Science.gov

Sample records for cell tumor metastatic

  1. Tumor cells as cellular vehicles to deliver gene therapies to metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    García-Castro, Javier; Martínez-Palacio, Jesús; Lillo, Rosa; García-Sánchez, Félix; Alemany, Ramón; Madero, Luis; Bueren, Juan A; Ramírez, Manuel

    2005-04-01

    A long-pursued goal in cancer treatment is to deliver a therapy specifically to metastases. As a result of the disseminated nature of the metastatic disease, carrying the therapeutic agent to the sites of tumor growth represents a major step for success. We hypothesized that tumor cells injected intravenously (i.v.) into an animal with metastases would respond to many of the factors driving the metastatic process, and would target metastases. Using a model of spontaneous metastases, we report here that i.v. injected tumor cells localized on metastatic lesions. Based on this fact, we used genetically transduced tumor cells for tumor targeting of anticancer agents such as a suicide gene or an oncolytic virus, with evident antitumoral effect and negligible systemic toxicity. Therefore, autologous tumor cells may be used as cellular vehicles for systemic delivery of anticancer therapies to metastatic tumors.

  2. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. Blast cell aggregates simulating metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Rivera, G; Mirro, J; Stass, S; Peiper, S; Murphy, S B

    1985-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is a rare leukemia that can present diagnostic problems. We describe two children who have this disease and had clumps of blast cells in their bone marrow, a finding usually attributed to metastatic tumor. The megakaryocytic origin of the cells was supported by their cytochemical staining pattern (positive alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase resistant to sodium fluoride inhibition and negative alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase) and by the presence of factor VIII-related antigen. Ultrastructural studies of blast cells from one patient demonstrated platelet peroxidase. The mechanism of blast cell clump formation in these cases is unknown; nevertheless, awareness that this feature can occur in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia may avoid a misdiagnosis of metastatic solid tumor.

  3. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor and ...

  4. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  5. A mouse surgical model for metastatic ovarian granulosa cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Marie-Eve; Kaartinen, M Johanna; Laguë, Marie-Noëlle; Paquet, Marilène; Huneault, Louis M; Boerboom, Derek

    2009-12-01

    We recently described a genetically engineered mouse model that develops ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) that mimic many aspects of the advanced human disease, including distant dissemination. However, because the primary tumors killed their hosts before metastases were able to form, the use of these mice to study metastatic disease required the development of a simple, reliable, and humane surgical protocol for the excision of large GCTs from debilitated mice. Here we describe a protocol involving multimodal anesthesia, tumor removal through ventral midline celiotomy and perioperative fluid therapy, and analgesia that led to the postoperative survival of more than 90% of mice, despite the removal of tumors representing as much as 10% of the animal's body weight. Intraabdominal recurrence of the GCT did not occur in surviving animals, but most developed pulmonary or adrenal metastases (or both) by 12 wk after surgery. We propose that this mouse model of metastatic GCT will serve as a useful preclinical model for the development of novel treatment modalities and diagnostic techniques. Furthermore, our results delineate anesthetic and surgical principles for the removal of large abdominal tumors from mice that will be applicable to other models of human cancers.

  6. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  7. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  8. Biomarker utility of circulating tumor cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Lorigan, Paul; Zhou, Cong; Lancashire, Matthew; Booth, Jessica; Cummings, Jeff; Califano, Raffaele; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Dive, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Advances in targeted agents and immunotherapy have improved outcomes in metastatic disease, but biomarkers are required to optimize treatment. We determined the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and explored their utility as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. A total of 101 patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were recruited prospectively. CTC number was determined using the CellSearch platform and melanoma kits in samples taken at baseline and serially during treatment. CTC numbers ranged between 0 and 36 per 7.5 ml blood; 26% of patients had ≥ 2 CTCs. Baseline CTC number was prognostic for median overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis (2.6 vs. 7.2 months (P<0.011) for patients with ≥ 2 CTCs vs. <2 CTCs, respectively). In multivariate analysis, CTC number was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.403, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.303-4.430, P=0.005). Patients receiving treatment in whom CTC number remained ≥ 2 CTCs during treatment had shorter median OS than those who maintained <2 CTCs (7 vs. 10 months, HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.81, log-rank test P=0.015). In conclusion, CTC number in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients is prognostic for OS with a cutoff of 2 CTCs per 7.5 ml blood. CTC number measured before and throughout treatment provided additional prognostic information. Larger studies are warranted to confirm CTC biomarker utility in melanoma patients.

  9. Heterogeneity of isozyme expression in tumor cells does not correlate with metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Siciliano, M J; Fidler, I J

    1986-01-01

    The major purpose of these studies was to determine whether the expression of isozymes by tumor cells was heterogeneous among tumor cell subpopulations within a neoplasm and whether expression of one or another isozyme correlated with metastatic potential of tumor cells. The expression levels of 40 isozymes were determined in 56 cell lines, many of them clonal, from nine different murine and human tumors. The enzymes chosen for study are involved in nucleotide, carbohydrate and pentose phosphate metabolism, and as such are indicators of the general metabolic and differentiational status of the cell. The tumors studied included two murine and two human malignant melanomas, four murine fibrosarcomas, and one human prostatic adenocarcinoma. The lines isolated from these tumors consisted of cells that are tumorigenic non-metastatic, tumorigenic low metastatic and tumorigenic highly metastatic. Clonally derived cell lines from a given tumor differed in their expression of a number of different isozymes, including adenosine deaminase, creatine phosphokinase-B and lactate dehydrogenase. Different patterns of isozyme expression were observed among different tumor types as well as between tumors of the same type; however, there were no differences in isozyme expression for any enzyme tested that correlated with metastatic ability of tumor cells.

  10. Gene expression profiles of circulating tumor cells versus primary tumors in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Weekhout, Marleen; Mostert, Bianca; Reijm, Esther A; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B; Peeters, Dieter J; Hamberg, Paul; Seynaeve, Caroline; Jager, Agnes; de Jongh, Felix E; Smid, Marcel; Dirix, Luc Y; Kehrer, Diederik F S; van Galen, Anne; Ramirez-Moreno, Raquel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; Gratama, Jan W; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Before using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as liquid biopsy, insight into molecular discrepancies between CTCs and primary tumors is essential. We characterized CellSearch-enriched CTCs from 62 metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients with ≥5 CTCs starting first-line systemic treatment. Expression levels of 35 tumor-associated, CTC-specific genes, including ESR1, coding for the estrogen receptor (ER), were measured by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and correlated to corresponding primary tumors. In 30 patients (48%), gene expression profiles of 35 genes were discrepant between CTCs and the primary tumor, but this had no prognostic consequences. In 15 patients (24%), the expression of ER was discrepant. Patients with ER-negative primary tumors and ER-positive CTCs had a longer median TTS compared to those with concordantly ER-negative CTCs (8.5 versus 2.1 months, P = 0.05). From seven patients, an axillary lymph node metastasis was available. In two patients, the CTC profiles better resembled the lymph node metastasis than the primary tumor. Our findings suggest that molecular discordances between CTCs and primary tumors frequently occur, but that this bears no prognostic consequences. Alterations in ER-status between primary tumors and CTCs might have prognostic implications.

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells do not contribute to tumor endothelium in primary and metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Wickersheim, Anke; Kerber, Mark; de Miguel, Lourdes Sanchez; Plate, Karl H; Machein, Marcia Regina

    2009-10-15

    Despite extensive research, the contribution of bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPC) to tumor angiogenesis remains controversial. In previous publications, the extent of incorporation of BM-EPCs into the endothelial cell (EC) layer in different tumor models has been reported as significant in some studies but undetectable in others. Here, we studied the differentiation of BM-EPCs and its contribution to tumor vessels in experimental and spontaneous lung metastasis (B16 melanoma and prostate carcinoma), in an autochthonous transgenic model of prostate tumorigenesis, in orthotopically implanted lung tumors [Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC)], in heterotopic subcutaneous models (LLC and C1 prostate carcinoma) growing in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing bone marrow (BM) chimeras. Immunofluorescence was performed with a set of endothelial and hematopoietic markers and confocal microscopy was used to generate 3D reconstruction images. By performing rigorously conducted morphological studies, we found no evidence of BM-EPCs differentiation into tumor endothelium independently of tumor type, grade and organ site in primary and metastatic tumors. The vast majority of GFP(+) cells were trafficking leucocytes or periendothelial myeloid cells. To explore the possibility that local overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) might increase the numbers of incorporated BM-EPCs, we analyzed tumors genetically manipulated to overexpress VEGF(164). Local VEGF production induces a massive infiltration of bone-marrow-derived cells, but did not lead to vessel wall integration of these cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that during tumor progression vascularization occurs primarily via classical tumor angiogenesis (e.g., sprouting of pre-existing ECs), whereas BM-EPCs do not incorporate into the vessel wall to any significant extent.

  12. Concordance of Pathologic Features Between Metastatic Sites and the Primary Tumor in Surgically Resected Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Psutka, Sarah P; Cheville, John C; Costello, Brian A; Stewart-Merrill, Suzanne B; Lohse, Christine M; Leibovich, Bradley C; Boorjian, Stephen A; Thompson, R Houston

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the concordance of pathologic features in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) between the primary nephrectomy and metastasectomy specimens. Primary nephrectomy (n = 454) and matched metastasectomy specimens (n = 680) from patients treated between 1970 and 2009 for RCC were re-reviewed by 1 urologic pathologist in a blinded fashion. RCC histologic subtype, grade, coagulative necrosis, and the presence of sarcomatoid differentiation were compared between the primary and the metastatic tumor with kappa statistics. Concordance with the primary tumor was observed for subtype in 647 (95%, kappa = 0.71) of the metastases, for grade in 411 (60%, kappa = 0.35), necrosis in 460 (68%, kappa = 0.32), and sarcomatoid differentiation in 643 (95%, kappa = 0.60). Upgrading was observed in 100%, 63%, and 13% of patients with grades 1, 2, and 3 primary tumors, respectively (no patient had a grade 1 metastatic lesion). Metastatic tumors treated with metastasectomy within 30 days of nephrectomy (n = 145) had similar rates of concordant subtype, necrosis, and sarcomatoid differentiation to those undergoing metastasectomy beyond 30 days from nephrectomy (P >.05 for all), but had higher rates of concordant grade (71% vs 58%, P = .003). Pre-metastasectomy exposure to systemic targeted or immunotherapy was not associated with a change in concordance of histopathologic features. Among 454 surgically managed metastatic RCC patients, we observed a high degree of concordance for histologic subtype and sarcomatoid differentiation, and varying degrees of discordance for grade and coagulative tumor necrosis, between primary and metastatic tumors. Further investigation is warranted to understand the biologic and therapeutic implications of these observations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madic, Jordan; Kiialainen, Anna; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Birzele, Fabian; Ramey, Guillemette; Leroy, Quentin; Rio Frio, Thomas; Vaucher, Isabelle; Raynal, Virginie; Bernard, Virginie; Lermine, Alban; Clausen, Inga; Giroud, Nicolas; Schmucki, Roland; Milder, Maud; Horn, Carsten; Spleiss, Olivia; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Weisser, Martin; Lebofsky, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a new circulating tumor biomarker which might be used as a prognostic biomarker in a way similar to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Here, we used the high prevalence of TP53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to compare ctDNA and CTC detection rates and prognostic value in metastatic TNBC patients. Forty patients were enrolled before starting a new line of treatment. TP53 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissues and in plasma DNA using two next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in parallel. Archived tumor tissue was sequenced successfully for 31/40 patients. TP53 mutations were found in 26/31 (84%) of tumor samples. The same mutation was detected in the matched plasma of 21/26 (81%) patients with an additional mutation found only in the plasma for one patient. Mutated allele fractions ranged from 2 to 70% (median 5%). The observed correlation between the two NGS approaches (R(2) = 0.903) suggested that ctDNA levels data were quantitative. Among the 27 patients with TP53 mutations, CTC count was ≥1 in 19 patients (70%) and ≥5 in 14 patients (52%). ctDNA levels had no prognostic impact on time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS), whereas CTC numbers were correlated with OS (p = 0.04) and marginally with TTP (p = 0.06). Performance status and elevated LDH also had significant prognostic impact. Here, absence of prognostic impact of baseline ctDNA level suggests that mechanisms of ctDNA release in metastatic TNBC may involve, beyond tumor burden, biological features that do not dramatically affect patient outcome.

  14. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Withers, Sita S; Lawson, Corinne M; Burton, Andrew G; Rebhun, Robert B; Steffey, Michele A

    2016-03-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence.

  15. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Sita S.; Lawson, Corinne M.; Burton, Andrew G.; Rebhun, Robert B.; Steffey, Michele A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence. PMID:26933269

  16. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Bouchtaoui, Morad El; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities. We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived. Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC. PMID:26002555

  17. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Guilhem; El Bouchtaoui, Morad; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-08-07

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities.We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived.Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC.

  18. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  19. Metastatic Insulinoma Following Resection of Nonsecreting Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ilyssa O.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented to our clinic for recurrent hypoglycemia after undergoing resection of an incidentally discovered nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumor 6 years ago. She underwent a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, after which she developed diabetes and was placed on an insulin pump. Pathology showed a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm with negative islet hormone immunostains. Two years later, computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver lesions. Biopsy of a liver lesion showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm, consistent with pancreatic origin. Six years later, she presented to clinic with 1.5 years of recurrent hypoglycemia. Laboratory results showed elevated proinsulin, insulin levels, and c-peptide levels during a hypoglycemic episode. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen redemonstrated multiple liver lesions. Repeated transarterial catheter chemoembolization and microwave thermal ablation controlled hypoglycemia. The unusual features of interest of this case include the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumor to a metastatic insulinoma and the occurrence of atrial flutter after octreotide for treatment. PMID:26425568

  20. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  1. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection.

  2. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J.; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell—endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  3. Germ cell tumor metastatic to the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Luis; Oppenheimer, Randy; Jayaram, Lakshmi

    2012-04-01

    Neoplasms metastatic to the oral cavity are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all malignancies found there. When they do occur, they are usually found in the soft tissue or mandible. Metastatic malignancies involving the gingival, alveolar, or buccal mucosa are very rare. We present a case of what appeared to be a benign epulis in a 25-year-old man. Biopsy revealed that the lesion represented metastatic testicular cancer.

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  5. Inhibition of Metastatic Outgrowth From Single Dormant Tumor Cells by Targeting the Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, Dalit; Kleinman, Hynda; Simmons, Justin L.; Asmussen, Holly; Kamaraju, Anil K.; Hoenorhoff, Mark J.; Liu, Zi-yao; Costes, Sylvain V.; Cho, Edward H.; Lockett, Stephen; Khanna, Chand; Chambers, Ann F.; Green, Jeffrey E.

    2008-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer may emerge from latent tumor cells that remain dormant at disseminated sites for many years. Identifying mechanisms regulating the switch from dormancy to proliferative metastatic growth has been elusive due to the lack of experimental models of tumor cell dormancy. We characterized the in vitro growth characteristics of cells that exhibit either dormant (D2OR, MCF7, K7M2-AS.46) or proliferative (D2.A1, MDA-MB-231, K7M2) metastatic behavior in vivo. Although these cells proliferate readily in 2D culture, we demonstrate that when grown in 3D matrix, distinct growth properties of the cells were revealed that correlate to their dormant or proliferative behavior at metastatic sites in vivo. In 3D culture, cells with dormant behavior in vivo remained cell cycle arrested with elevated nuclear expression of p16 and p27. The transition from quiescence to proliferation of D2A1 cells was dependent upon fibronectin production and signaling through integrin β1, leading to cytoskeletal reorganization with f-actin stress fiber formation. We demonstrate that phosphorylation of myosin light chain by MLC kinase (MLCK) through integrin 1 is required for actin stress fiber formation and proliferative growth. Inhibition of integrin β1 or MLCK prevents transition from a quiescent to proliferative state in vitro. Iinhibition of MLCK significantly reduces metastatic outgrowth in vivo. These studies demonstrate that the switch from dormancy to metastatic growth may be regulated, in part, through epigenetic signaling from the microenvironment leading to changes in the cytoskeletal architecture of dormant cells. Targeting this process may provide therapeutic strategies for inhibition of the dormant-to-proliferative metastatic switch. PMID:18676848

  6. Golden bullet-denosumab: early rapid response of metastatic giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Demirsoy, Ugur; Karadogan, Meriban; Selek, Özgür; Anik, Yonca; Aksu, Görkem; Müezzinoglu, Bahar; Corapcioglu, Funda

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is usually a benign, locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. Histogenesis of GCTB is unknown and a correlation has not been found between histologic and clinical course. For this reason, many authors consider its prognosis unpredictable. Lung metastasis after GCTB treatment is well known and generally has unfavorable outcome, despite varied chemotherapy regimens. Denosumab, which inhibits RANK-RANKL interaction, is a new, promising actor among targeted therapeutic agents for GCTB. In this report, we emphasize on early rapid response to denosumab in metastatic GCTB.

  7. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  8. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  9. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5+ regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, E. C.; Hamilton, M. J.; Young, A.; Wadsworth, B. J.; LePard, N. E.; Lee, H. N.; Firmino, N.; Collier, J. L.; Bennewith, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C–C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C–C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80+ macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5+ Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth. PMID:27471618

  10. A rare cause in etiology of left atrial mass: metastatic testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Huseyin, Serhat; Okyay, Ahmet; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tastekin, Ebru; Yılmaztepe, Mustafa; Taylan, Gökay; Canbaz, Suat; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Although intracardiac metastasis of germ cell tumors is rare, it can be localized in the right or left heart by disseminating spread and give their cardiac symptoms depending on the location of metastatic mass. We present a 38-year-old male patient with a preliminary diagnosis of testicular tumor who was followed by the medical oncology clinic with cerebrovascular event and heart failure symptoms. PMID:27212979

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase-10 Is Required for Lung Cancer Stem Cell Maintenance, Tumor Initiation and Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, I-Chu; Walsh, Michael P.; Batra, Jyotica; Radisky, Evette S.; Murray, Nicole R.; Fields, Alan P.

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (Mmps) stimulate tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the extracellular matrix. Here we reveal an unexpected role for Mmp10 (stromelysin 2) in the maintenance and tumorigenicity of mouse lung cancer stem-like cells (CSC). Mmp10 is highly expressed in oncosphere cultures enriched in CSCs and RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mmp10 leads to a loss of stem cell marker gene expression and inhibition of oncosphere growth, clonal expansion, and transformed growth in vitro. Interestingly, clonal expansion of Mmp10 deficient oncospheres can be restored by addition of exogenous Mmp10 protein to the culture medium, demonstrating a direct role for Mmp10 in the proliferation of these cells. Oncospheres exhibit enhanced tumor-initiating and metastatic activity when injected orthotopically into syngeneic mice, whereas Mmp10-deficient cultures show a severe defect in tumor initiation. Conversely, oncospheres implanted into syngeneic non-transgenic or Mmp10−/− mice show no significant difference in tumor initiation, growth or metastasis, demonstrating the importance of Mmp10 produced by cancer cells rather than the tumor microenvironment in lung tumor initiation and maintenance. Analysis of gene expression data from human cancers reveals a strong positive correlation between tumor Mmp10 expression and metastatic behavior in many human tumor types. Thus, Mmp10 is required for maintenance of a highly tumorigenic, cancer-initiating, metastatic stem-like cell population in lung cancer. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Mmp10 is a critical lung cancer stem cell gene and novel therapeutic target for lung cancer stem cells. PMID:22545096

  12. Novel near-diploid ovarian cancer cell line derived from a highly aneuploid metastatic ovarian tumor

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, Ester; Sotelo-Silveira, Jose R.; Kim, Gina Y.; Zhu, Jack Y.; Lau, Christopher C.; McNeil, Nicole; Korolevich, Susana; Liao, Hongling; Cherry, James M.; Munroe, David J.; Ried, Thomas; Meltzer, Paul S.; Kuehl, Walter M.

    2017-01-01

    A new ovarian near-diploid cell line, OVDM1, was derived from a highly aneuploid serous ovarian metastatic adenocarcinoma. A metastatic tumor was obtained from a 47-year-old Ashkenazi Jewish patient three years after the first surgery removed the primary tumor, both ovaries, and the remaining reproductive organs. OVDM1 was characterized by cell morphology, genotyping, tumorigenic assay, mycoplasma testing, spectral karyotyping (SKY), and molecular profiling of the whole genome by aCGH and gene expression microarray. Targeted sequencing of a panel of cancer-related genes was also performed. Hierarchical clustering of gene expression data clearly confirmed the ovarian origin of the cell line. OVDM1 has a near-diploid karyotype with a low-level aneuploidy, but samples of the original metastatic tumor were grossly aneuploid. A number of single nucleotide variations (SNVs)/mutations were detected in OVDM1 and the metastatic tumor samples. Some of them were cancer-related according to COSMIC and HGMD databases (no founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been found). A large number of focal copy number alterations (FCNAs) were detected, including homozygous deletions (HDs) targeting WWOX and GATA4. Progression of OVDM1 from early to late passages was accompanied by preservation of the near-diploid status, acquisition of only few additional large chromosomal rearrangements and more than 100 new small FCNAs. Most of newly acquired FCNAs seem to be related to localized but massive DNA fragmentation (chromothripsis-like rearrangements). Newly developed near-diploid OVDM1 cell line offers an opportunity to evaluate tumorigenesis pathways/events in a minor clone of metastatic ovarian adenocarcinoma as well as mechanisms of chromothripsis. PMID:28787462

  13. Treatment of pulmonary metastatic tumors in mice using lentiviral vector-engineered stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Zhao, P; Kennedy, C; Chen, K; Wiegand, J; Washington, G; Marrero, L; Cui, Y

    2008-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy relies on functional tumor-specific effector T lymphocytes for tumor elimination. Dendritic cells (DCs), as most potent antigen-presenting cells, have been popularly employed in clinical and experimental tumor treatments. We have previously demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated transgene delivery to DC progenitors, including bone marrow cells and hematopoietic stem cells, followed by transplantation supports systemic generation of great numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs. These DCs subsequently stimulate marked and systemic immune activation. Here, we examined whether this level of immune activation is sufficient to overcome tumor-induced tolerogenic environment for treating an established aggressive epithelial tumor. We showed that a combination treatment of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and cytosine-phosphate-guanine-containing oligonucleotide stimulated large numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs in situ from transgene-modified stem cells. Moreover, these in situ generated and activated DCs markedly stimulated activation of antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells by augmenting their numbers, as well as function, even in a tumor-bearing tolerogenic environment. This leads to significant improvement in the therapeutic efficacy of established pulmonary metastases. This study suggests that lentiviral vector-modified stem cells as DC progenitors may be used as an effective therapeutic regimen for treating metastatic epithelial tumors. PMID:18084244

  14. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Poff, A M; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, T N; D'Agostino, D P

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use.

  15. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, AM; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, TN; D’Agostino, DP

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use. PMID:24615175

  16. Oncogenic LINE-1 Retroelements Sustain Prostate Tumor Cells and Promote Metastatic Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    RNA -sequencing data that we are part way through processing, but suggests so far significant activation of non-coding RNA sequences derived from RNA ...metastasis tumor tissues in the UTHSCSA tissue bank, however the RNA was not considered of sufficient quality to submit for RNA sequencing. We did RNA ...sequencing of LNCaP cell line RNA as this is derived from a prostate cancer lymph node metastatic deposit, although the bioinformatics analysis has

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells promote tumor engraftment and metastatic colonization in rat osteosarcoma model.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Shinji; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Tohma, Yasuaki; Kido, Akira; Mori, Toshio; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2012-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered to be the cells of origin for most sarcomas, the role of MSCs as a source of tumor stroma is not fully understood in this tumor type. The current study investigated whether MSCs affect the tumor growth and metastatic ability in rat osteosarcoma model. Results from subcutaneous co-implantation of rat osteosarcoma COS1NR cells, established in our laboratory, with rat MSCs isolated from femur bone marrow showed that the incidence of tumor formation and tumor growth rate was higher until 5 weeks compared to COS1NR cell inoculation alone. However, no difference was observed in tumor growth afterwards and in the number of metastatic nodules at 9 weeks (0.75 vs. 1.2). Intravenous MSC injection at weeks 3 and 5 after subcutaneous inoculation of COS1NR cells significantly increased the number of lung nodules in the group with MSC injection compared to the group without MSC injection (17.33 vs. 2.0), while no difference was observed in subcutaneous tumor growth between those groups. Pathway analysis from gene expression profile identified that genes involved in focal adhesion, cytokine-cytokine receptor and extracellular matrix-receptor pathways such as CAMs (ICAM and VCAM)-integrins were highly expressed in MSCs, possibly participating in the tumor progression of osteosarcoma. These results suggest that MSCs could provide a source of microenvironments for osteosarcoma cells, and might enhance the ability of settlement and colonization which lead to early onset of growth and metastasis, possibly through their activated pathways interaction.

  18. Nanoroughened adhesion-based capture of circulating tumor cells with heterogeneous expression and metastatic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiqiang; Allen, Steven G; Reka, Ajaya Kumar; Qian, Weiyi; Han, Shuo; Zhao, Jianing; Bao, Liwei; Keshamouni, Venkateshwar G; Merajver, Sofia D; Fu, Jianping

    2016-08-08

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have shown prognostic relevance in many cancer types. However, the majority of current CTC capture methods rely on positive selection techniques that require a priori knowledge about the surface protein expression of disseminated CTCs, which are known to be a dynamic population. We developed a microfluidic CTC capture chip that incorporated a nanoroughened glass substrate for capturing CTCs from blood samples. Our CTC capture chip utilized the differential adhesion preference of cancer cells to nanoroughened etched glass surfaces as compared to normal blood cells and thus did not depend on the physical size or surface protein expression of CTCs. The microfluidic CTC capture chip was able to achieve a superior capture yield for both epithelial cell adhesion molecule positive (EpCAM+) and EpCAM- cancer cells in blood samples. Additionally, the microfluidic CTC chip captured CTCs undergoing transforming growth factor beta-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (TGF-β-induced EMT) with dynamically down-regulated EpCAM expression. In a mouse model of human breast cancer using EpCAM positive and negative cell lines, the number of CTCs captured correlated positively with the size of the primary tumor and was independent of their EpCAM expression. Furthermore, in a syngeneic mouse model of lung cancer using cell lines with differential metastasis capability, CTCs were captured from all mice with detectable primary tumors independent of the cell lines' metastatic ability. The microfluidic CTC capture chip using a novel nanoroughened glass substrate is broadly applicable to capturing heterogeneous CTC populations of clinical interest independent of their surface marker expression and metastatic propensity. We were able to capture CTCs from a non-metastatic lung cancer model, demonstrating the potential of the chip to collect the entirety of CTC populations including subgroups of distinct biological and phenotypical properties. Further

  19. Molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells resemble the liver metastasis more closely than the primary tumor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Mostert, Bianca; Lalmahomed, Zarina; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B.; van Galen, Anne; Smid, Marcel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; de Weerd, Vanja; Ramírez-Moreno, Raquel; Biermann, Katharina; Verhoef, Cornelis; Grünhagen, Dirk J.; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Gratama, Jan W.; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background CTCs are a promising alternative for metastatic tissue biopsies for use in precision medicine approaches. We investigated to what extent the molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) resemble the liver metastasis and/or the primary tumor from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Results The CTC profiles were concordant with the liver metastasis in 17/23 patients (74%) and with the primary tumor in 13 patients (57%). The CTCs better resembled the liver metastasis in 13 patients (57%), and the primary tumor in five patients (22%). The strength of the correlations was not associated with clinical parameters. Nine genes (CDH1, CDH17, CDX1, CEACAM5, FABP1, FCGBP, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, and MAPT) displayed significant differential expressions, all of which were downregulated, in CTCs compared to the tissues in the 23 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were retrospectively selected from a prospective study. Using the CellSearch System, CTCs were enumerated and isolated just prior to liver metastasectomy. A panel of 25 CTC-specific genes was measured by RT-qPCR in matching CTCs, primary tumors, and liver metastases. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and considered as continuous variables with r=1 representing absolute concordance and r= -1 representing absolute discordance. A cut-off of r>0.1 was applied in order to consider profiles to be concordant. Conclusions In the majority of the patients, CTCs reflected the molecular characteristics of metastatic cells better than the primary tumors. Genes involved in cell adhesion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were downregulated in the CTCs. Our results support the use of CTC characterization as a liquid biopsy for precision medicine. PMID:27340863

  20. Establishment of a tumor sphere cell line from a metastatic brain neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Ryoichi; Maruyama, Masato; Ito, Tomoki; Nakano, Yosuke; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Yoshimura, Kunikazu; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nomura, Shosaku; Sugimoto, Tetsuo; Yamada, Hisao; Asai, Akio

    2017-05-17

    Neuroendocrine tumors are rare, and little is known about the existence of cancer stem cells in this disease. Identification of the tumorigenic population will contribute to the development of effective therapies targeting neuroendocrine tumors. Surgically resected brain metastases from a primary neuroendocrine tumor of unknown origin were dissociated and cultured in serum-free neurosphere medium. Stem cell properties, including self-renewal, differentiation potential, and stem cell marker expression, were examined. Tumor formation was evaluated using intracranial xenograft models. The effect of temozolomide was measured in vitro by cell viability assays. We established the neuroendocrine tumor sphere cell line ANI-27S, which displayed stable exponential growth, virtually unlimited expansion in vitro, and expression of stem-cell markers such as CD133, nestin, Sox2, and aldehyde dehydrogenase. FBS-induced differentiation decreased Sox2 and nestin expression. On the basis of real-time PCR, ANI-27S cells expressed the neuroendocrine markers synaptophysin and chromogranin A. Intracranial xenotransplanted brain tumors recapitulated the original patient tumor and temozolomide exhibited cytotoxic effects on tumor sphere cells. For the first time, we demonstrated the presence of a sphere-forming, stem cell-like population in brain metastases from a primary neuroendocrine tumor. We also demonstrated the potential therapeutic effects of temozolomide for this disease.

  1. Tumor Mutational Load and Immune Parameters across Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk Groups.

    PubMed

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H; Hakimi, A Ari; Hsieh, James J; Tannir, Nizar M; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-10-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared with patients with favorable or intermediate risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here, we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole-exome transcriptome data in renal cell carcinoma patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas who ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by the MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes-granzyme A and perforin-or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 820-2. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Alternative therapies for metastatic breast cancer: multimodal approach targeting tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Sambi, Manpreet; Haq, Sabah; Samuel, Vanessa; Qorri, Bessi; Haxho, Fiona; Hill, Kelli; Harless, William; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary challenges in developing effective therapies for malignant tumors is the specific targeting of a heterogeneous cancer cell population within the tumor. The cancerous tumor is made up of a variety of distinct cells with specialized receptors and proteins that could potentially be viable targets for drugs. In addition, the diverse signals from the local microenvironment may also contribute to the induction of tumor growth and metastasis. Collectively, these factors must be strategically studied and targeted in order to develop an effective treatment protocol. Targeted multimodal approaches need to be strategically studied in order to develop a treatment protocol that is successful in controlling tumor growth and preventing metastatic burden. Breast cancer, in particular, presents a unique problem because of the variety of subtypes of cancer that can arise and the multiple drug targets that could be exploited. For example, the tumor stage and subtypes often dictate the appropriate treatment regimen. Alternate multimodal therapies should consider the importance of time-dependent drug administration, as well as targeting the local and systemic tumor environment. Many reviews and papers have briefly touched on the clinical implications of this cellular heterogeneity; however, there has been very little discussion on the development of study models that reflect this diversity and on multimodal therapies that could target these subpopulations. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the origins of intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer subtypes, and its implications for tumor progression, metastatic potential, and treatment regimens. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing specific breast cancer models for research, including in vitro monolayer systems and three-dimensional mammospheres, as well as in vivo murine models that may have the capacity to encompass this heterogeneity. Lastly, we summarize some of the current

  3. Alternative therapies for metastatic breast cancer: multimodal approach targeting tumor cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Sambi, Manpreet; Haq, Sabah; Samuel, Vanessa; Qorri, Bessi; Haxho, Fiona; Hill, Kelli; Harless, William; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary challenges in developing effective therapies for malignant tumors is the specific targeting of a heterogeneous cancer cell population within the tumor. The cancerous tumor is made up of a variety of distinct cells with specialized receptors and proteins that could potentially be viable targets for drugs. In addition, the diverse signals from the local microenvironment may also contribute to the induction of tumor growth and metastasis. Collectively, these factors must be strategically studied and targeted in order to develop an effective treatment protocol. Targeted multimodal approaches need to be strategically studied in order to develop a treatment protocol that is successful in controlling tumor growth and preventing metastatic burden. Breast cancer, in particular, presents a unique problem because of the variety of subtypes of cancer that can arise and the multiple drug targets that could be exploited. For example, the tumor stage and subtypes often dictate the appropriate treatment regimen. Alternate multimodal therapies should consider the importance of time-dependent drug administration, as well as targeting the local and systemic tumor environment. Many reviews and papers have briefly touched on the clinical implications of this cellular heterogeneity; however, there has been very little discussion on the development of study models that reflect this diversity and on multimodal therapies that could target these subpopulations. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the origins of intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer subtypes, and its implications for tumor progression, metastatic potential, and treatment regimens. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing specific breast cancer models for research, including in vitro monolayer systems and three-dimensional mammospheres, as well as in vivo murine models that may have the capacity to encompass this heterogeneity. Lastly, we summarize some of the current

  4. Heterogeneous proliferative potential of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with solid epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Solakoglu, Oender; Maierhofer, Christine; Lahr, Georgia; Breit, Elisabeth; Scheunemann, Peter; Heumos, Isabella; Pichlmeier, Uwe; Schlimok, Günter; Oberneder, Ralph; Köllermann, Manfred W.; Köllermann, Jens; Speicher, Michael R.; Pantel, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow is a major homing site for circulating epithelial tumor cells. The present study was aimed to assess the proliferative capacity of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with operable solid tumors especially with regard to their clinical outcome. We obtained bone marrow aspirates from 153 patients with carcinomas of the prostate (n = 46), breast (n = 45), colon (n = 33), and kidney (n = 29). Most of the patients (87%) had primary disease with no clinical signs of overt metastases [tumor-node-metastasis (TNM)-stage UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) I-III]. After bone marrow was cultured for 21–102 days under special cell culture conditions, viable epithelial cells were detected by cytokeratin staining in 124 patients (81%). The cultured epithelial cells harbored Ki-ras2 mutations and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The highest median number of expanded tumor cells was observed in prostate cancer (2,619 per flask). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of expanded tumor cells and the UICC-stage of the patients (P = 0.03) or the presence of overt metastases (P = 0.04). Moreover, a strong expansion of tumor cells was correlated to an increased rate of cancer-related deaths (P = 0.007) and a reduced survival of the patients (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients have viable tumor cells in their bone marrow at primary tumor diagnosis, and the proliferative potential of these cells determines the clinical outcome. PMID:11854519

  5. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buim, Marcilei EC; Fanelli, Marcello F; Souza, Virgilio S; Romero, Juliana; Abdallah, Emne A; Mello, Celso AL; Alves, Vanessa; Ocea, Luciana MM; Mingues, Natália B; Barbosa, Paula NVP; Tyng, Chiang J; Chojniak, Rubens; Chinen, Ludmilla TD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quantification of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has already been validated and approved for routine use. However, more than quantification, qualification or characterization of CTCs is gaining importance, since the genetic characterization of CTCs may reflect, in a real time fashion, genetic profile of the disease. Objective: To characterize KRAS mutations (codon 12 and 13) in CTCs from patients with mCRC and to compare with matched primary tumor. Additionally, correlate these mutations with clinical and pathological features of patients. Methods: Blood samples were collected from 26 patients with mCRC from the AC Camargo Cancer Center (São Paulo-Brazil). CTCs were isolated by ISET technology (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumors; Rarecells Diagnostics, France) and mutations analyzes were performed by pyrosequencing (QIAGEN). Results: KRAS mutation was detected in 7 of the 21 cases (33%) of samples from CTCs. In matched primary tumors, 9 of the 24 cases (37.5%) were found KRAS mutated. We observed that 5 of the 9 samples with KRAS mutation in their primary tumor had also KRAS mutation in CTCs, meaning a concordance of 71% of matched cases (P = 0.017). KRAS mutation neither on primary tumor nor in CTCs was associated with clinical-pathological parameters analyzed. Conclusion: Faced with a polyclonal disease like colorectal cancer, which is often treated with alternating and successive lines of chemotherapy, real time genetic characterization of CTCs, in a fast and feasible fashion, can provide important information to clinical management of metastatic patients. Although our cohort was limited, it was possible to show a high grade of concordance between primary tumor and CTCs, which suggests that CTCs can be used as surrogate of primary tumors in clinical practice, when the knowledge of mutation profile is necessary and the primary tumor is not available. PMID:26252055

  6. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Buim, Marcilei Ec; Fanelli, Marcello F; Souza, Virgilio S; Romero, Juliana; Abdallah, Emne A; Mello, Celso Al; Alves, Vanessa; Ocea, Luciana Mm; Mingues, Natália B; Barbosa, Paula Nvp; Tyng, Chiang J; Chojniak, Rubens; Chinen, Ludmilla Td

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) has already been validated and approved for routine use. However, more than quantification, qualification or characterization of CTCs is gaining importance, since the genetic characterization of CTCs may reflect, in a real time fashion, genetic profile of the disease. To characterize KRAS mutations (codon 12 and 13) in CTCs from patients with mCRC and to compare with matched primary tumor. Additionally, correlate these mutations with clinical and pathological features of patients. Blood samples were collected from 26 patients with mCRC from the AC Camargo Cancer Center (São Paulo-Brazil). CTCs were isolated by ISET technology (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumors; Rarecells Diagnostics, France) and mutations analyzes were performed by pyrosequencing (QIAGEN). KRAS mutation was detected in 7 of the 21 cases (33%) of samples from CTCs. In matched primary tumors, 9 of the 24 cases (37.5%) were found KRAS mutated. We observed that 5 of the 9 samples with KRAS mutation in their primary tumor had also KRAS mutation in CTCs, meaning a concordance of 71% of matched cases (P = 0.017). KRAS mutation neither on primary tumor nor in CTCs was associated with clinical-pathological parameters analyzed. Faced with a polyclonal disease like colorectal cancer, which is often treated with alternating and successive lines of chemotherapy, real time genetic characterization of CTCs, in a fast and feasible fashion, can provide important information to clinical management of metastatic patients. Although our cohort was limited, it was possible to show a high grade of concordance between primary tumor and CTCs, which suggests that CTCs can be used as surrogate of primary tumors in clinical practice, when the knowledge of mutation profile is necessary and the primary tumor is not available.

  7. Metastatic pancreatic polypeptide-secreting islet cell tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Cruz Cardona, Janice A; Wamsley, Heather L; Farina, Lisa L; Kiupel, Matti

    2010-09-01

    A 14-year-old female spayed Golden Retriever was presented to the University of Florida's Veterinary Medical Center with history of lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis, intermittent vomiting, watery diarrhea, and weight loss for over a year. CBC, biochemical profile, and urinalysis were within reference intervals. Abdominal ultrasonographic examination revealed mesenteric and jejunal lymphadenopathy and hyperechoic hepatic nodules. Cytologic examination of the enlarged lymph nodes revealed loosely cohesive cells with moderate nuclear pleomorphism and rare punctate eosinophilic cytoplasmic granules. The cytologic interpretation was metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasia. On surgical exploration, a mass was detected in the right lobe of the pancreas. Histologic evaluation determined the mass to be an islet cell tumor. Approximately 98% of cells were positive by immunolabeling for pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and only rare cells were positive for insulin or somatostatin. All cells were negative for glucagon, gastrin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, protein gene product 9.5, synaptophysin, and chromogranins A and B. Pancreatic tumors that primarily produce PP are rare in dogs, and this is the first report of both the cytologic and histologic features of an islet cell tumor predominantly secreting PP. Clinical signs for these tumors are typically absent or nonspecific; signs may include watery diarrhea, as noted in this dog, although the diarrhea may have resulted from lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis. Additional case studies are needed to further characterize the cytomorphologic features and clinical presentation of PP-secreting islet cell tumor, or polypeptidoma, in dogs.

  8. Tumor cell-driven extracellular matrix remodeling drives haptotaxis during metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Madeleine J.; Jonas, Oliver; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Broye, Liliane C.; Guido, Bruna C.; Wyckoff, Jeff; Riquelme, Daisy; Lamar, John M.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Whittaker, Charlie; Ma, Duanduan; Langer, Robert; Cima, Michael J.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Hynes, Richard O.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Keely, Patricia J.; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the tumor microenvironment, but its role in promoting metastasis is incompletely understood. Here we show that FN gradients elicit directional movement of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Haptotaxis on FN gradients requires direct interaction between α5β1 integrin and Mena, an actin regulator, and involves increases in focal complex signaling and tumor-cell-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Compared to Mena, higher levels of the pro-metastatic MenaINV isoform associate with α5, which enables 3D haptotaxis of tumor cells towards the high FN concentrations typically present in perivascular space and in the periphery of breast tumor tissue. MenaINV and FN levels were correlated in two breast cancer cohorts, and high levels of MenaINV were significantly associated with increased tumor recurrence as well as decreased patient survival. Our results identify a novel tumor-cell-intrinsic mechanism that promotes metastasis through ECM remodeling and ECM guided directional migration. PMID:26811325

  9. Relationship between primary and metastatic testicular germ cell tumors: a clinicopathologic analysis of 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, William P; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Guo, Charles C

    2013-10-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) commonly metastasize to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes (RPLNs). We evaluated 100 cases of RPLN dissection specimens with viable GCTs after chemotherapy and compared them with their corresponding orchiectomy specimens. The mean age of patients was 28 years (range, 15-58 years). The testicular tumors consisted of mixed GCT (n = 72), teratoma (n = 18), seminoma (n = 4), embryonal carcinoma (n = 3), yolk sac tumor (n = 1), and no viable tumor (n = 2). Somatic malignant components were found in 5 cases. The metastatic tumors in the RPLNs consisted of only teratoma (n = 77) and non-teratomatous GCT (n = 23). Twenty-one patients had only teratoma in the RPLNs but not in the testis, and 10 patients had metastatic non-teratomatous GCT components that were not observed in the testis. Six patients had somatic malignant components in the RPLNs, but only one of them had such a component in the testis. Overall, 13 patients died of disease in a mean of 42 months, and the patients with only teratoma in the RPLNs had a lower mortality rate (9%) than those with non-teratomatous components (26%) (P = .044). One patient with somatic components in the primary GCT and 3 patients with somatic components in the metastases died of disease. Our study demonstrates that there is frequent discordance of histologic composition between primary and metastatic testicular GCTs. Teratoma is the most common component in treated GCTs and is usually associated with a more favorable clinical outcome than non-teratomatous GCTs. The presence of somatic components in the RPLNs metastasis indicates a poor prognosis.

  10. Impact of Non-Pulmonary Visceral Metastases in the Prognosis and Practice of Metastatic Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Lorena; Martignano, Filippo; Gallà, Valentina; Maugeri, Antonio; Schepisi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Non-pulmonary visceral metastases, in bones, brain and liver, represent nearly the 10% of metastatic sites of advanced germ cell tumors and are associated with poor prognosis. This review article summarizes major evidences on the impact of different visceral sites on the prognosis, treatment and clinical outcome of patients with germ cell tumors. The clinic-biological mechanisms by which these metastatic sites are associated with poor clinical outcome remain unclear. The multimodality treatment showed a potential better survival, in particular in patients with relapsed disease. Patients with advanced germ cell tumors with visceral metastases should be referred to centers with high expertise in the clinical management of such disease. PMID:27471579

  11. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  12. Tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells in metastatic gastrointestinal cancer refractory to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, S.; Gros, A.; Tran, E.; Lee, C.-C. R.; Wunderlich, J.R.; Robbins, P.F.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether patients with metastatic gastrointestinal (GI) adenocarcinomas refractory to chemotherapy harbor tumor-reactive cytotoxic T cells. Experimental design Expansion of CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and cancer cell lines was attempted from GI cancer metastases in 16 consecutive patients for the study of anti-tumor immune recognition. Retroviral transduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCR) was used to define HLA-restriction elements and specific reactivity. Results TIL were expanded from metastases in all patients, and new tumor cell lines generated in five patients. Autologous tumor-recognition without cross-reactivity against allogeneic HLA-matched GI tumors was found in CD8+ TIL from three of these five patients. In a patient with gastric cancer liver metastases, the repertoire of CD8+ TIL was dominated by cytolytic sister clones reactive to 2 out of 4 autologous cancer cell lines restricted by HLA-C*0701. From the same patient, a rare CD8+ TIL clone with a distinct TCR recognized all four cancer cell lines restricted by HLA-B*4901. In a patient with bile duct cancer, two distinct anti-tumor cytolytic clones were isolated from a highly polyclonal CD8+ TIL repertoire. TCRs isolated from these clones recognized epitopes restricted by HLA-A*0201. In a third patient, CD8+ TIL reactivity was progressively lost against an autologous colon cancer cell line that displayed loss of HLA haplotype. Conclusions This study provides a basis for the development of immunotherapy for patients with advanced GI malignancies by first establishing the presence of naturally occurring tumor-reactive CD8+ TIL at the molecular level. PMID:24218514

  13. Improved detection of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuske, Andra; Gorges, Tobias M.; Tennstedt, Pierre; Tiebel, Anne-Kathrin; Pompe, Raisa; Preißer, Felix; Prues, Sandra; Mazel, Martine; Markou, Athina; Lianidou, Evi; Peine, Sven; Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Riethdorf, Sabine; Beyer, Burkhard; Schlomm, Thorsten; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of blood-based assays to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD) in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) remains unclear. Proving that clinically relevant circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected with available technologies could address this. This study aimed to improve CTC detection in non-metastatic PCa patients by combining three independent CTC assays: the CellSearch system, an in vivo CellCollector and the EPISPOT. Peripheral blood samples from high-risk PCa patients were screened for CTCs before and three months after radical prostatectomy (RP). Combining the results of both time points, CTCs were detected in 37%, 54.9% and 58.7% of patients using CellSearch, CellCollector and EPISPOT, respectively. The cumulative positivity rate of the three CTC assays was 81.3% (87/107) with 21.5% (23/107) of patients harboring ≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml blood. Matched pair analysis of 30 blood samples taken before and after surgery indicated a significant decrease in CTCs captured by the CellCollector from 66% before RP to 34% after therapy (p = 0.031). CTC detection by EPISPOT before RP significantly correlated with PSA serum values (p < 0.0001) and clinical tumor stage (p = 0.04), while the other assays showed no significant correlations. In conclusion, CTC-based liquid biopsies have the potential to monitor MRD in patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:28000772

  14. [Radio-frequency ablation (RFA) for post-chemotherapeutic metastatic germ cell tumors as minimally invasive salvage therapy].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Jun; Nakamura, Terukazu; Shiraishi, Takumi; Mikami, Kazuya; Takaha, Natsuki; Ukimura, Osamu; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Miki, Tsuneharu; Yamagami, Takuji; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2009-11-01

    Radio-frequency ablation (RFA) has been successfully applied for local control of metastatic tumor. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of RFA to post-chemotherapeutic metastatic germ cell tumors (GCTs). As combined modality therapy, RFA was performed to 42 tumors in 19 patients of GCTs at our institution between November 2000 and December 2008. RFA was performed for 10 liver metastatic tumors (in 6 cases), 32 lung metastatic tumors (in 13 cases), and median age was 36 years old (range 20-53) and the median tumor size was 12 mm (range 2-40). We used Cool-tip RF system (straight electrode needle of the internal cooling type, Radionics, Palm Coast, USA) for RFA with ultrasound or CT fluorosent guidance under intravenous or local anesthesia. The therapeutic effect was assessed by the contrast-enhanced CT or MRI. When contrast enhancement was remained in the tumor, the treatment was repeated. The 28 evaluable lesions followed were with median 25 months in the term of the surveillance, and 9 tumors were treated by an additional session of RFA repeatedly. complete response (CR) was achieved in 12 out of 12 tumors (100%) with tumor maker normalization. On the other hand, 12 out of 16 tumors (75%) without marker normalization showed CR. All of the 24 tumors with tumor diameter of 30 mm or less achieved CR, and the tumor greater than 30 mm achieved no CR. Major complications included pneumothorax (n=9) and hemato-thoraxes (n=2), but no complications in surrounding organs. The chest drainage tube was required in 4 cases (36%). RFA might be an alternative therapeutic option of combined modality therapy as salvage therapy for post-chemotherapeutic metastatic germ cell tumors.

  15. Tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells in metastatic gastrointestinal cancer refractory to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Simon; Gros, Alena; Tran, Eric; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Wunderlich, John R; Robbins, Paul F; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2014-01-15

    To evaluate whether patients with metastatic gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas refractory to chemotherapy harbor tumor-reactive cytotoxic T cells. Expansion of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and cancer cell lines was attempted from gastrointestinal cancer metastases in 16 consecutive patients for the study of antitumor immune recognition. Retroviral transduction of genes encoding T-cell receptors (TCR) was used to define HLA-restriction elements and specific reactivity. TIL were expanded from metastases in all patients, and new tumor cell lines were generated in 5 patients. Autologous tumor recognition without cross-reactivity against allogeneic HLA-matched gastrointestinal tumors was found in CD8(+) TIL from 3 of these 5 patients. In a patient with gastric cancer liver metastases, the repertoire of CD8(+) TIL was dominated by cytolytic sister clones reactive to 2 out of 4 autologous cancer cell lines restricted by HLA-C*0701. From the same patient, a rare CD8(+) TIL clone with a distinct TCR recognized all four cancer cell lines restricted by HLA-B*4901. In a patient with bile duct cancer, two distinct antitumor cytolytic clones were isolated from a highly polyclonal CD8(+) TIL repertoire. TCRs isolated from these clones recognized epitopes restricted by HLA-A*0201. In a third patient, CD8(+) TIL reactivity was progressively lost against an autologous colon cancer cell line that displayed loss of HLA haplotype. This study provides a basis for the development of immunotherapy for patients with advanced gastrointestinal malignancies by first establishing the presence of naturally occurring tumor-reactive CD8(+) TIL at the molecular level. ©2013 AACR.

  16. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, Larissa E; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-09-06

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45-, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45- cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45- TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45- cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45- cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas.

  17. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  18. Genomic profiling of isolated circulating tumor cells from metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M.; Sosa, Eduardo V.; Roy, Ritu; Eisenbud, Lauren E.; Scott, Janet H.; Olshen, Adam; Pinkel, Dan; Rugo, Hope; Park, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood is technically challenging because cells are rare and difficult to isolate. We developed a novel approach to isolate CTCs from blood via immunomagnetic enrichment followed by fluorescence activated cell sorting (IE/FACS). Isolated CTCs were subjected to genome-wide copy number analysis via array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). In clinical studies, CTCs were isolated from 181 patients with metastatic breast cancer, 102 of which were successfully profiled, including matched archival primary tumor from five patients. CTCs revealed a wide range of copy number alterations including those previously reported in breast cancer. Comparison with two published aCGH datasets of primary breast tumors revealed similar frequencies of recurrent genomic copy number aberrations. In addition, serial testing of CTCs confirmed reproducibility and indicated genomic change over time. Comparison of CTCs with matched archival primary tumors confirmed shared lineage with notable divergence. We demonstrate that it is feasible to isolate CTCs away from hematopoietic cells with high purity via IE/FACS and profile them via aCGH analysis. Our approach may be utilized to explore genomic events involved in cancer progression and to monitor therapeutic efficacy of targeted therapies in clinical trials in a relatively non-invasive manner. PMID:23135909

  19. Apoptotic circulating tumor cells in early and metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kallergi, Galatea; Konstantinidis, Georgios; Markomanolaki, Harris; Papadaki, Maria A; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Stournaras, Christos; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Agelaki, Sofia

    2013-09-01

    The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer is strongly associated with disease relapse. Since it is unclear whether all CTCs are capable of generating metastasis, we investigated their apoptotic and proliferative status in 56 CTC-positive (29 early and 27 metastatic) patients with breast cancer. Double-staining immunofluorescence experiments were carried out in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cytospins, using the pancytokeratin A45-B/B3 antibody and either M30 (apoptotic marker) or Ki67 (proliferation marker) antibodies. Apoptosis was also evaluated using a polycaspase detection kit. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly lower numbers of apoptotic CTCs compared with patients with early breast cancer (polycaspase kit: 8.1% vs. 47.4% of the total CTC number; P = 0.0001; M30-antibody: 32.1% vs. 76.63%; P = 0.002). The median percentage of apoptotic CTCs per patient was also lower in patients with advanced compared with those with early disease (polycaspase kit: 0% vs. 53.6%; M30-antibody: 15% vs. 80%). Ki67-positive CTCs were identified in 51.7% and 44% of patients with early and metastatic disease, respectively. Adjuvant chemotherapy reduced both the number of CTCs per patient and the number of proliferating CTCs (63.9% vs. 30%). In conclusion, apoptotic CTCs could be detected in patients with breast cancer irrespective of their clinical status, though the incidence of detection is higher in early compared with metastatic patients. The detection of CTCs that survive despite adjuvant therapy implies that CTC elimination should be attempted using agents targeting their distinctive molecular characteristics.

  20. Differing Von Hippel Lindau Genotype in Paired Primary and Metastatic Tumors in Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Susan A. J.; Tavares, Emmanuel J.; Golshayan, Ali R.; Rini, Brian I.; Aydin, Hakan; Zhou, Ming; Sercia, Linda; Wood, Laura; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K.; Bukowski, Ronald M.; Ganapathi, Ram

    2012-01-01

    In sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene is inactivated by mutation or methylation in the majority of primary (P) tumors. Due to differing effects of wild-type (WT) and mutant (MT) VHL gene on downstream signaling pathways regulating angiogenesis, VHL gene status could impact clinical outcome. In CCRCC, comparative genomic hybridization analysis studies have reported genetic differences between paired P and metastatic (M) tumors. We thus sequenced the VHL gene in paired tumor specimens from 10 patients to determine a possible clonal relationship between the P tumor and M lesion(s) in patients with CCRCC. Using paraffin-embedded specimens, genomic DNA from microdissected samples (>80% tumor) of paired P tumor and M lesions from all 10 patients, as well as in normal tissue from 6 of these cases, was analyzed. The DNA was used for PCR-based amplification of each of the 3 exons of the VHL gene. Sequences derived from amplified samples were compared to the wild-type VHL gene sequence (GenBank Accession No. AF010238). Methylation status of the VHL gene was determined using VHL methylation-specific PCR primers after DNA bisulfite modification. In 4/10 (40%) patients the VHL gene status differed between the P tumor and the M lesion. As expected, when the VHL gene was mutated in both the P tumor and M lesion, the mutation was identical. Further, while the VHL genotype differed between the primary tumor in different kidneys or multiple metastatic lesions in the same patient, the VHL germline genotype in the normal adjacent tissue was always wild-type irrespective of the VHL gene status in the P tumor. These results demonstrate for the first time that the VHL gene status can be different between paired primary and metastatic tissue in patients with CCRCC. PMID:22655276

  1. Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    intravital imaging and whole tissue clearing based imaging to dissect the interaction between tumor cell and its brain metastatic microenvironment. We...have successfully expanded GFAP-GFP mouse line (brain astrocyte specific) and performed preliminary testing on the intravital imaging capability. In...breast cancer driver genes. 2. Keywords……………………………………………………………. Breast cancer, brain metastasis, metastatic outgrowth, brain intravital imaging

  2. Immunophenotypic features of metastatic lymph node tumors to predict recurrence in N2 lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuwaki, Rie; Ishii, Genichiro; Zenke, Yoshitaka; Neri, Shinya; Aokage, Keiju; Hishida, Tomoyuki; Yoshida, Junji; Fujii, Satoshi; Kondo, Haruhiko; Goya, Tomoyuki; Nagai, Kanji; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Patients with mediastinal lymph node metastasis (N2) in squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) of the lung have poor prognosis after surgical resection of the primary tumor. The aim of this study was to clarify predictive factors of the recurrence of pathological lung SqCC with N2 focusing on the biological characteristics of both cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in primary and metastatic lymph node tumors. We selected 64 patients with pathological primary lung N2 SqCC who underwent surgical complete resection and investigated the expressions of four epithelial–mesenchymal transition-related markers (caveolin, clusterin, E-cadherin, ZEB2), three cancer stem cell-related markers (ALDH-1, CD44 variant6, podoplanin) of cancer cells, and four markers of CAFs (caveolin, CD90, clusterin, podoplanin) in both primary and matched metastatic lymph node tumors in the N2 area. In the primary tumors, the expressions of all the examined molecules were not related to recurrence. However, in the metastatic lymph node tumors, high clusterin and ZEB2 expressions in the cancer cells and high podoplanin expression in the CAFs were significantly correlated with recurrence (P = 0.03, 0.04, and 0.007, respectively). In a multivariate analysis, only podoplanin expression in the CAFs in metastatic lymph node tumors was identified as a significantly independent predictive factor of recurrence (P = 0.03). Our study indicated that the immunophenotypes of both cancer cells and CAFs in metastatic lymph node tumors, but not primary tumors, provide useful information for predicting the recurrence of pathological N2 lung SqCC. PMID:24814677

  3. Polyethylenimine-coated SPION exhibits potential intrinsic anti-metastatic properties inhibiting migration and invasion of pancreatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mulens-Arias, Vladimir; Rojas, José Manuel; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Morales, María del Puerto; Barber, Domingo F

    2015-10-28

    Due to its aggressive behavior, pancreatic cancer is one of the principal causes of cancer-related deaths. The highly metastatic potential of pancreatic tumor cells demands the development of more effective anti-metastatic approaches for this disease. Although polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEI-coated SPIONs) have been studied for their utility as transfection agents, little is known of their effect on tumor cell biology. Here we demonstrated that PEI-coated SPIONs have potent inhibitory effects on pancreatic tumor cell migration/invasion, through inhibition of Src kinase and decreased expression of MT1-MMP and MMP2 metalloproteinases. When treated with PEI-coated SPIONs, the pancreatic tumor cell line Pan02 showed reduced invadosome density and thus, a decrease in their ability to invade through basement membrane. These nanoparticles temporarily downmodulated microRNA-21, thereby upregulating the cell migration inhibitors PTEN, PDCD4 and Sprouty-1. PEI-coated SPIONs thus show intrinsic, possibly anti-metastatic properties for modulating pancreatic tumor cell migration machinery, which indicates their potential as anti-metastatic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  4. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Natalie; Pestrin, Marta; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Malorni, Luca; Di Leo, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach. PMID:24670368

  5. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  6. Neural stem cell-based dual suicide gene delivery for metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Natsume, A; Lee, H J; Motomura, K; Nishimira, Y; Ohno, M; Ito, M; Kinjo, S; Momota, H; Iwami, K; Ohka, F; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2012-11-01

    In our previous works, we demonstrated that human neural stem cells (NSCs) transduced with the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on glioma and medulloblastoma cells after administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). In addition, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) is a widely studied enzyme used for suicide gene strategies, for which the prodrug is ganciclovir (GCV). To apply this strategy to brain metastasis treatment, we established here a human NSC line (F3.CD-TK) expressing the dual suicide genes CD and TK. We examined whether F3.CD-TK cells intensified the antitumor effect on lung cancer brain metastases. In vitro studies showed that F3.CD-TK cells exerted a marked bystander effect on human lung cancer cells after treatment with 5-FC and GCV. In a novel experimental brain metastases model, intravenously administered F3 cells migrated near lung cancer metastatic lesions, which were induced by the injection of lung cancer cells via the intracarotid artery. More importantly, F3.CD-TK cells in the presence of prodrugs 5-FC and GCV decreased tumor size and considerably prolonged animal survival. The results of the present study indicate that the dual suicide gene-engineered, NSC-based treatment strategy might offer a new promising therapeutic modality for brain metastases.

  7. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  8. FOXL2 molecular status in adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary: A study of primary and metastatic cases.

    PubMed

    Zannoni, Gian Franco; Improta, Giuseppina; Petrillo, Marco; Pettinato, Angela; Scambia, Giovanni; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2016-08-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary are uncommon neoplasms, accounting for ~5% of all malignant ovarian tumors. GCTs are a relatively homogeneous group of tumors, categorized into two distinct subtypes, juvenile GCT and adult GCT (AGCT), likely arising from a limited set of molecular events usually involving the disruption of pathways that regulate granulosa cell proliferation. In the present study, the presence of forkheadbox L2 (FOXL2) c.402C>G mutation was investigated in a series of 42 samples of primary and metastatic AGCT of the ovary. The samples consisted of 37 primary and 5 metastatic ovarian AGCTs from 37 patients. FOXL2 mutational status was evaluated using a pyrosequencing approach on 2.5-µm sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. FOXL2 c.402C>G mutation was found in 33/37 (89.2%) primary AGCTs and in 4/5 (80.0%) metastases, with the molecular status of the metastases recapitulating that of the primary tumors (4 mutated cases and 1 wild-type case). Overall, FOXL2 mutation is present in the majority of primary and metastatic AGCTs, and could be used as a valid tool in the diagnosis of the disease and in cases of metastatic lesions from an unknown primary origin. Moreover the concordance of FOXL2 molecular status in primary and associated metastases suggests its early appearance and genomic stability in AGCT tumorigenesis.

  9. Histopathological mapping of metastatic tumor cells in sentinel lymph nodes of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Denoth, Seraina; Broglie, Martina A; Haerle, Stephan K; Huber, Gerhard F; Haile, Sarah R; Soltermann, Alex; Jochum, Wolfram; Stoeckli, Sandro J

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is a reliable technique for accurate determination of the cervical lymph node status in patients with early oral and oropharyngeal cancer but analyses on the distribution pattern of metastatic spread within sentinel lymph nodes are lacking. The localizations of carcinoma deposits were analyzed with a virtual microscope by creating digital images from the microscopic glass slides. Metastatic deposits were not randomly distributed within sentinel lymph nodes but were predominant in the central planes closer to the lymphatic inlet. Initial evaluation of the 4 most central slices achieved a high rate of 90% for the detection of micrometastases and of 80% for the detection of isolated tumor cells (ITCs). Based on the distribution we recommend an initial cut through the hilus and to proceed with the 4 most central 150-µm slices. Complete step sectioning is only required in case of a so far negative result. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  11. Detection rate and prognostic value of circulating tumor cells and circulating tumor DNA in metastatic uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bidard, François-Clément; Madic, Jordan; Mariani, Pascale; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Rampanou, Aurore; Servois, Vincent; Cassoux, Nathalie; Desjardins, Laurence; Milder, Maud; Vaucher, Isabelle; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Lebofsky, Ronald; Stern, Marc-Henri; Lantz, Olivier

    2014-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) have been recently investigated in several cancer types, but their respective clinical significance remains to be determined. In our prospective study, we compared the detection rate and the prognostic value of these two circulating biomarkers in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma. GNAQ/GNA11 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissue. Using a highly sensitive and mutation-specific bidirectional pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization (bi-PAP) technique, GNAQ c.626A>T, GNAQ c.626A>C and GNA11 c.626A>T copy numbers were quantified in plasma from 12 mL of blood. CTCs were detected at the same time in 7.5 mL of blood by the CellSearch technique. Patient characteristics and outcome were prospectively collected. CTCs (≥1) were detected in 12 of the 40 included patients (30%, range 1-20). Among the 26 patients with known detectable mutations, ctDNA was detected and quantified in 22 (84%, range 4-11,421 copies/mL). CTC count and ctDNA levels were associated with the presence of miliary hepatic metastasis (p = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively), with metastasis volume (p = 0.005 and 0.004) and with each other (p < 0.0001). CTC count and ctDNA levels were both strongly associated with progression-free survival (p = 0.003 and 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.0009 and <0.0001). In multivariate analyses, ctDNA appeared to be a better prognostic marker than CTC. In conclusion, ctDNA and CTC are correlated and both have poor prognostic significance. CTC detection can be performed in every patient but, in patients with detectable mutations, ctDNA was more frequently detected than CTC and has possibly more prognostic value. © 2013 UICC.

  12. Early detection of poor outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: tumor kinetics evaluated by circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Souza e Silva, Virgílio; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Abdallah, Emne A; Damascena, Aline; Paludo, Jociana; Chojniak, Rubens; Dettino, Aldo Lourenço Abbade; de Mello, Celso Abdon Lopes; Alves, Vanessa S; Fanelli, Marcello F

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most prevalent cancer worldwide. New prognostic markers are needed to identify patients with poorer prognosis, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) seem to be promising to accomplish this. Patients and methods A prospective study was conducted by blood collection from patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC), three times, every 2 months in conjunction with image examinations for evaluation of therapeutic response. CTC isolation and counting were performed by Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells (ISET). Results A total of 54 patients with mCRC with a mean age of 57.3 years (31–82 years) were included. Among all patients, 60% (n=32) were carriers of wild-type KRAS (WT KRAS) tumors and 90% of them (n=29) were exposed to monoclonal antibodies along with systemic treatment. Evaluating CTC kinetics, when we compared the baseline (pretreatment) CTC level (CTC1) with the level at first follow-up (CTC2), we observed that CTC1-positive patients (CTCs above the median), who became negative (CTCs below the median) had a favorable evolution (n=14), with a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 14.7 months. This was higher than that for patients with an unfavorable evolution (CTC1− that became CTC2+; n=13, 6.9 months; P=0.06). Patients with WT KRAS with favorable kinetics had higher PFS (14.7 months) in comparison to those with WT KRAS with unfavorable kinetics (9.4 months; P=0.02). Moreover, patients whose imaging studies showed radiological progression had an increased quantification of CTCs at CTC2 compared to those without progression (P=0.04). Conclusion This study made possible the presentation of ISET as a feasible tool for evaluating CTC kinetics in patients with mCRC, which can be promising in their clinical evaluation. PMID:28008271

  13. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  14. CD39/ENTPD1 expression by CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells promotes hepatic metastatic tumor growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    SUN, XIAOFENG; WU, YAN; GAO, WENDA; ENJYOJI, KEIICHI; CSIZMADIA, EVA; MÜLLER, CHRISTA E.; MURAKAMI, TAKASHI; ROBSON, SIMON C.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Adenosine mediates immune suppression and is generated by the ectonucleotidases CD39 (ENTPD1) and CD73 that are expressed on vascular endothelial cells and regulatory T cells (Treg). Although tumor-infiltrating immune cells include Foxp3+ Treg, it is not clear whether local adenosine generation by Treg promotes tumor growth in a CD39-dependent manner. In this study, we have examined the impact of CD39 expression by Treg on effector immune cell responses to hepatic metastases in vivo. Methods and Results A model of hepatic metastatic cancer was developed with portal vein infusion of luciferase-expressing melanoma B16/F10 cells and MCA38 colon cancer cells in wild type and mutant mice null for Cd39. Chimeric mice were generated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) using Cd39 null or wild type (wt) C57BL6 donors and irradiated recipient mice. We demonstrate that hepatic growth of melanoma metastatic tumors was strongly inhibited in mice with Cd39 null vasculature or in wild type mice with circulating Cd39 null bone marrow-derived cells. We show functional CD39 expression on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg suppressed anti-tumor immunity mediated by NK cells in vitro and in vivo. Lastly, inhibition of CD39 activity by POM-1 (polyoxometalate-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of NTPDase activity, significantly inhibited tumor growth (P < .001). Conclusions CD39 expression on Treg inhibits NK activity and is permissive for metastatic growth. Pharmacological or targeted inhibition of CD39 enzymatic activity may find utility as an adjunct therapy for secondary hepatic malignancies. PMID:20546740

  15. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Daniel W.; Coppock, Joseph D.; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M.; Spanos, William C.; Onken, Michael D.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H.; Vermeer, Paola D.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60–80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes metastatic potential of breast cancer cells through Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Qiu, Zhu; Huang, Jing; Li, Yunhai; Huang, Hongyan; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Hui, Tianli; Lin, Yong; Li, Hongzhong; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer development and progression by releasing various cytokines and chemokines. Previously, we have found that the number of COX-2+ TAMs was associated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. However, the mechanism remains enigmatic. In this study, we show that COX-2 in breast TAMs enhances the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. COX-2 in TAMs induces MMP-9 expression and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells. In addition, COX-2/PGE2 induces IL-6 release in macrophages. Furthermore, we find that the activation of Akt pathway in cancer cells is crucial for the pro-metastatic effect of COX-2+ TAMs by regulating MMP-9 and EMT. These findings indicate that TAMs facilitate breast cancer cell metastasis through COX-2-mediated intercellular communication. PMID:27994517

  17. Anti-tumor Properties of cis-Resveratrol Methylated Analogues in Metastatic Mouse Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valery L.; Toseef, Tayyaba; Nazumudeen, Fathima B.; Rivoira, Christian; Spatafora, Carmela; Tringali, Corrado; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (E-3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol found in red wine that has been shown to have multiple anti-cancer properties. Although cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers of resveratrol occur in nature, the cis form is not biologically active. However, methylation at key positions of the cis form results in more potent anti-cancer properties. This study determined that synthetic cis-polymethoxystilbenes (methylated analogues of cis-resveratrol) inhibited cancer-related phenotypes of metastatic B16 F10 and non-metastatic B16 F1 mouse melanoma cells. In contrast with cis or trans-resveratrol and trans-polymethoxystilbene which were ineffective at 10 μM, cis-polymethoxystilbenes inhibited motility and proliferation of melanoma cells with low micromolar specificity (IC50 <10 μM). Inhibitory effects by cis-polymethoxystilbenes were significantly stronger with B16 F10 cells and were accompanied by decreased expression of β-tubulin and pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein, a marker of metastatic B16 cells. Thus, cis-polymethoxystilbenes have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for metastatic melanoma. PMID:25567208

  18. Combination of miR-21 with Circulating Tumor Cells Markers Improve Diagnostic Specificity of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Xiaoming; Shen, Hongyan; Deng, Rong; Xue, Kecheng

    2015-09-01

    Circulating miR-21 is upregulated in breast cancer. However, correlation of miR-21 expression with clinic pathologic characteristics remains questionable. In this study, we investigate whether combination of circulation miR-21 with circulating tumor cells (CTCs) marker (EpCAM, MUS1, HER2) could improve diagnostic specificity of metastatic breast cancer. Total 223 breast cancer patients were included. 89 % patients were associated with upregulation of miR-21 compared with health control. 20 % patients were detected for CTCs marker positive. For higher specificity purpose, triple marker positive samples were selected as true CTCs positive, which only occupied 59.5 % of total metastatic breast cancer patients. Specificity of detection of CTCs was 96.7 %. Furthermore, 59.5 % metastatic breast cancer patients were shown both abnormal miR-21 and true CTCs positive according to distribution of true CTCs positive and abnormal miR-21; Combination of miR-21 and CTCs was increased specificity of metastatic detection to 100 %. Our findings suggested that combination of miR-21 with CTCs marker could be used for better diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer in the future.

  19. The safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of intraoperative cell salvage in metastatic spine tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Elmalky, Mahmoud; Yasin, Naveed; Rodrigues-Pinto, Ricardo; Stephenson, John; Carroll, Craig; Smurthwaite, Glyn; Verma, Rajat; Mohammad, Saeed; Siddique, Irfan

    2017-07-01

    Metastatic spine tumor surgery (MSTS) is associated with substantial blood loss, therefore leading to high morbidity and mortality. Although intraoperative cell salvage with leukocyte depletion filter (IOCS-LDF) has been studied as an effective means of reducing blood loss in other surgical settings, including the spine, no study has yet analyzed the efficacy of reinfusion of salvaged blood in reducing the need for allogenic blood transfusion in patients who have had surgery for MSTS. This study aimed to analyze the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of using IOCS-LDF in MSTS. This is a retrospective controlled study. A total of 176 patients undergoing MSTS were included in the study. All patients undergoing MSTS at a single center between February 2010 and December 2014 were included in the study. The primary outcome measure was the use of autologous blood transfusion. Secondary outcome measures included hospital stay, survival time, complications, and procedural costs. The key predictor variable was whether IOCS-LDF was used during surgery. Logistic and linear regression analyses were conducted by controlling variables such as tumor type, number of diseased vertebrae, approach, number and site of stabilized segments, operation time, preoperative anemia, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). No funding was obtained and there are no conflicts of interest to be declared. Data included 63 cases (IOCS-LDF) and 113 controls (non-IOCS-LDF). Intraoperative cell salvage with LDF utilization was substantively and significantly associated with a lower likelihood of allogenic blood transfusion (OR=0.407, p=.03). Intraoperative cell salvage with LDF was cost neutral (p=.88). Average hospital stay was 3.76 days shorter among IOCS-LDF patients (p=.03). Patient survival and complication rates were comparable in both groups. We have demonstrated that the use of IOCS-LDF in MSTS reduces the need for postoperative allogenic

  20. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  1. Circulating tumor cells and response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer: SWOG S0500.

    PubMed

    Smerage, Jeffrey B; Barlow, William E; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Winer, Eric P; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Srkalovic, Gordan; Tejwani, Sheela; Schott, Anne F; O'Rourke, Mark A; Lew, Danika L; Doyle, Gerald V; Gralow, Julie R; Livingston, Robert B; Hayes, Daniel F

    2014-11-01

    Increased circulating tumor cells (CTCs; five or more CTCs per 7.5 mL of whole blood) are associated with poor prognosis in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). A randomized trial of patients with persistent increase in CTCs tested whether changing chemotherapy after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy would improve the primary outcome of overall survival (OS). Patients with MBC who did not have increased CTCs at baseline remained on initial therapy until progression (arm A). Patients with initially increased CTCs that decreased after 21 days of therapy remained on initial therapy (arm B). Patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of therapy were randomly assigned to continue initial therapy (arm C1) or change to an alternative chemotherapy (arm C2). Of 595 eligible and evaluable patients, 276 (46%) did not have increased CTCs (arm A). Of those with initially increased CTCs, 31 (10%) were not retested, 165 were assigned to arm B, and 123 were randomly assigned to arm C1 or C2. No difference in median OS was observed between arm C1 and C2 (10.7 and 12.5 months, respectively; P = .98). CTCs were strongly prognostic. Median OS for arms A, B, and C (C1 and C2 combined) were 35 months, 23 months, and 13 months, respectively (P < .001). This study confirms the prognostic significance of CTCs in patients with MBC receiving first-line chemotherapy. For patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of first-line chemotherapy, early switching to an alternate cytotoxic therapy was not effective in prolonging OS. For this population, there is a need for more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. Circulating Tumor Cells and Response to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer: SWOG S0500

    PubMed Central

    Smerage, Jeffrey B.; Barlow, William E.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Winer, Eric P.; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Srkalovic, Gordan; Tejwani, Sheela; Schott, Anne F.; O'Rourke, Mark A.; Lew, Danika L.; Doyle, Gerald V.; Gralow, Julie R.; Livingston, Robert B.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Increased circulating tumor cells (CTCs; five or more CTCs per 7.5 mL of whole blood) are associated with poor prognosis in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). A randomized trial of patients with persistent increase in CTCs tested whether changing chemotherapy after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy would improve the primary outcome of overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods Patients with MBC who did not have increased CTCs at baseline remained on initial therapy until progression (arm A). Patients with initially increased CTCs that decreased after 21 days of therapy remained on initial therapy (arm B). Patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of therapy were randomly assigned to continue initial therapy (arm C1) or change to an alternative chemotherapy (arm C2). Results Of 595 eligible and evaluable patients, 276 (46%) did not have increased CTCs (arm A). Of those with initially increased CTCs, 31 (10%) were not retested, 165 were assigned to arm B, and 123 were randomly assigned to arm C1 or C2. No difference in median OS was observed between arm C1 and C2 (10.7 and 12.5 months, respectively; P = .98). CTCs were strongly prognostic. Median OS for arms A, B, and C (C1 and C2 combined) were 35 months, 23 months, and 13 months, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion This study confirms the prognostic significance of CTCs in patients with MBC receiving first-line chemotherapy. For patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of first-line chemotherapy, early switching to an alternate cytotoxic therapy was not effective in prolonging OS. For this population, there is a need for more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy. PMID:24888818

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Metastatic Poor Prognosis Germ Cell Tumors: Current Perspective From a Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Necchi, Andrea; Farè, Elena; Vullo, Salvatore Lo; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Raggi, Daniele; Nicolai, Nicola; Piva, Luigi; Biasoni, Davide; Catanzaro, Mario; Torelli, Tullio; Stagni, Silvia; Maffezzini, Massimo; Verzoni, Elena; Grassi, Paolo; Procopio, Giuseppe; Pizzocaro, Giorgio; Mariani, Luigi; Salvioni, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Survival estimates with first-line treatment for patients with metastatic poor prognosis germ cell tumors (GCT) are still suboptimal in the literature. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the outcome of patients referred to our tertiary cancer center. A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients who received at least first-line chemotherapy at our center. Distribution of clinical characteristics was evaluated in the periods < 1997, 1997 to 2001, 2001 to 2006, and 2007 to 2013. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Univariable and multivariable Cox models with prespecified clinical variables were undertaken for PFS and OS. All tests and confidence intervals were 2-sided and set at a P = .05 level of significance. Between 1982 and 2013, 168 patients were identified. The median age was 27 years (interquartile range [IQR], 22-34). The presence of liver, bone, or brain metastases trended to greater incidence from 1997 onward (27.5% < 1997 to 55.6% in 2007-2013; χ(2)P = .054). Median follow-up was 102 (IQR, 63-166) months. Global 5-year PFS was 48.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.5-56.8) and OS was 63.2% (95% CI, 56.0-71.2). In multivariable analysis, treatment period was not significantly associated with either PFS (overall P = .229) or OS (overall P = .216). In this single-center series of consecutive poor prognosis GCT we could observe greater PFS and OS than the historical estimates. This observation was independent from the period of treatment. Based on the present results, studies focused on improving the outcome in the sole poor-risk cohort should be discouraged. Results were biased by their retrospective quality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  5. Cancer stemness and metastatic potential of the novel tumor cell line K3: an inner mutated cell of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Ding, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jiao; Mao, Fei; Sun, Zixuan; Jia, Haoyuan; Yin, Lei; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Yongmin; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2017-06-13

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation has been used for therapeutic applications in various diseases. Here we report MSCs can malignantly transform in vivo. The novel neoplasm was found on the tail of female rat after injection with male rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (rBM-MSCs) and the new tumor cell line, K3, was isolated from the neoplasm. The K3 cells expressed surface antigens and pluripotent genes similar to those of rBM-MSCs and presented tumor cell features. Moreover, the K3 cells contained side population cells (SP) like cancer stem cells (CSCs), which might contribute to K3 heterogeneity and tumorigenic capacity. To investigate the metastatic potential of K3 cells, we established the nude mouse models of liver and lung metastases and isolated the corresponding metastatic cell lines K3-F4 and K3-B6. Both K3-F4 and K3-B6 cell lines with higher metastatic potential acquired more mesenchymal and stemness-related features. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a potential mechanism of K3-F4 and K3-B6 formation.

  6. Hypoxic Tumor Cell Modulates Its Microenvironment to Enhance Angiogenic and Metastatic Potential by Secretion of Proteins and Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Tan, Hon Sen; Datta, Arnab; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Zhang, Huoming; Meng, Wei; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxia, tumor cells produce a secretion that modulates their microenvironment to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here, we observed that hypoxic or reoxygenated A431 carcinoma cells exhibited enhanced angiogenic and metastatic potential such as reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, increased invasiveness, and production of a secretion with increased chorioallantoic membrane angiogenic activity. Consistent with these observations, quantitative proteomics revealed that under hypoxia the tumor cells secreted proteins involved in angiogenesis, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and immune cell recruitment. Unexpectedly, the secreted proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. Ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g precipitated 54% of the secreted proteins and enriched for many exosome-associated proteins such as the tetraspanins and Alix and also proteins with the potential to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. Two tetraspanins, CD9 and CD81, co-immunoprecipitated. Together, these data suggested that tumor cells secrete proteins and exosomes with the potential to modulate their microenvironment and facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:20124223

  7. Exploiting natural anti-tumor immunity for metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Katherine A; James, Britnie R; Guan, Yue; Torry, Donald S; Wilber, Andrew; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations of spontaneous disease regression in some renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients implicate a role for tumor immunity in controlling this disease. Puzzling, however, are findings that high levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are common to RCC. Despite expression of activation markers by TILs, functional impairment of innate and adaptive immune cells has been consistently demonstrated contributing to the failure of the immune system to control RCC. Immunotherapy can overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor and provide an opportunity for long-term disease free survival. Unfortunately, complete response rates remain sub-optimal indicating the effectiveness of immunotherapy remains limited by tumor-specific factors and/or cell types that inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here we discuss immunotherapies and the function of multiple immune system components to achieve an effective response. Understanding these complex interactions is essential to rationally develop novel therapies capable of renewing the immune system's ability to respond to these tumors.

  8. Exploiting natural anti-tumor immunity for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A; James, Britnie R; Guan, Yue; Torry, Donald S; Wilber, Andrew; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations of spontaneous disease regression in some renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients implicate a role for tumor immunity in controlling this disease. Puzzling, however, are findings that high levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are common to RCC. Despite expression of activation markers by TILs, functional impairment of innate and adaptive immune cells has been consistently demonstrated contributing to the failure of the immune system to control RCC. Immunotherapy can overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor and provide an opportunity for long-term disease free survival. Unfortunately, complete response rates remain sub-optimal indicating the effectiveness of immunotherapy remains limited by tumor-specific factors and/or cell types that inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here we discuss immunotherapies and the function of multiple immune system components to achieve an effective response. Understanding these complex interactions is essential to rationally develop novel therapies capable of renewing the immune system's ability to respond to these tumors. PMID:25996049

  9. The inhibition of 45A ncRNA expression reduces tumor formation, affecting tumor nodules compactness and metastatic potential in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Penna, Ilaria; Gigoni, Arianna; Costa, Delfina; Vella, Serena; Russo, Debora; Poggi, Alessandro; Villa, Federico; Brizzolara, Antonella; Canale, Claudio; Mescola, Andrea; Daga, Antonio; Russo, Claudio; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio; Menichini, Paola; Pagano, Aldo

    2017-01-31

    We recently reported the in vitro over-expression of 45A, a RNA polymerase III-transcribed non-coding (nc)RNA, that perturbs the intracellular content of FE65L1 affecting cell proliferation rate, short-term response to genotoxic stress, substrate adhesion capacity and, ultimately, increasing the tumorigenic potential of human neuroblastoma cells. In this work, to deeply explore the mechanism by which 45A ncRNA contributes to cancer development, we targeted in vitro and in vivo 45A levels by the stable overexpression of antisense 45A RNA.45A downregulation leads to deep modifications of cytoskeleton organization, adhesion and migration of neuroblastoma cells. These effects are correlated with alterations in the expression of several genes including GTSE1 (G2 and S phase-expressed-1), a crucial regulator of tumor cell migration and metastatic potential. Interestingly, the downregulation of 45A ncRNA strongly affects the in vivo tumorigenic potential of SKNBE2 neuroblastoma cells, increasing tumor nodule compactness and reducing GTSE1 protein expression in a subcutaneous neuroblastoma mouse model. Moreover, intracardiac injection of neuroblastoma cells showed that downregulation of 45A ncRNA also influences tumor metastatic ability. In conclusion, our data highlight a key role of 45A ncRNA in cancer development and suggest that its modulation might represent a possible novel anticancer therapeutic approach.

  10. Two-dimensional electrophoretic comparison of metastatic and non-metastatic human breast tumors using in vitro cultured epithelial cells derived from the cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Vydra, Jan; Selicharová, Irena; Smutná, Kateřina; Šanda, Miloslav; Matoušková, Eva; Buršíková, Eva; Prchalová, Markéta; Velenská, Zuzana; Coufal, David; Jiráček, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Background Breast carcinomas represent a heterogeneous group of tumors diverse in behavior, outcome, and response to therapy. Identification of proteins resembling the tumor biology can improve the diagnosis, prediction, treatment selection, and targeting of therapy. Since the beginning of the post-genomic era, the focus of molecular biology gradually moved from genomes to proteins and proteomes and to their functionality. Proteomics can potentially capture dynamic changes in protein expression integrating both genetic and epigenetic influences. Methods We prepared primary cultures of epithelial cells from 23 breast cancer tissue samples and performed comparative proteomic analysis. Seven patients developed distant metastases within three-year follow-up. These samples were included into a metastase-positive group, the others formed a metastase-negative group. Two-dimensional electrophoretical (2-DE) gels in pH range 4–7 were prepared. Spot densities in 2-DE protein maps were subjected to statistical analyses (R/maanova package) and data-mining analysis (GUHA). For identification of proteins in selected spots, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was employed. Results Three protein spots were significantly altered between the metastatic and non-metastatic groups. The correlations were proven at the 0.05 significance level. Nucleophosmin was increased in the group with metastases. The levels of 2,3-trans-enoyl-CoA isomerase and glutathione peroxidase 1 were decreased. Conclusion We have performed an extensive proteomic study of mammary epithelial cells from breast cancer patients. We have found differentially expressed proteins between the samples from metastase-positive and metastase-negative patient groups. PMID:18416831

  11. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma, with a radiographically occult primary tumor, presenting in the operative site of a thoracic meningioma: long-term follow-up: Case report.

    PubMed

    Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Nitin; Barrese, James C; Barry, Maureen T; Baisre, Ada

    2014-10-01

    Lesions metastatic to the site of a meningioma resection from a different primary tumor are rare. Metastasis of a tumor without a known primary tumor is also rare. Metastasis of a renal cell carcinoma, without an identifiable primary tumor, to the bed of a meningioma resection has not been previously reported. The authors describe the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with decreased sensory and motor function in the lower extremities. He underwent T3-5 laminectomies and gross-total removal of an intradural, extramedullary meningioma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient regained full neurological function. After a 3-year period, he developed progressive upper thoracic pain and lower-extremity paresthesias. Imaging studies showed an epidural mass at the T2-4 levels and what appeared to be blastic involvement of the T2-4 vertebrae. A metastatic workup was negative. Emergency revision laminectomies yielded a fibrous, nonvascular mass. Neuropathology was consistent with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. After 6 months, the patient's symptoms of pain and paresthesias recurred. Repeat excision, with decompression of the spinal cord, revealed tumor cells morphologically and immunophenotypically similar to those obtained from the prior surgery. Cytogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. A novel case of an epidural metastatic renal cell carcinoma, of unknown primary origin, in the same operative bed of a previously resected intradural, extramedullary meningioma of the thoracic spine is reported.

  12. Crosstalk from non-cancerous mitochondria can inhibit tumor properties of metastatic cells by suppressing oncogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Ma, Yewei; Park, Jun Hyoung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Zhang, Yiqun; Yotnda, Patricia; Creighton, Chad J; Chan, Wai-Yee; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nucleus cross talks and mitochondrial retrograde regulation can play a significant role in cellular properties. Transmitochondrial cybrid systems (cybrids) are an excellent tool to study specific effects of altered mitochondria under a defined nuclear background. The majority of the studies using the cybrid model focused on the significance of specific mitochondrial DNA variations in mitochondrial function or tumor properties. However, most of these variants are benign polymorphisms without known functional significance. From an objective of rectifying mitochondrial defects in cancer cells and to establish mitochondria as a potential anticancer drug target, understanding the role of functional mitochondria in reversing oncogenic properties under a cancer nuclear background is very important. Here we analyzed the potential reversal of oncogenic properties of a highly metastatic cell line with the introduction of non-cancerous mitochondria. Cybrids were established by fusing the mitochondria DNA depleted 143B TK- ρ0 cells from an aggressive osteosarcoma cell line with mitochondria from benign breast epithelial cell line MCF10A, moderately metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 and 143B cells. In spite of the uniform cancerous nuclear background, as observed with the mitochondria donor cells, cybrids with benign mitochondria showed high mitochondrial functional properties including increased ATP synthesis, oxygen consumption and respiratory chain activities compared to cybrids with cancerous mitochondria. Interestingly, benign mitochondria could reverse different oncogenic characteristics of 143B TK(-) cell including cell proliferation, viability under hypoxic condition, anti-apoptotic properties, resistance to anti-cancer drug, invasion, and colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumor growth in nude mice. Microarray analysis suggested that several oncogenic pathways observed in cybrids with cancer mitochondria are inhibited in cybrids with

  13. Novel in vivo flow cytometry platform for early prognosis of metastatic activity of circulating tumor cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Jacqueline; Cai, Chenzhoung; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 8 million people lose their lives due to cancer each year. Metastatic disease is responsible for 90% of those cancer-related deaths. Only viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that can survive in the blood circulation can create secondary tumors. Thus, real-time enumeration of CTCs and assessment of their viability in vivo has great biological significance. However, little progress has been made in this field. Conventional flow cytometry is the current technique being used for the assessment of cell viability, but there are many limitations to this technique: 1) cell properties may be altered during the extraction and processing method; 2) collection of cells from blood prevents the long-term study of individual cells in their natural biological environment; and 3) there are time-consuming preparation procedures. Whether it be for the assessment of antitumor drugs, where induction of apoptosis or necrosis is the preferred event, or the identification of nanoparticle-induced toxicity during nanotherapeutic treatment, it is clear that new approaches for assessment of the viability circulating blood cells and CTCs are urgently needed. We have developed a novel high speed, multicolor in vivo flow cytometry (FC) platform that integrates photoacoustic (PA) and fluorescence FC (PAFFC) and demonstrate its ability to enumerate rare circulating normal and abnormal (e.g. tumor) cells and assess their viability (e.g. apoptotic and necrotic) in a mouse model.

  14. Post-transcriptional Control of Tumor Cell Autonomous Metastatic Potential by CCR4-NOT Deadenylase CNOT7

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Farhoud; Hu, Ying; Yang, Howard H.; Lee, Maxwell P.; Winkler, G. Sebastian; Hafner, Markus; Hunter, Kent W.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the role of an aberrant transcriptome as a driver of metastatic potential. Deadenylation is a general regulatory node for post-transcriptional control by microRNAs and other determinants of RNA stability. Previously, we demonstrated that the CCR4-NOT scaffold component Cnot2 is an inherited metastasis susceptibility gene. In this study, using orthotopic metastasis assays and genetically engineered mouse models, we show that one of the enzymatic subunits of the CCR4-NOT complex, Cnot7, is also a metastasis modifying gene. We demonstrate that higher expression of Cnot7 drives tumor cell autonomous metastatic potential, which requires its deadenylase activity. Furthermore, metastasis promotion by CNOT7 is dependent on interaction with CNOT1 and TOB1. CNOT7 ribonucleoprotein-immunoprecipitation (RIP) and integrated transcriptome wide analyses reveal that CNOT7-regulated transcripts are enriched for a tripartite 3’UTR motif bound by RNA-binding proteins known to complex with CNOT7, TOB1, and CNOT1. Collectively, our data support a model of CNOT7, TOB1, CNOT1, and RNA-binding proteins collectively exerting post-transcriptional control on a metastasis suppressive transcriptional program to drive tumor cell metastasis. PMID:26807845

  15. Targeting amino acid transport in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: effects on cell cycle, cell growth, and tumor development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Tiffen, Jessamy; Bailey, Charles G; Lehman, Melanie L; Ritchie, William; Fazli, Ladan; Metierre, Cynthia; Feng, Yue Julie; Li, Estelle; Gleave, Martin; Buchanan, Grant; Nelson, Colleen C; Rasko, John E J; Holst, Jeff

    2013-10-02

    L-type amino acid transporters (LATs) uptake neutral amino acids including L-leucine into cells, stimulating mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling and protein synthesis. LAT1 and LAT3 are overexpressed at different stages of prostate cancer, and they are responsible for increasing nutrients and stimulating cell growth. We examined LAT3 protein expression in human prostate cancer tissue microarrays. LAT function was inhibited using a leucine analog (BCH) in androgen-dependent and -independent environments, with gene expression analyzed by microarray. A PC-3 xenograft mouse model was used to study the effects of inhibiting LAT1 and LAT3 expression. Results were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U or Fisher exact tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. LAT3 protein was expressed at all stages of prostate cancer, with a statistically significant decrease in expression after 4-7 months of neoadjuvant hormone therapy (4-7 month mean = 1.571; 95% confidence interval = 1.155 to 1.987 vs 0 month = 2.098; 95% confidence interval = 1.962 to 2.235; P = .0187). Inhibition of LAT function led to activating transcription factor 4-mediated upregulation of amino acid transporters including ASCT1, ASCT2, and 4F2hc, all of which were also regulated via the androgen receptor. LAT inhibition suppressed M-phase cell cycle genes regulated by E2F family transcription factors including critical castration-resistant prostate cancer regulatory genes UBE2C, CDC20, and CDK1. In silico analysis of BCH-downregulated genes showed that 90.9% are statistically significantly upregulated in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Finally, LAT1 or LAT3 knockdown in xenografts inhibited tumor growth, cell cycle progression, and spontaneous metastasis in vivo. Inhibition of LAT transporters may provide a novel therapeutic target in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, via suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity and M-phase cell cycle genes.

  16. Allogeneic nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation in metastatic colon cancer: tumor-specific T cells directed to a tumor-associated antigen are generated in vivo during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Cignetti, Alessandro; Capaldi, Antonio; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Vallario, Antonella; Ricchiardi, Alberto; Sperti, Elisa; Ferraris, Renato; Gatti, Marco; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Geuna, Massimo; Fizzotti, Marco; Sangiolo, Dario; Sottile, Antonino; De Rosa, Giovanni; Bucci, Anna Rosa; Lambertenghi-Deliliers, Giorgio; Benedetti, Edoardo; Nash, Richard; Aglietta, Massimo

    2006-05-01

    A pilot study was conducted to evaluate safety and activity of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and to determine whether a T-cell response to a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) was induced. Fifteen patients with metastatic CRC underwent HCT from human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen. All patients engrafted with a median donor T-cell chimerism of 72% at day +56. Eight patients experienced grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Despite progressive disease before HCT, partial remission and disease stabilization longer than 90 days were observed in 1 and 3 patients, respectively. Induction of TAA-specific T cells was evaluated with a carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-specific HLA-A(*)0201 pentamer in 6 patients with CRC. CEA-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected in 3 of 3 patients concomitant with GHVD onset, but not in 3 of 3 patients without GVHD. They were also not detected in 9 of 9 control patients with GVHD who received transplants for diagnoses other than CRC. Antitumor activity of CEA-specific T cells was also validated in vitro. In one patient, the induction of CEA-specific T cells was associated with a decrease of serum CEA levels and a partial response. Thus, graft-versus-host reactions associated with allogeneic HCT can trigger the generation of T cells specific for CEA, and this may be associated with a clinical response.

  17. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    undesirable side effects. The objective of this proposal is to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy ( PDT ) on prostate tumors in order to design...optimal treatment regimens. We have established subcurative PDT conditions in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. Using these conditions we observed a transient...Ab to detect circulating prostate cancer cells. The results obtained establishes that PDT alters cellular-molecular processes such as cell adhesion

  18. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  19. p53 deficiency linked to B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) loss enhances metastatic potential by promoting tumor growth in primary and metastatic sites in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Powell, Emily; Shao, Jiansu; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Cai, Shirong; Echeverria, Gloria V; Mistry, Nipun; Decker, Keith F; Schlosberg, Christopher; Do, Kim-Anh; Edwards, John R; Liang, Han; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2016-01-27

    Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients, metastasis remains the major cause of mortality. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer, and these alterations can occur during the early stages of oncogenesis or as later events as tumors progress to more aggressive forms. Previous studies have suggested that p53 plays a role in cellular pathways that govern metastasis. To investigate how p53 deficiency contributes to late-stage tumor growth and metastasis, we developed paired isogenic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) differing only in p53 status for longitudinal analysis. Patient-derived isogenic human tumor lines differing only in p53 status were implanted into mouse mammary glands. Tumor growth and metastasis were monitored with bioluminescence imaging, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were quantified by flow cytometry. RNA-Seq was performed on p53-deficient and p53 wild-type tumors, and functional validation of a lead candidate gene was performed in vivo. Isogenic p53 wild-type and p53-deficient tumors metastasized out of mammary glands and colonized distant sites with similar frequency. However, p53-deficient tumors metastasized earlier than p53 wild-type tumors and grew faster in both primary and metastatic sites as a result of increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. In addition, greater numbers of CTCs were detected in the blood of mice engrafted with p53-deficient tumors. However, when normalized to tumor mass, the number of CTCs isolated from mice bearing parental and p53-deficient tumors was not significantly different. Gene expression profiling followed by functional validation identified B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2), a downstream effector of p53, as a negative regulator of tumor growth both at primary and metastatic sites. BTG2 expression status correlated with survival of TNBC patients. Using paired isogenic PDX-derived metastatic TNBC cells

  20. Changes in keratin expression during metastatic progression of breast cancer: impact on the detection of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Joosse, Simon A; Hannemann, Juliane; Spötter, Julia; Bauche, Andreas; Andreas, Antje; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus

    2012-02-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) might function as early markers for breast cancer metastasis or monitoring therapy efficacy. Enrichment and identification of CTCs are based on epithelial markers that might be modulated during epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Little is known about the expression of keratins in CTCs and whether all CTCs can be detected with antibodies directed against a limited panel of keratins. Protein expression of keratin 2, 4-10, 13-16, 18, and 19 were assessed by a cocktail of antibodies (C11, AE1, AE3, and K7) and keratin antibodies C11 and A45-B/B3 alone in 11 breast cancer cell lines and 50 primary breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. Furthermore, CTCs were assessed in blood of 70 metastatic breast cancer patients. Claudin-low cell lines did not show expression of normal breast epithelial keratins but were positive for K14 and K16, detected by the cocktail only. Primary breast carcinomas showed changes in keratin expression during metastatic progression to the lymph nodes. In 35 of 70 patients CTCs were identified, of which 83%, 40%, and 57% were identified by the cocktail, C11 and A45-B/B3, respectively. Identification of CTCs by the cocktail was associated with shorter survival (P < 0.01). In silico analyses revealed association between KRT16 expression and shorter relapse-free survival in metastatic breast cancer. Breast cancer cells show a complex pattern of keratin expression with potential biologic relevance. Individual keratin antibodies recognizing only a limited set of keratins inherit the risk to miss biologically relevant CTCs in cancer patients, and antibody cocktails including these keratins are therefore recommended. ©2012 AACR.

  1. Tumor matrix stiffness promotes metastatic cancer cell interaction with the endothelium.

    PubMed

    Reid, Steven E; Kay, Emily J; Neilson, Lisa J; Henze, Anne-Theres; Serneels, Jens; McGhee, Ewan J; Dhayade, Sandeep; Nixon, Colin; Mackey, John Bg; Santi, Alice; Swaminathan, Karthic; Athineos, Dimitris; Papalazarou, Vasileios; Patella, Francesca; Román-Fernández, Álvaro; ElMaghloob, Yasmin; Hernandez-Fernaud, Juan Ramon; Adams, Ralf H; Ismail, Shehab; Bryant, David M; Salmeron-Sanchez, Manuel; Machesky, Laura M; Carlin, Leo M; Blyth, Karen; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Zanivan, Sara

    2017-08-15

    Tumor progression alters the composition and physical properties of the extracellular matrix. Particularly, increased matrix stiffness has profound effects on tumor growth and metastasis. While endothelial cells are key players in cancer progression, the influence of tumor stiffness on the endothelium and the impact on metastasis is unknown. Through quantitative mass spectrometry, we find that the matricellular protein CCN1/CYR61 is highly regulated by stiffness in endothelial cells. We show that stiffness-induced CCN1 activates β-catenin nuclear translocation and signaling and that this contributes to upregulate N-cadherin levels on the surface of the endothelium, in vitro This facilitates N-cadherin-dependent cancer cell-endothelium interaction. Using intravital imaging, we show that knockout of Ccn1 in endothelial cells inhibits melanoma cancer cell binding to the blood vessels, a critical step in cancer cell transit through the vasculature to metastasize. Targeting stiffness-induced changes in the vasculature, such as CCN1, is therefore a potential yet unappreciated mechanism to impair metastasis. © 2017 Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  2. Third-line chemotherapy and novel agents for metastatic germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Christine M; Vaughn, David J

    2011-06-01

    Although germ cell tumors (GCT) are among the most curable solid tumors, a subset of patients with GCT experience relapse or progression despite appropriate cisplatin-based therapy or first-line salvage therapy. This article describes the molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance, outlines single-agent chemotherapy and combination chemotherapy regimens that are active against GCT in the third-line or later setting, discusses the use of drug therapy for treating growing teratoma syndrome and teratoma with malignant transformation, outlines novel agents used to treat GCT, and highlights ongoing clinical trials and future directions in the treatment of refractory GCT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dissecting the Heterogeneity of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Going Far Beyond the Needle in the Haystack

    PubMed Central

    Bulfoni, Michela; Turetta, Matteo; Del Ben, Fabio; Di Loreto, Carla; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Cesselli, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Although the enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTC) defined as expressing both epithelial cell adhesion molecule and cytokeratins (EpCAM+/CK+) can predict prognosis and response to therapy in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer, its clinical utility (i.e., the ability to improve patient outcome by guiding therapy) has not yet been proven in clinical trials. Therefore, scientists are now focusing on the molecular characterization of CTC as a way to explore its possible use as a “surrogate” of tumor tissues to non-invasively assess the genomic landscape of the cancer and its evolution during treatment. Additionally, evidences confirm the existence of CTC in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) characterized by a variable loss of epithelial markers. Since the EMT process can originate cells with enhanced invasiveness, stemness and drug-resistance, the enumeration and characterization of this population, perhaps the one truly responsible of tumor recurrence and progression, could be more clinically useful. For these reasons, several devices able to capture CTC independently from the expression of epithelial markers have been developed. In this review, we will describe the types of heterogeneity so far identified and the key role played by the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in driving CTC heterogeneity. The clinical relevance of detecting CTC-heterogeneity will be discussed as well. PMID:27783057

  4. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase) and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery. PMID:27293952

  5. Analysis of the tumor-initiating and metastatic capacity of PDX1-positive cells from the adult pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ischenko, Irene; Petrenko, Oleksi; Hayman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies. A striking feature of pancreatic cancer is that activating Kras mutations are found in ∼90% of cases. However, apart from a restricted population of cells expressing pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), most pancreatic cells are refractory to Kras-driven transformation. In the present study, we sought to determine which subsets of PDX1+ cells may be responsible for tumor growth. Using the Lox-Stop-Lox–KrasG12D genetic mouse model of pancreatic carcinogenesis, we isolated a population of KrasG12D-expressing PDX1+ cells with an inherent capacity to metastasize. This population of cells bears the surface phenotype of EpCAM+CD24+CD44+CD133–SCA1− and is closer in its properties to stem-like cells than to more mature cell types. We further demonstrate that the tumorigenic capacity of PDX1+ cells is limited, becoming progressively lost as the cells acquire a mature phenotype. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the adult pancreas harbors a dormant progenitor cell population that is capable of initiating tumor growth under conditions of oncogenic stimulation. We present evidence that constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling and stabilization of the MYC protein are the two main driving forces behind the development of pancreatic cancer cells with stem-cell–like properties and high metastatic potential. Our results suggest that pancreatic cells bearing Kras mutation can be induced to differentiate into quasi-normal cells with suppressed tumorigenicity by selective inhibition of the MAPK/ERK/MYC signaling cascade. PMID:24550494

  6. Tumor regression in patients with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma and melanoma using genetically engineered lymphocytes reactive with NY-ESO-1.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A; Yang, James C; Sherry, Richard M; Dudley, Mark E; Wunderlich, John R; Nahvi, Azam V; Helman, Lee J; Mackall, Crystal L; Kammula, Udai S; Hughes, Marybeth S; Restifo, Nicholas P; Raffeld, Mark; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Levy, Catherine L; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Schwarz, Susan L; Laurencot, Carolyn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2011-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes represents an effective cancer treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. The NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen, which is expressed in 80% of patients with synovial cell sarcoma and approximately 25% of patients with melanoma and common epithelial tumors, represents an attractive target for immune-based therapies. The current trial was carried out to evaluate the ability of adoptively transferred autologous T cells transduced with a T-cell receptor (TCR) directed against NY-ESO-1 to mediate tumor regression in patients with metastatic melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. A clinical trial was performed in patients with metastatic melanoma or metastatic synovial cell sarcoma refractory to all standard treatments. Patients with NY-ESO-1-positive tumors were treated with autologous TCR-transduced T cells plus 720,000 iU/kg of interleukin-2 to tolerance after preparative chemotherapy. Objective clinical responses were evaluated using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Objective clinical responses were observed in four of six patients with synovial cell sarcoma and five of 11 patients with melanoma bearing tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. Two of 11 patients with melanoma demonstrated complete regressions that persisted after 1 year. A partial response lasting 18 months was observed in one patient with synovial cell sarcoma. These observations indicate that TCR-based gene therapies directed against NY-ESO-1 represent a new and effective therapeutic approach for patients with melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. To our knowledge, this represents the first demonstration of the successful treatment of a nonmelanoma tumor using TCR-transduced T cells.

  7. Adoptive T-cell Therapy Using Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes for Metastatic Melanoma: Current Status and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard; Forget, Marie-Andree; Chacon, Jessica; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Chen, Jie Qing; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy using autologous T-cells has emerged to be a powerful treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma. These include the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), T-cells transduced with high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) against major melanosomal tumor antigens, and T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) composed of hybrid immunoglobulin light chains with endo-domains of T-cell signaling molecules. Among these and other options for T-cell therapy, TIL together with high-dose IL-2 has had the longest clinical history with multiple clinical trials in centers across the world consistently demonstrating durable clinical response rates near 50% or more. A distinct advantage of TIL therapy making it still the T-cell therapy of choice is the broad nature of the T-cell recognition against both defined as well as un-defined tumors antigens against all possible MHC, rather than the single specificity and limited MHC coverage of the newer TCR and CAR transduction technologies. In the past decade, significant inroads have been made in defining the phenotypes of T cells in TIL mediating tumor regression. CD8+ T cells are emerging to be critical, although the exact subset of CD8+ T cells exhibiting the highest clinical activity in terms of memory and effector markers is still controversial. We present a model in which both effector-memory and more differentiated effector T cells ultimately may need to cooperate to mediate long-term tumor control in responding patients. Although TIL therapy has shown great potential to treat metastatic melanoma, a number of issues have emerged that need to be addressed to bring it more into the mainstream of melanoma care. First, we have a reached the point where a pivotal phase II or phase III trials are needed in an attempt to gain regulatory approval of TIL as standard-of-care. Second, improvements in how we expand TIL for therapy are needed, that minimize the time the T-cells

  8. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  9. Cure of metastatic growth of EMT6 tumor cells in mice following manipulation of CD200:CD200R signaling.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Podnos, Anna; Yu, Kai

    2013-11-01

    In previous studies, we observed that regulation of expression of CD200, both on cells of a transplantable breast cancer, EMT6, and of the host, as well as of the receptor, CD200R in host mice, regulated local tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompetent animals. This in turn led to an improved ability to document immunity to EMT6 in CD200R1KO mice. In the current study, we have explored the ability to cure BALB/c CD200KO or CD200R1KO mice of tumors ≤1 cm(3) in size by surgical resection of localized tumor, followed by immunization with irradiated EMT6 cells along with CpG as adjuvant. While control animals treated in this fashion developed significant pulmonary and liver metastases within 30 days of surgery, significant protection was seen in both CD200KO or CD200R1KO mice, with no macroscopic lung/liver metastases observed in CD200R1KO mice on sacrifice at day 300. Following surgical resection and immunization, draining lymph nodes from control mice contained tumor cells cloned at limiting dilution in vitro even before pulmonary and hepatic metastasis was seen. In contrast, within the limits of detection of the assay used (sensitivity ~1 in 10(7) cells), no tumor cells were detected at limiting dilution in similarly treated CD200R1KO mice, and significant reductions were seen in CD200KO mice. Infusion of anti-CD4, but less so anti-CD8, mAb into surgically treated and immunized CD200R1KO mice attenuated protection from both macroscopic (liver/lung) and microscopic (assayed by limiting dilution of DLN) metastasis. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from treated CD200R1KO mice to surgically treated control mice also attenuated metastatic growth of tumor, which was abolished by pretreatment of transferred cells with anti-CD4 mAb. Our data suggest that CD200:CD200R attenuates a potentially tumor-protective CD4 host response to breast cancer.

  10. A case of long-term survival of metastatic desmoplastic small round cell tumor treated with multimodal therapy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Miyamoto, Shin'ichi; Kitagori, Koji; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Morita, Shuko; Mashimo, Yoko; Ezoe, Yasumasa; Muto, Manabu; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare, aggressive and malignant tumor that predominantly affects young males. No standard therapy is currently available for patients with DSRCT and the prognosis remains extremely poor. In this study, we report a thought-provoking DSRCT case. A 24-year-old male was admitted to our hospital with a chief complaint of hematemesis. Computed tomography revealed a retrovesical mass with a splenic hilar tumor, multiple lung and liver tumors and marked lymph node swellings. The source of hematemesis was gastric varices caused by the compression of the splenic vein by a splenic hilar tumor. The patient was provided with a histological diagnosis of DSRCT based on needle biopsy from the liver tumors and the pelvic mass was thought to be the primary lesion. This is a long-term survival case of metastatic DSRCT treated with multimodal therapy including 15 courses of multiagent chemotherapy, radiation therapy for the hepatic portal region using 42.5 Gy, and four instances of therapeutic endoscopy. The prolonged progression-free survival period (15 months) obtained following chemotherapy suggests the chemosensitive feature of the disease. We used a modified P6 regimen (cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, vincristine, ifosfamide and etoposide) and a modified PAVEP regimen (cyclophosphamide, pirarubicin, etoposide and cisplatin) to decrease severe adverse events and to improve the completion rate of chemotherapy. DSRCT is an aggressive but chemo-sensitive disease, and continuous chemotherapy using an appropriate regimen with possible supportive care is essential for long-term survival. This case report may represent a treatment option for this rare disease.

  11. Microenvironment-Modulated Metastatic CD133+/CXCR4+/EpCAM- Lung Cancer-Initiating Cells Sustain Tumor Dissemination and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giulia; D'Amico, Lucia; Moro, Massimo; Landoni, Elena; Perego, Paola; Miceli, Rosalba; Gatti, Laura; Andriani, Francesca; Wong, Donald; Caserini, Roberto; Tortoreto, Monica; Milione, Massimo; Ferracini, Riccardo; Mariani, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Roato, Ilaria; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for lung cancer-related mortality, but little is known about specific determinants of successful dissemination from primary tumors and metastasis initiation. Here, we show that CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cancer-initiating cells (CIC) directly isolated from patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of non-small cell lung cancer are endowed with superior ability to seed and initiate metastasis at distant organs. We additionally report that CXCR4 inhibition successfully prevents the increase of cisplatin-resistant CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cells in residual tumors and their metastatization. Immunophenotypic analysis of lung tumor cells intravenously injected or spontaneously disseminated to murine lungs demonstrated the survival advantage and increased colonization ability of a specific subset of CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) with reduced expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(-)), which also shows the greatest in vitro invasive potential. We next prove that recovered disseminated cells from lungs of PDX-bearing mice enriched for CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) CICs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic. Importantly, microenvironment stimuli eliciting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts, are able to increase the dissemination potential of lung cancer cells through the generation of the CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) subset. These findings also have correlates in patient samples where disseminating CICs are enriched in metastatic lymph nodes (20-fold, P = 0.006) and their detection in primary tumors is correlated with poor clinical outcome (disease-free survival: P = 0.03; overall survival: P = 0.05). Overall, these results highlight the importance of specific cellular subsets in the metastatic process, the need for in-depth characterization of disseminating tumor cells, and the potential of therapeutic strategies targeting both primary tumor and tumor-microenvironment interactions.

  12. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits events related with the metastatic process in breast tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    López-Marure, Rebeca; Zapata-Gómez, Estrella; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Aguilar, María Cecilia; Espinosa Castilla, Magali; Meléndez Zajgla, Jorge; Meraz-Cruz, Noemí; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; Gamboa-Ávila, Ricardo; Gómez-González, Erika Olivia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal hormone, has a protective role against cancer. We previously shown that DHEA inhibits the proliferation and migration of cell lines derived from breast cancer; however, the role of DHEA in others events related with these effects are unknown. We hypothesized that DHEA inhibits the expression of proteins and some events related with cell migration and metastasis. We determined the migration in Boyden chambers, the invasion in matrigel, anchorage-independent growth and the formation of spheroids in 3 cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-30) derived from breast cancer exposed to DHEA. The secretion of metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and several pro-inflammatory molecules in the secretome of these cells was also evaluated.  DHEA inhibited the migration in transwells and the invasion in matrigel of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Besides, DHEA inhibited the anchorage-independent growth on agar and decreased the size of spheroids, and also reduced the secretion of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in all cell lines. Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) secretion was slightly decreased by DHEA treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results also showed that inhibition of migration and invasion induced by DHEA in breast cancer cells is correlated with the decrease of cytokine/chemokine secretion and the diminution of tumor cells growth.  MCF-7 cells were the most responsive to the exposure to DHEA, whereas ZR-75-30 cells responded less to this hormone, suggesting that DHEA could be used in the treatment of breast cancer in early stages. PMID:27260851

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits events related with the metastatic process in breast tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    López-Marure, Rebeca; Zapata-Gómez, Estrella; Rocha-Zavaleta, Leticia; Aguilar, María Cecilia; Espinosa Castilla, Magali; Meléndez Zajgla, Jorge; Meraz-Cruz, Noemí; Huesca-Gómez, Claudia; Gamboa-Ávila, Ricardo; Gómez-González, Erika Olivia

    2016-09-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal hormone, has a protective role against cancer. We previously shown that DHEA inhibits the proliferation and migration of cell lines derived from breast cancer; however, the role of DHEA in others events related with these effects are unknown. We hypothesized that DHEA inhibits the expression of proteins and some events related with cell migration and metastasis. We determined the migration in Boyden chambers, the invasion in matrigel, anchorage-independent growth and the formation of spheroids in 3 cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-30) derived from breast cancer exposed to DHEA. The secretion of metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), and several pro-inflammatory molecules in the secretome of these cells was also evaluated.  DHEA inhibited the migration in transwells and the invasion in matrigel of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Besides, DHEA inhibited the anchorage-independent growth on agar and decreased the size of spheroids, and also reduced the secretion of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α in all cell lines. Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) secretion was slightly decreased by DHEA treatment in MDA-MB-231 cells. Our results also showed that inhibition of migration and invasion induced by DHEA in breast cancer cells is correlated with the decrease of cytokine/chemokine secretion and the diminution of tumor cells growth.  MCF-7 cells were the most responsive to the exposure to DHEA, whereas ZR-75-30 cells responded less to this hormone, suggesting that DHEA could be used in the treatment of breast cancer in early stages.

  14. Gonadal dysfunction in patients treated for metastatic germ-cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Leitner, S P; Bosl, G J; Bajorunas, D

    1986-10-01

    The effects of chemotherapy on endocrine function were assessed in 22 previously treated patients with germ-cell tumors and compared with the endocrine function of six previously untreated patients. Baseline and stimulated serum levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), testosterone, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), prolactin, and thyroxine (T4) were obtained. Baseline LH levels were elevated in both groups of patients, whereas basal FSH levels were significantly elevated only in treated patients (P less than .001). Following gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), levels of LH (P = .051) and FSH (P = .003) were greater in treated patients than in untreated control patients. No abnormalities of thyroid function or prolactin responsiveness were observed. Patients younger than 25 years of age at the time of treatment had lower serum levels of LH and FSH following chemotherapy than patients older than 25. Evidence for partial recovery of gonadal function was present with patients treated more than 18 months before study having lower levels of LH and FSH than those patients studied less than 18 months after treatment. These data demonstrate that frequent gonadal dysfunction exists in untreated patients with germ-cell tumors and that chemotherapy induces additional injury to both Leydig cells and the germinal epithelium. Further studies with long-term follow-up are necessary to define the pattern of gonadal recovery and to assess the potential sequelae of endogenous gonadotropin hypersecretion.

  15. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Local Tumor Control: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Estimated Cost-effectiveness for Palliation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Adam, Barbara; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS), and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multisite cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods A total of 60 computed tomography- and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 72 tumors in 27 patients (three women and 24 men). Average patient age was 63 years. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Established surgical selection criteria graded patient status. Median OS was determined by Kaplan–Meier method and defined life-years gained (LYGs). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomic site are as follows: nephrectomy bed, 11 and 11; adrenal gland, nine and eight; paraaortic, seven and six; lung, 14 and 13; bone, 13 and 13; superficial, 12 and nine; intraperitoneal, five and three; and liver, one and one. A mean of 2.2 procedures per patient were performed, with a median clinical follow-up of 16 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 2% (one of 60) and 3% (two of 72), respectively. No patients were graded as having good surgical risk, but median OS was 2.69 years, with an estimated 5-year survival rate of 27%. Cryoablation remained cost-effective with or without the presence of systemic therapies according to historical cost comparisons, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio of $28,312–$59,554 per LYG. Conclusions MCA was associated with very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, with apparent increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligometastatic RCC. PMID:22538119

  16. Comparison of the c-MET gene amplification between primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun-Wei; Wang, Wen-Xian; Wu, Mei-Juan; Zhu, You-Cai; Zhuang, Wu; Lin, Gen; Du, Kai-Qi; Huang, Yun-Jian; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Gang; Fang, Mei-Yu

    2017-09-01

    c-MET has recently been identified as a promising novel target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We detected the consistency of c-MET gene amplification in metastatic lymph nodes and tumor tissues of NSCLC patients and discuss the clinical application value of c-MET gene amplification in metastatic lymph nodes. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to test tumor tissues in 368 NSCLC patients and 178 paired metastatic lymph node samples. The amplification consistency in metastatic lymph nodes and tissue samples were compared and the correlation between c-MET gene amplification and the clinical characteristics of patients was analyzed. The c-MET gene amplification rate was 8.97% (33/368) in tumor tissues. Of the 178 paired cases, c-MET gene amplification was positive in 7.95% (15/178) of cancerous tissues and 18.54% (33/178) of metastatic lymph nodes. c-MET gene amplification was detected more frequently in metastatic lymph nodes than in primary cancerous tissue. When metastatic lymph nodes were used as surrogate samples of primary cancerous tissues, the sensitivity was 86.67% (13/15) and the specificity was 87.69% (143/163). Screening for c-MET gene amplification in lymph node metastases could determine which patients are eligible for tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Lymph node metastasis can predict c-MET gene amplification in a primary tumor and guide the clinical use of c-MET gene targeted drugs. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Case Report: Detection and quantification of tumor cells in peripheral blood and ascitic fluid from a metastatic esophageal cancer patient using the CellSearch ® technology

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Qian; Bittencourt, Marcelo De Carvalho; Cai, Huili; Bastien, Claire; Lemarie-Delaunay, Camille; Bene, Marie C; Faure, Gilbert C

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of ascitic fluid should help to identify and characterize malignant cells in gastrointestinal cancer. However, despite a high specificity, the sensitivity of traditional ascitic fluid cytology remains insufficient, at around 60%. Since 2004 the CellSearch ® technology has shown its advantages in the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood, which can perform an accurate diagnosis and molecular analysis at the same time. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored the potential utility of this technology for the detection and quantification of tumor cells in ascitic fluid samples. Herein we report a case of metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma in a 70-year-old man presenting with dysphagia and a large amount of fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Analysis of a peripheral blood sample and ascites sample with the CellSearch ® technology both revealed the presence of putative tumor cells that were positive for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and cytokeratin (CK) expression. This study confirmed the hematogenous dissemination of esophageal cancer by the detection of circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood, and is the first to demonstrate that tumor cells can be identified in ascitic fluid by using CellSearch ® technology. PMID:25075284

  18. Brain May Prime Metastatic Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Metastasizing tumor cells lose expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN at a much higher rate when they enter the brain compared to other organs, suggesting that the brain's unique microenvironment may prime metastatic cells for aggressive growth, a recent study reports. The findings may have implications for developing targeted therapies for brain metastases. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Metastatic adenocarcinoma in a young male, 12 years after treatment of primary non seminomatous germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Coca, Pragnya; Gundeti, Sadashivudu; Uppin, Shantiveer; Digumarti, Raghunadharao

    2011-01-01

    A man aged 32 years presented with metastatic adenocarcinomatous deposits, 12 years after his initial diagnosis and treatment of immature teratoma of the testis. He was treated for his metastasis with local radiotherapy, failing which he underwent excision of the tumor and palliative chemotherapy. This case is presented for its rarity of occurrence, unique presenting features and difficulty in management. PMID:22174503

  20. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs.

  1. Critical hypercalcemia following discontinuation of denosumab therapy for metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Gossai, Nathan; Hilgers, Megan V; Polgreen, Lynda E; Greengard, Emily G

    2015-06-01

    We report a 14 year-old female with Giant Cell Tumor of Bone, successfully treated with denosumab, who developed critical hypercalcemia after completion of therapy. Five months after her last denosumab treatment, serum calcium rose to 16.5 mg/dL (normal 8.7-10.8 mg/dL), nearly double her prior level of 8.4 mg/dL while receiving denosumab. She required emergent intervention to treat her hypercalcemia, which was attributed to rebound osteoclast activity and osteopetrotic bone. Denosumab is widely used in adults and increasingly in pediatric oncology populations and our experience demonstrates the need for close monitoring for electrolyte derangements following discontinuation.

  2. Pathways of metastatic spread of malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    del Regato, J A

    1977-03-01

    In order to produce viable metastases, the neoplastic cells must first be able to survive in the fluid system that they attain and that transport them. An important circumstance that has escaped the attention of most observers is the fact that the establishment of metastatic colonies is favored by the sluggish transportation of the detached neoplastic cells. Such leisurely transport is provided by lymphatic channels and peritoneal fluid; in the peritoneal cavity, the favorable circumstance aids the spread of relatively benign tumors such as pseudomyxoma peritonei and ovarian adenomas. In the blood, the slow transport is assured only by the venous access to the vertebral vein system; this avenue to blood-borne spread is particularly favorable to well differentiated tumors with a slow rate of growth and explains the widespread bone metastases from tumors with a low degree of malignancy, such as well differentiated adenocarcinomas of the thyroid and prostate. In contrast, neoplastic cells that enter the swift arterial circulation from the left heart are not often successfully implanted, in spite of their high degree of malignancy, and more often perish. Otherwide, we should observe a greater number of metastases in the small bones of the wrists and hands and of the ankles and feet, where the arterial circulation would bring them.

  3. Reduced Expression of the ROCK Inhibitor Rnd3 Is Associated with Increased Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential in Mesenchymal Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Frapolli, Roberta; Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Chiodi, Ilaria; Favero, Francesco; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Dei Tos, Angelo P.; Giulotto, Elena; Taraboletti, Giulia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Mondello, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal and amoeboid movements are two important mechanisms adopted by cancer cells to invade the surrounding environment. Mesenchymal movement depends on extracellular matrix protease activity, amoeboid movement on the RhoA-dependent kinase ROCK. Cancer cells can switch from one mechanism to the other in response to different stimuli, limiting the efficacy of antimetastatic therapies. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the acquisition and molecular regulation of the invasion capacity of neoplastically transformed human fibroblasts, which were able to induce sarcomas and metastases when injected into immunocompromised mice. We found that neoplastic transformation was associated with a change in cell morphology (from fibroblastic to polygonal), a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, a decrease in the expression of several matrix metalloproteases and increases in cell motility and invasiveness. In a three-dimensional environment, sarcomagenic cells showed a spherical morphology with cortical actin rings, suggesting a switch from mesenchymal to amoeboid movement. Accordingly, cell invasion decreased after treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, but not with the matrix protease inhibitor Ro 28-2653. The increased invasiveness of tumorigenic cells was associated with reduced expression of Rnd3 (also known as RhoE), a cellular inhibitor of ROCK. Indeed, ectopic Rnd3 expression reduced their invasive ability in vitro and their metastatic potential in vivo. Conclusions These results indicate that, during neoplastic transformation, cells of mesenchymal origin can switch from a mesenchymal mode of movement to an amoeboid one. In addition, they point to Rnd3 as a possible regulator of mesenchymal tumor cell invasion and to ROCK as a potential therapeutic target for sarcomas. PMID:21209796

  4. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  5. Myeloid heme oxygenase-1 promotes metastatic tumor colonization in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Huei; Chiang, Ming-Tsai; Chang, Po-Chiao; Chau, Lee-Young

    2015-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a heme degradation enzyme with antioxidant and immune-modulatory functions. HO-1 promotes tumorigenesis by enhancing tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Whether HO-1 has an effect on cancer progression through stromal compartments is less clear. Here we show that the growth of tumor engrafted subcutaneously in syngeneic mice was not affected by host HO-1 expression. However, lung metastasis arisen from subcutaneous tumor or circulating tumor cells was significantly reduced in HO-1(+/-) mice comparing to wild type (WT) mice. The reduced lung metastasis was also observed in B6 mice bearing HO-1(+/-) bone marrow as comparing to WT chimeras, indicating that HO-1 expression in hematopoietic cells impacts tumor colonization at the metastatic site. Further experiments demonstrated that the numbers of myeloid cells recruited to pulmonary premetastatic niches and metastatic loci were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice than in WT mice. Likewise, the extents of tumor cell extravasation and colonization at the metastatic loci in the early phase of metastasis were significantly lower in HO-1(+/-) mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that HO-1 impacted chemoattractant-induced myeloid cell migration by modulating p38 kinase signaling. Moreover, myeloid HO-1-induced expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin-10 promoted tumor cell transendothelial migration and STAT3 activation in vitro. These data support a pathological role of myeloid HO-1 in metastasis and suggest a possibility of targeting myeloid HO-1 for cancer treatment.

  6. Intra-Tumoral Heterogeneity in Metastatic Potential and Survival Signaling between Iso-Clonal HCT116 and HCT116b Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sanjib; Ongchin, Melanie; Sharratt, Elizabeth; Dominguez, Ivan; Wang, Jing; Brattain, Michael G.; Rajput, Ashwani

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. The molecular mechanisms underlying this complex, multi-step pathway are yet to be completely elucidated. Recent reports have stressed the importance of intra-tumoral heterogeneity in the development of a metastatic phenotype. The purpose of this study was to characterize the intra-tumoral phenotypic heterogeneity between two iso-clonal human colon cancer sublines HCT116 and HCT116b on their ability to undergo metastatic colonization and survive under growth factor deprivation stress (GFDS). Materials and Methods HCT116 and HCT116b cells were transfected with green fluorescence protein and subcutaneously injected into BALB/c nude male mice. Once xenografts were established, they were excised and orthotopically implanted into other male BALB/c nude mice using microsurgical techniques. Animal tissues were studied for metastases using histochemical techniques. Microarray analysis was performed to generate gene signatures associated with each subline. In vitro assessment of growth factor signaling pathway was performed under GFDS for 3 and 5 days. Results Both HCT116 and HCT116b iso-clonal variants demonstrated 100% primary tumor growth, invasion and peritoneal spread. However, HCT116 was highly metastatic with 68% metastasis observed in liver and/or lungs compared to 4% in HCT116b. Microarray analysis revealed an upregulation of survival and metastatic genes in HCT116 cells compared to HCT116b cells. In vitro analysis showed that HCT116 upregulated survival and migratory signaling proteins and downregulated apoptotic agents under GFDS. However, HCT116b cells effectively showed the opposite response under stress inducing cell death. Conclusions We demonstrate the importance of clonal variation in determining metastatic potential of colorectal cancer cells using the HCT116/HCT116b iso-clonal variants in an orthotopic metastatic mouse model. Determination of

  7. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer.

  8. Detection of Live Circulating Tumor Cells by a Class of Near-Infrared Heptamethine Carbocyanine Dyes in Patients with Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Chia-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Bui, Matthew H. T.; Ng, Christopher S.; Josephson, David Y.; Knudsen, Beatrice; Tighiouart, Mourad; Kim, Hyung L.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W. K.; Wang, Ruoxiang; Posadas, Edwin M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells are inherently heterogeneous and often exhibit diminished adhesion, resulting in the shedding of tumor cells into the circulation to form circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A fraction of these are live CTCs with potential of metastatic colonization whereas others are at various stages of apoptosis making them likely to be less relevant to understanding the disease. Isolation and characterization of live CTCs may augment information yielded by standard enumeration to help physicians to more accurately establish diagnosis, choose therapy, monitor response, and provide prognosis. We previously reported on a group of near-infrared (NIR) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes that are specifically and actively transported into live cancer cells. In this study, this viable tumor cell-specific behavior was utilized to detect live CTCs in prostate cancer patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 40 patients with localized prostate cancer together with 5 patients with metastatic disease were stained with IR-783, the prototype heptamethine cyanine dye. Stained cells were subjected to flow cytometric analysis to identify live (NIR+) CTCs from the pool of total CTCs, which were identified by EpCAM staining. In patients with localized tumor, live CTC counts corresponded with total CTC numbers. Higher live CTC counts were seen in patients with larger tumors and those with more aggressive pathologic features including positive margins and/or lymph node invasion. Even higher CTC numbers (live and total) were detected in patients with metastatic disease. Live CTC counts declined when patients were receiving effective treatments, and conversely the counts tended to rise at the time of disease progression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of applying of this staining technique to identify live CTCs, creating an opportunity for further molecular interrogation of a more biologically relevant CTC population. PMID:24551200

  9. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop in patients with underlying NF1, and usually arise as a result of malignant transformation of a pre-existing plexiform neurofibroma. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities reported in primary MPNST include complex karyotypes with chromosome numbers in the triploid or tetraploid range with recurrent abnormalities of several chromosomes including losses or imbalances. As a prelude to cell biological, pharmacological, and functional studies to investigate pathways and gene(s) associated with multistep tumorigenesis, which includes progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy in MPNST, detailed molecular cytogenetic and genetic analyses of cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent MPNST with underlying NF1 disorder have been performed. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities detected in the primary tumor cell line were similar to those observed in primary cultures of this tumor. Due to the complexity of the rearrangements seen by G-banded karyotype analysis, further characterization of the clonal abnormalities in these three cell lines was performed by molecular cytogenetic techniques, including CGH and SKY. CGH analysis detected recurrent deletions of 9p, 12q21-q32, complete losses of the X-chromosome, and gains of the chromosomal segment 17q25 in all three cell lines. SKY analysis detected extensive clonal abnormalities in these cell lines. The nature and the alterations of the cell cycle regulators, particularly those associated with G1-S checkpoints and known to be deregulated in MPNST, were studied. These cell cycle regulators included those associated with Rb1-cyclin D1 and the p53 pathways. The findings are consistent with the argument that an imbalance between the cyclin activators of CDKs and inhibitory proteins such as p16 result in uncontrollable proliferation in the cell lines, associated with progression of the disease. LOH and expression of the p53 gene in metastatic and recurrent cell

  10. NF-kappaB Activity in Macrophages Determines Metastatic Potential of Breast Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    macrophages inhibit mammary to lung metastasis? BODY Task 1. Determine effects of increased NF-κB activity in macrophages on mammary to lung...metastasis: Determine effects of increased NF-κB activity in macrophages on lung tumor development using a tail vein metastasis model. These...suggested that activation of NF-κB would have pro-tumor effects resulting in greater numbers of lung metastases. We were therefore surprised when our

  11. Metastatic Tumors of the Penis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Da, Jun; Yao, Hai-jun; Zheng, Da-chao; Cai, Zhi-kang; Jiang, Yue-qing; Xu, Ming-xi; Wang, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to report the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of secondary penile cancers and review the literature of this rare condition. The records of 8 patients with metastatic penile cancer treated at our hospital from 2006 to 2013 were analyzed. A search of medical databases was conducted. Patient symptoms included penile mass (n = 7, 5 had concomitant pain) and acute urine retention (n = 1). The primary cancers included bladder, lung, gastric, liver, and prostate malignancies and 1 case of pulmonary epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. The longest time from diagnosis of the primary cancer to metastatic penile cancer was 16 years and the shortest was 7 months. Six patients were treated with phallectomy, 1 with resection of the mass, and 1 with only a biopsy because of advanced metastatic disease. Five patients are deceased at the time of this report, and the longest and shortest survival times (from the diagnosis of primary cancer to the death) were 16 years and 9 months, respectively. The literature review identified 17 cases reported since 2011, bringing the total number of reported cases to 480. Genitourinary cancer, primarily bladder and prostate, account for approximately 70 of the primary cancer sites and gastrointestinal cancers account for approximately 21%. Approximately half of the patients had died of their disease within 1 year of the diagnosis of penile metastasis. The prognosis of metastatic penile cancer is poor. Most primary cancers are in the urologic or gastrointestinal systems. Surgery and adjunctive therapy may improve symptoms, but fail to prolong survival. PMID:25569637

  12. Circulating Tumor Cells in a Phase 3 Study of Docetaxel and Prednisone with or without Lenalidomide in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Fizazi, Karim; Burke, John M; De Wit, Ronald; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Hutson, Thomas E; Crane, Edward; Berry, William R; Doner, Kevin; Hainsworth, John D; Wiechno, Pawel J; Liu, Kejian; Waldman, Michelle F; Gandhi, Anita; Barton, Debora; Jungnelius, Ulf; Fandi, Abderrahim; Sternberg, Cora N; Petrylak, Daniel P

    2017-02-01

    Elevated circulating tumor cell (CTC) blood levels (≥5 cells/7.5ml) convey a negative prognosis in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer but their prognostic significance in patients receiving chemotherapy is uncertain. The association between CTC counts (at baseline or after treatment), overall survival (OS), and response to docetaxel with lenalidomide was evaluated in a 208-patient subset from the MAINSAIL trial, which compared docetaxel-prednisone-lenalidomide and docetaxel-prednisone-placebo in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients. Baseline CTCs were <5 cells/7.5ml blood in 87 (42%) patients and ≥5 cells/7.5ml in 121 (58%) patients. Neither tumor response nor prostate-specific antigen response correlated with baseline CTCs. However, CTC count ≥5 cells/7.5ml was significantly associated with lower OS (hazard ratio: 3.23, p = 0.0028). Increases in CTCs from <5 cells/7.5ml to ≥5 cells/7.5ml after three cycles were associated with significantly shorter OS (hazard ratio: 5.24, p=0.025), whereas CTC reductions from ≥5 cells/7.5ml to <5 cells/7.5ml were associated with the best prognosis (p=0.003). Our study in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with docetaxel chemotherapy, with or without lenalidomide, showed that patient survival was best predicted by circulating tumor cell count at the start of treatment. A rising circulating tumor cell count after three cycles of therapy predicted poor survival, while a decline predicted good survival. Copyright © 2016 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Utility of immunohistochemistry in separating thymic neoplasms from germ cell tumors and metastatic lung cancer involving the anterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Saad, Reda S; Landreneau, Rodney J; Liu, Yulin; Silverman, Jan F

    2003-06-01

    A variety of primary and metastatic neoplasms can involve the anterior mediastinum and have similar radiographic or histologic appearances. We report an immunohistochemical (IHC) panel that includes CD5, placental-like alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), cytokeratin (CK) 7, CK20, CK5/6, and CD57 for the separation of thymic neoplasms from germ cell tumors (GCTs) and metastatic lung malignancies. One hundred cases representing different types of neoplasms involving the anterior mediastinum were retrieved and consisted of 20 pulmonary adenocarcinomas (PAs), 20 pulmonary large cell carcinomas (PLCs), 20 pulmonary squamous cell carcinomas (PSCCs), 20 thymomas (Ths), 10 invasive thymomas (IThs), and 10 thymic carcinomas (TCs). Fifteen cases of GCTs were also included in the study. CD5 was positive in 17 of 20 PAs, 11 of 20 PLCs, 2 of 15 GCTs, and 9 of 10 TCs. PLAP was positive in 5 of 20 PAs, 2 of 20 PLCs, 1 of 20 PSCCs, and 11 of 15 GCTs. TTF-1 was positive in 18 of 20 PAs, 10 of 20 PLCs, and 2 of 20 PSCCs. CK7 was positive in 20 of 20 PAs, 15 of 20 PLCs, 8 of 20 PSCCs, 5 of 15 GCTs, 11 of 20 Ths, 7 of 10 IThs, and 4 of 10 TCs. CK20 was positive only in 2 of 20 PAs. CK5/6 was positive in all cases of PSCC, Th, ITh, and TC, in 9 of 20 PLCs, and 1 of 15 GCTs. CD57 was positive in 9 of 20 PAs, 3 of 20 PLCs, 8 of 15 GCTs, 13 of 20 Ths, and 6 of 10 IThs. In conclusion, CD5 had low specificity for TC (60%) because it also stained 85% of PA and 55% of PLC. CK5/6 was a sensitive but not a specific IHC marker for the epithelial component of thymic neoplasms (100%); TTF-1 had a good sensitivity (90%) and excellent specificity (100%) for distinguishing PA from thymic neoplasms. An IHC panel consisting of CD5, CK5/6, PLAP, TTF-1, and CD57 is useful for the separation of thymic neoplasms from other epithelial malignancies involving the mediastinum.

  14. Circulating Tumor Cells Following First Chemotherapy Cycle: An Early and Strong Predictor of Outcome in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Custodio, Sara; de las Casas, Maria-Luisa Maestro; García-Sáenz, José-Ángel; de la Torre, Julio-César; Bellón-Cano, Jose-María; López-Tarruella, Sara; Vidaurreta-Lazaro, Marta; de la Orden, Virginia; Jerez, Yolanda; Márquez-Rodas, Iván; Casado, Antonio; Sastre, Javier; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) determined immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The CTC counts were taken at baseline, before the first cycle of chemotherapy (CTC-0), and on day 21 before commencing the second cycle of chemotherapy (CTC-21) in consecutive MBC patients. The study's primary objectives were to analyze relationships between CTC-21 count and overall survival (OS). Based on the current literature, the CTC measurements were dichotomized as 0–4 versus ≥5 CTCs. Of 117 patients recruited, 99 were evaluable. Patients with 0–4 CTCs on day 21 had a significantly better OS than those with ≥5 CTCs (median OS: 38.5 months vs. 8.7 months). They also had a significantly better progression-free survival (PFS; median: 9.4 months vs. 3.0 months) and clinical benefit rate (77% vs. 44%). The OS of patients whose baseline CTCs were ≥5 but dropped to <5 on day 21 was apparently similar to those who had <5 CTCs at baseline. In a Cox regression analysis, CTC-21 was the only independent variable significantly predicting OS and PFS. Our data indicate that CTCs determined immediately before the second cycle of chemotherapy is an early and strong predictor of treatment outcome in MBC patients. PMID:23873719

  15. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-14

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  17. P2Y2 receptor activation by nucleotides released from highly metastatic breast cancer cells increases tumor growth and invasion via crosstalk with endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hana; Eun, So Young; Lee, Jong Sil; Park, Sang Won; Lee, Jae Heun; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hye Jung

    2014-08-26

    Extracellular nucleotides are released and detectable in a high concentration within the tumor microenvironment. G protein-coupled P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) is activated equipotently by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), which mediate proinflammatory responses such as cell migration and proliferation. However, the role of P2Y2R in the process of cancer metastasis remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the role of P2Y2R in the proliferation, migration and invasion of highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through crosstalk with endothelial cells (ECs). ATP release and P2Y2R activity between high metastatic breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 and low metastatic breast cancer cell MCF-7 were compared. Then, the role of P2Y2R on tumor growth and invasion via crosstalk with ECs was examined in vitro, using MDA-MB-231 cells and ECs transfected with control- or P2Y2R-siRNA, and in vivo, using an animal model injected with control-shRNA- or P2Y2R-shRNA-transfected MDA-MB-231 cells. We found that this highly metastatic breast cancer cell line released higher levels of ATP and showed a higher P2Y2R activity in comparison to a low metastatic breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. In MDA-MB-231 cells, P2Y2R activation by ATP or UTP increased proliferation at 24 or 72 hours, which was abolished by P2Y2R knock-down. In addition, the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells to ECs and cell migration were both significantly increased by ATP or UTP through the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in MDA-MB-231 or ECs but not in cells where P2Y2R was knocked down. Furthermore, ATP- or UTP-mediated activation of P2Y2R induced MDA-MB-231 invasion through ECs, increased matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in MDA-MB-231 and induced the phosphorylation of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin in ECs. Tumor growth and metastasis to

  18. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients within a randomized, phase II trial: TBCRC 019

    PubMed Central

    Paoletti, Costanza; Li, Yufeng; Muñiz, Maria C.; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Aung, Kimberly; Thomas, Dafydd G.; Brown, Martha E.; Abramson, Vandana G.; Irvin, William J.; Lin, Nancy U.; Liu, Minetta C.; Nanda, Rita; Nangia, Julie R.; Storniolo, Anna M.; Traina, Tiffany A.; Vaklavas, Christos; Van Poznak, Catherine H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Forero-Torres, Andres; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Circulating Tumor cells (CTC) are prognostic in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We tested whether the EpCAM based capture system (CellSearch®) is effective in patients with triple negative (TN) MBC, and whether CTC-apoptosis and clustering enhances the prognostic role of CTC. Experimental Design CTC enumeration and apoptosis was determined using the CXC CellSearch® kit at baseline and days 15 and 29 in blood drawn from TN MBC patients who participated in a prospective randomized phase II trial of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-PAC) with or without tigatuzumab (TIG). Association between levels of CTC and patient outcomes was assessed using logistic regression, Kaplan Meier curves, and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Nineteen of 52 (36.5%), 14/52 (26.9%), and 13/49 (26.5%) patients who were evaluable had elevated CTC (≥5CTC/7.5 ml WB) at baseline, days 15 and 29, respectively. Patients with elevated vs. not elevated CTC at each time point had worse progression free survival (PFS) (p=0.005, 0.0003, 0.0002, respectively). The odds of clinical benefit response for those who had elevated vs. low CTC at baseline and days 15 and 29 were 0.25 (95% CI: 0.08–0.84, p=0.024), 0.19 (95% CI: 0.05–0.17, p=0.014), and 0.06 (95% CI: 0.01–0.33, p=0.001), respectively. There was no apparent prognostic effect comparing CTC-apoptosis vs. non-apoptosis. Presence of CTC-cluster at day 15, and day 29 was associated with shorter PFS. Conclusions CTC were detected using CellSearch® assay in approximately one-third of TN MBC patients. Elevated CTC at baseline and days 15 and 29 were prognostic, and reductions in CTC levels reflected response. PMID:25779948

  19. Efficacy of Lapatinib in Therapy-Resistant HER2-Positive Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Markomanolaki, Harris; Papadaki, Maria A.; Kallergi, Galatea; Hatzidaki, Dora; Kalbakis, Kostas; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the efficacy of lapatinib, a dual EGFR and HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in therapy-resistant HER2-positive CTCs in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and Methods Patients with MBC and HER2-positive CTCs despite disease stabilization or response to prior therapy, received lapatinib 1500 mg daily in monthly cycles, till disease progression or CTC increase. CTC monitoring was performed by immunofluorescent microscopy using cytospins of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) double stained for HER2 or EGFR and cytokeratin. Results A total of 120 cycles were administered in 22 patients; median age was 62.5 years, 15 (68.2%) patients were post-menopausal and 20 (90.1%) had HER2-negative primary tumors. At the end of the second course, HER2-positive CTC counts decreased in 76.2% of patients; the median number of HER2-positive CTCs/patient also declined significantly (p = 0.013), however the decrease was significant only among patients presenting disease stabilization (p = 0.018) but not among those with disease progression during lapatinib treatment. No objective responses were observed. All CTC-positive patients harbored EGFR-positive CTCs on progression compared to 62.5% at baseline (p = 0.054). The ratio of EGFR-positive CTCs/total CTCs detected in all patients increased from 17.1% at baseline to 37.6% on progression, whereas the mean percentage of HER2-negative CTCs/patient increased from 2.4% to 30.6% (p = 0.03). Conclusions The above results indicate that lapatinib is effective in decreasing HER2-positive CTCs in patients with MBC irrespectively of the HER2 status of the primary tumor and imply the feasibility of monitoring the molecular changes on CTCs during treatment with targeted agents. Trial Registration Clinical trial.gov NCT00694252 PMID:26083256

  20. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis.

  1. Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor Obstructing Left Ventricular Outflow

    PubMed Central

    Chrysant, George S.; Horstmanshof, Douglas A.; Guniganti, Uma M.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid cardiac tumor. To our knowledge, we are reporting the 1st combined use of clinical evaluation, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and histopathologic studies to reach such a diagnosis. PMID:21720473

  2. Desperation Postchemotherapy Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection for Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Carver, Brett S

    2015-08-01

    Patients with persistently elevated serum tumor markers should be monitored for marker kinetics and evaluated for nonviable cancer causes of marker elevation. Desperation postchemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection is performed in select patients following second-line chemotherapy. Adjuvant postoperative chemotherapy is not indicated in patients following second-line chemotherapy.

  3. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    task 1(a) to test the adhesion of PDT treated MLL cells to the extracellular matrix protein collagen IV. MLL cells were treated with 140 nM BPD for 1 h...cancer cells it is a reliable marker for the detection of circulating prostate cancer cells. We have tested the expression of PSMA in LNCaP and MLL cells...Licha, editors. Molecular Imaging: An Essential Tool in Preclinical Research, Diagnostic Imaging, and Therapy. Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag, 2005

  4. SU-E-J-198: Bioluminescence Monitoring of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Quantitative Assessment of Radiation Treatment Effects and Tracking of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Schmidt, T; Graves, E; Bazalova, M; Lee, J; Contag, C; Suh, T

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate radiation treatment effects on mammary carcinoma cells, quantitative photon radiance were monitored to track light-emitting cancer cells and metastasis using in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Eight female BALB/c mice aged 8 weeks were orthotopically injected with 5×104/cc 4T1 tumor cells into the abdominal mammary gland. The firefly luciferase-based bioluminescence images were acquired every 2-3 days for 1 month. Bioluminescent intensity was analyzed in average surface radiance (photons/sec/cm(2) /sr) taken in 3-dimensional bioluminescence tomography (BLT). After 1 week, single-radiation dose of 20 Gy was delivered by orthovoltage X-rays. Variation of detected bioluminescence signals emitted from molecular cancer cells was depicted on BLT images. To delineate tumor volumes according to bioluminescence intensity on anatomical images for radiation therapy, BLT images were registered with the micro computed tomography (CT) images using surface-constrained warping. Multispectral BLT images elaborated on early detection of cancer cells, characteristics of tumor growth, and metastasis for more accurate determination of internal bioluminescent sources. The radiation-treated mice having only primary tumor volumes showed 67% decrease in bioluminescent signals, while the mice with metastatic cancer cells suggested 88% reduction, as compared to the control group. Registration of BLT with CT images guided molecular cancer cells on anatomical coordinates. The BLT imaging was a useful tool to localize cancer cells and to quantify radiation response. Application of BLT led to more accurate definition of tumor volumes including molecular probe-based microscopic cancer cells. Monitoring of bioluminescence signals enables to diagnose real-time metastatic behavior of cancer cells and determine optimal radiation treatment strategies adapted to tumor characteristics. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  5. Preparing the "soil": the primary tumor induces vasculature reorganization in the sentinel lymph node before the arrival of metastatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao-Nan; Berghuis, Bree; Tsarfaty, Galia; Bruch, MaryBeth; Kort, Eric J; Ditlev, Jon; Tsarfaty, Ilan; Hudson, Eric; Jackson, David G; Petillo, David; Chen, Jindong; Resau, James H; Teh, Bin Tean

    2006-11-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis is the first step in the spreading of cancer in many malignancies. Tumor-reactive lymphadenopathy in SLNs has been observed for decades, but alterations of the lymphatic channels and vasculature in these nodes before the arrival of metastatic tumor cells remain unexplored. Using animal models, we show here that, before the establishment of metastasis in the SLN, there are reorganizations of the lymphatic channels and the vasculature. The node becomes a functional blood vessel-enriched and lymph vessel/sinus-enriched organ before metastasis. The enlargement of the lymph sinuses is correlated with the primary tumor weight. The newly emerged functional blood vessels develop from high endothelial venules (HEV), in which the proliferation rate of the endothelial cells is also significantly increased. Similar alterations of the HEVs are also characterized in the axillary lymph nodes from human breast cancer patients without the evidence of metastasis. These findings support the hypothesis that modification of the microenvironment for a secondary tumor (i.e., vasculature reorganization in the SLN) can be initiated by a primary tumor before and independent of the physical presence of metastatic cancer cells.

  6. Anti-metastatic effects of RAPTA-C conjugated polymeric micelles on two-dimensional (2D) breast tumor cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongxu; Blunden, Bianca M; Scarano, Wei; Lu, Mingxia; Stenzel, Martina H

    2016-03-01

    Macromolecular ruthenium (Ru) complexes are a promising avenue to better, and more selective, chemotherapeutics to treat metastatic cancers. In our previous research, amphiphilic block copolymeric micelles carrying RAPTA-C (RuCl2(p-cymene)(PTA)) were demonstrated to improve the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of RAPTA-C (Blunden et al., 2013). However, the anti-metastatic effect of RAPTA-C conjugated polymeric micelles is yet to be established. In this work, we investigated the anti-metastatic effects of RAPTA-C conjugated micelles in both 2D and 3D in vitro breast tumor cell models in comparison with free RAPTA-C. RAPTA-C conjugated micelles showed an improved anti-metastatic effect compared with RAPTA-C for 2D cultured breast tumor cells. RAPTA-C micelles selectively targeted the metastatic tumor cells over the nontumorigenic CHO cells. 3D MCTS assays showed that RAPTA-C conjugated micelles showed a cell growth inhibition similar to that of ten times of the free drug. Further improvement of the RAPTA-C delivery vehicle may provide useful tools to harness ruthenium compounds for metastatic cancer therapy. The interest in ruthenium drugs stem from their anti-metastatic effect. In contrast to other metal-based drugs that inhibit the growth of tumor cells, ruthenium drugs seem less toxic, but have a pronounce effect on the migration of cancer cells. The ruthenium drug chosen here, RAPTA-C, is capable of inhibiting migration as shown in various assays here. In this publication, we could show for the first time that this effect is enhanced when the drug is delivered using micelles. Important in particular is that the effect is more pronounced in cancerous breast cancer cells while RAPTA-C delivered in micelles does not seem to show any effect on healthy cells. We believe that the presented micelles are suitable carriers for this anti-metastatic drug. The design of the micelle would also allow the encapsulation of other drugs in future studies creating a potentially

  7. Serum Galectin-3 Levels in Dogs with Metastatic and Non-metastatic Mammary Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Cláudia; Santos, Mariana Sá; DE Matos, Augusto J; Barros, Rita; Gärtner, Fátima; Rutteman, Gerard R; DE Oliveira, Joana T

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. High levels of galectin-3 have been reported in intravasated cells in primary and metastatic tumor sites of canine malignant mammary tumors (CMMT). Nevertheless, it is still unknown whether this increase is limited to the site of the lesion or if it is a systemic feature. To better understand the pattern of the expression of galectin-3 and to investigate the possibility of using serum galectin-3 levels as a relevant biomarker in this disease, galectin-3 concentrations were determined in a series of sera from CMMT-bearing female dogs. None of the dogs included in the study had detectable metastases at the time of presentation. Animals were retrospectively divided into two groups dependent on whether or not they developed metastatic lesions during a 25-month follow-up period. Samples were collected from all dogs before surgery, 1 month after resection of the primary tumor and every 3 months during the postoperative period. Galectin-3 levels were significantly higher 1 month after than at the time of surgery (p=0.0058). Higher galectin-3 was found in samples collected 7 (p=0.0007), 10 (p=0.0061) and 13 months (p=0.0052) after surgery from dogs of the metastatic group when compared to those remaining free of development of detectable metastases. In conclusion, increased serum galectin-3 levels seem to be present in both metastatic and non-metastatic cases during the postoperative period, however, while in non-metastatic cases the values tend to return to baseline levels after surgery, in metastatic cases, levels remain persistently elevated.

  8. Circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients: a valuable prognostic and predictive biomarker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study was initiated to investigate the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration and the predictive value of CTC HER2 expression for efficient anti-HER2 therapy in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Methods Sixty HER2-positive MBC patients were enrolled in the present study. Before the initiation of systemic treatment, CTCs from 7.5 ml of blood were analyzed using the CellSearch system. The progression-free survival (PFS) of the patients was estimated using Kaplan-Meier survival curves. Results CTCs were detected in 45% (27/60) of the patients, who had shorter median PFS than those without CTCs (2.5 vs. 7.5 months, P = 0.0125). Furthermore, referring to the standard HER2 testing that uses immunohistochemistry (IHC), we proposed a CTC HER2-positive criterion, defined as >30% of CTCs over-expressing HER2. Among patients undergoing anti-HER2 therapy, those with HER2-positive CTCs had longer PFS (8.8 vs. 2.5 months, P = 0.002). Among patients with HER2-positive CTCs, the median PFS for those receiving anti-HER2 therapy was significantly longer than those who were not (8.8 vs. 1.5 months, P = 0.001). Notably, up to 52% (14/27) of the HER2-positive patients were CTC HER2-negative, and anti-HER2 therapy did not significantly improve the median PFS in these patients (2.5 vs. 0.9 months, P = 0.499). Conclusions Our findings underscore the necessity of a comprehensive CTC analysis, which may provide valuable prognostic and predictive information for optimizing individually tailored therapies in HER2-positive MBC patients. To test this idea, additional large cohort, multi-center and prospective clinical trials are needed. PMID:23617715

  9. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  10. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Da Eun; Song, Hye Jin Jin; Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-10-20

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies.

  11. Metastatic brain tumors from small-cell esophageal cancer: clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Harada, Hideyuki; Zhang, Peng; Mitsuya, Koichi; Zheng, Xiao; Yasui, Hirofumi; Nakasu, Yoko; Chen, Ming; Nishimura, Tetsuo

    2014-12-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical characteristics of patients with brain metastases from small-cell esophageal cancer. In this study, we review the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients with brain metastases from small-cell esophageal cancer. From August 2002 to August 2012, consecutive patients diagnosed with brain metastases from small-cell esophageal cancer and treated with radiotherapy were enrolled. Clinical features, diagnostic findings, and survival were analyzed. Six patients treated with brain radiotherapy were identified. The median age was 64 (range 61-74) years. All patients had neurological impairments. Three patients had supra- and infra-tentorial metastases, and three patients had cerebrum metastases. Brain metastases were detected when esophageal cancer was initially diagnosed in two patients. In three patients, magnetic resonance imaging findings after radiotherapy confirmed a significant response to treatment. The median overall survival was 6.0 months. During the same period, 43 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and seven patients with adenocarcinoma who had brain metastases were identified. Survival periods for squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma patients who had brain metastases were 5.5 months and 4.2 months, respectively. There was no significant difference in overall survival according to the histological type. Brain metastases from small-cell esophageal cancer tend to spread to the cerebellum and impair patients' quality-of-life. Brain radiotherapy had a positive effect in this case series; however, overall survival remains short.

  12. Comparison of the Serum Tumor Markers S100 and Melanoma-inhibitory Activity (MIA) in the Monitoring of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Receiving Vaccination Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Ugur; Schliep, Stefan; Schliep, Klaus; Erdmann, Michael; Koch, Hans-Uwe; Parsch, Hans; Rosenheinrich, Stina; Anzengruber, Doris; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin; Schuler, Gerold; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In patients with melanoma, early dissemination via lymphatic and hematogenous routes is frequently seen. Thus, besides clinical follow-up examination and imaging, reliable melanoma-specific serological tumor markers are needed. We retrospectively compared two serum markers for melanoma, S100 and melanoma-inhibitory activity (MIA), for monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma under either adjuvant or therapeutic vaccination immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DC). Serum was obtained from a total of 100 patients (28 patients in stage III and 72 patients in stage IV, according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) at regular intervals during therapy, accompanied by follow-up imaging. When relapse was detected, both markers often remained within normal range. In contrast, in patients with metastatic measurable disease receiving therapeutic and not adjuvant DC vaccination, an increase of both markers was a strong indicator for disease progression. When comparing both markers in the whole study population, MIA showed a superior sensitivity to detect disease progression. S100 and MIA are highly sensitive tumor markers for monitoring of patients with melanoma with current metastases, but less sensitive for monitoring of tumor-free patients. In the current study, MIA had a slightly superior sensitivity to detect progressive disease compared to S100 and seems to be more useful in monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma receiving immunotherapy. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Role of parathymic lymph nodes in metastatic tumor development.

    PubMed

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2012-06-01

    Parathymic lymph nodes as potential sites of tumor progression have been neglected in humans. We have established a rat renal capsule-parathymic lymph node model to study in vivo metastasis. Epithelial liver carcinoma (HeDe) and mesenchymal mesoblastic nephroma (NeDe) cell lines have been established after inducing chemical carcinogenesis in newborn Fisher 344 inbred rats by N-nitrosodimethylamine. Implanting the exact number of tumor cells (HeDe, NeDe) under the renal capsule allowed the standardization and timing of metastatic development. Tumor cells released from the primary tumor in the peritoneal cavity were drained to the parathymic lymph nodes (PTNs) as sentinel lymph nodes. Similarly, tumor cells injected i.p. were engulfed by macrophages, drained through the transdiaphragmatic channels, and transported to the thoracal lymphatics, primarily to PTNs. Tumor cells after transdiaphragmic drainage can enter both anterior mammary and parathymic sentinel lymph nodes. The potential common origin can shed new light on the metastatic cell progression of PTNs and mammary tumors.

  14. Lack of response of a metastatic renal perivascular epithelial cell tumor (PEComa) to successive courses of DTIC based-therapy and imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Rigby, Heather; Yu, Weiming; Schmidt, Matthias H; Fernandez, Conrad V

    2005-08-01

    An 11 year-old girl presented with two large abdominal masses in the left flank and epigastrium and left supraclavicular lymphadenopathy. Subsequent investigations led to the diagnosis of metastatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) arising from the left kidney. Effective treatment for this rare tumor is not yet known. The tumor did not respond to an initial treatment of two cycles of a dacarbazine (DTIC) based regimen. She was placed on a trial of imatinib mesylate based on tumor expression of c-KIT, a tyrosine kinase targeted by this drug. This report highlights the first documented case of the use of imatinib for PEComa. Lack of response and adverse effects of the drug required discontinuation of therapy.

  15. Biology and Treatment of Metastatic Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, Jonathan R.; Nasir, Aejaz; Kvols, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine malignancies of the gastroenteropancreatic axis include carcinoid and pancreatic endocrine tumors. These heterogeneous neoplasms arise from the enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract and the islet cells of the pancreas. Histologically, most well-differentiated endocrine tumors consist of small, round, monomorphic cells, arranged in islands or trabeculae, with a distinct “salt-and-pepper” pattern of nuclear chromatin. Chromogranin and synaptophysin are useful as immunohistochemical markers of neuroendocrine differentiation. Other common features include the capacity to secrete peptide hormones and biogenic amines. A relatively indolent growth rate is characteristic of most gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, with the exception of poorly differentiated tumors which are usually aggressive. Treatment strategies are designed to limit tumor progression and palliate hormonal syndromes. This article reviews the diverse biologic characteristics of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors and current treatment options for metastatic disease. PMID:19259290

  16. PD-L1, PD-L2 and PD-1 expression in metastatic melanoma: Correlation with tumor-infiltrating immune cells and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Joseph M; Erdag, Gulsun; Smolkin, Mark E; Deacon, Donna H; Patterson, James W; Chen, Leiping; Bullock, Timothy N; Slingluff, Craig L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic blockade of PD-1/PD-L1 can have dramatic therapeutic benefit in some patients; however, the prognostic associations of PD-1 and its ligands, in the absence of therapeutic blockade have not been definitively addressed. In particular, associations of PD-L2 with immune infiltrates and with outcome have yet to be explored. We hypothesized that surface expression of both PD-L1 and PD-L2 by melanoma cells would be associated with immune cell infiltration and with overall patient survival, independent of checkpoint blockade therapy. We also characterized the heterogeneity of their distribution within a tumor and within tumors of the same patient. Tissue microarrays of metastatic melanoma samples from 147 patients were quantified for CD8(+), CD45, CD4(+), CD3, CD163, CD20, CD138, FoxP3, PD-1, PD-L1 and PD-L2 markers by immunohistochemistry. Relationships between the proportions of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressing tumor cells with the immune cell count, distribution (immunotype) and patient survival were studied. Expressions of both PD-L1 and PD-L2 correlated significantly with increasing densities of immune cells in the tumor specimens and with immunotype. Positive PD-L2 expression was associated with improved overall survival and the simultaneous positive expression of both PD-1 ligands showed a higher association with survival. Significant heterogeneity of PD-L1 and PD-L2 expressions within tumors were observed, however, they were less pronounced with PD-L2. In conclusion, both are markers of immune infiltration and PD-L2, alone or in combination with PD-L1, is a marker for prognosis in metastatic melanoma patients. Larger tumor samples yield more reliable assessments of PD-L1/L2 expression.

  17. Primary Tr1 cells from metastatic melanoma eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages through granzyme B- and perforin-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hongxia; Zhang, Ping; Kong, Xue; Hou, Xianglian; Zhao, Li; Li, Tianhang; Yuan, Xiaozhou; Fu, Hongjun

    2017-04-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-associated macrophages play multiple roles in promoting tumor growth, such as inducing the transformation of melanocytes under ultraviolet irradiation, increasing angiogenesis in melanomas, and suppressing antitumor immunity. Because granzyme B- and perforin-expressing Tr1 cells could specifically eliminate antigen-presenting cells of myeloid origin, we examined whether Tr1 cells in melanoma could eliminate tumor-promoting macrophages and how the interaction between Tr1 cells and macrophages could affect the growth of melanoma cells. Tr1 cells were characterized by high interleukin 10 secretion and low Foxp3 expression and were enriched in the CD4(+)CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) T-cell fraction. Macrophages derived from peripheral blood monocytes in the presence of modified melanoma-conditioned media demonstrated tumor-promoting capacity, exemplified by improving the proliferation of cocultured A375 malignant melanoma cells. But when primary Tr1 cells were present in the macrophage-A375 coculture, the growth of A375 cells was abrogated. The conventional CD25(+) Treg cells, however, were unable to inhibit macrophage-mediated increase in tumor cell growth. Further analyses showed that Tr1 cells did not directly eliminate A375 cells, but mediated the killing of tumor-promoting macrophages through the secretion of granzyme B and perforin. The tumor-infiltrating interleukin 10(+)Foxp3(-)CD4(+) T cells expressed very low levels of granzyme B and perforin, possibly suggested the downregulation of Tr1 cytotoxic capacity in melanoma tumors. Together, these data demonstrated an antitumor function of Tr1 cells through the elimination of tumor-promoting macrophages, which was not shared by conventional Tregs.

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  19. Glucocorticoid Receptor Knockdown Decreases the Antioxidant Protection of B16 Melanoma Cells: An Endocrine System-Related Mechanism that Compromises Metastatic Cell Resistance to Vascular Endothelium-Induced Tumor Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Pellicer, José A.; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F.; Estrela, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2−-generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium. PMID:24802641

  20. Rapid Induction of Tumor-specific Type 1 T Helper Cells in Metastatic Melanoma Patients by Vaccination with Mature, Cryopreserved, Peptide-loaded Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Schultz, Erwin S.; Berger, Thomas G.; Weinlich, Georg; Ebner, Susanne; Woerl, Petra; Bender, Armin; Feuerstein, Bernadette; Fritsch, Peter O.; Romani, Nikolaus; Schuler, Gerold

    2002-01-01

    There is consensus that an optimized cancer vaccine will have to induce not only CD8+ cytotoxic but also CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, particularly interferon (IFN)-γ–producing, type 1 Th cells. The induction of strong, ex vivo detectable type 1 Th cell responses has not been reported to date. We demonstrate now that the subcutaneous injection of cryopreserved, mature, antigen-loaded, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) rapidly induces unequivocal Th1 responses (ex vivo detectable IFN-γ–producing effectors as well as proliferating precursors) both to the control antigen KLH and to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II–restricted tumor peptides (melanoma-antigen [Mage]-3.DP4 and Mage-3.DR13) in the majority of 16 evaluable patients with metastatic melanoma. These Th1 cells recognized not only peptides, but also DCs loaded with Mage-3 protein, and in case of Mage-3DP4–specific Th1 cells IFN-γ was released even after direct recognition of viable, Mage-3–expressing HLA-DP4+ melanoma cells. The capacity of DCs to rapidly induce Th1 cells should be valuable to evaluate whether Th1 cells are instrumental in targeting human cancer and chronic infections. PMID:12021308

  1. Conditional Survival of Patients With Metastatic Testicular Germ Cell Tumors Treated With First-Line Curative Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jenny J; Bernard, Brandon; Tran, Ben; Li, Haocheng; Asif, Tehmina; Stukalin, Igor; Lee, Margaret; Day, Daphne; Alimohamed, Nimira; Sweeney, Christopher J; Bedard, Philippe L; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-03-01

    The International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group (IGCCCG) criteria prognosticate survival outcomes in metastatic testicular germ cell tumor (MT-GCT), but how the initial risk changes over time for those who survived since curative treatment is unknown. We assessed patients eligible for first-line therapy for MT-GCT at five tertiary cancer centers from 1990 to 2012 for 2-year conditional overall survival (COS) and conditional disease-free survival (CDFS), defined as the probability of surviving, or surviving and being disease free, respectively, for an additional 2 years at a given time point since the initial diagnosis. For all patients (N = 942), 2-year COS increased from 92% (95% CI, 91% to 94%) at 0 months to 98% (95% CI, 97% to 99%), and 2-year CDFS increased from 83% (95% CI, 81% to 86%) at baseline to 98% (95% CI, 97% to 99%) at 24 months after diagnosis. Two-year COS improved by 2% (97% at 0 months, 99% at 24 months) in the IGCCCG favorable-risk group, by 5% (94% at 0 months, 99% at 24 months) in the intermediate-risk group, and by 22% (71% at 0 months to 93% at 24 months) in the poor-risk group. Two-year CDFS improved significantly at 12 months for each risk group (favorable, 91% baseline v 95% at 12 months; intermediate, 84% v 95%; poor, 55% v 85%). Baseline IGCCCG risk stratification was not associated with long-term COS or CDFS for patients who survived to greater than 2 years post therapy. No significant differences in COS and CDFS were noted between seminoma and nonseminoma; patients ≥ 40 years old had inferior 2-year COS from 0 to 12 months, but no differences were noted at 18 months. Our data suggest that the concept of conditional survival applies to patients with MT-GCT treated with curative therapy. Patients with MT-GCT who survived and remained disease free more than 2 years after the diagnosis had an excellent chance of staying alive and disease free in additional subsequent years, regardless of the initial IGCCCG risk stratification.

  2. Prognostic impact of circulating tumor cells assessed with the CellSearch System™ and AdnaTest Breast™ in metastatic breast cancer patients: the DETECT study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is a multitude of assays for the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) but a very limited number of studies comparing the clinical relevance of results obtained with different test methods. The DETECT trial for metastatic breast cancer patients was designed to directly compare the prognostic impact of two commercially available CTC assays that are prominent representatives of immunocytochemical and RT-PCR based technologies. Methods In total, 254 metastatic breast cancer patients were enrolled in this prospective multicenter trial. CTCs were assessed using both the AdnaTest Breast Cancer and the CellSearch system according to the manufacturers' instructions. Results With the CellSearch system, 116 of 221 (50%) evaluable patients were CTC-positive based on a cut-off level at 5 or more CTCs. The median overall survival (OS) was 18.1 months in CTC-positive patients. (95%-CI: 15.1-22.1 months) compared to 27 months in CTC-negative patients (23.5-30.7 months; p<0.001). This prognostic impact for OS was also significant in the subgroups of patients with triple negative, HER2-positive and hormone receptor-positive/HER2-negative primary tumors. The progression free survival (PFS) was not correlated with CTC status in our cohort receiving different types and lines of systemic treatment (p = 0.197). In multivariate analysis, the presence of CTCs was an independent predictor for OS (HR: 2.7, 95%-CI: 1.6-4.2). When the AdnaTest Breast was performed, 88 of 221 (40%) patients were CTC-positive. CTC-positivity assessed by the AdnaTest Breast had no association with PFS or OS. Conclusions The prognostic relevance of CTC detection in metastatic breast cancer patients depends on the test method. The present results indicate that the CellSearch system is superior to the AdnaTest Breast Cancer in predicting clinical outcome in advanced breast cancer. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials Registry number ISRCTN59722891. PMID:22894854

  3. Targeting Mortalin by Embelin Causes Activation of Tumor Suppressor p53 and Deactivation of Metastatic Signaling in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Nupur; Grover, Abhinav; Goyal, Sukriti; Katiyar, Shashank P.; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Wang, Pi-Chao; Sundar, Durai; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Embelin, a natural quinone found in the fruits of Embelia ribes, is commonly used in Ayurvedic home medicine for a variety of therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammation, anti-fever, anti-bacteria and anti-cancer. Molecular mechanisms of these activities and cellular targets have not been clarified to-date. We demonstrate that the embelin inhibits mortalin-p53 interactions, and activates p53 protein in tumor cells. We provide bioinformatics, molecular docking and experimental evidence to the binding affinity of embelin with mortalin and p53. Binding of embelin with mortalin/p53 abrogates their complex resulted in nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation function of p53 causing growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, analyses of growth factors and metastatic signaling using antibody membrane array revealed their downregulation in embelin-treated cells. We also found that the embelin causes transcriptional attenuation of mortalin and several other proteins involved in metastatic signaling in cancer cells. Based on these molecular dynamics and experimental data, it is concluded that the anticancer activity of embelin involves targeting of mortalin, activation of p53 and inactivation of metastatic signaling. PMID:26376435

  4. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  5. iTRAQ Quantitative Proteomic Comparison of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Uveal Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, John W.; Hu, Bo; Crabb, John S.; Triozzi, Pierre; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Singh, Arun D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common malignancy of the adult eye. The overall mortality rate is high because this aggressive cancer often metastasizes before ophthalmic diagnosis. Quantitative proteomic analysis of primary metastasizing and non-metastasizing tumors was pursued for insights into mechanisms and biomarkers of uveal melanoma metastasis. Methods Eight metastatic and 7 non-metastatic human primary uveal melanoma tumors were analyzed by LC MS/MS iTRAQ technology with Bruch’s membrane/choroid complex from normal postmortem eyes as control tissue. Tryptic peptides from tumor and control proteins were labeled with iTRAQ tags, fractionated by cation exchange chromatography, and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Protein identification utilized the Mascot search engine and the human Uni-Prot/Swiss-Protein database with false discovery ≤ 1%; protein quantitation utilized the Mascot weighted average method. Proteins designated differentially expressed exhibited quantitative differences (p ≤ 0.05, t-test) in a training set of five metastatic and five non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression models developed from the training set were used to classify the metastatic status of five independent tumors. Results Of 1644 proteins identified and quantified in 5 metastatic and 5 non-metastatic tumors, 12 proteins were found uniquely in ≥ 3 metastatic tumors, 28 were found significantly elevated and 30 significantly decreased only in metastatic tumors, and 31 were designated differentially expressed between metastatic and non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression modeling of differentially expressed collagen alpha-3(VI) and heat shock protein beta-1 allowed correct prediction of metastasis status for each of five independent tumor specimens. Conclusions The present data provide new clues to molecular differences in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanoma tumors. While sample size is limited and validation required, the results support collagen alpha-3(VI) and

  6. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-11

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  7. Efficacy of imatinib mesylate for the treatment of locally advanced and/or metastatic tenosynovial giant cell tumor/pigmented villonodular synovitis.

    PubMed

    Cassier, Philippe A; Gelderblom, Hans; Stacchiotti, Silvia; Thomas, David; Maki, Robert G; Kroep, Judith R; van der Graaf, Winette T; Italiano, Antoine; Seddon, Beatrice; Dômont, Julien; Bompas, Emanuelle; Wagner, Andrew J; Blay, Jean-Yves

    2012-03-15

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) (also known as diffuse-type giant cell tumor) and tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) are rare, usually benign neoplasms that affect the synovium and tendon sheaths in young adults. These tumors are driven by the overexpression of colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF1). CSF1 is expressed by a minority of tumor cells, which, in turn attract non-neoplastic inflammatory cells that express CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) through a paracrine effect. Imatinib mesylate (IM) blocks CSF1R, and previous case reports indicated that it also exerts antitumor activity in PVNS. The authors conducted a multi-institutional retrospective study to assess the activity of IM in patients with locally advanced/metastatic PVNS/TGCT. Twenty-nine patients from 12 institutions in Europe, Australia, and the United States were included. There were 13 men, the median age was 41 years, and the most common site of disease was the knee (n = 17; 59%). Two patients had metastatic disease to the lung and/or bone. Five of 27 evaluable patients had Response Evaluation in Solid Tumor (RECIST) responses (overall response rate, 19%; 1 complete response and 4 partial responses), and 20 of 27 patients (74%) had stable disease. Symptomatic improvement was noted in 16 of 22 patients (73%) who were assessable for symptoms. Despite a high rate of symptomatic improvement and a favorable safety profile, 6 patients discontinued because of toxicity, and 4 patients decided to discontinue IM for no clear medical reason. IM displayed interesting activity in patients with PVNS/TGCT, providing proof of concept for targeting CSF1R in this disease. The authors concluded that the benefits of alleviating morbidity in patients with localized PVNS/TGCT must be balanced against the potential toxicity of chronic drug therapy. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  8. Cannibalism: a way to feed on metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Fais, Stefano

    2007-12-18

    Cannibalism of tumors is an old story for pathologists, but it remained a mystery for at least one century. Recent data highlighted tumor cannibalism as a key advantage in tumor malignancy, possibly involved in resistance of tumors to the specific immune reaction. However, new data suggests also that metastatic tumor cells may use this peculiar function to feed in conditions of low nutrient supply. This makes malignant cancer cells more similar to microorganisms, rather than to normal cells undergoing malignant transformation. In cytological or histological samples of human tumors it is common to detect cells with one or many vacuoles, possibly containing cells under degradation, that push the nucleus to the periphery giving it the shape of a crescent moon. The cannibal cells may feed on sibling tumor cells, but also of the lymphocytes that should kill them. Cannibal cells eat everything without distinguishing between the feeding materials, with a mechanism that mostly differ from typical phagocytosis. Despite such phenomenon is considered mainly non-selective, a molecular framework of factors that contribute to cannibalism has been described. This machinery includes the presence of an acidic environment that allows a continuous activation of specific lytic enzymes, such as cathepsin B. Cannibalism occurs in apparently well defined structures whose main actors are big caveolar-like vacuoles and a connection between caveolin-1 and the actin cytoskeleton through the actin-linker molecule ezrin. Each of the components of the cannibal framework may represent specific tumor targets for future new strategies against cancer.

  9. Pulmonar collision tumor: metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Blanco, M; García-Fontán, E; Ríos, J; Rivo, J E; Fernández-Martín, R; Cañizares, M A

    2012-01-01

    We report an extraordinary case of collision tumor consisting of a lung adenocarcinoma and a metastatic adenoid cystic carcinoma in a 56 year-old man. He was diagnosed with a pulmonary nodule 11 years after treatment of an adenoid cystic carcinoma of the right maxillary sinus. A non-small cell carcinoma was observed when a transbronchial biopsy was performed. The other component of the nodule was only diagnosed with pathological examination of the resection specimen.

  10. Effects on Tumor Development and Metastatic Dissemination by the NKG2D Lymphocyte Receptor Expressed on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Gazzar, Ahmed; Cai, Xin; Reeves, Rebecca S.; Dai, Zhenpeng; Caballero-Benitez, Andrea; McDonald, David L.; Vazquez, Julio; Gooley, Ted A.; Sale, George E.; Spies, Thomas; Groh, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension wherein cancer cells themselves coopt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNAi-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may impact immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete. PMID:24141776

  11. Effects on tumor development and metastatic dissemination by the NKG2D lymphocyte receptor expressed on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El-Gazzar, A; Cai, X; Reeves, R S; Dai, Z; Caballero-Benitez, A; McDonald, D L; Vazquez, J; Gooley, T A; Sale, G E; Spies, T; Groh, V

    2014-10-09

    The stimulatory NKG2D lymphocyte receptor together with its tumor-associated ligands enable the immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells. However, with dynamic changes unfolding, cancers exploit NKG2D and its ligands for immune evasion and suppression. Recent findings have added yet another functional dimension, wherein cancer cells themselves co-opt NKG2D for their own benefit to complement the presence of its ligands for self-stimulation of parameters of tumorigenesis. Those findings are here extended to in vivo tumorigenicity testing by employing orthotopic xenotransplant breast cancer models in mice. Using human cancer lines with ectopic NKG2D expression and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated protein depletion among other controls, we show that NKG2D self-stimulation has tumor-promoting capacity. NKG2D signals had no notable effects on cancer cell proliferation and survival but acted at the level of angiogenesis, thus promoting tumor growth, tumor cell intravasation and dissemination. NKG2D-mediated effects on tumor initiation may represent another factor in the observed overall enhancement of tumor development. Altogether, these results may have an impact on immunotherapy approaches, which currently do not account for such NKG2D effects in cancer patients and thus could be misdirected as underlying assumptions are incomplete.

  12. Combination of circulating tumor cell enumeration and tumor marker detection in predicting prognosis and treatment effect in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun; Kong, Yun-Yi; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yue; Jia, Zhong-Wei; Li, Gao-Xiang

    2015-12-08

    Although circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration in peripheral blood has already been validated as a reliable biomarker in predicting prognosis in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), patients with favorable CTC counts (CTC < 5/7.5 ml) still experience various survival times. Assays that can reduce patients' risks are urgently needed. In this study, we set up a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method to detect epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell gene expression status in peripheral blood to validate whether they could complement CTC enumeration. From January 2013 to June 2014 we collected peripheral blood from 70 mCRPC patients and enumerated CTC in these blood samples using CellSearch system. At the same time, stem cell-related genes (ABCG2, PROM1 and PSCA) and EMT-related genes (TWIST1 and vimentin) were detected in these peripheral blood samples using an RT-qPCR assay. Patient overall survival (OS) and treatment methods were recorded in the follow-up. For patients who received first-line chemotherapy, docetaxel plus prednisone, PSA progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) and PSA response rate were recorded. At the time of analysis, 35 patients had died of prostate cancer with a median follow-up of 16.0 months. Unfavorable CTC enumerations (CTC ≥5/7.5 ml) were predictive of shorter OS (p = 0.01). Also, positive stem cell gene expression indicated poor prognosis in mCRPC patients (p = 0.01). However, EMT gene expression status failed to show any prognostic value in OS (p = 0.78). A multivariate analysis indicated that serum albumin (p = 0.04), ECOG performance status (p < 0.01), CTC enumeration (p = 0.02) and stem cell gene expression status (p = 0.01) were independent prognostic factors for OS. For the 40 patients categorized into the favorable CTC enumeration group, positive stem cell gene expression also suggested poor prognosis (p < 0.01). A combined prognostic model consisting of stem cell gene

  13. Molecular profiling of peripheral blood is associated with circulating tumor cells content and poor survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marín-Aguilera, Mercedes; Reig, Òscar; Lozano, Juan José; Jiménez, Natalia; García-Recio, Susana; Erill, Nadina; Gaba, Lydia; Tagliapietra, Andrea; Ortega, Vanesa; Carrera, Gemma; Colomer, Anna; Gascón, Pedro; Mellado, Begoña

    2015-04-30

    The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood correlates with clinical outcome in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We analyzed the molecular profiling of peripheral blood from 43 metastatic CRPC patients with known CTC content in order to identify genes that may be related to prostate cancer progression. Global gene expression analysis identified the differential expression of 282 genes between samples with ≥5 CTCs vs <5 CTCs, 58.6% of which were previously described as over-expressed in prostate cancer (18.9% in primary tumors and 56.1% in metastasis). Those genes were involved in survival functions such as metabolism, signal transduction, gene expression, cell growth, death, and movement. The expression of selected genes was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. This analysis revealed a two-gene model (SELENBP1 and MMP9) with a high significant prognostic ability (HR 6; 95% CI 2.61 - 13.79; P<0.0001). The combination of the two-gene signature plus the CTCs count showed a higher prognostic ability than CTCs enumeration or gene expression alone (P<0.05). This study shows a gene expression profile in PBMNC associated with CTCs count and clinical outcome in metastatic CRPC, describing genes and pathways potentially associated with CRPC progression.

  14. Molecular profiling of peripheral blood is associated with circulating tumor cells content and poor survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Aguilera, Mercedes; Reig, Òscar; Lozano, Juan José; Jiménez, Natalia; García-Recio, Susana; Erill, Nadina; Gaba, Lydia; Tagliapietra, Andrea; Ortega, Vanesa; Carrera, Gemma; Colomer, Anna; Gascón, Pedro; Mellado, Begoña

    2015-01-01

    The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood correlates with clinical outcome in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We analyzed the molecular profiling of peripheral blood from 43 metastatic CRPC patients with known CTC content in order to identify genes that may be related to prostate cancer progression. Global gene expression analysis identified the differential expression of 282 genes between samples with ≥5 CTCs vs <5 CTCs, 58.6% of which were previously described as over-expressed in prostate cancer (18.9% in primary tumors and 56.1% in metastasis). Those genes were involved in survival functions such as metabolism, signal transduction, gene expression, cell growth, death, and movement. The expression of selected genes was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. This analysis revealed a two-gene model (SELENBP1 and MMP9) with a high significant prognostic ability (HR 6; 95% CI 2.61 - 13.79; P<0.0001). The combination of the two-gene signature plus the CTCs count showed a higher prognostic ability than CTCs enumeration or gene expression alone (P<0.05). This study shows a gene expression profile in PBMNC associated with CTCs count and clinical outcome in metastatic CRPC, describing genes and pathways potentially associated with CRPC progression. PMID:25871394

  15. Correlation of PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells with Survival Outcomes after Radical Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Non-Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Victor H. F.; Lo, Anthony W. I.; Leung, Chun-Yin; Shek, Wai-Hung; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Lam, Ka-On; Tong, Chi-Chung; Sze, Chun-Kin; Leung, To-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated if programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression levels were prognostic of survival outcomes after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials 104 patients with non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT were investigated for their PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) which were correlated with survival endpoints including locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.6 years, 21 (20.2%), 19 (18.3%) and 31 (29.8%) patients suffered from locoregional failure, distant metastases and overall disease progression, respectively, and 31 (29.8%) patients died. Patients whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 2+ (moderate to strong membrane staining in ≥ 25% of tumor cells) enjoyed longer LRFFS (5-year 100% vs. 74.4%, Hazard ratio [HR], 0.159, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.021–0.988; P = 0.042) and marginally longer PFS (5-year 95.0% vs. 65.2%, HR, 0.351, 95% CI, 0.08–0.999, P = 0.067) compared to those whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 0 (minimal membrane staining with PD-L1 in < 5% tumor cells or no staining with PD-L1) or 1+ (minimal to moderate membrane staining with PD-L1 in between 5–24% tumor cells). PD-L1 IHC 2+ was independently prognostic of both LRFFS (P = 0.014) and PFS (P = 0.045) in multivariable analyses. Only induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation was prognostic of DMFS (P = 0.003) and no prognostic factor for OS was identified. Conclusion PD-L1 expression levels correlated with LRRFS and PFS in non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT. It may play a role in radiosensitivity for NPC, which should be further confirmed in prospective studies using immunotherapy together with IMRT. PMID:27341634

  16. Correlation of PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells with Survival Outcomes after Radical Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Non-Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Victor H F; Lo, Anthony W I; Leung, Chun-Yin; Shek, Wai-Hung; Kwong, Dora L W; Lam, Ka-On; Tong, Chi-Chung; Sze, Chun-Kin; Leung, To-Wai

    2016-01-01

    We investigated if programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression levels were prognostic of survival outcomes after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). 104 patients with non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT were investigated for their PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) which were correlated with survival endpoints including locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS). After a median follow-up of 7.6 years, 21 (20.2%), 19 (18.3%) and 31 (29.8%) patients suffered from locoregional failure, distant metastases and overall disease progression, respectively, and 31 (29.8%) patients died. Patients whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 2+ (moderate to strong membrane staining in ≥ 25% of tumor cells) enjoyed longer LRFFS (5-year 100% vs. 74.4%, Hazard ratio [HR], 0.159, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.021-0.988; P = 0.042) and marginally longer PFS (5-year 95.0% vs. 65.2%, HR, 0.351, 95% CI, 0.08-0.999, P = 0.067) compared to those whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 0 (minimal membrane staining with PD-L1 in < 5% tumor cells or no staining with PD-L1) or 1+ (minimal to moderate membrane staining with PD-L1 in between 5-24% tumor cells). PD-L1 IHC 2+ was independently prognostic of both LRFFS (P = 0.014) and PFS (P = 0.045) in multivariable analyses. Only induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation was prognostic of DMFS (P = 0.003) and no prognostic factor for OS was identified. PD-L1 expression levels correlated with LRRFS and PFS in non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT. It may play a role in radiosensitivity for NPC, which should be further confirmed in prospective studies using immunotherapy together with IMRT.

  17. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic tumors to the periampullary region.

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, H; Halpern, N B; Aldrete, J S

    1999-01-01

    Although operative resection of metastatic lesions to the liver, lung, and brain has proved to be useful, only recently have there been a few reports of pancreaticoduodenectomies in selected cases of metastases to the periampullary region. In this report we present four cases of proven metastatic disease to the periampullary region in which the lesions were treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy. Metastatic tumors corresponded to a melanoma of unknown primary site, choriocarcinoma, high-grade liposarcoma of the leg, and a small cell cancer of the lung. All four patients survived the operation and had no major complications. Two patients died of recurrence of their tumors, 6 and 63 months, respectively, after operation; the other two patients are alive 21 and 12 months, respectively, after operation. It can be inferred from this small but documented experience, as well as a review of the literature, that pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastatic disease can be considered in selected patients, as long as this operation is performed by experienced surgeons who have achieved minimal or no morbidity and mortality with it.

  18. Primary Tumor Characteristics Are Important Prognostic Factors for Sorafenib-Treated Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sohee; Nam, Byung-Ho; Lee, Sang Eun; Seo, Ill Young; Kim, Tae Nam; Hong, Sung-Hoo; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Seo, Seong Il; Song, Kanghyon; Kwak, Cheol

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to identify prognostic factors associated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients treated with sorafenib. We investigated 177 patients, including 116 who received sorafenib as first-line therapy, using the Cox regression model. During a median follow-up period of 19.2 months, the PFS and OS were 6.4 and 32.6 months among all patients and 7.4 months and undetermined for first-line sorafenib-treated patients, respectively. Clinical T3-4 stage (hazard ratio [HR] 2.56) and a primary tumor size >7 cm (HR 0.34) were significant prognostic factors for PFS among all patients, as were tumor size >7 cm (HR 0.12), collecting system invasion (HR 5.67), and tumor necrosis (HR 4.11) for OS (p < 0.05). In first-line sorafenib-treated patients, ≥4 metastatic lesions (HR 28.57), clinical T3-4 stage (HR 4.34), collecting system invasion (univariate analysis HR 2.11; multivariate analysis HR 0.07), lymphovascular invasion (HR 13.35), and tumor necrosis (HR 6.69) were significant prognosticators of PFS, as were bone metastasis (HR 5.49) and clinical T3-4 stages (HR 4.1) for OS (p < 0.05). Our study thus identified a number of primary tumor-related characteristics as important prognostic factors in sorafenib-treated mRCC patients. PMID:28271073

  19. Osteoprotegerin Contributes to the Metastatic Potential of Cells with a Dysfunctional TSC2 Tumor-Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Steagall, Wendy K.; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Glasgow, Connie G.; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Lin, Jing-Ping; Zheng, Gang; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    In addition to its effects on bone metabolism, osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble member of the tumor necrosis factor family of receptors, promotes smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration and may act as a survival factor for tumor cells. We hypothesized that these cellular mechanisms of OPG may be involved in the growth and proliferation of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) cells, abnormal smooth muscle-like cells with mutations in one of the tuberous sclerosis complex tumor-suppressor genes (TSC1/TSC2) that cause LAM, a multisystem disease characterized by cystic lung destruction, lymphatic infiltration, and abdominal tumors. Herein, we show that OPG stimulated proliferation of cells cultured from explanted LAM lungs, and selectively induced migration of LAM cells identified by the loss of heterozygosity for TSC2. Consistent with these observations, cells with TSC2 loss of heterozygosity expressed the OPG receptors, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, syndecan-1, and syndecan-2. LAM lung nodules showed reactivities to antibodies to tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand, receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, syndecan-1, and syndecan-2. LAM lung nodules also produced OPG, as shown by expression of OPG mRNA and colocalization of reactivities to anti-OPG and anti-gp100 (HMB45) antibodies in LAM lung nodules. Serum OPG was significantly higher in LAM patients than in normal volunteers. Based on these data, it appears that OPG may have tumor-promoting roles in the pathogenesis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis, perhaps acting as both autocrine and paracrine factors. PMID:23867796

  20. KBF1 (p50 NF-kappa B homodimer) acts as a repressor of H-2Kb gene expression in metastatic tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression is causally related to high malignancy and low immunogenicity of certain murine tumors. In this study, we have analyzed the roles of the nuclear factors KBF1/p50 and p65 in regulation of class I expression in high and low metastatic tumor cells. Low class I-expressing cells show at higher levels of KBF1/p50 and NF-kappa B (p50/p65) binding activity than high class I-expressing cells. However, an excess of KBF1 over NF- kappa B is observed in low expressing cells, while an excess of NF- kappa B over KBF1 is observed in high expressing cells. Stable transfection of a p65 expression vector into low class I-expressing cells activated H-2 transcription and cell surface expression, while stable transfection of p50 expression vector into high expressing cells suppressed H-2Kb transcription and cell surface expression. Our studies suggest that KBF1 has the potential of downregulating class I gene expression, whereas dimers containing the p65 subunit are activators of class I gene expression. PMID:8496683

  1. MART-1 adenovirus-transduced dendritic cell immunization in a murine model of metastatic central nervous system tumor.

    PubMed

    Broder, Howard; Anderson, Andrea; Kremen, Thomas J; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells that have been shown to play a critical role in the initiation of host immune responses against tumor antigens. In this study, a recombinant adenovirus vector encoding the melanoma-associated antigen, MART-1, was used to transduce murine DCs, which were then tested for their ability to activate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and induce protective immunity against B16 melanoma tumor cells implanted intracranially. Genetic modifications of murine bone marrow-derived DCs to express MART-1 was achieved through the use of an E1-deficient, recombinant adenovirus vector. Sixty-two C57BL/6 mice were immunized subcutaneously with AdVMART-1-transduced DCs (n = 23), untransduced DCs (n = 17), or sterile saline (n = 22). Using the B16 murine melanoma, which naturally expresses the MART-1 antigen, all the mice were then challenged intracranially with viable, unmodified syngeneic B16 tumor cells 7 days later. Splenocytes from representative animals in each group were harvested for standard cytotoxicity (CTL) and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays. The remaining mice were followed for survival. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with DCs transduced with an adenoviral vector encoding the MART-1 antigen elicited the development of antigen-specific CTL responses. As evidenced by a prolonged survival curve when compared to control-immunized mice with intracranial B16 tumors, AdMART-1-DC vaccination was able to elicit partial protection against central nervous system tumor challenge in vivo.

  2. Metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor involving the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Rowe, J Jordi; Prayson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases from malignant phyllodes tumors of the breast are a rare occurrence. We report a patient with a malignant phyllodes tumor of the right breast which subsequently metastasized to the right lower lobe of the lung 1 year after initial presentation, and to the right cerebellar hemisphere 2 years after diagnosis of her breast mass. After both chemotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy the patient is tumor free at most recent follow-up, 116 months after the breast tumor diagnosis was made. The literature is briefly reviewed and the differential diagnosis of malignant spindle cell brain tumors is discussed.

  3. High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Peripheral-Blood Stem-Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors: The Indiana University Experience.

    PubMed

    Adra, Nabil; Abonour, Rafat; Althouse, Sandra K; Albany, Costantine; Hanna, Nasser H; Einhorn, Lawrence H

    2017-04-01

    Purpose Patients with relapsed metastatic germ cell tumor (GCT) can be cured with second-line and even third-line regimens. We report survival outcomes of patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and peripheral-blood stem-cell transplantation (PBSCT) at Indiana University between 2004 and 2014. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 364 consecutive patients with GCT who progressed after cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy and were subsequently treated with HDCT and PBSCT. Three hundred forty-one patients received two consecutive courses of HDCT consisting of 700 mg/m(2) carboplatin and 750 mg/m(2) etoposide, each for 3 consecutive days, and each followed by PBSCT. Twenty-three patients received only a single course of HDCT because of progressive disease or toxicity. Cox proportional hazards models were used to test predictors of disease progression. Results The median age was 32 years (range, 17 to 70 years). With a median follow-up of 3.3 years, the 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 60% (95% CI, 55% to 65%) and the 2-year overall survival was 66% (95% CI, 60% to 70%). Three hundred three patients received HDCT as second-line therapy with a 2-year PFS of 63% (95% CI, 57% to 68%), and 61 patients received HDCT as third-line or later therapy with a 2-year PFS of 49% (95% CI, 36% to 61%). In a multivariable analysis, factors associated with disease progression included use of HDCT as third-line or later therapy, platinum-refractory disease, mediastinal primary tumor site, nonseminoma histology, intermediate- or poor-risk disease at the time of GCT diagnosis, and human chorionic gonadotropin ≥ 1,000 mIU/mL at initiation of HDCT. There were nine treatment-related deaths. Secondary leukemia developed in five patients. Conclusion This large single-institution study demonstrates that patients with relapsed metastatic GCT are curable by HDCT plus PBSCT even when used in third-line or later therapy.

  4. Anti-tumor immunity induced by local photothermal-immunoadjuvant therapy in a poorly immunogenic metastatic tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2003-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a novel method developed to treat metastatic tumors. The selective photothermal interaction using a near-infrared laser and indocyanine green destroys living tumor cells while preserving antigenic tissue derived protein. The treated tumor remained in the host as a source of exposed tumor antigens. Working in tandem with the applications of immunoadjuvant, laser immunotherapy has shown to induce an anti-tumor immunity in a metastatic mammary tumor model in rats. To further study the effect of laser immunotherapy, the immunogenicity of the rat model, DMBA-4, was investigated through surgical removal or primary tumors and by tumor immunization using freeze-thaw tumor cell lysates. The surgical removal of the primary tumors did not have any effect on the recurrence of the tumors at the primary sites. The metastases at remote sites also developed after the surgery. In the tumor challenges following the immunization, the immunized rats only had delayed emergence of the primary tumors and the metastases. All the immunized rats died with multiple tumors. The laser immunotherapy cured rats, on the other hand, showed strong tumor resistance in repeated tumor rechallenges. Our results showed that the laser immunotherapy could induce a strong anti-tumor immunity in a poorly immunogenic tumor model. Furthermore, the effect of laser immunotherapy on the metastases at remote sites indicated that this novel method could become an effective method in treating the metastatic tumors.

  5. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-01-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma. PMID:27418876

  6. Prospective blinded study of somatic mutation detection in cell-free DNA utilizing a targeted 54-gene next generation sequencing panel in metastatic solid tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lee, Won-Suk; Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie; Zill, Oliver A; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Kang, Won Ki; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jeeyun; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-11-24

    Sequencing of the mutant allele fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from tumors is increasingly utilized to detect actionable genomic alterations in cancer. We conducted a prospective blinded study of a comprehensive cfDNA sequencing panel with 54 cancer genes. To evaluate the concordance between cfDNA and tumor DNA (tDNA), sequencing results were compared between cfDNA from plasma and genomic tumor DNA (tDNA). Utilizing next generation digital sequencing technology (DST), we profiled approximately 78,000 bases encoding 512 complete exons in the targeted genes in cfDNA from plasma. Seventy-five patients were prospectively enrolled between February 2013 and March 2014, including 61 metastatic cancer patients and 14 clinical stage II CRC patients with matched plasma and tissue samples. Using the 54-gene panel, we detected at least one somatic mutation in 44 of 61 tDNA (72.1%) and 29 of 44 (65.9%) cfDNA. The overall concordance rate of cfDNA to tDNA was 85.9%, when all detected mutations were considered. We collected serial cfDNAs during cetuximab-based treatment in 2 metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC patients, one with acquired resistance and one with primary resistance. We demonstrate newly emerged KRAS mutation in cfDNA 1.5 months before radiologic progression. Another patient had a newly emerged PIK3CA H1047R mutation on cfDNA analysis at progression during cetuximab/irinotecan chemotherapy with gradual increase in allele frequency from 0.8 to 2.1%. This blinded, prospective study of a cfDNA sequencing showed high concordance to tDNA suggesting that the DST approach may be used as a non-invasive biopsy-free alternative to conventional sequencing using tumor biopsy.

  7. Prospective blinded study of somatic mutation detection in cell-free DNA utilizing a targeted 54-gene next generation sequencing panel in metastatic solid tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanman, Richard B.; Mortimer, Stefanie; Zill, Oliver A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Kang, Won Ki; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jeeyun; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the mutant allele fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from tumors is increasingly utilized to detect actionable genomic alterations in cancer. We conducted a prospective blinded study of a comprehensive cfDNA sequencing panel with 54 cancer genes. To evaluate the concordance between cfDNA and tumor DNA (tDNA), sequencing results were compared between cfDNA from plasma and genomic tumor DNA (tDNA). Utilizing next generation digital sequencing technology (DST), we profiled approximately 78,000 bases encoding 512 complete exons in the targeted genes in cfDNA from plasma. Seventy-five patients were prospectively enrolled between February 2013 and March 2014, including 61 metastatic cancer patients and 14 clinical stage II CRC patients with matched plasma and tissue samples. Using the 54-gene panel, we detected at least one somatic mutation in 44 of 61 tDNA (72.1%) and 29 of 44 (65.9%) cfDNA. The overall concordance rate of cfDNA to tDNA was 85.9%, when all detected mutations were considered. We collected serial cfDNAs during cetuximab-based treatment in 2 metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC patients, one with acquired resistance and one with primary resistance. We demonstrate newly emerged KRAS mutation in cfDNA 1.5 months before radiologic progression. Another patient had a newly emerged PIK3CA H1047R mutation on cfDNA analysis at progression during cetuximab/irinotecan chemotherapy with gradual increase in allele frequency from 0.8 to 2.1%. This blinded, prospective study of a cfDNA sequencing showed high concordance to tDNA suggesting that the DST approach may be used as a non-invasive biopsy-free alternative to conventional sequencing using tumor biopsy. PMID:26452027

  8. Elevated TAK1 augments tumor growth and metastatic capacities of ovarian cancer cells through activation of NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Patty C.H.; Shi, Lei; Liu, Vincent W.S.; Tang, Hermit W.M.; Liu, Iris J.; Leung, Thomas H.Y.; Chan, Karen K.L.; Yam, Judy W.P.; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Ngan, Hextan Y.S.; Chan, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-activating kinase 1 (TAK1) is a serine/threonine kinase which is frequently associated with human cancer progression. However, its functional role in tumorigenesis is still controversial. Here, we report that TAK1 enhances the oncogenic capacity of ovarian cancer cells through the activation of NF-κB signaling. We found that TAK1 is frequently upregulated and significantly associated with high-grade and metastatic ovarian cancers. Mechanistic studies showed that Ser412 phosphorylation is required for TAK1 in activating NF-κB signaling and promotes aggressiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Conversely, suppression of TAK1 activity by point mutation at Ser412, RNAi mediated gene knockdown or TAK1 specific inhibitor ((5Z) -7-Oxozeaenol) remarkably impairs tumor growth and metastasis in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Our study underscores the importance of targeting TAK1 as a promising therapeutic approach to counteract the ovarian cancer progression. PMID:25277189

  9. MHC class II-transduced tumor cells originating in the immune-privileged eye prime and boost CD4(+) T lymphocytes that cross-react with primary and metastatic uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Jacobus J; Thompson, James A; Srivastava, Minu K; Iheagwara, Uzoma K; Murray, Timothy G; Lotem, Michal; Ksander, Bruce R; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2007-05-01

    Uveal melanoma, the most common malignancy of the eye, has a 50% rate of liver metastases among patients with large primary tumors. Several therapies prolong survival of metastatic patients; however, none are curative and no patients survive. Therefore, we are exploring immunotherapy as an alternative or adjunctive treatment. Uveal melanoma may be particularly appropriate for immunotherapy because primary tumors arise in an immune-privileged site and may express antigens to which the host is not tolerized. We are developing MHC class II (MHC II)-matched allogeneic, cell-based uveal melanoma vaccines that activate CD4(+) T lymphocytes, which are key cells for optimizing CD8(+) T-cell immunity, facilitating immune memory, and preventing tolerance. Our previous studies showed that tumor cells genetically modified to express costimulatory and MHC II molecules syngeneic to the recipient are potent inducers of antitumor immunity. Because the MHC II-matched allogeneic vaccines do not express the accessory molecule, Invariant chain, they present MHC II-restricted peptides derived from endogenously encoded tumor antigens. We now report that MHC II-matched allogeneic vaccines, prepared from primary uveal melanomas that arise in the immune-privileged eye, prime and boost IFNgamma-secreting CD4(+) T cells from the peripheral blood of either healthy donors or uveal melanoma patients that cross-react with primary uveal melanomas from other patients and metastatic tumors. In contrast, vaccines prepared from metastatic cells in the liver are less effective at activating CD4(+) T cells, suggesting that tumor cells originating in immune-privileged sites may have enhanced capacity for inducing antitumor immunity and for serving as immunotherapeutic agents.

  10. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Expression in Disseminated Tumor Cells and Micrometastasis in Bone Marrow of Patients with Nonmetastatic and Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Theoretical Considerations and Clinical Implications—An Immunocytochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Reyes, Eduardo; Tapia, Pablo; Badínez, Leonardo; Orellana, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is important in the dissemination and invasion of tumor cells and activates angiogenesis. We present an immunocytochemical study of MMP-2 expression in circulating prostate cells (CPCs), disseminated tumor cells (DTCs), and micrometastasis (mM) in bone marrow of men with prostate cancer. Methods and Patients. Tumor cells were identified with anti-PSA immunocytochemistry. Positive samples underwent processing with anti-MMP-2, its expression was compared with Gleason score, concordance of expression, and metastatic and nonmetastatic disease. Results. 215 men participated, CPCs were detected in 62.7%, DTCs in 62.2%, and mM in 71.4% in nonmetastatic cancer; in metastatic cancer all had CPCs, DTCs, and mM detected. All CPCs and DTCs expressed MMP-2; in mM MMP-2 expression was positively associated with increasing Gleason score. MMP-2 expression in CPCs and DTCs showed concordance. In low grade tumors, mM and surrounding stromal cells were MMP-2 negative, with variable expression in high grade tumors; in metastatic disease, both mM and stromal cells were MMP-2 positive. Conclusions. CPCs and DTCs are different from mM, with inhibition of MMP-2 expression in mM of low grade tumors. With disease progression, MMP-2 expression increases in both mM and surrounding stromal cells, with implications for the use of bisphosphonates or MMP-2 inhibitors. PMID:23227342

  11. Metastatic carcinoid tumor--atypical presentation.

    PubMed

    Pleşa, Alina; Sarca, Emanuela; Maxim, Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is a slow-growing type of neuroendocrine tumor, originating in the enterochromaffin cells and secreting mainly serotonin. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are found throughout the intestinal tract, the appendix and terminal ileum being the most common locations, and are classified by site of origin and by degree of differentiation, with well-differentiated lesions representing those tumors formerly referred to as carcinoid tumors. The clinical symptoms are characterized by flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and/or bronchial constriction and occur almost exclusively in patients with liver metastases due to the release of bioactive peptides and amines directly into the systemic circulation. We report the clinical, serological and histological diagnosis of a 67-years-old male patient with congestive heart failure secondary to carcinoid heart disease in the context of liver metastases of an ileum carcinoid tumor.

  12. A Study of Epacadostat in Combination With a PD-1 Inhibitor and Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors (ECHO-207)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors; Advanced or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (CRC); Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC); Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC; Squamous or Nonsquamous); Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Protein 1 (PD-1) Inhibitor; Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumor That Progressed on Previous Therapy With a Programmed Cell Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1) Inhibitor

  13. Lanreotide in metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Martyn E; Pavel, Marianne; Ćwikła, Jarosław B; Phan, Alexandria T; Raderer, Markus; Sedláčková, Eva; Cadiot, Guillaume; Wolin, Edward M; Capdevila, Jaume; Wall, Lucy; Rindi, Guido; Langley, Alison; Martinez, Séverine; Blumberg, Joëlle; Ruszniewski, Philippe

    2014-07-17

    population, with the exception of small subgroups in which confidence intervals were wide. There were no significant between-group differences in quality of life or overall survival. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (in 26% of the patients in the lanreotide group and 9% of those in the placebo group). Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki-67 <10%). (Funded by Ipsen; CLARINET ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00353496; EudraCT 2005-004904-35.).

  14. Combining gemcitabine, cisplatin, and ifosfamide (GIP) is active in patients with relapsed metastatic germ-cell tumors (GCT): a prospective multicenter GETUG phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Fizazi, K; Gravis, G; Flechon, A; Geoffrois, L; Chevreau, C; Laguerre, B; Delva, R; Eymard, J C; Rolland, F; Houede, N; Laplanche, A; Burcoveanu, D; Culine, S

    2014-05-01

    The standard treatment of patients with metastatic germ-cell tumor (GCT) relapsing after first-line chemotherapy is based on a cisplatin and ifosfamide-containing three-drug regimen, which usually yields a complete response (CR) rate <50%. As gemcitabine consistently displayed activity in patients with advanced GCT and as synergy with cisplatin was reported, we integrated this drug into the salvage triplet regimen and assessed its activity in this phase II study. The GIP regimen consisted in gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) day 1 and 5, ifosfamide 1200 mg/m(2)/day day 1-5, cisplatin 20 mg/m(2)/day day 1-5, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 263 μg/day day 7-15, repeated every 3 weeks for four cycles. Eligibility criteria were that patients had favorable prognostic factors to conventional-dose salvage chemotherapy including a testis primary tumor and a previous CR to first-line chemotherapy for metastatic disease. The primary end point was the CR rate and a two-stage Simon design was used. Thirty-seven patients were accrued and 29 (78%) achieved a favorable response, including a CR in 20 (54%) and a partial response with normalization of tumor markers (PRm-) in 9 (24%). With a median follow-up of 53 months (13-81), the 2-year overall survival rate is 73% (57%-84%) and the continuous progression-free survival rate is 51% (35%-66%). Myelosuppression was the main toxicity including febrile neutropenia in 8 (22%) patients and 18 (50%) cases required platelet infusion. No grade 3 and 4 peripheral neurotoxicity or renal toxicity occurred. Two patients died of treatment-related toxicity, one of them with cancer progression. In a multicenter context, four cycles of the GIP regimen achieved a high CR rate in patients with relapsed testicular GCT. The GIP regimen avoided severe neurotoxicity and yielded a high survival rate. NCT00127049.

  15. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  16. Therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine on a metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Mohsenikia, Maryam; Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Khori, Vahid; Arjmand Abbassi, Yasaman; Vesovic, Milica; Soleymani, Ali; Najafi, Farhood

    2016-03-01

    Our previous studies showed that alpha-solanine can inhibit tumor growth in cell culture and animal models of breast cancer. However, solanine is insoluble in common solvents; therefore, we developed a special nanoparticle with high-capacity solubility. The present study is aimed to deliberate the therapeutic effects of dendrosomal solanine (DNS) on a metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After DNS preparation and dosing procedures, forty-five mice were equally divided into five groups to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNS on mammary tumor-bearing mice. Compared to solanine, DNS significantly suppressed the proliferation of 4 T1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DNS showed a remarkable safety rate of up to 10mg/kg. A significant decrease in white blood-cell count was seen at 20mg/kg DNS in comparison with control animals. Mice treated with DNS had smaller tumor volume (mm(3)) in comparison with control and solanine groups. Moreover, the incidence of the breast tumor metastases was about 67% in the control animals, where as solanine and DNS 1mg/kg were about 22% and 0%, respectively. Furthermore, the number of metastases per mouse varied from one to three. The tissues of tumor, brain, liver, spleen, and lung showed higher expression levels of Bcl-2 but lower expression levels of Bax, MMP-2, MMP-9, mTOR, and Akt in DNS-treated mice than control and solanine groups. The findings suggest that DNS has a more impactful therapeutic effect than solanine on 4 T1-induced breast tumorigenesis via influencing the tissue microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment outcome and cost-effectiveness analysis of two chemotherapeutic regimens (BEP vs. VIP) for poor-prognosis metastatic germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Attili, Venkata Satya Suresh; Chandra, Rama C; Anupama, G; Loknath, D; Bapsy, P P; Dadhich, Hemant K; Babu, Govind K

    2007-01-01

    In patients with small-volume disseminated disease of germ cell tumors, cure can be achieved with four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). However, around 20% of these cases are not curable. Strategies to improve cure rates have shown that none of the currently available modalities were superior to the others. Among the most used ones, BEP and VIP (etoposide, cisplatin, and ifosfamide) have been the most studied. However, there are no reports comparing the two, except for a few in abstract forms from southern India. Therefore, we did a treatment outcome and cost-effectiveness analysis of two chemotherapeutic regimens (BEP vs VIP) that are used in poor-prognosis metastatic germ cell tumors. All male patients with germ cell tumors, diagnosed as having poor risk by IGCCCG, between January 2002 and December 2004 were included in the study. Clinical, laboratory, and other data were recorded. The patients were stratified into two categories on the basis of the type of chemotherapeutic regimen they received. In all, 46 patients were analyzed, with a median follow up of 26.6 months. The baseline characteristics (age, stage, PS, histology, and serum markers) were not different in the two treatment arms. There is no significant difference in the outcome with either of the chemotherapeutic modalities. VIP is less cost effective and more toxic compared to BEP. In view of the greater toxicity and cost of therapy, as well as lack of either overall or disease free survival advantage, VIP is not a preferred option for patients with high-risk germ cell tumors in the Indian setting and it is still advisable to treat patients with BEP.

  18. Adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose interleukin-2 for metastatic melanoma: The surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    ZIPPEL, DOUGLAS B.; BESSER, MICHAL; SHAPIRA, RONI; BEN-NUN, ALON; GOITEIN, DAVID; DAVIDSON, TIMA; TREVES, ABRAHAM J.; MARKEL, GAL; SCHACHTER, JACOB; PAPA, MOSHE Z.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are produced by resecting tumor tissue and growing and expanding ex vivo large quantities of autologous T cells. Once the TILs are ready for infusion, the patient undergoes a non-myeloablative lympho-depleting course of chemotherapy and subsequent TIL infusion with high-dose bolus IL-2. This study reviews the surgical experience of the TIL program at the Chaim Sheba Cancer Research Center in Israel. Eligible patients underwent surgical consultation to determine what tumorectomy would be beneficial for harvesting appropriate tissue. Factors involved in the decision included tumor mass size, location and morbidity of the procedure. Between January 2006 and May 2010, 44 patients underwent 47 procedures of adoptive transfer of TILs. Three patients underwent the procedure twice for recurrence after initial good responses, including an additional surgical procedure to produce fresh tumor. Thirty-seven excisions were with general anesthesia and 10 were with local anesthesia. Of the 37 general anesthesia procedures, 27 were open procedures involving a thoracotomy, a laparotomy or dissection of a major lymph node basin. Ten used minimally invasive techniques such as thorascopy or laparoscopy. Tumorectomy sites included 18 lymph node metastasis, 13 subcutaneous nodules, 11 lung specimens and 5 abdominal visceral metastasis including 2 liver lesions. Surgical mortality and major morbidity was 0%. Minor morbidity included only wound complications. Maximal number of TILs were derived from lymph node specimens, while liver metastasis procured the fewest TILs. Adoptive cell transfer technology affords a maximal tumor response with minimal surgical morbidity in metastatic patients. PMID:22969990

  19. Separation of high and low metastatic subpopulations from solid tumors by centrifugal elutriation.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Nelson, K K; Grossi, I M; Umbarger, L A; Taylor, J D; Honn, K V

    1988-02-01

    We have isolated from murine solid tumors (B16a) subpopulations of cells possessing high and low metastatic potential. Tumors were dispersed by collagenase treatment. The resulting heterogeneous population of cells (i.e., viable and non-viable tumor cells and host cells) were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Four of the fractions (100, 180, 260, 340) contained tumor cells of high viability (greater than 95%) and high purity (less than 1% host cell contamination). The four fractions were characterized by flow cytometry and found to differ in distribution of cells in G1, S and G2. The cell populations were also found to differ in metastatic potential as determined by their ability to form lung colonies following intravenous injection. The 340 fraction was approximately 5-fold more metastatic than the 100 fraction. We also observed that cells from the 100 fraction failed to induce platelet aggregation whereas cells from the 340 fraction induced significant platelet aggregation. These observations demonstrate that cells of B16a tumors are heterogeneous for phenotypic characteristics (i.e., metastatic potential; platelet aggregation, etc.) and that their ability to induce platelet aggregation is positively correlated with metastatic potential.

  20. Bone marrow adipocytes promote the Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate tumors via HIF-1α activation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Jonathan D.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Mahapatra, Gargi; Hüttemann, Maik; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation is increasingly recognized as a key factor in tumor progression, yet its involvement in metastatic bone disease is not understood. Bone is as an adipocyte-rich organ, and a major site of metastasis from prostate cancer. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active cells capable of shaping tumor metabolism via lipolysis and lipid transfer. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo models of marrow adiposity, we demonstrate that marrow fat cells promote Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate cancer cells. We show increased expression of glycolytic enzymes, increased lactate production, and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes that require paracrine signaling between the two cell types. We also reveal that prostate cancer cells are capable of inducing adipocyte lipolysis as a postulated mechanism of sustenance. We provide evidence that adipocytes drive metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells via oxygen-independent mechanism of HIF-1α activation that can be reversed by HIF-1α downregulation. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the observed metabolic signature in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes mimics the expression patterns seen in patients with metastatic disease. Together, our data provide evidence for a functional relationship between marrow adipocytes and tumor cells in bone that has likely implications for tumor growth and survival within the metastatic niche. PMID:27588494

  1. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  2. Prognostic reclassification of patients with intermediate-risk metastatic germ cell tumors: Implications for clinical practice, trial design, and molecular interrogation.

    PubMed

    Raggi, Daniele; Mariani, Luigi; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Lo Vullo, Salvatore; Giardiello, Daniele; Nicolai, Nicola; Piva, Luigi; Biasoni, Davide; Catanzaro, Mario; Torelli, Tullio; Stagni, Silvia; Maffezzini, Massimo; Calareso, Giuseppina; Magni, Michele; Di Nicola, Massimo; Verzoni, Elena; Grassi, Paolo; Procopio, Giuseppe; De Braud, Filippo; Pizzocaro, Giorgio; Salvioni, Roberto; Necchi, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Approximately one-third of the metastatic germ cell tumors (GCT) in patients are classified as intermediate-risk metastatic GCT, and available guidelines recommend the same treatment of poor-risk cases. Yet the prognosis of these patients is heterogeneous, and consequently refining the intensity of treatment is warranted. We aimed to address the heterogeneity of this category by providing a proof of principle for reclassification attempt. Data on consecutive patients with intermediate-risk metastatic GCT and who received treatment at Fondazione INT Milano in the time frame between February 1980 and March 2014 were collected. Cox regression analyses were done, evaluating potential prognostic factors for overall survival (OS, primary end point) to first-line therapy. Each factor was evaluated in a multivariable model. Recursive partitioning was performed to define prognostic risk groups. A total of 224 patients were suitable for the present analysis. Median age was 26 years (interquartile range: 22-31), 11 patients (4.9%) had a retroperitoneal primary tumor, 6 yielded seminomatous histology, 85 (37.9%) had lung metastases, and 58 (25.9%) had bulky (i.e.,≥ 10 cm) retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Patients received cisplatin, bleomycin, and etoposide (PEB, n = 199) or vinblastine (PVB, n = 23); however, 2 patients received other treatments. Median follow-up was 135 months (interquartile range: 81-223). Globally, 5-year progression-free survival and OS rates were 72.8% (95% CI: 67.1-79.0) and 86.2% (81.7-91.0), respectively. In the multivariable model for OS, elevated alfa fetoprotein (AFP) level was the only significant prognostic factor (hazard ratio = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.12-1.96). The 2 separate prognostic groups with differential OS outcomes were identified based on the cutoff level of 6,200 IU/ml. The 10-year OS rate was 55.6% (95% CI: 36.6-84.3), and it was 86.7% (95% CI: 82.0-91.7) for those with AFP levels more than (n = 19, 8.5%) and less than (n = 205, 91.5%) the

  3. Reconstitution of a metastatic-resistant tumor microenvironment with cancer-associated fibroblasts enables metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Takuya; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The tumor microenvironment is critical for metastasis to occur. Subcutaneous xenografts of tumors in immunodeficient mice are usually encapsulated and rarely metastasize as opposed to orthotopic tumors which metastasize if the original tumor was metastatic. In the present report, we were able to reconstitute a metastatic tumor microenvironment by subcutaneously co-transplanting a human cervical cancer cell line and human cervical cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), in athymic mice, which resulted in lymph node metastasis in 40% of the animals. In contrast, no metastasis occurred from the cervical cancer without CAFs. These results suggest that CAFs can overcome an anti-metastatic tumor environment and are a potential target to prevent metastasis. PMID:28103135

  4. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  5. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-26

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  6. [Metastatic renal tumor from oral floor cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yusuke; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Okamoto, Teppei; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kudo, Shigemasa; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroto; Ohyama, Chikara

    2012-11-01

    A 61-year-old man with oral floor cancer (adenoid cystic carcinoma, T2N0M1) was treated with systemicc hemotherapy and radiation therapy at the department of dentistry and oral surgery in our hospital. He had three lung metastases and renal tumors detected by screening computed tomography. The oral floor cancer responded to the treatment to achieve partial response. However, lung and renal metastases did not respond to chemotherapy. Then, the patient was referred to our clinic to rule out the possibility of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. Laparoscopic left nephrectomy was performed and pathological examination on the renal lesions revealed adenoid cystic carcinoma, which had identical histopathological features to the oral floor cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of metastatic renal tumor from oral floor cancer (adenoid cystic carcinoma).

  7. Tumor-suppressive p53 Signaling Empowers Metastatic Inhibitor KLF17-dependent Transcription to Overcome Tumorigenesis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amjad; Bhatti, Muhammad Zeeshan; Shah, Abdus Saboor; Duong, Hong-Quan; Alkreathy, Huda Mohammad; Mohammad, Shah Faisal; Khan, Rahmat Ali; Ahmad, Ayaz

    2015-08-28

    Metastasis, which is controlled by concerted action of multiple genes, is a complex process and is an important cause of cancer death. Krüppel-like factor 17 (KLF17) is a negative regulator of metastasis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during cancer progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanism and biological relevance of KLF17 in cancer cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that tumor suppressor protein p53 plays an integral role to induce KLF17 expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). p53 is recruited to the KLF17 promoter and results in the formation of p53-DNA complex. p53 enhances binding of p300 and favors histone acetylation on the KLF17 promoter. Mechanistically, p53 physically interacts with KLF17 and thereby enhances the anti-metastatic function of KLF17. p53 empowers KLF17-mediated EMT genes transcription via enhancing physical association of KLF17 with target gene promoters. Nutlin-3 recruits KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters and results in the formation of KLF17-DNA complex via a p53-dependent pathway. p53 depletion abrogates DNA binding affinity of KLF17 to EMT target gene promoters. KLF17 is critical for p53 cellular activities in NSCLC. Importantly, KLF17 enhances p53 transcription to generate a novel positive feedback loop. KLF17 depletion accelerates lung cancer cell growth in response to chemotherapy. Mechanistically, we found that KLF17 increases the expression of tumor suppressor genes p53, p21, and pRB. Functionally, KLF17 required p53 to suppress cancer cell invasion and migration in NSCLC. In conclusion, our study highlights a novel insight into the anti-EMT effect of KLF17 via a p53-dependent pathway in NSCLC, and KLF17 may be a new therapeutic target in NSCLC with p53 status.

  8. Serial Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cells Predicts Outcome of Induction Biochemotherapy plus Maintenance Biotherapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Koyanagi, Kazuo; O’Day, Steven J.; Boasberg, Peter; Atkins, Michael B.; Wang, He-Jing; Gonzalez, Rene; Lewis, Karl; Thompson, John A.; Anderson, Clay M.; Lutzky, Jose; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Hersh, Evan; Richards, Jon; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Hoon, Dave S. B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Molecular biomarkers in blood are promising for assessment of tumor progression and treatment response. We hypothesized that serial monitoring of circulating tumor cells (CTC) using multimarker quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT) assays could be a surrogate predictor of outcome for melanoma patients enrolled in a multicenter phase II clinical trial of biochemotherapy (BCT) combined with maintenance biotherapy (mBT). Experimental Design Blood specimens were collected from 87 patients before and during induction BCT and mBT for stage IV melanoma. Expression of five melanoma-associated CTC biomarkers (MART-1, GalNAc-T, PAX-3, MAGE-A3, and Mitf) was assessed by qRT and correlated with treatment response and disease outcome. Results The number of positive CTC biomarkers decreased overall during induction BCT (P<0.0001). CTC biomarker detection after two cycles of BCT was correlated with treatment response (P=0.005) and overall survival (OS) (P=0.001): an increase in the number of CTC biomarkers was associated with poor response (P=0.006) and OS (P<0.0001). Multivariate analyses using a Cox proportional-hazards model identified the change in CTC biomarkers after two cycles of BCT as an independent prognostic factor for disease progression (risk ratio, 12.6; 95% CI, 4.78 to 33.4; P<0.0001) and OS (risk ratio, 6.11; 95% CI, 2.37 to 15.7; P=0.0005). Conclusion Serial monitoring of CTC during induction BCT may be useful for predicting the therapeutic efficacy and disease outcome in patients receiving BCT and mBT for stage IV melanoma. PMID:20371696

  9. HPMA-Copolymer Nanocarrier Targets Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zimel, Melissa N; Horowitz, Chloe B; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Christ, Alexander B; Wei, Xin; Wu, Jianbo; Wojnarowicz, Paulina M; Wang, Dong; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward; Healey, John H

    2017-08-22

    Polymeric nanocarriers such as N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers deliver drugs to solid tumors and avoid the systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapy. Because HPMA copolymers can target sites of inflammation and accumulate within innate immune cells, we hypothesized that HPMA copolymers could target tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in both primary and metastatic tumor microenvironments. We verified this hypothesis, first in preliminary experiments with isolated bone marrow macrophage cultures in vitro, and subsequently in a spontaneously metastatic murine breast cancer model generated from a well-established, cytogenetically characterized 4T1 breast cancer cell line. Using our standardized experimental conditions, we detected primary orthotopic tumor growth at 7 days and metastatic tumors at 28 days after orthotopic transplantation of 4T1 cells into the mammary fat pad. We investigated the uptake of HPMA copolymer conjugated with Alexa Fluor 647 and folic acid (P-Alexa647-FA) and HPMA copolymer conjugated with IRDye 800CW (P-IRDye), following their retroorbital injection into the primary and metastatic tumor-bearing mice. A significant uptake of P-IRDye was observed at all primary and metastatic tumor sites in these mice, and the P-Alexa647-FA signal was found specifically within CD11b+TAMs co-stained with pan macrophage marker CD68. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a novel capacity of a P-Alexa647-FA conjugate to colocalize to CD11b+CD68+ TAMs in both primary and metastatic breast tumors. This underscores the potential of this HPMA nanocarrier to deliver functional therapeutics that specifically target tumor-promoting macrophage activation and/or polarization during tumor development. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. A Randomized Phase II Trial Investigating the Effect of Platelet Function Inhibition on Circulating Tumor Cells in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roop, Ryan P.; Naughton, Michael J.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Schneider, Jochen G.; Lammers, Philip E.; Pluard, Timothy J.; Johnson, Farley; Eby, Charles S.; Weilbaecher, Katherine N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Blockade of platelet activation and aggregation can inhibit metastasis in preclinical models and is associated with cancer prevention. To test whether disruption of platelet function with clopidogrel and aspirin would decrease the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients with metastatic breast cancer, a randomized phase II study was performed. Methods Patients with metastatic breast cancer who were not currently receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy were eligible. Patients were randomized to receive either clopidogrel and aspirin or to a control group receiving no treatment. Phlebotomy was performed at baseline, at 2 and 4 weeks, and monthly thereafter to obtain specimens to assess CTC, platelet aggregation, and thrombin activity. The primary end point was the proportion of patients with detectable CTCs at 1 month. Results Forty-eight patients were enrolled and 42 were evaluable at 1 month. Baseline CTC numbers were ≥ 5 in 13% and ≥ 1 in 65% of patients. Despite adequate platelet function inhibition in the treatment group, the proportion of patients with detectable CTCs was similar between the clopidogrel/aspirin and control groups at baseline (P = .21) and 4 weeks (P = .75), showing no treatment effect. Measured endogenous thrombin potential did not correlate with CTC number. No bleeding-related serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred. Conclusion The baseline CTC numbers were lower than expected, decreasing the ability to detect an impact of platelet inhibition on CTCs. Clopidogrel and aspirin were well tolerated. Future studies evaluating the potential therapeutic role of antiplatelet therapy in breast cancer remain of interest, and they may be informed by these results. PMID:24267729

  11. Highly sensitive proximity mediated immunoassay reveals HER2 status conversion in the circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Phillip; Liu, Xinjun; Lee, Tani; Liu, Limin; Barham, Robert; Kirkland, Richard; Leesman, Glen; Kuller, Anne; Ybarrondo, Belen; Ng, Shi-Chung; Singh, Sharat

    2011-12-15

    The clinical benefits associated with targeted oncology agents are generally limited to subsets of patients. Even with favorable biomarker profiles, many patients do not respond or acquire resistance. Existing technologies are ineffective for treatment monitoring as they provide only static and limited information and require substantial amounts of tissue. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop methods that can profile potential therapeutic targets with limited clinical specimens during the course of treatment. We have developed a novel proteomics-based assay, Collaborative Enzyme Enhanced Reactive-immunoassay (CEER) that can be used for analyzing clinical samples. CEER utilizes the formation of unique immuno-complex between capture-antibodies and two additional detector-Abs on a microarray surface. One of the detector-Abs is conjugated to glucose oxidase (GO), and the other is conjugated to Horse Radish Peroxidase (HRP). Target detection requires the presence of both detector-Abs because the enzyme channeling event between GO and HRP will not occur unless both Abs are in close proximity. CEER was able to detect single-cell level expression and phosphorylation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 (HER1) in breast cancer (BCa) systems. The shift in phosphorylation profiles of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and other signal transduction proteins upon differential ligand stimulation further demonstrated extreme assay specificity in a multiplexed array format. HER2 analysis by CEER in 227 BCa tissues showed superior accuracy when compared to the outcome from immunohistochemistry (IHC) (83% vs. 96%). A significant incidence of HER2 status alteration with recurrent disease was observed via circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, suggesting an evolving and dynamic disease progression. HER2-positive CTCs were found in 41% (7/17) while CTCs with significant HER2-activation without apparent over

  12. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Caffe, Jordan R.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Azarin, Samira M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. PMID:26844426

  13. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  14. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, Lorena; Bronte, Giuseppe; Bazan, Viviana; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-04-19

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC).This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition.Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC.

  15. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  16. Cancer-related ectopic expression of the bone-related transcription factor RUNX2 in non-osseous metastatic tumor cells is linked to cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic breast cancer cells frequently and ectopically express the transcription factor RUNX2, which normally attenuates proliferation and promotes maturation of osteoblasts. RUNX2 expression is inversely regulated with respect to cell growth in osteoblasts and deregulated in osteosarcoma cells. Methods Here, we addressed whether the functional relationship between cell growth and RUNX2 gene expression is maintained in breast cancer cells. We also investigated whether the aberrant expression of RUNX2 is linked to phenotypic parameters that could provide a selective advantage to cells during breast cancer progression. Results We find that, similar to its regulation in osteoblasts, RUNX2 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells is enhanced upon growth factor deprivation, as well as upon deactivation of the mitogen-dependent MEK-Erk pathway or EGFR signaling. Reduction of RUNX2 levels by RNAi has only marginal effects on cell growth and expression of proliferation markers in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Thus, RUNX2 is not a critical regulator of cell proliferation in this cell type. However, siRNA depletion of RUNX2 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduces cell motility, while forced exogenous expression of RUNX2 in MCF7 cells increases cell motility. Conclusions Our results support the emerging concept that the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 functions as a metastasis-related oncoprotein in non-osseous cancer cells. PMID:21029421

  17. Frequent detection of PIK3CA mutations in single circulating tumor cells of patients suffering from HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasch, Christin; Oldopp, Theresa; Mauermann, Oliver; Gorges, Tobias M; Andreas, Antje; Coith, Cornelia; Müller, Volkmar; Fehm, Tanja; Janni, Wolfgang; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2016-10-01

    Modern technologies enable detection and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood samples. Thus, CTC have attracted interest as markers for therapeutic response in breast cancer. First studies have incorporated CTC analyses to guide therapeutic interventions and stratification of breast cancer patients. Aim of this study was to analyze characteristic features of CTC as biomarker for predicting resistance to HER2-targeted therapies. Therefore, CTC from metastatic breast cancer patients with HER2-negative primary tumors screened for the prospective randomized phase III trial DETECT III were explored for their HER2 status and the presence of PIK3CA mutations. Detection and characterization of HER2 expression of CTC were conducted with the CellSearch(®) system. Fifteen of 179 CTC-positive patients (8.4%) contained ≥1 CTC with strong HER2 expression. Genomic DNA from individual CTC isolated by micromanipulation was propagated by whole genome amplification and analyzed for PIK3CA mutations in exons 9 and 20 by Sanger sequencing. One or more CTC/7.5 mL were detected in 179/290 patients (61.7%). In 109 patients (34.8%), ≥5 CTC/7.5 mL were found. We detected at least one CTC with the mutation p.E542K, p.E545K, p.H1047R, p.H1047L or p.M1043V in 12/33 patients (36.4%). Thirty six of 114 CTC (31.6%) harbored one of these mutations. CTC in individual patients exhibited heterogeneity concerning PIK3CA mutations and HER2 expression. In conclusion, clinically relevant genomic aberrations such as mutations in the hotspot regions of exon 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene can be detected in single CTC and might provide insights into mechanisms of resistance to HER2-targeted therapies.

  18. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Management of metastatic disease and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Vadakara, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors like imatinib, there were few treatment options available to patients with metastatic GIST. Surgery was the mainstay of treatment and the prognosis for patients with metastatic GIST was dismal. With the advent of imatinib the prognosis of metastatic GIST has improved dramatically. Second line tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) such as sunitinib and regorafenib have further bettered prognosis, however there is still a need for therapies for patients with disease refractory to TKI therapy. Newer agents such as the Hsp90 inhibitors, PI3K-AKT-mTOR inhibitors and IGF1-R inhibitors are currently under investigation and may have promise. This review discusses the current standard of care in terms of pharmacotherapy, both standard and investigational (summarized in Box 1), in the management of metastatic GIST. PMID:24093167

  19. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Patients within a Randomized, Phase II Trial: TBCRC 019.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Li, Yufeng; Muñiz, Maria C; Kidwell, Kelley M; Aung, Kimberly; Thomas, Dafydd G; Brown, Martha E; Abramson, Vandana G; Irvin, William J; Lin, Nancy U; Liu, Minetta C; Nanda, Rita; Nangia, Julie R; Storniolo, Anna M; Traina, Tiffany A; Vaklavas, Christos; Van Poznak, Catherine H; Wolff, Antonio C; Forero-Torres, Andres; Hayes, Daniel F

    2015-06-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are prognostic in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We tested whether EpCAM-based capture system (CellSearch) is effective in patients with triple-negative (TN) MBC, and whether CTC apoptosis and clustering enhances the prognostic role of CTC. CTC enumeration and apoptosis were determined using the CXC CellSearch kit at baseline and days 15 and 29 in blood drawn from TN MBC patients who participated in a prospective randomized phase II trial of nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) with or without tigatuzumab. Association between levels of CTC and patient outcomes was assessed using logistic regression, Kaplan-Meier curves, and Cox proportional hazards modeling. Nineteen of 52 (36.5%), 14 of 52 (26.9%), and 13 of 49 (26.5%) patients who were evaluable had elevated CTC (≥5 CTC/7.5 mL whole blood) at baseline and at days 15 and 29, respectively. Patients with elevated versus not elevated CTC at each time point had worse progression-free survival (PFS; P = 0.005, 0.0003, 0.0002, respectively). The odds of clinical benefit response for those who had elevated versus low CTC at baseline and days 15 and 29 were 0.25 (95% CI: 0.08-0.84; P = 0.024), 0.19 (95% CI: 0.05-0.17; P = 0.014), and 0.06 (95% CI: 0.01-0.33; P = 0.001), respectively. There was no apparent prognostic effect comparing CTC apoptosis versus non-apoptosis. Presence of CTC cluster at day 15 and day 29 was associated with shorter PFS. CTC were detected using CellSearch assay in approximately one-third of TN MBC patients. Elevated CTC at baseline and days 15 and 29 were prognostic, and reductions in CTC levels reflected response. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Ifosfamide in combination with paclitaxel or doxorubicin: regimens which effectively mobilize peripheral blood progenitor cells while demonstrating anti-tumor activity in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Prince, H M; Gardyn, J; Millward, M J; Rischin, D; Francis, P; Gates, P; Chapple, P; Quinn, M; Juneja, S; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, E H; Richardson, G; Scarlett, J; Briggs, P; Brettell, M; Toner, G C

    1999-03-01

    For patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who undergo high-dose therapy with autologous peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation, an important prerequisite is a mobilization regimen that efficiently mobilizes PBPCs while producing an effective anti-tumor effect. We prospectively evaluated ifosfamide-based chemotherapy for mobilization efficiency, toxicity and disease response in 37 patients. Patients received two cycles of the ifosfamide-based regimen; ifosfamide (5 g/m2 with conventional-dose cycle and 6 g/m2 with mobilization cycle) with either 50 mg/m2 doxorubicin (if limited prior anthracycline and/or progression more than 12 months after an anthracycline-based regimen) or 175 mg/m2 paclitaxel. For the mobilization cycle, all patients received additional G-CSF (10 microg/kg SC, daily) commencing 24 h after completion of chemotherapy. The target yield was >6x10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, sufficient to support the subsequent three cycles of high-dose therapy. The mobilization therapy was well tolerated and the peak days for peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells were days 10-13 with no significant differences in the PB CD34+ cells mobilization kinetics between the ifosfamide-doxorubicin vs. ifosfamide-paclitaxel regimens. The median PBPC CD34+ cell content ranged from 2.9 to 4.0x10(6)/kg per day during days 9-14. After a median of 3 (range 1-5) collection days, the median total CD34+ cell, CFU-GM and MNC for all 44 individual sets of collections was 9.2x10(6)/kg (range 0.16-54.9), 37x10(4)/kg (range 5.7-247) and 7.3x10(8)/kg (range 2.1-26.1), respectively. The PBPC target yield was achieved in 35 of the 37 patients. The overall response rate for the 31 evaluable patients was 68% with 10% having progressive disease. Thirty-three patients have subsequently received high-dose therapy consisting of three planned cycles of high-dose ifosfamide, thiotepa and paclitaxel with each cycle supported with PBPCs. Rapid neutrophil and platelet recovery has been

  1. Oncolytic Reovirus in Combination With Chemotherapy in Metastatic or Recurrent Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With KRAS-Activated Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.; Lam, Elaine; Otterson, Gregory A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Timmons, Matthew; Subramaniam, Deepa; Hade, Erinn M.; Gill, George M.; Coffey, Matthew; Selvaggi, Giovanni; Bertino, Erin; Chao, Bo; Knopp, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The type 3 Dearing reovirus (Reolysin) is a naturally occurring virus that preferentially infects and causes oncolysis in tumor cells with a Ras-activated pathway. It induces host immunity and cell cycle arrest and acts synergistically with cytotoxic agents. METHODS This study evaluated Reolysin combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with metastatic/recurrent KRAS-mutated or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mutated/amplified non–small cell lung cancer. RESULTS Thirty-seven patients were treated. Molecular alterations included 20 KRAS mutations, 10 EGFR amplifications, 3 EGFR mutations, and 4 BRAF-V600E mutations. In total, 242 cycles (median, 4; range, 1-47) were completed. The initial doses were area under the curve (AUC) 6 mg/mL/min for carboplatin, 200 mg/m2 for paclitaxel on day 1, and 3×1010 50% tissue culture infective dose for Reolysin on days 1 to 5 of each 21-day cycle. Because of diarrhea and febrile neutropenia (in the first 2 patients), subsequent doses were reduced to 175 mg/m2 for paclitaxel and AUC 5 mg/mL/min for carboplatin. Toxicities included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, neutropenia, arthralgia/myalgia, anorexia, and electrolyte abnormalities. Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.0 responses included the following: partial response for 11 patients, stable disease (SD) for 20 patients, progressive disease for 4 patients, and not evaluable for 2 patients (objective response rate, 31%; 90% 1-sided lower confidence interval, 21%). Four SD patients had >40% positron emission tomography standardized uptake value reductions. The median progression-free survival, median overall survival, and 12-month overall survival rate were 4 months, 13.1 months, and 57%, respectively. Seven patients were alive after a median follow-up of 34.2 months; they included 2 patients without disease progression at 37 and 50 months. CONCLUSIONS Reolysin in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin was well tolerated. The

  2. Limitation of liver function tests in metastatic carcinoid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moinuddin, M.; Dean, P.; Vander Zwaag, R.; Dragutsky, M.

    1987-04-01

    To evaluate the utility of liver function tests (LFT) as indicators of metastatic carcinoid tumors, a retrospective study was performed. The LFT results of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors metastatic to the liver were compared with 17 patients with other malignant tumors. In the noncarcinoid group, 82.4% of the patients had elevated alkaline phosphatase (AP) or gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), whereas only 28.6% of carcinoid patients had abnormal enzymes. The medians of all LFT values were significantly higher in noncarcinoid patients than in the carcinoid group, except for glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT). Our data indicate that LFT are helpful in screening for liver metastases in patients with noncarcinoid tumors, but are unreliable in carcinoid tumors. Imaging tests should be used to rule out liver metastases in carcinoid tumors, irrespective of LFT results.

  3. The dual role of TLR3 in metastatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Tanja; Pavelic, Jasminka

    2011-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are members of transmembrane proteins that recognize conserved molecular motifs of viral and bacterial origin and initiate innate immune response. As the role of TLRs in tumors cells is still not clear, our aim was to investigate the role of TLR3 in primary tumor and metastatic cells (SW480, SW620, FaDu and Detroit 562). We have reported here on the dual role of TLR3 in pharynx metastatic cell line (Detroit 562); on one hand TLR3 activation drove cells to apoptosis while on the other its stimulation contributed to tumor progression by altering the expression of tumor promoting genes (PLAUR, RORB) and enhancing the cell migration potential. In addition, we have shown TLR3 signaling pathway is functional in another metastatic cancer cell line (SW620) suggesting TLR3 might be important in the process of tumor metastasis. Since TLR3 agonists have been used in tumor therapy with the aim to activate immune system, scientific contribution of this work is drawing attention to the importance of further work on this topic, especially pro-tumor effect of TLR3, in order to avoid possible side-effects.

  4. Concordance of ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) immunohistochemistry between biopsy or metastatic tumor samples and primary tumors in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Sung; Kim, Min A; Hodgson, Darren; Harbron, Christopher; Wellings, Robert; O'Connor, Mark J; Womack, Christopher; Yin, Xiaolu; Bang, Yung-Jue; Im, Seok-Ah; Lee, Byung Lan; Kim, Woo Ho

    2013-01-01

    ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) is one of several DNA repair proteins that are suggested to sensitize tumor cells to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib when deficient. The aim of this study was to assess the spatiotemporal concordance of ATM immunohistochemistry (IHC) in gastric cancer in order to determine if measurements made at the level of various sample types and times could be inferred as having the potential to be relevant to treatment decisions made at the patient level. Two independent cohorts composed of 591 gastric cancer patients divided into a gastrectomy cohort (n = 450) and a metastasis cohort (n = 141) were used in this study. A total of 2,705 ATM IHC samples were examined, including 450 whole tissue, 3 sets of 450 tissue microarray (TMA), 301 biopsy, 222 metastatic tumor and 2 additional whole tissue samples of 50 cases from the gastrectomy cohort, and 141 pairs of primary and metastatic tumors from the metastasis cohort. The prevalence of ATM negativity was 13.1% in biopsies, 13.9, 15.1, and 16.0% in TMAs and 15.9% in whole tissue samples of the gastrectomy cohort, and 21.4% in primary tumor and 21.5% in metastatic tumor samples of the metastasis cohort. coefficients were 0.341 for biopsy, 0.572 as the average of 3 TMAs and 0.415 for the largely synchronous metastatic tumors of the gastrectomy cohort, and 0.153 for the largely asynchronous metastatic tumors of the metastasis cohort. Using whole tissue sections from tumor resections or primary tumor, respectively, as the reference standards, specificity and sensitivity were 91.6 and 41.0% for biopsy, 93.9 and 61.9% as the average of 3 TMAs, and 86.6 and 58.8% for metastatic tumors of the gastrectomy cohort and 81.7 and 33.3% for metastatic tumors of the metastasis cohort, respectively. Although we have demonstrated that the IHC assay for ATM was robust and reproducible in gastric tumor samples, we have also found that measurements were subject to significant discordance across

  5. Percutaneous Sacroplasty for Sacral Metastatic Tumors Under Fluoroscopic Guidance Only

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji; Gu, Yi-feng; Li, Ming-hua

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous sacroplasty is a safe and effective procedure for sacral insufficient fractures under CT or fluoroscopic guidance; although, few reports exist about sacral metastatic tumors. We designed a pilot study to treat intractable pain caused by a sacral metastatic tumor with sacroplasty. A 62-year-old man and a 38-year-old woman with medically intractable pain due to metastatic tumors of S1 from lymphoma and lung cancer, respectively, underwent percutaneous sacroplasty. Over the course of the follow-up period, the two patients experienced substantial and immediate pain relief that persisted over a 3-month and beyond. The woman had deposition of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) in the needle track, but did not experience significant symptoms. No other peri-procedural complications were observed for either patient. PMID:19039277

  6. PAX 8 expression in non-neoplastic tissues, primary tumors, and metastatic tumors: a comprehensive immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Ayhan; Shen, Steven S; Hamilton, Candice; Anjana, Kundu; Coffey, Donna; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Truong, Luan D

    2011-06-01

    PAX 8 is a transcription factor that is essential for embryonic development of the kidney, Müllerian organs, and thyroid. It may also have a role in tumor development in these organs. The diagnostic utility of PAX 8 has not been comprehensively studied. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples for non-neoplastic tissues (n=1601), primary neoplasms (n=933), and metastatic neoplasms (n=496) were subjected to PAX 8 immunostain. In non-neoplastic tissues, PAX 8 was consistently noted in glomerular parietal epithelial cells, renal collecting ductal cells, atrophic renal tubular epithelial cells regardless of nephronic segments, and epithelial cells of the endocervix, endometrium, fallopian tube, seminal vesicle, epidydimis, thyroid, pancreatic islet cells, and lymphoid cells. PAX 8 was not seen in the rest of the tissue samples. In primary neoplasms, PAX 8 was expressed by 194 of 240 (89%) renal cell neoplasms, by 238 of 267 (89%) Müllerian-type neoplasms, by 65 of 65 (100%) thyroid follicular cell neoplasms, by 8 of 8 (100%) nephrogenic adenomas, and by 17 of 17 (100%) lymphomas. Weak focal staining was noted in 5 of 12 (42%) cases of parathyroid hyperplasia/adenoma and in 6 of 17 (35%) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas. PAX 8 was not seen in other neoplasms. In metastatic neoplasms, PAX 8 was expressed by 90 of 102 (88%) metastatic renal cell carcinomas, by 57 of 63 metastatic Müllerian tumors (90%), and by 6 of 6 metastatic papillary thyroid carcinomas (100%). There was also weak focal staining for 1 of 15 metastatic small cell carcinomas and for 1 of 9 metastatic well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. PAX 8 was not seen in other metastatic neoplasms. It can be successfully identified in routinely processed tissue samples, and its expression is mostly nuclear. PAX 8 expression in non-neoplastic mature tissues is limited to the organs, the embryonic development of which depends on this transcription factor. This tissue/cell

  7. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  8. Non-overlapping activities of ADF and cofilin-1 during the migration of metastatic breast tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADF/cofilin proteins are key modulators of actin dynamics in metastasis and invasion of cancer cells. Here we focused on the roles of ADF and cofilin-1 individually in the development of polarized migration of rat mammary adenocarcinoma (MTLn3) cells, which express nearly equal amounts of each protein. Small interference RNA (siRNA) technology was used to knockdown (KD) the expression of ADF and cofilin-1 independently. Results Either ADF KD or cofilin KD caused cell elongation, a reduction in cell area, a decreased ability to form invadopodia, and a decreased percentage of polarized cells after 180 s of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Moreover, ADF KD or cofilin KD increased the rate of cell migration and the time of lamellipodia protrusion but through different mechanisms: lamellipodia protrude more frequently in ADF KD cells and are more persistent in cofilin KD cells. ADF KD cells showed a significant increase in F-actin aggregates, whereas cofilin KD cells showed a significant increase in prominent F-actin bundles and increased cell adhesion. Focal adhesion area and cell adhesion in cofilin KD cells were returned to control levels by expressing exogenous cofilin but not ADF. Return to control rates of cell migration in ADF KD cells was achieved by expression of exogenous ADF but not cofilin, whereas in cofilin KD cells, expression of cofilin efficiently rescued control migration rates. Conclusion Although ADF and cofilin have many redundant functions, each of these isoforms has functional differences that affect F-actin structures, cell adhesion and lamellipodial dynamics, all of which are important determinants of cell migration. PMID:24093776

  9. Clinical Significance of Early Changes in Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients Receiving First-Line Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy for Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Emanuela; Necchi, Andrea; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Colecchia, Maurizio; Raggi, Daniele; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic paradigm of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) is rapidly shifting and new biomarkers are needed to enhance patient selection. Objective: Early identification of dynamic predictors of outcome may be a key to optimize the sequence of effective therapies in metastatic UC patients. Methods: Blood samples from patients receiving first-line MVAC chemotherapy were collected at baseline (T0) and after 2 cycles (T2). Samples were processed by immunomagnetic beads (AdnaTest ProstateCancerSelect kit) and the expression of EPCAM, MUC1 and ERBB2 was studied using multiplex-PCR. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) positivity and cutoffs, obtained by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis in healthy donors, were: ≥1 positive marker among EPCAM (≥0.40 ng/μl), MUC1 (≥0.10 ng/μl) and ERBB2 (≥0.20 ng/μl). CTC variation (T0/T2) was split in favorable (+/–, –/–, –/+) and unfavorable groups (+/+). Cox regression analyses evaluated associations with clinical factors. Results: In this pilot study to assess a new CTC detection method, among 31 evaluable patients, 17 (54.8%) were CTC-positive at T0. No association was found between CTC and objective response to MVAC. CTC dynamic changes better predicted 3-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to CTC status assessed at single time points. Unfavorable trend was univariably detrimental on 3-year PFS (10% vs. 49.2%, p = 0.006) and OS (20% vs. 63.5%, p = 0.017). Significance was maintained after controlling for liver metastases (p = 0.031 and p = 0.025 for PFS and OS) and MSKCC score (p = 0.014 and 0.025). Conclusions: Newly described early CTC changes during chemotherapy might be useful to improve our prognostic ability. Pending validation, these results could fulfill the promise to help accelerating therapeutic sequences. PMID:28035320

  10. KLF4-dependent perivascular cell plasticity mediates pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Murgai, Meera; Ju, Wei; Eason, Matthew; Kline, Jessica; Beury, Daniel W; Kaczanowska, Sabina; Miettinen, Markku M; Kruhlak, Michael; Lei, Haiyan; Shern, Jack F; Cherepanova, Olga A; Owens, Gary K; Kaplan, Rosandra N

    2017-10-01

    A deeper understanding of the metastatic process is required for the development of new therapies that improve patient survival. Metastatic tumor cell growth and survival in distant organs is facilitated by the formation of a pre-metastatic niche that is composed of hematopoietic cells, stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM). Perivascular cells, including vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) and pericytes, are involved in new vessel formation and in promoting stem cell maintenance and proliferation. Given the well-described plasticity of perivascular cells, we hypothesized that perivascular cells similarly regulate tumor cell fate at metastatic sites. We used perivascular-cell-specific and pericyte-specific lineage-tracing models to trace the fate of perivascular cells in the pre-metastatic and metastatic microenvironments. We show that perivascular cells lose the expression of traditional vSMC and pericyte markers in response to tumor-secreted factors and exhibit increased proliferation, migration and ECM synthesis. Increased expression of the pluripotency gene Klf4 in these phenotypically switched perivascular cells promoted a less differentiated state, characterized by enhanced ECM production, that established a pro-metastatic fibronectin-rich environment. Genetic inactivation of Klf4 in perivascular cells decreased formation of a pre-metastatic niche and metastasis. Our data revealed a previously unidentified role for perivascular cells in pre-metastatic niche formation and uncovered novel strategies for limiting metastasis.

  11. T Cells Induce Pre-Metastatic Osteolytic Disease and Help Bone Metastases Establishment in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Leal, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Mercadante, Ana Carolina T.; Kestelman, Fabiola; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Monteiro, João P.; Bonomo, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases, present in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer, lead to skeletal disease, fractures and intense pain, which are all believed to be mediated by tumor cells. Engraftment of tumor cells is supposed to be preceded by changes in the target tissue to create a permissive microenvironment, the pre-metastatic niche, for the establishment of the metastatic foci. In bone metastatic niche, metastatic cells stimulate bone consumption resulting in the release of growth factors that feed the tumor, establishing a vicious cycle between the bone remodeling system and the tumor itself. Yet, how the pre-metastatic niches arise in the bone tissue remains unclear. Here we show that tumor-specific T cells induce osteolytic bone disease before bone colonization. T cells pro-metastatic activity correlate with a pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine profile, including RANKL, a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo inhibition of RANKL from tumor-specific T cells completely blocks bone loss and metastasis. Our results unveil an unexpected role for RANKL-derived from T cells in setting the pre-metastatic niche and promoting tumor spread. We believe this information can bring new possibilities for the development of prognostic and therapeutic tools based on modulation of T cell activity for prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:23935856

  12. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  13. Detection of circulating tumor cells in blood of metastatic breast cancer patients using a combination of cytokeratin and EpCAM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are detectable in peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC). In this paper we evaluate a new CTC separation method based on a combination of anti-EpCAM- and anti-cytokeratin magnetic cell separation with the aim to improve CTC detection with low target antigen densities. Methods Blood samples of healthy donors spiked with breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used to determine accuracy and precision of the method. 10 healthy subjects were examined to evaluate specificity. CTC counts in 59 patients with MBC were measured to evaluate the prognostic value on overall survival. Results Regression analysis of numbers of recovered vs. spiked HCC1937 cells yielded a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.957. The average percentage of cell recovery was 84%. The average within-run coefficient of variation for spiking of 185, 85 and 30 cells was 14%. For spiking of 10 cells the within-run CV was 30%. No CTCs were detected in blood of 10 healthy subjects examined. A standard threshold of 5 CTC/7.5 ml blood as a cut-off point between risk groups led to a highly significant prognostic marker (p < 0.001). To assess the prognostic value of medium CTC levels we additionally considered a low (CTC-L: 0 CTC), a medium (CTC-M: 1–4 CTC) and a high risk group (CTC-H: ≥5 CTC). The effect of this CTC-LMH marker on overall survival was significant as well (p < 0.001). A log-ratio test performed to compare the model with 3 vs. the model with 2 risk groups rejected the model with 2 risk groups (p = 0.026). For CTC as a count variable, we propose an offset reciprocal transformation 1/(1 + x) for overall survival prediction (p < 0.001). Conclusions We show that our CTC detection method is feasible and leads to accurate and reliable results. Our data suggest that a refined differentiation between patients with different CTC levels is reasonable. PMID:22646670

  14. Variable expression levels of keratin and vimentin reveal differential EMT status of circulating tumor cells and correlation with clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Polioudaki, Hara; Agelaki, Sofia; Chiotaki, Rena; Politaki, Eleni; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Matikas, Alexios; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Theodoropoulos, Panayiotis A

    2015-05-13

    CTCs expressing variable levels of epithelial and mesenchymal markers in breast cancer have previously been reported. However, no information exists for keratin expression levels of CTCs in association with disease status, whereas assays for the characterization of transitional EMT phenotypes of CTCs in breast cancer are rather lacking. We investigated the correlation between keratin expression of CTCs and patients' outcome and characterized the EMT status of CTCs via the establishment of a numerical "ratio" value of keratin and vimentin expression levels on a single cell basis. Keratin expression was evaluated in 1262 CTCs from 61 CTC-positive patients with metastatic breast cancer, using analysis of images obtained through the CellSearch System. For the determination of vimentin/keratin (vim/K) ratios, expression levels of keratin and vimentin were measured in cytospin preparations of luminal (MCF-7 and T47D) and basal (MDA.MB231 and Hs578T) breast cancer cell lines and 110 CTCs from 5 CTC-positive patients using triple immunofluorescence laser scanning microscopy and image analysis. MCF-7 and T47D displayed lower vim/K ratios compared to MDA.MB231 and Hs578T cells, while MCF-7 cells that had experimentally undergone EMT were characterized by varying intermediate vim/K ratios. CTCs were consisted of an heterogeneous population presenting variable vim/K values with 46% of them being in the range of luminal breast cancer cell lines. Keratin expression levels of CTCs detected by the CellSearch System correlated with triple negative (p = 0.039) and ER-negative (p = 0.025) breast cancer, and overall survival (p = 0.038). Keratin expression levels of CTCs correlate with tumor characteristics and clinical outcome. Moreover, CTCs display significant heterogeneity in terms of the degree of EMT phenotype that probably reflects differential invasive potential. The assessment of the vim/K ratios as a surrogate marker for the EMT status of CTCs merits further investigation as

  15. Tumor Genetic Analyses of Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and Extended Benefit from mTOR Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Martin H.; Hakimi, A. Ari; Pham, Can G.; Brannon, A. Rose; Chen, Ying-Bei; Cunha, Luis F.; Akin, Oguz; Liu, Han; Takeda, Shugaku; Scott, Sasinya N.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Viale, Agnes; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Reuter, Victor E.; Russo, Paul; Cheng, Emily H.; Motzer, Robert J.; Berger, Michael F.; Hsieh, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Rapalogs are allosteric mTOR inhibitors and approved agents for advanced kidney cancer. Reports of clonal heterogeneity in this disease challenge the concept of targeted monotherapy, yet a small subset of patients derives extended benefit. Our aim was to analyze such outliers and explore the genomic background of extreme rapalog sensitivity in the context of intratumor heterogeneity. Experimental Design We analyzed archived tumor tissue of five RCC patients, who previously achieved durable disease control with rapalogs (median duration 28 months). DNA was extracted from spatially separate areas of primary tumors and metastases. Custom target capture and ultra-deep sequencing was used to identify alterations across 230 target genes. Whole exome sequence analysis was added to investigate genes beyond this original target list. Results Five long-term responders contributed 14 specimens to explore clonal heterogeneity. Genomic alterations with activating effect on mTOR signaling were detected in 11 of 14 specimens, offering plausible explanation for exceptional treatment response through alterations in two genes (TSC1, MTOR). In two subjects, distinct yet functionally convergent alterations activated the mTOR pathway in spatially separate sites. In one patient, concurrent genomic events occurred in two separate pathway components across different tumor regions. Conclusions Analysis of outlier cases can facilitate identification of potential biomarkers for targeted agents, and we implicate two genes as candidates for further study in this class of drugs. The previously reported phenomenon of clonal convergence can occur within a targetable pathway which might have implications for biomarker development beyond this disease and this class of agents. PMID:24622468

  16. Alternating electric fields (TTFields) inhibit metastatic spread of solid tumors to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Kirson, Eilon D; Giladi, Moshe; Gurvich, Zoya; Itzhaki, Aviran; Mordechovich, Daniel; Schneiderman, Rosa S; Wasserman, Yoram; Ryffel, Bernhard; Goldsher, Dorit; Palti, Yoram

    2009-01-01

    Tumor treating fields (TTFields) are low intensity, intermediate frequency, alternating electric fields used to treat cancerous tumors. This novel treatment modality effectively inhibits the growth of solid tumors in vivo and has shown promise in pilot clinical trials in patients with advanced stage solid tumors. TTFields were tested for their potential to inhibit metastatic spread of solid tumors to the lungs in two animal models: (1) Mice injected with malignant melanoma cells (B16F10) into the tail vein, (2) New Zealand White rabbits implanted with VX-2 tumors within the kidney capsule. Mice and rabbits were treated using two-directional TTFields at 100-200 kHz. Animals were either monitored for survival, or sacrificed for pathological and histological analysis of the lungs. The total number of lung surface metastases and the absolute weight of the lungs were both significantly lower in TTFields treated mice then in sham control mice. TTFields treated rabbits survived longer than sham control animals. This extension in survival was found to be due to an inhibition of metastatic spread, seeding or growth in the lungs of TTFields treated rabbits compared to controls. Histologically, extensive peri- and intra-tumoral immune cell infiltration was seen in TTFields treated rabbits only. These results raise the possibility that in addition to their proven inhibitory effect on the growth of solid tumors, TTFields may also have clinical benefit in the prevention of metastatic spread from primary tumors.

  17. [Testicular germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Dourthe, L M; Ouachet, M; Fizazi, K; Droz, J P

    1998-09-01

    Testicle germ cells tumors are the most common young men neoplasm. The incidence is maximal in Scandinavian countries. Cryptorchidism is a predisposing factor. Diagnosis is clinic, first treatment is radical orchidectomy by inguinal incision, after study of tumor markers. Histology shows seminoma or non seminomatous tumor. Carcinoma in situ is the precursor of invasive germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors have no p53 mutation, and have isochrome of the short arm of chromosome 12 as a specific marker. With the results of histological, biochemical and radiographic evaluation, patient are classified as follows: good, intermediate and poor risk prognosis. Standard treatment of stage I seminoma is prophylactic irradiation. Stage II with less than 3 cm lymph node too. Other situations need a cisplatin based chemotherapy. In case of metastatic residuals masses more than 3 cm, surgery need to be discussed. Stage I non seminomatous germ cell tumors are treated by retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, by surveillance or by two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (BEP). Standard treatment of good prognosis stage II and III is three cycles of BEP, four for poor prognosis. Residual mass need surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary in presence of viable germ cell. Standard treatment for relapses is chemotherapy with cisplatin, ifosfamide and vinblastine with a 30% remission rate. The place of high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation is not yet standardised. New drugs, as paclitaxel, are under studies.

  18. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  19. Giant metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bognet, Rachel; Thompson, Christina; Campanelli, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with a rapidly growing, asymptomatic mass on his left mid-back for the past 3 months. The patient's medical history revealed an intentional 60-pound weight loss over the previous 2 years along with smoking approximately 1 pack of cigarettes per day. On physical examination, a fungating, 11-cm red tumor with palpable broader underlying extension (23 cm total) was present on the left mid-back with distinct red dermal nodules in a dermatomal distribution. In close proximity were two ulcerated nodules, proven histologically to be basal cell carcinomas. In the left groin was massive, fixed lymphadenopathy. A punch biopsy of the tumor was performed, which showed a dense infiltrate of small, round hyperchromatic blue cells that stained positive for CD 56 and pancytokeratin in a perinuclear dot pattern. Tumor cells were negative for CK20, TTF, CK7, and LCA.

  20. Tumoral Melanosis Associated with Pembrolizumab-Treated Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2017-01-01

    Tumoral melanosis is a form of completely regressed melanoma that usually presents as darkly pigmented lesions suspicious for malignant melanoma. Histology reveals dense dermal and subcutaneous infiltration of melanophages. Pembrolizumab is an antibody directed against programmed death receptor-1 (PD1) and is frontline treatment for advanced melanoma. An 81-year-old man with metastatic melanoma treated with pembrolizumab who developed tumoral melanosis at previous sites of metastases is described. The PubMed database was searched with the key words: antibody, immunotherapy, melanoma, melanosis, metastasis, pembrolizumab, and tumoral. The papers generated by the search and their references were reviewed. The patient was initially diagnosed with lentigo maligna melanoma on the left cheek three years earlier, and he was treated with wide local excision. The patient was subsequently diagnosed with epidermotropic metastatic malignant melanoma on the left parietal scalp 14 months later and was treated with wide local excision. Three months later, the patient was found to have metastatic melanoma in the same area of the scalp and was started on pembrolizumab immunotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with tumoral melanosis in the site of previous metastases nine months later. The patient remained free of disease 13 months after starting pembrolizumab. Tumoral melanosis may mimic malignant melanoma; hence a workup, including skin biopsy, should be undertaken. Extensive tumoral melanosis has been reported with ipilimumab, and we add a case following treatment with pembrolizumab. Additional cases of tumoral melanosis may present since immunotherapy has become frontline therapy for advanced melanoma.  PMID:28348944

  1. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  2. Identification of high independent prognostic value of nanotechnology based circulating tumor cell enumeration in first-line chemotherapy for metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ran; Shao, Bin; Peng, Jia-Xi; Li, Hui-Ping; Yang, Yan-Lian; Kong, Wei-Yao; Song, Guo-Hong; Jiang, Han-Fang; Liang, Xu; Yan, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a promising tool in the management of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). This study investigated the capturing efficiency and prognostic value of our previously reported peptide-based nanomagnetic CTC isolation system (Pep@MNPs). We counted CTCs in blood samples taken at baseline (n = 102) and later at patients' first clinical evaluation after starting firstline chemotherapy (n = 72) in a cohort of women treated for MBC. Their median follow-up was 16.3 months (range: 9.0-31.0 months). The CTC detection rate was 69.6 % for the baseline samples. Patients with ≤2 CTC/2 ml at baseline had longer median progression-free survival (PFS) than did those with >2 CTC/2 ml (17.0 months vs. 8.0 months; P = 0.002). Patients with ≤2 CTC/2 ml both at baseline and first clinical evaluation had longest PFS (18.2 months) among all patient groups (P = 0.004). Particularly, among patients with stable disease (SD; per imaging evaluation) our assay could identify those with longer PFS (P < 0.001). Patients with >2 CTC/2 ml at baseline were also significantly more likely to suffer liver metastasis (P = 0.010). This study confirmed the prognostic value of Pep@MNPs assays for MBC patients who undergo firstline chemotherapy, and offered extra stratification regarding PFS for patients with SD, and a possible indicator for patients at risk for liver metastasis.

  3. The Added Value of Circulating Tumor Cell Enumeration to Standard Markers in Assessing Prognosis in a Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Population.

    PubMed

    Heller, Glenn; Fizazi, Karim; McCormack, Robert; Molina, Arturo; MacLean, David; Webb, Iain J; Saad, Fred; de Bono, Johann S; Scher, Howard I

    2016-09-27

    Purpose: Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is a heterogeneous disease for which better prognostic models for survival are needed. We examined the added value of circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration relative to common prognostic laboratory measures from patients with CRPC.Methods: Utility of CTC enumeration as a baseline and postbaseline prognostic biomarker was examined using data from two prospective randomized registration-directed trials (COU-AA-301 and ELM-PC4) within statistical models used to estimate risk for survival. Discrimination and calibration were used to measure model predictive accuracy and the added value for CTC enumeration in the context of a Cox model containing albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), PSA, hemoglobin, and alkaline phosphatase (ALK). Discrimination quantifies how accurately a risk model predicts short-term versus long-term survivors. Calibration measures the closeness of actual survival time to the predicted survival time.Results: Adding CTC enumeration to a model containing albumin, LDH, PSA, hemoglobin, and ALK ("ALPHA") improved its discriminatory power. The weighted c-index for ALPHA without CTCs was 0.72 (SE, 0.02) versus 0.75 (SE, 0.02) for ALPHA + CTCs. The increase in discrimination was restricted to the lower-risk cohort. In terms of calibration, adding CTCs produced a more accurate model-based prediction of patient survival. The absolute prediction error for ALPHA was 3.95 months (SE, 0.28) versus 3.75 months (SE, 0.22) for ALPHA + CTCs.Conclusion: Addition of CTC enumeration to standard measures provides more accurate assessment of patient risk in terms of baseline and postbaseline prognosis in the mCRPC population. Clin Cancer Res; 1-7. ©2016 AACR.

  4. A Statistical Approach to Determine the Optimal Duration of Post-Treatment Follow-Up: Application to Metastatic Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Somda, Serge M A; Culine, Stéphane; Chevreau, Christine; Fizazi, Karim; Leconte, Eve; Kramar, Andrew; Filleron, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to present a statistical method to define an optimal duration of follow-up for patients in remission after treatment for cancer, for detection of recurrences. Surveillance duration was estimated using the 2-step approach proposed by Mould et al. Relapse-free interval was modeled using the parametric cure model proposed by Boag. The optimal length of follow-up was then estimated as the minimal elapsed time after which the probability of a patient to relapse and to be cured with success is below a given threshold value. The method is applied to 2 real data sets of patients treated for metastatic non seminomatous germ-cell tumors: T93BP and T93MP. For the T93BP, cure rate was estimated at 91.3% and proportions of patients who relapsed after 3 and 5 years were estimated at 0.5% and 0.2%. With a probability of success of salvage treatment equal to 80% and 50%, numbers of delayed cases after 5 years were 2 and 1. For T93MP, the proportion of patients who presented relapse after 5 and 10 years were estimated at 5.2% and 2.6%. Considering a probability of salvage treatment equal to 20%, the number of delayed cases after 5 and 10 years were 10 and 5. Using this methodology, duration of post-therapeutic follow-up might be tailored according to an objective criteria: the number of patients who present relapse after the end of follow-up and who could have been treated with success in case of early detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  6. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  7. Escape from Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    3 ESCAPE FROM TUMOR CELL DORMANCY An Organotypic Liver System to Study Tumor Cell Dormancy Alan Wells and Donna Stolz (UPitt), Linda Griffith (MIT...insights into dormancy and the transition that heralds metastatic emergenceis due mainly to the lack of tractable experimental systems with which to... systems are being optimized in others. The main efforts during the first year of this two-year project have been focused on the establishing the

  8. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  9. Marine algal fucoxanthin inhibits the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Choi, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Jeong, Han-Sol; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Joo, Myungsoo; Choi, Jun-Yong; Han, Chang-Woo; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Sue; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2013-10-04

    Metastasis is major cause of malignant cancer-associated mortality. Fucoxanthin has effect on various pharmacological activities including anti-cancer activity. However, the inhibitory effect of fucoxanthin on cancer metastasis remains unclear. Here, we show that fucoxanthin isolated from brown alga Saccharina japonica has anti-metastatic activity. To check anti-metastatic properties of fucoxanthin, in vitro models including assays for invasion, migration, actin fiber organization and cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction were used. Fucoxanthin inhibited the expression and secretion of MMP-9 which plays a critical role in tumor invasion and migration, and also suppressed invasion of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells as evidenced by transwell invasion assay. In addition, fucoxanthin diminished the expressions of the cell surface glycoprotein CD44 and CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) which play roles in migration, invasion and cancer-endothelial cell adhesion. Fucoxanthin markedly suppressed cell migration in wound healing assay and inhibited actin fiber formation. The adhesion of B16-F10 melanoma cells to the endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by fucoxanthin. Moreover, in experimental lung metastasis in vivo assay, fucoxanthin resulted in significant reduction of tumor nodules. Taken together, we demonstrate, for the first time, that fucoxanthin suppresses metastasis of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  11. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process. PMID:27683421

  12. In vivo echographic evidence of tumoral vascularization and microenvironment interactions in metastatic orthotopic human neuroblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jean-Marc; Gross, Nicole; Lassau, Nathalie; Rouffiac, Valérie; Opolon, Paule; Laudani, Lysiane; Auderset, Katya; Geay, Jean-François; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Vassal, Gilles

    2005-03-01

    Human neuroblastoma (NB) is the second most frequent solid tumor of childhood and represents a highly heterogeneous disease at clinical and biologic levels. Little progress has been made to improve the poor prognosis of patients with high-stage NB. Tumor progression and metastatic dissemination still represent major obstacles to the successful treatment of advanced stage disease. In order to develop and evaluate new, targeted, therapeutic strategies, fully defined and biologically relevant in vivo models of NB are strongly needed. We have developed an orthotopic model of metastatic human NB in the nude mouse, using 2 well-characterized NB cell lines. Tumor growth, vascular properties and metastatic patterns were investigated using a sensitive and newly developed in vivo echographic technology in addition to immunohistochemistry and PCR analyses. Results show that implantation of low numbers of NB cells directly into the adrenal gland of nude mice resulted in rapid and homogeneous tumor growth without tumor morbidity. Nude mice were shown to rapidly develop highly vascularized adrenal tumors that selectively metastasized to the liver and bone marrow. In addition, the newly formed mouse vessels in orthotopic but not in heterotopic tumors, were found to express the highly angiogenic alphavbeta3 integrin marker, indicating the development of a truly malignant neovasculature in orthotopic conditions only. This observation confirms the impact of the regional microenvironment on tumor biology and suggests the existence of cross-talk with the tumor cells. In conclusion, such model faithfully reproduces the growth, vascular and metastatic patterns as observed in patients. It therefore represents a powerful and biologically relevant tool to improve our understanding of the biology of NB and to develop and assess new antiangiogenic and metastasis-targeted therapies. (c) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  14. [Surgery of metastatic brain tumors with new surgical instruments].

    PubMed

    Nomura, K; Shibui, S; Matsuoka, K; Watanabe, T; Nakamura, O

    1987-05-01

    The risk of damages of neurological function by the operation of metastatic brain tumors was reduced considerably after introduction of neurosurgical apparatuses, such as ultrasonograph, ultrasonic surgical aspirator and laser scalpel. Of these, ultrasonograph is useful to indicate the exact location of brain tumor at real time during the operation. Ultrasonic surgical aspirator reduced the risk of damage on important brain structures due to the selectivity of fragmentation and the safety of the dissection in the vicinity of important vessels and nerve tissues. Laser scalpel is also useful to extirpate the hemorrhagic tumor with hard consistency. Cases introduced in this paper were: case 1, brain metastasis from lung cancer located just under the left motor area in brain; case 2, metastasis with abundant neovascularization from renal cancer to orbital cavity which showed invasion to orbital roof and frontal bone; case 3, radiation induced sarcoma after the treatment of retinoblastoma; case 4, a large cerebellar metastatic tumor; case 5, neurogenic sarcoma which were successfully removed by using one of or combination of ultrasonograph, ultrasonic aspirator and laser scalpel. Advantage of these new instruments for the surgery on metastatic brain tumor was mentioned here. However, it is necessarily to get a custom before we use these apparatuses at operation efficiently.

  15. Mathematical modeling of tumor growth and metastatic spreading: validation in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Niklas; Mollard, Séverine; Barbolosi, Dominique; Benabdallah, Assia; Chapuisat, Guillemette; Henry, Gerard; Giacometti, Sarah; Iliadis, Athanassios; Ciccolini, Joseph; Faivre, Christian; Hubert, Florence

    2014-11-15

    Defining tumor stage at diagnosis is a pivotal point for clinical decisions about patient treatment strategies. In this respect, early detection of occult metastasis invisible to current imaging methods would have a major impact on best care and long-term survival. Mathematical models that describe metastatic spreading might estimate the risk of metastasis when no clinical evidence is available. In this study, we adapted a top-down model to make such estimates. The model was constituted by a transport equation describing metastatic growth and endowed with a boundary condition for metastatic emission. Model predictions were compared with experimental results from orthotopic breast tumor xenograft experiments conducted in Nod/Scidγ mice. Primary tumor growth, metastatic spread and growth were monitored by 3D bioluminescence tomography. A tailored computational approach allowed the use of Monolix software for mixed-effects modeling with a partial differential equation model. Primary tumor growth was described best by Bertalanffy, West, and Gompertz models, which involve an initial exponential growth phase. All other tested models were rejected. The best metastatic model involved two parameters describing metastatic spreading and growth, respectively. Visual predictive check, analysis of residuals, and a bootstrap study validated the model. Coefficients of determination were [Formula: see text] for primary tumor growth and [Formula: see text] for metastatic growth. The data-based model development revealed several biologically significant findings. First, information on both growth and spreading can be obtained from measures of total metastatic burden. Second, the postulated link between primary tumor size and emission rate is validated. Finally, fast growing peritoneal metastases can only be described by such a complex partial differential equation model and not by ordinary differential equation models. This work advances efforts to predict metastatic spreading

  16. Metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent girl: an unusually malignant tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, H C; Trestioreanu, A; Ketcham, A S

    1975-01-01

    The first case of metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent is reported. This case also represents the first reported response of this tumor to chemotherapy and irradiation. This tumor showed an unusually rapid rate of cell division probably making it more susceptible to these agents. The importance of an early diagnosis and definitive excision is stressed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:165788

  17. Eclipse photodynamic therapy for a presumed peripapillary metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shawn; Yeh, Shu-I; Chan, Wei-Chun; Chen, Lee-Jen

    2012-01-01

    We report a successful use of a modified photodynamic therapy (PDT) termed Eclipse PDT in treating a patient with peripapillary metastatic choroidal tumor. Optic disk protection effect was measured with different colored paper disk attached to the reflecting mirror of the laser machine. Black paper disk was chosen to perform Eclipse PDT because of its maximal blocking effect. A patient with peripapillary metastatic choroidal tumor was treated using this method, and the postoperative outcome was favorable, with improvement in visual acuity and resolution of subretinal fluid. With the new technique, treatment can be modified according to the lesion's shape and location without damaging the optic disk. Eclipse PDT can further extend the indication of PDT treatment to peripapillary choroidal neovascularization as well as choroidal tumors close to the optic disk.

  18. Liver transplantation for metastatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Lang, H; Oldhafer, K J; Weimann, A; Schlitt, H J; Scheumann, G F; Flemming, P; Ringe, B; Pichlmayr, R

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article describes the experience with liver transplantation in patients with irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Liver transplantation has become an established therapy in primary liver cancer. On contrast, there is little experience with liver transplantation in secondary hepatic tumors. So far, in the majority of patients being transplanted for irresectable liver metastases, long-term results have been disappointing because of early tumor recurrence. Because of their biologically less aggressive nature, the metastases of neuroendocrine tumors could represent a justified indication for liver grafting. METHODS: In a retrospective study, the data of 12 patients who underwent liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases were analyzed regarding survival, tumor recurrence, and symptomatic relief. RESULTS: Nine of 12 patients currently are alive with a median survival of 55 months (range, 11.0 days to 103.5 months). The operative mortality was 1 of 12, 2 patients died because of septic complications or tumor recurrences or both 6.5 months and 68.0 months after transplantation. all patients had good symptomatic relief after hepatectomy and transplantation. Four of the nine patients who are alive have no evidence of tumor with a follow-up of 2.0, 57.0, 58.0, and 103.5 months after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, liver transplantation for irresectable neuroendocrine hepatic metastases may provide not only long-term palliation but even cure. Regarding the shortage of donor organs, liver grafting for neuroendocrine metastases should be considered solely in patients without evidence of extrahepatic tumor manifestation and in whom all other treatment methods are no longer effective. Images Figure 1. Figure 3. PMID:9114792

  19. Scoring system for prediction of metastatic spine tumor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Uei, Hiroshi; Oshima, Masashi; Ajiro, Yasumitsu

    2014-01-01

    Assessing the prognosis before treatment for metastatic spine tumor is extremely important in therapy selection. Therefore, we review some prognostic scoring systems and their outcomes. Articles with combinations of two keywords among “metastatic spine tumor” and “prognosis”, “score”, “scoring system”, “predicting”, or “life expectancy” were searched for in PubMed. As a result, 236 articles were extracted. Those referring to representative scoring systems about predicting the survival of patients with metastatic spine tumors were used. The significance and limits of these scoring systems, and the future perspectives were described. Tokuhashi score, Tomita score, Baur score, Linden score, Rades score, and Katagiri score were introduced. They are all scoring systems prepared by combining factors that affect prognosis. The primary site of cancer and visceral metastasis were common factors in all of these scoring systems. Other factors selected to influence the prognosis varied. They were useful to roughly predict the survival period, such as, “more than one year or not” or “more than six months or not”. In particular, they were utilized for decision-making about operative indications and avoidance of excessive medical treatment. Because the function depended on the survival period in the patients with metastatic spine tumor, it was also utilized in assessing functional prognosis. However, no scoring system had more than 90% consistency between the predicted and actual survival periods. Future perspectives should adopt more oncological viewpoints with adjustment of the process of treatment for metastatic spine tumor. PMID:25035829

  20. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  1. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Brian A; Caffe, Jordan R; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S; Bushnell, Grace G; Azarin, Samira M; Shea, Lonnie D

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM-coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. The pre-metastatic niche consists partially of ECM proteins that promote metastatic cell colonization to a target organ. We present a biomaterials-based approach to mimic this niche and identify ECM mediators of colonization. Using murine breast cancer models, we implanted microporous PCL scaffolds to recruit colonizing tumor cells in vivo. As a strategy to modulate colonization, we coated scaffolds with various ECM proteins, including decellularized lung and liver matrix from

  2. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  3. Prognostic Value of Metastatic Tumoral Caveolin-1 Expression in Patients with Resected Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Der Sheng; Won, Hye Sung; Lee, Han Hong

    2017-01-01

    Objective Caveolin-1 (Cav-1), as the main component of caveolae, has complex roles in tumourigenesis in human malignancies. We investigated Cav-1 in primary and metastatic tumor cells of gastric cancer (GC) and its association with clinical outcomes. Methods We retrieved 145 cases of GC who had undergone curative gastrectomy. The expression levels of Cav-1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and its association with clinicopathological parameters and patient survival was analyzed. Results High expression of Cav-1 protein of the GC in the stomach and metastatic lymph node was 12.4% (18/145) and 16.5% (15/91). In the multivariate analysis, tumoral Cav-1 protein in metastatic lymph node showed prognostic significance for relapse-free survival (RFS, HR, 3.934; 95% CI, 1.882–8.224; P = 0.001) and cancer-specific survival outcome (CSS, HR, 2.681; 95% CI, 1.613–8.623; P = 0.002). Among the GCs with metastatic lymph node, it remained as a strong indicator of poor prognosis for RFS (HR, 3.136; 95% CI, 1.444–6.810; P = 0.004) and CSS (HR, 2.509; 95% CI, 1.078–5.837; P = 0.032). Conclusion High expression of tumoral Cav-1 protein in metastatic lymph node is associated with unfavorable prognosis of curative resected GC, indicating the potential of novel prognostic markers. PMID:28828003

  4. Molecular Markers and Targeted Therapeutics in Metastatic Tumors of the Spine: Changing the Treatment Paradigms.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Rhines, Laurence D; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya; Boriani, Stefano; Sciubba, Daniel M; Bettegowda, Chetan

    2016-10-15

    A review of the literature. The aim of this study was to discuss the evolution of molecular signatures and the history and development of targeted therapeutics in metastatic tumor types affecting the spinal column. Molecular characterization of metastatic spine tumors is expected to usher in a revolution in diagnostic and treatment paradigms. Molecular characterization will provide critical information that can be used for initial diagnosis, prognosticating the ideal treatment strategy, assessment of treatment efficacy, surveillance and monitoring recurrence, and predicting complications, clinical outcome, and overall survival in patients diagnosed with metastatic cancers to the spinal column. A review of the literature was performed focusing on illustrative examples of the role that molecular-based therapeutics have played in clinical outcomes for patients diagnosed with metastatic tumor types affecting the spinal column. The impact of molecular therapeutics including receptor tyrosine kinases and immune checkpoint inhibitors and the ability of molecular signatures to provide prognostic information are discussed in metastatic breast cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, melanoma, and renal cell cancer affecting the spinal column. For the providers who will ultimately counsel patients diagnosed with metastases to the spinal column, molecular advancements will radically alter the management/surgical paradigms utilized. Ultimately, the translation of these molecular advancements into routine clinical care will greatly improve the quality and quantity of life for patients diagnosed with spinal malignancies and provide better overall outcomes and counseling for treating physicians. N/A.

  5. Endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement: metastatic versus primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Benjamin K; Chow, Vincent E; Adams, Sheila C; Letson, G Douglas; Temple, H Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of underlying diagnosis on the functional and oncologic outcomes following endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement (PFR). We performed a retrospective review of 61 consecutive cemented bipolar PFR in 59 patients for treatment neoplastic lesions with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Twenty-two patients had primary bone tumors and 39 had metastatic disease. Average follow-up for the 30 surviving patients was 55.4 months and the mean postoperative survival for the 29 patients who died was 12.2 months. Patients with primary tumors demonstrated significantly better functional outcomes than those with metastatic disease, with mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores of 80.2 and 66.8%, respectively (p=0.0002). Age correlated inversely with functional scores (r=-0.48; p=0.0002), while femoral resection length did not. Preoperative pathologic fracture did not appear to adversely impact final functional outcomes. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year implant survival estimate was 92.5%, with aseptic loosening as the endpoint. Both functional results and survival are increased for primary tumors versus metastatic disease following PFR. However, PFR results in excellent local disease control, reliable pain relief and good functional results in both groups, with prosthesis survival exceeding that of the patient in many cases.

  6. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P.; Rimm, David L.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  7. Imaging features of carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Katie N.; Dilaveri, Christina A.; Perry, Kyle; Reynolds, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to describe the imaging findings of carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast, with pathologic and clinical correlations. We searched our surgical database for cases of pathologically proven carcinoid tumors metastatic to the breast from October 1, 2000, to May 31, 2010. Of the approximate 10,000 breast biopsies identified, 7000 had malignant findings. Ten cases of metastatic carcinoid (0.1% of all malignancies), all with imaging studies available for review, were included in the study. All patients were women and had their primary carcinoid in the gastrointestinal tract (n=9) or lung (n = 1). One patient presented with a palpable breast mass and no history of carcinoid tumor; an ileal carcinoid was discovered after the pathologic diagnosis of metastatic carcinoid was established. In the breast, tumors presented as solitary lesions in half the cases. Metastases to the breast typically presented as circumscribed masses mammographically and as hypoechoic circumscribed masses ultrasonographically; some showed increased through-transmission and increased vascularity with color Doppler evaluation. Five patients had octreotide scans; of these, 4 had increased focal activity in the region of metastasis within the breast. Six patients underwent computed tomography. Without contrast, nodular masses were observed; with contrast, the masses showed rapid enhancement during arterial phase imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (n = 4) also showed rapid enhancement and washout kinetics after contrast administration. Recognition of carcinoid metastases to the breast in patients with known or occult primary carcinoid tumors is important to avoid unnecessary treatment for primary breast cancer. PMID:21771708

  8. External optical imaging of freely moving mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing metastatic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-04-01

    We report here a new approach to genetically engineering tumors to become fluorescence such that they can be imaged externally in freely-moving animals. We describe here external high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical imaging of metastatic tumors in live mice. Stable high-level green flourescent protein (GFP)-expressing human and rodent cell lines enable tumors and metastasis is formed from them to be externally imaged from freely-moving mice. Real-time tumor and metastatic growth were quantitated from whole-body real-time imaging in GFP-expressing melanoma and colon carcinoma models. This GFP optical imaging system is highly appropriate for high throughput in vivo drug screening.

  9. Unusual primary tumors presenting as papillary carcinomas metastatic to the neck.

    PubMed

    Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Wilt, Marc; Kennel, Pierre; Charpiot, Anne; Rodier, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastatic papillary carcinoma in the neck is presumptive evidence of a primary thyroid neoplasm since neck metastases of other primary tumors are uncommon. Immunohistochemical studies may be required to diagnose these metastases. We report 2 cases in which an unrelated tumor mimicked a thyroid malignancy. Both patients had been referred for evaluation of enlarged lymph neck nodes without any other symptoms. In both cases, a lymph node biopsy identified a metastatic papillary adenocarcinoma that was believed to be consistent with a thyroid primary. Thyroidectomy was not performed in either case. Further investigations led to the diagnosis of other primary tumors that were unrelated to the thyroid; the unrelated primaries were an ovarian serous tumor in one patient and a papillary renal cell carcinoma in the other.

  10. Perioperative Considerations in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Kate; Vasdev, Nikhil; Ashead, Jim; Lane, Tim; Hanbury, Damian; Nathan, Paul; Gowrie-Mohan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma are complex, with the potential for significant complications, and require extensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative management. This article discusses, in depth, the necessary considerations in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27833463

  11. Intraventricular metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sava, I; Sava, Anca; Şapte, Elena; Mihailov, Claudia; Dumitrescu, Gabriela; Poeată, I; Sava, Florina; Haba, Danisia

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular tumors represent a diagnostic problem, due to a wide range of differential diagnosis, with an important variability of tumoral histological types in adult and pediatric population. Patient, Our case is represented by a patient, aged 48 years, without any history of significant personal pathology, accusing nausea, vomiting, and intensive headache. In the morning, he became confused, having hallucinations for a short period of time, and has accused drowsiness for several weeks. Imaging (CT and MRI) shows a neoformation in the third ventricle, accompanied by bilateral lateral ventricles dilatation, with predominantly annular enhancement. During surgery, through the middle third transcallosal interhemispheric approach, it was revealed a reddish, well-demarcated intraventricular mass, well vascularized and with a firm consistency. Final pathologic diagnosis was metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma. Initial postoperative evolution was good, and then neurological and respiratory condition worsened as a bronchopneumonia lead to patient's death in 12 days after surgery. Clear cell carcinoma metastasis located in the third ventricle should be taken into consideration for patients presenting a single intraventricular lesion even they have no documented primary malignancy.

  12. Tumor biology of non-metastatic stages of clear cell renal cell carcinoma; overexpression of stearoyl desaturase-1, EPO/EPO-R system and hypoxia-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Stoyanoff, Tania Romina; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Todaro, Juan Santiago; Espada, Joaquín Diego; Colavita, Juan Pablo Melana; Brandan, Nora Cristina; Torres, Adriana Mónica; Aguirre, María Victoria

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common subtype of renal carcinomas. There is great interest to know the molecular basis of the tumor biology of ccRCC that might contribute to a better understanding of the aggressive biological behavior of this cancer and to identify early biomarkers of disease. This study describes the relationship among proliferation, survival, and apoptosis with the expression of key molecules related to tumoral hypoxia (hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)), their receptors (EPO-R, VEGFR-2), and stearoyl desaturase-1 (SCD-1) in early stages of ccRCC. Tissue samples were obtained at the Urology Unit of the J.R. Vidal Hospital (Corrientes, Argentina), from patients who underwent radical nephrectomy for renal cancer between 2011 and 2014. Four experimental groups according to pathological stage and nuclear grade were organized: T1G1 (n = 6), T2G1 (n = 4), T1G2 (n = 7), and T2G2 (n = 7). The expression of HIF-1α, EPO, EPO-R, VEGF, VEGFR-2, Bcl-xL, and SCD-1 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and/or RT-PCR. Apoptosis was assessed by the TUNEL in situ assay, and tumor proliferation was determined by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Data revealed that HIF-1α, EPO, EPO-R, VEGF, and VEGF-R2 were overexpressed in most samples. The T1G1 group showed the highest EPO levels, approximately 200 % compared with distal renal tissue. Bcl-xL overexpression was concomitant with the enhancement of proliferative indexes. SCD-1 expression increased with the tumor size and nuclear grade. Moreover, the direct correlations observed between SCD-1/HIF-1α and SCD-1/Ki-67 increments suggest a link among these molecules, which would determine tumor progression in early stages of ccRCC. Our results demonstrate the relationship among proliferation, survival, and apoptosis with the expression of key molecules related to tumoral hypoxia (HIF-1α, EPO, VEGF), their

  13. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger; Rao, Jian Yu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is ~33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  14. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. Sclerosing Stromal Tumor Mimicking a Pregnancy Luteoma: Case Report of a Diagnostically Challenging Entity Further Complicated by the Presence of Metastatic Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma From the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Uner, Meral; Usubutun, Alp

    2017-06-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumors of the ovary are very rare. We report the case of a 29-year-old pregnant woman who presented with a history of preterm labor and gestational hypertension. A huge mass measuring 30 cm in greatest dimension was recognized on the right ovary during cesarean section. Signet ring cell infiltration was seen during intraoperative frozen section consultation. She underwent a right salpingo-oophorectomy, and the permanent diagnosis was sclerosing stromal tumor infiltrated by signet ring cells. Pregnancy-related changes were seen in tumor morphology. Signet ring cells were immunoreactive with antibodies MUC5ac, MUC2, and EMA. Thus, stromal cells were immunoreactive with antibodies inhibin and calretinin. Endoscopic biopsy of the stomach showed a signet ring cell carcinoma, from which the metastasis had originated. This is the first reported case in the literature, and is notable for its challenging differential diagnosis, which included a pregnancy luteoma and primary signet ring stromal tumor of the ovary.

  16. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J

    2015-10-20

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis.

  17. Clinical and Endoscopic Features of Metastatic Tumors in the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ga Hee; Ahn, Ji Yong; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Min-Ju; Choi, Kee Don; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Kim, Do Hoon; Lim, Hyun; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Metastasis to the stomach is rare. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the clinical outcomes of cancers that metastasized to the stomach. Methods We reviewed the clinicopathological aspects of patients with gastric metastases from solid organ tumors. Thirty-seven cases were identified, and we evaluated the histology, initial presentation, imaging findings, lesion locations, treatment courses, and overall patient survival. Results Endoscopic findings indicated that solitary lesions presented more frequently than multiple lesions and submucosal tumor-like tumors were the most common appearance. Malignant melanoma was the tumor that most frequently metastasized to the stomach. Twelve patients received treatments after the diagnosis of gastric metastasis. The median survival period from the diagnosis of gastric metastasis was 3.0 months (interquartile range, 1.0 to 11.0 months). Patients with solitary lesions and patients who received any treatments survived longer after the diagnosis of metastatic cancer than patients with multiple lesions and patients who did not any receive any treatments. Conclusions Proper treatment with careful consideration of the primary tumor characteristics can increase the survival period in patients with tumors that metastasize to the stomach, especially in cases with solitary metastatic lesions in endoscopic findings. PMID:25473071

  18. CYP4A in tumor-associated macrophages promotes pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X W; Yu, T J; Zhang, J; Li, Y; Chen, H L; Yang, G F; Yu, W; Liu, Y Z; Liu, X X; Duan, C F; Tang, H L; Qiu, M; Wang, C L; Zheng, H; Yue, J; Guo, A M; Yang, J

    2017-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play an essential role in metastasis. However, what enables TAMs to have a superior capacity to establish pre-metastatic microenvironment in distant organs is unclear. Here we have begun to uncover the effects of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 4A in TAMs on lung pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis. CYP4A+ TAM infiltration was positively associated with metastasis, pre-metastatic niche formation and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The pharmacological inhibition of CYP4A reduced lung pre-metastatic niche formation (evidenced by a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 positive (VEGFR1+) myeloid cell recruitment and pro-metastatic protein expression) and metastatic burden, accompanied with TAM polarization away from the M2 phenotype in spontaneous metastasis models of 4T1 breast cancer and B16F10 melanoma. Co-implantation of 4T1 cells with CYP4A10high macrophages promoted lung pre-metastatic niche formation and metastasis. Depletion of TAMs disrupted lung pre-metastatic niches and thereby prevented metastasis. Treatment with the CM from CYP4A10high M2 macrophages (M2) increased pre-metastatic niche formation and metastatic burden in the lungs, whereas CYP4A inhibition attenuated these effects. In vitro TAM polarization away from the M2 phenotype induced by CYP4A inhibition decreased VEGFR1+ myeloid cell migration and fibronectin expression, accompanied with downregulation of STAT3 signaling. Conversely, overexpression of CYP4A or exogenous addition of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid promoted M2 polarization and cytokine production of macrophages and thereby enhanced migration of VEGFR1+ myeloid cells, which were reversed by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of STAT3. Importantly, a combined blocking M2 macrophage-derived factors TGF-β, VEGF and SDF-1 abolished VEGFR1+ myeloid cell migration and fibroblast activation induced by CYP4A. In summary, CYP4A in TAMs is crucial for lung pre-metastatic niche

  19. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  20. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Mark F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  1. Ghost Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Jason; Cohen, Molly D; Ramer, Naomi; Payami, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Ghost cell tumors are a family of lesions that range in presentation from cyst to solid neoplasm and in behavior from benign to locally aggressive or metastatic. All are characterized by the presence of ameloblastic epithelium, ghost cells, and calcifications. This report presents the cases of a 14-year-old girl with a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and a 65-year-old woman with a peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) with dysplastic changes, a rare locally invasive tumor of odontogenic epithelium. The first patient presented with a 1-year history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph displayed a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion. An incisional biopsy yielded a diagnosis of CCOT. Decompression of the mass was completed; after 3 months, it was enucleated and immediately grafted with bone harvested from the anterior iliac crest. The second patient presented with a 3-month history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph depicted a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion with saucerization of the buccal mandibular cortex. An incisional biopsy examination suggested a diagnosis of DGCT because of the presence of ghost cells, dentinoid, and islands of ameloblastic epithelium. Excision of the mass with peripheral ostectomy was completed. At 6 and 12 months of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was noted.

  2. Gamma Knife Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Sato, Mitsuru

    2016-05-01

    The incidences of metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer have increased. The results of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the treatment of patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and uterine cervical cancers) were retrospectively analyzed to identify the efficacy and prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed of 70 patients with 306 tumors who underwent GKS for brain metastases from gynecologic cancer between January 1995 and December 2013 in our institution. The primary cancers were ovarian in 33 patients with 147 tumors and uterine in 37 patients with 159 tumors. Median tumor volume was 0.3 cm(3). Median marginal prescription dose was 20 Gy. The local tumor control rates were 96.4% at 6 months and 89.9% at 1 year. There was no statistically significant difference between ovarian and uterine cancers. Higher prescription dose and smaller tumor volume were significantly correlated with local tumor control. Median overall survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and solitary brain metastasis were significantly correlated with satisfactory overall survival. Median activities of daily living (ADL) preservation survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and higher Karnofsky Performance Status score were significantly correlated with better ADL preservation. GKS is effective for control of tumor progression in patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer, and may provide neurologic benefits and preservation of the quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Terada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity is very rare. A 76-year-old man presented with epistaxis and admitted to our hospital. His past histories were right radical nephrectomy for renal cell carcinomas at the age of 68 years and brain infarction at the age of 75 years. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a red polyp of the right nasal cavity. Imaging modalities including CT and MRI also revealed a tumor measuring 2 x 3 x 2 cm. Angiography showed that the tumor is very hypervascular. Clinical diagnosis was angiogenic tumors including hemangioma, sinonasal hemangiopericytoma, and paraganglioma. A blood data showed anemia and low platerets, and bone marrow biopsy revealed myelodysplastic syndrome. A coiling embolization of the feeding artery was performed, and the tumor reduced markedly. The tumor was resected almost entirely. Pathologically, the tumor was 2 x 1.5 x 1.5 cm red tumor. The tumor cells had clear cytoplasm, and arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. Atypia is mild. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for pancytokeratin (AE1/3, CAM5.2), RCC ma, CD10, and Ki-67 (labeling=20%), but negative for CD34, factor-VIII-related antigen, CEA, EMA, melanosome (HMB45), S100 protein, p53, and HepPar-1. The pathological diagnosis was made without knowledge of kidney status. A pathological diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma of clear cell type (grade 1) was made. The patient is now free from tumor, and palliative chemoradiation is considered.

  4. Cure of mice with established metastatic friend leukemia cell tumors by a combined therapy with tumor cells expressing both interferon-alpha 1 and herpes simplex thymidine kinase followed by ganciclovir.

    PubMed

    Santodonato, L; Ferrantini, M; Gabriele, L; Proietti, E; Venditti, M; Musiani, P; Modesti, A; Modica, A; Lupton, S D; Belardelli, F

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of the murine interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) gene into various malignant mouse tumor cells has resulted in the loss of tumorigenicity and an acquired capacity to induce long-lasting antitumor immunity following their injection into immunocompetent syngeneic mice. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of IFN-alpha-producing tumor cells in the therapy of mice with established mouse tumors. In DBA/2 mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c.) Friend erythroleukemia cell (FLC) tumors, we found that to achieve some antitumor response (i) it was necessary to inject high numbers of IFN-alpha-producing FLC, which occasionally lead to the formation of slowly growing tumors; and, that (ii) repeated injections of irradiated IFN-alpha-FLC did not result in any antitumor effect. The therapeutic potential of IFN-alpha-producing FLC rendered sensitive to ganciclovir (GCV), by transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) gene, was investigated. Complete tumor rejection and cure was observed in > or = 70% of the animals after injection of high numbers (10(7)) of IFN-alpha-producing tk-expressing tumor cells followed 4 days later by repeated GCV treatments, whereas only a slight increase in survival time was obtained after administration of control tk-expressing tumor cells (not producing IFN) and GCV. Tumor rejection was associated with a dramatic destruction of tumor tissue and with the subsequent development of a potent and long-lasting antitumor immunity. No therapeutic effect was observed in immunosuppressed nude mice. These data indicate that this approach may represent an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for antitumor cytokine gene therapy.

  5. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  6. [Metastatic tumors in the ovary, difficulties of histologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tamás, Judit; Vereczkey, Ildikó; Tóth, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The ovary is a common site of metastases. Secondary tumors account for 3-40% of all ovarian malignancies. Most ovarian metastases arise from the colon, although tumors of the breast, stomach and endometrium are also common places of origin. Clinical and histological features of metastatic tumors frequently mimic primary ovarian malignancies, causing serious diagnostic problems for the surgical pathologist. However, differentiation between primary ovarian cancer and ovarian metastasis is important in order to prevent inappropriate management and suboptimal treatment. The distinction between primary and secondary ovarian malignancies is especially difficult in cases when the metastasis is diagnosed before the primary tumor. Frozen section is widely used in the intra-operative assessment of patients with ovarian tumors but it can be very difficult to distinguish certain types of primary ovarian tumors and metastases from other sites. We examined 152 cases of secondary ovarian neoplasm diagnosed at the National Institute of Oncology, Hungary from 2000 to 2014. Colorectal cancer was the most common primary tumor (58 cases), followed by breast (33 cases), endometrium (30 cases) and stomach cancer (13 cases). The differential diagnosis proved the most difficult in cases when endometrioid and mucinous tumors were present in the ovaries. Metastases of colorectal and gastric adenocarcinomas may simulate benign or borderline cystadenomas too. In these cases the knowledge of the patient's history and immunohistochemical stains were helpful. In our study we discuss the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasms and the limits of the intraoperative frozen sections.

  7. Paired Tumor and Normal Whole Genome Sequencing of Metastatic Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Glen J.; Liang, Winnie S.; Izatt, Tyler; Arora, Shilpi; Cherni, Irene; Raju, Robert N.; Hostetter, Galen; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Christoforides, Alexis; Sinari, Shripad; Baker, Angela S.; Metpally, Raghu; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Phillips, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare cancer of the sinonasal tract with little molecular characterization. We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on paired normal and tumor DNA from a patient with metastatic-ONB to identify the somatic alterations that might be drivers of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA was isolated from fresh frozen tissue from a metastatic lesion and whole blood, followed by WGS at >30X depth, alignment and mapping, and mutation analyses. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm selected mutations. Sixty-two somatic short nucleotide variants (SNVs) and five deletions were identified inside coding regions, each causing a non-synonymous DNA sequence change. We selected seven SNVs and validated them by Sanger sequencing. In the metastatic ONB samples collected several months prior to WGS, all seven mutations were present. However, in the original surgical resection specimen (prior to evidence of metastatic disease), mutations in KDR, MYC, SIN3B, and NLRC4 genes were not present, suggesting that these were acquired with disease progression and/or as a result of post-treatment effects. Conclusions/Significance This work provides insight into the evolution of ONB cancer cells and provides a window into the more complex factors, including tumor clonality and multiple driver mutations. PMID:22649506

  8. Prostaglandin E2 synthesis by human primary and metastatic bone tumors in culture.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M C; Lippiello, L; Bringhurst, F R; Mankin, H J

    1985-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is known to stimulate osteolysis in vitro and has been implicated in mediating bone resorption in several animal and human tumors. Little attention has yet to be directed toward local humoral control (including PGE2) of bone resorption in primary and metastatic bone tumors. For investigation of whether histologically identified areas of osteolytic or osteoblastic bone tumors differentially secrete PGE2 under in vitro conditions, culture media from explants of central and peripheral areas of tissue were sterilely collected from 13 surgical specimens of primary and metastatic bone tumors and assayed for (PGE2) radioimmunoassay. The results indicate a marked heterogeneity in the concentration of immunoreactive (I-PGE2) synthesis by tumors of different as well as similar cell type. PGE2 production was time-dependent in culture, and at 72 hours substantial increases were apparent compared to cultures of non-neoplastic fascia controls. Significantly higher levels of I-PGE2 were found in cultures derived from "bone-destructive" tumors. No difference in I-PGE2 synthesis was found between explants of peripheral versus central tissue of the same tumors. PGE2 is synthesized in culture by bone tumors characterized as destructive of bone at higher levels than "bone-forming" tumors, and this synthesis is inhibited by indomethacin.

  9. An integrin-linked machinery of cytoskeletal regulation that enables experimental tumor initiation and metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Shibue, Tsukasa; Brooks, Mary W.; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recently extravasated metastatic cancer cells employ the Rif/mDia2 actin-nucleating/polymerizing machinery in order to extend integrin β1-containing, filopodium-like protrusions (FLPs), which enable them to interact productively with the surrounding extracellular matrix; this process governs the initial proliferation of these cancer cells. Here we identify the signaling pathway governing FLP lifetime, which involves integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and β-parvin, two integrin:actin-bridging proteins, that block cofilin-mediated actin-filament severing. Importantly, the combined actions of Rif/mDia2 and ILK/β-parvin/cofilin pathways on FLPs are required not only for metastatic outgrowth but also for primary tumor formation following experimental implantation. This provides one mechanistic explanation for how the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program imparts tumor-initiating powers to carcinoma cells, since it enhances FLP formation through the activation of ILK/β-parvin/cofilin pathway. PMID:24035453

  10. Comparison of Tumor Recurrence After Resection of Highly- and Poorly-Metastatic Triple-negative Breast Cancer in Orthotopic Nude-Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shuya; Takehara, Kiyoto; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Urata, Yasuo; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), defined by the absence of receptors for estrogen, progesterone and human epithelial receptor 2, is a recalcitrant disease in need of effective therapy. We previously isolated highly-metastatic variants of the human TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231 using serial orthotopic implantation in nude mice. In the present report, we compared local and metastatic recurrence in lymph nodes in orthotopic nude-mouse models after bright-light surgery (BLS) of tumors from highly-metastatic variants or poorly-metastatic parental MDA-MB-231-RFP cells. Orthotopic tumors from parental MDA-MB-231 or highly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 were resected under bright light similar to an operating room. After resection of primary tumors, local recurrence from highly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells grew more rapidly than did parental MDA-MB-231 cells. Lymph-node metastasis from highly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells occurred after primary tumor resection much more extensively than after parental MDA-MB-231 tumors were resected. The results of the present report suggest that conventional surgery under bright light was unable to control highly-metastatic compared with poorly-metastatic MDA-MB-231 TNBC. Copyright© 2017 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of tumor HPV status on outcome in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck receiving chemotherapy with or without cetuximab: retrospective analysis of the phase III EXTREME trial

    PubMed Central

    Vermorken, J. B.; Psyrri, A.; Mesía, R.; Peyrade, F.; Beier, F.; de Blas, B.; Celik, I.; Licitra, L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor human papillomavirus (HPV) status is an important prognostic factor in locoregionally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Prognostic value in recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) disease remains to be confirmed. This retrospective analysis of the EXTREME trial, comparing chemotherapy plus cetuximab with chemotherapy first line in R/M SCCHN, investigated efficacy and prognosis according to tumor p16 and HPV status. Patients and methods Paired tissue samples were used: p16INK4A expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and HPV status determined in extracted DNA samples using oligonucleotide hybridization assays. Results Altogether, 416 of 442 patients had tumor samples available for p16 and HPV: 10% of tumors were p16 positive and 5% were HPV positive. Adding cetuximab to chemotherapy improved survival, irrespective of tumor p16 or HPV status. This pattern remained in a combined analysis of p16 and HPV. p16 positivity and HPV positivity were associated with prolonged survival compared with p16 negativity and HPV negativity. Subgroup analysis of patients with oropharyngeal cancer demonstrated a similar pattern to all evaluable patients. Conclusion The results from this analysis suggest that p16 and HPV status have prognostic value in R/M SCCHN and survival benefits of chemotherapy plus cetuximab over chemotherapy alone are independent of tumor p16 and HPV status. PMID:24577117

  12. Heparan Sulfate Degradation: Relation to Tumor Invasive and Metastatic Properties of Mouse B16 Melanoma Sublines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Motowo; Irimura, Tatsuro; di Ferrante, Daniela; di Ferrante, Nicola; Nicolson, Garth L.

    1983-05-01

    After transport in the blood and implantation in the microcirculation, metastatic tumor cells must invade the vascular endothelium and underlying basal lamina. Mouse B16 melanoma sublines were used to determine the relation between metastatic properties and the ability of the sublines to degrade enzymatically the sulfated glycosaminoglycans present in the extracellular matrix of cultured vascular endothelial cells. Highly invasive and metastatic B16 sublines degraded matrix glycosaminoglycans faster than did sublines of lower metastatic potential. The main products of this matrix degradation were heparan sulfate fragments. Intact B16 cells (or their cell-free homogenates) with a high potential for lung colonization degraded purified heparan sulfate from bovine lung at higher rates than did B16 cells with a poor potential for lung colonization. Analysis of the degradation fragments indicated that B16 cells have a heparan sulfate endoglycosidase. Thus the abilities of B16 melanoma cells to extravasate and successfully colonize the lung may be related to their capacities to degrade heparan sulfate in the walls of pulmonary blood vessels.

  13. Surgical and nonsurgical management of primary and metastatic liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Zibari, G B; Riche, A; Zizzi, H C; McMillan, R W; Aultman, D F; Boykin, K N; Gonzalez, E; Nandy, I; Dies, D F; Gholson, C F; Holcombe, R F; McDonald, J C

    1998-03-01

    The medical records of 267 patients who had liver tumors, primary and metastatic, from 1988 to 1995 were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred thirteen patients (80%) had metastatic disease, and 54 patients (20%) had primary liver disease. Their clinical manifestations and laboratory values were evaluated as factors predictive of diagnosis and survival. There was a significant increase in the occurrence of upper abdominal pain, weight loss, extrahepatic symptoms due to the metastatic origin, and hepatomegaly. Metastases from colorectal primary lesions were synchronous in 34 patients and metachronous in 31 patients. Stomach, lung, and pancreatic primaries were more commonly synchronous. Breast metastases were more commonly metachronous. Elevated serum glutamic-oxaloecetic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase and decreased albumin were the most common liver test abnormalities at diagnosis. Carcinoembryonic antigen values were elevated in the majority of colon cancer patients. Eighty-one percent of patients with primary liver cancer had elevated levels of alpha-fetoprotein, 40 per cent were seropositive for hepatitis B, and 23 per cent were seropositive for hepatitis C. Seventy-nine patients (30%) underwent surgery for their cancer, 37 (47%) had resections, 38 (48%) were unresectable, and 4 (5%) underwent liver transplantation. The patients who underwent surgery had a 32 per cent 5-year survival rate compared to a 0 per cent 5-year survival in the patients who did not have surgery (p = 0.0001). The patients who had resections had a better survival rate than those deemed unresectable at surgery (62% versus 0% at 5-years with p = 0.0008). The perioperative morbidity rate was 16 per cent, with lobectomies having the best rate and trisegmentectomies having the worst. Perioperative mortality rate was zero for all liver resections. Hepatic resection and, in selected patients, liver transplantation are the only two available therapeutic modalities that produce long

  14. Circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:24521660

  15. NGAL immunohistochemical expression in brain primary and metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Barresi, V; Tuccari, G; Barresi, G

    2010-01-01

    A significant association has been recently shown between the expression of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) in tumors and its urinary levels. Thus NGAL urinary detection has been proposed as a method for the early diagnosis of brain tumors. In view of this, the objective of this study was to investigate whether NGAL expression differs according to brain tumor type or in primary vs. metastatic brain neolasias. 42 surgically resected formalin fixed and paraffin embedded neoplasias, including 15 cases of brain metastasis and 27 cases of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors (11 meningiomas; 1 pilocytic astrocytoma, 2 diffuse astrocytomas, 2 oligoastrocytomas, 2 oligodendrogliomas, 1 anaplastic oligoastrocytoma, 7 glioblastomas, 1 ependymoma) were submitted to the immunohistochemical procedure. Sections were incubated overnight with the primary antibody against NGAL. NGAL staining was found in all the analyzed glioblastomas and in the anaplastic oligoastrocytoma. No NGAL immuno-expression was evidenced in all the other cases. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between NGAL presence and high proliferation index in the primary tumors. In conclusion, our findings suggest that NGAL expression is restricted to high grade gliomas among primary brain tumors, and that brain metastases do not express this protein. Considering the correlation between NGAL expression in tumors and its urinary levels, if our observations will be further validated, NGAL urinary detection might be used as an additional tool in the pre-surgical definition of brain lesions involving difficult differential diagnosis.

  16. Intraoperative 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced photodynamic diagnosis of metastatic brain tumors with histopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Yagi, R; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, N; Nonoguchi, N; Furuse, M; Katayama, Y; Kajimoto, Y; Kuroiwa, T

    2017-09-29

    Fluorescence-guided surgery using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a promising real-time navigation method in the surgical resection of malignant gliomas. In order to determine whether this method is applicable to metastatic brain tumors, we evaluated the usefulness of intraoperative fluorescence patterns and histopathological features in patients with metastatic brain tumors. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 16 patients with metastatic brain tumors who underwent intraoperative 5-ALA fluorescence-guided resection. Patients were given 20 mg/kg of 5-ALA orally 2 h prior to the surgery. High-powered excitation illumination and a low-pass filter (420, 450, or 500 nm) were used to visualize the fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), the 5-ALA metabolite. We evaluated the relationships between the fluorescence and histopathological findings in both tumoral and peritumoral brain tissue. Tumoral PpIX fluorescence was seen in only 5 patients (31%); in the remaining 11 patients (69%), there was no fluorescence in the tumor bulk itself. In 14 patients (86%), vague fluorescence was seen in peritumoral brain tissue, at a thickness of 2-6 mm. The histopathological examination found cancer cell invasion of adjacent brain tissue in 75% of patients (12/16), at a mean ± SD depth of 1.4 ± 1.0 mm (range 0.2-3.4 mm) from the microscopic border of the tumor. There was a moderate correlation between vague fluorescence in adjacent brain tissue and the depth of cancer cell invasion (P = 0.004). Peritumoral fluorescence may be a good intraoperative indicator of tumor extent, preceding more complete microscopic gross total resection. Institutional Review Board of Osaka Medical College No. 42, registered February 17, 1998, and No. 300, registered April 1, 2008. They were retrospectively registered.

  17. Mixed Testicular Germ Cell Tumor Presenting as Metastatic Pure Choriocarcinoma Involving Multiple Lung Metastases That Was Effectively Treated with High-dose Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Nam Su; Park, Hee Sook

    2009-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma in the testis is very rare, and it represents less than 1% (0.3%) of all the testicular germ cell tumors. It is a particularly aggressive variant of non-seminoma tumor, which is characterized by a high serum β-HCG level and multiple lung metastases. The optimal management for this disease remains undefined. We report here on a case of choriocarcinoma with multiple lung metastases, and the patient has achieved continuous remission for 2 years after combination chemotherapy of BEP (bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin) and sequential high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral stem cell rescue. PMID:20057969

  18. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-05

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, DNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (P<0.05). The metastatic tumors were more common in control mice than the treated groups in the lung, the liver and the sternum tissues. Animals treated with DNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Final mean tumor volume reached to approximately 1.11, 0.31 and 0.27cm(3) in the control, and 40 and 80mg/kg DNC groups, respectively (P<0.05). Furthermore, suppression of NF-κB expression by DNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products.

  19. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  20. Applications for quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA in the plasma of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schreuer, Max; Meersseman, Geert; van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Bott, Ambre; Chevolet, Ines; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Maertens, Geert; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Small fragments of cell-free DNA that are shed by normal and tumor cells can be detected in the plasma of patients with advanced melanoma. Quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant DNA within the cell-free DNA holds promise as a tumor-specific biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with BRAF V600 mutant melanoma. Allele-specific quantitative PCR analysis for BRAF V600 E/E2/D/K/R/M mutations on DNA extracted from 1 ml of plasma is currently under evaluation in a number of ongoing prospective clinical studies. We report five patient cases that indicate the potential applications and utility of quantitative measurements of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA as a diagnostic test and as a therapeutic monitoring tool in stage IV melanoma patients treated with BRAF-targeted therapy or immunotherapy. Finally, we offer novel insights into the dynamics of cell-free tumor DNA in melanoma.

  1. QW-1624F2-2, a synthetic analogue of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, enhances the response to other deltanoids and suppresses the invasiveness of human metastatic breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Sujatha; Beckman, Matthew J; Bajwa, Amandeep; Wei, Jeffrey; Smith, Kathleen M; Posner, Gary H; Gewirtz, David A

    2006-11-01

    The enzyme 24-hydroxylase, also known as CYP24, metabolizes 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)] and is an established marker of vitamin D activity. Our studies evaluated the influence of a low-calcemic 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) analogue, QW-1624F2-2 (QW), on the regulation of CYP24 expression in MKL-4 cells, a metastatic mammary tumor cell model. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and its analogue, EB 1089, stimulated CYP24 induction at both protein and transcript levels. In contrast, QW failed to produce a sustained stimulation of CYP24, due, in large part, to a reduction in the stability of the CYP24 message. QW enhanced the capacity of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and EB 1089 to inhibit tumor cell proliferation by approximately 2-fold. QW also blocked the sustained induction of CYP24 expression by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and EB 1089, increased the potency of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and EB 1089, and inhibited breast tumor cell proliferation and invasion.

  2. Metastatic melanoma mimicking solitary fibrous tumor: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Bekers, Elise M; van Engen-van Grunsven, Adriana C H; Groenen, Patricia J T A; Westdorp, Harm; Koornstra, Rutger H T; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; Flucke, Uta; Blokx, Willeke A M

    2014-02-01

    Malignant melanomas are known for their remarkable morphological variation and aberrant immunophenotype with loss of lineage-specific markers, especially in recurrences and metastases. Hot spot mutations in BRAF, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 and mutations in KIT are oncogenic events in melanomas. Therefore, genotyping can be a useful ancillary diagnostic tool. We present one case each of recurrent and metastatic melanoma, both showing histological and immunohistochemical features of solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Mutational analysis detected BRAF and NRAS mutations in the primary and secondary lesions, respectively. This result confirmed the diagnosis of recurrent/metastastic melanoma.

  3. Reversible neuropathy after chemotherapy for metastatic adenocarcinoma from an unknown primary tumor to the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Saikumar, Jagannath; Li, Guiyuan; Chaudhary, Rekha T

    2011-11-01

    Adenocarcinomas and other various tumors are known to metastasize to various locations without any significant predilection and the metastasis could be the first presentation of the malignancy by the patient. Involvement of peripheral nerves without the central nervous system involvement has been rarely reported. Perineural tumor spread has been infrequently reported with soft tissue tumors without central nervous system involvement. Here we present an unusual case of an elderly gentleman presenting with symptoms consistent with peripheral neuropathy involving multiple nerves. After failure of symptomatic therapy, electromyogram, and nerve conduction study showed severe bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. Interestingly, symptoms worsened in the left hand after bilateral release surgery. Due to persistence of significant lifestyle-limiting symptoms, biopsy of the sural nerve was done that showed metastatic poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma cells. A complete surveillance for the primary lesion has been negative so far. The peripheral neuropathy was considered to be arising from the involvement of the perineural sheaths by the metastatic tumor lesions. The patient was then started on gemcitabine therapy and after just 2 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient has shown notable improvement of his symptoms. After completion of the duration of chemotherapy, he has been symptom-free for more than 6 months. Metastatic lesions to the peripheral nervous system should be considered in patients who have persisting neuropathic symptoms because treatment of those lesions can results in improvement of symptoms.

  4. Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    regulate the development of anti-tumor immune responses . Importantly, our results show that, compared to unfused DC and tumor cells, the DC/ breast tumor...AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0487 TITLE: Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer ...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

  5. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in a meningioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Han, H S; Kim, E Y; Han, J Y; Kim, Y B; Hwang, T S; Chu, Y C

    2000-10-01

    Tumor-to-tumor metastasis is rare. We report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in meningioma. A 67-year-old woman presented a two-week history of motor dysphagia and decreased short-term memory. She had undergone a left radical nephrectomy for a renal cell carcinoma 7 years ago, and had not received any adjuvant therapy. MRI disclosed a 3.0 x 3.0 x 3.0-cm sized round tentorial-based extraaxial mass with peritumoral edema in the left posterior temporal lobe. During operation, the tumor was found to be an encapsulated mass firmly attached to the tentorium. Histologically, the tumor was a meningotheliomatous meningioma extensively infiltrated by metastatic renal cell carcinoma, accompanying widespread coagulative necrosis. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin revealed strong positivity only in the renal cell carcinoma component. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Post-operative radiation therapy was applied to the whole brain. Three months after operation, the patient developed right hemiparesis and dysphagia. Brain MRI at that time did not reveal recurrence or any other causative lesions, although the whole body scan disclosed uptake at the second lumbar vertebra and rib. The patient refused further treatment.

  6. Single cell metastatic phenotyping using pulsed nanomechanical indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babahosseini, Hesam; Strobl, Jeannine S.; Agah, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The existing approach to characterize cell biomechanical properties typically utilizes switch-like models of mechanotransduction in which cell responses are analyzed in response to a single nanomechanical indentation or a transient pulsed stress. Although this approach provides effective descriptors at population-level, at a single-cell-level, there are significant overlaps in the biomechanical descriptors of non-metastatic and metastatic cells which precludes the use of biomechanical markers for single cell metastatic phenotyping. This study presents a new promising marker for biosensing metastatic and non-metastatic cells at a single-cell-level using the effects of a dynamic microenvironment on the biomechanical properties of cells. Two non-metastatic and two metastatic epithelial breast cell lines are subjected to a pulsed stresses regimen exerted by atomic force microscopy. The force-time data obtained for the cells revealed that the non-metastatic cells increase their resistance against deformation and become more stiffened when subjected to a series of nanomechanical indentations. On the other hand, metastatic cells become slightly softened when their mechanical microenvironment is subjected to a similar dynamical changes. This distinct behavior of the non-metastatic and metastatic cells to the pulsed stresses paradigm provided a signature for single-cell-level metastatic phenotyping with a high confidence level of ∼95%.

  7. The Role of Capecitabine/Temozolomide in Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, David T.; Chauhan, Aman; Boudreaux, J. Philip; Wang, Yi-Zarn; Woltering, Eugene A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are commonly treated with multimodality therapy. The combination of capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM) has been suggested as a treatment option for patients with metastatic NETs. We present our experience with CAPTEM. Methods. Data on NET patients who were placed on CAPTEM and received at least one cycle were obtained from a Velos eResearch database. Response rate was calculated by RECIST 1.1. Overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier survival method. Results. A total of 29 patients (17 male and 12 female) were included. Median age at CAPTEM initiation was 58 years (range: 26–77). Primary tumors included 9 small bowel (31%), 15 pancreas (52%), 3 lung (10%), and 2 rectum (7%). Median number of CAPTEM cycles was 8 (range: 1–55). Partial response occurred in 5 patients (5 of 29, 17%); 14 patients (14 of 29, 48%) had stable disease, and 10 patients (10 of 29, 34%) had progressive disease. A total of 3 (20%) and 5 (33%) pancreatic NETs experienced partial response and stable disease, respectively. A total of 2 (14%) and 9 (64%) nonpancreatic NETs experienced partial response and stable disease, respectively. Partial response was noted in 1 patient (13%) and stable disease in 5 patients (63%) with Ki-67 values of less than 2%. In patients with Ki-67 values of 2%–20%, partial response was noted in 3 (19%) and stable disease in 8 (50%). Partial response and stable disease were noted in 1 patient each (20%) with Ki-67 values greater than 20%. Median PFS was 12 months. Adverse reactions caused dose reductions in 24% of patients. Conclusion. Although adverse reactions were experienced, most patients tolerated this regimen. CAPTEM should be considered as a reasonable treatment option for metastatic NET patients. Implications for Practice: The role of chemotherapy in neuroendocrine tumors has evolved in recent years. The results of this study suggest that the combination of

  8. Metastatic tumors to the adrenal glands in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Labelle, P; De Cock, H E V

    2005-01-01

    Although metastases to the adrenals are common in humans, they have not been thoroughly studied in animals. The purpose of this retrospective study was to document the types of malignant tumors that metastasize to canine, feline, equine, and bovine adrenals, and the rate at which they do so. The average rate of adrenal involvement in metastatic cancer was 112/534 (21.0%) in dogs, 12/81 (14.8%) in cats, 18/67 (26.9%) in horses, and 5/16 (31.3%) in cattle. In dogs, 26 different tumor types metastasized to the adrenals. Pulmonary, mammary, prostatic, gastric, and pancreatic carcinomas, and melanoma had the highest rates of metastasis to the adrenal glands in dogs. Hemangiosarcoma and melanoma had high rates of adrenal involvement in horses. In cats and cattle, relevant data were only available for lymphoma. Adrenal metastases usually occurred in the late stages of the disease. One dog had developed Addison's disease (hypoadrenocorticism) secondary to lymphoma. Metastatic lesions represented 126/472 (26.7%) of canine, 12/20 (60.0%) of feline, 21/80 (26.3%) of equine, and 5/9 (55.5%) of bovine adrenal neoplasms. This study shows that adrenal glands should be thoroughly examined during both clinical work-up and postmortems when disseminated neoplasia is suspected.

  9. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  10. Modulation of the Metastatic Activity of Melanoma Cells by Laminin and Fibronectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Victor P.; Williams, Jeannette E.; Liotta, Lance A.; Martin, George R.

    1984-11-01

    Metastatic mouse melanoma cells have a high affinity for the basement membrane and the ability to degrade it; these properties may allow tumor cells to invade the membrane and disseminate. In this study it was found that the metastatic potential of mouse melanoma cells varied when the cells were exposed in culture to fibronectin or laminin. After removal of fibronectin or exposure to laminin, the cells had an increased affinity for basement membrane collagen, were more invasive of basement membranes in vitro, and produced more lung colonies in vivo. These changes are correlated with and may be due to an increase in the laminin-binding capacity of the tumor cell surface.

  11. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  12. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-03-21

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities - a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes

    PubMed Central

    Winnard, Paul T.; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-01

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities – a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy. PMID:28145887

  14. Effective activity of cytokine-induced killer cells against autologous metastatic melanoma including cells with stemness features.

    PubMed

    Gammaitoni, Loretta; Giraudo, Lidia; Leuci, Valeria; Todorovic, Maja; Mesiano, Giulia; Picciotto, Franco; Pisacane, Alberto; Zaccagna, Alessandro; Volpe, Maria Giuseppa; Gallo, Susanna; Caravelli, Daniela; Giacone, Elena; Venesio, Tiziana; Balsamo, Antonella; Pignochino, Ymera; Grignani, Giovanni; Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario

    2013-08-15

    We investigate the unknown tumor-killing activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells against autologous metastatic melanoma and the elusive subset of putative cancer stem cells (mCSC). We developed a preclinical autologous model using same patient-generated CIK cells and tumor targets to consider the unique biology of each patient/tumor pairing. In primary tumor cell cultures, we visualized and immunophenotypically defined a putative mCSC subset using a novel gene transfer strategy that exploited their exclusive ability to activate the promoter of stemness gene Oct4. The CIK cells from 10 patients with metastatic melanoma were successfully expanded (median, 23-fold; range, 11-117). Primary tumor cell cultures established and characterized from the same patients were used as autologous targets. Patient-derived CIK cells efficiently killed autologous metastatic melanoma [up to 71% specific killing (n = 26)]. CIK cells were active in vivo against autologous melanoma, resulting in delayed tumor growth, increased necrotic areas, and lymphocyte infiltration at tumor sites. The metastatic melanoma cultures presented an average of 11.5% ± 2.5% putative mCSCs, which was assessed by Oct4 promoter activity and stemness marker expression (Oct4, ABCG2, ALDH, MITF). Expression was confirmed on mCSC target molecules recognized by CIK cells (MIC A/B; ULBPs). CIK tumor killing activity against mCSCs was intense (up to 71%, n = 4) and comparable with results reported against differentiated metastatic melanoma cells (P = 0.8). For the first time, the intense killing activity of CIK cells against autologous metastatic melanoma, including mCSCs, has been shown. These findings move clinical investigation of a new immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma, including mCSCs, closer. ©2013 AACR.

  15. Caffeic Acid Expands Anti-Tumor Effect of Metformin in Human Metastatic Cervical Carcinoma HTB-34 Cells: Implications of AMPK Activation and Impairment of Fatty Acids De Novo Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tyszka-Czochara, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Pawel; Majka, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy of cancer treatments is often limited and associated with substantial toxicity. Appropriate combination of drug targeting specific mechanisms may regulate metabolism of tumor cells to reduce cancer cell growth and to improve survival. Therefore, we investigated the effects of anti-diabetic drug Metformin (Met) and a natural compound caffeic acid (trans-3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid, CA) alone and in combination to treat an aggressive metastatic human cervical HTB-34 (ATCC CRL­1550) cancer cell line. CA at concentration of 100 µM, unlike Met at 10 mM, activated 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). What is more, CA contributed to the fueling of mitochondrial tricarboxylic acids (TCA) cycle with pyruvate by increasing Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDH) activity, while Met promoted glucose catabolism to lactate. Met downregulated expression of enzymes of fatty acid de novo synthesis, such as ATP Citrate Lyase (ACLY), Fatty Acid Synthase (FAS), Fatty Acyl-CoA Elongase 6 (ELOVL6), and Stearoyl-CoA Desaturase-1 (SCD1) in cancer cells. In conclusion, CA mediated reprogramming of glucose processing through TCA cycle via oxidative decarboxylation. The increased oxidative stress, as a result of CA treatment, sensitized cancer cells and, acting on cell biosynthesis and bioenergetics, made HTB-34 cells more susceptible to Met and successfully inhibited neoplastic cells. The combination of Metformin and caffeic acid to suppress cervical carcinoma cells by two independent mechanisms may provide a promising approach to cancer treatment. PMID:28230778

  16. Microwave thermal ablation of spinal metastatic bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Kastler, Adrian; Alnassan, Hussein; Aubry, Sébastien; Kastler, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    To assess feasibility, safety, and efficacy of microwave ablation of spinal metastatic bone tumors. Retrospective study of 17 patients with 20 spinal metastatic tumors treated with microwave ablation under computed tomographic guidance between March 2011 and August 2013 was performed. Ablations were performed under local anesthesia and nitrous oxide ventilation. Lesions were lumbar (n = 10), sacral (n = 7), and thoracic (n = 3) in location. Primary neoplastic sites were lung (n = 9), prostate (n = 4), kidney (n = 6), and uterus (n = 1). Adjunct cementoplasty was performed in nine cases, and a temperature-monitoring device was used in four cases. Procedure effectiveness was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) during a 6-month follow-up. Patient medical records were reviewed, and demographic and clinical data, tumor characteristics, and information on pain were assessed. Mean ablation time was 4.4 minutes ± 2.7 (range, 1-8 min), with an average of 3.8 cycles per ablation at 60 W (range, 30-70 W). The preprocedure mean VAS score was 7.4 ± 1.2 (range, 6-9). Pain relief was achieved in all but one patient. Follow-up VAS scores were as follows: day 0, 1.3 ± 1.8 (P < .001); day 7, 1.6 ± 1.7 (P < .001); month 1, 1.9 ± 1.6 (P < .001); month 3, 2.2 ± 1.5 (P < .001); and month 6, 2.3 ± 1.4 (P < .01). No complications were noted. Microwave ablation appears to be feasible, safe, and an effective treatment of painful refractory spinal metastases and may be considered as a potential alternative percutaneous technique in the management of spinal metastases. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase I active immunotherapy with combination of two chimeric, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, B-cell epitopes fused to a promiscuous T-cell epitope in patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kaumaya, Pravin T P; Foy, Kevin Chu; Garrett, Joan; Rawale, Sharad V; Vicari, Daniele; Thurmond, Jennifer M; Lamb, Tammy; Mani, Aruna; Kane, Yahaira; Balint, Catherine R; Chalupa, Donald; Otterson, Gregory A; Shapiro, Charles L; Fowler, Jeffrey M; Grever, Michael R; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios S; Carson, William E

    2009-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety profile, and immunogenicity of two chimeric, B-cell epitopes derived from the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2) extracellular domain in a combination vaccine with a promiscuous T-cell epitope (ie, MVF) and nor-muramyl-dipeptide as adjuvant emulsified in SEPPIC ISA 720. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients with metastatic and/or recurrent solid tumors received three inoculations on days 1, 22, and 43 at doses of total peptide that ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 mg. Immunogenicity was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow cytometry, and HER2 signaling assays. Results Twenty-four patients received three inoculations at the intended dose levels, which elicited antibodies able to recognize native HER2 receptor and inhibited both the proliferation of HER2-expressing cell lines and phosphorylation of the HER2 protein. The MTD was determined to be the highest dose level of 3.0 mg of the combination vaccine. There was a significant increase from dose level 1 (0.5 mg) to dose level 4 (3.0 mg) in HER2-specific antibodies. Four patients (one each with adrenal, colon, ovarian, and squamous cell carcinoma of unknown primary) were judged to have stable disease; two patients (one each with endometrial and ovarian cancer) had partial responses; and 11 patients had progressive disease. Patients with stable disease received 6-month boosts, and one patient received a 20-month boost. CONCLUSION The combination vaccines were safe and effective in eliciting antibody responses in a subset of patients (62.5%) and were associated with no serious adverse events, autoimmune disease, or cardiotoxicity. There was preliminary evidence of clinical activity in several patients.

  18. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  19. High tumor budding stratifies breast cancer with metastatic properties.

    PubMed

    Salhia, Bodour; Trippel, Mafalda; Pfaltz, Katrin; Cihoric, Nikola; Grogg, André; Lädrach, Claudia; Zlobec, Inti; Tapia, Coya

    2015-04-01

    Tumor budding refers to single or small cluster of tumor cells detached from the main tumor mass. In colon cancer high tumor budding is associated with positive lymph nodes and worse prognosis. Therefore, we investigated the value of tumor budding as a predictive feature of lymph node status in breast cancer (BC). Whole tissue sections from 148 surgical resection specimens (SRS) and 99 matched preoperative core biopsies (CB) with invasive BC of no special type were analyzed on one slide stained with pan-cytokeratin. In SRS, the total number of intratumoral (ITB) and peripheral tumor buds (PTB) in ten high-power fields (HPF) were counted. A bud was defined as a single tumor cell or a cluster of up to five tumor cells. High tumor budding equated to scores averaging >4 tumor buds across 10HPFs. In CB high tumor budding was defined as ≥10 buds/HPF. The results were correlated with pathological parameters. In SRS high PTB stratified BC with lymph node metastases (p ≤ 0.03) and lymphatic invasion (p ≤ 0.015). In CB high tumor budding was significantly (p = 0.0063) associated with venous invasion. Pathologists are able, based on morphology, to categorize BC into a high and low risk groups based in part on lymph node status. This risk assessment can be easily performed during routine diagnostics and it is time and cost effective. These results suggest that high PTB is associated with loco-regional metastasis, highlighting the possibility that this tumor feature may help in therapeutic decision-making.

  20. Chemokine axes in breast cancer: factors of the tumor microenvironment reshape the CCR7-driven metastatic spread of luminal-A breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Kossover, Olga; Körner, Cindy; Meshel, Tsipi; Wiemann, Stefan; Seliktar, Dror; Legler, Daniel F; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine axes have been shown to mediate site-specific metastasis in breast cancer, but their relevance to different subtypes has been hardly addressed. Here, with the focus on the CCR7-CCL21 axis, patient datasets demonstrated that luminal-A tumors express relatively low CCR7 levels compared with more aggressive disease subtypes. Furthermore, lymph node metastasis was not associated with high CCR7 levels in luminal-A patients. The metastatic pattern of luminal-A breast tumors may be influenced by the way luminal-A tumor cells interpret signals provided by factors of the primary tumor microenvironment. Thus, CCR7-expressing human luminal-A cells were stimulated simultaneously by factors representing 3 tumor microenvironment arms typical of luminal-A tumors, hormonal, inflammatory, and growth stimulating: estrogen + TNF-α + epidermal growth factor. Such tumor microenvironment stimulation down-regulated the migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells toward CCL21 and inhibited the formation of directional protrusions toward CCL21 in a novel 3-dimensional hydrogel system. CCL21-induced migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells depended on PI3K and MAPK activation; however, when CCR7-expressing cancer cells were prestimulated by tumor microenvironment factors, CCL21 could not effectively activate these signaling pathways. In vivo, pre-exposure of the tumor cells to tumor microenvironment factors has put restraints on CCL21-mediated lymph node-homing cues and shifted the metastatic pattern of CCR7-expressing cells to the aggressive phenotype of dissemination to bones. Several of the aspects were also studied in the CXCR4-CXCL12 system, demonstrating similar patient and in vitro findings. Thus, we provide novel evidence to subtype-specific regulation of the CCR7-CCL21 axis, with more general implications to chemokine-dependent patterns of metastatic spread, revealing differential regulation in the luminal-A subtype.

  1. Identification of an aptamer through whole cell-SELEX for targeting high metastatic liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yin, Chang-Qing; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human cancers due to its ability of invasion and metastasis. Thus, the approaches to identify potential compounds that inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC are critical for treatment of this disease. In the present study, we used HCCLM9 cells with high metastatic potential and MHCC97L with low metastatic potential as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis. By applying cell- Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) against living cells, we used HCCLM9 as target cells and MHCC97L cells as control to screen a group of HCC metastasis- and cell-specific DNA aptamers. One of selected aptamers, LY-1, could specifically bind to metastatic HCC with a dissociation constant (Kd) in nanomolar range. In vitro studies demonstrated that LY-1 can recognize and bind to membrane protein of metastatic HCC cells. Furthermore, QD605 labeled LY-1 aptamer could recognize HCC cells in both local liver cancer tissues and pulmonary metastatic sites in a xenograft model of HCC with pulmonary metastasis. Further biochemical and immunostaining studies showed that LY-1 could selectively bind to a subpopulation of more metastatic cells in HCCLM9 cells, which express more CK19 and vimentin. Finally, treatment of highly metastatic cells with LY-1 led to reduced migration and invasiveness of HCCLM9 cells in vitro and suppression of xenograft growth in vivo. Taken together, the present study demonstrated the tumor targeting and tumor suppressive effects of LY-1, which could be a promising molecular probe for metastatic HCC and a potential candidate of chemotherapy for metastatic HCC. PMID:26882565

  2. Tumor Reduction in Primary and Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Lesions With nab-Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Kunzmann, Volker; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Goldstein, David; Liu, Helen; Ferrara, Stefano; Lu, Brian; Renschler, Markus F.; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Results from the phase 3 Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial (MPACT) led to approval of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine for first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. The current analysis evaluated the effects of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine on primary pancreatic and metastatic lesions. Methods In this analysis of the previously described MPACT trial, changes in pancreatic and metastatic tumor burden were assessed using independently measured diameters of lesions on computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. Changes in the sums of longest tumor diameters were summarized using descriptive statistics and were included in a multivariate analysis of overall survival. Results Primary pancreatic lesion measurement was feasible. Reductions in primary pancreatic tumor burden and metastatic burden from baseline to nadir were significantly greater with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine. Baseline pancreatic tumor burden was independently predictive of survival. Both regimens elicited linear reductions in primary pancreatic and metastatic tumor burden through time. There was a high within-patient concordance of tumor changes between primary pancreatic lesions and metastatic lesions. Conclusions This analysis of MPACT demonstrated significant tumor shrinkage benefit for nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine in both primary pancreatic and metastatic lesions, supporting ongoing evaluation of this regimen in locally advanced disease. PMID:27841795

  3. Photothermal and immunological reactions against metastatic tumors using laser photosensitizer immunoadjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; El-Samad, Ahmad; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1999-06-01

    Photothermal tissue interaction is the most common phenomenon when laser energy is deposited in tissue. Because of the sensitivity of cancer cells to temperature increase, photothermal reaction can be an effective mechanism of direct cancer destruction using lasers. Tumor-specific immune response is crucial in achieving systemic and long-term cures for cancers, particularly for metastatic cancers. Can photothermal interaction induce sufficient immunological reaction when the local destruction of tumor cells occurs? To achieve selective photothermal destruction, indocyanine green as a photosensitizer was directly injected into rat mammary tumors, followed by irradiation of 805 nm laser light. Although extensive photothermal tumor killing was achieved and tumor growth was slowed down immediately following the treatment, photothermal reaction alone was shown not sufficient in controlling the treated primary tumors and their metastases. When an immunoadjuvant was used with the indocyanine green, however, the same laser treatment not only could eventually eradicate the treated primary tumors but also eradicate the untreated metastases at remote sites. The tumor eradication went through a growth-regression process over a period of six to nine weeks post-treatment, indicating an induced immune response. The Western Blot analysis using the serum from a laser-immunotherapy cured rat showed that the tumor-specific antibody induced by the treatment had a long- lasting effect. Our experimental data indicated that photothermal interaction alone was not sufficient to slow and eventually reverse tumor growth. However, it can reduce the tumor burden and at the same time release tumor antigens to be recognized by the host immune system. Therefore, in conjunction with specific immunological stimulation using in situ immunoadjuvants, the selective thermal injury to tumors plays an important and a direct role in this laser immunotherapy.

  4. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  5. Establishment of a multimarker qPCR panel for the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in blood samples of metastatic breast cancer patients during the course of palliative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bredemeier, Maren; Edimiris, Philippos; Tewes, Mitra; Mach, Pawel; Aktas, Bahriye; Schellbach, Doreen; Wagner, Jenny; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTC) are discussed to be an ideal surrogate marker for individualized treatment in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) since metastatic tissue is often difficult to obtain for repeated analysis. We established a nine gene qPCR panel to characterize the heterogeneous CTC population in MBC patients including epithelial CTC, their receptors (EPCAM, ERBB2, ERBB3, EGFR) CTC in Epithelial-Mesenchymal-Transition [(EMT); PIK3CA, AKT2), stem cell-like CTC (ALDH1) as well as resistant CTC (ERCC1, AURKA] to identify individual therapeutic targets. Results At TP0, at least one marker was detected in 84%, at TP1 in 74% and at TP2 in 79% of the patients, respectively. The expression of ERBB2, ERBB3 and ERCC1 alone or in combination with AURKA was significantly associated with therapy failure. ERBB2 + CTC were only detected in patients not receiving ERBB2 targeted therapies which correlated with no response. Furthermore, patients responding at TP2 had a significantly prolonged overall-survival than patients never responding (p = 0.0090). Patients and Methods 2 × 5 ml blood of 62 MBC patients was collected at the time of disease progression (TP0) and at two clinical staging time points (TP1 and TP2) after 8–12 weeks of chemo-, hormone or antibody therapy for the detection of CTC (AdnaTest EMT-2/StemCell Select™, QIAGEN Hannover GmbH, Germany). After pre-amplification, multiplex qPCR was performed. Establishment was performed using various cancer cell lines. PTPRC (Protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type C) and GAPDH served as controls. Conclusions Monitoring MBC patients using a multimarker qPCR panel for the characterization of CTC might help to treat patients accordingly in the future. PMID:27223437

  6. Primary Tumor-Secreted Lymphangiogenic Factors Induce Pre-Metastatic Lymphvascular Niche Formation at Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wakisaka, Naohiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Yoshimoto, Seiichi; Miura, Kouki; Shiotani, Akihiro; Yokoyama, Junkichi; Sugasawa, Masashi; Moriyama-Kita, Makiko; Endo, Kazuhira; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to evaluate the formation of lymphvascular niches in lymph nodes of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and investigate the roles of lymphangiogenic and angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D, expressed in the primary tumors. Materials and Methods Forty-four patients with previously untreated clinically late T2 or T3 OSCC of cN0 were evaluated for primary tumors and 166 sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Primary tumors were immunohistochemically analyzed for expressions of VEGFs. Densities of lymphatic vessels (LVDpodoplanin) and high endothelial venules (HEVD) in the SLNs were also calculated using antibodies for each marker, podoplanin and MECA-79, respectively. Results In 25 patients, all lymph nodes were metastasis-negative, whereas, in 19 patients, metastasis was positive for at least one lymph node (either at SLN, non-SLN, or nodal recurrence). From the analyses of 140 SLNs without metastasis, LVDpodoplanin in 50 SLNs of metastasis-positive cases was significantly higher than that in 90 SLNs of metastasis-negative cases (p = 0.0025). HEVD was not associated with lymph node metastasis. The patients with VEGF-A-High or VEGF-D-High tumors had significantly higher LVDpodoplanin than patients with their Low counterparts (p = 0.0233 and p = 0.0209, respectively). In cases with lymph node metastasis, the VEGF-D-expression score was significantly higher than in those without lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0006). Conclusions These results suggest that lymph node lymphangiogenesis occurs before metastasis in OSCC. VEGF-A and VEGF-D play critical roles in this process. VEGF-D is a potential predictive marker of positive lymph node metastasis in cN0 patients. PMID:26630663

  7. Dietary Selenium Supplementation Modulates Growth of Brain Metastatic Tumors and Changes the Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Brain Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Wolff, Gretchen; Xiao, Rijin; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Various dietary agents can modulate tumor invasiveness. The current study explored whether selenoglycoproteins (SeGPs) extracted from selenium-enriched yeast affect tumor cell homing and growth in the brain. Mice were fed diets enriched with specific SeGPs (SeGP40 or SeGP65, 1 mg/kg Se each), glycoproteins (GP40 or GP65, 0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se each) or a control diet (0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se) for 12 weeks. Then, murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells were infused into the brain circulation. Analyses were performed at early (48 h) and late stages (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Imaging of tumor progression in the brain revealed that mice fed SeGP65-enriched diet displayed diminished metastatic tumor growth, fewer extravasating tumor cells and smaller metastatic lesions. While administration of tumor cells resulted in a significant upregulation of adhesion molecules in the early stage of tumor progression, overexpression of VCAM-1 (vascular call adhesion molecule-1) and ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) messenger RNA (mRNA) was diminished in SeGP65 supplemented mice. Additionally, mice fed SeGP65 showed decreased expression of acetylated NF-κB p65, 48 h post tumor cell infusion. The results indicate that tumor progression in the brain can be modulated by specific SeGPs. Selenium-containing compounds were more effective than their glycoprotein controls, implicating selenium as a potential negative regulator of metastatic process.

  8. Increased Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor (SLPI) Production by Highly Metastatic Mouse Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Kevin T.; Brooks, Alan D.; Sayers, Thomas J.; Chertov, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular mechanisms enabling cancer cells to metastasize from the primary tumor to different tissue locations are still largely unknown. Secretion of some proteins by metastatic cells could facilitate metastasis formation. The comparison of secreted proteins from cancer cells with different metastatic capabilities in vivo might provide insight into proteins involved in the metastatic process. Comparison of the secreted proteins from the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1 and its highly metastatic 4T1.2 clone revealed a prominent differentially secreted protein which was identified as SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor). Western blotting indicated higher levels of the protein in both conditioned media and whole cell lysates of 4T1.2 cells. Additionally higher levels of SLPI were also observed in 4T1.2 breast tumors in vivo following immunohistochemical staining. A comparison of SLPI mRNA levels by gene profiling using microarrays and RT-PCR did not detect major differences in SLPI gene expression between the 4T1 and 4T1.2 cells indicating that SLPI secretion is regulated at the protein level. Our results demonstrate that secretion of SLPI is drastically increased in highly metastatic cells, suggesting a possible role for SLPI in enhancing the metastatic behavior of breast cancer cell line 4T1. PMID:25110884

  9. Lymph Node-Targeted Immunotherapy Mediates Potent Immunity Resulting in Regression of Isolated or Metastatic HPV-Transformed Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kent A.; Meisenburg, Brenna L.; Tam, Victor L.; Pagarigan, Robb R.; Wong, Raymond; Joea, Diljeet K.; Lantzy, Liz; Carrillo, Mayra A.; Gross, Todd M.; Malyankar, Uriel M.; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Da Silva, Diane M.; Kündig, Thomas M.; Kast, W. Martin; Qiu, Zhiyong; Bot, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of a novel immunotherapy strategy resulting in immunity to localized or metastatic HPV 16-transformed murine tumors. Experimental design Animals bearing E7-expressing tumors were co-immunized by lymph node injection with E7 49-57 antigen and TLR3-ligand (synthetic dsRNA). Immune responses were measured by flow cytometry and anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated by tumor size and survival. In situ cytotoxicity assays and identification of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and T regulatory cells were used to assess the mechanisms of treatment resistance in bulky disease. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide was explored to augment immunotherapy in late-stage disease. Results In therapeutic and prophylactic settings, immunization resulted in a considerable expansion of E7 49-57 antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the range of 1/10 CD8+ T cells. The resulting immunity was effective in suppressing disease progression and mortality in a pulmonary metastatic disease model. Therapeutic immunization resulted in control of isolated tumors up to a certain volume, and correlated with anti-tumor immune responses measured in blood. In situ analysis showed that within bulky tumors, T cell function was affected by negative regulatory mechanisms linked to an increase in T regulatory cells and could be overcome by cyclophosphamide treatment in conjunction with immunization. Conclusions This study highlights a novel cancer immunotherapy platform with potential for translatability to the clinic and suggests its potential usefulness for controlling metastatic disease, solid tumors of limited size, or larger tumors when combined with cytotoxic agents that reduce the number of tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells. PMID:19789304

  10. A Distinct Macrophage Population Mediates Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Extravasation, Establishment and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Binzhi; Deng, Yan; Im, Jae Hong; Muschel, Ruth J.; Zou, Yiyu; Li, Jiufeng; Lang, Richard A.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2009-01-01

    Background The stromal microenvironment and particularly the macrophage component of primary tumors influence their malignant potential. However, at the metastatic site the role of these cells and their mechanism of actions for establishment and growth of metastases remain largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Using animal models of breast cancer metastasis, we show that a population of host macrophages displaying a distinct phenotype is recruited to extravasating pulmonary metastatic cells regardless of species of origin. Ablation of this macrophage population through three independent means (genetic and chemical) showed that these macrophages are required for efficient metastatic seeding and growth. Importantly, even after metastatic growth is established, ablation of this macrophage population inhibited subsequent growth. Furthermore, imaging of intact lungs revealed that macrophages are required for efficient tumor cell extravasation. Conclusion/Significance These data indicate a direct enhancement of metastatic growth by macrophages through their effects on tumor cell extravasation, survival and subsequent growth and identifies these cells as a new therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic disease. PMID:19668347

  11. Different growth and metastatic phenotypes associated with a cell-intrinsic change of Met in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Eri; Sakai, Katsuya; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Imamura, Ryu; Sato, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic phenotypic change contributes to the metastatic progression and drug resistance in malignant melanoma. Nevertheless, mechanisms for a phenotypic change have remained to be addressed. Here, we show that Met receptor expression changes in a cell-autonomous manner and can distinguish phenotypical differences in growth, as well as in metastatic and drug-resistant characteristics. In metastatic melanoma, the cells are composed of Met-low and Met-high populations. Met-low populations have stem-like gene expression profiles, are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, and have shown abundant angiogenesis and rapid tumor growth in subcutaneous inoculation. Met-high populations have a differentiated phenotype, are relatively resistant to B-RAF inhibitor, and are highly metastatic to the lungs. Met plays a definitive role in lung metastasis because the lung metastasis of Met-high cells requires Met, and treatment of mice with the Met-containing exosomes from Met-high cells facilitates lung metastasis by Met-low cells. Clonal cell fate analysis showed the hierarchical phenotypical changes from Met-low to Met-high populations. Met-low cells either showed self-renewal or changed into Met-high cells, whereas Met-high cells remained Met-high. Clonal transition from Met-low to Met-high cells accompanied changes in the gene expression profile, in tumor growth, and in metastasis that were similar to those in Met-high cells. These findings indicate that malignant melanoma has the ability to undergo phenotypic change by a cell-intrinsic/autonomous mechanism that can be characterized by Met expression. PMID:27683122

  12. Curing metastatic cancer: lessons from testicular germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Masters, John R W; Köberle, Beate

    2003-07-01

    Most metastatic cancers are fatal. More than 80% of patients with metastatic testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCTs), however, can be cured using cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Why are TGCTs more sensitive to chemotherapeutics than most other tumour types? Answers to this question could lead to new treatments for metastatic cancers.

  13. New therapeutic approaches to metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: A glimpse into the future

    PubMed Central

    Cidon, Esther Una

    2017-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) gastroenteropancreatic tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasias arising from neuroendocrine cells of the embryological gut. Their incidence have increased significantly over the past 3 decades probably due to the improvements in imaging and diagnosis. The recent advances in molecular biology have translated into an expansion of therapeutic approaches to these patients. Somatostatin analogs, which initially were approved for control of hormonal syndromes, have recently been proven to inhibit tumor growth. Several new drugs such as antiangiogenics and others targeting mammalian target of rapamycin pathways have been approved to treat progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) although their role in non-pancreatic is still controversial. The treatment of NETs requires a coordinated multidisciplinary approach. The management of localized NETs primarily involves surgical resection followed by surveillance. However, the treatment of unresectable and/or metastatic disease may involve a combination of surgical resection, systemic therapy, and liver-directed therapies with the goal of alleviating symptoms of peptide release and controlling tumor growth. This article will review the current therapeutic strategies for metastatic gastroenteropancreatic NETs and will take a glimpse into the future approaches. PMID:28144395

  14. Comparative proteomic investigation of metastatic and non-metastatic osteosarcoma cells of human and canine origin.

    PubMed

    Roy, Jahnabi; Wycislo, Kathryn L; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in dogs and people. In order to improve clinical outcomes, it is necessary to identify proteins that are differentially expressed by metastatic cells. Membrane bound proteins are responsible for multiple pro-metastatic functions. Therefore characterizing the differential expression of membranous proteins between metastatic and non-metastatic clonal variants will allow the discovery of druggable targets and consequently improve treatment methodology. The objective of this investigation was to systemically identify the membrane-associated proteomics of metastatic and non-metastatic variants of human and canine origin. Two clonal variants of divergent in vivo metastatic potential from human and canine origins were used. The plasma membranes were isolated and peptide fingerprinting was used to identify differentially expressed proteins. Selected proteins were further validated using western blotting, flow cytometry, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Over 500 proteins were identified for each cell line with nearly 40% of the proteins differentially regulated. Conserved between both species, metastatic variants demonstrated significant differences in expression of membrane proteins that are responsible for pro-metastatic functions. Additionally, CD147, CD44 and vimentin were validated using various biochemical techniques. Taken together, through a comparative proteomic approach we have identified several differentially expressed cell membrane proteins that will help in the development of future therapeutics.

  15. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  17. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Errami, Mounir; Margulis, Vitali; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Because of the asymptomatic natural history of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), by the time a diagnosis is made, metastatic disease is present in about one third of the cases. Thus, the overall survival of patients with RCC remains poor. Ultimately up to 50% of patients with RCC will develop metastases. Metastatic lesions from RCC are usually observed in the lungs, liver or bone. Metastases to the brain or the skin from RCC are rare. Here we present a patient diagnosed with RCC, found to have no evidence of metastases at the time of nephrectomy, who presented two years later with metastases to the scalp. We review the literature of patients with this rare site of metastasis and outline the overall prognosis of this lesion compared to other site of metastases from RCC. PMID:28191289

  18. Orbitofacial Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma: Report of 10 Cases.

    PubMed

    Branson, Sara V; McClintic, Elysa; Ozgur, Omar; Esmaeli, Bita; Yeatts, R Patrick

    To explore the clinical features, management, and prognosis of metastatic basal cell carcinoma originating in the orbitofacial region. Ten cases of orbitofacial metastatic basal cell carcinoma were identified by searching databases at 2 institutions from 1995 to 2015. A retrospective chart review was performed. Main outcome measures included patient demographics, lesion size, location of metastases, histologic subtype, recurrence rate, time between primary tumor diagnosis and metastasis, perineural invasion, treatment modalities, and survival from time of metastasis. The median tumor size at largest dimension was 3.3 cm (range, 1.9-11.5 cm), and 6 of 10 patients had at least 1 local recurrence before metastasis (range, 0-2 recurrences). The most common sites of metastasis included the ipsilateral parotid gland (n = 6) and cervical lymph nodes (n = 5). Histologic subtypes included infiltrative (n = 5), basosquamous (n = 2), nodular (n = 1), and mixed (n = 1). The median time from primary tumor diagnosis to metastasis was 7.5 years (range, 0-13). The median survival time from diagnosis of metastasis to last documented encounter or death was 5.3 years (range, 7 months-22.8 years). Treatment regimens included surgical excision, radiotherapy, and hedgehog inhibitors. Based on our findings, the following features may be markers of high risk orbitofacial basal cell carcinoma: 1) increasing tumor size, 2) local recurrence of the primary tumor, 3) aggressive histologic subtype, and 4) perineural invasion. Screening should include close observation of the primary site and tissues in the distribution of regional lymphatics, particularly the parotid gland and cervical lymph nodes.

  19. Proteome profiling of exosomes derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells reveal differential expression of key metastatic factors and signal transduction components.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Greening, David W; Barnes, Thomas W; Lim, Justin W; Tauro, Bow J; Rai, Alin; Xu, Rong; Adda, Christopher; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular 40-100 nm diameter membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that can mediate intercellular transfer of RNAs and proteins to assist premetastatic niche formation. Using primary (SW480) and metastatic (SW620) human isogenic colorectal cancer cell lines we compared exosome protein profiles to yield valuable insights into metastatic factors and signaling molecules fundamental to tumor progression. Exosomes purified using OptiPrep™ density gradient fractionation were 40-100 nm in diameter, were of a buoyant density ~1.09 g/mL, and displayed stereotypic exosomal markers TSG101, Alix, and CD63. A major finding was the selective enrichment of metastatic factors (MET, S100A8, S100A9, TNC), signal transduction molecules (EFNB2, JAG1, SRC, TNIK), and lipid raft and lipid raft-associated components (CAV1, FLOT1, FLOT2, PROM1) in exosomes derived from metastatic SW620 cells. Additionally, using cryo-electron microscopy, ultrastructural components in exosomes were identified. A key finding of this study was the detection and colocalization of protein complexes EPCAM-CLDN7 and TNIK-RAP2A in colorectal cancer cell exosomes. The selective enrichment of metastatic factors and signaling pathway components in metastatic colon cancer cell-derived exosomes contributes to our understanding of the cross-talk between tumor and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  1. The utility of tetraspanin CD9 as a biomarker for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Garner, Jo M; Herr, Michael J; Hodges, Kurt B; Jennings, Lisa K

    2016-02-26

    The use of tetraspanin CD9 as a biomarker for renal cell carcinomas (RCC) has been explored with minor conclusions. Identification of a biomarker that not only distinguishes between the different types of renal cell carcinomas, but also predicts the metastatic potential of these tumors would significantly advance diagnosis and prognosis of kidney cancers. We utilized established cell lines to better understand the contribution of CD9 to the metastatic potential of clear cell renal cell carcinomas, and then applied our findings to the TCGA database and immunohistochemical analysis of human samples based on tumor grading to determine the utility of CD9 as a biomarker for RCC. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cell expression of tetraspanin CD9 was compared to normal kidney cells and found to be elevated. Upon knockdown of CD9, ccRCC cells obtained a more metastatic phenotype. We found E-cadherin expression to be repressed and the endothelial to mesenchymal transition markers Snail, Twist1, and Zeb1 to be elevated upon CD9 knockdown. Upon observing these gene expression changes in the TCGA database and in 10 cases, we found that CD9 and E-cadherin expression was lowered in higher grade ccRCC tumors. There was a significant correlation between CD9 and either E-cadherin, Snail, or Zeb1 in these tumors. Collectively, using tetraspanin CD9 in tandem with E-cadherin as a biomarker in renal cell carcinoma will help to not only distinguish between types, but also predict the metastatic potential of RCC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hypoxia-induced lysyl oxidase is a critical mediator of bone marrow cell recruitment to form the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Erler, Janine T.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Cox, Thomas R.; Lang, Georgina; Bird, Demelza; Koong, Albert; Le, Quynh-Thu; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tumor cell metastasis is facilitated by “pre-metastatic niches” formed in destination organs by invading bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs). Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is critical for pre-metastatic niche formation. LOX secreted by hypoxic breast tumor cells accumulates at pre-metastatic sites, cross-links collagen-IV in the basement membrane, and is essential for CD11b+ myeloid cell recruitment. CD11b+ cells adhere to cross-linked collagen-IV and produce matrix metalloproteinase-2 which cleaves collagen, enhancing the invasion and recruitment of BMDCs and metastasizing tumor cells. LOX inhibition prevents CD11b+ cell recruitment and metastatic growth. CD11b+ cells and LOX also co-localize in biopsies of human metastases. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for LOX in pre-metastatic niche formation and support targeting LOX for the treatment and prevention of metastatic disease. PMID:19111879

  3. Optical redox ratio identifies metastatic potential-dependent changes in breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alhallak, Kinan; Rebello, Lisa G.; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    The development of prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic risk could reduce the number of patients receiving chemotherapy for tumors with low metastatic potential. Recent evidence points to a critical role for cell metabolism in driving breast cancer metastasis. Endogenous fluorescence intensity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) can provide a label-free method for assessing cell metabolism. We report the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD + NADH) of four isogenic triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with varying metastatic potential. Under normoxic conditions, the redox ratio increases with increasing metastatic potential (168FARN>4T07>4T1), indicating a shift to more oxidative metabolism in cells capable of metastasis. Reoxygenation following acute hypoxia increased the redox ratio by 43 ± 9% and 33 ± 4% in the 4T1 and 4T07 cells, respectively; in contrast, the redox ratio decreased 14 ± 7% in the non-metastatic 67NR cell line. These results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio is sensitive to the metabolic adaptability of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential and could potentially be used to measure dynamic functional changes that are indicative of invasive or metastatic potential. PMID:27895979

  4. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer.

  5. Dasatinib, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Malignant Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-09

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Methyl Sulfone Blocked Multiple Hypoxia- and Non-Hypoxia-Induced Metastatic Targets in Breast Cancer Cells and Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joan McIntyre; Caron, Jane McIntyre

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancer causes 90% of cancer deaths. Unlike many primary tumors, metastatic tumors cannot be cured by surgery alone. Metastatic cancer requires chemotherapy. However, metastatic cells are not easily killed by chemotherapy. These problems with chemotherapy are caused in part by the metastatic cell niche: hypoxia. Here we show that the molecule, methyl sulfone, normalized metastatic metabolism of hypoxic breast cancer and melanoma cells by altering several metabolic functions of the cells. Under hypoxia, methyl sulfone decreased expression of the master regulator of hypoxia, HIF-1α, and reduced levels of the glycolytic enzymes, PKM2, LDHA, GLUT1, the pro-angiogenic protein, VEGF, and the iron-sulfur metabolism molecules, miR-210 and transferrin, all of which promote metastasis. Conversely, methyl sulfone increased levels of ISCU1/2 and ferroportin, proteins associated with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis in normal cells. These data identify methyl sulfone as a multi-targeting molecule that blocks the survival/proliferative effect of hypoxia on metastatic cells and brings normality back to cellular metabolism. PMID:26536104

  7. Loss of Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 2 in Prostate Cancer Is Linked to an Aggressive Cancer Phenotype, High Tumor Cell Proliferation and Predicts Early Metastatic and Biochemical Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Hennigs, Jan K.; Müller, Julia; Adam, Matti; Spin, Joshua M.; Riedel, Emilia; Graefen, Markus; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Sauter, Guido; Huland, Hartwig; Schlomm, Thorsten; Minner, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) is the most frequently expressed SSTR subtype in normal human tissues. SSTR2 expression is differentially regulated in various tumor types and therapeutic somatostatin analogs binding to SSTR2 are in clinical use. In prostate cancers highly contradictory results in terms of SSTR2 expression and its consequences have been published over the past years. The aim of this study was to clarify prevalence and clinical significance of SSTR2 expression in prostate cancer. Therefore, quantitative immunohistochemistry (IHC) using a tissue microarray containing samples from 3,261 prostate cancer patients with extensive clinical and molecular cancer characteristics and oncological follow-up data was performed. IHC data was compared to publicly available Gene Expression Omnibus datasets of human prostate cancer gene expression arrays. While membranous SSTR2 staining was always seen in normal prostate epithelium, SSTR2 staining was absent in more than half (56.1%) of 2,195 interpretable prostate cancer samples. About 13% of all analyzed prostate cancers showed moderate to strong cytoplasmic and membranous SSTR2 staining. Staining intensities were inversely correlated with high Gleason grade, advanced pT category, high tumor cell proliferation (p<0.0001 each), high pre-operative PSA levels, (p = 0.0011) and positive surgical margins (p = 0.006). In silico analysis confirmed lower SSTR2 gene expression in prostate cancers vs. normal adjacent tissue (p = 0.0424), prostate cancer metastases vs. primary cancers (p = 0.0011) and recurrent vs. non-recurrent prostate cancers (p = 0.0438). PSA-free survival gradually declined with SSTR2 staining intensity (p<0.0001). SSTR2-negative cancers were more likely to develop metastases over time (p<0.05). In conclusion, most prostate cancers are indeed SSTR2-negative and loss of SSTR2 strongly predicts an unfavorable tumor phenotype and poor prognosis. Therefore, SSTR2 expression seems

  8. Prognostic factors in patients with metastatic germ cell tumors who experienced treatment failure with cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Anja; Beyer, Jörg; Bascoul-Mollevi, Caroline; Kramar, Andrew; Einhorn, Lawrence H; Necchi, Andrea; Massard, Christophe; De Giorgi, Ugo; Fléchon, Aude; Margolin, Kim A; Lotz, Jean-Pierre; Germa Lluch, Jose Ramon; Powles, Thomas; Kollmannsberger, Christian K

    2010-11-20

    To develop a prognostic model in patients with germ cell tumors (GCT) who experience treatment failure with cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy. Data from 1,984 patients with GCT who progressed after at least three cisplatin-based cycles and were treated with cisplatin-based conventional-dose or carboplatin-based high-dose salvage chemotherapy was retrospectively collected from 38 centers/groups worldwide. One thousand five hundred ninety-four (80%) of 1,984 eligible patients were randomly divided into a training set of 1,067 patients (67%) and a validation set of 527 patients (33%). Seminomas were set aside for posthoc analyses. Primary end point was the 2-year progression-free survival after salvage treatment. Overall, 990 patients (62%) relapsed and 604 patients (38%) remained relapse free. Histology, primary tumor location, response, and progression-free interval after first-line treatment, as well as levels of alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotrophin, and the presence of liver, bone, or brain metastases at salvage were identified as independent prognostic variables and used to build a prognostic model in the training set. Survival rates in the training and validation set were very similar. The estimated 2-year progression-free survival rates in patients not included in the training set was 75% in very low risk, 51% in low risk, 40% in intermediate risk, 26% in high risk, and only 6% in very high-risk patients. Due to missing values in individual variables, 69 patients could not reliably be classified into one of these categories. Prognostic variables are important in patients with GCT who experienced treatment failure with cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy and can be used to construct a prognostic model to guide salvage strategies.

  9. Primary breast tumor-derived cellular models: characterization of tumorigenic, metastatic, and cancer-associated fibroblasts in dissociated tumor (DT) cultures.

    PubMed

    Drews-Elger, Katherine; Brinkman, Joeli A; Miller, Philip; Shah, Sanket H; Harrell, J Chuck; da Silva, Thiago G; Ao, Zheng; Schlater, Amy; Azzam, Diana J; Diehl, Kathleen; Thomas, Dafydd; Slingerland, Joyce M; Perou, Charles M; Lippman, Marc E; El-Ashry, Dorraya

    2014-04-01

    Our goal was to establish primary cultures from dissociation of breast tumors in order to provide cellular models that may better recapitulate breast cancer pathogenesis and the metastatic process. Here, we report the characterization of six cellular models derived from the dissociation of primary breast tumor specimens, referred to as "dissociated tumor (DT) cells." In vitro, DT cells were characterized by proliferation assays, colony formation assays, protein, and gene expression profiling, including PAM50 predictor analysis. In vivo, tumorigenic and metastatic potential of DT cultures was assessed in NOD/SCID and NSG mice. These cellular models differ from recently developed patient-derived xenograft models in that they can be used for both in vitro and in vivo studies. PAM50 predictor analysis showed DT cultures similar to their paired primary tumor and as belonging to the basal and Her2-enriched subtypes. In vivo, three DT cultures are tumorigenic in NOD/SCID and NSG mice, and one of these is metastatic to lymph nodes and lung after orthotopic inoculation into the mammary fat pad, without excision of the primary tumor. Three DT cultures comprised of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were isolated from luminal A, Her2-enriched, and basal primary tumors. Among the DT cells are those that are tumorigenic and metastatic in immunosuppressed mice, offering novel cellular models of ER-negative breast cancer subtypes. A group of CAFs provide tumor subtype-specific components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). Altogether, these DT cultures provide closer-to-primary cellular models for the study of breast cancer pathogenesis, metastasis, and TME.

  10. Microenvironment -Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0352 TITLE: Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean...Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...that eventually kills the patient. Although many PCa cell -intrinsic molecules and end-organ factors have been implicated in the metastatic

  11. Current Treatment Algorithms for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell, Non-Squamous Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The treatment paradigm for metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer is continuously evolving due to new treatment options and our increasing knowledge of molecular signal pathways. As a result of treatments becoming more efficacious and more personalized, survival for selected groups of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is increasing. In this paper, three algorithms will be presented for treating patients with metastatic non-squamous, NSCLC. These include treatment algorithms for NSCLC patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations, ALK rearrangements, or wild-type/wild-type tumors. As the world of immunotherapy continues to evolve quickly, a future algorithm will also be presented. PMID:28373963

  12. Adoptive Cell Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Merhavi-Shoham, Efrat; Itzhaki, Orit; Markel, Gal; Schachter, Jacob; Besser, Michal J

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is a powerful form of immunotherapy by inducing durable complete responses that significantly extend the survival of melanoma patients. Mutation-derived neoantigens were recently identified as key factors for tumor recognition and rejection by TILs. The isolation of T-cell receptor (TCR) genes directed against neoantigens and their retransduction into peripheral T cells may provide a new form of ACT.Genetic modifications of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have demonstrated remarkable clinical results in hematologic malignancies, but are so far less effective in solid tumors. Only very limited reports exist in melanoma. Progress in CAR T-cell engineering, including neutralization of inhibitory signals or additional safety switches, may open opportunities also in melanoma.We review clinical results and latest developments of adoptive therapies with TILs, T-cell receptor, and CAR-modified T cells and discuss future directions for the treatment of melanoma.

  13. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  14. Isolation and sequencing of a cDNA clone encoding the 85 kDa human lysosomal sialoglycoprotein (hLGP85) in human metastatic pancreas islet tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fujita, H; Takata, Y; Kono, A; Tanaka, Y; Takahashi, T; Himeno, M; Kato, K

    1992-04-30

    A full length cDNA for a human lysosomal membrane sialoglycoprotein (hLGP85) was isolated as a probe of the cDNA of rat LGP85 (rLGP85) from the cDNA library prepared from total mRNA of QGP-1NL cells, a human pancreatic islet tumor cell with a high metastatic activity. The deduced amino acid sequence shows that hLGP85 consists of 478 amino acid residues (MW. 54,289). The protein has 10 putative N-glycosylation sites and 2 hydrophobic regions at the NH2- and near the COOH-termini, respectively. Thus, both domains probably constitute putative transmembrane domains. It exhibits 86% and 79% sequence similarities in amino acids and nucleic acids to rat lysosomal membrane sialoglycoprotein (rLGP85), respectively. The protein contained the short cytoplasmic tail at the COOH-terminus which does not form the glycine-tyrosine sequence (GY motif), the so-called lysosomal targetting signal.

  15. Astrocytes from the brain microenvironment alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shumakovich, Marina A; Mencio, Caitlin P; Siglin, Jonathan S; Moriarty, Rebecca A; Geller, Herbert M; Stroka, Kimberly M

    2017-08-09

    Tumor cell metastasis to the brain involves cell migration through biochemically and physically complex microenvironments at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The current understanding of tumor cell migration across the BBB is limited. We hypothesize that an interplay between biochemical cues and physical cues at the BBB affects the mechanisms of brain metastasis. We found that astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) applied directly to tumor cells increased tumor cell velocity, induced elongation, and promoted actin stress fiber organization. Notably, treatment of the extracellular matrix with ACM led to even more significant increases in tumor cell velocity in comparison with ACM treatment of cells directly. Furthermore, inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases in ACM reversed ACM's effect on tumor cells. The effects of ACM on tumor cell morphology and migration also depended on astrocytes' activation state. Finally, using a microfluidic device, we found that the effects of ACM were abrogated in confinement. Overall, our work demonstrates that astrocyte-secreted factors alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast tumor cells, and this effect depends on the cells' mechanical microenvironment.-Shumakovich, M. A., Mencio, C. P., Siglin, J. S., Moriarty, R. A., Geller, H. M., Stroka, K. M. Astrocytes from the brain microenvironment alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast cancer cells. © FASEB.

  16. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  17. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  18. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  19. Fourier analysis of cell motility: correlation of motility with metastatic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Partin, A W; Schoeniger, J S; Mohler, J L; Coffey, D S

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a computerized, mathematical system for quantitating the various types of cell motility. This Fourier analysis method simultaneously quantifies for individual cells (i) temporal changes in cell shape represented by cell ruffling, undulation, and pseudopodal extension, (ii) cell translation, and (iii) average cell size and shape. This spatial-temporal Fourier analysis was tested on a series of well-characterized animal tumor cell lines of rat prostatic cancer to study in a quantitative manner the correlation of cell motility with increasing in vivo metastatic potential. Fourier motility coefficients measuring pseudopodal extension correlated best with metastatic potential in the cell lines studied. This study demonstrated that Fourier analysis provides quantitative measurement of cell motility that may be applied to the study of biological processes. This analysis should aid in the study of the motility of individual cells in various areas of cellular and tumor biology. Images PMID:2919174

  20. In Vivo Bioluminescence Tomography for Monitoring Breast Tumor Growth and Metastatic Spreading: Comparative Study and Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Mollard, Séverine; Fanciullino, Raphaelle; Giacometti, Sarah; Serdjebi, Cindy; Benzekry, Sebastien; Ciccolini, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the reliability and precision of Diffuse Luminescent Imaging Tomography (DLIT) for monitoring primary tumor and metastatic spreading in breast cancer mice, and to develop a biomathematical model to describe the collected data. Using orthotopic mammary fat pad model of breast cancer (MDAMB231-Luc) in mice, we monitored tumor and metastatic spreading by three-dimensional (3D) bioluminescence and cross-validated it with standard bioluminescence imaging, caliper measurement and necropsy examination. DLIT imaging proved to be reproducible and reliable throughout time. It was possible to discriminate secondary lesions from the main breast cancer, without removing the primary tumor. Preferential metastatic sites were lungs, peritoneum and lymph nodes. Necropsy examinations confirmed DLIT measurements. Marked differences in growth profiles were observed, with an overestimation of the exponential phase when using a caliper as compared with bioluminescence. Our mathematical model taking into account the balance between living and necrotic cells proved to be able to reproduce the experimental data obtained with a caliper or DLIT imaging, because it could discriminate proliferative living cells from a more composite mass consisting of tumor cells, necrotic cell, or inflammatory tissues. DLIT imaging combined with mathematical modeling could be a powerful and informative tool in experimental oncology. PMID:27812027

  1. The effect of Neovastat (AE-941) on an experimental metastatic bone tumor model.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael H; Lee, Joanne; Orr, F William

    2002-02-01

    Bone metastases are generally associated with bone destruction which occurs in response to factors secreted by metastatic cells. Some of these factors secreted by the metastatic cells activate osteoclats while others are proteases that degrade bone collagen. To determine if Neovastat (AE-941), a naturally occurring multi-functional inhibitor of angiogenesis, is able to regulate properties that are thought to have relevance to their propensity to form bone metastases in vivo, we used the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line which can metastasize to bone. We showed that Neovastat prevented the degradation of osteoid-like radiolabeled extracellular matrices which was induced by incubation of human SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells with MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, Neovastat was demonstrated to inhibit the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expressed by MDA-MB-231 cells. The potential of Neovastat to retard the spread, growth, and osteolysis of MDA-MB-231 cells was then estimated in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the vertebral bodies indicated that MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated in nude mice (intracardiac) successfully generate osteolytic metastases with an 83% reduction of the volume of medullary bone (p< or =0.01). However, when tumor-bearing animals were treated orally with Neovastat, there was only a 19% decrease in medullary bone thus indicating that Neovastat can prevent bone metastasis in this model. Consistent with histological results, radiographic analysis indicated that Neovastat decreased the number of osteolytic lesions by 33% (p< or =0.3). Moreover, a decrease in the tumor volume in bone was observed in Neovastat-treated animals. These results indicate that Neovastat may be useful in preventing bone metastasis in cancer patients.

  2. Exosomes secreted from human colon cancer cells influence the adhesion of neighboring metastatic cells: Role of microRNA-210

    PubMed Central

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Guasti, Daniele; Cinci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer-secreted exosomes influence tumor microenvironment and support cancer growth and metastasis. MiR-210 is frequently up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues and correlates with metastatic disease. We investigated whether exosomes are actively released by HCT-8 colon cancer cells, the role of exosomal miR-210 in the cross-talk between primary cancer cells and neighboring metastatic cells and its contribution in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). After 7 d of culture, a subpopulation of viable HCT-8 cells detached the monolayer and started to grow in suspension, suggesting anoikis resistance and a metastatic potential. The expression of key proteins of EMT revealed that these cells were E-cadherin negative and vimentin positive further confirming their metastatic phenotype and the acquisition of anoikis resistance. Metastatic cells, in the presence of adherently growing HCT-8, continued to grow in suspension whereas only if seeded in cell-free wells, were able to adhere again and to form E-cadherin positive and vimentin negative new colonies, suggesting the occurrence of MET. The chemosensitivity to 5 fluorouracil and to FOLFOX-like treatment of metastatic cells was significantly diminished compared to adherent HCT-8 cells. Of note, adherent new colonies undergoing MET, were insensitive to both chemotherapeutic strategies. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that adherently growing HCT-8, actually secreted exosomes and that exosomes in turn were taken up by metastatic cells. When exosomes secreted by adherently growing HCT-8 were administered to metastatic cells, MET was significantly inhibited. miR-210 was significantly upregulated in exosomes compared to its intracellular levels in adherently growing HCT-8 cells and correlated to anoikis resistance and EMT markers. Exosomes containing miR-210 might be considered as EMT promoting signals that preserve the local cancer

  3. Metastatic tumors to the penis: a report of 17 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Alcides; Amin, Mahul; Cubilla, Antonio L; Young, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    This study presents clinicopathologic and outcome features of 17 patients with metastatic tumor to the penis. Primary sites and histological types were as follows: 6 urothelial carcinomas of urinary bladder, 4 prostatic carcinomas (2 adenocarcinomas and 2 adenosquamous carcinomas), 2 colorectal adenocarcinomas, 2 pulmonary carcinomas (1 squamous cell carcinoma and 1 small cell carcinoma), 1 squamous cell carcinoma of base of the tongue, 1 cutaneous malignant melanoma, and 1 acute myeloid leukemia. Literature review revealed similar distribution of organ sites in 437 cases. Most of our tumors were metachronous. Interval between primary and penile metastasis ranged from 3 to 60 months (mean 16 months). Most of the patients presented with a penile mass. Priapism was observed in 4 patients. The shaft was the commonest anatomical site involved (12 cases). Tumor emboli were usually found in the erectile tissues (14 cases), mainly corpora cavernosa. A total of 14 patients died of disseminated disease. Time interval between primary tumor and penile metastasis ranged from 3 to 60 months (mean 19 months) and between diagnosis of penile metastasis and death ranged from 0.25 to 18 months (mean 6 months), significantly shorter (P = .0058). Patients presented a median survival of 18 months from primary treatment and 5 months after diagnosis of penile metastasis. None of the patients who died of disseminated cancer lived more than 18 months after pathological diagnosis. Clinical evidence of penile involvement in a patient with a known malignancy is an ominous sign and should alert the clinicians to the dismal prognosis.

  4. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland.

  5. Melanoma exosomes educate bone marrow progenitor cells toward a pro-metastatic phenotype through MET

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Héctor; Alečković, Maša; Lavotshkin, Simon; Matei, Irina; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Hergueta-Redondo, Marta; Williams, Caitlin; García-Santos, Guillermo; Nitadori-Hoshino, Ayuko; Hoffman, Caitlin; Badal, Karen; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Callahan, Margaret K.; Yuan, Jianda; Martins, Vilma R.; Skog, Johan; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Brady, Mary S.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Kang, Yibin; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging mediators of tumorigenesis with tissue-specific addresses and messages. We explored the function of melanoma-derived exosomes in the formation of primary tumor and metastases in mouse and human subjects. Exosomes from highly metastatic melanoma increased the metastatic behavior of primary tumors by permanently “educating” bone marrow (BM) progenitors via the MET receptor. Melanoma-derived exosomes also induced vascular leakiness at pre-metastatic sites, and reprogrammed BM progenitors towards a c-Kit+Tie2+Met+ pro-vasculogenic phenotype. Reducing Met expression in exosomes diminished the pro-metastatic behavior of BM cells. Importantly, MET expression was elevated in circulating CD45−C-KITlow/+TIE2+ BM progenitors from metastatic melanoma subjects. RAB1a, RAB5b, RAB7, and RAB27a were highly expressed in melanoma cells and Rab27a RNA interference decreased exosome production, preventing BM education, tumor growth and metastasis. Finally, we identified an exosome-specific “melanoma signature” with prognostic and therapeutic potential, comprised of TYRP2, VLA-4, HSP70, an HSP90 isoform and the MET oncoprotein. PMID:22635005

  6. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  7. Transfusion of sickle cells may be a therapeutic option for patients suffering metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease will sickle under conditions of hypoxemia and acidosis which is a similar milieu found in malignant tumors. While control of tumor angiogenesis has long been a goal of cancer therapy, selective occlusion of tumor blood supply may be achieved by transfusion of sickle cells into patients who suffer metastatic cancer. Although this potential therapy has not been previously reported in the medical literature, the concept may have been elusive to medical mainstream thinking because it requires transfusion of diseased cells. For this therapy to be effective, other environmental factors may need to be manipulated such inducing mild hypoxemia or hypercarbia (respiratory acidosis) to induce red cell sickling. Preliminary evidence supportive of this therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is provided by case evidence that sickle cell occlusion of a malignant brain tumor (glioma) produced tumor necrosis. Also sickle cells have been successfully transfused into primates. Furthermore, donor blood is crossmatched and transfused into patients suffering from sickle cell disease regularly in clinics and this procedure is associated with acceptable morbidity. Most importantly, animal models of sickle cell disease and cancer currently exist, and this theory could be tried with available technologies including ultrasound detection of vaso-occlusion. While the proposed therapy may not cure metastatic cancer, this treatment could prove useful for decreasing the size and perhaps the pain from metastatic tumor burden. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ABO Rh compatible crossmatched sickle cells transfused into patients who suffer metastatic cancer under controlled conditions of blood oxygenation and pH will selectively produce vaso-occlusive infarcts in malignant tumors and be a useful therapy. The author hopes for further investigations.

  8. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents.

  9. Automatic metastatic brain tumor segmentation for stereotactic radiosurgery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Hrycushko, Brian; Wardak, Zabi; Lu, Weiguo; Yan, Yulong; Jiang, Steve B.; Timmerman, Robert; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Nedzi, Lucien; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop an automatic segmentation strategy for efficient and accurate metastatic brain tumor delineation on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1c) magnetic resonance images (MRI) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The proposed four-step automatic brain metastases segmentation strategy is comprised of pre-processing, initial contouring, contour evolution, and contour triage. First, T1c brain images are preprocessed to remove the skull. Second, an initial tumor contour is created using a multi-scaled adaptive threshold-based bounding box and a super-voxel clustering technique. Third, the initial contours are evolved to the tumor boundary using a regional active contour technique. Fourth, all detected false-positive contours are removed with geometric characterization. The segmentation process was validated on a realistic virtual phantom containing Gaussian or Rician noise. For each type of noise distribution, five different noise levels were tested. Twenty-one cases from the multimodal brain tumor image segmentation (BRATS) challenge dataset and fifteen clinical metastases cases were also included in validation. Segmentation performance was quantified by the Dice coefficient (DC), normalized mutual information (NMI), structural similarity (SSIM), Hausdorff distance (HD), mean value of surface-to-surface distance (MSSD) and standard deviation of surface-to-surface distance (SDSSD). In the numerical phantom study, the evaluation yielded a DC of 0.98  ±  0.01, an NMI of 0.97  ±  0.01, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 2.2  ±  0.8 mm, an MSSD of 0.1  ±  0.1 mm, and an SDSSD of 0.3  ±  0.1 mm. The validation on the BRATS data resulted in a DC of 0.89  ±  0.08, which outperform the BRATS challenge algorithms. Evaluation on clinical datasets gave a DC of 0.86  ±  0.09, an NMI of 0.80  ±  0.11, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 8

  10. Automatic metastatic brain tumor segmentation for stereotactic radiosurgery applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Hrycushko, Brian; Wardak, Zabi; Lu, Weiguo; Yan, Yulong; Jiang, Steve B; Timmerman, Robert; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Nedzi, Lucien; Gu, Xuejun

    2016-12-21

    The objective of this study is to develop an automatic segmentation strategy for efficient and accurate metastatic brain tumor delineation on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1c) magnetic resonance images (MRI) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) applications. The proposed four-step automatic brain metastases segmentation strategy is comprised of pre-processing, initial contouring, contour evolution, and contour triage. First, T1c brain images are preprocessed to remove the skull. Second, an initial tumor contour is created using a multi-scaled adaptive threshold-based bounding box and a super-voxel clustering technique. Third, the initial contours are evolved to the tumor boundary using a regional active contour technique. Fourth, all detected false-positive contours are removed with geometric characterization. The segmentation process was validated on a realistic virtual phantom containing Gaussian or Rician noise. For each type of noise distribution, five different noise levels were tested. Twenty-one cases from the multimodal brain tumor image segmentation (BRATS) challenge dataset and fifteen clinical metastases cases were also included in validation. Segmentation performance was quantified by the Dice coefficient (DC), normalized mutual information (NMI), structural similarity (SSIM), Hausdorff distance (HD), mean value of surface-to-surface distance (MSSD) and standard deviation of surface-to-surface distance (SDSSD). In the numerical phantom study, the evaluation yielded a DC of 0.98  ±  0.01, an NMI of 0.97  ±  0.01, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 2.2  ±  0.8 mm, an MSSD of 0.1  ±  0.1 mm, and an SDSSD of 0.3  ±  0.1 mm. The validation on the BRATS data resulted in a DC of 0.89  ±  0.08, which outperform the BRATS challenge algorithms. Evaluation on clinical datasets gave a DC of 0.86  ±  0.09, an NMI of 0.80  ±  0.11, an SSIM of 0.999  ±  0.001, an HD of 8

  11. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anus to the lung confirmed with allelotyping.

    PubMed

    Roth, Rachel; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan; Leon, Marino E

    2014-01-01

    Histopathologic techniques are insufficient for distinguishing primary squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from metastatic SCC, which is clinically important. A patient with SCC of the anus was found to also have SCC of the lung, and the question of metastatic versus synchronous primary diseases was raised. Immunohistochemical and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining on sections of tissue could not discriminate between the two entities. Immunostain for p16 and chromogenic in situ hybridization for human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 were positive in both tumors. Additionally, allelotyping for loss of heterozygosity displayed similar findings and confirmed the histopathological impression of anal SCC metastasis to the lung. The patient was treated with palliative chemotherapy instead of additional surgical treatment. When multiple tumors are present, determining metastatic versus synchronous primary tumors is necessary for appropriate treatment. Identification can be achieved using allelotyping for loss of heterozygosity.

  12. [Disseminated metastatic tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata presenting intractable hiccups. A case report].

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kikuta, Ken-ichirou

    2011-04-01

    We report the case of disseminated metastatic tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata presenting intractable hiccups. A 73-year-old man has a history of for metastatic lung tumor of the left tempral lobe. Although 3 surgeries and 4 radiotherapies were performed in the last 8 years, residual tumor grew slowly. He presented with intractable hiccups. His hiccups continued for 30 minutes, sometimes for 3 hours with obstruction of eating. Contrast-enhanced Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated the dissemination of metastatic lung tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata and ventral surface of midbrain. Some literatures reported the patients with intractable hiccups caused by dorsal medullary lesions. Therefore, we thought that the small disseminated tumor at dorsal surface of medulla oblongata caused the hiccups. Evaluation of dorsal medullay area by MR imaging is important to reveal the cause of intractable hiccups.

  13. An animal model for colon cancer metastatic cell line with enhanced metastasizing ability. Establishment and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Cheng, J Y; Tzeng, C C; Yeh, M Y; Meng, C L

    1991-06-01

    We have developed an animal model for colon cancer metastasis and produced a metastasizing tumor after using a microinjection technique to inject SW480 cells into the cecal wall of athymic nude mice during "minilaparotomy." After the metastatic foci formed in murine lung, an in vitro primary culture was performed and a new metastatic cancer cell line, which was designated as CC-ML3, was established. The studies included: 1) the comparison between SW 480 and CC-ML3 in morphology, growth kinetics, seeding and plating efficiency, and karyotype; and 2) carcino-embryonic antigen determination, origination, and metastatic ability of CC-ML3. The results showed that CC-ML3 was significantly different from SW480 in vitro and possessed a high metastatic potential in vivo. This newly developed animal model may thus be useful for studying the biology and pathogenesis of metastasis of human colonic cancer.

  14. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  15. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Weight, Ryan M; Viator, John A; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Lisle, Allison E

    2006-10-15

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  16. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weight, Ryan M.; Viator, John A.; Dale, Paul S.; Caldwell, Charles W.; Lisle, Allison E.

    2006-10-01

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  17. Establishment and characterization of a novel human cholangiocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic activity.

    PubMed

    Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Seubwai, Wunchana; Talabnin, Chutima; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Obchoei, Sumalee; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Okada, Seiji; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly metastatic tumor, and the lung is a common site of metastasis. A greater understanding of the biology of metastases is needed to improve treatment outcomes. Herein, a highly metastatic human CCA subline, KKU-213L5 from an original cell line, KKU-213 that has marginally metastatic ability, was established and characterized. KKU-213L5 was selected in vivo through the fifth serial passage of pulmonary metastasized tissues via tail-vein injection in NOD/scid/Jak3 mice. The metastatic abilities of the KKU-213L5 cells were compared with the parental line in vitro and in vivo. The expression profile of this metastatic cell line was determined using real-time PCR. KKU-213L5 cells were found to possess higher metastatic phenotypes, i.e., growth rates, stem cell surface markers (CD133), migration and invasion characteristics when compared with the parental cells. Compared to the KKU-213 cells, KKU-213L5 cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous xenografted mice and had a >10-fold increase in lung metastases in the tail-vein injected metastatic mouse model. Mice injected intravenously with KKU-213L5 cells had a significantly shorter survival. Analysis of the expressed genes related to progression of cancer revealed significant upregulation of anterior gradient protein-2 (AGR2) and suppression of KiSS-1 in the KKU-213L5 cells. The association of these two genes with metastasis was affirmed in CCA patient tissues since increased AGR2 expression and decreased KiSS-1 expression were found in higher stage patient tumors. In conclusion, a highly metastatic human CCA cell line was established and characterized. It is plausible that the differential expression between the parental KKU-213 and highly metastatic KKU-213L5 cells may be beneficial to classify novel genes associated with metastasis. The KKU-213L5 cell line should serve as a valued device for discovering the molecular mechanisms of CCA metastasis and enabling the search for an

  18. Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Dhaliwal, Ravinder S; Kufuor-Mensah, Eric

    2007-02-01

    A 7-year-old, spayed female Persian cat was referred for evaluation of progressive paraplegia. The cat was thin, cachectic and paraplegic on presentation. The survey radiographs showed a left caudal pulmonary lesion and lytic skeletal lesions at the right iliac crest and left distal scapula. Due to a poor prognosis for complete recovery, the owner opted for euthanasia. Post-mortem examination revealed bilaterally small and irregular kidneys, lysis of the left iliac crest and left distal scapula and a dilated left ventricular lumen with a thin interventricular septum. Histologically, all the lesions were determined to be squamous cell carcinoma. It appears that the origin or the primary site of the malignancy in this case is pulmonary as cardiac and skeletal tissues are primarily mesenchymal in origin and are less likely to develop a primary epithelial malignancy. To the best of our knowledge, there is no description of cardiac or skeletal metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in a cat.

  19. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  20. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Staal, Jerome A.; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities. PMID:27775567

  1. A Proteogenomic Approach to Understanding MYC Function in Metastatic Medulloblastoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Staal, Jerome A; Pei, Yanxin; Rood, Brian R

    2016-10-19

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and medulloblastoma is the most prevalent malignant childhood/pediatric brain tumor. Providing effective treatment for these cancers, with minimal damage to the still-developing brain, remains one of the greatest challenges faced by clinicians. Understanding the diverse events driving tumor formation, maintenance, progression, and recurrence is necessary for identifying novel targeted therapeutics and improving survival of patients with this disease. Genomic copy number alteration data, together with clinical studies, identifies c-MYC amplification as an important risk factor associated with the most aggressive forms of medulloblastoma with marked metastatic potential. Yet despite this, very little is known regarding the impact of such genomic abnormalities upon the functional biology of the tumor cell. We discuss here how recent advances in quantitative proteomic techniques are now providing new insights into the functional biology of these aggressive tumors, as illustrated by the use of proteomics to bridge the gap between the genotype and phenotype in the case of c-MYC-amplified/associated medulloblastoma. These integrated proteogenomic approaches now provide a new platform for understanding cancer biology by providing a functional context to frame genomic abnormalities.

  2. Detection of metastatic tumor in normal-sized retroperitoneal lymph nodes by monoclonal-antibody imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Sears, H.F.; Mulhern, C.B. Jr.; Hammond, N.D.; Powe, J.; Gatenby, R.A.; Steplewski, Z.; Koprowski, H.

    1984-07-12

    Detection of metastatic colon carcinoma is reported in retroperitoneal lymph nodes that were visible but normal in size (less than 1 cm) and number on CT scanning and at surgery. A case history is presented of 1 of 27 patients with colon carcinoma, metastatic or primary, evaluated with intravenously administered, radiolabeled monoclonal-antibody fragments and subsequent nuclear medicine imaging. Images of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red cells corresponding to each (/sup 131/I)antibody view of the abdomen were obtained as a control, to avoid interpretation of simple blood-pool radioactivity as specific localization of antibody on tumor. Antibody images were evaluated both without and with computer blood-pool image substraction. Directed to the level of the left renal hilum by the antibody scan, the surgeon removed the largest palpable node, which measured slightly less than 1 cm in diameter and was not palpably or visibly abnormal to the surgeon until it was removed and sectioned. Pathological evaluation of frozen and permanent sections revealed microscopic foci of adenocarcinoma consistent with a colonic primary tumor. Immunoperoxidase staining for the 1083-17-1A colorectal-carcinoma antigen demonstrated the presence of the antigen in the lymph node. As a result of the detection of this metastasis outside the liver, the patient did not receive the planned hepatic-artery chemotherapy pump but instead received intravenous chemotherapy.

  3. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  4. Minimal residual disease and circulating tumor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cell dissemination in bone marrow or other organs is thought to represent an important step in the metastatic process. The detection of bone marrow disseminated tumor cells is associated with worse outcome in early breast cancer. Moreover, the detection of peripheral blood circulating tumor cells is an adverse prognostic factor in metastatic breast cancer, and emerging data suggest that this is also true for early disease. Beyond enumeration, the characterization of these cells has the potential to improve risk assessment, treatment selection and monitoring, and the development of novel therapeutic agents, and to advance our understanding of the biology of metastasis. PMID:22078011

  5. Minimal residual disease and circulating tumor cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Reinholz, Monica

    2011-10-25

    Tumor cell dissemination in bone marrow or other organs is thought to represent an important step in the metastatic process. The detection of bone marrow disseminated tumor cells is associated with worse outcome in early breast cancer. Moreover, the detection of peripheral blood circulating tumor cells is an adverse prognostic factor in metastatic breast cancer, and emerging data suggest that this is also true for early disease. Beyond enumeration, the characterization of these cells has the potential to improve risk assessment, treatment selection and monitoring, and the development of novel therapeutic agents, and to advance our understanding of the biology of metastasis.

  6. Resection of Carcinoid Tumor Metastatic to the Right Ventricle and Tricuspid Valve.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adam R; Wang, Andrew; Kim, Han; Milano, Carmelo A

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoid tumors rarely metastasize to the heart, and previous reports involved the myocardium only. We present a case of carcinoid tumor metastatic to the right ventricle (RV) and tricuspid valve. Preoperative cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) showed the tumor arising from the right ventricular free wall and involving the tricuspid valve apparatus. The tumor was resected through a right atriotomy and required tricuspid valve replacement.

  7. Circulating Tumor Cell Counts Are Prognostic of Overall Survival in SWOG S0421: A Phase III Trial of Docetaxel With or Without Atrasentan for Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldkorn, Amir; Ely, Benjamin; Quinn, David I.; Tangen, Catherine M.; Fink, Louis M.; Xu, Tong; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J.; Agarwal, Neeraj; Carducci, Michael A.; Monk, J. Paul; Datar, Ram H.; Garzotto, Mark; Mack, Philip C.; Lara, Primo; Higano, Celestia S.; Hussain, Maha; Thompson, Ian Murchie; Cote, Richard J.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration has not been prospectively validated in standard first-line docetaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We assessed the prognostic value of CTCs for overall survival (OS) and disease response in S0421, a phase III trial of docetaxel plus prednisone with or without atrasentan. Patients and Methods CTCs were enumerated at baseline (day 0) and before cycle two (day 21) using CellSearch. Baseline counts and changes in counts from day 0 to 21 were evaluated for association with OS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and RECIST response using Cox regression as well as receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) analysis, and regression trees. Results Median day-0 CTC count was five cells per 7.5 mL, and CTCs < versus ≥ five per 7.5 mL were significantly associated with baseline PSA, bone pain, liver disease, hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, and subsequent PSA and RECIST response. Median OS was 26 months for < five versus 13 months for ≥ five CTCs per 7.5 mL at day 0 (hazard ratio [HR], 2.74 [adjusting for covariates]). ROC curves had higher areas under the curve for day-0 CTCs than for PSA, and IDI analysis showed that adding day-0 CTCs to baseline PSA and other covariates increased predictive accuracy for survival by 8% to 10%. Regression trees yielded new prognostic subgroups, and rising CTC count from day 0 to 21 was associated with shorter OS (HR, 2.55). Conclusion These data validate the prognostic utility of CTC enumeration in a large docetaxel-based prospective cohort. Baseline CTC counts were prognostic, and rising CTCs at 3 weeks heralded significantly worse OS, potentially serving as an early metric to help redirect and optimize therapy in this clinical setting. PMID:24616308

  8. Circulating tumor cell counts are prognostic of overall survival in SWOG S0421: a phase III trial of docetaxel with or without atrasentan for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, Amir; Ely, Benjamin; Quinn, David I; Tangen, Catherine M; Fink, Louis M; Xu, Tong; Twardowski, Przemyslaw; Van Veldhuizen, Peter J; Agarwal, Neeraj; Carducci, Michael A; Monk, J Paul; Datar, Ram H; Garzotto, Mark; Mack, Philip C; Lara, Primo; Higano, Celestia S; Hussain, Maha; Thompson, Ian Murchie; Cote, Richard J; Vogelzang, Nicholas J

    2014-04-10

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration has not been prospectively validated in standard first-line docetaxel treatment for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We assessed the prognostic value of CTCs for overall survival (OS) and disease response in S0421, a phase III trial of docetaxel plus prednisone with or without atrasentan. CTCs were enumerated at baseline (day 0) and before cycle two (day 21) using CellSearch. Baseline counts and changes in counts from day 0 to 21 were evaluated for association with OS, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and RECIST response using Cox regression as well as receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) analysis, and regression trees. Median day-0 CTC count was five cells per 7.5 mL, and CTCs < versus ≥ five per 7.5 mL were significantly associated with baseline PSA, bone pain, liver disease, hemoglobin, alkaline phosphatase, and subsequent PSA and RECIST response. Median OS was 26 months for < five versus 13 months for ≥ five CTCs per 7.5 mL at day 0 (hazard ratio [HR], 2.74 [adjusting for covariates]). ROC curves had higher areas under the curve for day-0 CTCs than for PSA, and IDI analysis showed that adding day-0 CTCs to baseline PSA and other covariates increased predictive accuracy for survival by 8% to 10%. Regression trees yielded new prognostic subgroups, and rising CTC count from day 0 to 21 was associated with shorter OS (HR, 2.55). These data validate the prognostic utility of CTC enumeration in a large docetaxel-based prospective cohort. Baseline CTC counts were prognostic, and rising CTCs at 3 weeks heralded significantly worse OS, potentially serving as an early metric to help redirect and optimize therapy in this clinical setting.

  9. Anti-tumor activity and the mechanism of SIP-S: A sulfated polysaccharide with anti-metastatic effect.

    PubMed

    Zong, Aizhen; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Yan; Song, Xinlei; Shi, Yikang; Cao, Hongzhi; Liu, Chunhui; Cheng, Yanna; Jiang, Wenjie; Du, Fangling; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-09-20

    Our previous studies demonstrated that SIP-S had anti-metastatic activity and inhibited the growth of metastatic foci. Here we report the anti-tumor and immunoregulatory potential of SIP-S. SIP-S could significantly inhibit tumor growth in S180-bearing mice, and the inhibition rates was 43.7% at 30 mg/kg d. Besides, SIP-S could improve the thymus and spleen indices of S180-bearing mice and the mice treated with CTX. The combination of SIP-S (15 mg/kg d) with CTX (12.5 mg/kg d) showed higher anti-tumor potency than CTX (25 mg/kg d) alone. These results indicated that SIP-S had immunoenhancing and anticancer activity, and the immunoenhancing activity might be one mechanism for its anti-tumor activity. Flow cytometry results showed that SIP-S could induce tumor cells apoptosis. Western blot analysis indicated that SIP-S could upregulate the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, caspase-3, -8, -9 and Bax, and downregulate the expression of anti-apoptotic protein PARP-1 in tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, SIP-S has anti-tumor activity, which may be associated with its immunostimulating and pro-apoptotic activity.

  10. Evidence for a Role of Tumor-Derived Laminin-511 in the Metastatic Progression of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jenny; Kusuma, Nicole; Anderson, Robin; Parker, Belinda; Bidwell, Bradley; Zamurs, Laura; Nice, Edouard; Pouliot, Normand

    2007-01-01

    Most studies investigating laminins (LMs) in breast cancer have focused on LM-111 or LM-332. Little is known, however, about the expression and function of α5 chain-containing LM-511/521 during metastatic progression. Expression of LM-511/521 subunits was examined in genetically related breast tumor lines and corresponding primary tumors and metastases in a syngeneic mouse model using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. The results from our investigation indicate that LM-511 rather than LM-111, -332, or -521 correlates with metastatic potential in mouse mammary tumors. LM-511 was a potent adhesive substrate for both murine and human breast carcinoma cells and promoted strong haptotactic responses in metastatic lines. Haptotaxis was mediated by α3 integrin in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and was strongly inhibited by blocking antibodies against this integrin subunit. However, whereas nonmetastatic MCF-7 cells migrated toward LM-511 primarily via α3β1 integrin, results from antibody perturbation experiments and flow cytometry analysis suggest that this response is mediated by an as yet unidentified α3β integrin heterodimer (other than α3β1) in MDA-MB-231 cells. These results are consistent with earlier reports implicating α3 integrins in breast cancer progression and support the role of LM-511 as a functional substrate regulating breast cancer metastasis. PMID:17525279

  11. Kinetics of metastatic breast cancer cell trafficking in bone

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Pushkar A.; Mercer, Robyn R.; Harms, John F.; Jia, Yujiang; Frost, Andra R.; Jewell, Jennifer L.; Bussard, Karen M.; Nelson, Shakira; Moore, Cynthia; Kappes, John C.; Gay, Carol V.; Mastro, Andrea M.; Welch, Danny R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose In vivo studies have focused on the latter stages of the bone metastatic process (osteolysis), while little is known about earlier events, e.g., arrival, localization, initial colonization. Defining these initial steps may potentially identify critical points susceptible to therapeutic intervention. Experimental Design MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells engineered with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected into the cardiac left ventricle of athymic mice. Femurs were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR, flow cytometry and histomorphometry at times ranging from 1 hr to 6 wk. Results Single cells were found in distal metaphyses at 1 hr post-injection and remained as single cells up to 72 hr. Diaphyseal arrest occurred rarely and few cells remained there after 24 hr. At 1 wk, numerous foci (2–10 cells) were observed, mostly adjacent to osteoblast-like cells. By 2 wk, fewer but larger foci (≥50 cells) were seen. Most bones had a single large mass at 4 wk (originating from a colony or coalescing foci) which extended into the diaphysis by 4–6 wk. Little change (<20%) in osteoblast or osteoclast numbers was observed at 2 wk; but, at 4–6 wk osteoblasts were dramatically reduced (8% of control), while osteoclasts were reduced modestly (to ~60% of control). Conclusions Early arrest in metaphysis and minimal retention in diaphysis highlight the importance of local milieu in determining metastatic potential. These results extend the Seed and Soil hypothesis by demonstrating both inter- and intra-tissue differences governing metastasis location. Ours is the first in vivo evidence that tumor cells influence not only osteoclasts, as widely believed, but also eliminate functional osteoblasts, thereby restructuring the bone microenvironment to favor osteolysis. The data also explain why bisphosphonates do heal bone despite inhibiting resorption, implying that concurrent strategies that restore osteoblast function are

  12. Characterization of the metastatic phenotype of a panel of established osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Zhu, Jack; Briggs, Joseph W; Halsey, Charles; Hong, Ellen S; Burkett, Sandra S; Morrow, James; Lizardo, Michael M; Osborne, Tanasa; Li, Samuel Q; Luu, Hue H; Meltzer, Paul; Khanna, Chand

    2015-10-06

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common bone tumor in pediatric patients. Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. The rarity of this disease coupled with the challenges of drug development for metastatic cancers have slowed the delivery of improvements in long-term outcomes for these patients. In this study, we collected 18 OS cell lines, confirmed their expression of bone markers and complex karyotypes, and characterized their in vivo tumorgenicity and metastatic potential. Since prior reports included conflicting descriptions of the metastatic and in vivo phenotypes of these models, there was a need for a comparative assessment of metastatic phenotypes using identical procedures in the hands of a single investigative group. We expect that this single characterization will accelerate the study of this metastatic cancer. Using these models we evaluated the expression of six previously reported metastasis-related OS genes. Ezrin was the only gene consistently differentially expressed in all the pairs of high/low metastatic OS cells. We then used a subtractive gene expression approach of the high and low human metastatic cells to identify novel genes that may be involved in OS metastasis. PHLDA1 (pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A) was identified as one of the genes more highly expressed in the high metastatic compared to low metastatic cells. Knocking down PHLDA1 with siRNA or shRNA resulted in down regulation of the activities of MAPKs (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Reducing the expression of PHLDA1 also delayed OS metastasis progression in mouse xenograft models.

  13. Imaging changes following stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic intracranial tumors: differentiating pseudoprogression from tumor progression and its effect on clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery has become standard adjuvant treatment for patients with metastatic intracranial lesions. There has been a growing appreciation for benign imaging changes following radiation that are difficult to distinguish from true tumor progression. These imaging changes, termed pseudoprogression, carry significant implications for patient management. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of pseudoprogression in metastatic brain lesions, research to differentiate pseudoprogression from true progression, and clinical implications of pseudoprogression on treatment decisions. PMID:24233257

  14. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    S. CHAHAL, MANPREET; TERESA KU, H.; ZHANG, ZHIHONG; M. LEGASPI, CHRISTIAN; LUO, ANGELA; M. HOPKINS, MANDI; E. MEIER, KATHRYN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Materials and Methods: Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Results: Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and metastatic cell lines. One of the most striking new findings was up-regulation of mRNA for the matricellular protein WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) in metastatic cells; increased protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Other differentially expressed genes included those for reproductive homeobox 5 (Rhox5; increased in metastatic) and cystatin 7 (Cst7; decreased in metastatic). Differences between PLD2-expressing and parental cell lines were limited but included the signaling proteins Ras guanyl releasing protein 1 (RGS18; increased with PLD2) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2; decreased with PLD2). Conclusion: The results provide insights into signaling pathways potentially involved in conferring metastatic ability on lymphoma cells. PMID:27807066

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joachims, Zohar; Feinmesser, Raphael; Purim, Ofer; Halpern, Marisa; Brenner, Baruch; Fenig, Eyal; Roizman, Pepi; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Feinmesser, Meora

    2008-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the development and progression of many tumors, and its inhibition has been shown to block tumor growth. This study examined COX-2 expression in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 26 primary MCCs and 7 lymph node metastases were stained immunohistochemically with a monoclonal antibody directed against COX-2, and the percentage and intensity of staining were analyzed semiquantitatively. Immunopositivity for COX-2 was found in 20 primary tumors (77%), and was diffuse in 16 of them (80%). Staining intensity was strong in 5 tumors (19%), moderate in 6 (23%), and weak in 9 (35%). Five metastases (71%) showed similar staining. Prominent mitotic activity was associated with more diffuse COX-2 immunopositivity. No association was found between COX-2 expression and outcome. This study confirms that most MCCs express COX-2 and shows that COX-2 expression is related to one parameter of aggressive behavior--a high mitotic rate--but not to any others. The possibility of treating MCC with COX-2 inhibitors should be considered.

  16. Papillary thyroid carcinoma with extensive squamous dedifferentiation metastatic to the lung: BRAF mutational analysis as a useful tool to rule out tumor to tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Pins, Michael R

    2016-02-01

    Tumors containing elements of both papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are rare but well documented. When they present initially as metastatic disease in an organ that can harbor a primary SCC, the possibility of a tumor to tumor metastasis (TTM) must be considered. The aim of this case study is to illustrate how BRAF mutational analysis can be used to help differentiate between these two diagnoses. We report a 63-year-old male with a longstanding history of PTC metastatic to the brain and lymph nodes who presented to our institution with a right lower lobe lung mass after a 2-year recurrence-free interval. Histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a composite neoplasm with distinct elements of both PTC and SCC. We performed BRAF (V600E) (c.1799 T > A) mutational analysis to help elucidate the origin of each component. This is the first time that BRAF sequencing has been used to discriminate between dedifferentiated PTC and TTM, to the best of our knowledge. In the context of metastatic PTC with SCC dedifferentiation, the presence of the identical BRAF (V600E) (c.1799 T > A) mutation in both components might help rule out tumor to tumor metastasis.

  17. Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Hiroyuki Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

  18. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Bear, Adham S; Kennedy, Laura C; Young, Joseph K; Perna, Serena K; Mattos Almeida, Joao Paulo; Lin, Adam Y; Eckels, Phillip C; Drezek, Rebekah A; Foster, Aaron E

    2013-01-01

    Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT) are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+)Ly-6G/C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  19. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John M.; Agrawal, Manish; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Doshi, Gury; Fleming, Mark T.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network’s Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future. PMID:28326277

  20. Paranuclear blue inclusions in metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Wittchow, R; Laszewski, M; Walker, W; Dick, F

    1992-09-01

    Paranuclear blue inclusions (PBIs) are frequently identified within metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma (SCC) cells on air-dried bone marrow aspirates stained with Wright's stain. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this finding, 116 bone marrow aspirates containing metastatic neoplasms were evaluated for the presence and frequency of PBIs. Bone marrow specimens included 47 cases of metastatic SCC of the lung, 13 cases of large cell lymphoma, 19 cases of neuroblastoma, five cases of small, noncleaved cell lymphoma, seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma, three cases of Ewing's sarcoma, three cases of other sarcomas, and 19 cases of non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). PBIs were identified in 40 of 47 (85%) cases of SCC and their frequency varied from 0 to 24% of tumor cells among different cases. In approximately half the cases of SCC, PBIs were identified in 1 to 4% tumor cells; and in eight cases, PBIs were present in 5% or more of tumor cells. PBIs were also identified in two of seven (29%) cases of rhabdomyosarcoma and one case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, but they were not seen in Ewing's sarcoma, small non-cleaved cell lymphoma, large cell lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or non-small cell carcinoma. In addition, PBIs were not seen in alcohol-fixed, Papanicolaou-stained cytology specimens containing SCC. Ultrastructurally, PBIs may represent phagocytized nuclear/cellular material. PBIs are a feature of small cell carcinoma on air-dried, cytologic material stained with Romanowsky type stains. Their presence may provide diagnostic information with regard to the differential diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the bone marrow. Future studies evaluating non-bone marrow Wright's stained fine-needle aspiration specimens are needed to determine if PBIs are useful in distinguishing SCC from other poorly differentiated tumors in the cytology laboratory.

  1. IGFBP‐3 inhibits Wnt signaling in metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zingariello, Maria; Sancillo, Laura; Panasiti, Vincenzo; Polinari, Dorina; Martella, Marianna; Rosa Alba, Rana; Londei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    In previous works, we have shown that insulin‐like growth factor‐binding protein‐3 (IGFBP‐3), a tissue and circulating protein able to bind to IGFs, decreases drastically in the blood serum of patients with diffuse metastatic melanoma. In agreement with the clinical data, recombinant IGFBP‐3 was found to inhibit the motility and invasiveness of cultured metastatic melanoma cells and to prevent growth of grafted melanomas in mice. The present work was aimed at identifying the signal transduction pathways underlying the anti‐tumoral effects of IGFBP‐3. We show that the anti‐tumoral effect of IGFBP‐3 is due to inhibition of the Wnt pathway and depends upon the presence of CD44, a receptor protein known to modulate Wnt signaling. Once it has entered the cell, IGFBP‐3 binds the Wnt signalosome interacting specifically with its component GSK‐3β. As a consequence, the β‐catenin destruction complex dissociates from the LRP6 Wnt receptor and GSK‐3β is activated through dephosphorylation, becoming free to target cytoplasmic β‐catenin which is degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Altogether, the results suggest that IGFBP‐3 is a novel and effective inhibitor of Wnt signaling. As IGFBP‐3 is a physiological protein which has no detectable toxic effects either on cultured cells or live mice, it might qualify as an interesting new therapeutic agent in melanoma, and potentially many other cancers with a hyperactive Wnt signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27377812

  2. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglyca