tumors MET expression with probe uptake by cancer cells. Results: Approximately 91.5% of HCC and 81% of CRC microarray cores showed MET expression. HCC and CRC cells incubated with the probe showed substantial fluorescence compared to control LNCaP, with strong correlation between fluorescence signal and MET expression (R2 = 0.99, p < 0.001). Probe binding affinity to MET (Kd) was measured to be 2.9 ± 0.36 nM. Epifluorescence imaging showed intense uptake in subcapsular tumors with peak TBR of 5.46 ± 0.46 in Huh-7, 3.55 ± 0.38 in HepG2, and 15.93 ± 0.61 in HT-29 orthotopic xenografts at 4 hours post-injection (mean ± standard deviation). We demonstrated that in vivo probe uptake in xenografts is

  11. Integrated Multimodal Imaging of Dynamic Bone-Tumor Alterations Associated with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, Thomas L.; Jacobson, Jon A.; Boes, Jennifer L.; Galbán, Stefanie; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Johnson, Timothy D.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Galbán, Craig J.; Meyer, Charles R.; Schakel, Timothy; Nicolay, Klaas; Alva, Ajjai S.; Hussain, Maha; Ross, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis occurs for men with advanced prostate cancer which promotes osseous growth and destruction driven by alterations in osteoblast and osteoclast homeostasis. Patients can experience pain, spontaneous fractures and morbidity eroding overall quality of life. The complex and dynamic cellular interactions within the bone microenvironment limit current treatment options thus prostate to bone metastases remains incurable. This study uses voxel-based analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI and CT scans to simultaneously evaluate temporal changes in normal bone homeostasis along with prostate bone metatastsis to deliver an improved understanding of the spatiotemporal local microenvironment. Dynamic tumor-stromal interactions were assessed during treatment in mouse models along with a pilot prospective clinical trial with metastatic hormone sensitive and castration resistant prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Longitudinal changes in tumor and bone imaging metrics during delivery of therapy were quantified. Studies revealed that voxel-based parametric response maps (PRM) of DW-MRI and CT scans could be used to quantify and spatially visualize dynamic changes during prostate tumor growth and in response to treatment thereby distinguishing patients with stable disease from those with progressive disease (p<0.05). These studies suggest that PRM imaging biomarkers are useful for detection of the impact of prostate tumor-stromal responses to therapies thus demonstrating the potential of multi-modal PRM image-based biomarkers as a novel means for assessing dynamic alterations associated with metastatic prostate cancer. These results establish an integrated and clinically translatable approach which can be readily implemented for improving the clinical management of patients with metastatic bone disease. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02064283 PMID:25859981

  12. Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization Using Drug-Eluting Beads in Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Shantanu K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Ayyagari, Rajasekhara; Binkert, Christoph A.; Schenker, Matthew P.; Kulke, Matthew; Baum, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate short (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) follow-up in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver who underwent hepatic arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads at a single institution. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective review. All patients who were treated with 100-300 or 300-500 {mu}m drug-eluting LC Beads (Biocompatibles, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (range, 50-100 mg) for GI neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver from June 2004 to June 2009 were included. CT and MRI were evaluated for progression using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Short-term (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) imaging response was determined and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. Results: Thirty-eight drug-eluting bead chemoembolization procedures were performed on 32 hepatic lobes, comprising 21 treatment cycles in 18 patients. All procedures were technically successful with two major complications (biliary injuries). At short-term follow-up (<3 months), 22 of 38 (58%) procedures and 10 of 21 (48%) treatment cycles produced an objective response (OR) with the remainder having stable disease (SD). At intermediate-term follow-up (mean, 445 days; range, 163-1247), 17 of 26 (65%) procedures and 8 of 14 (57%) treatment cycles produced an OR. Probability of progressing was approximately 52% at 1 year with a median time to progression of 419 days. Conclusions: Drug-eluting bead chemoembolization is a reasonable alternative to hepatic arterial embolization and chemoembolization for the treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver.

  13. The rationale for liquid biopsy in colorectal cancer: a focus on circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Carletti, Raffaella; di Gioia, Cira; Gradilone, Angela; Cortesi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Capturing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and/or circulating tumor DNA from blood, which represents a precious source of biological material derived from both primary and metastatic tumors, has been named a 'liquid biopsy'. While the circulating tumor DNA might be more representative of the bulk of the metastatic tumor, CTCs are thought to reflect more of the metastases-initiating cells. Consequently, a liquid biopsy made of tumor cells and tumor DNA that is able to track cancer evolution, as a fingerprint of the patient's individual tumor, and is easy to perform at every stage of the disease course, sounds attractive. This article mainly focuses on the applications of CTCs to track tumor dynamics in real time using colorectal cancer as a model system. The analysis of viable CTCs at DNA, RNA and protein levels, as well as their expansion in vitro, may allow deep investigation of the features of metastases-initiating cells.

  14. Injection of Syngeneic Murine Melanoma Cells to Determine Their Metastatic Potential in the Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Joshua J.; Cohessy, Sean; Wong, Eric T.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 90% of human cancer deaths are linked to metastasis. Despite the prevalence and relative harm of metastasis, therapeutics for treatment or prevention are lacking. We report a method for the establishment of pulmonary metastases in mice, useful for the study of this phenomenon. Tail vein injection of B57BL/6J mice with B16-BL6 is among the most used models for melanoma metastases. Some of the circulating tumor cells establish themselves in the lungs of the mouse, creating "experimental" metastatic foci. With this model it is possible to measure the relative effects of therapeutic agents on the development of cancer metastasis. The difference in enumerated lung foci between treated and untreated mice indicates the efficacy of metastases neutralization. However, prior to the investigation of a therapeutic agent, it is necessary to determine an optimal number of injected B16-BL6 cells for the quantitative analysis of metastatic foci. Injection of too many cells may result in an overabundance of metastatic foci, impairing proper quantification and overwhelming the effects of anti-cancer therapies, while injection of too few cells will hinder the comparison between treated and controls. PMID:27285567

  15. Neural Cell Adhesion Protein CNTN1 Promotes the Metastatic Progression of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Judy; Ojo, Diane; Kapoor, Anil; Lin, Xiaozeng; Pinthus, Jehonathan H; Aziz, Tariq; Bismar, Tarek A; Wei, Fengxiang; Wong, Nicholas; De Melo, Jason; Cutz, Jean-Claude; Major, Pierre; Wood, Geoffrey; Peng, Hao; Tang, Damu

    2016-03-15

    Prostate cancer metastasis is the main cause of disease-related mortality. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying prostate cancer metastasis is critical for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we performed gene-expression profiling of prostate cancer stem-like cells (PCSC) derived from DU145 human prostate cancer cells to identify factors involved in metastatic progression. Our studies revealed contactin 1 (CNTN1), a neural cell adhesion protein, to be a prostate cancer-promoting factor. CNTN1 knockdown reduced PCSC-mediated tumor initiation, whereas CNTN1 overexpression enhanced prostate cancer cell invasion in vitro and promoted xenograft tumor formation and lung metastasis in vivo. In addition, CNTN1 overexpression in DU145 cells and corresponding xenograft tumors resulted in elevated AKT activation and reduced E-cadherin (CDH1) expression. CNTN1 expression was not readily detected in normal prostate glands, but was clearly evident on prostate cancer cells in primary tumors and lymph node and bone metastases. Tumors from 637 patients expressing CNTN1 were associated with prostate cancer progression and worse biochemical recurrence-free survival following radical prostatectomy (P < 0.05). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that CNTN1 promotes prostate cancer progression and metastasis, prompting further investigation into the mechanisms that enable neural proteins to become aberrantly expressed in non-neural malignancies.

  16. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Mazen A; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Melerzanov, Alexander V; Zharov, Vladimir P; Galanzha, Ekaterina I

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs' diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0-54 CTCs per 5 min). These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients. PMID:24434542

  17. [Mediastinal germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Bremmer, F; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is among the most frequent anatomic region in which germ cell tumors (GCT) arise, second only to the gonads. Mediastinal GCT (mGCT) account for 16 % of all mediastinal neoplasms. Although the morphology and (according to all available data) the molecular genetics of mediastinal and gonadal GCT are identical, a number of unique aspects exist. There is a highly relevant bi-modal age distribution. In pre-pubertal children of both sexes, mGCT consist exclusively of teratomas and yolk sac tumors. The prognosis is generally favorable with modern treatment. In post-pubertal adults, virtually all patients with malignant mGCT are males; the prognosis is more guarded and depends (among other factors) on the histological GCT components and is similar to GCT in other organs. So-called somatic type malignancies (i. e. clonally related, non-germ cell neoplasias arising in a GCT) are much more frequent in mGCT than in other organs, and the association between mediastinal yolk sac tumors and hematological malignancies, such as myelodysplasias and leukemias, is unique to mediastinal tumors. The prognosis of GCT with somatic type malignancies is generally dismal. PMID:27491549

  18. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte–tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  19. Hypercalcemia from metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor secreting 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Viola; de las Morenas, Antonio; Janicek, Milos

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hypercalcemia occurs in about 20-30% of patients with cancer, both solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. The secretion of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTH-rP) is the most common cause and has been shown to be the etiology of hypercalcemia associated with neuroendocrine tumors. Here we report the case of a patient with metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor who developed hypercalcemia more than 4 years after the initial diagnosis as a result of secretion of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, a mechanism only commonly seen in lymphomas. The successful control of the patient’s disease with capecitabine and temozolomide led to the alleviation of this paraneoplastic syndrome. PMID:25083313

  20. The Metastasis-Promoting Roles of Tumor-Associated Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Heath A.; Kang, Yibin

    2013-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is driven not only by the accumulation of intrinsic alterations in malignant cells, but also by the interactions of cancer cells with various stromal cell components of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, inflammation and infiltration of the tumor tissue by host immune cells, such as tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and regulatory T cells have been shown to support tumor growth in addition to invasion and metastasis. Each step of tumor development, from initiation through metastatic spread, is promoted by communication between tumor and immune cells via the secretion of cytokines, growth factors and proteases that remodel the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis requires neovascularization, breakdown of the basement membrane, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The subsequent dissemination of tumor cells to distant organ sites necessitates a treacherous journey through the vasculature, which is fostered by close association with platelets and macrophages. Additionally, the establishment of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is fostered by neutrophils and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells and other inflammatory cytokines derived from tumor and immune cells, which alter the local environment of the tissue to promote adhesion of circulating tumor cells. This review focuses on the interactions between tumor cells and immune cells recruited to the tumor microenvironment, and examines the factors allowing these cells to promote each stage of metastasis. PMID:23515621

  1. Management of non metastatic phyllodes tumors of the breast: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Khosravi-Shahi, Parham

    2011-12-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast are rare tumors, accounting for less than 0.5% of all breast tumors. These tumors are comprised of both stromal and epithelial elements; and traditionally they are graded by the use of a set of histologic features into benign, borderline, and malignant subtypes. Unfortunately, the histologic classification of phyllodes tumors does not reliably predict clinical behavior. The mainstay of treatment of non metastatic phyllodes tumors of the breast is complete surgical resection with wide resection margins. Lumpectomy or partial mastectomy is the preferred surgical therapy. However, despite the complete surgical resection, local failure rate may be high; and 22% of malignant tumors may give rise to haematogenous metastases. The most frequent site of distant metastases is the lungs. Several predictive factors of recurrence and metastases have been described in the literature, such as positive surgical margins, increased stromal cellularity, stromal overgrowth, stromal atypia and increased mitotic activity. Nevertheless, the role of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy and chemotherapy) is presently undefined and should be tested in multicenter, prospective, randomized trials.

  2. Interstitial laser irradiation of metastatic mammary tumors in combination with intratumoral injection of immunoadjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chet; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Goddard, Jessica; Li, Xiaosong; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) was developed to treat metastatic cancers using a combination of laser irradiation and immunological stimulation. The original design of LIT employs a non-invasive, selective laser photothermal interaction, using an in situ light-absorbing dye. However, this non-invasive treatment mode faces challenges in treating deep, large tumors. Furthermore, it has difficulties in the cases of highly pigmented skin overlying target tumors. To overcome these limitations, interstitial laser immunotherapy (ILIT) was proposed. In ILIT, a cylindrical, side-fire fiber diffuser is placed inside the target tumor to induce thermal damage. To enhance the interstitial irradiation induced photothermal interaction, an immunological modifier, glycated chitosan (GC), is injected into the tumor after the laser treatment. In this study, a cylindrical diffuser with an active length of 1 cm was used to treat tumors of 1 to 1.5 cm in size. Different laser powers (1 to 3 watts) and different irradiation durations (10 to 30 minutes) were used to test the thermal effects of ILIT. Different doses of the GC (1.0%, 0.1 to 0.6 ml per rat) were used to determine the immunological effects of ILIT. Our results show that the animal survival depends on both laser dose and GC dose. A dose of 0.2 ml per tumor appeared to result in the highest survival rate under interstitial laser irradiation with 2.5 watts and 20 minutes. While the results in this study are not conclusive, they indicate that interstitial laser irradiation can be combined with immunotherapy to treat metastatic cancers. Furthermore, our results suggest that an optimal combination of laser dose and GC dose could be obtained for future clinical protocols using interstitial laser immunotherapy.

  3. Liposomal delivery of dexamethasone attenuates prostate cancer bone metastatic tumor growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Buijs, Jeroen T.; van der Horst, Geertje; Cheung, Henry; van der Mark, Maaike; van Bloois, Louis; Rizzo, Larissa Y.; Lammers, Twan; Pelger, Rob C.; Storm, Gert; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Metselaar, Josbert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The inflammatory tumor microenvironment, and more specifically the tumor‐associated macrophages, plays an essential role in the development and progression of prostate cancer towards metastatic bone disease. Tumors are often characterized by a leaky vasculature, which ‐ combined with the prolonged circulation kinetics of liposomes ‐ leads to efficient tumor localization of these drug carriers, via the so‐called enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) ‐effect. In this study, we evaluated the utility of targeted, liposomal drug delivery of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone in a model of prostate cancer bone metastases. Methods Tumor‐bearing Balb‐c nu/nu mice were treated intravenously with 0.2–1.0–5.0 mg/kg/week free‐ and liposomal DEX for 3–4 weeks and tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging. Results Intravenously administered liposomes localize efficiently to bone metastases in vivo and treatment of established bone metastases with (liposomal) dexamethasone resulted in a significant inhibition of tumor growth up to 26 days after initiation of treatment. Furthermore, 1.0 mg/kg liposomal dexamethasone significantly outperformed 1.0 mg/kg free dexamethasone, and was found to be well‐tolerated at clinically‐relevant dosages that display potent anti‐tumor efficacy. Conclusions Liposomal delivery of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone inhibits the growth of malignant bone lesions. We believe that liposomal encapsulation of dexamethasone offers a promising new treatment option for advanced, metastatic prostate cancer which supports further clinical evaluation. Prostate 75: 815–824, 2015. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25663076

  4. AAVrh.10-mediated genetic delivery of bevacizumab to the pleura to provide local anti-VEGF to suppress growth of metastatic lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Boyer, J L; Crystal, R G

    2010-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced by tumor cells has a central role in stimulating angiogenesis required for tumor growth. Humanized monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab, Avastin), approved as a treatment for non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer, requires administration every 3 weeks. We hypothesized that an intrapleural administration of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing an anti-VEGF-A antibody equivalent of bevacizumab would result in sustained anti-VEGF-A localized expression within the lung and suppress metastatic tumor growth. The AAV vector AAVrh.10alphaVEGF encodes the light chain and heavy chain complementary DNAs of monoclonal antibody A.4.6.1, a murine antibody that specifically recognizes human VEGF-A with the same antigen-binding site as bevacizumab. A metastatic lung tumor model was established in severe combined immunodeficient mice by intravenous administration of human DU145 prostate carcinoma cells. Intrapleural administration of AAVrh.10alphaVEGF directed long-term expression of the anti-human VEGF-A antibody in lung, as shown by sustained, high-level anti-human VEGF titers in lung epithelial lining fluid for 40 weeks, which was the duration of the study. In the AAVrh.10alphaVEGF-treated animals, tumor growth was significantly suppressed (P<0.05), the numbers of blood vessels and mitotic nuclei in the tumor was decreased (P<0.05) and there was increased survival (P<0.05). Thus, intrapleural administration of an AAVrh.10 vector, encoding the murine monoclonal antibody equivalent of bevacizumab, effectively suppresses the growth of metastatic lung tumors, suggesting AAV-mediated gene transfer to the pleura to deliver bevacizumab locally to the lung as a novel alternative platform to conventional monoclonal antibody therapy.

  5. Enhanced Survival with Implantable Scaffolds That Capture Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Rao, Shreyas S; Bushnell, Grace G; Azarin, Samira M; Spicer, Graham; Aguado, Brian A; Stoehr, Jenna R; Jiang, Eric J; Backman, Vadim; Shea, Lonnie D; Jeruss, Jacqueline S

    2016-09-15

    The onset of distant organ metastasis from primary breast cancer marks the transition to a stage IV diagnosis. Standard imaging modalities often detect distant metastasis when the burden of disease is high, underscoring the need for improved methods of detection to allow for interventions that would impede disease progression. Here, microporous poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were developed that capture early metastatic cells and thus serve as a sentinel for early detection. These scaffolds were used to characterize the dynamic immune response to the implant spanning the acute and chronic foreign body response. The immune cell composition had stabilized at the scaffold after approximately 1 month and changed dramatically within days to weeks after tumor inoculation, with CD11b(+)Gr1(hi)Ly6C(-) cells having the greatest increase in abundance. Implanted scaffolds recruited metastatic cancer cells that were inoculated into the mammary fat pad in vivo, which also significantly reduced tumor burden in the liver and brain. Additionally, cancer cells could be detected using a label-free imaging modality termed inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography, and we tested the hypothesis that subsequent removal of the primary tumor after early detection would enhance survival. Surgical removal of the primary tumor following cancer cell detection in the scaffold significantly improved disease-specific survival. The enhanced disease-specific survival was associated with a systemic reduction in the CD11b(+)Gr1(hi)Ly6C(-) cells as a consequence of the implant, which was further supported by Gr-1 depletion studies. Implementation of the scaffold may provide diagnostic and therapeutic options for cancer patients in both the high-risk and adjuvant treatment settings. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5209-18. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27635043

  6. [Magnetic resonance imaging of non-organic bulky masses of the retroperitoneal space. Part 2. Primary and metastatic tumors].

    PubMed

    Dombrovskiĭ, V I

    2003-01-01

    Based on MRI findings in 15 patients with primary non-organic tumors and 9 patients with metastatic neoplasms of the retroperitoneal space, the paper describes the MRI-semiotics of these diseases and proposes methodological approaches to their identification in its second part. By comparing the data of MRI and autopsies, the author defines the values of the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the technique in detecting primary and metastatic non-organic tumors of the retroperitoneal space. The author emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages of MRI, shows how difficult to make a differential diagnosis of benign and malignant types of primary non-organic tumors by means of this method.

  7. CGH analysis of secondary genetic changes in Ewing tumors: correlation with metastatic disease in a series of 43 cases.

    PubMed

    Brisset, S; Schleiermacher, G; Peter, M; Mairal, A; Oberlin, O; Delattre, O; Aurias, A

    2001-10-01

    The occurrence of secondary chromosome changes is frequent in Ewing tumors, in particular trisomies for chromosomes 8 and 12, and unbalanced (1;16) translocations leading to gains of 1q and losses of 16q. The prognostic value of these secondary aberrations has not been statistically demonstrated. We report here a CGH analysis of a series of 43 primary tumors corresponding to 21 localized and 22 metastatic tumors. For five of them, a sufficient amount of DNA for the CGH analysis was available from the frozen samples. For 19 samples, a preliminary step of DOP-PCR amplification of the DNA was necessary. For the last 19 tumors, DNA was obtained after DOP-PCR amplification of small amount of DNA contaminating the RNA. As a whole, the main chromosome imbalances previously described, such as trisomies for 1q, 8, and 12, were observed. It is noteworthy that the mean number of imbalances was more frequent in localized versus metastatic tumors. Gain of 1q was more frequent in metastatic than in localized tumors. Nevertheless, these two results do not reach statistical significance. Conversely, a statistically significant excess of copy number of chromosome 2 was observed in non-metastatic tumors, suggesting that this imbalance, which has never been previously reported, could be associated with more favorable tumor behavior. PMID:11672775

  8. Identification of Lectins from Metastatic Cancer Cells through Magnetic Glyconanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kavunja, Herbert W.; Voss, Patricia G.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells can have characteristic carbohydrate binding properties. Previously, it was shown that a highly metastatic melanoma cell line B16F10 bound to galacto-side-functionalized nanoparticles much stronger than the corresponding less metastatic B16F1 cells. To better understand the carbohydrate binding properties of cancer cells, herein, we report the isolation and characterization of endogenous galactose binding proteins from B16F10 cells using magnetic glyconanoparticles. The galactose-coated magnetic glyconanoparticles could bind with lectins present in the cells and be isolated through magnet-mediated separation. Through Western blot and mass spectrometry, the arginine/serine rich splicing factor Sfrs1 was identified as a galactose-selective endogenous lectin, overexpressed in B16F10 cells, compared with B16F1 cells. In addition, galactin-3 was found in higher amounts in B16F10 cells. Finally, the glyconanoparticles exhibited a superior efficiency in lectin isolation, from both protein mixtures and live cells, than the corresponding more traditional microparticles functionalized with carbohydrates. Thus, the magnetic glyconanoparticles present a useful tool for discovery of endogenous lectins, as well as binding partners of lectins, without prior knowledge of protein identities. PMID:27110035

  9. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs): recent insights and advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. PMID:22886480

  10. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs.

  11. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs. PMID:26945789

  12. Microfluidic Device for Studying Tumor Cell Extravasation in Cancer Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry K; Thundat, Thomas George; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Datar, Ram H; Reese, Benjamin E; Zheng, Siyang

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads to form secondary tumors at downstream locations throughout the body. This uncontrolled spreading is the leading cause of death in patients with epithelial cancers and is the main reason that suppressing and targeting cancer has proven to be so challenging. Tumor cell extravasation is one of the key steps in cancer s progression towards a metastatic state. This occurs when circulating tumor cells found within the blood stream are able to transmigrate through the endothelium lining and basement membrane of the vasculature to form metastatic tumors at secondary sites within the body. Predicting the likelihood of this occurrence in patients, or being able to determine specific markers involved in this process could lead to preventative measures targeting these types of cancer; moreover, this may lead to the discovery of novel anti-metastatic drugs. We have developed a microfluidic device that has shown the extravasation of fluorescently labeled tumor cells across an endothelial cell lined membrane coated with matrigel followed by the formation of colonies. This device provides the advantages of combining a controlled environment, mimicking that found within the body, with real-time monitoring capabilities allowing for the study of these biomarkers and cellular interactions along with other potential mechanisms involved in the process of extravasation.

  13. Transcapillary Trafficking of Clustered Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Brian; Au, Sam; Chen, Yeng-Long; Sarioglu, Fatih; Javaid, Sarah; Haber, Daniel; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC-clusters) are known to be more metastatic than equal numbers of singlet circulating tumor cells. Yet the mechanisms responsible for CTC-cluster dissemination and tumor seeding are still largely unknown. Without direct experimental evidence, it was assumed that because of their size, CTC-clusters would occlude and rupture capillaries. In this work, we have challenged this assumption by investigating the transit of CTC-clusters through microfluidic capillary constrictions under physiological pressures. Remarkably, cancer cell aggregates containing 2-20 cells were observed to successfully traverse constrictions 5-10 microns with over 90% efficiency. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into chain-like geometries to pass through constrictions in single file. This observation was verified by computational simulation of clusters modeled with physiological cell-cell interaction energies. Hydrodynamic analysis suggested that CTC-clusters were able to pass narrow constrictions by acting as individual cells in series, not as cohesive units. Upon exiting constrictions, clusters remained viable, proliferative and rapidly returned to `typical' cluster morphologies.

  14. [Management of complications after residual tumor resection for metastatic testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Lusch, A; Zaum, M; Winter, C; Albers, P

    2014-07-01

    Residual tumor resection (RTR) in patients with metastatic testicular cancer plays a pivotal role in a multimodal treatment. It can be performed unilaterally or as an extended bilateral RTR. Additional surgical procedures might be necessary, such as nephrectomy, splenectomy, partial colectomy, or vascular interventions with possible caval resection, cavotomy, or aortic resection with aortic grafting. Consequently, several complications can be seen in the intra- and postoperative course, most common of which are superficial wound infections, intestinal paralysis, lymphocele, and chylous ascites. We sought to describe complication management and how to prevent complications before they arise. PMID:25023235

  15. Metastatic Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Fliedner, Stephanie M. J.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2010-01-01

    Paragangliomas (PGLs) are rare chromaffin cell tumors that can often be cured by resection. Although described for the first time in 1886 1, the diagnosis of PGL remains a challenge, because patients do not present with characteristic signs and symptoms. If untreated, PGL can have a devastating outcome due to myocardial infarction, severe hypertension, stroke and/or arrhytmia caused by catecholamine excess. Even after proper diagnosis, the risk of metastatic disease remains. In recent years the opinion that metastatic disease is rare in PGL had to be revised, particularly in patients presenting with extra-adrenal PGL, with a PGL exceeding a size of 5 cm and/or carrying an SDHB germline mutation (especially for children and adolescents). In up to 10 % of patients, metastases are already present at diagnosis of PGL. Measurement of plasma and urinary metanephrine levels has long been used effectively in the diagnosis of PGL. Recently, a dopaminergic phenotype (excess dopamine, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and or methoxytyramine) was recognized as a good indicator for metastatic disease. Vast progress in targeted PET imaging (e.g. 18F-FDA, 18F-FDOPA, 18F-FDG) now allows for reliable early detection of metastatic disease. However, once metastatses are present, treatment options are limited. Survival of patients with metastatic PGL is variable. Depending on the study population the overall 5 year survival is 35–60 %, 2. Here we review recent advances involving findings about the genetic background, the molecular pathogenesis, new diagnostic indicators, pathologic markers and emerging treatment options for metastatic PGL. PMID:21167381

  16. Orthotopic mouse models of tumor metastasis expressing fluorescent reporters produce imageable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are of high importance, since they are potential metastatic precursors and are readily available for prognostic analysis and treatment testing. In this review, we demonstrate the great power that green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeling and orthotopic mouse models of cancer confer to the study of CTCs for isolation and characterization, including metastatic testing in mice and the chick embryo as well as drug response testing in vitro. We also describe a facile method to label patient CTCs ex vivo using a telomerase-expressing GFP-containing adenovirus that will allow the CTC studies described in this review to be translated clinically.

  17. Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Howlin, Jillian; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Dahlgren, Malin; Schulz, Ralph; Grabau, Dorthe; van Westen, Danielle; Fernö, Mårten; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Rydén, Lisa; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Jernström, Helena; Saal, Lao H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow-up. Using an approach combining low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor-specific rearrangements in plasma by droplet digital PCR, we identify for the first time that ctDNA monitoring is highly accurate for postsurgical discrimination between patients with (93%) and without (100%) eventual clinically detected recurrence. ctDNA-based detection preceded clinical detection of metastasis in 86% of patients with an average lead time of 11 months (range 0–37 months), whereas patients with long-term disease-free survival had undetectable ctDNA postoperatively. ctDNA quantity was predictive of poor survival. These findings establish the rationale for larger validation studies in early breast cancer to evaluate ctDNA as a monitoring tool for early metastasis detection, therapy modification, and to aid in avoidance of overtreatment. PMID:25987569

  18. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    High-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Low-grade Salivary Gland Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Salivary Gland Acinic Cell Tumor; Salivary Gland Adenocarcinoma; Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Anaplastic Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Malignant Mixed Cell Type Tumor; Salivary Gland Poorly Differentiated Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer

  19. Clear-cell carcinoma of the lung metastatic to the hamate: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M; Kutz, J E; Lister, G D

    1978-01-01

    Metastatic lesions of the hand are uncommon. A report of a solitary metastasis to the hamate seems not to have appeared previously in the literature. A 46-year-old factory worker presented a rare tumor, clear-cell carcinom of the lung, metastasizing to an unusual location, the hamate. The symptoms simulated sympathetic dystrophy and diagnosis was delayed because of the late appearance of radiographic changes over 6 months after symptoms first appeared. Early bone scanning in patients with chronic pain may provide useful information prior to the appearance of X-ray changes.

  20. Phase II clinical trial of pasireotide long-acting repeatable in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cives, M; Kunz, P L; Morse, B; Coppola, D; Schell, M J; Campos, T; Nguyen, P T; Nandoskar, P; Khandelwal, V; Strosberg, J R

    2015-01-01

    Pasireotide long-acting repeatable (LAR) is a novel somatostatin analog (SSA) with avid binding affinity to somatostatin receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 (SSTR1,2,3) and 5 (SSTR5). Results from preclinical studies indicate that pasireotide can inhibit neuroendocrine tumor (NET) growth more robustly than octreotide in vitro. This open-label, phase II study assessed the clinical activity of pasireotide in treatment-naïve patients with metastatic grade 1 or 2 NETs. Patients with metastatic pancreatic and extra-pancreatic NETs were treated with pasireotide LAR (60 mg every 4 weeks). Previous systemic therapy, including octreotide and lanreotide, was not permitted. Tumor assessments were performed every 3 months using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). The secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), overall radiographic response rate (ORR), and safety. Twenty-nine patients were treated with pasireotide LAR (60 mg every 4 weeks) and 28 were evaluable for response. The median PFS was 11 months. The most favorable effect was observed in patients with low hepatic tumor burden, normal baseline chromogranin A, and high tumoral SSTR5 expression. Median OS has not been reached; the 30-month OS rate was 70%. The best radiographic response was partial response in one patient (4%), stable disease in 17 patients (60%), and progressive disease in ten patients (36%). Although grade 3/4 toxicities were rare, pasireotide LAR treatment was associated with a 79% rate of hyperglycemia including 14% grade 3 hyperglycemia. Although pasireotide appears to be an effective antiproliferative agent in the treatment of advanced NETs, the high incidence of hyperglycemia raises concerns regarding its suitability as a first-line systemic agent in unselected patients. SSTR5 expression is a potentially predictive biomarker for response. PMID:25376618

  1. A Study of Varlilumab (Anti-CD27) and Sunitinib in Patients With Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Carcinoma, Renal Cell; Kidney Diseases; Kidney Neoplasms; Urogenital Neoplasms; Urologic Diseases; Urologic Neoplasms; Neoplasms; Neoplasms by Histologic Type; Clear-cell Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

  2. Capecitabine, Temozolomide and Bevacizumab for Metastatic or Unresectable Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Equine testicular interstitial cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; McEntee, K

    1987-05-01

    Interstitial cell tumors from nine stallions were described. In all but one horse the tumors were found in undescended testes. Five animals had bilateral tumors. Two animals showed increased aggression. Tumors contained two cell types. The first type were large distinctly bordered eosinophilic cells interpreted to be hyperplastic and hypertrophic interstitial cells. They blended with pleomorphic often spindloid neoplastic cells which had fibrillar, vacuolated cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. This latter cell population was arranged in nodules or broad sheets as endocrine-like packets or interweaving fascicles. Biologic behavior of the neoplasms could not be ascertained from histologic examination. PMID:2885961

  4. A novel metastatic animal model reflecting the clinical appearance of human neuroblastoma: growth arrest of orthotopic tumors by natural, cytotoxic human immunoglobulin M antibodies.

    PubMed

    Engler, S; Thiel, C; Förster, K; David, K; Bredehorst, R; Juhl, H

    2001-04-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood is associated with poor prognosis in patients with advanced tumor stages. Natural human cytotoxic anti-NB IgM antibodies present in the serum of healthy humans are discussed as a potential novel immunotherapeutic regimen against human NB because these antibodies have been shown to affect growth arrest of solid s.c. xenografts of human NB in nude rats. Subcutaneously induced tumors, however, exhibit a different growth pattern compared with the typical growth pattern of NB tumors in humans. Therefore, we developed in this study a novel metastatic tumor model in nude rats that reflects the clinical appearance of human NB and used this model to study the therapeutic efficacy of human anti-NB IgM. Intra-aortal injection of human NB cells in nude rats resulted in the development of large invasive adrenal gland tumors and micrometastases in the liver and bones. Apparently, adrenal glands provide most favorable growth conditions for human NB cells, as documented by the preferential and rapid growth of NB cells in this location. We studied three different treatment protocols of natural human anti-NB IgM. Anti-NB IgM completely inhibited tumor formation and metastases when injected simultaneously with human LAN-1 NB cells (P < 0.05). When antibody treatment was started 6 days after tumor cell injection (i.e., micrometastatic stage), tumor growth was inhibited by 90% (P < 0.05). An anti-NB IgM therapy directed against established tumors (14 days after tumor cell injection) shrank adrenal gland tumors by 90% (P < 0.05). Analysis of the tumors revealed both complement activation and an induction of apoptosis as two independent mechanisms of antitumor function. This study strongly suggests human anti-NB IgM antibodies as new agents for the therapy of neuroblastoma.

  5. Metastatic consequences of immune escape from NK cell cytotoxicity by human breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhe; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shi-Cang; Ping, Yi-Fang; Yang, Jing; Xu, Sen-Lin; Ye, Xian-Zong; Xu, Chuan; Yang, Lang; Qian, Cheng; Wang, Ji Ming; Cui, You-Hong; Zhang, Xia; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2014-10-15

    Breast cancer stem-like cells (BCSC) are crucial for metastasis but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we report that tumor-infiltrating natural killer (NK) cells failed to limit metastasis and were not associated with improved therapeutic outcome of BCSC-rich breast cancer. Primary BCSCs were resistant to cytotoxicity mediated by autologous/allogeneic NK cells due to reduced expression of MICA and MICB, two ligands for the stimulatory NK cell receptor NKG2D. Furthermore, the downregulation of MICA/MICB in BCSCs was mediated by aberrantly expressed oncogenic miR20a, which promoted the resistance of BCSC to NK cell cytotoxicity and resultant lung metastasis. The breast cancer cell differentiation-inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid, restored the miR20a-MICA/MICB axis and sensitized BCSC to NK cell-mediated killing, thereby reducing immune escape-associated BCSC metastasis. Together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for immune escape of human BCSC and identify the miR20a-MICA/MICB signaling axis as a therapeutic target to limit metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Dual targeting for metastatic breast cancer and tumor neovasculature by EphA2-mediated nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoming; He, Bing; Yuan, Lan; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2015-09-30

    EphA2 is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase that is highly expressed on both tumor neovasculature and some kinds of tumor cells. Here, a homing peptide with a sequence of YSAYPDSVPMMSK (YSA) that binds specifically with EphA2 was utilized to modify the stealth liposomes (YSA-LP). With a particle size of about 85 nm, this functionalized nanocarrier was loaded with fluorescent probe or doxorubicin (DOX) and investigated in vitro and in vivo. In the cellular endocytosis studies in vitro, coumarin-6 loaded YSA-LP exhibited significant specificity to both EphA2-overexpressing tumor cells (MDA-MB-231) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) via a YSA mediated interaction. In a MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumor mouse model, DiR-loaded YSA-LP showed more lasting accumulation in tumor tissue by small animal imaging compared to unmodified liposomes (LP). Further, YSA-LP greatly facilitated the efficacy of DOX loaded against both tumor cells and tumor angiogenesis in the same mouse model, evidenced by inhibiting tumor growth, metastasis and CD31 expression as well as inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Additionally, YSA-LP (DOX) showed relatively low systemic and cardiac toxicity compared with control groups. In conclusion, YSA might be a promising targeting motif for EphA2-overexpressing tumor cells and tumor neovasculature, which could be used to mediate drug delivery for chemotherapy agents. PMID:26004003

  7. Metastatic metaplastic breast carcinoma mimicking pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma on fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Doreen N; Kawamoto, Satomi; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Illei, Peter B; Rosenthal, Dorothy L; VandenBussche, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Metaplastic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the breast is a rare type of breast cancer. Metastases to the lung, which can be a major site of second primary tumor development among breast cancer patients, are difficult to distinguish from primary SCC of the lung and present a unique challenge for pathologists. There are few available discriminating immunohistochemical markers as squamous differentiation typically leads to loss of expression of characteristic primary epithelial cell markers of both breast and lung origin. GATA protein binding 3 (GATA-3) is a useful marker of breast origin in metastatic ductal and lobular carcinomas including poorly differentiated triple-negative carcinomas and some metaplastic carcinomas. Here, we present a case of metastatic SCC presenting as a solitary lung mass with regional lymph node metastases and a single satellite lesion in a patient with a history of metaplastic SCC of the breast. In addition to the routine markers of squamous differentiation, the metastases were also positive for estrogen receptor (ER) and GATA-3 on cytologic material obtained by transbronchial FNA. This suggests that immunoreactivity for ER and GATA-3 may support a diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the context of a prior metaplastic SCC of the breast.

  8. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  9. Second-harmonic generation scattering directionality predicts tumor cell motility in collagen gels.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kathleen A; Dawes, Ryan P; Cheema, Mehar K; Van Hove, Amy; Benoit, Danielle S W; Perry, Seth W; Brown, Edward

    2015-05-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) allows for the analysis of tumor collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. SHG directionality, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward-propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by collagen fibril diameter, spacing, and disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors progress, these parameters evolve, producing concurrent changes in F/B. It has been recently shown that the F/B of highly metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast tumors is significantly different from less metastatic tumors. This suggests a possible relationship between the microstructure of collagen, as measured by the F/B, and the ability of tumor cells to locomote through that collagen. Utilizing in vitro collagen gels of different F/B ratios, we explored the relationship between collagen microstructure and motility of tumor cells in a “clean” environment, free of the myriad cells, and signals found in in vivo. We found a significant relationship between F/B and the total distance traveled by the tumor cell, as well as both the average and maximum velocities of the cells. Consequently, one possible mechanism underlying the observed relationship between tumor F/B and metastatic output in IDC patient samples is a direct influence of collagen structure on tumor cell motility. PMID:25625899

  10. Second-harmonic generation scattering directionality predicts tumor cell motility in collagen gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Dawes, Ryan P.; Cheema, Mehar K.; Van Hove, Amy; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Perry, Seth W.; Brown, Edward

    2015-05-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) allows for the analysis of tumor collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. SHG directionality, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward-propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by collagen fibril diameter, spacing, and disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors progress, these parameters evolve, producing concurrent changes in F/B. It has been recently shown that the F/B of highly metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast tumors is significantly different from less metastatic tumors. This suggests a possible relationship between the microstructure of collagen, as measured by the F/B, and the ability of tumor cells to locomote through that collagen. Utilizing in vitro collagen gels of different F/B ratios, we explored the relationship between collagen microstructure and motility of tumor cells in a "clean" environment, free of the myriad cells, and signals found in in vivo. We found a significant relationship between F/B and the total distance traveled by the tumor cell, as well as both the average and maximum velocities of the cells. Consequently, one possible mechanism underlying the observed relationship between tumor F/B and metastatic output in IDC patient samples is a direct influence of collagen structure on tumor cell motility.

  11. Sodium calcium exchanger operates in the reverse mode in metastatic human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sennoune, S R; Santos, J M; Hussain, F; Martínez-Zaguilán, R

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) is important in the regulation of several cellular functions involved in metastasis. We hypothesize that distinct [Ca2+]cyt regulation explains the acquisition of a more metastatic phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we used highly and lowly metastatic human melanoma cells and [Ca2+]cyt was monitored using Fura—2AM and fluorescence spectroscopy. Stimulation with ATP elicited a sustained increase in [Ca2+]cyt in highly metastatic cells, but a transient increase in lowly metastatic cells. Na+ substitution revealed Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) activity in reverse mode in highly, but not in lowly metastatic cells. In highly metastatic cells, addition of Na+ in the plateau phase of [Ca2+]cyt increase elicited with ATP, in the absence of Na+, resulted in a rapid return to basal, indicating that NCX can operate in both reverse and forward modes. Inhibition and knockdown of NCX, using KB—R7943 and siRNA NCX—1 respectively, supported the significance of NCX in [Ca2+]cyt regulation in highly metastatic cells. Stimulation with UTP triggered a rapid increase in highly metastatic cells [Ca2+]cyt, but not in lowly metastatic cells suggesting that highly and lowly metastatic cells exhibit distinct purinergic receptors. These data indicate that following agonist—stimulation, NCX operates preferentially in the reverse mode to enable a sustained [Ca2+]cyt increase in highly metastatic cells. The forward mode of NCX operation to extrude Ca2+ is preferred in lowly metastatic cells. The acquisition of a more metastatic phenotype involves a switch in NCX activity from forward to reverse mode that is favorable to maintain elevated [Ca2+]cyt in response to agonist stimulation.

  12. Preemptive tumor profiling for biomarker-stratified early clinical drug development in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Welt, Anja; Tewes, Mitra; Aktas, Bahriye; O Hoffmann, Oliver; Wiesweg, Marcel; Ting, Saskia; Reis, Henning; Worm, Karl; Richly, Heike; Hense, Jörg; Palmer, Michael R; Lee, Benjamin H; Wendling, Johanna; Kossow, Josef; Scheulen, Max E; Lehnerdt, Cathrin; Kohl, Marzena; Derks, Cordula; Skottky, Silke; Haus, Ulrike; Schmid, Kurt W; Kimmig, Rainer; Schuler, Martin; Kasper, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Biomarker-stratified cancer pharmacotherapy was pioneered in the care of breast cancer patients. The utility of agents modulating hormone receptors, synthesis of steroid hormones, or HER2-targeting agents has been greatly enhanced by the detection of predictive biomarkers in diagnostic tumor samples. Based on deeper understanding of breast cancer biology multiple drug candidates have been developed to modulate additional molecular targets which may associate with specific biomarker profiles. Accordingly, exploratory biomarkers are increasingly incorporated in early clinical trials, thus demanding a new process of patient selection. Here, we describe the implementation of preemptive, multiplexed biomarker profiling linked to standard diagnostic algorithms for metastatic breast cancer patients treated at the West German Cancer Center. Profiling for experimental biomarkers was prospectively offered to patients with metastatic breast cancer who met generic clinical trial inclusion criteria. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were retrieved and studied for potentially “actionable” biomarkers related to active clinical trials by immunohistochemistry, amplicon sequencing, and in situ hybridization. The clinical course of those “profiled” patients was closely monitored to offer trial participation whenever applicable. Here, we report results from the first 131 patients enrolled in this program. PIK3CA mutations (23 %) and amplifications (2 %), loss of PTEN expression (13 %), and FGFR1 amplifications (8 %) were detected next to established biomarkers such as estrogen (67 %) and progesterone receptor expression (52 %), and HER2 overexpression or amplification (23 %). So far 16 “profiled” patients (12 %) have been enrolled in biomarker-stratified early clinical trials. Preemptive profiling of investigational biomarkers can be integrated into the diagnostic algorithm of a large Comprehensive Cancer Center. Extensive administrative efforts are required

  13. Primary Tumor Location as a Prognostic Factor in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loupakis, Fotios; Yang, Dongyun; Yau, Linda; Feng, Shibao; Cremolini, Chiara; Zhang, Wu; Maus, Martin K. H.; Antoniotti, Carlotta; Langer, Christiane; Scherer, Stefan J.; Müller, Thomas; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Saltz, Leonard; Falcone, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Background: We sought to clarify the prognostic impact of primary tumor location in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Methods: We evaluated the association between tumor location and survival parameters in patients with previously untreated mCRC receiving first-line chemotherapy ± bevacizumab in three independent cohorts: a prospective pharmacogenetic study (PROVETTA) and two randomized phase III trials, AVF2107g and NO16966. Cancers proximal or distal of the splenic flexure were classified as right-sided or left-sided, respectively. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Data were analyzed with Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Among evaluable patients in the PROVETTA (n = 200), AVF2107g (n = 559), and NO16966 (n = 1268) studies, 72.0%, 63.1%, and 73.7% had left-sided tumors, respectively. In PROVETTA, patients with left-sided tumors had superior OS (left-sided vs right-sided: hazard ratio [HR] = .44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = .28 to .70, P < .001) and progression-free survival (HR = .52, 95% CI = .36 to .75, P < .001) outcomes. Multivariable analyses confirmed right-sided location as a negative prognostic variable, independent of mucinous histology and BRAF mutational status. Data from the AVF2107g (HR for OS = .55, 95% CI = .43 to .70) and NO16966 trials (HR for OS = .71, 95% CI = .62 to .82 both P < .001) also showed favorable outcomes in patients with left-sided tumors. In both randomized studies, the efficacy of bevacizumab was independent of tumor location. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that primary tumor location is an important prognostic factor in previously untreated mCRC. Given the consistency across an exploratory set and two confirmatory phase III studies, side of tumor origin should be considered for stratification in randomized trials. PMID:25713148

  14. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  15. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  16. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer.

  17. [Molecular biological foundation of targeted therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Lai, Chong; Teng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is increasing. Radical cure by surgery can only be achieved in patients with early stage tumors. How to precisely use antineoplastic agents after surgery is an important problem to be solved. Most metastatic RCCs are pathologically identified as clear cell RCC (ccRCC), thus to develop agents targeting ccRCC is critical. Most clinically available targeted therapies are based on targeting some spots in specific pathways; or based on targeting new anti-tumor mechanisms, such as programmed death-1(PD-1), antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) and stem cells. There is still no targeted therapy having definite effect to most RCC patients. Only von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) pathway so far has been confirmed to be related to ccRCC development and progression; the inactivation of VHL gene causes many significant downstream gene changes. The key proteins involved in VHL pathway may be potential therapeutic targets for ccRCC. In this article, we review the current progress of targeted therapy for RCC, focus on the molecular characteristics of ccRCC, its relation to VHL pathway, the potential therapeutic targets and future clinical application for metastatic ccRCC. PMID:27045248

  18. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Complications of these tumors include: Diabetes Hormone crises (if the tumor releases certain types of hormones) Severe low blood sugar (from insulinomas) Severe ulcers in the stomach and small intestine (from gastrinomas) Spread of the tumor to the liver

  19. The role of pharmacogenomics in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Daniel; Virizuela, Juan Antonio; Cruz, Josefina; Sepulveda, Juan Manuel; Sáez, María Isabel; Sáenz, Maribel; Paz-Ares, Luís

    2012-09-01

    Pharmacogenomics is the study of how variation in the genetic background affects an individual's response to a specific drug and/or its metabolism. Using knowledge about the genes which produce the enzymes that metabolize a specific drug, a physician may decide to raise or lower the dose, or even change to a different drug. Targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors has led to a substantial improvement in the standard of care for patients with advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Although few studies have identified biomarkers that predict the response of targeted drugs in the treatment of metastatic RCC, some associations have been found. Several studies have identified genetic polymorphisms with implications in the pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics of TKIs and mTOR inhibitors and which are associated with a prolonged progression-free survival and/or overall survival in patients with metastatic RCC. Among the genes of interest, we should consider IL8, FGFR2, VEGFA, FLT4, and NR1I2. In this review, we discuss single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with outcome and toxicity following targeted therapies and provide recommendations for future trials to facilitate the use of SNPs in personalized therapy for this disease.

  20. Microscopic validation of whole mouse micro-metastatic tumor imaging agents using cryo-imaging and sliding organ image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiqiao; Zhou, Bo; Qutaish, Mohammed; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    We created a metastasis imaging, analysis platform consisting of software and multi-spectral cryo-imaging system suitable for evaluating emerging imaging agents targeting micro-metastatic tumor. We analyzed CREKA-Gd in MRI, followed by cryo-imaging which repeatedly sectioned and tiled microscope images of the tissue block face, providing anatomical bright field and molecular fluorescence, enabling 3D microscopic imaging of the entire mouse with single metastatic cell sensitivity. To register MRI volumes to the cryo bright field reference, we used our standard mutual information, non-rigid registration which proceeded: preprocess --> affine --> B-spline non-rigid 3D registration. In this report, we created two modified approaches: mask where we registered locally over a smaller rectangular solid, and sliding organ. Briefly, in sliding organ, we segmented the organ, registered the organ and body volumes separately and combined results. Though sliding organ required manual annotation, it provided the best result as a standard to measure other registration methods. Regularization parameters for standard and mask methods were optimized in a grid search. Evaluations consisted of DICE, and visual scoring of a checkerboard display. Standard had accuracy of 2 voxels in all regions except near the kidney, where there were 5 voxels sliding. After mask and sliding organ correction, kidneys sliding were within 2 voxels, and Dice overlap increased 4%-10% in mask compared to standard. Mask generated comparable results with sliding organ and allowed a semi-automatic process.

  1. The Metastatic Potential and Chemoresistance of Human Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J; Bishop, J Michael; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) typically have the capacity to evade chemotherapy and may be the principal source of metastases. CSCs for human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) have been identified, but neither the metastatic potential nor the chemoresistance of these cells has been adequately evaluated. We have addressed these issues by examining side-population (SP) cells isolated from the Panc-1 and BxPC3 lines of human PDAC cells, the oncogenotypes of which differ. SP cells could be isolated from monolayers of Panc-1, but only from spheroids of BxPC3. Using orthotopic xenografts into the severely immunocompromised NSG mouse, we found that SP cells isolated from both cell lines produced tumors that were highly metastatic, in contrast to previous experience with PDAC cell lines. SP cells derived from both cell lines expressed the ABCG2 transporter, which was demonstrably responsible for the SP phenotype. SP cells gave rise to non-SP (NSP) cells in vitro and in vivo, a transition that was apparently due to posttranslational inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter. Twenty-two other lines of PDAC cells also expressed ABCG2. The sensitivity of PDAC SP cells to the vinca alkaloid vincristine could be greatly increased by verapamil, a general inhibitor of transporters. In contrast, verapamil had no effect on the killing of PDAC cells by gemcitabine, the current first-line therapeutic for PDAC. We conclude that the isolation of SP cells can be a convenient and effective tool for the study of PDAC CSCs; that CSCs may be the principal progenitors of metastasis by human PDAC; that the ABCG2 transporter is responsible for the SP phenotype in human PDAC cells, and may be a ubiquitous source of drug-resistance in PDAC, but does not confer resistance to gemcitabine; and that inhibition of ABCG2 might offer a useful adjunct in a therapeutic attack on the CSCs of PDAC. PMID:26859746

  2. Toxicity, immunogenicity, and tumor radioimmunodetecting ability of two human monoclonal antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Steis, R.G.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; McCabe, R.; Bookman, M.A.; Reynolds, J.C.; Larson, S.M.; Smith, J.W. 2d.; Clark, J.W.; Dailey, V.; Del Vecchio, S. )

    1990-03-01

    Two human immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), 16.88 and 28A32, which react with cytoplasmic (28A32 and 16.88) or cell surface (28A32) determinants on human colon carcinoma cells, were administered intravenously to 26 patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma to determine if they could localize to sites of metastatic disease, if they had any antitumor or toxic effects, and to determine whether they would elicit an antihuman MoAb response. Serial scans showed tumor uptake of radioisotope in 12 of 16 patients receiving 131I-labeled 28A32 and in nine of 12 patients receiving 131I-labeled 16.88. No antitumor effects were seen with either antibody. No antibody-related toxic effects were observed following administration of 16.88, but two patients developed localized urticarial reactions following injection with antibody 28A32. No patient developed an antibody response to 16.88. Anti-28A32 reactivity was found in five of 12 (42%) normal sera and in seven of 23 (30%) patients before receiving any antibody. Following administration of 28A32, a low titer (1:10 dilution) of anti-28A32 developed in four patients with no preexisting antibody, a decrease in the preexisting titer was seen in three other patients, the titer remained constant in one patient, and no anti-28A32 was ever detected in six patients. In most cases, anti-28A32 activity was lost at dilutions greater than 1:10 and did not appear to affect antibody half-life in the serum or whole body retention of the antibody. We conclude that these human IgM MoAbs are capable of localizing at sites of disease in vivo, are nontoxic, and are poorly immunogenic in humans. Further studies to determine the specificity of targeting and to improve the delivery of antibody to sites of tumor are indicated.

  3. Multi-course PDT of malignant tumors: the influence on primary tumor, metastatic spreading and homeostasis of cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Sukhin, Garry M.; Nemtsova, E. R.; Belous, T. A.; Zharkova, Natalia N.

    1996-12-01

    The first clinical trials of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer with two photosensitizers, PHOTOHEME and PHOTOSENS, were started in P.A. Hertzen Research Oncological Institute (Moscow, Russia) in 1992 and 1994. Up to now, 208 patients with primary, recurrent and metastatic malignant tumors (469) of skin (34 patients/185 tumors), breast cancer (24/101), head and neck (30/31), trachea and bronchus (31/42), esophagus (35/35), stomach (31/32), rectum (4/4), vagina and uterine cervix (7/8) and bladder (12/31) have been treated by PDT. One-hundred-thirty patients were injected with PHOTOHEME, 64 patients were injected with PHOTOSENS, 14 patients were injected with PHOTOHEME and PHOTOSENS. Totally, 302 courses of treatment were performed: 155 patients had one course and 53 patients were subjected to two to nine PDT sources with intervals from 1 to 18 months. A therapeutic effect of a one-course and multi- course PDT of malignant tumors (respiratory, digestive and urogenital systems) was evaluated clinically, histologically, roentgenologically, sonographically and endoscopically. The biochemical, hematological and immunological investigations were performed for all the patients in dynamics. Results of our study showed that a multi-course PDT method seems to be perspective in treatment of malignant tumors of basic localizations.

  4. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  5. [Principles of adoptive cell therapy based on "Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes"].

    PubMed

    Martins, Filipe; Orcurto, Angela; Michielin, Olivier; Coukos, George

    2016-05-18

    Adoptive cell therapy consists in the use of T lymphocytes for therapeutic purposes. Up to now, of limited use in clinical practice for logistical reasons, technical progress and substantial level of evidence obtained in the last decade allow its arrival in universitary hospitals. We will principally discuss the administration of expanded tumor infiltrating T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This treatment modality exploits the natural specificity of these cells and aims to potentiate their effectiveness. This personalized immunotherapy detains a potential for expansion to many other advanced tumor types. PMID:27424426

  6. Metastatic Breast Cancer With ESR1 Mutation: Clinical Management Considerations From the Molecular and Precision Medicine (MAP) Tumor Board at Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iafrate, John A.; Sundaresan, Tilak; Younger, Jerry; Nardi, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    and mediate resistance to aromatase inhibitors. ESR1 mutations may be detected by genomic sequencing of tissue biopsies of the metastatic tumor or by sequencing the circulating tumor cells or tumor DNA (ctDNA). Sequencing results may lead to a therapeutic “match” with an existing FDA-approved drug or match with an experimental agent that fits the clinical setting. PMID:27551012

  7. Reconstruction of the natural history of metastatic cancer and assessment of the effects of surgery: Gompertzian growth of the primary tumor.

    PubMed

    Hanin, Leonid; Bunimovich-Mendrazitsky, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    This work deals with retrospective reconstruction of the individual natural history of solid cancer and assessment of the effects of treatment on metastatic progression. This is achieved through a mathematical model of cancer progression accounting for the growth of the primary tumor, shedding of metastases, their dormancy and growth at secondary sites. To describe dynamics of the primary tumor, we used the Gompertz law, a parsimonious model of tumor growth accounting for its saturation. Parameters of the model were estimated from the age and volume of the primary tumor at surgery and volumes of detectable bone metastases collected from one breast cancer patient and one prostate cancer patient. This allowed us to estimate, for each patient, the ages at cancer onset and inception of all detected metastases, the expected metastasis latency time, parameters of the Gompertzian growth of the primary tumor, and the rates of growth of metastases before and after surgery. We found that for both patients: (1) onset of metastasis occurred when primary tumor was undetectable; (2) inception of all surveyed metastases except one occurred before surgery; and most importantly, (3) resection of the primary tumor led to a dramatic increase in the rate of growth of metastases. The model provides an excellent fit to the observed volumes of bone metastases in both patients. Our results agree well with those obtained previously based on exponential growth of the primary tumor, which serves as model validation. Our findings support the notion of metastatic dormancy and indirectly confirm the existence of stem-like cancer cells in breast and prostate tumors. We also explored the logistic law of primary tumor growth; however, it degenerated into the exponential law for both patients analyzed. The conclusions of this work are supported by a vast body of experimental, clinical and epidemiological knowledge accumulated over the last century. PMID:24211826

  8. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  9. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with or without surgery for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kirichenko, Alexander; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David; Kudithipudi, Vijay; Tom, Kusum; Khan, Akhtar; Abrams, Peter; Szramowski, Molly; Oliva, Jose; Monga, Dulabh; Raj, Moses; Thai, Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We report single center experience on the outcome and toxicity of SBRT alone or in combination with surgery for inoperable primary and metastatic liver tumors between 2007 and 2014. Patients and methods Patients with 1–4 hepatic lesions and tumor diameter ≤9 cm received SBRT at 46.8Gy ± 3.7 in 4–6 fractions. The primary end point was local control with at least 6 months of radiographic followup, and secondary end points were toxicity and survival. Results Eighty-seven assessable patients (114 lesions) completed liver SBRT for hepatoma (39) or isolated metastases (48) with a median followup of 20.3 months (range 1.9–64.1). Fourteen patients underwent liver transplant with SBRT as a bridging treatment or for tumor downsizing. Eight patients completed hepatic resections in combination with planned SBRT for unresectable tumors. Two-year local control was 96% for hepatoma and 93.8% for metastases; it was 100% for lesions ≤4 cm. Two-year overall survival was 82.3% (hepatoma) and 64.3% (metastases). No incidence of grade >2 treatment toxicity was observed. Conclusion In this retrospective analysis we demonstrate that liver SBRT alone or in combination with surgery is safe and effective for the treatment of isolated inoperable hepatic malignancies and provides excellent local control rates. PMID:26776856

  10. Effect of pedicle fixation combined with 125I seed implantation for metastatic thoracolumbar tumors

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jiale; Bao, Zhaohua; Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy in treating metastatic thoracolumbar tumors. Patients and methods A retrospective analysis of the clinical data of seven metastatic thoracolumbar tumor patients who received pedicle fixation combined with radioactive 125I seed implantation brachytherapy in our department between January 2009 and December 2013 was performed. The visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were observed and recorded. The changes in the scores at each time point were compared. Results All the patients underwent a successful operation, without any complications during their hospitalization. All the patients received postoperative follow-up, and the duration of follow-up was 15–50 months, with an average of 32.2 months. One pancreatic cancer patient died of liver failure and hypoproteinemia 28 months post surgery. The VAS scores of patients before the operation and 1, 6, and 12 months after the operation were 7.43±0.98, 2.71±0.49, 3.00±0.82, and 4.29±0.98, respectively; the KPS scores were 52.9±9.5, 84.3±5.3, 75.7±5.3, and 72.9±4.9, respectively. These results suggest that the VAS score at each time point was significantly decreased compared with that before the operation, while the KPS score was significantly increased compared with that before the operation. Both differences had statistical significance (P<0.05). Conclusion As a therapy for advanced malignant tumors with thoracolumbar metastasis, pedicle fixation combined with 125I brachytherapy can effectively relieve short-term pain and improve patient’s quality of life. PMID:27274307

  11. The cancer stem cell niche: how essential is the niche in regulating stemness of tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Plaks, Vicki; Kong, Niwen; Werb, Zena

    2015-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are tumor cells that have the principal properties of self-renewal, clonal tumor initiation capacity, and clonal long-term repopulation potential. CSCs reside in niches, which are anatomically distinct regions within the tumor microenvironment. These niches maintain the principle properties of CSCs, preserve their phenotypic plasticity, protect them from the immune system, and facilitate their metastatic potential. In this perspective, we focus on the CSC niche and discuss its contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Since CSCs survive many commonly employed cancer therapies, we examine the prospects of targeting the niche components as preferable therapeutic targets. PMID:25748930

  12. The Cancer Stem Cell Niche: How Essential is the Niche in Regulating Stemness of Tumor Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Plaks, Vicki; Kong, Niwen; Werb, Zena

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are tumor cells that have the principal properties of self-renewal, clonal tumor initiation capacity and clonal long-term repopulation potential. CSCs reside in niches, which are anatomically distinct regions within the tumor microenvironment. These niches maintain the principle properties of CSCs, preserve their phenotypic plasticity, protect them from the immune system and facilitate their metastatic potential. In this perspective, we focus on the CSC niche and discuss its contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Since CSCs survive many commonly employed cancer therapies, we examine the prospects of targeting the niche components as preferable therapeutic targets. PMID:25748930

  13. Suppressing effect of resveratrol on the migration and invasion of human metastatic lung and cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Suk; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong

    2012-09-01

    The antioxidant 3,4',5 tri-hydroxystilbene (resveratrol), a phytoalexin found in grapes, shows cancer preventive activities, including inhibition of migration and invasion of metastatic tumors. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of resveratrol on tumor metastasis, especially in human metastatic lung and cervical cancers is not clear. A non-cytotoxic dosage of resveratrol causes a reduction in the generation of reactive oxygen species, and suppresses phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced invasion and migration in both A549 and HeLa cells. Resveratrol also decreases both the expression and the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and the promoter activity of PMA-stimulated MMP-9 is also inhibited. However, resveratrol does not affect either the expression or the proteolytic activity of MMP-2. Our results also show that resveratrol suppresses the transcription of MMP-9 by the inhibition of both NF-κB and AP-1 transactivation. These results indicate that resveratrol inhibits both NF-κB and AP-1 mediated MMP-9 expression, leading to suppression of migration and invasion of human metastatic lung and cervical cancer cells. Resveratrol has potential for clinical use in preventing invasion by human metastatic lung and cervical cancers.

  14. Metastatic colonization potential of primary tumour cells in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, D.; Price, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A model has been developed for studying the capability of cells from primary murine mammary tumours to establish colonies in distant organs. The model involves the i.v. inoculation of disaggregated tumour cells into autologous and syngeneic recipients. The results show that the metastatic colonization potential of cells from a given tumour is consistent within the animals of an inoculated batch. Also, the findings are uniform in the autologous host and the syngeneic recipients. Tumours vary in their colonization potential and can be classified in 2 main groups designated high and low. These findings indicate that: (i) cells from 37% of mammary tumours can heavily colonize the lungs when inoculated i.v., even though the incidence of metastatic spread of these tumours in the undisturbed animal is almost zero. Thus, the relative infrequency of spontaneous metastasis from murine mammary tumours is not due to inability of the tumour cells to survive and colonize once free in the blood stream; and (ii) the colonization potential of the tumours is an intrinsic property of the tumour cells rather than of the host, whose prior acquaintance with the cells does not seem to confer resistance to colonization. The model presents opportunities for identification of possible differences between tumours of high and low colonization potential, and is being used to study cellular properties which favour colonization of distant organs by comparison of observations in vitro with the behaviour of cells from the same tumour in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:444412

  15. Combined analysis of copy number alterations by single-nucleotide polymorphism array and MYC status in non-metastatic breast cancer patients: comparison according to the circulating tumor cell status.

    PubMed

    Nadal, R; Salido, M; Nonell, L; Rodríguez-Rivera, M; Puigdecanet, E; Garcia-Puche, J L; Macià, M; Corominas, J M; Serrano, M J; Lorente, J A; Solé, F

    2015-02-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in operable breast cancer patients. Whether the presence of CTCs in cancer patients correlates with molecular alterations in the primary tumor has not been widely explored. We identified 14 primary breast cancer specimens with known CTC status, in order to evaluate the presence of differential genetic aberrations by using SNP array assay. There was a global increase of altered genome, CNA, and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (cn-LOH) observed in the CTC-positive (CTC(+)) versus CTC-negative (CTC(-)) cases. As the preliminary results showed a higher proportion of copy number alteration (CNA) at 8q24 (MYC loci) and the available evidence supporting the role of MYC in the processes cancer metastases is conflicting, MYC status was determined in tissue microarray sections in a larger series of patients (n = 49) with known CTC status using FISH. MYC was altered in 62% (16/26) CTC(+) patients and in 43% (6/14) CTC(-) patients (p = 0.25). Based on the observation in our study, future studies involving a larger number of patients should be performed in order to definitively define if this correlation exists.

  16. Combined analysis of copy number alterations by single-nucleotide polymorphism array and MYC status in non-metastatic breast cancer patients: comparison according to the circulating tumor cell status.

    PubMed

    Nadal, R; Salido, M; Nonell, L; Rodríguez-Rivera, M; Puigdecanet, E; Garcia-Puche, J L; Macià, M; Corominas, J M; Serrano, M J; Lorente, J A; Solé, F

    2015-02-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in operable breast cancer patients. Whether the presence of CTCs in cancer patients correlates with molecular alterations in the primary tumor has not been widely explored. We identified 14 primary breast cancer specimens with known CTC status, in order to evaluate the presence of differential genetic aberrations by using SNP array assay. There was a global increase of altered genome, CNA, and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (cn-LOH) observed in the CTC-positive (CTC(+)) versus CTC-negative (CTC(-)) cases. As the preliminary results showed a higher proportion of copy number alteration (CNA) at 8q24 (MYC loci) and the available evidence supporting the role of MYC in the processes cancer metastases is conflicting, MYC status was determined in tissue microarray sections in a larger series of patients (n = 49) with known CTC status using FISH. MYC was altered in 62% (16/26) CTC(+) patients and in 43% (6/14) CTC(-) patients (p = 0.25). Based on the observation in our study, future studies involving a larger number of patients should be performed in order to definitively define if this correlation exists. PMID:25286758

  17. Multimodal Approach to the Management of Metastatic Epidural Spinal Cord Compression (MESCC) Due to Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Tancioni, Flavio; Navarria, Pierina; Lorenzetti, Martin A.; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Masci, Giovanna; Mancosu, Pietro; Alloisio, Marco; Morenghi, Emanuela; Santoro, Armando; Rodriguez y Baena, Riccardo; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of a multidisciplinary approach for treatment of patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression in terms of feasibility, local control, and survival. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine consecutive patients treated between January 2004 and December 2007 were included. The most common primary cancers were lung, breast, and kidney cancers. Ninety-eight surgical procedures were performed. Radiotherapy was performed within the first month postoperatively. Clinical outcome was evaluated by modified visual analog scale for pain, Frankel scale for neurologic deficit, and magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. Nearly all patients (93%) had back pain before treatment, whereas major or minor preoperative neurologic deficit was present in 62 cases (63%). Results: Clinical remission of pain was obtained in the vast majority of patients (91%). Improvement of neurologic deficit was observed in 45 cases (72.5%). Local relapse occurred in 10%. Median survival was 11 months (range, 0-46 months). Overall survival at 1 year was 43.6%. Type of primary tumor significantly affected survival. Conclusions: In patients with metastatic epidural spinal cord compression, the combination of surgery plus radiotherapy is feasible and provides clinical benefit in most patients. The discussion of each single case within a multidisciplinary team has been of pivotal importance in implementing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  18. Increased efficiency of immunotherapy using irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, J M; Fitzgerald, J; Sonis, S; Ravikumar, T; Wilson, R

    1987-01-01

    The efficacy of irradiated tumor cells combined with chemotherapy or non-specific immunostimulation with complete Freund's adjuvant was tested in a model of minimal residual tumor-bearing syngeneic mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were innoculated in the right rear leg with live tumor cells from a methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma. The tumor was resected when it reached 0.7 cm in diameter and animals were treated with doses of irradiated tumor cells (XTC) from the primary tumor ranging in number from 1 X 10(3) to 9 X 10(3). Best survival was noted using 5 X 10(3) XTC combined with irradiated tumor cells of liver or pulmonary metastases origin, complete Freund's adjuvant or cytoxan. The combination of irradiated tumor cells of metastatic origin did not enhance the therapeutic effect of XTC alone. Freund's adjuvant was not of benefit in enhancing the efficacy of XTC. However, improved survival was noted when chemotherapy in the form of cytoxan was used to supplement XTC. Our data suggests that XTC is more efficacious as a mode of immunotherapy than are live tumor cells. The dose of XTC used is critical in determining its effect. Chemotherapy appears to enhance the benefit of XTC.

  19. Registered report: Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, Francesca; Doroudchi, M Mehdi; Ismail, Nawfal; Carreno, Alberto; Griner, Erin; Anna Lim, Minyoung; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by replicating selected results from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology published between 2010 and 2012. This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization’ by Malanchi and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Malanchi et al., 2012). The key experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2H, 3A, 3B, and S13. In these experiments, Malanchi and colleagues analyze messenger RNA levels of periostin (POSTN) in pulmonary fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells isolated from mice with micrometastases to determine which cell type is producing POSTN in the metastatic niche (Figure 2H; Malanchi et al., 2012). Additionally, they examine MMTV-PyMT control or POSTN null mice to test the effect of POSTN on primary tumor growth and metastasis (Figures 3A, 3B, and S13; Malanchi et al., 2012). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06938.001 PMID:26086719

  20. Registered report: Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization.

    PubMed

    Incardona, Francesca; Doroudchi, M Mehdi; Ismail, Nawfal; Carreno, Alberto; Griner, Erin; Anna Lim, Minyoung

    2015-06-18

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by replicating selected results from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology published between 2010 and 2012. This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from 'Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization' by Malanchi and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Malanchi et al., 2012). The key experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2H, 3A, 3B, and S13. In these experiments, Malanchi and colleagues analyze messenger RNA levels of periostin (POSTN) in pulmonary fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells isolated from mice with micrometastases to determine which cell type is producing POSTN in the metastatic niche (Figure 2H; Malanchi et al., 2012). Additionally, they examine MMTV-PyMT control or POSTN null mice to test the effect of POSTN on primary tumor growth and metastasis (Figures 3A, 3B, and S13; Malanchi et al., 2012). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published in eLife.

  1. Metastasis signatures: genes regulating tumor-microenvironment interactions predict metastatic behavior.

    PubMed

    Albini, Adriana; Mirisola, Valentina; Pfeffer, Ulrich

    2008-03-01

    The possibility of predicting clinical outcome of cancer patients through the analysis of gene expression profiles in the primary tumor is a kind of ideological revolution as the multistep carcinogenesis model postulates that the proportion of cells within the primary tumor that actually acquire metastasis driving mutation(s) is small; too small to leave its imprint on the gene expression profile. The data collected to date have brought a new paradigm to reality in the metastasis field: metastasis must at least in part rely on mutations and/or gene regulation events present in the majority of cells which constitute the primary tumor mass. By analyses of differential expression of primary tumors versus metastases or by functional analyses of putative metastasis genes in experimental metastasis, many metastasis-associated gene expression events have been identified that correlate with the development of metastases. Among genes "favoring" metastasis, we find many molecules that are expressed not by the tumor cell itself but by the cells of the microenvironment, as well as genes over-expressed in the primary tumor that have a principle role in mediating tumor-host interactions. Here we review these concepts and advance hypotheses on how gene expression of the primary tumor and the microenvironment can favor the spread of the metastasis seeds and how this knowledge can provide tools to secondary prevention.

  2. Hitting the Bull’s-Eye in Metastatic Cancers—NSAIDs Elevate ROS in Mitochondria, Inducing Malignant Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stephen John; Pritchard, Rhys; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ralph, Raymond Keith

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastases that impede the function of vital organs are a major cause of cancer related mortality. Mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by hypoxia, low nutrient levels, or other stresses, such as genotoxic events, act as key drivers of the malignant changes in primary tumors to enhance their progression to metastasis. Emerging evidence now indicates that mitochondrial modifications and mutations resulting from oxidative stress, and leading to OxPhos stimulation and/or enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, are essential for promoting and sustaining the highly metastatic phenotype. Moreover, the modified mitochondria in emerging or existing metastatic cancer cells, by their irreversible differences, provide opportunities for selectively targeting their mitochondrial functions with a one-two punch. The first blow would block their anti-oxidative defense, followed by the knockout blow—promoting production of excess ROS, capitulating the terminal stage—activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), specifically killing metastatic cancer cells or their precursors. This review links a wide area of research relevant to cellular mechanisms that affect mitochondria activity as a major source of ROS production driving the pro-oxidative state in metastatic cancer cells. Each of the important aspects affecting mitochondrial function are discussed including: hypoxia, HIFs and PGC1 induced metabolic changes, increased ROS production to induce a more pro-oxidative state with reduced antioxidant defenses. It then focuses on how the mitochondria, as a major source of ROS in metastatic cancer cells driving the pro-oxidative state of malignancy enables targeting drugs affecting many of these altered processes and why the NSAIDs are an excellent example of mitochondria-targeted agents that provide a one-two knockout activating the mPTP and their efficacy as selective anticancer metastasis drugs. PMID:25688484

  3. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, K.; Janetopoulos, C.; Terekhov, A.; Hofmeister, W.; Vilgelm, A.; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J. P.; Richmond, A.

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the “single file” pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  4. T Cells Contribute to Tumor Progression by Favoring Pro-Tumoral Properties of Intra-Tumoral Myeloid Cells in a Mouse Model for Spontaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Jonathan; Douguet, Laetitia; Garcette, Marylène; Kato, Masashi; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Bercovici, Nadège; Lucas, Bruno; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle

    2011-01-01

    Tumors affect myelopoeisis and induce the expansion of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity. In the MT/ret model of spontaneous metastatic melanoma, myeloid cells are the most abundant tumor infiltrating hematopoietic population and their proportion is highest in the most aggressive cutaneous metastasis. Our data suggest that the tumor microenvironment favors polarization of myeloid cells into type 2 cells characterized by F4/80 expression, a weak capacity to secrete IL-12 and a high production of arginase. Myeloid cells from tumor and spleen of MT/ret mice inhibit T cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion. Interestingly, T cells play a role in type 2 polarization of myeloid cells. Indeed, intra-tumoral myeloid cells from MT/ret mice lacking T cells are not only less suppressive towards T cells than corresponding cells from wild-type MT/ret mice, but they also inhibit more efficiently melanoma cell proliferation. Thus, our data support the existence of a vicious circle, in which T cells may favor cancer development by establishing an environment that is likely to skew myeloid cell immunity toward a tumor promoting response that, in turn, suppresses immune effector cell functions. PMID:21633700

  5. Case study of the morphologic variation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Bruce, Richard H; Curry, Douglas N; Hsieh, Ben; Humphrey, Mark; Krivacic, Robert T; Kroener, Joan; Kroener, Lindsay; Ladanyi, Andras; Lazarus, Nicole H; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2007-03-01

    We report a detailed cytomorphologic evaluation of the circulating component of widely metastatic breast carcinoma. A previously healthy 38-year-old woman was diagnosed with breast cancer. Wide local excision revealed a 1.7-cm infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma, BSR score 7/9 with angiolymphatic invasion, and 4/20 lymph nodes positive for carcinoma. Five years later, a bone marrow biopsy revealed involvement of bone marrow by metastatic breast carcinoma, and shortly thereafter, metastases were identified in the liver and lung hilum. She enrolled in a clinical investigation for the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in breast carcinoma. A total of 659 CTCs were identified in a 10-mL blood sample using an immunofluorescent protocol targeting cytokeratins and detected using fiber-optic array scanning technology. The detected CTCs were subsequently stained with a Wright-Giemsa stain, and representative cells were evaluated in detail by light microscopy for morphologic evaluation. We find that the patient's CTCs exhibit a high degree of pleomorphism including CTCs with high and low nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratios along with CTCs exhibiting early and late apoptotic changes. In addition, in comparison with her tumor cells in other sites, the full morphologic spectrum of cancer cells present in primary and metastatic tumor is also present in peripheral blood circulation. PMID:17188328

  6. The NOMS Framework: Approach to the Treatment of Spinal Metastatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Ilya; Rubin, David G.; Lis, Eric; Cox, Brett W.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2013-01-01

    Background. Spinal metastases frequently arise in patients with cancer. Modern oncology provides numerous treatment options that include effective systemic, radiation, and surgical options. We delineate and provide the evidence for the neurologic, oncologic, mechanical, and systemic (NOMS) decision framework, which is used at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to determine the optimal therapy for patients with spine metastases. Methods. We provide a literature review of the integral publications that serve as the basis for the NOMS framework and report the results of systematic implementation of the NOMS-guided treatment. Results. The NOMS decision framework consists of the neurologic, oncologic, mechanical, and systemic considerations and incorporates the use of conventional external beam radiation, spinal stereotactic radiosurgery, and minimally invasive and open surgical interventions. Review of radiation oncology and surgical literature that examine the outcomes of treatment of spinal metastatic tumors provides support for the NOMS decision framework. Application of the NOMS paradigm integrates multimodality therapy to optimize local tumor control, pain relief, and restoration or preservation of neurologic function and minimizes morbidity in this often systemically ill patient population. Conclusion. NOMS paradigm provides a decision framework that incorporates sentinel decision points in the treatment of spinal metastases. Consideration of the tumor sensitivity to radiation in conjunction with the extent of epidural extension allows determination of the optimal radiation treatment and the need for surgical decompression. Mechanical stability of the spine and the systemic disease considerations further help determine the need and the feasibility of surgical intervention. PMID:23709750

  7. [The first experience in interstitial brachytherapy for primary and metastatic tumors of the brain].

    PubMed

    Bentsion, D L; Gvozdev, P B; Sakovich, V P; Fialko, N V; Kolotvinov, V S; Baiankina, S N

    2006-01-01

    In 2001-2002, the authors performed a course of brachytherapy in 15 patients with inoperable primary, recurrent, and metastatic brain tumors. The histostructural distribution was as follows: low-grade astrocytoma (grade II according to the WHO classification) in 2 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) in 3, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in 5. Five patients had solid tumor deposits in the brain. Computer tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were used to define a path for forthcoming biopsy and implantation at a "Stryker" navigation station, by taking into account the anatomy of the brain, vessels, and functionally significant areas. After having histological findings, plastic intrastats whose number had been determined by the volume of a target were implanted into a tumor by the predetermined path. Dosimetric planning was accomplished by using CT and MRI images on an "Abacus" system. The final stage involved irradiation on a "GammaMed plus" with a source of 192Ir. Irradiation was given, by hyperfractionating its dose (3-4 Gy twice daily at an interval of 4-5 hours) to the total focal dose (TFD) of 36-44 Gy. Patients with gliomas untreated with radiation also underwent external radiation in a TFD of 54-56 Gy and patients with brain metastases received total external irradiation of the brain in a TFD of 36-40 Gy. The tolerance of a course of irradiation was fair. In patients with AA and GBM, one-year survival was observed in 66 and 60%, respectively; in those having metastasis, it was in 20%. Six patients died from progressive disease. All patients with low-grade astrocytoma and one patient with anaplastic astrocytoma were alive at month 24 after treatment termination. The mean lifespan of patients with malignant gliomas and solid tumor metastasis was 11.5 and 5.8 months, respectively. Brachytherapy is a noninvasive and tolerable mode of radiotherapy that increases survival in some groups of patients with inoperable brain tumors.

  8. Gastric-type Endocervical Adenocarcinoma: An Aggressive Tumor With Unusual Metastatic Patterns and Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J

    2015-11-01

    Gastric-type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of 3 institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (1 Li-Fraumeni, 1 Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II to IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least 1 site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 mo); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease-specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS versus 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon.

  9. Pericardial effusion associated with metastatic disease from an unknown primary tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, J A; Dhupa, S; Cornell, K K

    2000-01-01

    A 6.5-year-old, spayed female Siberian husky presented with signs of cardiac tamponade and weakness. Pleural, pericardial, and abdominal effusion were identified with radiographs and ultrasound. Pericardiocentesis relieved signs of tamponade, and the dog was clinically improved. Pericardial effusion recurred, and pericardiectomy was performed. Histopathological examination of excised tissues failed to reveal evidence of infectious or neoplastic disease. After pericardiectomy, clinically apparent thoracic effusion persisted. The dog was euthanized, and postmortem histopathological examination revealed emboli of metastatic carcinoma cells in the epicardium. The location of intrathoracic disease in this dog made antemortem diagnosis difficult, if not impossible.

  10. Fluorescence in situ hybridization as an adjunct tool in the diagnosis of primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in fine needle aspiration specimens.

    PubMed

    Kos, Zuzana; Williams, Phillip A; Belanger, Eric C; Mai, Kien T

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the role of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in the diagnosis of primary renal neoplasms and lesions suspicious for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Consecutive fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of 39 renal masses and 41 metastatic tumours suspicious for renal cell origin were assessed with an immunohistochemical panel for CK7, RCC antigen, CD10, AMACR, PAX8, vimentin, and CD117. In addition, FISH was performed using probes for chromosomes 1p, 3p, 7, 17, X, and Y. A total of 31 of 39 primary renal masses and 33 of 41 metastatic tumors suspicious for renal origin demonstrated typical cytological and immunohistochemical (IHC) features of subtypes of renal neoplasms (40 clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), 20 papillary RCC, and 4 renal oncocytomas). FISH analysis of 15 randomly selected cases each of primary and metastatic lesions revealed chromosomal abnormalities consistent with the diagnosis in 73% of these cases. Of 8 primary renal masses demonstrating atypical microscopic features and noncontributory IHC profiles, FISH was helpful in subtyping 5 (62%) of these lesions (2 clear cell RCC, 1 solid variant of oncocytic papillary RCC, 1 mixed clear cell and papillary RCC, and 1 chromophobe RCC with papillary architecture). Of 8 metastatic tumors clinically suspicious for renal cell origin and supportive, but nondiagnostic IHC, FISH revealed supportive chromosomal changes in 6 (75%) cases. In conclusion FISH analysis on FNAB material, even with limited tissue, may be contributory to the diagnosis and subtyping of RCC in diagnostically challenging biopsies. PMID:24692327

  11. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of the liver coexisting with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Moraes Neto, Francisco Alves; Agaimy, Abbas; Custodio Domingues, Maria Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2008-02-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) develop other neoplasms, either synchronously or metachronously. In this report we describe coexistence of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor and a hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) in a 51-year-old woman with no evidence of tuberous sclerosis. A subcapsular hepatic nodule (0.8 cm in diameter) was found during surgery for symptomatic gastric neoplasm (15 cm in diameter) arising from the lesser curvature. Both tumors revealed histomorphological and immunohistochemical features confirming a diagnosis of a small incidental hepatic PEComa and a high risky extramural gastric GIST, respectively. The patient remained disease-free 25 mo after surgery with no evidence of tumor recurrence or new neoplasms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PEComa in a patient with GIST. Hepatic lesions detected synchronously or metachronously in patients with GISTs may represent histogenetically distinct lesions and should be sampled to confirm or exclude metastatic GISTs.

  12. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  13. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. PMID:26216635

  14. Atlas of hepatic tumors and focal lesions: Arteriographic and tomographic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, O.; Schwartz, S.I.

    1984-01-01

    This book describes the diagnosis of liver tumors. Topics considered include general considerations, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma, mesenchyomoma, sarcoma, hemangioma, hepatic cell adenoma, focal nodular hyperlasia (FNH), hamartoma, echinococcus cyst, abscess, AV fistula, hepatic artery aneurysm, metastatic carcinoma-colon, metastatic cholangiocarcinoma, metastatic melanoma, metastatic merkel cell and extrahepatic tumor.

  15. Multi-Target Approach to Metastatic Adrenal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Norasyikin A; Zainudin, Suehazlyn; AbAziz, Aini; Mustafa, Norlaila; Sukor, Norlela; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2016-09-01

    Adrenal cell carcinoma is a rare tumor and more than 70% of patients present with advanced stages. Adrenal cell carcinoma is an aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. Surgical intervention is the gold standard treatment and mitotane is the only drug approved for the treatment of adrenal cell carcinoma. Until recently in 2012, the etoposide, doxorubicin, cisplatin plus mitotane are approved as first-line therapy based on response rate and progression-free survival. This case illustrates a case of advanced adrenal cell carcinoma in a young girl who presented with huge adrenal mass with inferior vena cava thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. Multi-approach of therapy was used to control the tumor size and metastasis. Therefore, it may prolong her survival rate for up to 5 years and 4 months. PMID:27631184

  16. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  17. EphA2-mediated mesenchymal-amoeboid transition induced by endothelial progenitor cells enhances metastatic spread due to cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Elisa; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Parri, Matteo; Bianchini, Francesca; Santosuosso, Michela; Grifantini, Renata; Fibbi, Gabriella; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Calorini, Lido; Chiarugi, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Tumor progression is deeply influenced by epigenetic changes induced by tumor stroma. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have been reported to promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer cells, thereby enhancing their aggressiveness and stem-like properties. As CAFs are able to recruit endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to tumor site, we aim to investigate their interplay for prostate carcinoma progression. Both prostate CAFs and cancer cells actively recruit EPCs, known to affect tumor progression through increased vasculogenesis. EPCs synergize with CAFs to further promote epigenetic plasticity of cancer cells, through a mesenchymal-to-amoeboid transition. Indeed, after fibroblasts have engaged epithelial-mesenchymal transition in cancer cells, a further shift towards amoeboid motility is promoted by EPCs through contact-mediated triggering of the bidirectional ephrinA1/EphA2 signaling. The activation of ephrinA1 reverse pathway enhances EPC-induced neo-vascularization, thus promoting tumor growth, while EphA2 forward signaling elicits mesenchymal-amoeboid transition in cancer cells, favoring their adhesion to endothelium, transendothelial migration, and lung metastatic colonization. We therefore underscore that the metastatic advantage given by tumor microenvironment embraces different motility strategies and propose EphA2-targeted tools as useful adjuvants in anti-metastatic treatments.

  18. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  19. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  20. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  1. FTY720 induces apoptosis in B16F10-NEX2 murine melanoma cells, limits metastatic development in vivo, and modulates the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Felipe V.; Arruda, Denise C.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Massaoka, Mariana H.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Bueno, Valquiria; Rodrigues, Elaine G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Available chemotherapy presents poor control over the development of metastatic melanoma. FTY720 is a compound already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. It has also been observed that FTY720 inhibits tumor growth in vivo (experimental models) and in vitro (animal and human tumor cells). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of FTY720 on a metastatic melanoma model and in tumor cell lines. METHODS: We analyzed FTY720 efficacy in vivo in a syngeneic murine metastatic melanoma model, in which we injected tumor cells intravenously into C57BL/6 mice and then treated the mice orally with the compound for 7 days. We also treated mice and human tumor cell lines with FTY720 in vitro, and cell viability and death pathways were analyzed. RESULTS: FTY720 treatment limited metastatic melanoma growth in vivo and promoted a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of murine and human tumor cells in vitro. Melanoma cells treated with FTY720 exhibited characteristics of programmed cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, and increased β-catenin expression. In addition, FTY720 treatment resulted in an immunomodulatory effect in vivo by decreasing the percentage of Foxp3+ cells, without interfering with CD8+ T cells or lymphocyte-producing interferon-gamma. CONCLUSION: Further studies are needed using FTY720 as a monotherapy or in combined therapy, as different types of cancer cells would require a variety of signaling pathways to be extinguished. PMID:23917669

  2. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-03-26

    The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One of the active regimens identified is the combination of bevacizumab and interferon-α. Recently published reports provided evidence of the clinical and biologic activity of this therapy. The current manuscript reviews the background and rationale for the activity of bevacizumab in RCC, and results from recent clinical trials with this agent alone or in combination with targeted agents or cytokines. The role of this therapy in contrast to other targeted agents is reviewed, and the potential utility as well as questions raised by recent studies are discussed.

  3. Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiotherapy Alone for Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression From Unfavorable Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bajrovic, Amira; Karstens, Johann H.; Adamietz, Irenaeus A.; Kazic, Nadja; Rudat, Volker; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Despite a previously published randomized trial, controversy exists regarding the benefit of adding surgery to radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). It is thought that patients with MSCC from relatively radioresistant tumors or tumors associated with poor functional outcome after radiotherapy alone may benefit from surgery. This study focuses on these tumors. Methods and Materials: Data from 67 patients receiving surgery plus radiotherapy (S+RT) were matched to 134 patients (1:2) receiving radiotherapy alone (RT). Groups were matched for 10 factors and compared for motor function, ambulatory status, local control, and survival. Additional separate matched-pair analyses were performed for patients receiving direct decompressive surgery plus stabilization of involved vertebrae (DDSS) and patients receiving laminectomy (LE). Results: Improvement of motor function occurred in 22% of patients after S+RT and 16% after RT (p = 0.25). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 67% and 61%, respectively (p = 0.68). Of nonambulatory patients, 29% and 19% (p = 0.53) regained ambulatory status. One-year local control rates were 85% and 89% (p = 0.87). One-year survival rates were 38% and 24% (p = 0.20). The matched-pair analysis of patients receiving LE showed no significant differences between both therapies. In the matched-pair analysis of patients receiving DDSS, improvement of motor function occurred more often after DDSS+RT than RT (28% vs. 19%, p = 0.024). Posttreatment ambulatory rates were 86% and 67% (p = 0.30); 45% and 18% of patients regained ambulatory status (p = 0.29). Conclusions: Patients with MSCC from an unfavorable primary tumor appeared to benefit from DDSS but not LE when added to radiotherapy in terms of improved functional outcome.

  4. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  5. Infiltrating S100A8+ myeloid cells promote metastatic spread of human breast cancer and predict poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Drews-Elger, Katherine; Iorns, Elizabeth; Dias, Alexandra; Miller, Philip; Ward, Toby M; Dean, Sonja; Clarke, Jennifer; Campion-Flora, Adriana; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Rae, James M; Thomas, Dafydd; Berry, Deborah; El-Ashry, Dorraya; Lippman, Marc E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms by which breast cancer (BrC) can successfully metastasize are complex and not yet fully understood. Our goal was to identify tumor-induced stromal changes that influence metastatic cell behavior, and may serve as better targets for therapy. To identify stromal changes in cancer-bearing tissue, dual-species gene expression analysis was performed for three different metastatic BrC xenograft models. Results were confirmed by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and protein knockdown. These results were validated in human clinical samples at the mRNA and protein level by retrospective analysis of cohorts of human BrC specimens. In pre-clinical models of BrC, systemic recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells-including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs)-was promoted by tumor-derived factors. Recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells was diminished by inhibition of tumor-derived factors or depletion of MDSCs, resulting in fewer metastases and smaller primary tumors. Importantly, these MDSCs retain their ability to suppress T cell proliferation upon co-culture. Secretion of macrophage inhibitory factor (MIF) activated the recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells systemically. Inhibition of MIF, or depletion of MDSCs resulted in delayed tumor growth and lower metastatic burden. In human BrC specimens, increased mRNA and protein levels of S100A8+ infiltrating cells are highly associated with poor overall survival and shorter metastasis free survival of BrC patients, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of nine different human gene expression datasets confirms the association of increased levels of S100A8 transcripts with an increased risk of death. Recruitment of S100A8+ myeloid cells to primary tumors and secondary sites in xenograft models of BrC enhances cancer progression independent of their suppressive activity on T cells. In clinical samples, infiltrating S100A8+ cells are associated with poor overall survival. Targeting these molecules or associated pathways

  6. Overexpression of Metastatic Related MicroRNAs, Mir-335 and Mir-10b, by Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B in the Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Heidary, Mohammad Foad; Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Mehdizadeh Aghdam, Elnaz; Nourani, Mohammad Reza; Ranjbar, Reza; Mirnejad, Reza; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: One of the advanced cancer therapy strategies is immune-stimulating compound based immunotherapy Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is one of the potent superantigens, which can efficiently activate antitumor immune response to eradicate tumor growth and inhibit metastasis. Herein, we evaluated the effect of SEB on the expression of two master microRNAs, mir-335 and mir-10b, involved in metastasis. Methods: A metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231was treated with four different concentrations of SEB, including 10, 102, 103 and 104 ng/ml, for 24 and 48 hours. To identify the cytotoxic effect of SEB, treated cells were examined by MTT assay. The stem loop RT-PCR (TaqMan) was used to analyze the mir-335 and mir-10b expression. Results: Results showed that SEB significantly increased the expression of mir-335 both after 24 and 48 hours (pv < 0.001 and pv < 0.05, respectively). No significant differences were found in the mir-10b expression. Conclusion: Moreover, our findings demonstrated no cytotoxic effect of SEB on the treated cells. Our results suggest that SEB probably induces its anti-metastatic effect via the expression regulation of the main genes which contributes to metastasis. PMID:26236665

  7. Effective palliative treatment of metastatic carcinoid tumors with intra-arterial chemotherapy/chemoembolization combined with octreotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Hajarizadeh, H; Ivancev, K; Mueller, C R; Fletcher, W S; Woltering, E A

    1992-05-01

    Survival in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors is dependent on control of tumor growth and adequate palliation of vasoactive amine-induced symptoms of flushing, diarrhea, wheezing, and valvular heart disease. Eight patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were treated with long-term octreotide acetate therapy (100 to 500 micrograms three times a day), intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil infusion (2 g/day x 5 days), and hepatic tumor chemoembolization. All eight patients became asymptomatic and have remained so with a mean follow-up duration of 22 months from the time of first infusion. Following institution of subcutaneous octreotide acetate, intra-arterial infusion, and tumor chemoembolization, all patients are alive with a mean survival of 40 months from the time of diagnosis of carcinoid syndrome (range: 2 to 108 months). Four patients had greater than a 50% decrease in tumor size after therapy (mean follow-up duration: 10.6 months), and the other four patients have had stable disease after institution of therapy. It appears that combinations of long-term subcutaneous administration of octreotide acetate, intra-arterial 5-fluorouracil, and tumor chemoembolization effectively control progressive liver metastasis and provide excellent symptomatic palliation in patients with hepatic metastasis from functional carcinoid tumors.

  8. Hotspot mutation panel testing reveals clonal evolution in a study of 265 paired primary and metastatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Rashmi S.; Patel, Keyur P.; Singh, Rajesh R.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kopetz, E. Scott; Subbiah, Vivek; Alvarez, Ricardo H.; Davies, Michael A.; Jabbar, Kausar J.; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Lazar, Alexander J.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Broaddus, Russell R.; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Routbort, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We used a clinical next-generation sequencing hotspot mutation panel to investigate clonal evolution in paired primary and metastatic tumors. Experimental Design A total of 265 primary and metastatic tumor pairs were sequenced using a 46-gene cancer mutation panel capable of detecting one or more single nucleotide variants as well as small insertions/deletions. Mutations were tabulated together with tumor type and percentage, mutational variant frequency, time interval between onset of primary tumor and metastasis, and neoadjuvant therapy status. Results 227 of 265 (85.7%) tumor-metastasis pairs showed identical mutation calls. Of the tumor pairs with identical mutation calls, 160 (60.4%) possessed defining somatic mutation signatures and 67 (25.3%) did not exhibit any somatic mutations. There were 38 (14.3%) cases that showed at least one novel mutation call between the primary and metastasis. Metastases were almost two times more likely to show novel mutations (n=20, 7.5%) than primary tumors (n=12, 4.5%). TP53 was the most common additionally mutated gene in metastatic lesions, followed by PIK3CA and SMAD4. PIK3CA mutations were more often associated with metastasis in colon carcinoma samples. Conclusions Clinical next-generation sequencing hotspot panels can be useful in analyzing clonal evolution within tumors as well as in determining subclonal mutations that can expand in future metastases. PIK3CA, SMAD4 and TP53 are most often involved in clonal divergence, providing potential targets that may help guide the clinical management of tumor progression or metastases. PMID:25695693

  9. High-resolution profiling of histone h3 lysine 36 trimethylation in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ho, T H; Park, I Y; Zhao, H; Tong, P; Champion, M D; Yan, H; Monzon, F A; Hoang, A; Tamboli, P; Parker, A S; Joseph, R W; Qiao, W; Dykema, K; Tannir, N M; Castle, E P; Nunez-Nateras, R; Teh, B T; Wang, J; Walker, C L; Hung, M-C; Jonasch, E

    2016-03-24

    Mutations in SETD2, a histone H3 lysine trimethyltransferase, have been identified in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC); however it is unclear if loss of SETD2 function alters the genomic distribution of histone 3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) in ccRCC. Furthermore, published epigenomic profiles are not specific to H3K36me3 or metastatic tumors. To determine if progressive SETD2 and H3K36me3 dysregulation occurs in metastatic tumors, H3K36me3, SETD2 copy number (CN) or SETD2 mRNA abundance was assessed in two independent cohorts: metastatic ccRCC (n=71) and the Cancer Genome Atlas Kidney Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma data set (n=413). Although SETD2 CN loss occurs with high frequency (>90%), H3K36me3 is not significantly impacted by monoallelic loss of SETD2. H3K36me3-positive nuclei were reduced an average of ~20% in primary ccRCC (90% positive nuclei in uninvolved vs 70% positive nuclei in ccRCC) and reduced by ~60% in metastases (90% positive in uninvolved kidney vs 30% positive in metastases) (P<0.001). To define a kidney-specific H3K36me3 profile, we generated genome-wide H3K36me3 profiles from four cytoreductive nephrectomies and SETD2 isogenic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput DNA sequencing and RNA sequencing. SETD2 loss of methyltransferase activity leads to regional alterations of H3K36me3 associated with aberrant RNA splicing in a SETD2 mutant RCC and SETD2 knockout cell line. These data suggest that during progression of ccRCC, a decline in H3K36me3 is observed in distant metastases, and regional H3K36me3 alterations influence alternative splicing in ccRCC.

  10. Analysis of potential response predictors to capecitabine/temozolomide in metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Cives, M; Ghayouri, M; Morse, B; Brelsford, M; Black, M; Rizzo, A; Meeker, A; Strosberg, J

    2016-09-01

    The capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM) regimen is active in the treatment of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs), with response rates ranging from 30 to 70%. Small retrospective studies suggest that O(6)-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency predicts response to temozolomide. High tumor proliferative activity is also commonly perceived as a significant predictor of response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. It is unclear whether chromosomal instability (CIN), which correlates with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), is a predictive factor. In this study, we evaluated 143 patients with advanced pNET who underwent treatment with CAPTEM for radiographic and biochemical response. MGMT expression (n=52), grade (n=128) and ALT activation (n=46) were investigated as potential predictive biomarkers. Treatment with CAPTEM was associated with an overall response rate (ORR) of 54% by RECIST 1.1. Response to CAPTEM was not influenced by MGMT expression, proliferative activity or ALT pathway activation. Based on these results, no biomarker-driven selection criteria for use of the CAPTEM regimen can be recommended at this time.

  11. Influence of preharvest tumor cell contamination in bone marrow or blood does not predict resultant tumor cell contamination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Kröger, N; Tögel, F; Badbaran, A; Renges, H; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell contamination of stem cell collections harvested from breast cancer patients is a common phenomenon described by several investigators but with findings that vary among reports. Although so-called co-mobilization of these cells has been hypothesized, the origin of tumor cell contamination in stem cells is still unknown. A total of 47 G-CSF mobilized stem cell grafts from patients with nodal-positive (n = 30), chemosensitive metastatic (n = 11), and 5 women with inflammatory breast cancer were evaluated for cancer cells by immunocytochemistry. Additionally, 40 bone marrow aspirations and 23 peripheral blood samples collected prior to apheresis and after one to two cycles of conventional chemotherapy were available for examination. Tumor cell contamination of leukapheresis correlated best with preharvest blood state. This was valid when the nominal (positive/negative) presence of tumor cells in blood was compared to the nominal presence of tumor cells in apheresis samples and when the it was correlated to the tumor cell load of apheresis samples (TCL = tumor cells per 10(6) nucleated cells investigated). The correlation between blood and stem cells was better (nominal and quantitative) than that between marrow and stem cells, despite the larger sample size of marrow aspirations. The presence or absence of cancer cells in apheresis samples could not be safely predicted by the presence or absence of tumor cells in marrow or blood alone. Diagnostic specificity seems to improve from a combination of results from marrow and blood analysis. No correlation was found in quantitative analysis of tumor cell contamination between marrow and blood. In conclusion, the results suggest that blood and bone marrow represent different compartments for epithelial cancer cells and that contaminating tumor cells in stem cell harvests may be derived from the blood and/or marrow compartment. The tumor cell contamination of a stem cell harvest cannot be safely predicted by a

  12. Trespassing cancer cells: ‘fingerprinting’ invasive protrusions reveals metastatic culprits

    PubMed Central

    Klemke, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer cells produce invasive membrane protrusions called invadopodia and pseudopodia, which play a central role in driving cancer cell dissemination in the body. Malignant cells use these structures to attach to and degrade extracellular matrix proteins, generate force for cell locomotion, and to penetrate the vasculature. Recent work using unique subcellular fractionation methodologies combined with spatial genomic, proteomic, and phosphoproteomic profiling has provided insight into the invadopodiome and pseudopodiome signaling networks that control the protrusion of invasive membranes. Here I highlight how these powerful spatial “omics” approaches reveal important signatures of metastatic cancer cells and possible new therapeutic targets aimed at treating metastatic disease. PMID:22980730

  13. Physical Biology in Cancer. 4. Physical cues guide tumor cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Stroka, Kimberly M.

    2013-01-01

    As tumor