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Sample records for cell wall glycoproteins

  1. The chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP1 is a constituent of the insoluble glycoprotein framework of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Frank, Ronald; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells are surrounded by the insoluble cell wall component, a sac-like framework of cross-linked glycoproteins containing 22% hydroxyproline. The chaotrope-soluble cell wall glycoprotein GP1 is the only polypeptide with an even higher proportion of hydroxyproline (35%) occurring in vegetative C. reinhardtii cells. Mass spectrometric analyses of peptides released from the purified insoluble cell wall fraction by trypsin treatment and epitope analyses of polyclonal antibodies raised against different deglycosylation products of this particular wall fraction using 181 chemically synthesized GP1-derived pentadecapeptides revealed evidence that GP1 is indeed a constituent of the insoluble wall component.

  2. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review.

  3. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewisa substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  4. Insolubilization of hydroxyproline-rich cell wall glycoprotein in aerated carrot root slices.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J B; Varner, J E

    1983-04-15

    The hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein of plant cell walls is secreted from the cytoplasm as a soluble monomer which slowly becomes insolubilized. A tyrosine derivative, isodityrosine, is formed in the cell wall during this insolubilization and could serve as a protein-protein crosslink. Glycoprotein insolubilization is inhibited by peroxidase inhibitors and free radical scavengers, the most effective of which is L-ascorbate. These data support a hypothesis that the hydroxyproline-rich cell wall glycoprotein forms a covalently crosslinked wall network under the control of an extracellular peroxidase/ascorbate oxidase system.

  5. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is involved in normal lignification.

  6. A structural glycoprotein, containing hydroxyproline, isolated from the cell wall of Chlamydomonas reinhardii.

    PubMed

    Catt, J W; Hills, G J; Roberts, K

    1976-01-01

    A soluble extract from purified cell walls of C. reinhardii has been separated by gel filtration into three fractions which together account for 94% of the cell wall. The major fraction (accounting for 70% of the extract) is a glycoprotein, with a molecular wt. in sodium perchlorate of 298,000, which can be split into 4 electrophoretically distinct species. It contains 35% protein with high levels of hydroxyproline, arabinose and galactose, and is capable of self assembly into crystalline structures identical to those found within the cell wall. The second fraction (25% of the extract) is a similar glycoprotein, but contains 24% protein, a higher proportion of mannose, and is incapable of self assembly. The third fraction (3-6% of the extract) is shown to be an adsorbed impurity from the growth medium used.

  7. Isolation from Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus cell walls of specific receptors for sugarcane glycoproteins, which act as recognition factors.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Y; Arroyo, M; Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    2005-11-04

    Glycoproteins from sugarcane stalks have been isolated from plants field-grown by size-exclusion chromatography. Some of these glycoproteins, previously labelled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, are able to bind to the cell wall of the sugarcane endophyte, N2-fixing Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, and largely removed after washing the bacterial cells with sucrose. This implies that sugarcane glycoproteins use beta-(1-->2)-fructofuranosyl fructose domains in their glycosidic moiety to bind to specific receptors in the bacterial cell walls. These receptors have been isolated by affinity chromatography on a sugarcane glycoprotein-agarose matrix, desorbed with sucrose and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophresisand capillary electrophoresis (CE).

  8. Cell-wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins of parenchymatous tissues of runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus).

    PubMed

    Ryden, P; Selvendran, R R

    1990-07-15

    1. Polymers were solubilized from the cell walls of parenchyma from mature runner-bean pods with minimum degradation by successive extractions with cyclohexane-trans-1,2-diamine-NNN'N'-tetra-acetate (CDTA), Na2CO3 and KOH to leave the alpha-cellulose residue, which contained cross-linked pectic polysaccharides and Hyp-rich glycoproteins. These were solubilized with chlorite/acetic acid and cellulase. The polymers were fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, and fractions were subjected to methylation analysis. 2. The pectic polysaccharides differed in their ease of extraction, and a small proportion were highly cross-linked. The bulk of the pectic polysaccharides solubilized by CDTA and Na2CO3 were less branched than those solubilized by KOH. There was good evidence that most of the pectic polysaccharides were not degraded during extraction. 3. The protein-containing fractions included Hyp-rich and Hyp-poor glycoproteins associated with easily extractable pectic polysaccharides, Hyp-rich glycoproteins solubilized with 4M-KOH+borate, the bulk of which were not associated with pectic polysaccharides, and highly cross-linked Hyp-rich glycoproteins. 4. Isodityrosine was not detected, suggesting that it does not have a (major) cross-linking role in these walls. Instead, it is suggested that phenolics, presumably linked to C-5 of 3,5-linked Araf residues of Hyp-rich glycoproteins, serve to cross-link some of the polymers. 5. There were two main types of xyloglucan, with different degrees of branching. The bulk of the less branched xyloglucans were solubilized by more-concentrated alkali. The anomeric configurations of the sugars in one of the highly branched xyloglucans were determined by 13C-n.m.r. spectroscopy. 6. The structural features of the cell-wall polymers and complexes are discussed in relation to the structure of the cell walls of parenchyma tissues.

  9. The cell-wall glycoproteins of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The predominant cell-wall polypeptide of Scenedesmus obliquus is related to the cell-wall glycoprotein gp3 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Stolarczyk, Adam; Zych, Maria; Malec, Przemysław; Burczyk, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains a multilayered cell wall, ultrastructurally similar to that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although its proportion of hydroxyproline is considerably lower. Therefore, we have investigated the polypeptide composition of the insoluble and the chaotrope-soluble wall fractions of S. obliquus. The polypeptide pattern of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction was strongly modified by chemical deglycosylation with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) in pyridine indicating that most of these polypeptides are glycosylated. Polypeptide constituents of the chaotrope-soluble cell-wall fraction with apparent molecular masses of 240, 270, 265, and 135 kDa cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 100 kDa deglycosylation product of the C. reinhardtii cell-wall glycoprotein GP3B. Chemical deglycosylation of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction resulted in a 135 kDa major polypeptide and a 106 kDa minor component reacting with the same antibody. This antibody recognized specific peptide epitopes of GP3B. When the insoluble wall fraction of S. obliquus was treated with anhydrous HF/pyridine, three polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 144, 135, and 65 kDa were solubilized, which also occured in the deglycosylated chaotrope-soluble wall fraction. These findings indicate that theses glycoproteins are cross-linked to the insoluble wall fraction via HF-sensitive bonds.

  10. [Interaction of the glycoprotein from the Bacillus pumilis cell wall with liposomes].

    PubMed

    Karamushka, V I; Gruzina, T G; Podol'skaia, V I; Ul'berg, Z R

    1987-01-01

    The methods of centrifugation and gel-filtration on Sephadexes G-50 and G-150 were used to study the interaction of Bacillus pumilis cell wall glycoprotein component having the molecular weight of 50 kDa (GP-50) with lyposomes from bacterial lipids. GP-50 is shown to sorb on such liposomes and disturb their barrier properties inducing yield of low-molecular label. GP-50 exerts no effect on properties of liposomes from egg lecithin. Electrostatic forces are supposed to play a decisive role in initial acts of GP-50 interactions with lipid phase of microbial envelopes.

  11. Identification and evolution of a plant cell wall specific glycoprotein glycosyl transferase, ExAD.

    PubMed

    Møller, Svenning Rune; Yi, Xueying; Velásquez, Silvia Melina; Gille, Sascha; Hansen, Pernille Louise Munke; Poulsen, Christian P; Olsen, Carl Erik; Rejzek, Martin; Parsons, Harriet; Zhang, Yang; Wandall, Hans H; Clausen, Henrik; Field, Robert A; Pauly, Markus; Estevez, Jose M; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Petersen, Bent Larsen

    2017-03-30

    Extensins are plant cell wall glycoproteins that act as scaffolds for the deposition of the main wall carbohydrate polymers, which are interlocked into the supramolecular wall structure through intra- and inter-molecular iso-di-tyrosine crosslinks within the extensin backbone. In the conserved canonical extensin repeat, Ser-Hyp4, serine and the consecutive C4-hydroxyprolines (Hyps) are substituted with an α-galactose and 1-5 β- or α-linked arabinofuranoses (Arafs), respectively. These modifications are required for correct extended structure and function of the extensin network. Here, we identified a single Arabidopsis thaliana gene, At3g57630, in clade E of the inverting Glycosyltransferase family GT47 as a candidate for the transfer of Araf to Hyp-arabinofuranotriose (Hyp-β1,4Araf-β1,2Araf-β1,2Araf) side chains in an α-linkage, to yield Hyp-Araf4 which is exclusively found in extensins. T-DNA knock-out mutants of At3g57630 showed a truncated root hair phenotype, as seen for mutants of all hitherto characterized extensin glycosylation enzymes; both root hair and glycan phenotypes were restored upon reintroduction of At3g57630. At3g57630 was named Extensin Arabinose Deficient transferase, ExAD, accordingly. The occurrence of ExAD orthologs within the Viridiplantae along with its' product, Hyp-Araf4, point to ExAD being an evolutionary hallmark of terrestrial plants and charophyte green algae.

  12. Identification and evolution of a plant cell wall specific glycoprotein glycosyl transferase, ExAD

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Svenning Rune; Yi, Xueying; Velásquez, Silvia Melina; Gille, Sascha; Hansen, Pernille Louise Munke; Poulsen, Christian P.; Olsen, Carl Erik; Rejzek, Martin; Parsons, Harriet; Zhang, Yang; Wandall, Hans H.; Clausen, Henrik; Field, Robert A.; Pauly, Markus; Estevez, Jose M.; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Petersen, Bent Larsen

    2017-01-01

    Extensins are plant cell wall glycoproteins that act as scaffolds for the deposition of the main wall carbohydrate polymers, which are interlocked into the supramolecular wall structure through intra- and inter-molecular iso-di-tyrosine crosslinks within the extensin backbone. In the conserved canonical extensin repeat, Ser-Hyp4, serine and the consecutive C4-hydroxyprolines (Hyps) are substituted with an α-galactose and 1–5 β- or α-linked arabinofuranoses (Arafs), respectively. These modifications are required for correct extended structure and function of the extensin network. Here, we identified a single Arabidopsis thaliana gene, At3g57630, in clade E of the inverting Glycosyltransferase family GT47 as a candidate for the transfer of Araf to Hyp-arabinofuranotriose (Hyp-β1,4Araf-β1,2Araf-β1,2Araf) side chains in an α-linkage, to yield Hyp-Araf4 which is exclusively found in extensins. T-DNA knock-out mutants of At3g57630 showed a truncated root hair phenotype, as seen for mutants of all hitherto characterized extensin glycosylation enzymes; both root hair and glycan phenotypes were restored upon reintroduction of At3g57630. At3g57630 was named Extensin Arabinose Deficient transferase, ExAD, accordingly. The occurrence of ExAD orthologs within the Viridiplantae along with its’ product, Hyp-Araf4, point to ExAD being an evolutionary hallmark of terrestrial plants and charophyte green algae. PMID:28358137

  13. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein of the plant cell wall): Report on work from June 1987 to June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In soybean seed costs the accumulation of the hydroxproline-rich glycoprotein extensin is regulated in a developmental and tissue-specific manner. The time course of appearance of extensin during seed development was studied by Western blot analysis and by immunogold-silver localization. Using these techniques extensin was first detected at 16 to 18 d after anthesis, increasing during development to high levels at 24 d after anthesis. Immunogold-silver localization of extensin in the seed coat showed marked depostion of the glycoprotein in the walls of palisade epidermal cells and hourglass cells. The immunolocalization of extensin in developing soybean seeds was also made by a new technique - tissue printing on nitrocellulose paper. This technique shows that extensin is primarily localized in the seed coal, hilum, and vascular elements of the seed.

  14. The first biantennary bacterial secondary cell wall polymer and its influence on S-layer glycoprotein assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christian; Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Graninger, Michael; Matecko, Irena; Müller, Norbert; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The cell surface of Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus DSM 10155 is covered with a square surface (S)-layer glycoprotein lattice. This S-layer glycoprotein, which was extracted with aqueous buffers after a freeze-thaw cycle of the bacterial cells, is the only completely water-soluble S-layer glycoprotein to be reported to date. The purified S-layer glycoprotein preparation had an overall carbohydrate content of 19%. Detailed chemical investigations indicated that the S-layer O-glycans of previously established structure accounted for 13% of total glycosylation. The remainder could be attributed to a peptidoglycan-associated secondary cell wall polymer. Structure analysis was performed using purified secondary cell wall polymer-peptidoglycan complexes. NMR spectroscopy revealed the first biantennary secondary cell wall polymer from the domain Bacteria, with the structure alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->4)-[alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)]-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->O)-PO(2)(-)-O-PO(2)(-)-(O-->6)-MurNAc- (where MurNAc is N -acetylmuramic acid). The neutral polysaccharide is linked via a pyrophosphate bond to the C-6 atom of every fourth N -acetylmuramic acid residue, in average, of the A1gamma-type peptidoglycan. In vivo, the biantennary polymer anchored the S-layer glycoprotein very effectively to the cell wall, probably due to the doubling of motifs for a proposed lectin-like binding between the polymer and the N-terminus of the S-layer protein. When the cellular support was removed during S-layer glycoprotein isolation, the co-purified polymer mediated the solubility of the S

  15. The Neurospora crassa dfg5 and dcw1 Genes Encode α-1,6-Mannanases That Function in the Incorporation of Glycoproteins into the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Maddi, Abhiram; Fu, Ci; Free, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The covalent cross-linking of cell wall proteins into the cell wall glucan/chitin matrix is an important step in the biogenesis of the fungal cell wall. We demonstrate that the Neurospora crassa DFG5 (NCU03770) and DCW1 (NCU08127) enzymes function in vivo to cross-link glycoproteins into the cell wall. Mutants lacking DFG5 or DCW1 release slightly elevated levels of cell wall proteins into their growth medium. Mutants lacking both DFG5 and DCW1 have substantially reduced levels of cell wall proteins in their cell walls and release large amounts of known cell wall proteins into the medium. DFG5 and DCW1 are members of the GH76 family of glycosyl hydrolases, which have specificity to recognize and cleave α-1,6-mannans. A model for incorporation of glycoproteins into the cell wall through the α-1,6-mannan core of the N-linked galactomannan is presented. In this model, DFG5 and DCW1 recognize the N-linked galactomannan present on glycoproteins and cross-link it into the cell wall glucan/chitin matrix. PMID:22701726

  16. Carbohydrate-dependent binding of langerin to SodC, a cell wall glycoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Brennan, Patrick J; Heaslip, Darragh; Udey, Mark C; Modlin, Robert L; Belisle, John T

    2015-02-01

    Langerhans cells participate in the immune response in leprosy by their ability to activate T cells that recognize the pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae, in a langerin-dependent manner. We hypothesized that langerin, the distinguishing C-type lectin of Langerhans cells, would recognize the highly mannosylated structures in pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. The coding region for the extracellular and neck domain of human langerin was cloned and expressed to produce a recombinant active trimeric form of human langerin (r-langerin). Binding assays performed in microtiter plates, by two-dimensional (2D) Western blotting, and by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that r-langerin possessed carbohydrate-dependent affinity to glycoproteins in the cell wall of M. leprae. This lectin, however, yielded less binding to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and even lower levels of binding to phosphatidylinositol mannosides. However, the superoxide dismutase C (SodC) protein of the M. leprae cell wall was identified as a langerin-reactive ligand. Tandem mass spectrometry verified the glycosylation of a recombinant form of M. leprae SodC (rSodC) produced in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Analysis of r-langerin affinity by surface plasmon resonance revealed a carbohydrate-dependent affinity of rSodC (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] = 0.862 μM) that was 20-fold greater than for M. leprae ManLAM (KD = 18.69 μM). These data strongly suggest that a subset of the presumptively mannosylated M. leprae glycoproteins act as ligands for langerin and may facilitate the interaction of M. leprae with Langerhans cells.

  17. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall]. Annual technical progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is involved in normal lignification.

  18. Cell wall protein and glycoprotein constituents of Aspergillus fumigatus that bind to polystyrene may be responsible for the cell surface hydrophobicity of the mycelium.

    PubMed

    Peñalver, M C; Casanova, M; Martínez, J P; Gil, M L

    1996-07-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Aspergillus fumigatus grown both in complex medium (yeast extract/peptone/dextrose; YPD) and minimal (Vogel's N) medium was monitored by assessing attachment of polystyrene microspheres to the cell surface. It was found that mature mycelium was hydrophobic. Treatment of intact mycelium with beta-mercaptoethanol (beta ME) abolished binding of the microspheres to hyphal elements, and coating of the microspheres with beta ME extracts from mycelium inhibited their attachment to intact mycelial cells. A. fumigatus mycelium was tagged in vivo with biotin and treated with beta ME. The beta ME extracts were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting with both peroxidase-conjugated-ExtrAvidin and concanavalin A (ConA). This procedure allowed identification of cell wall surface proteins and glycoproteins. Rabbit polyclonal antisera were raised against beta ME extracts obtained from cells grown in YPD and Vogel's N media. These antisera defined some major cell-wall-bound antigens. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis of the cell wall material released by beta ME and adsorbed on polystyrene microspheres revealed about 19 protein species with apparent molecular masses ranging from 20 to 70 kDa, and two high-molecular-mass glycoproteins of 115 and 210 kDa. Treatment of cells grown in YPD, but not those grown in Vogel's N medium, with beta ME released a 55 kDa polypeptide able to adsorb to polystyrene microspheres that was detectable with the antisera. The ability to bind to polystyrene particles exhibited by several protein and glycoprotein species released by beta ME treatment suggested that these cell wall moieties possess exposed hydrophobic domains that could be responsible for the CSH of mycelium.

  19. Tunicamycins: translocase-I inhibitors that target bacterial cell wall and mammalian N-glycoproteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tunicamycins, streptovirudins, and corynetoxins are natural products that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycin-Mg**2+ complex established as a transition state analog for hexosamine-1-phosphate:pren...

  20. An update on post-translational modifications of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins: toward a model highlighting their contribution to plant cell wall architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Velasquez, Silvia M.; Jamet, Elisabeth; Estevez, José M.; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composite structures mainly composed of polysaccharides, also containing a large set of proteins involved in diverse functions such as growth, environmental sensing, signaling, and defense. Research on cell wall proteins (CWPs) is a challenging field since present knowledge of their role into the structure and function of cell walls is very incomplete. Among CWPs, hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich O-glycoproteins (HRGPs) were classified into three categories: (i) moderately glycosylated extensins (EXTs) able to form covalent scaffolds; (ii) hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs); and (iii) Hyp/proline (Pro)-Rich proteins (H/PRPs) that may be non-, weakly- or highly-glycosylated. In this review, we provide a description of the main features of their post-translational modifications (PTMs), biosynthesis, structure, and function. We propose a new model integrating HRGPs and their partners in cell walls. Altogether, they could form a continuous glyco-network with non-cellulosic polysaccharides via covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions, thus strongly contributing to cell wall architecture. PMID:25177325

  1. Honey Glycoproteins Containing Antimicrobial Peptides, Jelleins of the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, Are Responsible for the Cell Wall Lytic and Bactericidal Activities of Honey

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified the bacterial cell wall as the cellular target for honey antibacterial compounds; however, the chemical nature of these compounds remained to be elucidated. Using Concavalin A- affinity chromatography, we found that isolated glycoprotein fractions (glps), but not flow-through fractions, exhibited strong growth inhibitory and bactericidal properties. The glps possessed two distinct functionalities: (a) specific binding and agglutination of bacterial cells, but not rat erythrocytes and (b) non-specific membrane permeabilization of both bacterial cells and erythrocytes. The isolated glps induced concentration- and time-dependent changes in the cell shape of both E. coli and B. subtilis as visualized by light and SEM microscopy. The appearance of filaments and spheroplasts correlated with growth inhibition and bactericidal effects, respectively. The time-kill kinetics showed a rapid, >5-log10 reduction of viable cells within 15 min incubation at 1xMBC, indicating that the glps-induced damage of the cell wall was lethal. Unexpectedly, MALDI-TOF and electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry, (ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis of glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. The presence of high-mannose structures explained the lectin-like activity of MRJP1, while the presence of Jelleins in MRJP1 may explain cell wall disruptions. Thus, the observed damages induced by the MRJP1 to the bacterial cell wall constitute the mechanism by which the antibacterial effects were produced. Antibacterial activity of MRJP1 glps directly correlated with the overall antibacterial activity of honey, suggesting that it is honey’s active principle responsible for this activity. PMID:25830314

  2. Honey glycoproteins containing antimicrobial peptides, Jelleins of the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, are responsible for the cell wall lytic and bactericidal activities of honey.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified the bacterial cell wall as the cellular target for honey antibacterial compounds; however, the chemical nature of these compounds remained to be elucidated. Using Concavalin A-affinity chromatography, we found that isolated glycoprotein fractions (glps), but not flow-through fractions, exhibited strong growth inhibitory and bactericidal properties. The glps possessed two distinct functionalities: (a) specific binding and agglutination of bacterial cells, but not rat erythrocytes and (b) non-specific membrane permeabilization of both bacterial cells and erythrocytes. The isolated glps induced concentration- and time-dependent changes in the cell shape of both E. coli and B. subtilis as visualized by light and SEM microscopy. The appearance of filaments and spheroplasts correlated with growth inhibition and bactericidal effects, respectively. The time-kill kinetics showed a rapid, >5-log10 reduction of viable cells within 15 min incubation at 1xMBC, indicating that the glps-induced damage of the cell wall was lethal. Unexpectedly, MALDI-TOF and electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry, (ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis of glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. The presence of high-mannose structures explained the lectin-like activity of MRJP1, while the presence of Jelleins in MRJP1 may explain cell wall disruptions. Thus, the observed damages induced by the MRJP1 to the bacterial cell wall constitute the mechanism by which the antibacterial effects were produced. Antibacterial activity of MRJP1 glps directly correlated with the overall antibacterial activity of honey, suggesting that it is honey's active principle responsible for this activity.

  3. Tunicamycins: translocase-I inhibitors that target bacterial cell wall and mammalian N-glycoproteins. The potential for selective inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tunicamycins are a heterologous family of nucleoside antibiotics that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycin-Mg2+ complex established as a transition state analog for hexosamine-1-phosphate: prenol pho...

  4. Between-species analysis of short-repeat modules in cell wall and sex-related hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Waffenschmidt, Sabine; Small, Linda; Goodenough, Ursula

    2007-08-01

    Protein diversification is commonly driven by single amino acid changes at random positions followed by selection, but, in some cases, the structure of the gene itself favors the occurrence of particular kinds of mutations. Genes encoding hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) in green organisms, key protein constituents of the cell wall, carry short-repeat modules that are posited to specify proline hydroxylation and/or glycosylation events. We show here, in a comparison of two closely related Chlamydomonas species-Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CC-621) and Chlamydomonas incerta (CC-1870/3871)-that these modules are prone to misalignment and hence to both insertion/deletion and endoduplication events, and that the dynamics of the rearrangements are constrained by purifying selection on the repeat patterns themselves, considered either as helical or as longitudinal face modules. We suggest that such dynamics may contribute to evolutionary diversification in cell wall architecture and physiology. Two of the HRGP genes analyzed (SAG1 and SAD1) encode the mating-type plus and minus sexual agglutinins, displayed only by gametes, and we document that these have undergone far more extensive divergence than two HRGP genes (GP1 and VSP3) that encode cell wall components-an example of the rapid evolution that characterizes sex-related proteins in numerous lineages. Strikingly, the central regions of the agglutinins of both mating types have diverged completely, by selective endoduplication of repeated motifs, since the two species last shared a common ancestor, suggesting that these events may have participated in the speciation process.

  5. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; López-Romero, Everardo; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response.

  6. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A.; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response. PMID:27051673

  7. A major stress-inducible Mr-42000 wall glycoprotein of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Millar, D J; Slabas, A R; Sidebottom, C; Smith, C G; Allen, A K; Bolwell, G P

    1992-05-01

    A major wall protein of suspension-cultured cells of French bean has been isolated and characterised. It can be prepared from walls or the culture filtrate and in composition it is particularly rich in proline, valine and glutamic acid/glutamine and contains appreciable amounts of hydroxyproline. The N-terminus shows some glycosylation, while following chemical deglycosylation the first 38 residues were found to be identical to those of proline-rich proteins from soybean. However, the composition of the highly purified Mr-42000 bean protein differs considerably from the soybean proteins and must contain its own specific domains. An antibody was raised and used to demonstrate the inducibility of the Mr-42000 bean protein in response to elicitor action. The protein was found to be mainly localised in the intercellular spaces of the cortical cells of bean hypocotyls and at the wall-plasmalemma interface of xylem vessels, another potentially accessible compartment for pathogens. Following wounding, the protein was found to be generally distributed in the wall of epidermal and cortical cells of the hypocotyls. The Mr-42000 protein is cross reactive with antibodies raised to glycoproteins of the Rhizobium infection thread and the chitin-binding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, potato lectin. These common epitopes together with the previously demonstrated chitin-binding properties of the bean protein indicate a role in host-microbial interactions. Furthermore, the Mr-42000 protein itself bound to the growing hyphal tips of the bean pathogen, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

  8. A workflow for large-scale empirical identification of cell wall N-linked glycoproteins of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Thannhauser, Theodore W.; Shen, Miaoqing; Sherwood, Robert; Howe, Kevin; Fish, Tara; Yang, Yong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of plant proteins that impacts a large number of important biological processes. Nevertheless, the impacts of differential site occupancy and the nature of specific glycoforms are obscure. Historically, characterization of glycoproteins has been difficult due to the distinct physicochemical properties of the peptidyl and glycan moieties, the variable and dynamic nature of the glycosylation process, their heterogeneous nature, and the low relative abundance of each glycoform. In this study, we explore a new pipeline developed for large-scale empirical identification of N-linked glycoproteins of tomato fruit as part of our ongoing efforts to characterize the tomato secretome. The workflow presented involves a combination of lectin affinity, tryptic digestion, ion-pairing HILIC and precursor ion-driven data dependent MS/MS analysis with a script to facilitate the identification and characterization of occupied N-linked glycosylation sites. A total of 212 glycoproteins were identified in this study, in which 26 glycopeptides from 24 glycoproteins were successfully characterized in just one HILIC fraction. Further precursor ion discovery (PID)-based MS/MS and deglycosylation followed by high accuracy and resolution MS analysis were used to confirm the glycosylation sites and determine site occupancy rates. The workflow reported is robust and capable of producing large amounts of empirical data involving N-linked glycosylation sites and their associated glycoforms. PMID:23580464

  9. A workflow for large-scale empirical identification of cell wall N-linked glycoproteins of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of plant proteins that impacts a large number of important biological processes. Nevertheless, the impacts of differential site occupancy and the nature of specific glycoforms are obscure. Historically, characterization of glycoproteins has b...

  10. Glycoproteins from sugarcane plants regulate cell polarity of Ustilago scitaminea teliospores.

    PubMed

    Millanes, Ana-María; Fontaniella, Blanca; Legaz, María-Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    2005-03-01

    Saccharum officinarum, cv. Mayarí, is a variety of sugarcane resistant to smut disease caused by Ustilago scitaminea. Sugarcane naturally produces glycoproteins that accumulate in the parenchymatous cells of stalks. These glycoproteins contain a heterofructan as polysaccharide moiety. The concentration of these glycoproteins clearly increases after inoculation of sugarcane plants with smut teliospores, although major symptoms of disease are not observed. These glycoproteins induce homotypic adhesion and inhibit teliospore germination. When glycoproteins from healthy, non-inoculated plants are fractionated, they inhibit actin capping, which occurs before teliospore germination. However, inoculation of smut teliospores induce glycoprotein fractions that promote teliospore polarity and are different from those obtained from healthy plants. These fractions exhibit arginase activity, which is strongly enhanced in inoculated plants. Arginase from healthy plants binds to cell wall teliospores and it is completely desorpted by sucrose, but only 50% of arginase activity from inoculated plants is desorpted by the disaccharide. The data presented herein are consistent with a model of excess arginase entry into teliospores. Arginase synthesized by sugarcane plants as a response to the experimental infection would increase the synthesis of putrescine, which impedes polarization at concentration values higher than 0.05 mM. However, smut teliospores seem to be able to change the pattern of glycoprotein production by sugarcane, thereby promoting the synthesis of different glycoproteins that activate polarization after binding to their cell wall ligand.

  11. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  13. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  14. Immunohistochemical analysis of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins in the roots of resistant and susceptible wax gourd cultivars in response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Benincasae infection and fusaric acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dasen; Ma, Li; Samaj, Jozef; Xu, Chunxiang

    2011-08-01

    Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) play a defensive role in host-pathogen interactions. However, specific roles of individual HRGPs in plant defense against pathogen are poorly understood. Changes in extracellular distribution and abundance of individual cell wall HRGPs were investigated on root sections of two wax gourd (Benincasa hispida Cogn.) cultivars (Fusarium wilt resistant and susceptible, respectively), which were analyzed by immunolabelling with 20 monoclonal antibodies recognizing different epitopes of extensins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) after being inoculated with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Benincasae or treated with fusaric acid (FA). These analyses revealed the following: (1) The levels of JIM11 and JIM20 interacting extensins were higher in the resistant cultivar. Either treatment caused a dramatic decrease in signal in both cultivars, but some new signal appeared in the rhizodermis. (2) The AGPs or rhamnogalacturonan containing CCRCM7-epitope were enhanced in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible one by either treatment. (3) Either treatment caused a slight increase in the levels of the AGPs recognized by LM2 and JIM16, but there were no differences between two cultivars. (4) The MAC204 signal nearly disappeared after FA treatment, but this was not the case with pathogen attack. (5) The LM14 signal slightly decreased after both treatments in both cultivars, but a less decrease was observed with the resistant cultivar. These results indicate that the CCRCM7 epitope likely contributed to the resistance of wax gourd to this pathogen, and JIM11 and JIM20 interacting extensins as well as LM2, LM14, MAC204 and JIM16 interacting AGPs were involved in the host-pathogen interaction.

  15. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  16. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A.; Cannon, Maura C.; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N.; Mort, Andrew J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  17. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity.

    PubMed

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-02-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the previously favored xyloglucan.

  18. How the deposition of cellulose microfibrils builds cell wall architecture.

    PubMed

    Emons, A M; Mulder, B M

    2000-01-01

    Cell walls, the extracytoplasmic matrices of plant cells, consist of an ordered array of cellulose microfibrils embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and glycoproteins. This construction is reminiscent of steel rods in reinforced concrete. How a cell organizes these ordered textures around itself, creating its own desirable environment, is a fascinating question. We believe that nature adopted an economical solution to this design problem: it exploits the geometrical constraints imposed by the shape of the cell and the limited space in which microfibrils are deposited, enabling the wall textures essentially to 'build themselves'. This does not imply that the cell cannot control its wall texture. On the contrary, the cell has ample regulatory mechanisms to control wall texture formation by controlling the insertion of synthases and the distance between individual microfibrils within a wall lamella.

  19. Array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desired glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Yongtae; Son, Young Dok; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kim, Eunkyung; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jung Hoe; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and in vivo biological function of a glycoprotein is significantly affected by its glycosylation profile. For the development of glycoproteins with therapeutic applications, selection of cell lines producing a glycoprotein with adequate glycoform is crucial. Here, we demonstrate an array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid and efficient selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desirable glycosylation. Our approach relies on microengraving and interrogation of glycoproteins produced by individual cells in a microwell array in terms of glycosylation profile as well as the produced amount. On the basis of statistical analysis of the interrogation, single cells which are predicted to produce a desired glycoprotein are selected, retrieved, and expanded. We applied the approach to human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO)-producing CHO cells and verified the selection of a single CHO cell that produces rhEPO with a high sialylation degree. Human erythropoietin (hEPO) bearing highly sialylated oligosaccharide was shown to display a much longer plasma half-life, resulting in high therapeutic efficacy. This method may find widespread use in the clonal selection for the production of other glycoproteins with specific glycosylation as well as analysis of the heterogeneity in cell populations in a high-throughput manner.

  20. [Glycoproteins of mucus of gastric and duodenal wall surface during ulcerogenesis and the impact of fenugreek].

    PubMed

    Khil'ko, T D; Iakubtsova, I V; Preobrazhens'ka, T D; Ostapchenko, L I

    2013-01-01

    The comparative evaluation of qualitative and quantitative composition of glycoproteins of gastric and duodenal wall surface layer of protective mucus in the normal, at the modeling of ulcers in rats and at the introduction to animals with ulcerative lesions of fenugreek extract carried out. It was shown in control (normally) the general level of glycosylation of glycoproteins gastric mucus is 1.7 times more than the duodenum. Under acute stress model ulceration in the stomach mucus decrease in hexosamine (1.4 times), galactose (2.2 times), fucose (1.3-fold) and an increase in NANA (3.6 times) observed. Under cysteamine model ulceration in duodenal mucus increase galactose (2.7 times), NANA (2.4 times), fucose (1.8-fold) but significant decrease in the amount of hexosamines 3 times compared to the control occurred. It was proved the protective effect of fenugreek extract to the wall surface mucus of the stomach and duodenum mucosa under conditions modeling ulceration in rats.

  1. The primary structure of a procaryotic glycoprotein. Cloning and sequencing of the cell surface glycoprotein gene of halobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lechner, J; Sumper, M

    1987-07-15

    The hexagonally patterned surface layer of halobacteria consists of a true glycoprotein. This procaryotic glycoprotein has recently been shown to exhibit novel features with respect to saccharide structure and saccharide biosynthesis. The primary structure and the location of glycosylation sites were determined by cloning and sequencing of the glycoprotein gene of Halobacterium halobium. According to the predicted amino acid sequence, the glycoprotein is synthesized with a N-terminal leader sequence of 34 amino acid residues reminiscent of eucaryotic and procaryotic signal peptides. A hydrophobic stretch of 21 amino acid residues at the C terminus probably serves as a transmembrane domain. 14 threonine residues are clustered adjacent to this membrane anchor and linked to these threonines are all the disaccharides of the cell surface glycoprotein. 12 N-glycosylation sites are distributed over the polypeptide chain.

  2. Synthesis of cell envelope glycoproteins of Cryptococcus laurentii

    PubMed Central

    Schutzbach, John; Ankel, Helmut; Brockhausen, Inka

    2007-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Cryptococcus are encapsulated basidiomycetes that are ubiquitously found in the environment. These organisms infect both lower and higher animals. Human infections that are common in immune-compromised individuals have proven difficult to cure or even control with currently available antimycotics that are quite often toxic to the host. The virulence of Cryptococcus has been linked primarily to its polysaccharide capsule, but also to cell-bound glycoproteins. In this review we show that C. laurentii is an excellent model for studies of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis in the pathogenic relative C. neoformans. In particular we will discuss the structure and biosynthesis of O-linked carbohydrates on cell envelope glycoproteins of C. laurentii. These O-linked structures are synthesized by at least four mannosyltransferases, two galactosyltransferases and at least one xylosyltransferase that have been characterized. These glycosyltransferases have no known homologues in human tissues. Therefore enzymes involved in the synthesis of cryptococcal glycoproteins, as well as related enzymes involved in capsule synthesis, are potential targets for the development of specific inhibitors for treatment of cryptococcal disease. PMID:17316583

  3. An emerging role of pectic rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Reboul, Rebecca; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2012-01-01

    The plant cell wall is a complex network of different polysaccharides and glycoproteins, showing high diversity in nature. The essential components, tethering cell wall are under debate, as novel mutants challenge established models. The mutant ugd2,3 with a reduced supply of the important wall precursor UDP-glucuronic acid reveals the critical role of the pectic compound rhamnogalacturonanII for cell wall stability. This polymer seems to be more important for cell wall integrity than the previously favored xyloglucan. PMID:22353862

  4. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  5. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  6. Isolation of the Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    This chapter describes a method allowing the purification of the cell wall for studying both polysaccharides and proteins. The plant primary cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides (90-95 % in mass) and of proteins (5-10 %). At the end of growth, specialized cells may synthesize a lignified secondary wall composed of polysaccharides (about 65 %) and lignin (about 35 %). Due to its composition, the cell wall is the cellular compartment having the highest density and this property is used for its purification. It plays critical roles during plant development and in response to environmental constraints. It is largely used in the food and textile industries as well as for the production of bioenergy. All these characteristics and uses explain why its study as a true cell compartment is of high interest. The proposed method of purification can be used for large amount of material but can also be downscaled to 500 mg of fresh material. Tools for checking the quality of the cell wall preparation, such as protein analysis and microscopy observation, are also provided.

  7. Sporothrix schenckii Cell Wall Peptidorhamnomannans

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M.

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review article is dedicated to clarifying certain important biochemical aspects of Sporothrix schenckii cell wall peptidorhamnomannans. Cell wall components involved in the host interaction such as antigens as well as a gp70 adhesin are important molecules present on the surface of the yeast parasitic phase. Other structural glycoconjugates present on the fungus cell surface are also described here. Knowledge of the fine structure of carbohydrate epitopes expressed on the surface in both morphological phases of S. schenckii permitted the development of non-invasive immunochemical methods to diagnose human and feline sporotrichosis. PMID:22203817

  8. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with those expressed by a nonmalignant set. The average number of spectral counts (proportional to relative protein abundance) and the total number of glycopeptides in the malignant samples were reduced to about two-thirds of the level in the nonmalignant samples. Most glycoproteins were expressed at a different level in the malignant samples, with nearly as many increasing as decreasing. The glycoproteins with reduced expression accounted for a larger change in spectral counts, and hence for the net loss of spectral counts in the malignant lines. Similar results were found when the glycoproteins were studied via identified glycosylation sites only, or through identified sites together with non-glycopeptides. The overall reduction is largely due to the loss of integrins, laminins and other proteins that form or interact with the basement membrane.

  9. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Talmadge, Kenneth W.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Albersheim, Peter

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan. The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall. The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an α-(1 → 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 → 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 → 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan. The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  10. Recent Advances on the Posttranslational Modifications of EXTs and Their Roles in Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Melina; Salter, Juan Salgado; Dorosz, Javier Gloazzo; Petersen, Bent L.; Estevez, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic set up and the enzymes that define the O-glycosylation sites and transfer the activated sugars to cell wall glycoprotein Extensins (EXTs) have remained unknown for a long time. We are now beginning to see the emerging components of the molecular machinery that assembles these complex O-glycoproteins on the plant cell wall. Genes conferring the posttranslational modifications, i.e., proline hydroxylation and subsequent O-glycosylation, of the EXTs have been recently identified. In this review we summarize the enzymes that define the O-glycosylation sites on the O-glycoproteins, i.e., the prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs), the glycosyltransferases that transfer arabinose units (named arabinosyltransferases, AraTs), and the one responsible for transferring a single galactose (galactosyltransferase, GalT) on the protein EXT backbones. We discuss the effects of posttranslational modifications on the structure and function of extensins in plant cell walls. PMID:22639676

  11. Cell wall construction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; Boorsma, Andre; De Groot, Piet W J

    2006-02-01

    In this review, we discuss new insights in cell wall architecture and cell wall construction in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transcriptional profiling studies combined with biochemical work have provided ample evidence that the cell wall is a highly adaptable organelle. In particular, the protein population that is anchored to the stress-bearing polysaccharides of the cell wall, and forms the interface with the outside world, is highly diverse. This diversity is believed to play an important role in adaptation of the cell to environmental conditions, in growth mode and in survival. Cell wall construction is tightly controlled and strictly coordinated with progression of the cell cycle. This is reflected in the usage of specific cell wall proteins during consecutive phases of the cell cycle and in the recent discovery of a cell wall integrity checkpoint. When the cell is challenged with stress conditions that affect the cell wall, a specific transcriptional response is observed that includes the general stress response, the cell wall integrity pathway and the calcineurin pathway. This salvage mechanism includes increased expression of putative cell wall assemblases and some potential cross-linking cell wall proteins, and crucial changes in cell wall architecture. We discuss some more enzymes involved in cell wall construction and also potential inhibitors of these enzymes. Finally, we use both biochemical and genomic data to infer that the architectural principles used by S. cerevisiae to build its cell wall are also used by many other ascomycetous yeasts and also by some mycelial ascomycetous fungi.

  12. Cell surface glycoproteins from Thermoplasma acidophilum are modified with an N-linked glycan containing 6-C-sulfofucose.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Deschatelets, Lise; Lamoureux, Marc; Patel, Girishchandra B; Tremblay, Tammy-Lynn; Robotham, Anna; Goneau, Marie-France; Cummings-Lorbetskie, Cathy; Watson, David C; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Kelly, John F; Gilbert, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Thermoplasma acidophilum is a thermoacidophilic archaeon that grows optimally at pH 2 and 59°C. This extremophile is remarkable by the absence of a cell wall or an S-layer. Treating the cells with Triton X-100 at pH 3 allowed the extraction of all of the cell surface glycoproteins while keeping cells intact. The extracted glycoproteins were partially purified by cation-exchange chromatography, and we identified five glycoproteins by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry of in-gel tryptic digests. These glycoproteins are positive for periodic acid-Schiff staining, have a high content of Asn including a large number in the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequon and have apparent masses that are 34-48% larger than the masses deduced from their amino acid sequences. The pooled glycoproteins were digested with proteinase K and the purified glycopeptides were analyzed by NMR. Structural determination showed that the carbohydrate part was represented by two structures in nearly equal amounts, differing by the presence of one terminal mannose residue. The larger glycan chain consists of eight residues: six hexoses, one heptose and one sugar with an unusual residue mass of 226 Da which was identified as 6-deoxy-6-C-sulfo-D-galactose (6-C-sulfo-D-fucose). Mass spectrometry analyses of the peptides obtained by trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion confirmed the principal structures to be those determined by NMR and identified 14 glycopeptides derived from the main glycoprotein, Ta0280, all containing the Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Thermoplasma acidophilum appears to have a "general" protein N-glycosylation system that targets a number of cell surface proteins.

  13. Back wall solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar cell is disclosed which comprises a first semiconductor material of one conductivity type with one face having the same conductivity type but more heavily doped to form a field region arranged to receive the radiant energy to be converted to electrical energy, and a layer of a second semiconductor material, preferably highly doped, of opposite conductivity type on the first semiconductor material adjacent the first semiconductor material at an interface remote from the heavily doped field region. Instead of the opposite conductivity layer, a metallic Schottky diode layer may be used, in which case no additional back contact is needed. A contact such as a gridded contact, previous to the radiant energy may be applied to the heavily doped field region of the more heavily doped, same conductivity material for its contact.

  14. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  15. CELL WALL CARBOHYDRATE EPITOPES IN THE GREEN ALGA OEDOGONIUM BHARUCHAE F. MINOR (OEDOGONIALES, CHLOROPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Estevez, José M; Leonardi, Patricia I; Alberghina, Josefina S

    2008-10-01

    Cell wall changes in vegetative and suffultory cells (SCs) and in oogonial structures from Oedogonium bharuchae N. D. Kamat f. minor Vélez were characterized using monoclonal antibodies against several carbohydrate epitopes. Vegetative cells and SCs develop only a primary cell wall (PCW), whereas mature oogonial cells secrete a second wall, the oogonium cell wall (OCW). Based on histochemical and immunolabeling results, (1→4)-β-glucans in the form of crystalline cellulose together with a variable degree of Me-esterified homogalacturonans (HGs) and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) epitopes were detected in the PCW. The OCW showed arabinosides of the extensin type and low levels of arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) glycans but lacked cellulose, at least in its crystalline form. Surprisingly, strong colabeling in the cytoplasm of mature oogonia cells with three different antibodies (LM-5, LM-6, and CCRC-M2) was found, suggesting the presence of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-like structures. Our results are discussed relating the possible functions of these cell wall epitopes with polysaccharides and O-glycoproteins during oogonium differentiation. This study represents the first attempt to characterize these two types of cell walls in O. bharuchae, comparing their similarities and differences with those from other green algae and land plants. This work represents a contribution to the understanding of how cell walls have evolved from simple few-celled to complex multicelled organisms.

  16. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  17. Identification of peanut agglutinin binding glycoproteins restricted to Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Flavell, D J; Jones, D B; Wright, D H

    1989-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binding glycoproteins from four Hodgkin's disease (HD)-derived cell lines and a variety of cell lines/peripheral blood cells representative of the lymphoid and myeloid lineages were identified by probing nitrocellulose membranes of SDS-PAGE separated NP40 solubilized cellular glycoproteins with [125I]-labelled PNA. The two Hodgkin's cell lines Ho and L428 demonstrated the most heterogeneous glycoprotein profiles each expressing 15 PNA binding glycoproteins, respectively. The two remaining Hodgkin's lines Co and L591 expressed only four glycoproteins each and these were all also commonly expressed by Ho and L428. Comparative analysis with all other cell types studied revealed the expression of five glycoproteins restricted to Ho (gp42, gp40, gp38, gp24 and gp22) and six restricted to L428 (gp180, gp75, gp40, gp38, gp24 and gp22). Four of these, gp40, gp38, gp24 and gp22 were commonly expressed by both Ho and L428. Of cell lines of myeloid lineage studied only the erythroleukemia cell line K562 expressed detectable glycoproteins also expressed by some of the Hodgkin's cell lines (gp110, gp96, gp50 and gp45). Only one glycoprotein, gp20 expressed by Ho was also commonly expressed by normal peripheral blood granulocytes. This limited study has thus succeeded in demonstrating for the range of cell types studied, that some glycoproteins with terminal D-galactose beta (1----3) N-acetyl galactosamine oligosaccharide sequences are apparently restricted to two of the HD cell lines. Moreover, the heterogeneous glycoprotein profiles obtained for the HD cell lines Ho and L428 suggests that galactosylation processes in these two cell lines is aberrant.

  18. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the GH72 family of cell wall transglycosylases in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jie; Free, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    The Neurospora crassa genome encodes five GH72 family transglycosylases, and four of these enzymes (GEL-1, GEL-2, GEL-3 and GEL-5) have been found to be present in the cell wall proteome. We carried out an extensive genetic analysis on the role of these four transglycosylases in cell wall biogenesis and demonstrated that the transglycosylases are required for the formation of a normal cell wall. As suggested by the proteomic analysis, we found that multiple transglycosylases were being expressed in N. crassa cells and that different combinations of the enzymes are required in different cell types. The combination of GEL-1, GEL-2 and GEL-5 is required for the growth of vegetative hyphae, while the GEL-1, GEL-2, GEL-3 combination is needed for the production of aerial hyphae and conidia. Our data demonstrates that the enzymes are redundant with partially overlapping enzymatic activities, which provides the fungus with a robust cell wall biosynthetic system. Characterization of the transglycosylase-deficient mutants demonstrated that the incorporation of cell wall proteins was severely compromised. Interestingly, we found that the transglycosylase-deficient mutant cell walls contained more β-1,3-glucan than the wild type cell wall. Our results demonstrate that the GH72 transglycosylases are not needed for the incorporation of β-1,3-glucan into the cell wall, but they are required for the incorporation of cell wall glycoprotein into the cell wall.

  19. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  20. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  1. Ovine Herpesvirus 2 Glycoproteins B, H, and L Are Sufficient for, and Viral Glycoprotein Ov8 Can Enhance, Cell-Cell Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    AlHajri, Salim M; Cunha, Cristina W; Nicola, Anthony V; Aguilar, Hector C; Li, Hong; Taus, Naomi S

    2017-03-15

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) is a gammaherpesvirus in the genus Macavirus that is carried asymptomatically by sheep. Infection of poorly adapted animals with OvHV-2 results in sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever, a fatal disease characterized by lymphoproliferation and vasculitis. There is no treatment or vaccine for the disease and no cell culture system to propagate the virus. The lack of cell culture has hindered studies of OvHV-2 biology, including its entry mechanism. As an alternative method to study OvHV-2 glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion as a part of the entry mechanism, we developed a virus-free cell-to-cell membrane fusion assay to identify the minimum required OvHV-2 glycoproteins to induce membrane fusion. OvHV-2 glycoproteins B, H, and L (gB, gH, and gL) were able to induce membrane fusion together but not when expressed individually. Additionally, open reading frame Ov8, unique to OvHV-2, was found to encode a transmembrane glycoprotein that can significantly enhance membrane fusion. Thus, OvHV-2 gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to induce membrane fusion, while glycoprotein Ov8 plays an enhancing role by an unknown mechanism.IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses enter cells via attachment of the virion to the cellular surface and fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes. Virus-cell membrane fusion is an important step for a successful viral infection. Elucidating the roles of viral glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion is critical toward understanding viral entry. Entry of ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), the causative agent of sheep associated-malignant catarrhal fever, which is one of the leading causes of death in bison and other ungulates, has not been well studied due to the lack of a cell culture system to propagate the virus. The identification of OvHV-2 glycoproteins that mediate membrane fusion may help identify viral and/or cellular factors involved in OvHV-2 cell tropism and will advance investigation of cellular

  2. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Kaufman, Peter; McNeil, Michael; Albersheim, Peter

    1974-01-01

    The primary cell walls of six suspension-cultured monocots and of a single suspension-cultured gymnosperm have been investigated with the following results: (a) the compositions of all six monocot cell walls are remarkably similar, despite the fact that the cell cultures were derived from diverse tissues; (b) the cell walls of suspension-cultured monocots differ substantially from those of suspension-cultured dicots and from the suspension-cultured gymnosperm; (c) an arabinoxylan is a major component (40% or more by weight) of monocot primary cell walls; (d) mixed β-1,3; β-1,4-glucans were found only in the cell wall preparations of rye grass endosperm cells, and not in the cell walls of any of the other five monocot cell cultures nor in the walls of suspension-cultured Douglas fir cells; (e) the monocot primary cell walls studied contain from 9 to 14% cellulose, 7 to 18% uronic acids, and 7 to 17% protein; (f) hydroxyproline accounts for less than 0.2% of the cell walls of monocots. Similar data on the soluble extracellular polysaccharides secreted by these cells are included. PMID:16658824

  3. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  4. Surface Glycoproteins of Exosomes Shed by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Contribute to Function.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sitara; Danielson, Steven; Clements, Virginia; Edwards, Nathan; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2017-01-06

    In this report, we use a proteomic strategy to identify glycoproteins on the surface of exosomes derived from myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and then test if selected glycoproteins contribute to exosome-mediated chemotaxis and migration of MDSCs. We report successful modification of a surface chemistry method for use with exosomes and identify 21 surface N-glycoproteins on exosomes released by mouse mammary carcinoma-induced MDSCs. These glycoprotein identities and functionalities are compared with 93 N-linked glycoproteins identified on the surface of the parental cells. As with the lysate proteomes examined previously, the exosome surface N-glycoproteins are primarily a subset of the glycoproteins on the surface of the suppressor cells that released them, with related functions and related potential as therapeutic targets. The "don't eat me" molecule CD47 and its binding partners thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) were among the surface N-glycoproteins detected. Functional bioassays using antibodies to these three molecules demonstrated that CD47, TSP1, and to a lesser extent SIRPα facilitate exosome-mediated MDSC chemotaxis and migration.

  5. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  6. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood.

  7. Binding of soluble glycoproteins from sugarcane juice to cells of Acetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; de Armas, R; Barriguete, E; Vicente, C

    2000-09-01

    Sugarcane produces two different pools of glycoproteins containing a heterofructan as glycidic moiety, tentatively defined as high-molecular mass (HMMG) and mid-molecular mass (MMMG) glycoproteins. Both kinds of glycoproteins can be recovered in sugarcane juice. Fluorescein-labelled glycoproteins are able to bind to Acetobacter diazotrophicus cells, a natural endophyte of sugarcane. This property implies the aggregation of bacterial cells in liquid culture after addition of HMMG or MMMG. Anionic glycoproteins seem to be responsible for the binding activity whereas cationic fraction is not retained on the surface ofA. diazotrophicus. Bound HMMG is competitively desorbed by sucrose whereas MMMG is desorbed by glucosamine or fructose. On this basis, a hypothesis about the discriminatory ability of sugarcane to choose the compatible endophyte from several possible ones is proposed.

  8. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; ...

    2014-12-23

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increasedmore » wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. In conclusion, these data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.« less

  9. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2014-12-23

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. In conclusion, these data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  10. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2014-01-01

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. These data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production. PMID:25536327

  11. Affinity of bronchial secretion glycoproteins and cells of human bronchial mucosa for Ricinus communis lectins.

    PubMed

    Lhermitte, M; Lamblin, G; Degand, P; Roussel, P; Mazzuca, M

    1977-01-01

    The coupling of Ricinus communis lectins to Sephadex G 25 was used in order to study mucins and other glycoproteins from human bronchial secretion. The major part of human bronchial mucins and other glycoproteins such as immunoglobulins A, bronchotransferrin and alpha1-antichymotrypsin were isolated by this procedure. A parallel study of human bronchial mucosa was achieved with peroxidase labeled Ricinus communis lectins; this study characterized goblet cells and mucous cells which contain mucins, and serous cells which are involved in the synthesis or the secretion of the other glycoproteins.

  12. Regulation of HSV glycoprotein induced cascade of events governing cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H

    2016-09-14

    Receptor dependent HSV-induced fusion requires glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. Our current model posits that during fusion receptor-activated conformational changes in gD activate gH/gL, which subsequently triggers transformation of the pre-fusion form of gB into a fusogenic state. To examine the role of each glycoprotein in receptor dependent cell-cell fusion we took advantage of our discovery that fusion by wild type HSV-2 glycoproteins occurs twice as fast as that achieved by HSV-1 glycoproteins. By sequentially swapping each glycoprotein between the two serotypes, we established that fusion speed was governed by gH/gL, with gH being the main contributor. While the mutant forms of gB fuse at distinct rates that are dictated by their molecular structure, these restrictions can be overcome by gH2/gL2, thereby enhancing their activity. We also found that deregulated forms of gD1 and gH2/gL2 can alter the fusogenic potential of gB, promoting cell fusion in the absence of a cellular receptor and that deregulated forms of gB can drive the fusion machinery to even higher levels. Low pH enhanced fusion by affecting the structure of both gB and gH/gL mutants. Together, our data highlight the complexity of the fusion machinery, the impact of the activation state of each glycoprotein on the fusion process and the critical role of gH/gL in regulating HSV induced fusion.

  13. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  14. Biosynthesis: Imaging cell-wall biosynthesis live

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugg, Timothy D. H.

    2013-01-01

    The biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is an important step in bacterial cell division and cell-wall maturation. Now it has been shown that fluorescent D-amino acids can be used to label the peptidoglycan cell wall of living bacteria, providing a new tool to study this important process.

  15. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  16. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases. PMID:23535334

  17. Impact of cell wall composition on maize resistance to pests and diseases.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A

    2013-03-27

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases.

  18. How do plant cell walls extend?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  19. Cell Wall Assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lesage, Guillaume; Bussey, Howard

    2006-01-01

    An extracellular matrix composed of a layered meshwork of β-glucans, chitin, and mannoproteins encapsulates cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This organelle determines cellular morphology and plays a critical role in maintaining cell integrity during cell growth and division, under stress conditions, upon cell fusion in mating, and in the durable ascospore cell wall. Here we assess recent progress in understanding the molecular biology and biochemistry of cell wall synthesis and its remodeling in S. cerevisiae. We then review the regulatory dynamics of cell wall assembly, an area where functional genomics offers new insights into the integration of cell wall growth and morphogenesis with a polarized secretory system that is under cell cycle and cell type program controls. PMID:16760306

  20. Pathobiology of Pneumocystis pneumonia: life cycle, cell wall and cell signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Skalski, Joseph H; Kottom, Theodore J; Limper, Andrew H

    2015-09-01

    Pneumocystis is a genus of ascomycetous fungi that are highly morbid pathogens in immunosuppressed humans and other mammals. Pneumocystis cannot easily be propagated in culture, which has greatly hindered understanding of its pathobiology. The Pneumocystis life cycle is intimately associated with its mammalian host lung environment, and life cycle progression is dependent on complex interactions with host alveolar epithelial cells and the extracellular matrix. The Pneumocystis cell wall is a varied and dynamic structure containing a dominant major surface glycoprotein, β-glucans and chitins that are important for evasion of host defenses and stimulation of the host immune system. Understanding of Pneumocystis cell signaling pathways is incomplete, but much has been deduced by comparison of the Pneumocystis genome with homologous genes and proteins in related fungi. In this mini-review, the pathobiology of Pneumocystis is reviewed, with particular focus on the life cycle, cell wall components and cell signal transduction.

  1. [The cell wall of Coelastrum (Chlorophycees)].

    PubMed

    Reymond, O

    1975-01-01

    The cell wall of Coelastrum is usually composed of three layers. The outermost layer was studied most extensively. It consists of erect tubules which often bear long bristles whose function may be to stabilize the algae in its enviroment. The cell wall can modify its morphology according to the enviroment.

  2. Expression and functional activity of P-glycoprotein in cultured cerebral capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hegmann, E J; Bauer, H C; Kerbel, R S

    1992-12-15

    Analysis of a panel of endothelial cells passaged between 5 and 25 times and derived from various organs and species demonstrated that murine and porcine cerebral capillary endothelial cells actively excluded the fluorescent dye rhodamine 123, a substrate of P-glycoprotein. In addition, rhodamine 123 accumulation could be enhanced by the multidrug resistance chemosensitizer verapamil, known to reduce P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux. Cloned murine and porcine cerebral capillary endothelial cells were immunoreactive with the C219 monoclonal antibody to P-glycoprotein, and a C219 epitope-specific blocking peptide could abolish staining. The antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of vincristine, but not cis-platinum(II) diamminedichloride, were increased by the addition of either verapamil or cyclosporin A to brain endothelial cell cultures in a 72-h assay, as determined by [3H]thymidine incorporation and total protein measurement. Cyclosporin A was a more effective reversal agent than verapamil. Thus, a P-glycoprotein isoform may be constitutively expressed in brain endothelial cells in vitro and supports the available data on in situ immunohistochemical staining of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier. In addition, these findings may indicate that one function of P-glycoprotein in vivo at the blood-brain barrier is the exclusion of xenobiotics from central nervous system tissues.

  3. Accelerating forward genetics for cell wall deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Vidaurre, Danielle; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the genes involved in cell wall synthesis and assembly remains one of the biggest challenges of cell wall biology. Although traditional genetic approaches, using simple yet elegant screens, have identified components of the cell wall, many unknowns remain. Exhausting the genetic toolbox by performing sensitized screens, adopting chemical genetics or combining these with improved cell wall imaging, hold the promise of new gene discovery and function. With the recent introduction of next-generation sequencing technologies, it is now possible to quickly and efficiently map and clone genes of interest in record time. The combination of a classical genetics approach and cutting edge technology will propel cell wall biology in plants forward into the future. PMID:22685448

  4. Do plant cell walls have a code?

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-12-01

    A code is a set of rules that establish correspondence between two worlds, signs (consisting of encrypted information) and meaning (of the decrypted message). A third element, the adaptor, connects both worlds, assigning meaning to a code. We propose that a Glycomic Code exists in plant cell walls where signs are represented by monosaccharides and phenylpropanoids and meaning is cell wall architecture with its highly complex association of polymers. Cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms, structure, architecture and properties are addressed according to Code Biology perspective, focusing on how they oppose to cell wall deconstruction. Cell wall hydrolysis is mainly focused as a mechanism of decryption of the Glycomic Code. Evidence for encoded information in cell wall polymers fine structure is highlighted and the implications of the existence of the Glycomic Code are discussed. Aspects related to fine structure are responsible for polysaccharide packing and polymer-polymer interactions, affecting the final cell wall architecture. The question whether polymers assembly within a wall display similar properties as other biological macromolecules (i.e. proteins, DNA, histones) is addressed, i.e. do they display a code?

  5. Safranine fluorescent staining of wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Bond, J; Donaldson, L; Hill, S; Hitchcock, K

    2008-06-01

    Safranine is an azo dye commonly used for plant microscopy, especially as a stain for lignified tissues such as xylem. Safranine fluorescently labels the wood cell wall, producing green/yellow fluorescence in the secondary cell wall and red/orange fluorescence in the middle lamella (ML) region. We examined the fluorescence behavior of safranine under blue light excitation using a variety of wood- and fiber-based samples of known composition to interpret the observed color differentiation of different cell wall types. We also examined the basis for the differences in fluorescence emission using spectral confocal microscopy to examine lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls including reaction wood and decayed wood compared to normal wood. Our results indicate that lignin-rich cell walls, such as the ML of tracheids, the secondary wall of compression wood tracheids, and wood decayed by brown rot, tend to fluoresce red or orange, while cellulose-rich cell walls such as resin canals, wood decayed by white rot, cotton fibers and the G-layer of tension wood fibers, tend to fluoresce green/yellow. This variation in fluorescence emission seems to be due to factors including an emission shift toward red wavelengths combined with dye quenching at shorter wavelengths in regions with high lignin content. Safranine fluorescence provides a useful way to differentiate lignin-rich and cellulose-rich cell walls without counterstaining as required for bright field microscopy.

  6. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Giséle; Charmont, Stephane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Herve; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (1) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (2) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (3) the presence of proteins interacting in many different ways with the polysaccharide matrix require different procedures to elute them from the cell wall. Three categories of CWP are distinguished: labile proteins that have little or no interactions with cell wall components, weakly bound proteins extractable with salts, and strongly bound proteins. Two alternative protocols are decribed for cell wall proteomics: (1) nondestructive techniques allowing the extraction of labile or weakly bound CWP without damaging the plasma membrane; (2) destructive techniques to isolate cell walls from which weakly or strongly bound CWP can be extracted. These protocols give very low levels of contamination by intracellular proteins. Their application should lead to a realistic view of the cell wall proteome at least for labile and weakly bound CWP extractable by salts.

  7. Method of using alpha-1 acid glycoprotein on T-cells as a marker for alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fudenberg, H.H.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described of diagnosing a dementia of the Alzheimer's type characterized by a change in the percentage of T-cells bearing surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein which comprises providing T-cells from a subject, determining the percentage of those T cells which bear surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, and comparing that percentage of the percentage of T cells which bear the glycoprotein in a control, whereby the dementia is diagnosed.

  8. Producing recombinant therapeutic glycoproteins with enhanced sialylation using CHO-gmt4 glycosylation mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Goh, John SY; Liu, Yingwei; Chan, Kah Fai; Wan, Corrine; Teo, Gavin; Zhang, Peiqing; Zhang, Yuanxing; Song, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant glycoprotein drugs require proper glycosylation for optimal therapeutic efficacy. Glycoprotein therapeutics are rapidly removed from circulation and have reduced efficacy if they are poorly sialylated. Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) was found highly toxic to wild-type CHO-K1 cells and all the mutants that survived RCA-I treatment contained a dysfunctional N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnT I) gene. These mutants are named CHO-gmt4 cells. Interestingly, upon restoration of GnT I, the sialylation of a model glycoprotein, erythropoietin, produced in CHO-gmt4 cells was shown to be superior to that produced in wild-type CHO-K1 cells. This addendum summarizes the applicability of this cell line, from transient to stable expression of the recombinant protein, and from a lab scale to an industrial scale perfusion bioreactor. In addition, CHO-gmt4 cells can be used to produce glycoproteins with mannose-terminated N-glycans. Recombinant glucocerebrosidase produced by CHO-gmt4 cells will not require glycan remodeling and may be directly used to treat patients with Gaucher disease. CHO-gmt4 cells can also be used to produce other glycoprotein therapeutics which target cells expressing mannose receptors. PMID:24911584

  9. Producing recombinant therapeutic glycoproteins with enhanced sialylation using CHO-gmt4 glycosylation mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Goh, John S Y; Liu, Yingwei; Chan, Kah Fai; Wan, Corrine; Teo, Gavin; Zhang, Peiqing; Zhang, Yuanxing; Song, Zhiwei

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant glycoprotein drugs require proper glycosylation for optimal therapeutic efficacy. Glycoprotein therapeutics are rapidly removed from circulation and have reduced efficacy if they are poorly sialylated. Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) was found highly toxic to wild-type CHO-K1 cells and all the mutants that survived RCA-I treatment contained a dysfunctional N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (GnT I) gene. These mutants are named CHO-gmt4 cells. Interestingly, upon restoration of GnT I, the sialylation of a model glycoprotein, erythropoietin, produced in CHO-gmt4 cells was shown to be superior to that produced in wild-type CHO-K1 cells. This addendum summarizes the applicability of this cell line, from transient to stable expression of the recombinant protein, and from a lab scale to an industrial scale perfusion bioreactor. In addition, CHO-gmt4 cells can be used to produce glycoproteins with mannose-terminated N-glycans. Recombinant glucocerebrosidase produced by CHO-gmt4 cells will not require glycan remodeling and may be directly used to treat patients with Gaucher disease. CHO-gmt4 cells can also be used to produce other glycoprotein therapeutics which target cells expressing mannose receptors.

  10. Cell Wall Assembly in Fucus Zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Quatrano, Ralph S.; Stevens, Patricia T.

    1976-01-01

    Fertilization triggers the assembly of a cell wall around the egg cell of three brown algae, Fucus vesiculosus, F. distichus, and F. inflatus. New polysaccharide polymers are continually being added to the cell wall during the first 24 hours of synchronous embryo development. This wall assembly involves the extracellular deposition of fibrillar material by cytoplasmic vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. One hour after fertilization a fragmented wall can be isolated free of cytoplasm and contains equal amounts of cellulose and alginic acid with no fucose-containing polymers (fucans) present. Birefringence of the wall caused by oriented cellulose microfibrils is not detected in all zygotes until 4 hours, at which time intact cell walls can be isolated that retain the shape of the zygote. These walls have a relatively low ratio of fucose to xylose and little sulfate when compared to walls from older embryos. When extracts of walls from 4-hour zygotes are subjected to cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH 7, a single fucan (F1) can be detected. By 12 hours, purified cell walls are composed of fucans containing a relatively high ratio of fucose to xylose and high levels of sulfate, and contain a second fucan (F2) which is electrophoretically distinct from F1. F2 appears to be deposited in only a localized region of the wall, that which elongates to form the rhizoid cell. Throughout wall assembly, the polyuronide block co-polymer alginic acid did not significantly vary its mannuronic (M) to guluronic (G) acid ratio (0.33-0.55) or its block distribution (MG, 54%; GG, 30%; MM, 16%). From 6 to 24 hours of embryo development, the proportion of the major polysaccharide components found in purified walls is stable. Alginic acid is the major polymer and comprises about 60% of the total wall, while cellulose and the fucans each make-up about 20% of the remainder. During the extracellular assembly of this wall, the intracellular levels of the storage glucan laminaran

  11. Nonaqueous titration of amino groups in polymeric matrix of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Meychik, N R; Nikolaeva, Yu I; Ermakov, I P

    2009-08-01

    Nonaqueous titration was used for detection of free amino groups in the polymeric matrix of plant cell walls. The content of amino groups varied in the range 0.54-0.91 and total nitrogen in the range 1.0-4.2 mmol per gram dry mass of cell walls depending on the plant species. However, these data on the high content of free amino groups do not correlate with the present day concept that the nitrogen fraction in charged amino groups in plant cell wall proteins, which are assumed to be mainly amino groups of lysine and arginine residues, is about 10%. It is supposed that most detected free amino groups belong to the hydroxy-amino acids hydroxyproline and tyrosine that can be bound at the hydroxyl group with the carbohydrate part of glycoprotein or another structural cell wall polymer.

  12. The cell walls of Chara aspera Willd. (Charophyta) vegetative cells.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, H; Saranpää, P

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the vegetative cell walls of the charophyte Chara aspera Willd was studied with TEM. Thallus cells, rhizoid bulbil and rhizoidal node cells were investigated. The internodal cells transverse walls contained plasmodesmata. The longitudinal walls of the internodal cells were uniform, fibrillar, with two thin structurally distinct layers with different structure facing the cytoplasm. The outermost layers of internodal, cortical and rhizoid bulbil cells were composed of randomly orientated fibrils. The longitudinal walls of the cortical cells were helicoidal in structure. In the rhizoid bulbil cell walls, six different layers could be distinguished, but their occurrence seemed to depend on the fixation, staining and cutting procedures. A middle lamella and osmophilic deposits were found in the wall between rhizoidal node cells. The cytoplasmic structure of the internodal and cortical cells was not found to differ from other species of Chara. Charasomes were observed only in cortical cells.

  13. Recent advances in plant cell wall proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Albenne, Cécile; Boudart, Georges; Irshad, Muhammad; Canut, Hervé; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    The plant extracellular matrix contains typical polysaccharides such as cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins that interact to form dense interwoven networks. Plant cell walls play crucial roles during development and constitute the first barrier of defense against invading pathogens. Cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to the description of the protein content of a compartment specific to plants. Around 400 cell wall proteins (CWPs) of Arabidopsis, representing about one fourth of its estimated cell wall proteome, have been described. The main points to note are that: (i) the diversity of enzymes acting on polysaccharides suggests a great plasticity of cell walls; (ii) CWPs such as proteases, polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes, and lipases may contribute to the generation of signals; (iii) proteins of unknown functions were identified, suggesting new roles for cell walls. Recently, the characterization of PTMs such as N- and O-glycosylations improved our knowledge of CWP structure. The presence of many glycoside hydrolases and proteases suggests a complex regulation of CWPs involving various types of post-translational events. The first 3-D structures to be resolved gave clues about the interactions between CWPs, or between CWPs and polysaccharides. Future work should include: extracting and identifying CWPs still recalcitrant to proteomics, describing the cell wall interactome, improving quantification, and unraveling the roles of each of the CWPs.

  14. Polyphosphorylated fungal cell wall glycopeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, S.J.; Black, B.; Gander, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Penicillium charlesii secretes a 65 kDa peptidophosphogalactomannan (pPGM) containing 10 phosphodiester residues and 10 galactofuranosyl-containing galactin chains attached to a linear mannan; the polysaccharides is attached to a 3 kDa seryl- and threonyl-rich peptide. The authors have now isolated and partially characterized a form of pPGM released from mycelia of P. charlesii treated at 50/sup 0/C for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min. Two- to 3-fold more pPGM was released by heat treatment than is secreted. Crude pPGM, released by heat, was fractionated on DE-52 and was fractionated into two major fractions on the basis of its difference in negative charge. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of these two fractions provided spectra very similar to that of secreted pPGM previously reported from this laboratory. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 31/P NMR showed major signals at 1.47, and 0.22 ppm and minor signals at 1.32, 1.15, 1.00, 0.91 and 0.76 ppm. These signals are upfield from phosphomonoesters and are in the region observed for (6-O-phosphorylcholine)- and (6-O-phosphorylethanolamine)-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues which are 0.22 and 0.90 ppm, respectively. These polymers contain 30 phosphodiester residues per molecule of 70 kDa mass compared with 10 phosphodiesters in secreted pPGM. Acid phosphatase and alkaline protease were the only lytic enzymes released by heat treatment. The evidence suggests that much of the pPGM is derived from cell walls; and that the polysaccharide is highly phosphorylated.

  15. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  16. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  17. Furin cleavage of the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein enhances cell-cell fusion but does not affect virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Follis, Kathryn E.; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H. . E-mail: jack.nunberg@umontana.edu

    2006-07-05

    The fusogenic potential of Class I viral envelope glycoproteins is activated by proteloytic cleavage of the precursor glycoprotein to generate the mature receptor-binding and transmembrane fusion subunits. Although the coronavirus (CoV) S glycoproteins share membership in this class of envelope glycoproteins, cleavage to generate the respective S1 and S2 subunits appears absent in a subset of CoV species, including that responsible for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To determine whether proteolytic cleavage of the S glycoprotein might be important for the newly emerged SARS-CoV, we introduced a furin recognition site at single basic residues within the putative S1-S2 junctional region. We show that furin cleavage at the modified R667 position generates discrete S1 and S2 subunits and potentiates membrane fusion activity. This effect on the cell-cell fusion activity by the S glycoprotein is not, however, reflected in the infectivity of pseudotyped lentiviruses bearing the cleaved glycoprotein. The lack of effect of furin cleavage on virion infectivity mirrors that observed in the normally cleaved S glycoprotein of the murine coronavirus and highlights an additional level of complexity in coronavirus entry.

  18. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  19. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  20. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  1. Requirements for cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation by Ebola virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Francica, Joseph R; Matukonis, Meghan K; Bates, Paul

    2009-01-20

    Ebola virus causes an acute hemorrhagic fever that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The viral glycoprotein is thought to contribute to pathogenesis, though precise mechanisms are unknown. Cellular pathogenesis can be modeled in vitro by expression of the Ebola viral glycoprotein (GP) in cells, which causes dramatic morphological changes, including cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation. These effects are known to be dependent on the presence of a highly glycosylated region of the glycoprotein, the mucin domain. Here we show that the mucin domain from the highly pathogenic Zaire subtype of Ebola virus is sufficient to cause characteristic cytopathology when expressed in the context of a foreign glycoprotein. Similarly to full length Ebola GP, expression of the mucin domain causes rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and the down-regulation of cell surface levels of beta1 integrin and major histocompatibility complex class 1. These effects were not seen when the mucin domain was expressed in the context of a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored isoform of the foreign glycoprotein. In contrast to earlier analysis of full length Ebola glycoproteins, chimeras carrying the mucin domains from the Zaire and Reston strains appear to cause similar levels of down-modulation and cell detachment. Cytopathology associated with Ebola glycoprotein expression does not occur when GP expression is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to a previously published report, our results demonstrate that GP-induced surface protein down-regulation is not mediated through a dynamin-dependent pathway. Overall, these results support a model in which the mucin domain of Ebola GP acts at the cell surface to induce protein down modulation and cytopathic effects.

  2. Phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.K.; Goossen, B.; Margolis, R.U.

    1988-05-03

    PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and cultures of early postnatal rat cerebellium were labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine, (/sup 3/H)fucose, (/sup 3/H)leucine, (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine, or sodium (/sup 35/S)sulfate and treated with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Enzyme treatment of (/sup 3/H) glucosamine- or (/sup 3/H)fucose-labeled PC12 cells led to a 15-fold increase in released glycoproteins. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel ectrophoresis, most of the released material migrated as a broad band with an apparent molecular size of 32,000 daltons (Da), which was specifically immunoprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody to the Thy-l glycoprotein. A second glycoprotein, with an apparent molecular size of 158,000 Da, was also released. After treatment with endo-..beta..-galactosidase, 40-45% of the (/sup 3/H)glucosamine of (/sup 3/H)fucose radioactivity in the phospholipase-released glycoproteins was converted to products of disaccharide size, and the molecular size of the 158-kDa glycoprotein decreased to 145 kDa, demonstrating that it contains fucosylated poly-(N-acetyllactosaminyl) oligosaccharides. The phospholipase also released labeled Thy-1 and the 158-kDa glycoprotein from PC12 cells cultured in the presence of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine, which specifically labels this component of the phosphatidylinositol membrane-anchoring sequence,while in the lipid-free protein residue of cells not treated with phospholipase, Thy-1 and a doublet at 46/48 kDa were the only labeled proteins. Sulfated glycoproteins of 155, 132/134, 61, and 21 kDa are the predominant species released by phospholipase, which does not affect a major 44-kDa protein seen in (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled brain cultures. The 44-48- and 155/158-kDa proteins may be common to both PC12 cells and brain.

  3. Cells under siege: Viral glycoprotein interactions at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Thomas A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Stuart, David I.

    2011-01-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses are required to enter and replicate within their host, a process which employs many of their proteins to hijack natural cellular processes. High resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis has proven to be an ideal method to visualize the mechanisms by which such virus-host interactions occur and has revealed the innovative capacity of viruses to adapt efficiently to their hosts. In this review, we draw upon recently elucidated paramyxovirus-, arenavirus-, and poxvirus-host protein complex crystal structures to reveal both the capacity of viruses to appropriate one component of a physiological protein–protein binding event (often modifying it to out-compete the host-protein), and the ability to utilize novel binding sites on host cell surface receptors. The structures discussed shed light on a number of biological processes ranging from viral entry to virulence and host antagonism. Drawn together they reveal the common strategies which viruses have evolved to interact with their natural host. The structures also support molecular level rationales for how viruses can be transmitted to unrelated organisms and thus pose severe health risks. PMID:21440638

  4. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  5. Insulin receptor: Interaction with nonreceptor glycoprotein from liver cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Joseph M.; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    1978-01-01

    In crude receptor preparations (either particulate or soluble) of rat liver membranes, the insulin receptor exhibits complicated binding kinetics (two binding plateaus, half-saturated at approximately 60 pM and 700 pM insulin) and an apparent chromatographic heterogeneity, suggested by the presence of two detectable, soluble insulin-binding components with apparent Stokes radii of 72 Å and 38 Å. In contrast, the insulin receptor isolated by affinity chromatography exhibits a simple binding isotherm (half-maximal saturation of binding at 700 pM insulin) without evidence for negative cooperativity and behaves as a single component (apparent Stokes radius of 38 Å) upon chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The apparent discrepancies between the properties of the unpurified insulin receptor and the affinity-purified receptor can be attributed to the presence in crude preparations of a nonreceptor constituent(s) having properties consistent with those of a membrane glycoprotein. A glycoprotein fraction from such crude soluble membrane preparations, freed from insulin receptor and subsequently partially purified using concanavalin-A-agarose, when combined with affinity-purified insulin receptor, causes both a reappearance of the complicated binding kinetics and an increase in the receptor's apparent Stokes radius from 38 Å to 72 Å. Similar results are observed for a glycoprotein fraction obtained from rat adipocyte membranes but are not observed for an identical fraction isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. We conclude that the insulin receptor in rat liver membranes can interact with another nonreceptor membrane glycoprotein that may represent either a nonrecognition moiety of the receptor oligomer or an effector molecule to the biological action of insulin. PMID:277909

  6. Role of cell wall deconstructing enzymes in the proanthocyanidin-cell wall adsorption-desorption phenomena.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Ortega-Regules, Ana; Lozada, Daniel; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén

    2016-04-01

    The transference of proanthocyanidins from grapes to wine is quite low. This could be due, among other causes, to proanthocyanidins being bound to grape cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations in the must. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from grapes will depend on the ability to disrupt these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the behavior of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions when commercial maceration enzymes are present in the solution. The results showed that cell wall polysaccharides adsorbed a high amount of proanthocyanidins and only a limited quantity of proanthocyanidins could be desorbed from the cell walls after washing with a model solution. The presence of enzymes in the solution reduced the proanthocyanidin-cell wall interaction, probably through the elimination of pectins from the cell wall network.

  7. Cell surface expression of v-fms-coded glycoproteins is required for transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Roussel, M F; Rettenmier, C W; Look, A T; Sherr, C J

    1984-01-01

    The viral oncogene v-fms encodes a transforming glycoprotein with in vitro tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity. Although most v-fms-coded molecules remain internally sequestered in transformed cells, a minor population of molecules is transported to the cell surface. An engineered deletion mutant lacking 348 base pairs of the 3.0-kilobase-pair v-fms gene encoded a polypeptide that was 15 kilodaltons smaller than the wild-type v-fms gene product. The in-frame deletion of 116 amino acids was adjacent to the transmembrane anchor peptide located near the middle of the predicted protein sequence and 432 amino acids from the carboxyl terminus. The mutant polypeptide acquired N-linked oligosaccharide chains, was proteolytically processed in a manner similar to the wild-type glycoprotein, and exhibited an associated tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity in vitro. However, the N-linked oligosaccharides of the mutant glycoprotein were not processed to complex carbohydrate chains, and the glycoprotein was not detected at the cell surface. Cells expressing high levels of the mutant glycoprotein did not undergo morphological transformation and did not form colonies in semisolid medium. The transforming activity of the v-fms gene product therefore appears to be mediated through target molecules on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:6390182

  8. Sinomenine reverses multidrug resistance in bladder cancer cells via P-glycoprotein-dependent and independent manners.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yule; Zhang, Linlin; Lu, Xinlan; Wu, Kaijie; Zeng, Jin; Gao, Yang; Shi, Qi; Wang, Xinyang; Chang, Luke S; He, Dalin

    2014-01-01

    P-Glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance is a frequent event during chemotherapy and a key obstacle for bladder cancer therapy. Search for strategies to reverse multidrug resistance is a promising approach to improve the management of bladder cancer. In the present study, we reported a novel P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistant cell model 253J/DOX, which was generated from human bladder cancer 253J cell line. Furthermore, we found that the multidrug resistant phenotype of 253J/DOX cells could be overcome by sinomenine, an alkaloid derived from the stem of Sinomenium acutum. Mechanistically, the chemosensitive effect by sinomenine was mediated by down-regulating P-glycoprotein expression, as well as triggering apoptotic pathways. The chemosensitive effect of sinomenine may make it a prime candidate agent to target bladder cancer.

  9. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translational modifications have been characterized in cell wall proteins to date? The purpose of this review is to discuss the experimental results obtained to date using proteomics, as well as some of the new questions challenging future research.

  10. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  11. Cell surface glycoproteins of CHO cells. I. Internalization and rapid recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Raub, T.J.; Denny, J.B.; Roberts, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    The major cell surface proteins of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells have been investigated after reacting cells at 4/sup 0/C with the membrane-impermeant reagent, trinitrobenzenesulfonate (TNBS). Immunoprecipitation and subsequent two-dimensional, sodiumdodecyl sulfate, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of proteins from derivatized cells that had been labelled previously with (/sup 3/H)D-glucosamine or (/sup 3/H)L-leucine showed that TNBS reacted with most of the high molecular weight (HMW) acidic glycoproteins that became labelled with iodine by the lactoperoxidase technique and that bind the lectin, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). After warming the cells to allow endocytosis to proceed, molecule haptenized with trinitrophenol (TNP) groups were followed radio-chemically by means of (/sup 125/I)anti-DNP antibodies. Within 15 min at 37/sup 0/C, a steady-state between surface and cytoplasmic label was reached, with about 65% of the hapten located internally. Recycling of internalized TNP groups back to the cell surface also occurred rapidly (t/sub 1/2/ approx. 5 min). Our results are consistent with the view that the majority of plasma membrane glycoproteins are continuously being internalized and recycled at a high rate.

  12. The inside and outside: topological issues in plant cell wall biosynthesis and the roles of nucleotide sugar transporters.

    PubMed

    Temple, Henry; Saez-Aguayo, Susana; Reyes, Francisca C; Orellana, Ariel

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall is a complex extracellular matrix composed primarily of polysaccharides. Noncellulosic polysaccharides, glycoproteins and proteoglycans are synthesized in the Golgi apparatus by glycosyltransferases (GTs), which use nucleotide sugars as donors to glycosylate nascent glycan and glycoprotein acceptors that are subsequently exported to the extracellular space. Many nucleotide sugars are synthesized in the cytosol, leading to a topological issue because the active sites of most GTs are located in the Golgi lumen. Nucleotide sugar transporters (NSTs) overcome this problem by translocating nucleoside diphosphate sugars from the cytosol into the lumen of the organelle. The structures of the cell wall components synthesized in the Golgi are diverse and complex; therefore, transporter activities are necessary so that the nucleotide sugars can provide substrates for the GTs. In this review, we describe the topology of reactions involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis in the Golgi and focus on the roles of NSTs as well as their impacts on cell wall structure when they are altered.

  13. An efficient platform for screening expression and crystallization of glycoproteins produced in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeffrey E.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2010-01-01

    Glycoproteins mediate multiple, diverse and critical cellular functions, that are desirable to explore by structural analysis. However, structure determination of these molecules has been hindered by difficulties expressing milligram quantities of stable, homogeneous protein and in determining, which modifications will yield samples amenable to structural studies. We describe a platform proven effective for rapidly screening expression and crystallization of challenging glycoprotein targets produced in mammalian cells. Here, multiple glycoprotein constructs are produced in parallel by transient expression of adherent human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells and subsequently screened in small quantities for crystallization by microfluidic free interface diffusion. As a result, recombinant proteins are produced and processed in a native, mammalian environment and crystallization screening can be accomplished with as little as 65 μg of protein. Moreover, large numbers of constructs can be screened for expression and crystallization and scaled up for structural studies in a matter of five weeks. PMID:19373230

  14. Proteomic dataset for altered glycoprotein expression upon GALNT3 knockdown in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sheta, Razan; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Woo, Christina M; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Droit, Arnaud; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-09-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to research published in "Role of the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 in ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in abnormal mucin O-glycosylation" [1]. The data presented here was obtained with the application of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy analyzing differential glycoprotein expression following the knock-down (KD) of the GALNT3 gene in the epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell line A2780s. LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry analysis was then performed and the processed data related to the identified glycoproteins show that several hundred proteins are differentially expressed between control and GALNT3 KD A2780s cells. The obtained data also uncover numerous novel glycoproteins; some of which could represent new potential EOC biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets.

  15. Isodityrosine cross-linking mediates insolubilization of cell walls in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Waffenschmidt, S; Woessner, J P; Beer, K; Goodenough, U W

    1993-07-01

    Enzymatic removal of the cell wall induces vegetative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to transcribe wall genes and synthesize new hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) related to the extensins found in higher plant cell walls. A cDNA expression library made from such induced cells was screened with antibodies to an oligopeptide containing the (SP)x repetitive domains found in Chlamydomonas wall proteins. One of the selected cDNAs encodes an (SP)x-rich polypeptide that also displays a repeated YGG motif. Ascorbate, a peroxidase inhibitor, and tyrosine derivatives were shown to inhibit insolubilization of both the vegetative and zygotic cell walls of Chlamydomonas, suggesting that oxidative cross-linking of tyrosines is occurring. Moreover, insolubilization of both walls was concomitant with a burst in H2O2 production and in extracellular peroxidase activity. Finally, both isodityrosine and dityrosine were found in hydrolysates of the insolubilized vegetative wall layer. We propose that the formation of tyrosine cross-links is essential to Chlamydomonas HRGP insolubilization.

  16. Isodityrosine cross-linking mediates insolubilization of cell walls in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed Central

    Waffenschmidt, S; Woessner, J P; Beer, K; Goodenough, U W

    1993-01-01

    Enzymatic removal of the cell wall induces vegetative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to transcribe wall genes and synthesize new hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) related to the extensins found in higher plant cell walls. A cDNA expression library made from such induced cells was screened with antibodies to an oligopeptide containing the (SP)x repetitive domains found in Chlamydomonas wall proteins. One of the selected cDNAs encodes an (SP)x-rich polypeptide that also displays a repeated YGG motif. Ascorbate, a peroxidase inhibitor, and tyrosine derivatives were shown to inhibit insolubilization of both the vegetative and zygotic cell walls of Chlamydomonas, suggesting that oxidative cross-linking of tyrosines is occurring. Moreover, insolubilization of both walls was concomitant with a burst in H2O2 production and in extracellular peroxidase activity. Finally, both isodityrosine and dityrosine were found in hydrolysates of the insolubilized vegetative wall layer. We propose that the formation of tyrosine cross-links is essential to Chlamydomonas HRGP insolubilization. PMID:7689882

  17. Disruption of Protein Mannosylation Affects Candida guilliermondii Cell Wall, Immune Sensing, and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Navarro-Arias, María J; Defosse, Tatiana A; Dementhon, Karine; Csonka, Katalin; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; Dias Valério, Aline; González-Hernández, Roberto J; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Hernández, Nahúm V; Pérez-García, Luis A; Singh, Dhirendra K; Vizler, Csaba; Gácser, Attila; Almeida, Ricardo S; Noël, Thierry; López, Mercedes G; Papon, Nicolas; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2016-01-01

    The fungal cell wall contains glycoproteins that interact with the host immune system. In the prominent pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, Pmr1 acts as a Golgi-resident ion pump that provides cofactors to mannosyltransferases, regulating the synthesis of mannans attached to glycoproteins. To gain insight into a putative conservation of such a crucial process within opportunistic yeasts, we were particularly interested in studying the role of the PMR1 homolog in a low-virulent species that rarely causes candidiasis, Candida guilliermondii. We disrupted C. guilliermondii PMR1 and found that loss of Pmr1 affected cell growth and morphology, biofilm formation, susceptibility to cell wall perturbing agents, mannan levels, and the wall composition and organization. Despite the significant increment in the amount of β1,3-glucan exposed at the wall surface, this positively influenced only the ability of the mutant to stimulate IL-10 production by human monocytes, suggesting that recognition of both mannan and β1,3-glucan, is required to stimulate strong levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, our results indicate C. guilliermondii sensing by monocytes was critically dependent on the recognition of N-linked mannans and β1,3-glucan, as reported in other Candida species. In addition, chemical remotion of cell wall O-linked mannans was found to positively influence the recognition of C. guilliermondii by human monocytes, suggesting that O-linked mannans mask other cell wall components from immune cells. This observation contrasts with that reported in C. albicans. Finally, mice infected with C. guilliermondii pmr1Δ null mutant cells had significantly lower fungal burdens compared to animals challenged with the parental strain. Accordingly, the null mutant showed inability to kill larvae in the Galleria mellonella infection model. This study thus demonstrates that mannans are relevant for the C. guilliermondii-host interaction, with an atypical role for O

  18. Disruption of Protein Mannosylation Affects Candida guilliermondii Cell Wall, Immune Sensing, and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Arias, María J.; Defosse, Tatiana A.; Dementhon, Karine; Csonka, Katalin; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; Dias Valério, Aline; González-Hernández, Roberto J.; Courdavault, Vincent; Clastre, Marc; Hernández, Nahúm V.; Pérez-García, Luis A.; Singh, Dhirendra K.; Vizler, Csaba; Gácser, Attila; Almeida, Ricardo S.; Noël, Thierry; López, Mercedes G.; Papon, Nicolas; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The fungal cell wall contains glycoproteins that interact with the host immune system. In the prominent pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, Pmr1 acts as a Golgi-resident ion pump that provides cofactors to mannosyltransferases, regulating the synthesis of mannans attached to glycoproteins. To gain insight into a putative conservation of such a crucial process within opportunistic yeasts, we were particularly interested in studying the role of the PMR1 homolog in a low-virulent species that rarely causes candidiasis, Candida guilliermondii. We disrupted C. guilliermondii PMR1 and found that loss of Pmr1 affected cell growth and morphology, biofilm formation, susceptibility to cell wall perturbing agents, mannan levels, and the wall composition and organization. Despite the significant increment in the amount of β1,3-glucan exposed at the wall surface, this positively influenced only the ability of the mutant to stimulate IL-10 production by human monocytes, suggesting that recognition of both mannan and β1,3-glucan, is required to stimulate strong levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly, our results indicate C. guilliermondii sensing by monocytes was critically dependent on the recognition of N-linked mannans and β1,3-glucan, as reported in other Candida species. In addition, chemical remotion of cell wall O-linked mannans was found to positively influence the recognition of C. guilliermondii by human monocytes, suggesting that O-linked mannans mask other cell wall components from immune cells. This observation contrasts with that reported in C. albicans. Finally, mice infected with C. guilliermondii pmr1Δ null mutant cells had significantly lower fungal burdens compared to animals challenged with the parental strain. Accordingly, the null mutant showed inability to kill larvae in the Galleria mellonella infection model. This study thus demonstrates that mannans are relevant for the C. guilliermondii-host interaction, with an atypical role for O

  19. The plant secretory pathway seen through the lens of the cell wall.

    PubMed

    van de Meene, A M L; Doblin, M S; Bacic, Antony

    2017-01-01

    Secretion in plant cells is often studied by looking at well-characterised, evolutionarily conserved membrane proteins associated with particular endomembrane compartments. Studies using live cell microscopy and fluorescent proteins have illuminated the highly dynamic nature of trafficking, and electron microscopy studies have resolved the ultrastructure of many compartments. Biochemical and molecular analyses have further informed about the function of particular proteins and endomembrane compartments. In plants, there are over 40 cell types, each with highly specialised functions, and hence potential variations in cell biological processes and cell wall structure. As the primary function of secretion in plant cells is for the biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides and apoplastic transport complexes, it follows that utilising our knowledge of cell wall glycosyltransferases (GTs) and their polysaccharide products will inform us about secretion. Indeed, this knowledge has led to novel insights into the secretory pathway, including previously unseen post-TGN secretory compartments. Conversely, our knowledge of trafficking routes of secretion will inform us about polarised and localised deposition of cell walls and their constituent polysaccharides/glycoproteins. In this review, we look at what is known about cell wall biosynthesis and the secretory pathway and how the different approaches can be used in a complementary manner to study secretion and provide novel insights into these processes.

  20. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity: possible role of N-linked glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oeltmann, T.N.; Chambers, W.H.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the role of N-linked glycoproteins in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) by treating effector cells or target cells with swainsonine, a specific inhibitor of golgi mannosidase II which is critical for N-linked glycoprotein processing. They have also examined the effects of alpha-mannosidase, an exoglycosidase specific for alpha-linked mannose residues, on both target and effector cells. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with swainsonine (18 hr) resulted in an inhibition of lysis of K-562 target cells as measured by LDH release. Protein synthesis was not inhibited as measured by incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acids. However, oligosaccharide processing was altered as measured by incorporation of 2(/sup 3/H)-mannose. Similar treatment did not inhibit target cell-effector cell conjugation. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with alpha-mannosidase (1 hr) did not result in a reduction in NK cell function. However, alpha-mannosidase did cause a release of mannose from treated cells. These results suggest that N-linked glycoproteins may play a role in NCMC, but not at the level of recognition and binding.

  1. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity: possible role of N-linked glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, W.H.; Oeltmann, T.N.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the role of N-linked glycoproteins in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) by treating effector cells or target cells with swainsonine, a specific inhibitor of golgi mannosidase II which is critical for N-linked glycoprotein processing. They have also examined the effects of alpha-mannosidase, an exoglycosidase specific for alpha-linked mannose residues, on both target and effector cells. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with swainsonine (18 hr) resulted in an inhibition of lysis of K-562 target cells as measured by LDH release. Protein synthesis was not inhibited as measured by incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acids. However, oligosaccharide processing was altered as measured by incorporation of 2(/sup 3/H)-mannose. Similar treatment did not inhibit target cell-effector cell conjugation. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with alpha-mannosidase (1 hr) did not result in a reduction in NK cell function. However, alpha-mannosidase did cause a release of mannose from treated cells. These results suggest that N-linked glycoproteins may play a role in NCMC, but not at the level of recognition and binding.

  2. β-(1,3)-Glucan Unmasking in Some Candida albicans Mutants Correlates with Increases in Cell Wall Surface Roughness and Decreases in Cell Wall Elasticity.

    PubMed

    Hasim, Sahar; Allison, David P; Retterer, Scott T; Hopke, Alex; Wheeler, Robert T; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Reynolds, Todd B

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common human fungal pathogens, causing a broad range of infections, including life-threatening systemic infections. The cell wall of C. albicans is the interface between the fungus and the innate immune system. The cell wall is composed of an outer layer enriched in mannosylated glycoproteins (mannan) and an inner layer enriched in β-(1,3)-glucan and chitin. Detection of C. albicans by Dectin-1, a C-type signaling lectin specific for β-(1,3)-glucan, is important for the innate immune system to recognize systemic fungal infections. Increased exposure of β-(1,3)-glucan to the immune system occurs when the mannan layer is altered or removed in a process called unmasking. Nanoscale changes to the cell wall during unmasking were explored in live cells with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Two mutants, the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants, were selected as representatives that exhibit modest and strong unmasking, respectively. Comparisons of the cho1Δ/Δ and kre5Δ/Δ mutants to the wild type reveal morphological changes in their cell walls that correlate with decreases in cell wall elasticity. In addition, AFM tips functionalized with Dectin-1 revealed that the forces of binding of Dectin-1 to all of the strains were similar, but the frequency of binding was highest for the kre5Δ/Δ mutant, decreased for the cho1Δ/Δ mutant, and rare for the wild type. These data show that nanoscale changes in surface topology are correlated with increased Dectin-1 adhesion and decreased cell wall elasticity. AFM, using tips functionalized with immunologically relevant molecules, can map epitopes of the cell wall and increase our understanding of pathogen recognition by the immune system.

  3. Generation of the heterodimeric precursor GP3 of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Kiess, Michael; Getzlaff, Rita; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Frank, Ronald

    2010-09-01

    The cell wall of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exclusively consists of hydroxyproline-containing glycoproteins. Protein chemical analysis of its polypeptide constituents was hindered by their cross-linking via peroxidase-catalysed intermolecular isodityrosine formation and transaminase-dependent processes. To overcome this problem, we have identified putative soluble precursors using polyclonal antibodies raised against deglycosylation products of the highly purified insoluble wall fraction and analysed their amino acid sequence. The occurrence of the corresponding polypeptide in the insoluble glycoprotein framework was finally probed by epitope mapping of the polyclonal antibodies using overlapping scan peptides which, together, cover the whole amino acid sequence of the putative precursor. As a control, peptide fragments released from the insoluble wall fraction by trypsin treatment were analysed by mass spectroscopy. By this approach, the heterodimeric, chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP3 proved to be a constituent of the insoluble extracellular matrix of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Furthermore, we have shown that the polypeptide backbones of both GP3 subunits are encoded by the same gene and differ by a C-terminal truncation in the case of GP3A.

  4. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Tanja C.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  5. The Cell Walls of Green Algae: A Journey through Evolution and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Ciancia, Marina; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Ulvskov, Peter; Willats, William G. T.

    2012-01-01

    The green algae represent a large group of morphologically diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes that occupy virtually every photic habitat on the planet. The extracellular coverings of green algae including cell walls are also diverse. A recent surge of research in green algal cell walls fueled by new emerging technologies has revealed new and critical insight concerning these coverings. For example, the late divergent taxa of the Charophycean green algae possess cell walls containing assemblages of polymers with notable similarity to the cellulose, pectins, hemicelluloses, arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), extensin, and lignin present in embryophyte walls. Ulvophycean seaweeds have cell wall components whose most abundant fibrillar constituents may change from cellulose to β-mannans to β-xylans and during different life cycle phases. Likewise, these algae produce complex sulfated polysaccharides, AGPs, and extensin. Chlorophycean green algae produce a wide array of walls ranging from cellulose–pectin complexes to ones made of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Larger and more detailed surveys of the green algal taxa including incorporation of emerging genomic and transcriptomic data are required in order to more fully resolve evolutionary trends within the green algae and in relationship with higher plants as well as potential applications of wall components in the food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:22639667

  6. The charophycean green algae provide insights into the early origins of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Bacic, Antony; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Fei, Zhangzhun; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2011-10-01

    Numerous evolutionary innovations were required to enable freshwater green algae to colonize terrestrial habitats and thereby initiate the evolution of land plants (embryophytes). These adaptations probably included changes in cell-wall composition and architecture that were to become essential for embryophyte development and radiation. However, it is not known to what extent the polymers that are characteristic of embryophyte cell walls, including pectins, hemicelluloses, glycoproteins and lignin, evolved in response to the demands of the terrestrial environment or whether they pre-existed in their algal ancestors. Here we show that members of the advanced charophycean green algae (CGA), including the Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, but not basal CGA (Klebsormidiales and Chlorokybales), have cell walls that are comparable in several respects to the primary walls of embryophytes. Moreover, we provide both chemical and immunocytochemical evidence that selected Coleochaete species have cell walls that contain small amounts of lignin or lignin-like polymers derived from radical coupling of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. Thus, the ability to synthesize many of the components that characterize extant embryophyte walls evolved during divergence within CGA. Our study provides new insight into the evolutionary window during which the structurally complex walls of embryophytes originated, and the significance of the advanced CGA during these events.

  7. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-07

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  8. Influence of N-glycans on Expression of Cell Wall Remodeling Related Genes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; Pessoni, André Moreira; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. It is caused by the temperature-dependent dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The P. brasiliensis cell wall is a dynamic outer structure, composed of a network of glycoproteins and polysaccharides, such as chitin, glucan and N-glycosylated proteins. These glycoproteins can interact with the host to affect infection rates, and are known to perform other functions. We inhibited N-linked glycosylation using tunicamycin (TM), and then evaluated the expression of P. brasiliensis genes related to cell wall remodeling. Our results suggest that cell wall synthesis related genes, such as β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase (PbGEL3), 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1), and α-1,4-amylase (PbAMY), as well as cell wall degrading related genes, such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (PbNAG1), α-1,3-glucanase (PbAGN), and β-1,3-glucanase (PbBGN1 and PbBGN2), have their expression increased by the N-glycosylation inhibition, as detected by qRT-PCR. The observed increases in gene expression levels reveal possible compensatory mechanisms for diminished enzyme activity due to the lack of glycosylation caused by TM. PMID:27226767

  9. Assembly of the Yeast Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Enrico; Farkas, Vladimir; Kosík, Ondrej; Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier; McPhie, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The cross-linking of polysaccharides to assemble new cell wall in fungi requires mechanisms by which a preexisting linkage is broken for each new one made, to allow for the absence of free energy sources outside the plasma membrane. Previous work showed that Crh1p and Crh2p, putative transglycosylases, are required for the linkage of chitin to β(1–3)glucose branches of β(1–6)glucan in the cell wall of budding yeast. To explore the linking reaction in vivo and in vitro, we used fluorescent sulforhodamine-linked laminari-oligosaccharides as artificial chitin acceptors. In vivo, fluorescence was detected in bud scars and at a lower level in the cell contour, both being dependent on the CRH genes. The linking reaction was also shown in digitonin-permeabilized cells, with UDP-N-acetylglucosamine as the substrate for nascent chitin production. Both the nucleotide and the Crh proteins were required here. A gas1 mutant that overexpresses Crh1p showed very high fluorescence both in intact and permeabilized cells. In the latter, fluorescence was still incorporated in patches in the absence of UDP-GlcNAc. Isolated cell walls of this strain, when incubated with sulforhodamine-oligosaccharide, also showed Crhp-dependent fluorescence in patches, which were identified as bud scars. In all three systems, binding of the fluorescent material to chitin was verified by chitinase digestion. Moreover, the cell wall reaction was inhibited by chitooligosaccharides. These results demonstrate that the Crh proteins act by transferring chitin chains to β(1–6)glucan, with a newly observed high activity in the bud scar. The importance of transglycosylation for cell wall assembly is thus firmly established. PMID:18694928

  10. Cell wall proteomic of Brachypodium distachyon grains: A focus on cell wall remodeling proteins.

    PubMed

    Francin-Allami, Mathilde; Merah, Kahina; Albenne, Cécile; Rogniaux, Hélène; Pavlovic, Marija; Lollier, Virginie; Sibout, Richard; Guillon, Fabienne; Jamet, Elisabeth; Larré, Colette

    2015-07-01

    Cell walls play key roles during plant development. Following their deposition into the cell wall, polysaccharides are continually remodeled according to the growth stage and stress environment to accommodate cell growth and differentiation. To date, little is known concerning the enzymes involved in cell wall remodeling, especially in gramineous and particularly in the grain during development. Here, we investigated the cell wall proteome of the grain of Brachypodium distachyon. This plant is a suitable model for temperate cereal crops. Among the 601 proteins identified, 299 were predicted to be secreted. These proteins were distributed into eight functional classes; the class of proteins that act on carbohydrates was the most highly represented. Among these proteins, numerous glycoside hydrolases were found. Expansins and peroxidases, which are assumed to be involved in cell wall polysaccharide remodeling, were also identified. Approximately half of the proteins identified in this study were newly discovered in grain and were not identified in the previous proteome analysis conducted using the culms and leaves of B. distachyon. Therefore, the data obtained from all organs of B. distachyon infer a global cell wall proteome consisting of 460 proteins. At present, this is the most extensive cell wall proteome of a monocot species.

  11. Cellular Immune Responses in Guinea Pigs Immunized with Cell Walls of Histoplasma capsulatum Prepared by Several Different Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Domer, Judith E.; Ichinose, H.

    1977-01-01

    Since guinea pigs immunized with water-washed cell walls of Histoplasma capsulatum developed cellular immune responses detectable with cytoplasmic substances, attempts were made to determine whether cytoplasmic contamination of the walls was responsible for the induction of the immune response. Cell walls were treated by several procedures designed to remove possible contamination, namely, extraction with lipid solvents, incubation with proteolytic enzymes, and washing with sodium dodecyl sulfate, and each of the treated preparations was compared with water-washed walls for its ability to induce cellular responses demonstrable with cytoplasmic substances. For comparison, wall glycoprotein was also used as a test antigen. Immune responses were assessed by gross and histological examinations of skin test sites and by assays for the production of migration inhibition factor. A portion of the material inducing the response detectable with cytoplasmic substances was apparently removed or altered by each of the purifying procedures. The cellular immune responses to wall glycoprotein were also altered, however, indicating that more than the mere removal of cytoplasmic substances had occurred. On the basis of the data collected from each of the cellular assays involving wall glycoprotein as the test antigen, the hypothesis is proposed that sodium dodecyl sulfate altered or removed protein from the wall and thus augmented its ability to induce a more intense immediate-type hypersensitivity, whereas incubation with Pronase altered the walls in such a way as to shift the balance toward a more intense delayed-type hypersensitivity. The latter effect was probably due to the removal of carbohydrate from the wall by glucanase or to mannosidase contaminating the Pronase preparation. Images PMID:326673

  12. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall. PMID:26539200

  13. Reconstitution of a Secondary Cell Wall in a Secondary Cell Wall-Deficient Arabidopsis Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    The secondary cell wall constitutes a rigid frame of cells in plant tissues where rigidity is required. Deposition of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells contributes to the production of wood in woody plants. The secondary cell wall is assembled through co-operative activities of many enzymes, and their gene expression is precisely regulated by a pyramidal cascade of transcription factors. Deposition of a transmuted secondary cell wall in empty fiber cells by expressing selected gene(s) in this cascade has not been attempted previously. In this proof-of-concept study, we expressed chimeric activators of 24 transcription factors that are preferentially expressed in the stem, in empty fiber cells of the Arabidopsis nst1-1 nst3-1 double mutant, which lacks a secondary cell wall in fiber cells, under the control of the NST3 promoter. The chimeric activators of MYB46, SND2 and ANAC075, as well as NST3, reconstituted a secondary cell wall with different characteristics from those of the wild type in terms of its composition. The transgenic lines expressing the SND2 or ANAC075 chimeric activator showed increased glucose and xylose, and lower lignin content, whereas the transgenic line expressing the MYB46 chimeric activator showed increased mannose content. The expression profile of downstream genes in each transgenic line was also different from that of the wild type. This study proposed a new screening strategy to identify factors of secondary wall formation and also suggested the potential of the artificially reconstituted secondary cell walls as a novel raw material for production of bioethanol and other chemicals. PMID:25535195

  14. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  15. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-inhibitors, ABT-737 and ABT-263, are substrates for P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Meike; Dickens, David; Dyer, Martin J.S.; Owen, Andrew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Cohen, Gerald M.

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The BCL2-inhibitor ABT-263 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein. {yields} Apoptosis is inhibited by P-glycoprotein expression. {yields} Overexpression of P-glycoprotein may contribute to resistance to ABT-263 or ABT-737. -- Abstract: Inhibition of BCL2 proteins is one of the most promising new approaches to targeted cancer therapy resulting in the induction of apoptosis. Amongst the most specific BCL2-inhibitors identified are ABT-737 and ABT-263. However, targeted therapy is often only effective for a limited amount of time because of the occurrence of drug resistance. In this study, the interaction of BCL2-inhibitors with the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein was investigated. Using {sup 3}H labelled ABT-263, we found that cells with high P-glycoprotein activity accumulated less drug. In addition, cells with increased P-glycoprotein expression were more resistant to apoptosis induced by either ABT-737 or ABT-263. Addition of tariquidar or verapamil sensitized the cells to BCL2-inhibitor treatment, resulting in higher apoptosis. Our data suggest that the BCL2-inhibitors ABT-737 and ABT-263 are substrates for P-glycoprotein. Over-expression of P-glycoprotein may be, at least partly, responsible for resistance to these BCL2-inhibitors.

  16. Glycoconjugates and polysaccharides of fungal cell wall and activation of immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, M.R.; Barreto-Bergter, E.; Taborda, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids and polysaccharides exposed at the most external layers of the wall are involved in several types of interactions of fungal cells with the exocellular environment. These molecules are fundamental building blocks of organisms, contributing to the structure, integrity, cell growth, differentiation and signaling. Several of them are immunologically active compounds with potential as regulators of pathogenesis and the immune response of the host. Some of these structures can be specifically recognized by antibodies from patients’ sera, suggesting that they can be also useful in the diagnosis of fungal infections. PMID:24031202

  17. Glucocorticoid-regulated localization of cell surface glycoproteins in rat hepatoma cells is mediated within the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones regulate the post-translational maturation and sorting of cell surface and extracellular mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) glycoproteins in M1.54 cells, a stably infected rat hepatoma cell line. Exposure to monensin significantly reduced the proteolytic maturation and externalization of viral glycoproteins resulting in a stable cellular accumulation of a single 70,000-Mr glycosylated polyprotein (designated gp70). Cell surface- and intracellular-specific immunoprecipitations of monensin-treated cells revealed that gp70 can be localized to the cell surface only in the presence of 1 microM dexamethasone, while in uninduced cells gp70 is irreversibly sequestered in an intracellular compartment. Analysis of oligosaccharide processing kinetics demonstrated that gp70 acquired resistance to endoglycosidase H with a half-time of 65 min in the presence or absence of hormone. In contrast, gp70 was inefficiently galactosylated after a 60-min lag in uninduced cells while rapidly acquiring this carbohydrate modification in the presence of dexamethasone. Furthermore, in the absence or presence of monensin, MMTV glycoproteins failed to be galactosylated in hormone-induced CR4 cells, a complement-selected sorting variant defective in the glucocorticoid-regulated compartmentalization of viral glycoproteins to the cell surface. Since dexamethasone had no apparent global effects on organelle morphology or production of total cell surface-galactosylated species, we conclude that glucocorticoids induce the localization of cell surface MMTV glycoproteins by regulating a highly selective step within the Golgi apparatus after the acquisition of endoglycosidase H- resistant oligosaccharide side chains but before or at the site of galactose attachment. PMID:2836430

  18. Pachytene spermatocyte protein(s) stimulate Sertoli cells grown in bicameral chambers: dose-dependent secretion of ceruloplasmin, sulfated glycoprotein-1, sulfated glycoprotein-2, and transferrin.

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Djakiew, D

    1991-03-01

    Interactions between pachytene spermatocytes and Sertoli cells were investigated using the bicameral culture chamber system. Pachytene spermatocytes were isolated from adult rats with a purity in excess of 90% by centrifugal elutriation. The pachytene spermatocytes were cultured in a defined media and pachytene spermatocyte protein prepared from the conditioned media by dialysis and lyophilization. This pachytene spermatocyte protein was reconstituted at various concentrations and incubated with confluent epithelial sheets of immature Sertoli cells cultured in bicameral chambers. Pachytene spermatocyte protein stimulated secretion of total [35S]methionine-labeled protein from Sertoli cells in a dose-dependent manner predominantly in an apical direction. This stimulatory effect of pachytene spermatocyte protein was domain specific from the apical surface of Sertoli cells, and seemed specific for secretion because total intracellular protein did not increase under the influence of pachytene spermatocyte protein. Pachytene spermatocyte protein and follicle-stimulating hormone additively stimulated Sertoli cell secretion. The physicochemical characteristics of the stimulatory pachytene spermatocyte protein are indicative of heat stability, whereas the stimulatory pachytene spermatocyte protein exhibit acid, dithiothreitol and trypsin sensitivity, and partial urea sensitivity. Furthermore, Sertoli cell secretion of ceruloplasmin, sulfated glycoprotein-1, sulfated glycoprotein-2, and transferrin in response to various concentrations of pachytene spermatocyte protein were determined by immunoprecipitate of these [35S]methionine-labeled proteins with polyclonal antibodies. Maximal stimulation of ceruloplasmin and sulfated glycoprotein-1 secretion from Sertoli cells was observed at a dose of 50 micrograms/ml pachytene spermatocyte protein, whereas maximal stimulation of sulfated glycoprotein-2 and transferrin secretion from Sertoli cells was observed at a dose of 100

  19. In vivo and in virto cellular responses to cytoplasmic and cell wall antigens of Histoplasma capsulatum in artificially immunized or infected guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Domer, J E

    1976-01-01

    Guinea pigs were infected with different doses of yeasts of Histoplasma capsulatum or artifically immunized with several concentrations of unextracted yeast cell walls, and then tested in vivo and in vitro for cell-mediated responses to various subcellular fractions of the fungus. Three types of cell-mediated responses were measured, viz., skin test activity, production of migration inhibition factor, and lymphocyte transformation. Positive cutaneous reactions were elicited in animals immunized with 100 or 1,000 mug of cell walls when such animals were skin-tested with cell wall glycoprotein of soluble cytoplasmic substances, whereas animals immunized with 2,000 mug of cell walls did not react significantly greater than unsensitized animals when skin-tested with the same antigens. Histoplasmin did not elicit cutaneous sensitivity in guinea pigs infected with the smallest inoculum, 6 X 10(5) yeast cells, or in animals immunized with cell walls, regardless of the concentration of cell walls used as immunogen. However, hypersensitivity to H. capsulatum could be detected with cytoplasmic substances in animals infected with 6X 10(5). In guinea pigs infected with larger doses, i.e., 10 X 10(7), 15 X10(7), or 20 X 10(7), hypersensitivity could be detected with histoplasmin, cell wall glycoprotein, a ribosome-rich fraction, and soluble cytoplasmic substances. Both cell wall glycoprotein and soluble cytoplasmic substances were functional in migration inhibition factor assays with peritoneal exudate cells from animals immunized with 100 or 1,000 mug of cell walls. The transformation of lymphocytes from infected and artificially immunized guinea pigs in the presence of cell wall glycoprotein and soluble cytoplasmic substances was variable and unpredictable, the lymphocytes from some animls within a given group transforming and those from other animals showing no evidence of stimulation. Moreover, the level of stimulation could not be correlated with the degree of dermal

  20. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  1. CELL WALL VARIABILITY IN THE GREEN SEAWEED CODIUM VERMILARA (BRYOPSIDALES CHLOROPHYTA) FROM THE ARGENTINE COAST(1).

    PubMed

    Fernández, Paula V; Ciancia, Marina; Estevez, José Manuel

    2011-08-01

    Cell wall chemistry in the coencocytic green seaweed Codium vermilara (Olivi) Delle Chiaje (Bryopsidales, Chlorophyta) is well understood. These cell walls are composed of major amounts of neutral β-(1→4)-D-mannans (Mn), sulfated polysaccharides (SPs), which include pyranosic arabinan sulfates (ArpS), pyruvylated galactan sulfates (pGaS), and mannan sulfates (MnS); also minor amounts of O-glycoproteins are present. In this study, cell wall samples of C. vermilara were investigated with regard to their monosaccharide composition and infrared spectra (using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy coupled to principal component [FTIR-PC] analysis). Samples from three different populations of C. vermilara from the Argentine coast showed: (i) an important variation in the relative arabinan content, which increases from north to south, and (ii) a measurable degree of cell wall variability in the sulfate distribution between the different sulfated polysaccharides, independent of the amount of each polysaccharide present and of total sulfate content. When cell wall composition was analyzed over three consecutive years in a single geographic location, the quantity of Mn and overall sulfate content on SPs remained constant, whereas the pGaS:ArpS molar ratio changed over the time. Besides, similar cell wall composition was found between actively growing and resting zones of the thallus, suggesting that cell wall composition is independent of growth stage and development. Overall, these results suggest that C. vermilara has developed a mechanism to adjust the total level of cell wall sulfation by modulating the ArpS:pGaS:MnS molar ratio and also by adjusting the sulfation level in each type of polymer, whereas nonsulfated Mn, as the main structural polysaccharide, did not change over the time or growing stage.

  2. Measuring in vitro extensibility of growing plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the theory and practical aspects of measuring cell wall properties by four different extensometer techniques and how the results of these methods relate to the concept and ideal measurement of cell wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. These in vivo techniques are particularly useful for studies of the molecular basis of cell wall extension. Measurements of breaking strength, elastic compliance, and plastic compliance may be informative about changes in cell wall structure, whereas measurements of wall stress relaxation and creep are sensitive to both changes in wall structure and wall-loosening processes, such as those mediated by expansins and some lytic enzymes. A combination of methods is needed to obtain a broader view of cell wall behavior and properties connected with the concept of cell wall extensibility.

  3. Infection with Listeria monocytogenes impairs sialic acid addition to host cell glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular bacterium that causes severe disease in neonates and immunocompromised adults. Although entry, multiplication, and locomotion of Listeria in the cytosol of infected cells are well described, the impact of such infection on the host cell is unknown. In this report, we investigate the effect of L. monocytogenes infection on MHC class I synthesis, processing, and intracellular trafficking. We show that L. monocytogenes infection interferes with normal processing of N-linked oligosaccharides on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I heavy chain molecule, H-2Kd, resulting in a reduced sialic acid content. The glycosylation defect is more pronounced as the infection progresses and results from interference with the addition of sialic acid rather than its removal by a neuraminidase. The effect is found in two different cell lines and is not limited to MHC class I molecules since CD45, a surface glycoprotein, and LGP120, a lysosomal glycoprotein, are similarly affected by L. monocytogenes infection. The glycosylation defect is specific for infection by L. monocytogenes since neither Trypanosoma cruzi nor Yersinia enterocolitica, two other intracellular pathogens, reproduces the effect. The resultant hyposialylation of H-2Kd does not impair its surface expression in infected cells. Diminished sialic acid content of surface glycoproteins may enhance host-defense by increasing susceptibility to lysis and promoting clearance of Listeria-infected cells. PMID:7964488

  4. Cell wall proteome of pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Kozik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A fast development of a wide variety of proteomic techniques supported by mass spectrometry coupled with high performance liquid chromatography has been observed in recent years. It significantly contributes to the progress in research on the cell wall, very important part of the cells of pathogenic fungi. This complicated structure composed of different polysaccharides, proteins, lipids and melanin, plays a key role in interactions with the host during infection. Changes in the set of the surface-exposed proteins under different environmental conditions provide an effective way for pathogens to respond, adapt and survive in the new niches of infection. This work summarizes the current state of knowledge on proteins, studied both qualitatively and quantitatively, and found within the cell wall of fungal pathogens for humans, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans and other medically important fungi. The described proteomic studies involved the isolation and fractionation of particular sets of proteins of interest with various techniques, often based on differences in their linkages to the polysaccharide scaffold. Furthermore, the proteinaceous contents of extracellular vesicles ("virulence bags") of C. albicans, C. neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis are compared, because their production can partially explain the problem of non-classical protein secretion by fungi. The role assigned to surface-exposed proteins in pathogenesis of fungal infections is enormously high, thus justifying the need for further investigation of cell wall proteomes.

  5. Systemic Delivery of Fusogenic Membrane Glycoprotein-expressing Neural Stem Cells to Selectively Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Detu; Lam, Dang Hoang; Purwanti, Yovita Ida; Goh, Sal Lee; Wu, Chunxiao; Zeng, Jieming; Fan, Weimin; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenously injected neural stem cells (NSCs) can infiltrate both primary and metastatic tumor sites; thus, they are attractive tumor-targeting vehicles for delivering anticancer agents. However, because the systemic distribution of the injected NSCs involves normal organs and might induce off-target actions leading to unintended side effects, clinical applications of this approach is impeded. Given that the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can promote the formation of multinucleated syncytia to kill cells in a pH-dependent manner, we engineered a pH sensor of VSV-G and generated a novel VSV-G mutant that efficiently promotes syncytium formation at the tumor extracellular pH (pHe) but not at pH 7.4. Using transduced NSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the VSV-G mutant was delivered into mice with metastatic breast cancers in the lung through tail vein injection. Compared with the conventional stem cell-based gene therapy that uses the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene, this treatment did not display toxicity to normal non-targeted organs while retaining therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing organs. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of a new approach for achieving tumor-selective killing effects following systemic stem cell administration. Its potential in stem cell-based gene therapy for metastatic cancer is worthy of further exploration. PMID:23752308

  6. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-06-24

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  7. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation. PMID:26114386

  8. In vitro enhancement of human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity by purified influenza virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, D J; Houde, M; Justewicz, D M; Mandeville, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of the glycoproteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) in the in vitro stimulation of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) or natural killer activity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated with radiolabeled K562 cells as target cells in an overnight chromium release assay. Three different approaches were used. (i) Purified viral proteins were obtained by extraction with Nonidet P-40, separation on a sucrose gradient, and further purification by affinity chromatography. Ficoll-Hypaque-purified peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to HA or NA individually or to a mixture of both significantly increased NCMC (32 to 50%). (ii) Treatment of HA and NA with their respective homologous antisera or F(ab')2 antibody abrogated the stimulation of NCMC by these glycoproteins. (iii) Virions treated with proteolytic enzymes resulted in viral cores lacking either HA or NA or both activities. Compared to whole virions, viral cores devoid of HA activity only induced a 50% increase in NCMC, whereas viral cores lacking HA activity and with traces of NA activity stimulated only 10% of the NCMC. These results suggest that influenza virus-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity is largely due to its glycoproteins. PMID:6387178

  9. Unique glycoprotein-proteoglycan complex defined by monoclonal antibody on human melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bumol, T F; Reisfeld, R A

    1982-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, 9.2.27, with a high specificity for human melanoma cell surfaces has been utilized for biosynthetic studies in M21 human melanoma cells to define a unique antigenic complex consisting of a 250-kilodalton N-linked glycoprotein and a high molecular weight proteoglycan component larger than 400 kilodaltons. The 250-kilodalton glycoprotein has endoglycosidase H-sensitive precursors and shows a lower apparent molecular weight after treatment with neuraminidase. The biosynthesis of the proteoglycan component is inhibited by exposure of M21 cells to the monovalent ionophore monensin, this component can be labeled biosynthetically with 35SO4, is sensitive to beta-elimination in dilute base, and is degraded by both chondroitinase AC and ABC lyases, suggesting that it is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. These data demonstrate that the antigenic determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 9.2.27 is located on a glycoprotein-proteoglycan complex which may have unique implications for the interaction of glycoconjugates at the human melanoma tumor cell surface. Images PMID:6175965

  10. Suppression of Arabidopsis peroxidase 72 alters cell wall and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Class III peroxidases are glycoproteins with a major role in cell wall maturation such as lignin formation. Peroxidases are usually present in a high number of isoenzymes, which complicates to assign specific functions to individual peroxidase isoenzymes. Arabidopsis genome encodes for 73 peroxidases, among which AtPrx72 has been shown to participate in lignification. Here, we report by using knock out peroxidase mutants how the disruption of AtPrx72 causes thinner secondary walls in interfascicular fibres but not in the xylem of the stem. This effect is also age-dependent, and AtPrx72 function seems to be particularly important when lignification prevails over elongation processes. Finally, the suppression AtPrx72 leads to the down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis pathway, as well as genes and transcription factors involved in secondary wall thickening.

  11. Celery (Apium graveolens) parenchyma cell walls: cell walls with minimal xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Thimm, Julian C.; Burritt, David J.; Sims, Ian M.; Newman, Roger H.; Ducker, William A.; Melton, Laurence D.

    2002-10-01

    The primary walls of celery (Apium graveolens L.) parenchyma cells were isolated and their polysaccharide components characterized by glycosyl linkage analysis, cross-polarization magic-angle spinning solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C NMR) and X-ray diffraction. Glycosyl linkage analysis showed that the cell walls consisted of mainly cellulose (43 mol%) and pectic polysaccharides (51 mol%), comprising rhamnogalacturonan (28 mol%), arabinan (12 mol%) and galactan (11 mol%). The amounts of xyloglucan (2 mol%) and xylan (2 mol%) detected in the cell walls were strikingly low. The small amount of xyloglucan present means that it cannot coat the cellulose microfibrils. Solid-state 13C NMR signals were consistent with the constituents identified by glycosyl linkage analysis and allowed the walls to be divided into three domains, based on the rigidity of the polymers. Cellulose (rigid) and rhamnogalacturonan (semi-mobile) polymers responded to the CP/MAS 13C NMR pulse sequence and were distinguished by differences in proton spin relaxation time constants. The arabinans, the most mobile polymers, responded to single-pulse excitation (SPE), but not CP/MAS 13C NMR. From solid-state 13C NMR of the cell walls the diameter of the crystalline cellulose microfibrils was determined to be approximately 3 nm while X-ray diffraction of the cell walls gave a value for the diameter of approximately 2 nm.

  12. Humoral immune response to the entire human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein made in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rusche, J.R.; Lynn, D.L.; Robert-Guroff, M.; Langlois, A.J.; Lyerly, H.K.; Carson, H.; Krohn, K.; Ranki, A.; Gallo, R.C.; Bolognesi, D.P.; Putney, S.D.

    1987-10-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus envelope gene was expressed in insect cells by using a Baculovirus expression vector. The protein has an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa, appears on the surface of infected insect cells, and does not appear to be cleaved to glycoproteins gp120 and gp41. Goats immunized with the 160-kDa protein have high titers of antibody that neutralizes virus infection as measured by viral gene expression or cell cytolysis. In addition, immune sera can block fusion of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in culture. Both neutralization and fusion-blocking activities are bound to and eluted from immobilized gp120.

  13. Expression and Purification of E2 Glycoprotein from Insect Cells (Sf9) for Use in Serology.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chong Long; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arbovirus which poses a major threat to global public health. Definitive CHIKV diagnosis is crucial, especially in distinguishing the disease from dengue virus, which co-circulates in endemic areas and shares the same mosquito vectors. Laboratory diagnosis is mainly based on serological or molecular approaches. The E2 glycoprotein is a good candidate for serological diagnosis since it is the immunodominant antigen during the course of infection, and reacts with seropositive CHIKV sera. In this chapter, we describe the generation of stable clone Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells expressing secreted, soluble, and native recombinant CHIKV E2 glycoprotein. We use direct plasmid expression in insect cells, rather than the traditional technique of generating recombinant baculovirus. This recombinant protein is useful for serological diagnosis of CHIKV infection.

  14. Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    study that focuses on testing a new cancer targeting strategy that aims at enhancing nanodelivery of drugs to osteopontin (OPN) that are often...testing a new cancer targeting strategy that aims at enhancing nanodelivery of drugs to the glycoproteins (e.g. osteopontin, OPN) that are often...nanocarrier will be loaded with an anticancer drug and the in vitro therapeutic activities against prostate cancer cells with TIC behaviors will be studied

  15. Revealing the structural and functional diversity of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    The extensive knowledge of the chemistry of isolated cell wall polymers, and that relating to the identification and partial annotation of gene families involved in their synthesis and modification, is not yet matched by a sophisticated understanding of the occurrence of the polymers within cell walls of the diverse cell types within a growing organ. Currently, the main sets of tools that are used to determine cell-type-specific configurations of cell wall polymers and aspects of cell wall microstructures are antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and microspectroscopies. As these tools are applied we see that cell wall polymers are extensively developmentally regulated and that there is a range of structurally distinct primary and secondary cell walls within organs and across species. The challenge now is to document cell wall structures in relation to diverse cell biological events and to integrate this knowledge with the emerging understanding of polymer functions.

  16. Glucocorticoid-regulated and constitutive trafficking of proteolytically processed cell surface-associated glycoproteins in wild type and variant rat hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amacher, S.L.; Goodman, L.J.; Bravo, D.A.; Wong, K.Y.; Goldfine, I.D.; Hawley, D.M.; Firestone, G.L. )

    1989-10-01

    Glucocorticoids regulate the trafficking of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) glycoproteins to the cell surface in the rat hepatoma cell line M1.54, but not in the immunoselected sorting variant CR4. To compare the localization of MMTV glycoproteins to another proteolytically processed glycoprotein, both wild type M1.54 cells and variant CR4 cells were transfected with a human insulin receptor (hIR) expression vector, pRSVhIR. The production of cell surface hIR was monitored in dexamethasone-treated and -untreated wild type M1.54 and variant CR4 cells by indirect immunofluorescence, direct plasma membrane immunoprecipitation, and by (125I) insulin binding. In both wild type and variant rat hepatoma cells, hIR were localized at the cell surface in the presence or in the absence of 1 microM dexamethasone. In contrast, the glucocorticoid-regulated trafficking of cell surface MMTV glycoproteins occurred only in wild type M1.54 cells. We conclude that the hIR, which undergoes posttranslational processing reactions similar to MMTV glycoproteins, does not require glucocorticoids to be transported to the plasma membrane and is representative of a subset of cell surface glycoproteins whose trafficking is constitutive in rat hepatoma cells. Thus, MMTV glycoproteins and hIR provide specific cell surface markers to characterize the glucocorticoid-regulated and constitutive sorting pathways.

  17. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  18. Association Mapping of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes and Cell Wall Quality in Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect

    Bartley, Laura; Wu, Y.; Zhu, L.; Brummer, E. C.; Saha, M.

    2016-05-31

    Inefficient conversion of biomass to biofuels is one of the main barriers for biofuel production from such materials. Approximately half of polysaccharides in biomass remain unused by typical biochemical conversion methods. Conversion efficiency is influenced by the composition and structure of cell walls of biomass. Grasses such as wheat, maize, and rice, as well as dedicated perennial bioenergy crops, like switchgrass, make up ~55% of biomass that can be produced in the United States. Grass cell walls have a different composition and patterning compared with dicotyledonous plants, including the well-studied model plant, Arabidopsis. This project identified genetic determinants of cell wall composition in grasses using both naturally occurring genetic variation of switchgrass and gene network reconstruction and functional assays in rice. In addition, the project linked functional data in rice and other species to switchgrass improvement efforts through curation of the most abundant class of regulators in the switchgrass genome. Characterizing natural diversity of switchgrass for variation in cell wall composition and properties, also known as quality, provides an unbiased avenue for identifying biologically viable diversity in switchgrass cell walls. To characterizing natural diversity, this project generated cell wall composition and enzymatic deconstruction data for ~450 genotypes of the Switchgrass Southern Association Collection (SSAC), a diverse collection composed of 36 switchgrass accessions from the southern U.S. distribution of switchgrass. Comparing these data with other measures of cell wall quality for the same samples demonstrated the complementary nature of the diverse characterization platforms now being used for biomass characterization. Association of the composition data with ~3.2K single nucleotide variant markers identified six significant single nucleotide variant markers co-associated with digestibility and another compositional trait. These

  19. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Snider, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with /sup 125/I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(/sup 3/H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with /sup 125/I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells.

  20. STREAMLINED METHOD FOR BIOMASS WHOLE-CELL-WALL STRUCTURAL PROFILING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wide-ranging research aimed at altering plant cell wall characteristics by conventional breeding or modern genetic methods, one of the biggest problems is in delineating the effects on the cell wall. Plant cell walls are a complex conglomerate of a variety of polysaccharides and lignin. Each comp...

  1. STREAMLINED METHOD FOR BIOMASS WHOLE-CELL-WALL STRUCTURAL PROFILING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In wide-ranging research aimed at altering plant cell wall characteristics by conventional breeding or modern genetic methods, one of the biggest problems is in delineating the effects on the cell wall. Plant cell walls are a complex conglomerate of a variety of polysaccharides and lignin. Although ...

  2. The cell surface expressed nucleolin is a glycoprotein that triggers calcium entry into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Losfeld, Marie-Estelle; Khoury, Diala El; Mariot, Pascal; Carpentier, Mathieu; Krust, Bernard; Briand, Jean-Paul; Mazurier, Joel; Hovanessian, Ara G.; Legrand, Dominique

    2009-01-15

    Nucleolin is an ubiquitous nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in fundamental aspects of transcription regulation, cell proliferation and growth. It has also been described as a shuttling molecule between nucleus, cytosol and the cell surface. Several studies have demonstrated that surface nucleolin serves as a receptor for various extracellular ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that nucleolin in the extranuclear cell compartment is a glycoprotein containing N- and O-glycans. In the present study, we show that glycosylation is an essential requirement for surface nucleolin expression, since it is prevented when cells are cultured in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation. Accordingly, surface but not nuclear nucleolin is radioactively labeled upon metabolic labeling of cells with [{sup 3}H]glucosamine. Besides its well-demonstrated role in the internalization of specific ligands, here we show that ligand binding to surface nucleolin could also induce Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells. Indeed, by flow cytometry, microscopy and patch-clamp experiments, we show that the HB-19 pseudopeptide, which binds specifically surface nucleolin, triggers rapid and intense membrane Ca{sup 2+} fluxes in various types of cells. The use of several drugs then indicated that Store-Operated Ca{sup 2+} Entry (SOCE)-like channels are involved in the generation of these fluxes. Taken together, our findings suggest that binding of an extracellular ligand to surface nucleolin could be involved in the activation of signaling pathways by promoting Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells.

  3. An effect of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors on the kinetics of red blood cells aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Irina A; Muravyov, Alexei V; Khokhlova, Maria D; Rikova, Sofya Yu; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Gafarova, Marina A; Skryabina, Maria N; Fedyanin, Angrey A; Kryukova, Darya V; Shahnazarov, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The reversible aggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) continues to be of the basic science and clinical interest. Recently it has been reported about a specific binding between fibrinogen and unknown erythrocyte glycoprotein receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the red blood cell aggregation (RBCA) include the cell-cell interaction using the membrane receptors that bind such ligands as fibrinogen or fibronectin. To test this hypothesis the RBCs were incubated with monafram - the drug of the monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, with the GPIIb-IIIa receptor antagonist tirofiban, epifibatide and with the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide. It has been found that the RBC incubation with monafram resulted in a marked RBCA decrease mainly in persons with high level of aggregation. Another research session has shown that RBC incubation with fibronectin was accompanied by a significant RBCA rise. The monafram addition to red cell incubation medium resulted in a significant RBCA lowering. The cell incubation with tirofiban and epifibatide issued in RBCA decrease. The similar results were obtained when RBCs were incubated with the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide. Although monafram, tirofiban, eptifibatide and the fibrinogen inhibiting peptide were related to fibrinogen function they didn't inhibit RBCA completely. Therefore, under moderate and low red blood cell aggregation the cell binding is probably related to nonspecific mode. It seems evident that the specific and nonspecific modes of red blood cell aggregate formation could co-exist. Additional theoretical and experimental investigations in this area are needed.

  4. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-07

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells.

  5. Engineering secondary cell wall deposition in plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Mitra, Prajakta; Zhang, Ling; Prak, Lina; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Kim, Jin-Sun; Sun, Lan; Zheng, Kejian; Tang, Kexuan; Auer, Manfred; Scheller, Henrik V; Loqué, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass was used for thousands of years as animal feed and is now considered a great sugar source for biofuels production. It is composed mostly of secondary cell walls built with polysaccharide polymers that are embedded in lignin to reinforce the cell wall structure and maintain its integrity. Lignin is the primary material responsible for biomass recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis. During plant development, deep reductions of lignin cause growth defects and often correlate with the loss of vessel integrity that adversely affects water and nutrient transport in plants. The work presented here describes a new approach to decrease lignin content while preventing vessel collapse and introduces a new strategy to boost transcription factor expression in native tissues. We used synthetic biology tools in Arabidopsis to rewire the secondary cell network by changing promoter-coding sequence associations. The result was a reduction in lignin and an increase in polysaccharide depositions in fibre cells. The promoter of a key lignin gene, C4H, was replaced by the vessel-specific promoter of transcription factor VND6. This rewired lignin biosynthesis specifically for vessel formation while disconnecting C4H expression from the fibre regulatory network. Secondly, the promoter of the IRX8 gene, secondary cell wall glycosyltransferase, was used to express a new copy of the fibre transcription factor NST1, and as the IRX8 promoter is induced by NST1, this also created an artificial positive feedback loop (APFL). The combination of strategies—lignin rewiring with APFL insertion—enhances polysaccharide deposition in stems without over-lignifying them, resulting in higher sugar yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:23140549

  6. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions. PMID:23641247

  7. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions.

  8. Roles and regulation of plant cell walls surrounding plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin

    2014-12-01

    In plants, the intercellular transport of simple and complex molecules can occur symplastically through plasmodesmata. These are membranous channels embedded in cell walls that connect neighbouring cells. The properties of the cell walls surrounding plasmodesmata determine their transport capacity and permeability. These cell wall micro-domains are enriched in callose and have a characteristic pectin distribution. Cell wall modifications, leading to changes in plasmodesmata structure, have been reported to occur during development and in response to environmental signals. Cell wall remodelling enzymes target plasmodesmata to rapidly control intercellular communication in situ. Here we describe current knowledge on the composition of cell walls at plasmodesmata sites and on the proteins and signals that modify cell walls to regulate plasmodesmata aperture.

  9. Double-walled carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinquan; Jia, Yi; Shu, Qinke; Gu, Zhiyi; Wang, Kunlin; Zhuang, Daming; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhicheng; Luo, Jianbin; Cao, Anyuan; Wu, Dehai

    2007-08-01

    We directly configured double-walled carbon nanotubes as energy conversion materials to fabricate thin-film solar cells, with nanotubes serving as both photogeneration sites and a charge carriers collecting/transport layer. The solar cells consist of a semitransparent thin film of nanotubes conformally coated on a n-type crystalline silicon substrate to create high-density p-n heterojunctions between nanotubes and n-Si to favor charge separation and extract electrons (through n-Si) and holes (through nanotubes). Initial tests have shown a power conversion efficiency of >1%, proving that DWNTs-on-Si is a potentially suitable configuration for making solar cells. Our devices are distinct from previously reported organic solar cells based on blends of polymers and nanomaterials, where conjugate polymers generate excitons and nanotubes only serve as a transport path.

  10. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  11. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C; Ryckman, Brent J; Britt, William J; Kamil, Jeremy P

    2015-04-07

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes.

  12. The expression of P-glycoprotein is causally related to a less aggressive phenotype in human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Scotlandi, K; Manara, M C; Serra, M; Benini, S; Maurici, D; Caputo, A; De Giovanni, C; Lollini, P L; Nanni, P; Picci, P; Campanacci, M; Baldini, N

    1999-01-21

    The relationship between P-glycoprotein expression and malignancy is controversial. We have recently found that, in osteosarcoma, multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with a less aggressive behavior, both in vitro and in clinical settings. In this study, we evaluated whether P-glycoprotein overexpression has a cause-effect relationship with the reduced metastatic potential of MDR cells, or rather reflects a more complex phenotype. MDR1 gene-transfected osteosarcoma cell clones, showing different levels of P-glycoprotein expression, were analysed for their in vitro characteristics and their tumorigenic and metastatic ability in athymic mice. Apart from the different levels of P-glycoprotein, no significant change in the expression of surface antigens or in the differentiative features were observed in the MDR1 gene transfectants compared to the parental cell lines or control clones, obtained by transfection with neo gene alone. In contrast to controls, however, MDR1 transfectants showed a significantly lower ability to grow in semi-solid medium and were completely unable to grow and give lung metastases in athymic mice. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein overexpression is causally associated with a low malignant potential of osteosarcoma cells, and open new insights on the role and functions of P-glycoprotein activity.

  13. Cell Wall Loosening in the Fungus, Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Truong, Jason T.; Munoz, Cindy M.; Ramirez, David G.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been conducted to determine how cell walls are loosened to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth in plant and algal cells. The same cannot be said about fungal cells. Almost nothing is known about how fungal cells loosen their walls to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth. In this study, anoxia is used to chemically isolate the wall from the protoplasm of the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The experimental results provide direct evidence of the existence of chemistry within the fungal wall that is responsible for wall loosening, irreversible wall deformation and elongation growth. In addition, constant-tension extension experiments are conducted on frozen-thawed sporangiophore walls to obtain insight into the wall chemistry and wall loosening mechanism. It is found that a decrease in pH to 4.6 produces creep extension in the frozen-thawed sporangiophore wall that is similar, but not identical, to that found in frozen-thawed higher plant cell walls. Experimental results from frozen-thawed and boiled sporangiophore walls suggest that protein activity may be involved in the creep extension. PMID:27135318

  14. Cell wall-associated kinases and pectin perception.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D

    2016-01-01

    The pectin matrix of the angiosperm cell wall is regulated in both synthesis and modification and greatly influences the direction and extent of cell growth. Pathogens, herbivory and mechanical stresses all influence this pectin matrix and consequently plant form and function. The cell wall-associated kinases (WAKs) bind to pectin and regulate cell expansion or stress responses depending upon the state of the pectin. This review explores the WAKs in the context of cell wall biology and signal transduction pathways.

  15. Grass cell walls: A story of cross-linking

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how the cell wall components are assembled into comple...

  16. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  17. Exploiting fungal cell wall components in vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, Stuart M.; Huang, Haibin; Ostroff, Gary R.; Specht, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Innate recognition of fungi leads to strong adaptive immunity. Investigators are trying to exploit this observation in vaccine development by combining antigens with evolutionarily conserved fungal cell wall carbohydrates to induce protective responses. Best studied is β-1,3-glucan, a glycan that activates complement and is recognized by Dectin-1. Administration of antigens in association with β-1,3-glucan, either by direct conjugation or complexed in glucan particles, results in robust humoral and cellular immune responses. While the host has a host of mannose receptors, responses to fungal mannoproteins generally are amplified if cells are cooperatively stimulated with an additional danger signal such as a toll-like receptor agonist. Chitosan, a polycationic homopolymer of glucosamine manufactured by the deacetylation of chitin, is being studied as an adjuvant in DNA and protein-based vaccines. It appears particularly promising in mucosal vaccines. Finally, universal and organism-specific fungal vaccines have been formulated by conjugating fungal cell wall glycans to carrier proteins. A major challenge will be to advance these experimental findings so that at risk patients can be protected. PMID:25404118

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum L67 glycoprotein protects against cadmium chloride toxicity in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Sooyeon; Oh, Sejong; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-03-01

    The food and water we consume may be contaminated with a range of chemicals and heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, and mercury by accumulation through the food chain. Cadmium is known to be one of the major components in cigarette smoke and can cause lesions in many organs. Some lactobacilli can bind and remove heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and copper. However, the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and inhibition by probiotics are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that glycoprotein (18 kDa) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 protected RAW 264.7 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (100 µM). Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of cadmium using the MTT assay and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, and assessed activities of activator protein kinase C (PKC-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, activator protein (AP)-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases using immunoblot. Our results indicated that glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 inhibited intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. It also significantly suppressed inflammatory factors such as AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our findings suggest that the 24-kDa glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 might be used as a food component for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion.

  19. Grass Cell Walls: A Story of Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Hatfield, Ronald D.; Rancour, David M.; Marita, Jane M.

    2017-01-01

    Cell wall matrices are complex composites mainly of polysaccharides, phenolics (monomers and polymers), and protein. We are beginning to understand the synthesis of these major wall components individually, but still have a poor understanding of how cell walls are assembled into complex matrices. Valuable insight has been gained by examining intact components to understand the individual elements that make up plant cell walls. Grasses are a prominent group within the plant kingdom, not only for their important roles in global agriculture, but also for the complexity of their cell walls. Ferulate incorporation into grass cell wall matrices (C3 and C4 types) leads to a cross-linked matrix that plays a prominent role in the structure and utilization of grass biomass compared to dicot species. Incorporation of p-coumarates as part of the lignin structure also adds to the complexity of grass cell walls. Feruoylation results in a wall with individual hemicellulosic polysaccharides (arabinoxylans) covalently linked to each other and to lignin. Evidence strongly suggests that ferulates not only cross-link arabinoxylans, but may be important factors in lignification of the cell wall. Therefore, the distribution of ferulates on arabinoxylans could provide a means of structuring regions of the matrix with the incorporation of lignin and have a significant impact upon localized cell wall organization. The role of other phenolics in cell wall formation such as p-coumarates (which can have concentrations higher than ferulates) remains unknown. It is possible that p-coumarates assist in the formation of lignin, especially syringyl rich lignin. The uniqueness of the grass cell wall compared to dicot sepcies may not be so much in the gross composition of the wall, but how the distinctive individual components are organized into a functional wall matrix. These features are discussed and working models are provided to illustrate how changing the organization of feruoylation and p

  20. Arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed Central

    Amako, K; Umeda, A; Murata, K

    1982-01-01

    The arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus was observed with the newly developed freeze-fracture technique, using n-octanol instead of water as the freezing medium. The replica of the trichloroacetic acid-extracted cell wall (TCA-wall) showed two areas. One of them has a concentric circular structure, a characteristic surface structure of the staphylococcal cell wall, and the other showed an irregular and rough surface. The chemical analysis of the wall revealed that the TCA-wall consisted of mostly peptidoglycan. By digesting the TCA-wall with lysozyme, the circular structures were greatly disturbed, and they disappeared after 60 min of treatment. From these observations it can be expected that the peptidoglycan is arranged in a concentric circular manner in the newly generated cell wall of Staphylococcus. Images PMID:7068534

  1. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  2. Quantitative Secretome Analysis of Activated Jurkat Cells Using Click Chemistry-Based Enrichment of Secreted Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Witzke, Kathrin E; Rosowski, Kristin; Müller, Christian; Ahrens, Maike; Eisenacher, Martin; Megger, Dominik A; Knobloch, Jürgen; Koch, Andrea; Bracht, Thilo; Sitek, Barbara

    2017-01-06

    Quantitative secretome analyses are a high-performance tool for the discovery of physiological and pathophysiological changes in cellular processes. However, serum supplements in cell culture media limit secretome analyses, but serum depletion often leads to cell starvation and consequently biased results. To overcome these limiting factors, we investigated a model of T cell activation (Jurkat cells) and performed an approach for the selective enrichment of secreted proteins from conditioned medium utilizing metabolic marking of newly synthesized glycoproteins. Marked glycoproteins were labeled via bioorthogonal click chemistry and isolated by affinity purification. We assessed two labeling compounds conjugated with either biotin or desthiobiotin and the respective secretome fractions. 356 proteins were quantified using the biotin probe and 463 using desthiobiotin. 59 proteins were found differentially abundant (adjusted p-value ≤0.05, absolute fold change ≥1.5) between inactive and activated T cells using the biotin method and 86 using the desthiobiotin approach, with 31 mutual proteins cross-verified by independent experiments. Moreover, we analyzed the cellular proteome of the same model to demonstrate the benefit of secretome analyses and provide comprehensive data sets of both. 336 proteins (61.3%) were quantified exclusively in the secretome. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004280.

  3. Disruption of hydrogen bonding between plant cell wall polymers by proteins that induce wall extension.

    PubMed Central

    McQueen-Mason, S; Cosgrove, D J

    1994-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is controlled by the ability of the constraining cell wall to expand. This ability has been postulated to be under the control of polysaccharide hydrolases or transferases that weaken or rearrange the loadbearing polymeric networks in the wall. We recently identified a family of wall proteins, called expansins, that catalyze the extension of isolated plant cell walls. Here we report that these proteins mechanically weaken pure cellulose paper in extension assays and stress relaxation assays, without detectable cellulase activity (exo- or endo- type). Because paper derives its mechanical strength from hydrogen bonding between cellulose microfibrils, we conclude that expansins can disrupt hydrogen bonding between cellulose fibers. This conclusion is further supported by experiments in which expansin-mediated wall extension (i) was increased by 2 M urea (which should weaken hydrogen bonding between wall polymers) and (ii) was decreased by replacement of water with deuterated water, which has a stronger hydrogen bond. The temperature sensitivity of expansin-mediated wall extension suggests that units of 3 or 4 hydrogen bonds are broken by the action of expansins. In the growing cell wall, expansin action is likely to catalyze slippage between cellulose microfibrils and the polysaccharide matrix, and thereby catalyze wall stress relaxation, followed by wall surface expansion and plant cell enlargement. Images PMID:11607483

  4. Anthocyanins influence tannin-cell wall interactions.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Martínez-Hernández, Alejandro; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gil-Muñoz, Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2016-09-01

    The rate of tannin extraction was studied in a vinification of red grapes and the results compared with another vinification made with white grapes fermented as for typical red wine, in the presence of skins and seeds. Even though the grapes presented a quite similar skin and seed tannin content, the differences in tannin concentration between both vinifications was very large, despite the fact that the only apparent difference between the phenolic composition of both wines was the anthocyanin content. This suggests that anthocyanins play an important role in tannin extractability, perhaps because they affect the extent of the tannin-cell wall interaction, a factor that largely controls the resulting quantity of tannins in wines. To confirm this observation, the effect of anthocyanins on the tannin extractability from grape seeds and skin and on the interaction between tannins and grape cell walls suspended in model solutions were studied. The results indicated that anthocyanins favored skin and seed tannin extraction and that there is a competition for the adsorption sites between anthocyanins and tannins that increases the tannin content when anthocyanins are present.

  5. Tracing Cell Wall Biogenesis in Intact Cells and Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Gibeaut, David M.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    1991-01-01

    Cells of proso millet (Panicum miliaceum L. cv Abarr) in liquid culture and leaves of maize seedlings (Zea mays L. cv LH51 × LH1131) readily incorporated d-[U-14C]glucose and l-[U-14C]arabinose into soluble and cell wall polymers. Radioactivity from arabinose accumulated selectively in polymers containing arabinose or xylose because a salvage pathway and C-4 epimerase yield both nucleotide-pentoses. On the other hand, radioactivity from glucose was found in all sugars and polymers. Pulse-chase experiments with proso millet cells in liquid culture demonstrated turnover of buffer soluble polymers within minutes and accumulation of radioactive polymers in the cell wall. In leaves of maize seedlings, radioactive polymers accumulated quickly and peaked 30 hours after the pulse then decreased slowly for the remaining time course. During further growth of the seedlings, radioactive polymers became more tenaciously bound in the cell wall. Sugars were constantly recycled from turnover of polysaccharides of the cell wall. Arabinose, hydrolyzed from glucuronoarabinoxylans, and glucose, hydrolyzed from mixed-linkage (1→3, 1→4)β-d-glucans, constituted most of the sugar participating in turnover. Arabinogalactans were a large portion of the buffer soluble (cytoplasmic) polymers of both proso millet cells and maize seedlings, and these polymers also exhibited turnover. Our results indicate that the primary cell wall is not simply a sink for various polysaccharide components, but rather a dynamic compartment exhibiting long-term reorganization by turnover and alteration of specific polymers during development. PMID:16668434

  6. Disruption of cell walls for enhanced lipid recovery

    DOEpatents

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Donohoe, Bryon S; Gerken, Henri; Laurens, Lieve; Van Wychen, Stefanie Rose

    2015-03-24

    Presented herein are methods of using cell wall degrading enzymes for recovery of internal lipid bodies from biomass sources such as algae. Also provided are algal cells that express at least one exogenous gene encoding a cell wall degrading enzyme and methods for recovering lipids from the cells.

  7. Analysis of COPII vesicles indicates a role for the Emp47-Ssp120 complex in transport of cell surface glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Margulis, Neil G.; Wilson, Joshua D.; Bentivoglio, Christine M.; Dhungel, Nripesh; Gitler, Aaron D.; Barlowe, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle formation at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transports nascent secretory proteins forward to the Golgi complex. To further define the machinery that packages secretory cargo and targets vesicles to Golgi membranes, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified COPII vesicles. In addition to previously known proteins, we identified new vesicle proteins including Coy1, Sly41 and Ssp120, which were efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles for trafficking between the ER and Golgi compartments. Further characterization of the putative calcium-binding Ssp120 protein revealed a tight association with Emp47 and in emp47Δ cells Ssp120 was mislocalized and secreted. Genetic analyses demonstrated that EMP47 and SSP120 display identical synthetic positive interactions with IRE1 and synthetic negative interactions with genes involved in cell wall assembly. Our findings support a model in which the Emp47-Ssp120 complex functions in transport of plasma membrane glycoproteins through the early secretory pathway. PMID:26650540

  8. Shifting foundations: the mechanical cell wall and development.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A; Jönsson, Henrik

    2016-02-01

    The cell wall has long been acknowledged as an important physical mediator of growth in plants. Recent experimental and modelling work has brought the importance of cell wall mechanics into the forefront again. These data have challenged existing dogmas that relate cell wall structure to cell/organ growth, that uncouple elasticity from extensibility, and those which treat the cell wall as a passive and non-stressed material. Within this review we describe experiments and models which have changed the ways in which we view the mechanical cell wall, leading to new hypotheses and research avenues. It has become increasingly apparent that while we often wish to simplify our systems, we now require more complex multi-scale experiments and models in order to gain further insight into growth mechanics. We are currently experiencing an exciting and challenging shift in the foundations of our understanding of cell wall mechanics in growth and development.

  9. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  10. Evolution and diversity of green plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Popper, Zoë A

    2008-06-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by a dynamic cell wall that performs many essential biological roles, including regulation of cell expansion, the control of tissue cohesion, ion-exchange and defence against microbes. Recent evidence shows that the suite of polysaccharides and wall proteins from which the plant cell wall is composed shows variation between monophyletic plant taxa. This is likely to have been generated during the evolution of plant groups in response to environmental stress. Understanding the natural variation and diversity that exists between cell walls from different taxa is key to facilitating their future exploitation and manipulation, for example by increasing lignocellulosic content or reducing its recalcitrance for use in biofuel generation.

  11. A sub-proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems trapped on Concanavalin A is enriched in cell wall glycoside hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zoran; Jamet, Elisabeth; Négroni, Luc; Arsene Der Garabedian, P.; Zivy, Michel; Jouanin, Lise

    2007-01-01

    N-glycosylated proteins were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems using affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A Sepharose, separated by 2D-electrophoresis and identified using nanoHPLC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS. 102 glycoproteins were identified. 94% of these proteins were predicted by bioinformatics to be targeted to the secretory pathway and 87% of them were predicted to be localized in the cell wall or at the plasma membrane. 30% of these proteins belong to glycoside hydrolases (GHs) families with some of them possibly involved in the hydrolysis of cell wall polysaccharides. The second major class of identified proteins comprises aspartyl and serine proteases. Other proteins are predicted to be oxido-reductases, contain interacting domains, are potentially involved in signalling or have an unknown function. This is to our knowledge the first survey of plant cell wall N-glycosylated proteins. PMID:17526915

  12. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function.

  13. Wall teichoic acids prevent antibody binding to epitopes within the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Samir; Kim, Taehan; Lester, Evan; Deep, Deeksha; Spiegel, David A

    2016-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that produces a range of infections including cellulitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The principle mechanism in antistaphylococcal host defense is opsonization with antibodies and complement proteins, followed by phagocytic clearance. Here we use a previously developed technique for installing chemical epitopes in the peptidoglycan cell wall to show that surface glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids conceal cell wall epitopes, preventing their recognition and opsonization by antibodies. Thus, our results reveal a previously unrecognized immunoevasive role for wall teichoic acids in S. aureus: repulsion of peptidoglycan-targeted antibodies.

  14. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Joseph A. H.; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms. PMID:26370936

  15. (The structure of pectins from cotton suspension culture cell walls)

    SciTech Connect

    Mort, A.

    1990-01-01

    We have made progress on several projects to do with determining the structure of pectins. These include: (1) Devising a new sensitive method to determine the degree of methyl esterification (DOM) of pectins; (2) solubilization of all of RGI from cotton cell walls; (3) solubilization of RGII from cotton cell walls; (4) characterization of xyloglucan from cotton cell walls; and (5) investigation giving an indication of a cross-link between extension and pectin.

  16. Recombinant pestivirus E2 glycoproteins prevent viral attachment to permissive and non permissive cells with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Asfor, A S; Wakeley, P R; Drew, T W; Paton, D J

    2014-08-30

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen, which like other pestiviruses has similar molecular biological features to hepaciviruses, including human Hepatitis C virus. The pestivirus E2 glycoproteins are the major target for virus-neutralising antibodies, as well as playing a role in receptor binding and host range restriction. In this study, recombinant E2 glycoproteins (rE2) derived from three different pestivirus species were examined for their inhibitory effects on pestivirus infectivity in cell culture. Histidine-tagged rE2 glycoproteins of BVDV type 2 strain 178003, BVDV type 1 strain Oregon C24V and CSFV strain Alfort 187 were produced in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells and purified under native conditions. The ability of rE2 glycoprotein to inhibit the infection of permissive cells by both homologous and heterologous virus was compared, revealing that the inhibitory effects of rE2 glycoproteins correlated with the predicted similarity of the E2 structures in the recombinant protein and the test virus. This result suggests that the sequence and structure of E2 are likely to be involved in the host specificity of pestiviruses at their point of uptake into cells.

  17. Surface glycoproteins of an African henipavirus induce syncytium formation in a cell line derived from an African fruit bat, Hypsignathus monstrosus.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Nadine; Hoffmann, Markus; Weis, Michael; Drexler, Jan Felix; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Winter, Christine; Corman, Victor Max; Gützkow, Tim; Drosten, Christian; Maisner, Andrea; Herrler, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Serological screening and detection of genomic RNA indicates that members of the genus Henipavirus are present not only in Southeast Asia but also in African fruit bats. We demonstrate that the surface glycoproteins F and G of an African henipavirus (M74) induce syncytium formation in a kidney cell line derived from an African fruit bat, Hypsignathus monstrosus. Despite a less broad cell tropism, the M74 glycoproteins show functional similarities to glycoproteins of Nipah virus.

  18. An arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptiona...

  19. Studies on glycoproteins produced by wild type and wheat germ agglutinin-resistant B16 mouse melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnaduwage, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two variants of B16 mouse melanoma cells have been selected in serum-free medium for their resistance to toxic levels of wheat germ agglutinin isolation 1 (WGA). Chromosome analysis and characteristic melanin production showed that the variants are derived from the parent mouse melanoma cell lines. However, the two variants were less tumorigenic in mice compared to the parent B16 mouse melanoma cells. The variants showed a marked decrease in cell agglutination with WGA. Cell agglutination with recin and peanut lectin was not different between the three cell lines, but the two variants showed a slight increase in agglutination with concanavalin A. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin to the two variant cells was reduced compared to that of the parent cell. Glycoproteins secreted or shed by the three lines were isolated after growth in serum-free medium in the presence of (/sup 3/He)glucosamine and bovine serum albumin (1%). These metabolically labeled products were fractionated on the basis of their interaction with WGA-Sepharose (2 mg/ml). The WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatographic data suggested a decrease in WGA-binding glycoprotein(s) secreted to the medium by the two variants. The WGA-bound glycoproteins from the two variants upon SDS-PAGE revealed three bands of approximate molecular weights, 92,000, 56,000, and 42,000, none of which were present in the parent cell line (50,000 molecular weight).

  20. Opposite polarity of virus budding and of viral envelope glycoprotein distribution in epithelial cells derived from different tissues

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We compared the surface envelope glycoprotein distribution and the budding polarity of four RNA viruses in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in CaCo-2 cells derived from a human colon carcinoma. Whereas both FRT and CaCo-2 cells sort similarly influenza hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, respectively, to apical and basolateral membrane domains, they differ in their handling of two togaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By conventional EM Sindbis virus and SFV were shown to bud apically in FRT cells and basolaterally in CaCo-2 cells. Consistent with this finding, the distribution of the p62/E2 envelope glycoprotein of SFV, assayed by immunoelectronmicroscopy and by domain-selective surface biotinylation was predominantly apical on FRT cells and basolateral on CaCo-2 cells. We conclude that a given virus and its envelope glycoprotein can be delivered to opposite membrane domains in epithelial cells derived from different tissues. The tissue specificity in the polarity of virus budding and viral envelope glycoprotein distribution indicate that the sorting machinery varies considerably between different epithelial cell types. PMID:1572895

  1. Catabolism of N-glycoproteins in mammalian cells: Molecular mechanisms and genetic disorders related to the processes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tadashi

    2016-10-01

    N-glycans on glycoproteins serve as one of the most important co- and post-translational modifications of proteins, and it has been well established that they play pivotal roles in controlling the physicochemical and/or physiological properties of the carrier proteins. The biosynthetic/processing pathways for N-glycans have been well characterized in mammalian cells. There are, however, issues that remain to be clarified concerning aspects of their degradation. While the molecular mechanism of the lysosomal degradation for N-glycoproteins has been well studied in relation to genetic disorders, which are collectively referred to as lysosomal storage disorders, evidence exists to suggest that there are also "non-lysosomal" degradation processes, which are now known to occur widely in eukaryotic cells. In this review, our current knowledge of the lysosomal/non-lysosomal degradation of N-glycoproteins in mammalian cells, as well as in human genetic disorders caused by the defects of these processes, is reviewed.

  2. Constituents of Carpobrotus edulis inhibit P-glycoprotein of MDR1-transfected mouse lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Martins, A; Vasas, A; Schelz, Zs; Viveiros, M; Molnár, J; Hohmann, J; Amaral, L

    2010-03-01

    A bioassay-guided separation protocol, including the testing of the extracts, fractions and pure compounds for their ability to inhibit P-glycoprotein (the efflux pump responsible for the multidrug resistance of the used cell line) of mouse lymphoma cells containing the human efflux pump gene MDR1, led to the isolation of seven compounds from the chloroform and ethyl acetate soluble fractions of the methanolic extract of Carpobrotus edulis. The compounds were identified by 1D, 2D NMR and MS investigations as triterpens (beta-amyrin, uvaol and oleanolic acid), monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, catechin, epicatechin and procyanidin B5. Uvaol was the most effective and promising compound in the reversal of multidrug resistance in MDR mouse lymphoma cell line.

  3. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis, patterned deposition and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Secondary walls are mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses (xylan and glucomannan) and lignin, and are deposited in some specialized cells, such as tracheary elements, fibers and other sclerenchymatous cells. Secondary walls provide strength to these cells, which lend mechanical support and protection to the plant body and, in the case of tracheary elements, enable them to function as conduits for transporting water. Formation of secondary walls is a complex process that requires the co-ordinated expression of secondary wall biosynthetic genes, biosynthesis and targeted secretion of secondary wall components, and patterned deposition and assembly of secondary walls. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition. Most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary wall components, including cellulose, xylan, glucomannan and lignin, have been identified and their co-ordinated activation has been shown to be mediated by a transcriptional network encompassing the secondary wall NAC and MYB master switches and their downstream transcription factors. It has been demonstrated that cortical microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins play important roles in the targeted secretion of cellulose synthase complexes, the oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils and the patterned deposition of secondary walls. Further investigation of many secondary wall-associated genes with unknown functions will provide new insights into the mechanisms controlling the formation of secondary walls that constitute the bulk of plant biomass.

  4. Small Molecule Probes for Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ian S.; Anderson, Charles T.

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics. PMID:22639673

  5. Cell wall ultrastructure of flocculent and non-flocculent Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains. Effect of cell wall hydrolysing enzymes on flocculation and cell wall ultastructure.

    PubMed

    Geleta, Anna; Kristóf, Z; Maráz, Anna

    2007-03-01

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopic studies revealed the presence of slime-like, amorphous material on the surface of Schizosaccahromyces pombe RIVE 4-2-1 cells, independently, whether they were in flocculated or in non-flocculated state. Close contact of the adjacent cells via the merging outermost cell wall layers was found, however, only in the case of floc formation, which was induced by cultivating the cells in the presence of 6% (v/v) ethanol. Irreversible loss of the flocculation ability of the cells by treatment with proteinases suggests that proteinaceous cell surface molecules as lectins contribute to the cell-to-cell interaction during flocculation. Both proteinase K and pronase treatments removed a distinct outer layer of the cell wall, which indicated that the protein moieties of the phosphogalactomannan outer surface layer has a crucial role in the maintenance of cell wall integrity. In the case of lysing enzyme treatment the removal of the outermost layer was also observed as the first step of the cell wall digestion, while driselase treatment resulted in almost complete digestion of the cell wall.

  6. An enlarged cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana rosettes.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Vincent; Duruflé, Harold; San Clemente, Hélène; Albenne, Cécile; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-12-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls playing many roles during development and in response to environmental constraints. Cell walls are mainly composed of polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins), but they also contain proteins which are critical players in cell wall remodeling processes. Today, the cell wall proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana, a major dicot model plant, comprises more than 700 proteins predicted to be secreted (cell wall proteins-CWPs) identified in different organs or in cell suspension cultures. However, the cell wall proteome of rosettes is poorly represented with only 148 CWPs identified after extraction by vacuum infiltration. This new study allows enlarging its coverage. A destructive method starting with the purification of cell walls has been performed and two experiments have been compared. They differ by the presence/absence of protein separation by a short 1D-electrophoresis run prior to tryptic digestion and different gradient programs for peptide separation before mass spectrometry analysis. Altogether, the rosette cell wall proteome has been significantly enlarged to 361 CWPs, among which 213 newly identified in rosettes and 57 newly described. The identified CWPs fall in four major functional classes: 26.1% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 11.1% oxido-reductases, 14.7% proteases and 11.7% proteins possibly related to lipid metabolism.

  7. Preparation of Cell Wall Antigens of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, J. J.; Tipper, Donald J.; Berman, David T.

    1970-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from Staphylococcus aureus strains Copenhagen and 263 by high-speed mixing in the presence of glass beads followed by differential centrifugation. Insoluble peptidoglycan complexes were derived from cell walls by extraction of teichoic acid with 10% trichloroacetic acid. Intact teichoic acid was prepared from each strain by digestion of cell walls with lysostaphin and isolated by column chromatography. Soluble glycopeptide (peptidoglycan in which only the glycan has been fragmented) and the stable complex of teichoic acid with glycopeptide were prepared by digestion of cell walls with Chalaropsis B endo-N-acetylmuramidase and were separated by column chromatography. Amino acid and amino sugar contents of walls and subunits of walls were comparable to those reported by others. Images PMID:16557799

  8. Screening and characterization of plant cell walls using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls built largely from complex carbohydrates. The primary walls of growing plant cells consist of interdependent networks of three polysaccharide classes: cellulose, cross-linking glycans (also known as hemicelluloses), and pectins. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered together by cross-linking glycans, and this assembly forms the major load-bearing component of primary walls, which is infiltrated with pectic polymers. In the secondary walls of woody tissues, pectins are much reduced and walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin. Plant cell walls are essential for plant life and also have numerous industrial applications, ranging from wood to nutraceuticals. Enhancing our knowledge of cell wall biology and the effective use of cell wall materials is dependent to a large extent on being able to analyse their fine structures. We have developed a suite of techniques based on microarrays probed with monoclonal antibodies with specificity for cell wall components, and here we present practical protocols for this type of analysis.

  9. Alteration of N-glycoproteins/N-glycosites in human hepatic stellate cells activated with transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Qin, Y; Wang, Q; Zhong, Y; Zhao, F; Wu, F; Wang, Y; Ma, T; Liu, C; Bian, H; Li, Z

    2016-03-20

    Proteins N-glycosylation is significantly increased in the activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) compared to the quiescent HSCs according to our previous study. However, little is known about the alteration of N-glycoprotein profiles in the activated HSCs. Profiles of N-glycopeptides / N-glycoproteins / N-glycosites in LX-2 cells, with and without activation by TGF-β1, were identified and compared using hydrazide chemistry enrichment coupled with liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry analysis. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were further used for validation. A total of 103 non-redundant N-glycopeptides, with 107 glycosylation sites from 86 N-glycoproteins, were identified in activated and quiescent LX-2 cells respectively. Among these, 23 proteins were known N-glycoproteins, and 58 were newly identified N-glycoproteins. In addition, 43 proteins (e.g., pigment epithelium-derived factor and clathrin heavy chain 1) were solely identified or up-regulated in the activated LX-2 cells, which participated in focal adhesion and glycosaminoglycan degradation pathways and were involved in interaction clusters of cytoskeletal proteins (e.g., myosin light chains and keratins). The increased expression of glucosamine (N-acetyl)-6-sulfatase and phospholipase C beta 2 and the decreased expression of zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein 1 were validated in the activated compared to the quiescent LX-2 cells. In conclusion, increased expression of N-glycoproteins and N-glycosites play important roles in cellular contractility, signal transduction, and responses to stimuli in the activated HSCs, which might provide useful information for discovering novel molecular mechanism of HSC activation and therapeutic targets in liver fibrosis.

  10. Variant surface glycoprotein RNA interference triggers a precytokinesis cell cycle arrest in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sheader, Karen; Vaughan, Sue; Minchin, James; Hughes, Katie; Gull, Keith; Rudenko, Gloria

    2005-06-14

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness. T. brucei multiplies extracellularly in the bloodstream, relying on antigenic variation of a dense variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat to escape antibody-mediated lysis. We investigated the role of VSG in proliferation and pathogenicity by using inducible RNA interference to ablate VSG transcript down to 1-2% normal levels. Inhibiting VSG synthesis in vitro triggers a rapid and specific cell cycle checkpoint blocking cell division. Parasites arrest at a discrete precytokinesis stage with two full-length flagella and opposing flagellar pockets, without undergoing additional rounds of S phase and mitosis. A subset (<10%) of the stalled cells have internal flagella, indicating that the progenitors of these cells were already committed to cytokinesis when VSG restriction was sensed. Although there was no obvious VSG depletion in vitro after 24-h induction of VSG RNA interference, there was rapid clearance of these cells in vivo. We propose that a stringent block in VSG synthesis produces stalled trypanosomes with a minimally compromised VSG coat, which can be targeted by the immune system. Our data indicate that VSG protein or transcript is monitored during cell cycle progression in bloodstream-form T. brucei and describes precise precytokinesis cell cycle arrest. This checkpoint before cell division provides a link between the protective VSG coat and cell cycle progression and could function as a novel parasite safety mechanism, preventing extensive dilution of the protective VSG coat in the absence of VSG synthesis.

  11. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  12. A low-toxic artificial fluorescent glycoprotein can serve as an efficient cytoplasmic labeling in living cell.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiangju; Liang, Dawei; Kong, Dan; Wu, Sufang; Yuan, Lan; Xiang, Yan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-06

    To maintain the virtue of good optical property and discard the dross of conventional fluorescent staining dyes, we provide a strategy for designing new fluorescent scaffolds. In this study, a novel fluorescent labeling glycoprotein (chitosan-poly-L-cysteine, CPC) was synthesized through graft copolymerization. CPC gives emission peak at 465-470 nm when excited at 386 nm. The submicro-scale CPC microspheres could be localized and persisted specifically in the cytoplasm of living cells, with strong blue fluorescence. Moreover, CPC was highly resistant to photo bleaching, the fluorescence was remained stable for up to 72 h as the cells grew and developed. The glycoprotein CPC was bio-compatible and in zero grade cytotoxicity as quantified by MTT assay. The fluorescent labeling process with our newly designed glycoprotein CPC is exceptionally efficient.

  13. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  14. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A. . E-mail: edward_berger@nih.gov

    2006-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor.

  15. Blue eye disease porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) infects pig neurons and glial cells using sialo-glycoprotein as receptor.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Godoy-Martinez, Diana V; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Rodriguez-Peredo, Alejandra; Dueñas-Jimenez, Judith M; Dueñas-Jiménez, Sergio H; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A

    2007-03-01

    Pig neural cells express glycoproteins with sialylated N-linked oligosaccharide chains (SNOC) which are used by the porcine rubulavirus (PoRv) as receptors. Pig neuronal or glial cell cultures were employed to investigate (a) whether PoRv infects such cells using a molecule expressing SNOC, and (b) the role of viral envelope glycoproteins in establishing the infection. Enriched neuronal or glial cell cultures were exposed to PoRv and infection was detected immunocytochemically. Neuronal cultures prepared from neonatal pigs were treated enzymatically to eliminate sialic acid or N-linked oligosaccharide chains. Primary neural cultures were exposed to anti-HN or anti-F preincubated with PoRv to study the role of the viral glycoproteins. In enriched cultures, PoRv infected neurons and glial cells, and sialic acid expressed in N-linked oligosaccharide chains appeared to play a central role in infection. It was concluded that HN and F viral glycoproteins are required to infect neurons and glial cells.

  16. Laurus nobilis L. Seed Extract Reveals Collateral Sensitivity in Multidrug-Resistant P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Saab, Antoine M; Guerrini, Alessandra; Zeino, Maen; Wiench, Benjamin; Rossi, Damiano; Gambari, Roberto; Sacchetti, Gianni; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The frequent failure of standard cancer chemotherapy requires the development of novel drugs capable of killing otherwise drug-resistant tumors. Here, we have investigated a chloroform extract of Laurus nobilis seeds. Fatty acids and 23 constituents of the volatile fraction were identified by gas chromotography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in good agreement with (1)H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrum. Multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-expressing CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells were hypersensitive (collaterally sensitive) toward this extract compared to drug-sensitive CCRF-CEM cells, whereas CEM/ADR5000 cells were 2586-fold resistant to doxorubicin as control drug. Collateral sensitivity was verified by measurement of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. The log10IC50 values of 3 compounds in the extract (limonene, eucalyptol, oleic acid) did not correlate with mRNA expression of the P-glycoprotein-coding ABCB1/MDR1 gene and accumulation of the P-glycoprotein substrate rhodamine in the NCI panel of tumor cell lines. A microarray-based profile of 20 genes predicted resistance to doxorubicin and 7 other anticancer drugs involved in the multidrug resistance phenotype but not to limonene, eucalyptol and oleic acid. In conclusion, our results show that Laurus nobilis seed extract is suitable to kill multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein expressing tumor cells.

  17. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Darvill, Alan; Hahn, Michael G.; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; York, William S.

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  18. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  19. Tissue-specific cell wall hydration in sugarcane stalks.

    PubMed

    Maziero, Priscila; Jong, Jennifer; Mendes, Fernanda M; Gonçalves, Adilson R; Eder, Michaela; Driemeier, Carlos

    2013-06-19

    Plant cell walls contain water, especially under biological and wet processing conditions. The present work characterizes this water in tissues of sugarcane stalks. Environmental scanning electron microscopy shows tissue deformation upon drying. Dynamic vapor sorption determines the equilibrium and kinetics of moisture uptake. Thermoporometry by differential scanning calorimetry quantifies water in nanoscale pores. Results show that cell walls from top internodes of stalks are more deformable, slightly more sorptive to moisture, and substantially more porous. These differences of top internode are attributed to less lignified walls, which is confirmed by lower infrared spectral signal from aromatics. Furthermore, cell wall nanoscale porosity, an architectural and not directly compositional characteristic, is shown to be tissue-specific. Nanoscale porosities are ranked as follows: pith parenchyma > pith vascular bundles > rind. This ranking coincides with wall reactivity and digestibility in grasses, suggesting that nanoscale porosity is a major determinant of wall recalcitrance.

  20. Mast cells in the human alveolar wall: an electronmicroscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Guz, A

    1981-01-01

    Mast cells were identified by electronmicroscopy in the alveolar wall of the lung in 20 subjects (10 normal, 10 abnormal). A quantitative and qualitative study was made of the mast cells. In the normal lung there was an average concentration of 350 mast cells/mm2 of alveolar wall and in the abnormal 523/mm2. Mast cells occupied approximately 1.6-2.1% of the area of the alveolar wall. There was marked variation in the structure of the mast cell granules but no differences between those in the normal and abnormal lungs. There was evidence that constant degranulation of mast cells may be occurring in the lung. The role that alveolar mast cells may play in the vasoconstrictor response to alveolar hypoxia is discussed. It is suggested that the tachypnoea present in asthma may partly be due to release of mediators from sensitised mast cells within the alveolar wall. Images PMID:7328180

  1. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Cherry, Joel

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  2. Reduced yield of infectious pseudorabies virus and herpes simplex virus from cell lines producing viral glycoprotein gp50.

    PubMed Central

    Petrovskis, E A; Meyer, A L; Post, L E

    1988-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein gp50 is the homolog of herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein D. Several cell lines that constitutively synthesize gp50 were constructed. Vero cells, HeLa cells, and pig kidney (MVPK) cells that produce gp50 all gave reduced yields of PRV and HSV progeny viruses when compared with the parent cell line or the same cell line transfected to produce a different protein. The reduction in virus yield was greatest at low multiplicities of infection. The Vero and HeLa cells that produce gp50 showed an even greater reduction in HSV yield than in PRV yield. This phenomenon may be an example in a herpesvirus of the interference observed in retroviruses or cross-protection in plant virus systems. PMID:2835521

  3. Selenorhodamine Photosensitizers for Photodynamic Therapy of P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We examined a series of selenorhodamines with amide and thioamide functionality at the 5-position of a 9-(2-thienyl) substituent on the selenorhodamine core for their potential as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT) in P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expressing cells. These compounds were examined for their photophysical properties (absorption, fluorescence, and ability to generate singlet oxygen), for their uptake into Colo-26 cells in the absence or presence of verapamil, for their dark and phototoxicity toward Colo-26 cells, for their rates of transport in monolayers of multidrug-resistant, P-gp-overexpressing MDCKII-MDR1 cells, and for their colocalization with mitochondrial specific agents in Colo-26 cells. Thioamide derivatives 16b and 18b were more effective photosensitizers than amide derivatives 15b and 17b. Selenorhodamine thioamides 16b and 18b were useful in a combination therapy to treat Colo-26 cells in vitro: a synergistic therapeutic effect was observed when Colo-26 cells were exposed to PDT and treatment with the cancer drug doxorubicin. PMID:25250825

  4. Collenchyma: a versatile mechanical tissue with dynamic cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background Collenchyma has remained in the shadow of commercially exploited mechanical tissues such as wood and fibres, and therefore has received little attention since it was first described. However, collenchyma is highly dynamic, especially compared with sclerenchyma. It is the main supporting tissue of growing organs with walls thickening during and after elongation. In older organs, collenchyma may become more rigid due to changes in cell wall composition or may undergo sclerification through lignification of newly deposited cell wall material. While much is known about the systematic and organographic distribution of collenchyma, there is rather less information regarding the molecular architecture and properties of its cell walls. Scope and conclusions This review summarizes several aspects that have not previously been extensively discussed including the origin of the term ‘collenchyma’ and the history of its typology. As the cell walls of collenchyma largely determine the dynamic characteristics of this tissue, I summarize the current state of knowledge regarding their structure and molecular composition. Unfortunately, to date, detailed studies specifically focusing on collenchyma cell walls have not been undertaken. However, generating a more detailed understanding of the structural and compositional modifications associated with the transition from plastic to elastic collenchyma cell wall properties is likely to provide significant insights into how specific configurations of cell wall polymers result in specific functional properties. This approach, focusing on architecture and functional properties, is likely to provide improved clarity on the controversial definition of collenchyma. PMID:22933416

  5. Mechanical properties of spruce wood cell walls by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindl, W.; Gupta, H. S.; Schöberl, T.; Lichtenegger, H. C.; Fratzl, P.

    2004-12-01

    In order to study the effects of structural variability, nanoindentation experiments were performed in Norway spruce cell walls with highly variable cellulose microfibril angle and lignin content. Contrary to hardness, which showed no statistically significant relationship with changing microfibril angle and lignin content, the elastic modulus of the secondary cell wall decreased significantly with increasing microfibril angle. While the elastic moduli of cell walls with large microfibril angle agreed well with published values, the elastic moduli of cell walls with small microfibril angle were clearly underestimated in nanoindentation measurements. Hardness measurements in the cell corner middle lamella allowed us to estimate the yield stress of the cell-wall matrix to be 0.34±0.16 GPa. Since the hardness of the secondary cell wall was statistically not different from the hardness of the cell corner middle lamella, irrespective of high variability in cellulose microfibril angle, it is proposed that compressive yielding of wood-cell walls is a matrix-dominated process.

  6. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis of plant cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuewen; Alonso, Ana P; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2013-07-01

    The regulation of plant cell wall synthesis pathways remains poorly understood. This has become a bottleneck in designing bioenergy crops. The goal of this study was to analyze the regulation of plant cell wall precursor metabolism using metabolic flux analysis based on dynamic labeling experiments. Arabidopsis T87 cells were cultured heterotrophically with (13)C labeled sucrose. The time course of ¹³C labeling patterns in cell wall precursors and related sugar phosphates was monitored using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry until steady state labeling was reached. A kinetic model based on mass action reaction mechanisms was developed to simulate the carbon flow in the cell wall synthesis network. The kinetic parameters of the model were determined by fitting the model to the labeling time course data, cell wall composition, and synthesis rates. A metabolic control analysis was performed to predict metabolic regulations that may improve plant biomass composition for biofuel production. Our results describe the routes and rates of carbon flow from sucrose to cell wall precursors. We found that sucrose invertase is responsible for the entry of sucrose into metabolism and UDP-glucose-4-epimerase plays a dominant role in UDP-Gal synthesis in heterotrophic Aradidopsis cells under aerobic conditions. We also predicted reactions that exert strong regulatory influence over carbon flow to cell wall synthesis and its composition.

  7. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  8. Expression of bovine viral diarrhea virus glycoprotein E2 as a soluble secreted form in a Mammalian cell line.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Bottarelli, Ezio; Sandro, Cavirani; Flammini, Cesidio Filippo

    2006-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) membrane-anchored type I glycoprotein E2 is an approximately 53-kDa immunodominant glycoprotein inducing the production of neutralizing antibodies in the animal host after natural infection or following immunization with live or killed vaccines. The E2 coding region lacking the transmembrane domain was constructed in a soluble secreted form (secE2) and expressed in the medium of a transiently transfected human cell line. The crude conditioned medium containing secE2 can be potentially employed to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen for the diagnosis of BVDV infection or for vaccine purposes.

  9. T-cell responses to the trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein are not limited to hypervariable subregions.

    PubMed

    Dagenais, Taylor R; Demick, Karen P; Bangs, James D; Forest, Katrina T; Paulnock, Donna M; Mansfield, John M

    2009-01-01

    Variable subregions within the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat displayed by African trypanosomes are predicted sites for T- and B-cell recognition. Hypervariable subregion 1 (HV-1) is localized to an internal amphipathic alpha helix in VSG monomers and may have evolved due to selective pressure by host T-cell responses to epitopes within this subregion. The prediction of T-cell receptor-reactive sites and major histocompatibility complex class II binding motifs within the HV-1 subregion, coupled with the conservation of amino acid residues in other regions of the molecule sufficient to maintain secondary and tertiary VSG structure, prompted us to test the hypothesis that Th cells may preferentially recognize HV-1 subregion peptides. Thus, we examined the fine specificity of VSG-specific T-cell lines, T-cell hybridomas, and Th cells activated during infection. Our results demonstrate that T-cell epitopes are distributed throughout the N-terminal domain of VSG but are not clustered exclusively within HV-1 or other hypervariable subregions. In contrast, T-cell-reactive sites were not detected within the relatively conserved C-terminal domain of VSG. Overall, this study is the first to dissect the fine specificity of T-cell responses to the trypanosome VSG and suggests that evolution of a conserved HV-1 region may be unrelated to selective pressures exerted by host T-cell responses. This study also demonstrates that T cells do not recognize the relatively invariant C-terminal region of the VSG molecule during infection, suggesting that it could serve as a potential subunit vaccine to provide variant cross-specific immunity for African trypanosomiasis.

  10. Dysregulated Glycoprotein B-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion Disrupts Varicella-Zoster Virus and Host Gene Transcription during Infection.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M

    2017-01-01

    The highly conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein complex gB/gH-gL mediates membrane fusion during virion entry and cell-cell fusion. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) characteristically forms multinucleated cells, or syncytia, during the infection of human tissues, but little is known about this process. The cytoplasmic domain of VZV gB (gBcyt) has been implicated in cell-cell fusion regulation because a gB[Y881F] substitution causes hyperfusion. gBcyt regulation is necessary for VZV pathogenesis, as the hyperfusogenic mutant gB[Y881F] is severely attenuated in human skin xenografts. In this study, gBcyt-regulated fusion was investigated by comparing melanoma cells infected with wild-type-like VZV or hyperfusogenic mutants. The gB[Y881F] mutant exhibited dramatically accelerated syncytium formation in melanoma cells caused by fusion of infected cells with many uninfected cells, increased cytoskeleton reorganization, and rapid displacement of nuclei to dense central structures compared to pOka using live-cell confocal microscopy. VZV and human transcriptomes were concurrently investigated using whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify viral and cellular responses induced when gBcyt regulation was disrupted by the gB[Y881F] substitution. The expression of four vital VZV genes, ORF61 and the genes for glycoproteins gC, gE, and gI, was significantly reduced at 36 h postinfection for the hyperfusogenic mutants. Importantly, hierarchical clustering demonstrated an association of differential gene expression with dysregulated gBcyt-mediated fusion. A subset of Ras GTPase genes linked to membrane remodeling were upregulated in cells infected with the hyperfusogenic mutants. These data implicate gBcyt in the regulation of gB fusion function that, if unmodulated, triggers cellular processes leading to hyperfusion that attenuates VZV infection.

  11. Maize development: cell wall changes in leaves and sheaths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Developmental changes occur in maize (Zea mays L.) as it transitions from juvenile stages to the mature plant. Changes also occur as newly formed cells mature into adult cells. Maize leaf blades, including the midribs and sheaths, undergo cell wall changes as cells transition to fully mature cell ty...

  12. Sulphation of proteins secreted by a human hepatoma-derived cell line. Sulphation of N-linked oligosaccharides on alpha 2HS-glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Hortin, G; Green, E D; Baenziger, J U; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    Several human glycoproteins, including alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, caeruloplasmin and alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, synthesized by the hepatoma-derived cell line HepG2 were observed to contain covalently linked sulphate. These proteins were estimated to contain about 0.1 mol of sulphate/mol of protein. The most abundant of the sulphated glycoproteins, alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, was analysed in detail. All of the sulphate on this protein was attached to N-linked oligosaccharides which contained sialic acid and resisted release by endoglycosidase H. Several independent analytical approaches established that approx. 10% of the molecules of alpha 2HS-glycoprotein contained sulphate. Our results suggest that a number of human plasma proteins contain small amounts of sulphate linked to oligosaccharides. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3017304

  13. The Plant Cell Wall: A Dynamic Barrier Against Pathogen Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, William

    2012-01-01

    Prospective plant pathogens must overcome the physical barrier presented by the plant cell wall. In addition to being a preformed, passive barrier limiting access of pathogens to plant cells, the cell wall is actively remodeled and reinforced specifically at discrete sites of interaction with potentially pathogenic microbes. Active reinforcement of the cell wall through the deposition of cell wall appositions, referred to as papillae, is an early response to perception of numerous categories of pathogens including fungi and bacteria. Rapid deposition of papillae is generally correlated with resistance to fungal pathogens that attempt to penetrate plant cell walls for the establishment of feeding structures. Despite the ubiquity and apparent importance of this early defense response, relatively little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms and cellular processes involved in the targeting and assembly of papillae. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of cell wall-associated defenses induced by pathogen perception as well as the impact of changes in cell wall polymers on interactions with pathogens and highlights significant unanswered questions driving future research in the area. PMID:22639669

  14. A Fungal Endoglucanase with Plant Cell Wall Extension Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Wu, Yajun; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a wall hydrolytic enzyme from Trichoderma reesei with potent ability to induce extension of heat-inactivated type I cell walls. It is a small (23-kD) endo-1,4-β-glucanase (Cel12A) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 12. Extension of heat-inactivated walls from cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv Burpee Pickler) hypocotyls was induced by Cel12A after a distinct lag time and was accompanied by a large increase in wall plasticity and elasticity. Cel12A also increased the rate of stress relaxation of isolated walls at very short times (<200 ms; equivalent to reducing t0, a parameter that estimates the minimum relaxation time). Similar changes in wall plasticity and elasticity were observed in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Pennmore Winter) coleoptile (type II) walls, which showed only a negligible extension in response to Cel12A treatment. Thus, Cel12A modifies both type I and II walls, but substantial extension is found only in type I walls. Cel12A has strong endo-glucanase activity against xyloglucan and (1→3,1→4)-β-glucan, but did not exhibit endo-xylanase, endo-mannase, or endo-galactanase activities. In terms of kinetics of action and effects on wall rheology, wall loosening by Cel12A differs qualitatively from the action by expansins, which induce wall extension by a non-hydrolytic polymer creep mechanism. The action by Cel12A mimics some of the changes in wall rheology found after auxin-induced growth. The strategy used here to identify Cel12A could be used to identify analogous plant enzymes that cause auxin-induced changes in cell wall rheology. PMID:11553760

  15. High-throughput microarray mapping of cell wall polymers in roots and tubers during the viscosity-reducing process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Willats, William G; Lange, Lene; Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Salmeán, Armando A; Pedersen, Henriette L; Busk, Peter Kamp; Zhao, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Viscosity reduction has a great impact on the efficiency of ethanol production when using roots and tubers as feedstock. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes have been successfully applied to overcome the challenges posed by high viscosity. However, the changes in cell wall polymers during the viscosity-reducing process are poorly characterized. Comprehensive microarray polymer profiling, which is a high-throughput microarray, was used for the first time to map changes in the cell wall polymers of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and Canna edulis Ker. over the entire viscosity-reducing process. The results indicated that the composition of cell wall polymers among these three roots and tubers was markedly different. The gel-like matrix and glycoprotein network in the C. edulis Ker. cell wall caused difficulty in viscosity reduction. The obvious viscosity reduction of the sweet potato and the cassava was attributed to the degradation of homogalacturonan and the released 1,4-β-d-galactan and 1,5-α-l-arabinan.

  16. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  17. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by wogonin is involved with the potentiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eibai; Enomoto, Riyo; Koshiba, Chika; Hirano, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-01

    Etoposide induces apoptotic cell death in normal and cancer cells. This apoptosis plays a role not only in anticancer effects but also in adverse reactions, such as myelosuppression. Because we had previously found that wogonin, a flavone found in a plant, suppresses thymocyte apoptosis induced by etoposide, we examined the effect of this flavone in cancer cells. Wogonin significantly potentiated etoposide-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. This flavone impaired the function of P-glycoprotein and then increased cellular content of etoposide in the cells. Thus, this flavone is likely to act as an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and potentiate the apoptotic action of etoposide. On the other hand, wogonin inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in thymocytes, one of the normal cells. The potentiation by wogonin is likely to be a specific action for cancer cells but not normal cells. Therefore, this flavone may be used to reduce the excretion of the anticancer agents via P-glycoprotein and increase the pharmacological action of it in cancer cells. These results suggest that wogonin may play a role in overcoming multidrug resistance.

  18. Expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins and alpha-granule proteins by a human erythroleukemia cell line (HEL).

    PubMed Central

    Tabilio, A; Rosa, J P; Testa, U; Kieffer, N; Nurden, A T; Del Canizo, M C; Breton-Gorius, J; Vainchenker, W

    1984-01-01

    We demonstrate that HEL, a human erythroleukemic cell line, has numerous megakaryocytic markers which were markedly enhanced following the addition of the inducers dimethyl sulfoxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to the culture medium. Ultrastructural and cytochemical studies showed: (i) the presence of organelles morphologically resembling the platelet alpha-granules; and (ii) a peroxidase activity with the same characteristics as that specifically found in platelets. The platelet alpha-granule proteins (von Willebrand factor, platelet factor-4 and beta-thromboglobulin) were immunologically detected in the HEL cell cytoplasm and their amounts increased after induction. Of particular interest was the presence of platelet membrane proteins. A monoclonal antibody specific for glycoprotein Ib bound to HEL cells. Platelet membrane glycoproteins IIb and IIIa were identified on intact cells using specific antibodies in a binding assay or in cell lysates using either crossed immunoelectrophoresis or an immunoblotting procedure following SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Most HEL cells also expressed the platelet alloantigen PIA1. All of the platelet membrane proteins were present in higher amounts after induction. Glycophorin A, specific for the erythroid lineage, was also detected on HEL cells. Thus, while confirming the presence of erythroid markers, our studies provide evidence that the HEL cell line also expresses platelet antigens. As such, HEL cells represent a unique system with which to study the biosynthesis of platelet-specific proteins and glycoproteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6201359

  19. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  20. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    De Souza, Amanda P.; Kamei, Claire L. Alvim; Torres, Andres F.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G.; Trindade, Luisa M.; Buckeridge, Marcos S.

    2015-01-01

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how they interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. Different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis. PMID:25908240

  1. How cell wall complexity influences saccharification efficiency in Miscanthus sinensis

    DOE PAGES

    De Souza, Amanda P.; Kamei, Claire L. Alvim; Torres, Andres F.; ...

    2015-04-23

    The production of bioenergy from grasses has been developing quickly during the last decade, with Miscanthus being among the most important choices for production of bioethanol. However, one of the key barriers to producing bioethanol is the lack of information about cell wall structure. Cell walls are thought to display compositional differences that lead to emergence of a very high level of complexity, resulting in great diversity in cell wall architectures. In this work, a set of different techniques was used to access the complexity of cell walls of different genotypes of Miscanthus sinensis in order to understand how theymore » interfere with saccharification efficiency. Three genotypes of M. sinensis displaying different patterns of correlation between lignin content and saccharification efficiency were subjected to cell wall analysis by quantitative/qualitative analytical techniques such as monosaccharide composition, oligosaccharide profiling, and glycome profiling. When saccharification efficiency was correlated negatively with lignin, the structural features of arabinoxylan and xyloglucan were found to contribute positively to hydrolysis. In the absence of such correlation, different types of pectins, and some mannans contributed to saccharification efficiency. In conclusion, different genotypes of M. sinensis were shown to display distinct interactions among their cell wall components, which seem to influence cell wall hydrolysis.« less

  2. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Kuki, Hiroaki; Kuroha, Takeshi; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to investigate the de novo construction process of the cell wall. This review deals with sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall through the use of protoplasts, a methodology that will provide the basis for further exploration of cell wall proteins and cell wall dynamics. PMID:28248244

  3. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable and even understandable ways. PMID:26057089

  4. Dynamic microtubules and the texture of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between microtubules and cell-wall texture has had a fitful history in which progress in one area has not been matched by progress in the other. For example, the idea that wall texture arises entirely from self-assembly, independently of microtubules, originated with electron microscopic analyses of fixed cells that gave no clue to the ability of microtubules to reorganize. Since then, live-cell studies have established the surprising dynamicity of plant microtubules involving collisions, changes in angle, parallelization, and rotation of microtubule tracks. Combined with proof that cellulose synthases do track along shifting microtubules, this offers more realistic models for the dynamic influence of microtubules on wall texture than could have been imagined in the electron microscopic era-the era from which most ideas on wall texture originate. This review revisits the classical literature on wall organization from the vantage point of current knowledge of microtubule dynamics.

  5. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable or even understandable ways.

  6. Measurement of pectin methylation in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    McFeeters, R.F.; Armstrong, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure was developed to measure the degree of pectin methylation in small samples of isolated cell walls from nonlignified plant tissues or pectin solutions. Galacturonic acid was determined colorimetrically with the 3,5-dimethylphenol reagent. Methylation was measured by base hydrolysis of galacturonic acid methyl esters, followed by gas chromatographic determination of released methanol. Estimates of the precision of analysis of pectin and cell wall samples were made. The coefficient of variation for estimates of the pectin esterification in cell walls isolated from 10-g samples of cucumber tissue ranged from 7.7 to 13.2%.

  7. Probing (macro)molecular transport through cell walls.

    PubMed

    Kilcher, Giona; Delneri, Daniela; Duckham, Craig; Tirelli, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    We here report a study on the passive permeability of hydrophobic probes through the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study we have prepared a series of fluorescent probes with similar chemical composition and molecular weight ranging from a few hundreds to a few thousands of g mol(-1). Their permeation into the cell body exhibits a clear MW cut-off and the underlying mechanism is governed by the permeation of individual molecules rather than aggregates. We also show that it is possible to reversibly alter the cell wall permeation properties without compromising the essence of its structure, by modifying the polarity/dielectric constant of the wall through solvent exchange.

  8. Unique glycoprotein antigen defined by monoclonal antibody on human neurobiastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mujoo, K.; Spiro, R.C.; Reisfeld, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have characterized a new target antigen on the surface of human neuroblastoma cells and defined it with a monoclonal antibody (Mab) 5G3. This antibody is of IgG2a type and has an association constant of 8 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/. In ELISA assays, Mab 5G3 reacted with human neuroblastoma as well as melanoma, squamous lung, skin carcinoma, and osteogenic sarcoma. Immunocytochemical analysis of frozen tissue sections revealed strong reactivity with all neuroblastoma tissues and marginal reactivity with melanoma and glioma tissues. There was no reactivity with fetal or normal tissues with the exception of cerebellum. The antigen recognized by Mab 5G3 is a glycoprotein of 200 and 215 kDa expressed on the SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells. The antigen appears to contain N-linked carbohydrates based on treatment of human neuroblastoma cells with tunicamycin before and after intrinsic radiolabeling followed by indirect immunoprecipitation. The pulse-chase biosynthetic studies followed by indirect immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE indicated the precursor/product relationship between 200 and 215 kDa molecules. The 200 kDa component is endoglycosidase H-sensitive, whereas 215 kDa molecule is Endo-H resistant. The 215 kDa component is also sulfated, sialylated, and phosphorylated at serine residues. Preliminary data suggests that Mab, aside from identifying a unique target antigen on human neuroblastoma cells, may be suited as a targeting device for chemotherapeutic drugs.

  9. Temozolomide reverses doxorubicin resistance by inhibiting P-glycoprotein in malignant glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Saito, Ryuta; Shibahara, Ichiyo; Sugiyama, Shinichiro; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide is a standard chemotherapy agent for malignant gliomas, but the efficacy is still not satisfactory. Therefore, combination chemotherapy using temozolomide with other anti-tumor compounds is now under investigation. Here we studied the mechanism of the synergistic anti-tumor effect achieved by temozolomide and doxorubicin, and elucidated the inhibitory effect of temozolomide on P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Temozolomide significantly enhanced sensitivity to P-gp substrate in glioma cells, particularly in P-gp-overexpressed cells. Synergetic effects, as determined by isobologram analysis, were observed by combining temozolomide and doxorubicin. Subsequently, flow cytometry was utilized to assess the intracellular retention of doxorubicin in cells treated with doxorubicin with or without temozolomide. Temozolomide significantly increased the accumulation of doxorubicin in these cells. The P-gp adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) assay showed that temozolomide inhibited the ATPase activity of P-gp. In addition, temozolomide combined with doxorubicin significantly prolonged the survival of 9L intracranial allografted glioma-bearing rats compared to single agent treatment. Collectively, our findings suggest that temozolomide can reverse doxorubicin resistance by directly affecting P-gp transport activity. Combination chemotherapy using temozolomide with other agents may be effective against gliomas in clinical applications.

  10. Analysis of B cell epitopes of a glycoprotein porcine zona pellucida (pZP1).

    PubMed

    Shigeta, M; Hasegawa, A; Hamada, Y; Koyama, K

    2000-07-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) of mammalian oocytes forms an extracellular matrix composed of three major glycoproteins and plays an important role in sperm-zona interactions. As ZP had a strong organ-specific but species-cross-reactive antigenicity and passive or active immunization with ZP antigens could impair fertilization, the possibility of developing a immunocontraceptive vaccine has been extensively studied. Studies on active immunization with porcine ZP (pZP) that contain B cell epitopes and T cell epitopes demonstrated that a temporary infertility could be induced along with the elevation of antibody titers, but it was always associated with ovarian failure. This could be due to the oophoritis by activation of pathogenic T cell immunity. It is the general consideration that any adverse effects by vaccination should be avoided for an immunocontraception. From this point of view, the analysis of B cell epitopes of pZP protein would be helpful for construction of a safe immunocontraceptive vaccine with zona antigens. We determined the amino acid sequence of the B epitope in the pZP1 protein by using a monoclonal antibody (MAb-5H4) that possesses a fertilization blocking ability. In addition, antiserum raised to the epitope sequence was revealed to block in vitro fertilization of homologous animal species.

  11. Host Cell P-glycoprotein Is Essential for Cholesterol Uptake and Replication of Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Bottova, Iveta; Hehl, Adrian B.; Štefanić, Saša; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Pieters, Jean; Sonda, Sabrina

    2009-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane-bound efflux pump that actively exports a wide range of compounds from the cell and is associated with the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. However, the role of P-gp in normal physiological processes remains elusive. Using P-gp-deficient fibroblasts, we showed that P-gp was critical for the replication of the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii but was not involved in invasion of host cells by the parasite. Importantly, we found that the protein participated in the transport of host-derived cholesterol to the intracellular parasite. T. gondii replication in P-gp-deficient host cells not only resulted in reduced cholesterol content in the parasite but also altered its sphingolipid metabolism. In addition, we found that different levels of P-gp expression modified the cholesterol metabolism in uninfected fibroblasts. Collectively our findings reveal a key and previously undocumented role of P-gp in host-parasite interaction and suggest a physiological role for P-gp in cholesterol trafficking in mammalian cells. PMID:19389707

  12. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells to hepatitis C virus recombinant envelope glycoprotein 2 protein exposure.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Rudnicki, Martina; Ferrer, Renila; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos da; Costa, Paulo Inácio da

    2014-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes approximately 10 different structural and non-structural proteins, including the envelope glycoprotein 2 (E2). HCV proteins, especially the envelope proteins, bind to cell receptors and can damage tissues. Endothelial inflammation is the most important determinant of fibrosis progression and, consequently, cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to two recombinant forms of the HCV E2 protein produced in different expression systems (Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris). We observed the induction of cell death and the production of nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated by the two recombinant E2 proteins. The E2-induced apoptosis of HUVECs was confirmed using the molecular marker PARP. The apoptosis rescue observed when the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was used suggests that reactive oxygen species are involved in E2-induced apoptosis. We propose that these proteins are involved in the chronic inflammation caused by HCV.

  13. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-02-16

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  14. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Hyacinthe Le; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  15. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; Turco, G.; Toal, T. W.; Gaudinier, A.; Young, N. F.; Trabucco, G. M.; Veling, M. T.; Lamothe, R.; Handakumbura, P. P.; Xiong, G.; Wang, C.; Corwin, J.; Tsoukalas, A.; Zhang, L.; Ware, D.; Pauly, M.; Kliebenstein, D. J.; Dehesh, K.; Tagkopoulos, I.; Breton, G.; Pruneda-Paz, J. L.; Ahnert, S. E.; Kay, S. A.; Hazen, S. P.; Brady, S. M.

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.

  16. Magnetic domain wall conduits for single cell applications.

    PubMed

    Donolato, M; Torti, A; Kostesha, N; Deryabina, M; Sogne, E; Vavassori, P; Hansen, M F; Bertacco, R

    2011-09-07

    The ability to trap, manipulate and release single cells on a surface is important both for fundamental studies of cellular processes and for the development of novel lab-on-chip miniaturized tools for biological and medical applications. In this paper we demonstrate how magnetic domain walls generated in micro- and nano-structures fabricated on a chip surface can be used to handle single yeast cells labeled with magnetic beads. In detail, first we show that the proposed approach maintains the microorganism viable, as proven by monitoring the division of labeled yeast cells trapped by domain walls over 16 hours. Moreover, we demonstrate the controlled transport and release of individual yeast cells via displacement and annihilation of individual domain walls in micro- and nano-sized magnetic structures. These results pave the way to the implementation of magnetic devices based on domain walls technology in lab-on-chip systems devoted to accurate individual cell trapping and manipulation.

  17. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  18. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  19. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qiuqiang; Liou, Liang-Chun; Ren, Qun; Bao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 cells to SDS after salt treatment, while overexpression of SCW11 results in higher sensitivity. In addition, salt stress in ρ0 cells induces high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which further damages the cell wall, causing cells to become more sensitive towards the cell wall-perturbing agent. PMID:28357227

  20. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus type K envelope glycoprotein in insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, R R; Limbach, C; Löwer, R; Kurth, R

    1997-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) family codes for the human teratocarcinoma-derived retrovirus (HTDV) particles. The existence of the envelope protein (ENV) of HERV-K encoded by the subgenomic env mRNA has not yet been demonstrated. To study the genetic requirements for successful expression of ENV, we have constructed a series of recombinant HERV-K env expression vectors for infection and transfection experiments in insect cells and mammalian cells, respectively. Six baculovirus constructs bearing full-length or truncated HERV-K env with or without homologous or heterologous signal peptides were used for infections of insect cells. All recombinant baculoviruses yielded ENV proteins with the expected molecular masses. The full-length 80- to 90-kDa HERV-K ENV protein including the cORF leader sequence was glycosylated in insect cells. In addition, the 14-kDa cORF protein was expressed due to splicing of the full-length env mRNA. The ENV precursor protein is not cleaved to the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) glycoproteins; it does not appear on the surface of infected insect cells and is not secreted into the medium. For ENV expression in COS cells, plasmid vectors harboring the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/intron A element and the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) signal peptide or the homologous HERV-K signal peptide upstream of the env gene were employed. Glycosylated and uncleaved ENV was expressed as in GH teratocarcinoma cells but at higher levels. The heterologous t-PA signal sequence was instrumental for expression of HERV-K ENV on the cell surface. Hence, we have shown for the first time that the HERV-K env gene has the potential to be expressed as a full-length envelope protein with appropriate glycosylation. In addition, our data provide explanations for the lack of infectivity of HERV-K/HTDV particles. PMID:9060628

  1. Arabinogalactan protein-rich cell walls, paramural deposits and ergastic globules define the hyaline bodies of rhinanthoid Orobanchaceae haustoria

    PubMed Central

    Pielach, Anna; Leroux, Olivier; Domozych, David S.; Knox, J. Paul; Popper, Zoë A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Parasitic plants obtain nutrients from their hosts through organs called haustoria. The hyaline body is a specialized parenchymatous tissue occupying the central parts of haustoria in many Orobanchaceae species. The structure and functions of hyaline bodies are poorly understood despite their apparent necessity for the proper functioning of haustoria. Reported here is a cell wall-focused immunohistochemical study of the hyaline bodies of three species from the ecologically important clade of rhinanthoid Orobanchaceae. Methods Haustoria collected from laboratory-grown and field-collected plants of Rhinanthus minor, Odontites vernus and Melampyrum pratense attached to various hosts were immunolabelled for cell wall matrix glycans and glycoproteins using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Key Results Hyaline body cell wall architecture differed from that of the surrounding parenchyma in all species investigated. Enrichment in arabinogalactan protein (AGP) epitopes labelled with mAbs LM2, JIM8, JIM13, JIM14 and CCRC-M7 was prominent and coincided with reduced labelling of de-esterified homogalacturonan with mAbs JIM5, LM18 and LM19. Furthermore, paramural bodies, intercellular deposits and globular ergastic bodies composed of pectins, xyloglucans, extensins and AGPs were common. In Rhinanthus they were particularly abundant in pairings with legume hosts. Hyaline body cells were not in direct contact with haustorial xylem, which was surrounded by a single layer of paratracheal parenchyma with thickened cell walls abutting the xylem. Conclusions The distinctive anatomy and cell wall architecture indicate hyaline body specialization. Altered proportions of AGPs and pectins may affect the mechanical properties of hyaline body cell walls. This and the association with a transfer-like type of paratracheal parenchyma suggest a role in nutrient translocation. Organelle-rich protoplasts and the presence of exceptionally profuse intra- and intercellular

  2. Studies on the skeletal cell wall of the cystocarpic stage of the red seaweed Iridaea undulosa B. Part II. Fractionation of the cell wall and methylation analysis of the inner core-fibrillar polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Flores, M L; Stortz1, C A; Cerezo, A S

    2000-03-16

    In order to determine the structure of the fibrillar cell wall, the material isolated from cystocarpic thalli of the red seaweed Iridaea undulosa was fractionated using different media. While classical methods produced a scarce solubilization of material, the use of lithium salts in polar aprotic solvents (dimethylsulfoxide or N, N-dimethylacetamide), had successfully extracted higher amounts of material. The final residue from the Li(+)/DMSO extraction contains cellulose and a mannan, while that from the Li(+)/DMAc extraction contains only cellulose and traces of a galactan. Methylation analyses of both residues confirm the presence of those polysaccharides, and shows that the mannan is (1-->4)-linked. Treatment with proteases suggests that the protein is efficiently shielded from digestion. All the extracts and residues contain major amounts of (glyco)proteins and/or proteins, in agreement with a previous suggestion that they are of major importance in the structure of the cell wall.

  3. NaCl effect on the distribution of wall ingrowth polymers and arabinogalactan proteins in type A transfer cells of Medicago sativa Gabès leaves.

    PubMed

    Boughanmi, Néziha; Thibault, Florence; Decou, Raphael; Fleurat-Lessard, Pierrette; Béré, Emile; Costa, Guy; Lhernould, Sabine

    2010-06-01

    We studied the distribution of wall ingrowth (WI) polymers by probing thin sections of companion cells specialized as transfer cells in minor veins of Medicago sativa cv Gabès blade with affinity probes and antibodies specific to polysaccharides and glycoproteins. The wall polymers in the controls were similar in WIs and in the primary wall but differently distributed. The extent of labeling in these papillate WIs differed for JIM5 and JIM7 homogalacturonans but was in the same range for LM5 and LM6 rhamnogalacturonans and xyloglucans. These data show that WI enhancement probably requires arabinogalactan proteins (JIM8) mainly localized on the outer part of the primary wall and WIs. By comparison, NaCl-treated plants exhibited cell wall polysaccharide modifications indicating (1) an increase in unesterified homogalacturonans (JIM5), probably implicated in Na(+) binding and/or polysaccharide network interaction for limiting turgor variations in mesophyll cells; (2) enhancement of the xyloglucan network with an accumulation of fucosylated xyloglucans (CCRC-M1) known to increase the capacity of cellulose binding; and (3) specific recognition of JIM8 arabinogalactan proteins that could participate in both wall enlargement and cohesion by increasing the number of molecular interactions with the other polymers. In conclusion, the cell wall polysaccharide distribution in enlarged WIs might (1) participate in wall resistance to sequestration of Na(+), allowing a better control of hydric homeostasis in mesophyll cells to maintain metabolic activity in source leaves, and (2) maintain tolerance of M. sativa to NaCl.

  4. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  5. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Tourkova, Irina L; Witt, Michelle R; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J; Blair, Harry C

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone-formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express FSH-R, to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1-3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short-term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones.

  6. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones

    PubMed Central

    Tourkova, Irina L.; Witt, Michelle R.; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J.; Blair, Harry C.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in FSH-R null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R), to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1–3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones. PMID:25118101

  7. New chemical tools to probe cell wall biosynthesis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gale, Robert T; Brown, Eric D

    2015-10-01

    Some of the most successful drugs in the antibiotic pharmacopeia are those that inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis. However, the worldwide spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance has eroded the clinical efficacy of these drugs and the antibiotic pipeline continues to be lean as drug discovery programs struggle to bring new agents to the clinic. Nevertheless, cell wall biogenesis remains a high interest and celebrated target. Recent advances in the preparation of chemical probes and biosynthetic intermediates provide the tools necessary to better understand cell wall assembly. Likewise, these tools offer new opportunities to identify and evaluate novel biosynthetic inhibitors. This review aims to highlight these advancements and to provide context for their utility as innovative new tools to study cell wall biogenesis and for antibacterial drug discovery.

  8. A versatile strategy for grafting polymers to wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, T; Cabane, E; Chanana, M; Hass, P; Merk, V; Gierlinger, N; Burgert, I

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical structure of wood is composed of a cellulose skeleton of high structural order at various length scales. At the nanoscale and microscale the specific structural features of the cells and cell walls result in a lightweight structure with an anisotropic material profile of excellent mechanical performance. By being able to specifically functionalize wood at the level of cell and cell walls one can insert new properties and inevitably upscale them along the intrinsic hierarchical structure, to a level of large-scale engineering materials applications. For this purpose, however, precise control of the spatial distribution of the modifying substances in the complex wood structure is needed. Here we demonstrate a method to insert methacryl groups into wood cell walls using two different chemistry routes. By using these methacryl groups as the anchor points for grafting, various polymers can be inserted into the wood structure. Strikingly, depending on the methacryl precursor, the spatial distribution of the polymer differs strongly. As a proof of concept we grafted polystyrene as a model compound in the second modification step. In the case of methacryloyl chloride the polymer was located mainly at the interface between the cell lumina and the cell wall covering the inner surface of the cells and being traceable up to 2-3 μm in the cell wall, whereas in the case of methacrylic anhydride the polymer was located inside the whole cell wall. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and especially Raman spectroscopy were used for an in-depth analysis of the modified wood at the cell wall level.

  9. Cell wall polysaccharides from fern leaves: evidence for a mannan-rich Type III cell wall in Adiantum raddianum.

    PubMed

    Silva, Giovanna B; Ionashiro, Mari; Carrara, Thalita B; Crivellari, Augusto C; Tiné, Marco A S; Prado, Jefferson; Carpita, Nicholas C; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2011-12-01

    Primary cell walls from plants are composites of cellulose tethered by cross-linking glycans and embedded in a matrix of pectins. Cell wall composition varies between plant species, reflecting in some instances the evolutionary distance between them. In this work the monosaccharide compositions of isolated primary cell walls of nine fern species and one lycophyte were characterized and compared with those from Equisetum and an angiosperm dicot. The relatively high abundance of mannose in these plants suggests that mannans may constitute the major cross-linking glycan in the primary walls of pteridophytes and lycophytes. Pectin-related polysaccharides contained mostly rhamnose and uronic acids, indicating the presence of rhamnogalacturonan I highly substituted with galactose and arabinose. Structural and fine-structural analyses of the hemicellulose fraction of leaves of Adiantum raddianum confirmed this hypothesis. Linkage analysis showed that the mannan contains mostly 4-Man with very little 4,6-Man, indicating a low percentage of branching with galactose. Treatment of the mannan-rich fractions with endo-β-mannanase produced characteristic mannan oligosaccharides. Minor amounts of xyloglucan and xylans were also detected. These data and those of others suggest that all vascular plants contain xyloglucans, arabinoxylans, and (gluco)mannans, but in different proportions that define cell wall types. Whereas xyloglucan and pectin-rich walls define Type I walls of dicots and many monocots, arabinoxylans and lower proportion of pectin define the Type II walls of commelinoid monocots. The mannan-rich primary walls with low pectins of many ferns and a lycopod indicate a fundamentally different wall type among land plants, the Type III wall.

  10. Chemical and in situ characterization of macromolecular components of the cell walls from the green seaweed Codium fragile.

    PubMed

    Estevez, José Manuel; Fernández, Paula Virginia; Kasulin, Luciana; Dupree, Paul; Ciancia, Marina

    2009-03-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the carbohydrate-containing macromolecules from the coencocytic green seaweed Codium fragile and their arrangement in the cell wall was carried out. Cell walls in this seaweed are highly complex structures composed of 31% (w/w) of linear (1-->4)-beta-D-mannans, 9% (w/w) of pyruvylated arabinogalactan sulfates (pAGS), and low amounts of hydroxyproline rich-glycoprotein epitopes (HRGP). In situ chemical imaging by synchrotron radiation Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and by immunolabeling using antibodies against specific cell wall carbohydrate epitopes revealed that beta-d-mannans and pAGS are placed in the middle part of the cell wall, whereas HRGP epitopes (arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and extensins) are located on the wall boundaries, especially in the utricle apical zone. pAGS are sulfated at C-2 and/or C-4 of the 3-linked beta-L-arabinopyranose units and at C-4 and/or C-6 of the 3-linked beta-D-galactopyranose residues. In addition, high levels of ketals of pyruvic acid were found mainly at 3,4- of some terminal beta-D-Galp units forming a five-membered ring. Ramification was found at some C-6 of the 3-linked beta-D-Galp units. In agreement with the immunolabeled AGP epitopes, a nonsulfated branched furanosidic arabinan with 5-linked alpha-L-Araf, 3,5-linked alpha-L-Araf, and terminal alpha-L-Araf units and a nonsulfated galactan structure composed of 3-(3,6)-linked beta-D-Galp residues, both typical of type-II AG glycans were found, suggesting that AGP structures are present at low levels in the cell walls of this seaweed. Based on this study, it is starting to emerge that Codium has developed unique cell wall architecture, when compared, not only with that of vascular plants, but also with other related green seaweeds and algae.

  11. An improved protocol to study the plant cell wall proteome

    PubMed Central

    Printz, Bruno; Dos Santos Morais, Raphaël; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Sergeant, Kjell; Lutts, Stanley; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins were extracted from alfalfa stems according to a three-steps extraction procedure using sequentially CaCl2, EGTA, and LiCl-complemented buffers. The efficiency of this protocol for extracting cell wall proteins was compared with the two previously published methods optimized for alfalfa stem cell wall protein analysis. Following LC-MS/MS analysis the three-steps extraction procedure resulted in the identification of the highest number of cell wall proteins (242 NCBInr identifiers) and gave the lowest percentage of non-cell wall proteins (about 30%). However, the three protocols are rather complementary than substitutive since 43% of the identified proteins were specific to one protocol. This three-step protocol was therefore selected for a more detailed proteomic characterization using 2D-gel electrophoresis. With this technique, 75% of the identified proteins were shown to be fraction-specific and 72.7% were predicted as belonging to the cell wall compartment. Although, being less sensitive than LC-MS/MS approaches in detecting and identifying low-abundant proteins, gel-based approaches are valuable tools for the differentiation and relative quantification of protein isoforms and/or modified proteins. In particular isoforms, having variations in their amino-acid sequence and/or carrying different N-linked glycan chains were detected and characterized. This study highlights how the extracting protocols as well as the analytical techniques devoted to the study of the plant cell wall proteome are complementary and how they may be combined to elucidate the dynamism of the plant cell wall proteome in biological studies. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001927. PMID:25914713

  12. Polysaccharide-degrading Enzymes are Unable to Attack Plant Cell Walls without Prior Action by a "Wall-modifying Enzyme".

    PubMed

    Karr, A L; Albersheim, P

    1970-07-01

    A study of the degradation of plant cell walls by the mixture of enzymes present in Pectinol R-10 is described. A "wall-modifying enzyme" has been purified from this mixture by a combination of diethylaminoethyl cellulose, Bio Gel P-100, and carboxymethyl cellulose chromatography. Treatment of cell walls with the "wall-modifying enzyme" is shown to be a necessary prerequisite to wall degradation catalyzed by a mixture of polysaccharide-degrading enzymes prepared from Pectinol R-10 or by an alpha-galactosidase secreted by the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. The action of the "wall-modifying enzyme" on cell walls is shown to result in both a release of water-soluble, 70% ethanol-insoluble polymers and an alteration of the residual cell wall. A purified preparation of the "wall-modifying enzyme" is unable to degrade a wide variety of polysaccharide, glycoside, and peptide substrates. However, the purified preparation of wall-modifying enzyme has a limited ability to degrade polygalacturonic acid. The fact that polygalacturonic acid inhibits the ability of the "wall-modifying enzyme" to affect cell walls suggests that the "wall-modifying enzyme" may be responsible for the limited polygalacturonic acid-degrading activity present in the purified preparation. The importance of a wall-modifying enzyme in developmental processes and in pathogenesis is discussed.

  13. Lefty Glycoproteins in Human Embryonic Stem Cells: Extracellular Delivery Route and Posttranslational Modification in Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Galat, Vasiliy; Galat, Yekaterina; Gilgur, Alina; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2016-09-19

    Lefty is a member of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily and a potent antagonist of the TGF-β/Nodal/Activin signaling pathway. Lefty is critical in sustaining self-renewal/pluripotency status, and implicated in the differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, emerging studies depict Lefty as a multifaceted protein involved in myriad cellular events. Lefty proteins (human Lefty A and B) are secreted glycoproteins, but their mode of secretion and the significance of their "glycan" moiety remain mostly unexplored. By employing an in vitro system of human ESCs (hESCs), we observed that Lefty protein(s) are encased in exosomes for extracellular release. The exosomal- and cell-associated Lefty diverge in their proteolytic processing, and possess N-glycan structures of high mannose and complex nature. Differentiation of hESCs to mesenchymal cells (MSCs) or neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) entails distinct changes in the Lefty A/Lefty B gene(s), and protein expression. Specifically, the proteolytic cleavage and N-glycan composition of the cell-associated and exosomal Lefty differ in the differentiated progenies. These modifications affected Lefty's inhibitory effect on Nodal signaling in aggressive melanoma cells. The microheterogeneity in the processing and glycosylation of Lefty protein(s) between hESCs, MSCs, and NPCs could present efficient means of diversifying the endogenous functions of Lefty. Whether Lefty's diverse functions in embryonic patterning, as well as its diffusion range in the extracellular environment, are similarly affected remains to be determined. Our studies underscore the potential relevance of Lefty-packaged exosomes for combating debilitating diseases such as cancer.

  14. The inhibitory and combinative mechanism of HZ08 with P-glycoprotein expressed on the membrane of Caco-2 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Yahui; Feng, Yidong; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Fang, Weirong; Li, Yunman; Huang, Wenlong

    2014-01-15

    Recently, the research and development of agents to reverse the phenomenon of multidrug resistance has been an attractive goal as well as a key approach to elevating the clinical survival of cancer patients. Although three generations of P-glycoprotein modulators have been identified, poor clearance and metabolism render these agents too toxic to be used in clinical application. HZ08, which has been under investigation for several years, shows a dramatic reversal effect with low cytotoxicity. For the first time, we aimed to describe the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cell line in which P-glycoprotein is overexpressed naturally. Cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance reversal assays, together with flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and siRNA interference as well as Caco-2 monolayer transport model were employed in this study to evaluate the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein. This study revealed that HZ08 was capable of reversing adriamycin resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein as a result of intracellular enhancement of adriamycin accumulation, which was found to be superior to verapamil. In addition, we confirmed that HZ08 suppressed the transport of Rhodamine123 in the Caco-2 monolayer model but had little effect on P-glycoprotein expression. The transport of HZ08 was diminished by P-glycoprotein inhibitors (verapamil and LY335979) and its accumulation was increased via siRNA targeting MDR1 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, considering the binding site of P-glycoprotein, verapamil performed as a competitive inhibitor with HZ08. In conclusion, as a P-glycoprotein substrate, HZ08 inhibited P-glycoprotein activity and may share the same binding site of verapamil to P-glycoprotein. - Highlights: • The cytotoxicity and reversing effect of HZ08 was measured in Caco-2 cell line. • HZ08 inhibited the transport of Rhodamine123 across Caco-2 cell monolayer. • The efflux ratio of HZ08 was dropped when combined with P-glycoprotein

  15. Contribution of mdr1b-type P-glycoprotein to okadaic acid resistance in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ritz, V; Marwitz, J; Sieder, S; Ziemann, C; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Quentin, I; Steinfelder, H J

    1999-08-01

    Okadaic acid as well as other, structurally different, inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A induce apoptosis in pituitary GH3 cells. Incubation with stepwise raised concentrations of okadaic acid resulted in the isolation of cells that were increasingly less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of this agent. After about 18 months cells were selected that survived at 300 nM okadaic acid, which is about 30 times the initially lethal concentration. This study revealed that a major pharmacokinetic mechanism underlying cell survival was the development of a P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The increase in mRNA levels of the mdr1b P-glycoprotein isoform correlated with the extent of drug resistance. Functional assays revealed that increasing drug resistance was paralleled by a decreased accumulation of rhodamine 123, a fluorescent dye which is a substrate of mdr1-mediated efflux activity. Resistance could be abolished by structurally different chemosensitizers of P-glycoprotein function like verapamil and reserpine but not by the leukotriene receptor antagonist MK571 which is a modulator of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). Okadaic acid resistance included cross-resistance to other cytotoxic agents that are substrates of mdr1-type P-glycoproteins, like doxorubicin and actinomycin D, but not to non-substrates of mdr1, e.g. cytosine arabinoside. Thus, functional as well as biochemical features support the conclusion that okadaic acid is a substrate of the mdr1-mediated efflux activity in rat pituitary GH3 cells. Maintenance of resistance after withdrawal of okadaic acid as well as metaphase spreads of 100 nM okadaic acid-resistant cells suggested a stable MDR genotype without indications for the occurrence of extrachromosomal amplifications, e.g. double minute chromosomes.

  16. Potential P-glycoprotein-mediated drug-drug interactions of antimalarial agents in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Oga, Enoche F; Sekine, Shuichi; Shitara, Yoshihisa; Horie, Toshiharu

    2012-07-01

    Antimalarials are widely used in African and Southeast Asian countries, where they are combined with other drugs for the treatment of concurrent ailments. The potential for P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between antimalarials and P-gp substrates was examined using a Caco-2 cell-based model. Selected antimalarials were initially screened for their interaction with P-gp based on the inhibition of rhodamine-123 (Rho-123) transport in Caco-2 cells. Verapamil (100 μM) and quinidine (1 μM) were used as positive inhibition controls. Lumefantrine, amodiaquin, and artesunate all showed blockade of Rho-123 transport. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of these antimalarials on the bi-directional passage of digoxin (DIG) was examined. All of the drugs decreased basal-to-apical (B-A) P-gp-mediated DIG transport at concentrations of 100 μM and 1 mM. These concentrations may reflect therapeutic doses for amodiaquin and artesunate. Therefore, clinically relevant DDIs may occur between certain antimalarials and P-gp substrates in general.

  17. Comparison of cell-surface glycoproteins of rat hepatomas and embryonic rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, W. P.; Emmelot, P.; Homburg, C.

    1977-01-01

    Cell-surface glycoprotein of 3 rat hepatoma strains and late-embryonic liver was metabolically labelled in vivo with [3H]- or [14C]-fucose. Trypsinization of the cells and exhaustive pronase digestion of combined hepatoma-liver trypsinates followed by gel filtration over Sephadex-Biogel mixtures, yielded elution profiles that contained more early-eluting (high-mol.-wt.) glycopeptides for hepatomas than for liver. At least 3 factors were identified which acted to augment the fraction of early-eluting tumour glycopeptides: (a) increase of neuraminidase-sensitive sialic acid, (b) increase of neuraminidase-insensitive sialic acid that was sensitive to mild HCl hydrolysis, and (c) presence of sugar sulphate groups contributing to a restricted extent, relative to possible unknown factor(s). Whether (a), (b) or (c) operated depended on the hepatoma strain or its mode of growth. Notwithstanding these differences in the nature of the increase in early-eluting glycopeptides, the increase itself appears not to be due to growth per se, nor to an embryonic expression, but rather may serve as a marker of tumourigenicity. PMID:199223

  18. The Permeability of Plant Cell Walls as Measured by Gel Filtration Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepeer, Mark; Taylor, Iain E. P.

    1981-08-01

    The permeability of plant cell walls to macromolecules may limit the ability of enzymes to alter the biochemical and physical properties of the wall. Proteins of molecular weight up to 60,000 can permeate a substantial portion of the cell wall. Measurements of wall permeability in which cells are exposed to hypertonic solutions of macromolecules may seriously underestimate wall permeability.

  19. Characterization and Localization of Insoluble Organic Matrices Associated with Diatom Cell Walls: Insight into Their Roles during Cell Wall Formation

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Benoit; Hildebrand, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Organic components associated with diatom cell wall silica are important for the formation, integrity, and function of the cell wall. Polysaccharides are associated with the silica, however their localization, structure, and function remain poorly understood. We used imaging and biochemical approaches to describe in detail characteristics of insoluble organic components associated with the cell wall in 5 different diatom species. Results show that an insoluble organic matrix enriched in mannose, likely the diatotepum, is localized on the proximal surface of the silica cell wall. We did not identify any organic matrix embedded within the silica. We also identified a distinct material consisting of glucose polymer with variable localization depending on the species. In some species this component was directly involved in the morphogenesis of silica structure while in others it appeared to be only a structural component of the cell wall. A novel glucose-rich structure located between daughter cells during division was also identified. This work for the first time correlates the structure, composition, and localization of insoluble organic matrices associated with diatom cell walls. Additionally we identified a novel glucose polymer and characterized its role during silica structure formation. PMID:23626714

  20. P-glycoprotein-dependent resistance of cancer cells toward the extrinsic TRAIL apoptosis signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Galski, Hanan; Oved-Gelber, Tamar; Simanovsky, Masha; Lazarovici, Philip; Gottesman, Michael M; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-09-01

    The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or Apo2L) preferentially cause apoptosis of malignant cells in vitro and in vivo without severe toxicity. Therefore, TRAIL or agonist antibodies to the TRAIL DR4 and DR5 receptors are used in cancer therapy. However, many malignant cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to TRAIL. It has been previously proposed that the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) might play a role in resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic pathways by interfering with components of ceramide metabolism or by modulating the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In this study we investigated whether Pgp also confers resistance toward extrinsic death ligands of the TNF family. To this end we focused our study on HeLa cells carrying a tetracycline-repressible plasmid system which shuts down Pgp expression in the presence of tetracycline. Our findings demonstrate that expression of Pgp is a significant factor conferring resistance to TRAIL administration, but not to other death ligands such as TNF-α and Fas ligand. Moreover, blocking Pgp transport activity sensitizes the malignant cells toward TRAIL. Therefore, Pgp transport function is required to confer resistance to TRAIL. Although the resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is Pgp specific, TRAIL itself is not a direct substrate of Pgp. Pgp expression has no effect on the level of the TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5. These findings might have clinical implications since the combination of TRAIL therapy with administration of Pgp modulators might sensitize TRAIL resistant tumors.

  1. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants.

  2. Ultrastructure and Composition of the Nannochloropsis gaditana Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Matthew J.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Jing, Jia; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine algae of the genus Nannochloropsis are promising producers of biofuel precursors and nutraceuticals and are also harvested commercially for aquaculture feed. We have used quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and carbohydrate analyses to characterize the architecture of the Nannochloropsis gaditana (strain CCMP 526) cell wall, whose recalcitrance presents a significant barrier to biocommodity extraction. The data indicate a bilayer structure consisting of a cellulosic inner wall (∼75% of the mass balance) protected by an outer hydrophobic algaenan layer. Cellulase treatment of walls purified after cell lysis generates highly enriched algaenan preparations without using the harsh chemical treatments typically used in algaenan isolation and characterization. Nannochloropsis algaenan was determined to comprise long, straight-chain, saturated aliphatics with ether cross-links, which closely resembles the cutan of vascular plants. Chemical identification of >85% of the isolated cell wall mass is detailed, and genome analysis is used to identify candidate biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:25239976

  3. Characterizing visible and invisible cell wall mutant phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Carpita, Nicholas C; McCann, Maureen C

    2015-07-01

    About 10% of a plant's genome is devoted to generating the protein machinery to synthesize, remodel, and deconstruct the cell wall. High-throughput genome sequencing technologies have enabled a reasonably complete inventory of wall-related genes that can be assembled into families of common evolutionary origin. Assigning function to each gene family member has been aided immensely by identification of mutants with visible phenotypes or by chemical and spectroscopic analysis of mutants with 'invisible' phenotypes of modified cell wall composition and architecture that do not otherwise affect plant growth or development. This review connects the inference of gene function on the basis of deviation from the wild type in genetic functional analyses to insights provided by modern analytical techniques that have brought us ever closer to elucidating the sequence structures of the major polysaccharide components of the plant cell wall.

  4. Motion of red blood cells near microvessel walls: effects of a porous wall layer

    PubMed Central

    HARIPRASAD, DANIEL S.; SECOMB, TIMOTHY W.

    2013-01-01

    A two-dimensional model is used to simulate the motion and deformation of a single mammalian red blood cell (RBC) flowing close to the wall of a microvessel, taking into account the effects of a porous endothelial surface layer (ESL) lining the vessel wall. Migration of RBCs away from the wall leads to the formation of a cell-depleted layer near the wall, which has a large effect on the resistance to blood flow in microvessels. The objective is to examine the mechanical factors causing this migration, including the effects of the ESL. The vessel is represented as a straight parallel-sided channel. The RBC is represented as a set of interconnected viscoelastic elements, suspended in plasma, a Newtonian fluid. The ESL is represented as a porous medium, and plasma flow in the layer is computed using the Brinkman approximation. It is shown that an initially circular cell positioned close to the ESL in a shear flow is deformed into an asymmetric shape. This breaking of symmetry leads to migration away from the wall. With increasing hydraulic resistivity of the layer, the rate of lateral migration increases. It is concluded that mechanical interactions of RBCs flowing in microvessels with a porous wall layer may reduce the rate of lateral migration and hence reduce the width of the cell-depleted zone external to the ESL, relative to the cell-depleted zone that would be formed if the interface between the ESL and free-flowing plasma were replaced by an impermeable boundary. PMID:23493820

  5. Determining the polysaccharide composition of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Pettolino, Filomena A; Walsh, Cherie; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Bacic, Antony

    2012-09-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex structure composed mostly of polysaccharides. Detailed analyses of these cell wall polysaccharides are essential for our understanding of plant development and for our use of plant biomass (largely wall material) in the food, agriculture, fabric, timber, biofuel and biocomposite industries. We present analytical techniques not only to define the fine chemical structures of individual cell wall polysaccharides but also to estimate the overall polysaccharide composition of cell wall preparations. The procedure covers the preparation of cell walls, together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based methods, for both the analysis of monosaccharides as their volatile alditol acetate derivatives and for methylation analysis to determine linkage positions between monosaccharide residues as their volatile partially methylated alditol acetate derivatives. Analysis time will vary depending on both the method used and the tissue type, and ranges from 2 d for a simple neutral sugar composition to 2 weeks for a carboxyl reduction/methylation linkage analysis.

  6. Evaluation of cell wall preparations for proteomics: a new procedure for purifying cell walls from Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Leila; Irshad, Muhammad; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    Background The ultimate goal of proteomic analysis of a cell compartment should be the exhaustive identification of resident proteins; excluding proteins from other cell compartments. Reaching such a goal closely depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific difficulties: (i) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure, (ii) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins. Several reported procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomic analyses led to the isolation of a high proportion (more than 50%) of predicted intracellular proteins. Since isolated cell walls should hold secreted proteins, one can imagine alternative procedures to prepare cell walls containing a lower proportion of contaminant proteins. Results The rationales of several published procedures to isolate cell walls for proteomics were analyzed, with regard to the bioinformatic-predicted subcellular localization of the identified proteins. Critical steps were revealed: (i) homogenization in low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP, (ii) purification through increasing density cushions, (iii) extensive washes with a low ionic strength acid buffer to retain CWP while removing as many cytosolic proteins as possible, and (iv) absence of detergents. A new procedure was developed to prepare cell walls from etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana. After salt extraction, a high proportion of proteins predicted to be secreted was released (73%), belonging to the same functional classes as proteins identified using previously described protocols. Finally, removal of intracellular proteins was obtained using detergents, but their amount represented less than 3% in mass of the total protein extract, based on protein quantification. Conclusion The new cell wall

  7. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, R; González, C; Muñoz, N; Mendoza, S

    1966-05-01

    Virgilio, Rafael (Escuela de Química y Farmacia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), C. González, Nubia Muñoz, and Silvia Mendoza. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis. J. Bacteriol. 91:2018-2024. 1966.-A crude suspension of Staphylococcus aureus cell walls (strain Cowan III) in buffer solution was shown by electron microscopy to lyse slightly after 16 hr, probably owing to the action of autolysin. The lysis was considerably faster and more intense after the addition of lysozyme. A remarkable reduction in thickness and rigidity of the cell walls, together with the appearance of many irregular protrusions in their outlines, was observed after 2 hr; after 16 hr, there remained only a few recognizable cell wall fragments but many residual particulate remnants. When autolysin was previously inactivated by trypsin, there was a complete inhibition of the lytic action of lysozyme; on the other hand, when autolysin was inactivated by heat and lysozyme was added, a distinct decrease in the thickness of the cell walls was observed, but there was no destruction of the walls. The lytic action of lysozyme, after treatment with hot 5% trichloroacetic acid, gave rise to a marked dissolution of the structure of the cell walls, which became lost against the background, without, however, showing ostensible alteration of wall outlines. From a morphological point of view, the lytic action of autolysin plus lysozyme was quite different from that of trichloroacetic acid plus lysozyme, as shown by electron micrographs, but in both cases it was very intense. This would suggest different mechanisms of action for these agents.

  8. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  9. Production Model Press for the Preparation of Bacterial Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, T. D.; Ribi, E.; Maki, W.; Miller, B.; Oertli, E.

    1962-01-01

    A modification of the apparatus previously described permits the preparation of cell walls in quantity. This consists of a heavy duty, double-acting hydraulic press with motor-driven pump, and a superstrength alloy steel pressure cell which is corrosion resistant. Liquid cooling of the jet is substituted for the previously used gas cooling to minimize aerosol formation and to facilitate subsequent treatment of the products. The device produces cell walls of excellent quality in good yield. The pressure cell has been used satisfactorily up to about 60,000 psi. Design details are given. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 6 PMID:14485524

  10. Mating type-specific cell-cell recognition of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: cell wall attachment and active sites of a- and alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Cappellaro, C; Baldermann, C; Rachel, R; Tanner, W

    1994-01-01

    Mating type-specific agglutination of Saccharomyces cerevisiae a and alpha cells depends on the heterophilic interaction of two cell surface glycoproteins, the gene products of AG alpha 1 and AGA2. Evidence is presented with immunogold labelling that the alpha-agglutinin is part of the outer fimbrial cell wall coat. The a-agglutinin is bound via two S-S bridges (Cys7 and Cys50) to a cell wall component, most probably the gene product of AGA1. His273 of alpha-agglutinin has previously been shown to be essential for a- and alpha-agglutinin interaction and a model based on two opposing ion-pairs had been proposed. By site-directed mutagenesis this possibility has now been excluded. With the help of various peptides, either chemically synthesized, obtained by proteolysis of intact glycosylated a-agglutinin or prepared from a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, the biologically active region of a-agglutinin was located at the C-terminus of the molecule. A peptide consisting of the C-terminal 10 amino acids (GSPIN-TQYVF) was active in nanomolar concentrations. Saccharide moieties, therefore, are not essential for the mating type-specific cell-cell interaction; glycosylated peptides are, however, four to five times more active than non-glycosylated ones. Comparisons of the recognition sequences of the S. cerevisiae agglutinins with that of the Dictyostelium contact site A glycoprotein (gp80), as well as with those of the various families of cell adhesion molecules of higher eucaryotes, have been made and are discussed. Images PMID:7957044

  11. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei Variant Surface Glycoprotein Switching by Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R; Boothroyd, Catherine E; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2016-10-19

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite that causes both Human and Animal African Trypanosomiasis (known as sleeping sickness and nagana, respectively) cycles between a tsetse vector and a mammalian host. It evades the mammalian host immune system by periodically switching the dense, variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that covers its surface. The detection of antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei can be both cumbersome and labor intensive. Here, we present a method for quantifying the number of parasites that have 'switched' to express a new VSG in a given population. The parasites are first stained with an antibody against the starting VSG, and then stained with a secondary antibody attached to a magnetic bead. Parasites expressing the starting VSG are then separated from the rest of the population by running the parasites over a column attached to a magnet. Parasites expressing the dominant, starting VSG are retained on the column, while the flow-through contains parasites that express a new VSG as well as some contaminants expressing the starting VSG. This flow-through population is stained again with a fluorescently labeled antibody against the starting VSG to label contaminants, and propidium iodide (PI), which labels dead cells. A known number of absolute counting beads that are visible by flow cytometry are added to the flow-through population. The ratio of beads to number of cells collected can then be used to extrapolate the number of cells in the entire sample. Flow cytometry is used to quantify the population of switchers by counting the number of PI negative cells that do not stain positively for the starting, dominant VSG. The proportion of switchers in the population can then be calculated using the flow cytometry data.

  12. Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Efficiently Capture HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins via CD4 for Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sandgren, Kerrie J; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Forsell, Mattias N; Soldemo, Martina; Adams, William C; Liang, Frank; Perbeck, Leif; Koup, Richard A; Wyatt, Richard T; Hedestam, Gunilla B Karlsson; Loré, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Advances in HIV-1 vaccine clinical trials and preclinical research indicate that the virus envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely to be an essential component of a prophylactic vaccine. Efficient antigen uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DCs) is important for strong CD4+ T helper cell responses and the development of effective humoral immune responses. Here, we examined the capacity of distinct primary human DC subsets to internalise and present recombinant Env to CD4+ T cells. Consistent with their specific receptor expression, skin DCs bound and internalised Env via C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) while blood DC subsets, including CD1c+ myeloid DCs (MDCs), CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) and CD141+ DCs exhibited a restricted repertoire of CLRs and relied on CD4 for uptake of Env. Despite a generally poor capacity for antigen uptake compared to MDCs, the high expression of CD4 on PDCs allowed them to bind and internalise Env very efficiently. CD4-mediated uptake delivered Env to EEA1+ endosomes that progressed to Lamp1+ and MHC class II+ lysosomes where internalised Env was degraded rapidly. Finally, all three blood DC subsets were able to internalise an Env-CMV pp65 fusion protein via CD4 and stimulate pp65-specific CD4+ T cells. Thus, in the in vitro systems described here, CD4-mediated uptake of Env is a functional pathway leading to antigen presentation and this may therefore be a mechanism utilised by blood DCs, including PDCs, for generating immune responses to Env-based vaccines. PMID:23729440

  13. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    PubMed

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  14. A widespread family of bacterial cell wall assembly proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Marles-Wright, Jon; Cleverley, Robert M; Emmins, Robyn; Ishikawa, Shu; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Heinz, Nadja; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hoyland, Christopher N; Ogasawara, Naotake; Lewis, Richard J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Daniel, Richard A; Errington, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Teichoic acids and acidic capsular polysaccharides are major anionic cell wall polymers (APs) in many bacteria, with various critical cell functions, including maintenance of cell shape and structural integrity, charge and cation homeostasis, and multiple aspects of pathogenesis. We have identified the widespread LytR–Cps2A–Psr (LCP) protein family, of previously unknown function, as novel enzymes required for AP synthesis. Structural and biochemical analysis of several LCP proteins suggest that they carry out the final step of transferring APs from their lipid-linked precursor to cell wall peptidoglycan (PG). In Bacillus subtilis, LCP proteins are found in association with the MreB cytoskeleton, suggesting that MreB proteins coordinate the insertion of the major polymers, PG and AP, into the cell wall. PMID:21964069

  15. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, H; Nakamura, S; Kawasaki, H; Takada, K; Mizutani, S; Aono, R; Horikoshi, K

    1997-02-01

    The triangular disk-shaped halophilic archaeon Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 has a glycoprotein on its cell surface. The complete gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) was cloned and sequenced. The gene has an open reading frame of 2586 bp, and a potential archaeal promoter sequence approximately 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. The mature CSG is composed of 828 amino acids and is preceded by a signal sequence of 34 amino acid residues. A hydropathy analysis showed a hydrophobic stretch at the C-terminus, that probably serves as a transmembrane domain. The amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG showed 52.1% and 43.2% identities to those from the Halobacterium halobium and Haloferax volcanii CSGs, respectively. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature Ha. japonica CSG, sites that were distinctly different from those in Hb. halobium and Hf. volcanii. The Ha. japonica CSG gene was expressed in Escherichia coli.

  16. Novel cellular determinants for reversal of multidrug resistance in cells expressing P170-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yin, M B; Guo, B; Voigt, W; Vanhoefer, U; Gibbs, J F; Skenderis, B S; Frank, C; Wrzosek, C; Rustum, Y M

    1998-03-05

    The newly synthesized calcium channel blocker, Ro44-5912, significantly potentiates doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cytotoxicity at non-cytotoxic concentrations in Dox-resistant human ovarian cell line, A2780/DX5, overexpressing P170-glycoprotein (Pgp). Induction of DNA single- and double-strand breaks (ssbs and dsbs) was measured using alkaline elution and constant-field gel electrophoresis (CFGE) assays. The results indicate that potentiation of the cytotoxicity of Dox by Ro44-5912 was accompanied by significant increases in both, Dox-induced DNA ssbs and dsbs in the resistant cells. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that Dox induced DNA fragments in the 50-800 kilobase (kb) and 0.8-5.7 megabase (Mb) ranges. The majority of the newly synthesized DNA fragments were in the 50-800 kb range. Ro44-5912 treatment resulted in significant potentiation of DNA fragmentation in the 50-800 kb range with a minor increase in 0.8-5.7 Mb DNA fragments, suggesting that the modulator functions by potentiating nascent DNA fragmentation in the resistant cells. Exposure to Dox with Ro44-5912 was associated with a prolonged blockage of cells in the S-phase. In contrast, exposure to Dox alone resulted in temporary blockage of cells in G2/M phase (approximately 24 h) followed by restoration of cell proliferation and normal DNA histograms at 48 h after 2 h drug exposure. Incorporation of BrdUrd by flow cytometric analysis was inhibited by Dox in the presence of Ro44-5912, showing that there is a block of DNA replication. An increased damage in newly synthesized DNA could concur with a blocked DNA replication. Moreover, slowing progression through the S-phase in cells exposed to Dox in combination with Ro44-5912 is accompanied by increased sensitivity of Dox poisons, indicating a correlation of specific S-phase perturbation with the reversal of Dox resistance by Ro44-5912 in cells expressing Pgp. The results suggest that drug-induced augmentation of nascent DNA

  17. The composition of the cell wall of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. R.

    1965-01-01

    1. The cell-wall composition of Aspergillus niger has been investigated. Analysis shows the presence of six sugars, glucose, galactose, mannose, arabinose, glucosamine and galactosamine, all in the d-configuration, except that a small amount of l-galactose may be present. Sixteen common amino acids are also present. 2. The wall consists chiefly of neutral carbohydrate (73–83%) and hexosamine (9–13%), with smaller amounts of lipid (2–7%), protein (0·5–2·5%) and phosphorus (less than 0·1%). The acetyl content (3·0–3·4%) corresponds to 1·0mole/mole of hexosamine nitrogen. 3. A fractionation of the cell-wall complex was achieved, with or without a preliminary phenol extraction, by using n-sodium hydroxide. Though this caused some degradation, 30–60% of the wall could be solubilized (depending on the preparation). Analyses on several fractions suggest that fractionation procedures bring about some separation of components although not in a clear-cut fashion. 4. Cell-wall preparations were shown to yield a fraction having [α]D approx. +240° (in n-sodium hydroxide) and consisting largely of glucose. This was separated into two subfractions, one of which had [α]D+281° (in n-sodium hydroxide) and had properties resembling the polysaccharide nigeran; the other had [α]D +231° (in n-sodium hydroxide). It is suggested that nigeran is a cell-wall component. PMID:5862404

  18. Control of Cell Wall Extensibility during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hepler, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we address the question of how the tip-growing pollen tube achieves its rapid rate of elongation while maintaining an intact cell wall. Although turgor is essential for growth to occur, the local expansion rate is controlled by local changes in the viscosity of the apical wall. We focus on several different structures and underlying processes that are thought to be major participants including exocytosis, the organization and activity of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium and proton physiology, and cellular energetics. We think that the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the apical cortical actin fringe, directs the flow of vesicles to the apical domain, where they fuse with the plasma membrane and contribute their contents to the expanding cell wall. While pH gradients, as generated by a proton-ATPase located on the plasma membrane along the side of the clear zone, may regulate rapid actin turnover and new polymerization in the fringe, the tip-focused calcium gradient biases secretion towards the polar axis. The recent data showing that exocytosis of new wall material precedes and predicts the process of cell elongation provide support for the idea that the intussusception of newly secreted pectin contributes to decreases in apical wall viscosity and to cell expansion. Other prime factors will be the localization and activity of the enzyme pectin methyl-esterase, and the chelation of calcium by pectic acids. Finally, we acknowledge a role for reactive oxygen species in the control of wall viscosity. PMID:23770837

  19. Control of cell wall extensibility during pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Peter K; Rounds, Caleb M; Winship, Lawrence J

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we address the question of how the tip-growing pollen tube achieves its rapid rate of elongation while maintaining an intact cell wall. Although turgor is essential for growth to occur, the local expansion rate is controlled by local changes in the viscosity of the apical wall. We focus on several different structures and underlying processes that are thought to be major participants including exocytosis, the organization and activity of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium and proton physiology, and cellular energetics. We think that the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the apical cortical actin fringe, directs the flow of vesicles to the apical domain, where they fuse with the plasma membrane and contribute their contents to the expanding cell wall. While pH gradients, as generated by a proton-ATPase located on the plasma membrane along the side of the clear zone, may regulate rapid actin turnover and new polymerization in the fringe, the tip-focused calcium gradient biases secretion towards the polar axis. The recent data showing that exocytosis of new wall material precedes and predicts the process of cell elongation provide support for the idea that the intussusception of newly secreted pectin contributes to decreases in apical wall viscosity and to cell expansion. Other prime factors will be the localization and activity of the enzyme pectin methyl-esterase, and the chelation of calcium by pectic acids. Finally, we acknowledge a role for reactive oxygen species in the control of wall viscosity.

  20. Intestinal permeability and P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux transport of ticagrelor in Caco-2 monolayer cells.

    PubMed

    Marsousi, Niloufar; Doffey-Lazeyras, Fabienne; Rudaz, Serge; Desmeules, Jules A; Daali, Youssef

    2016-12-01

    Ticagrelor is the unique reversible oral antiplatelet drug commercialized today. During this study, the intestinal permeability of ticagrelor and its potential P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated active transport were assessed. To this end, bidirectional transport of ticagrelor was performed across Caco-2 (human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma) monolayer model in the presence and absence of potent P-gp inhibitor valspodar. Ticagrelor presented an apical-basolateral apparent permeability coefficient (Papp ) of 6.0 × 10(-6) cm/s. On the other hand, mean efflux ratio (ER) of 2.71 was observed for ticagrelor describing a higher efflux permeability compared to the influx component. Valspodar showed a significant inhibitory effect on the efflux of ticagrelor suggesting involvement of P-gp in its oral disposition. Co-incubation of the P-gp inhibitor decreased the efflux Papp of ticagrelor from 1.60 × 10(-5) to 1.13 × 10(-5) cm/s and decreased its ER by 70%. Results suggest a modest active transport of ticagrelor by P-gp across the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The co-administration of ticagrelor with a P-gp inhibitor seems altogether unlikely to have an extended impact on pharmacokinetics of ticagrelor and cause bleeding events in patients.

  1. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  2. Altered (neo-) lacto series glycolipid biosynthesis impairs α2-6 sialylation on N-glycoproteins in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Shahidul; Anugraham, Merrina; Huang, Yen-Lin; Kohler, Reto S.; Hettich, Timm; Winkelbach, Katharina; Grether, Yasmin; López, Mónica Núñez; Khasbiullina, Nailia; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Jacob, Francis

    2017-01-01

    The (neo-) lacto series glycosphingolipids (nsGSLs) comprise of glycan epitopes that are present as blood group antigens, act as primary receptors for human pathogens and are also increasingly associated with malignant diseases. Beta-1, 3-N-acetyl-glucosaminyl-transferase 5 (B3GNT5) is suggested as the key glycosyltransferase for the biosynthesis of nsGSLs. In this study, we investigated the impact of CRISPR-Cas9 -mediated gene disruption of B3GNT5 (∆B3GNT5) on the expression of glycosphingolipids and N-glycoproteins by utilizing immunostaining and glycomics-based PGC-UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS profiling. ∆B3GNT5 cells lost nsGSL expression coinciding with reduction of α2-6 sialylation on N-glycoproteins. In contrast, disruption of B4GALNT1, a glycosyltransferase for ganglio series GSLs did not affect α2-6 sialylation on N-glycoproteins. We further profiled all known α2-6 sialyltransferase-encoding genes and showed that the loss of α2-6 sialylation is due to silencing of ST6GAL1 expression in ∆B3GNT5 cells. These results demonstrate that nsGSLs are part of a complex network affecting N-glycosylation in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:28358117

  3. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions.

  4. Beta-agonists and secretory cell number and intracellular glycoproteins in airway epithelium. The effect of isoproterenol and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R.; Reid, L.

    1979-01-01

    This study describes the effect of systemic administration of the beta-adrenergic agonists isoproterenol and salbutamol on the secretory cell populations in seven regions of rat airway epithelium (three extrapulmonary and four intrapulmonary) and on the size of salivary glands and heart. Isoproterenol (a nonselective beta-adrenergic agonist) significantly increases secretory cell number in all airway regions except the midtrachea; salbutamol (a selective beta 2 agonist) increases secretory cell number only in proximal and peripheral regions. The absolute number of secretory cells is greatest in the most peripheral region after isoproterenol administration and in the most proximal region after salbutamol, although both drugs produce the greatest relative increase at the periphery. In proximal and, particularly, peripheral regions, the increase by isoproterenol (less than 3- and 14-fold, respectively) is greater than by salbutamol (less than 2- and less than 3-fold, respectively). In all airway regions, both drugs modify intracellular glycoprotein in the secretory cell population; within a given region, modification is much the same. In the most proximal region, the population of cells synthesizing only granules of neutral glycoprotein significantly increases while in other regions increase is in cells synthesizing only granules of acid. A significant shift in glycoprotein synthesis occurs whether or not the secretory cell population is increased, which suggests that existing as well as newly appearing cells modify their product. Isoproterenol significantly increases the size of the parotid and submaxillary glands; salbutamol increases the size of the parotid only. Isoproterenol significantly increases the weight of both ventricles of the heart; salbutamol has no such effect. PMID:36762

  5. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  6. Analyzing Cell Wall Elasticity After Hormone Treatment: An Example Using Tobacco BY-2 Cells and Auxin.

    PubMed

    Braybrook, Siobhan A

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy, and related nano-indentation techniques, is a valuable tool for analyzing the elastic properties of plant cell walls as they relate to changes in cell wall chemistry, changes in development, and response to hormones. Within this chapter I will describe a method for analyzing the effect of the phytohormone auxin on the cell wall elasticity of tobacco BY-2 cells. This general method may be easily altered for different experimental systems and hormones of interest.

  7. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Ruben R.; Muth, Anke; Schneider, Irene C.; Friedel, Thorsten; Hartmann, Jessica; Plückthun, Andreas; Maisner, Andrea; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs) can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV) glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance). Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV) glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4) was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs. PMID:27281338

  8. RESEARCH ON CELL WALL CYTOCHEMISTRY OF SELECTED FUNGI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    that the resistant material in their cell walls is chitin. All efforts to identify cellulose produced negative results. Solutions of chitinase ...fungi examined, especially Heterocephalum aurantiacum Plastid-like structures in the protoplasts are the cell organs which produce chitin. Chitin

  9. 15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring radioactive materials containment box, facing east - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  10. Cell-wall remodeling drives engulfment during Bacillus subtilis sporulation

    PubMed Central

    Ojkic, Nikola; López-Garrido, Javier; Pogliano, Kit; Endres, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    When starved, the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores for survival. Sporulation initiates with an asymmetric cell division, creating a large mother cell and a small forespore. Subsequently, the mother cell membrane engulfs the forespore in a phagocytosis-like process. However, the force generation mechanism for forward membrane movement remains unknown. Here, we show that membrane migration is driven by cell wall remodeling at the leading edge of the engulfing membrane, with peptidoglycan synthesis and degradation mediated by penicillin binding proteins in the forespore and a cell wall degradation protein complex in the mother cell. We propose a simple model for engulfment in which the junction between the septum and the lateral cell wall moves around the forespore by a mechanism resembling the ‘template model’. Hence, we establish a biophysical mechanism for the creation of a force for engulfment based on the coordination between cell wall synthesis and degradation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18657.001 PMID:27852437

  11. Brachypodium distachyon grain: characterization of endosperm cell walls.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Fabienne; Bouchet, Brigitte; Jamme, Frédéric; Robert, Paul; Quéméner, Bernard; Barron, Cécile; Larré, Colette; Dumas, Paul; Saulnier, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The wild grass Brachypodium distachyon has been proposed as an alternative model species for temperate cereals. The present paper reports on the characterization of B. distachyon grain, placing emphasis on endosperm cell walls. Brachypodium distachyon is notable for its high cell wall polysaccharide content that accounts for ∼52% (w/w) of the endosperm in comparison with 2-7% (w/w) in other cereals. Starch, the typical storage polysaccharide, is low [<10% (w/w)] in the endosperm where the main polysaccharide is (1-3) (1-4)-β-glucan [40% (w/w) of the endosperm], which in all likelihood plays a role as a storage compound. In addition to (1-3) (1-4)-β-glucan, endosperm cells contain cellulose and xylan in significant amounts. Interestingly, the ratio of ferulic acid to arabinoxylan is higher in B. distachyon grain than in other investigated cereals. Feruloylated arabinoxylan is mainly found in the middle lamella and cell junction zones of the storage endosperm, suggesting a potential role in cell-cell adhesion. The present results indicate that B. distachyon grains contain all the cell wall polysaccharides encountered in other cereal grains. Thus, due to its fully sequenced genome, its short life cycle, and the genetic tools available for mutagenesis/transformation, B. distachyon is a good model to investigate cell wall polysaccharide synthesis and function in cereal grains.

  12. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  13. Cell wall proteome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana mature stems.

    PubMed

    Duruflé, Harold; Clemente, Hélène San; Balliau, Thierry; Zivy, Michel; Dunand, Christophe; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2017-02-02

    Plant stems carry flowers necessary for species propagation and need to be adapted to mechanical disturbance and environmental factors. The stem cell walls are different from other organs and can modify their rigidity or viscoelastic properties for the integrity and the robustness required to withstand mechanical impacts and environmental stresses. Plant cell wall is composed of complex polysaccharide networks also containing cell wall proteins (CWPs) crucial to perceive and limit the environmental effects. The CWPs are fundamental players in cell wall remodeling processes, and today, only 86 have been identified from the mature stems of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. With a destructive method, this study has enlarged its coverage to 302 CWPs. This new proteome is mainly composed of 27.5% proteins acting on polysaccharides, 16% proteases, 11.6% oxido-reductases, 11% possibly related to lipid metabolism and 11% of proteins with interacting domains with proteins or polysaccharides. Compared to stem cell wall proteomes already available (Brachypodium distachyon, Sacharum officinarum, Linum usitatissimum, Medicago sativa), that of A. thaliana stems has a higher proportion of proteins acting on polysaccharides and of proteases, but a lower proportion of oxido-reductases.

  14. Gene expression in Fusarium graminearum grown on plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Carapito, Raphaël; Hatsch, Didier; Vorwerk, Sonja; Petkovski, Elizabet; Jeltsch, Jean-Marc; Phalip, Vincent

    2008-05-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus attacking a wide range of plants including Humulus lupulus (hop). Transcriptional analysis of F. graminearum grown on minimal media containing hop cell wall or glucose as the sole carbon source was performed by applying a highly stringent method combining microarrays and a subtracted cDNA library. In addition to genes coding for various cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE), several metabolic pathways were induced in response to the plant cell wall substrate. Many genes participating in these pathways are probably involved in cellular transport. But the most interesting was that all the genes composing the 4-aminobutyrate-shunt (GABA-shunt) were also up-regulated in the presence of plant cell wall material and were present in the cDNA library. This study provides a description of a part of the fungal gene expression profile when it is in contact with raw biological materials, and helps in understanding the plant cell wall degradation and the infection process.

  15. The role of the cell wall in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malinovsky, Frederikke G.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; Willats, William G. T.

    2014-01-01

    The battle between plants and microbes is evolutionarily ancient, highly complex, and often co-dependent. A primary challenge for microbes is to breach the physical barrier of host cell walls whilst avoiding detection by the plant’s immune receptors. While some receptors sense conserved microbial features, others monitor physical changes caused by an infection attempt. Detection of microbes leads to activation of appropriate defense responses that then challenge the attack. Plant cell walls are formidable and dynamic barriers. They are constructed primarily of complex carbohydrates joined by numerous distinct connection types, and are subject to extensive post-synthetic modification to suit prevailing local requirements. Multiple changes can be triggered in cell walls in response to microbial attack. Some of these are well described, but many remain obscure. The study of the myriad of subtle processes underlying cell wall modification poses special challenges for plant glycobiology. In this review we describe the major molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the roles of cell walls in plant defense against pathogen attack. In so doing, we also highlight some of the challenges inherent in studying these interactions, and briefly describe the analytical potential of molecular probes used in conjunction with carbohydrate microarray technology. PMID:24834069

  16. Human metapneumovirus glycoprotein G disrupts mitochondrial signaling in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoyong; Kolli, Deepthi; Ren, Junping; Liu, Tianshuang; Garofalo, Roberto P; Casola, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a recently identified RNA virus belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family. It is a common cause of respiratory tract infections in children, adults, and immunocompromised patients, for which no specific treatment or vaccine is available. Recent investigations in our lab identified hMPV glycoprotein G as an important virulence factor, as a recombinant virus lacking the G protein (rhMPV-ΔG) exhibited enhanced production of important immune and antiviral mediators, such as cytokines, chemokines and type I interferon (IFN) in airway epithelial cells, and expression of G protein alone inhibits cellular signaling dependent on retinoic induced gene (RIG)-I, a RNA helicase with a fundamental role in initiating hMPV-induced cellular responses. In this study, we have further investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory role of hMPV G protein on RIG-I-dependent signaling. We found that the interaction of hMPV G with RIG-I occurs primarily through the CARD domains of RIG-I N-terminus, preventing RIG-I association with the adaptor protein MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein), recruitment of RIG-I to mitochondria, as well as the interaction between mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which contains STINGS, an important part of the viral-induced RIG-I/MAVS signaling pathway, leading in the end to the inhibition of cytokine, chemokine and type I IFN expression. Mutagenesis analysis showed that hMPV G protein cytoplasmic domain played a major role in the observed inhibitory activity, and recombinant viruses expressing a G protein with amino acid substitution in position 2 and 3 recapitulated most of the phenotype observed with rhMPV-ΔG mutant upon infection of airway epithelial cells.

  17. Effect of temperature on plant elongation and cell wall extensibility.

    PubMed

    Pietruszka, M; Lewicka, S

    2007-03-01

    Lockhart equation was derived for explaining plant cell expansion where both cell wall extension and water uptake must occur concomitantly. Its fundamental contribution was to express turgor pressure explicitly in terms of osmosis and wall mechanics. Here we present a new equation in which pressure is determined by temperature. It also accounts for the role of osmosis and consequently the role of water uptake in growing cell. By adopting literature data, we also attempt to report theoretically the close relation between plant elongation and cell wall extensibility. This is accomplished by the modified equation of growth solved for various temperatures in case of two different species. The results enable to interpret empirical data in terms of our model and fully confirm its applicability to the investigation of the problem of plant cell extensibility in function of environmental temperature. Moreover, by separating elastic effects from growth process we specified the characteristic temperature common for both processes which corresponds to the resonance energy of biochemical reactions as well as to the rapid softening of the elastic modes toward the high temperature end where we encountered viscoelastic and/or plastic behavior as dominating. By introducing analytical formulae connected with growth and elastic properties of the cell wall, we conclude with the statement how these both processes contribute quantitatively to the resonance-like shape of the elongation curve. In addition, the tension versus temperature "phase diagram" for a living plant cell is presented.

  18. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael H.; Holman, Tara J.; Sørensen, Iben; Cancho-Sanchez, Ester; Wells, Darren M.; Swarup, Ranjan; Knox, J. Paul; Willats, William G. T.; Ubeda-Tomás, Susana; Holdsworth, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Vissenberg, Kris; Hodgman, T. Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans and glycoproteins present in the cell walls of these sections, and identified the expected decrease in pectin and increase in xylan from the meristematic zone (MS), through the rapid and late elongation zones (REZ, LEZ) to the maturation zone and the rest of the root, including the emerging lateral roots. Other compositional changes included extensin and xyloglucan levels peaking in the REZ and increasing levels of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP) epitopes from the MS to the LEZ, which remained high through the subsequent mature zones. Immuno-staining using the same antibodies identified the tissue and (sub)cellular localization of many epitopes. Extensins were localized in epidermal and cortex cell walls, while AGP glycans were specific to different tissues from root-hair cells to the stele. The transcriptome analysis found several gene families peaking in the REZ. These included a large family of peroxidases (which produce the reactive oxygen species (ROS) needed for cell expansion), and three xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase genes (XTH17, XTH18, and XTH19). The significance of the latter may be related to a role in breaking and re-joining xyloglucan cross-bridges between cellulose microfibrils, a process which is required for wall expansion. Knockdowns of these XTHs resulted in shorter root lengths, confirming a role of the corresponding proteins in root extension

  19. A new method for extraction of pectin from cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, N.O.; Mort, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Pectin is often extracted from plant tissues using the Ca{sup ++} chelators ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) or cyclohexane-trans-1,2 diamine tetraacetate (CDTA). While these chelators are effective in solubilizing pectin, even after extensive dialysis against distilled water, EDTA or CDTA remains associated with the pectin. The authors have found that if 500 mM imidazole buffer, pH 7.0 is substituted for 50 mM CDTA, pH 6.5, and for equivalent extraction periods, an equivalent amount of pectin with the same sugar composition is extracted. But, the imidazole buffer can be dialyzed away completely into distilled water. Their alternative procedure for extraction of pectin from cell walls will be presented. Utilization of the procedure for extraction of whole cell walls or cell walls pretreated with liquid hydrogen fluoride is discussed.

  20. Freezing stresses and hydration of isolated cell walls.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yonghyeon; Pope, Jim; Wolfe, Joe

    2003-06-01

    The hydration of the cell walls of the giant alga Chara australis was measured as a function of temperature using quantitative deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of samples hydrated with D2O. At temperatures 23-5K below freezing, the hydration ratio (the ratio of mass of unfrozen water in microscopic phases in the cell wall to the dry mass) increases slowly with increasing temperature from about 0.2 to 0.4. It then rises rapidly with temperature in the few Kelvin below the freezing temperature. The linewidth of the NMR signal varies approximately linearly with the reciprocal of the hydration ratio, and with the freezing point depression or water potential. These empirical relations may be useful in estimating cell wall water contents in heterogeneous samples.

  1. [Stem and progenitor cells in biostructure of blood vessel walls].

    PubMed

    Korta, Krzysztof; Kupczyk, Piotr; Skóra, Jan; Pupka, Artur; Zejler, Paweł; Hołysz, Marcin; Gajda, Mariusz; Nowakowska, Beata; Barć, Piotr; Dorobisz, Andrzej T; Dawiskiba, Tomasz; Szyber, Piotr; Bar, Julia

    2013-09-18

    Development of vascular and hematopoietic systems during organogenesis occurs at the same time. During vasculogenesis, a small part of cells does not undergo complete differentiation but stays on this level, "anchored" in tissue structures described as stem cell niches. The presence of blood vessels within tissue stem cell niches is typical and led to identification of niches and ensures that they are functioning. The three-layer biostructure of vessel walls for artery and vein, tunica: intima, media and adventitia, for a long time was defined as a mechanical barrier between vessel light and the local tissue environment. Recent findings from vascular biology studies indicate that vessel walls are dynamic biostructures, which are equipped with stem and progenitor cells, described as vascular wall-resident stem cells/progenitor cells (VW-SC/PC). Distinct zones for vessel wall harbor heterogeneous subpopulations of VW-SC/PC, which are described as "subendothelial or vasculogenic zones". Recent evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies show that prenatal activity of stem and progenitor cells is not only limited to organogenesis but also exists in postnatal life, where it is responsible for vessel wall homeostasis, remodeling and regeneration. It is believed that VW-SC/PC could be engaged in progression of vascular disorders and development of neointima. We would like to summarize current knowledge about mesenchymal and progenitor stem cell phenotype with special attention to distribution and biological properties of VW-SC/PC in biostructures of intima, media and adventitia niches. It is postulated that in the near future, niches for VW-SC/PC could be a good source of stem and progenitor cells, especially in the context of vessel tissue bioengineering as a new alternative to traditional revascularization therapies.

  2. Novel insights of ethylene role in strawberry cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Natalia M; Marina, María; Nardi, Cristina F; Civello, Pedro M; Martínez, Gustavo A

    2016-11-01

    Due to its organoleptic and nutraceutical qualities, strawberry fruit (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) is a worldwide important commodity. The role of ethylene in the regulation of strawberry cell wall metabolism was studied in fruit from Toyonoka cultivar harvested at white stage, when most changes associated with fruit ripening have begun. Fruit were treated with ethephon, an ethylene-releasing reagent, or with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action, maintaining a set of non-treated fruit as controls for each condition. Ethephon treated-fruit showed higher contents of hemicelluloses, cellulose and neutral sugars regarding controls, while 1-MCP-treated fruit showed a lower amount of those fractions. On the other hand, ethephon-treated fruit presented a lower quantity of galacturonic acid from ionically and covalently bound pectins regarding controls, while 1-MCP-treated fruit showed higher contents of those components. We also explored the ethylene effect over the mRNA accumulation of genes related to pectins and hemicelluloses metabolism, and a relationship between gene expression patterns and cell wall polysaccharides contents was shown. Moreover, we detected that strawberry necrotrophic pathogens growth more easily on plates containing cell walls from ethephon-treated fruit regarding controls, while a lower growth rate was observed when cell walls from 1-MCP treated fruit were used as the only carbon source, suggesting an effect of ethylene on cell wall structure. Around 60% of strawberry cell wall is made up of pectins, which in turns is 70% made by homogalacturonans. Our findings support the idea of a central role for pectins on strawberry fruit softening and a participation of ethylene in the regulation of this process.

  3. Increased chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cell lines treated with novel functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yijun; Weng, Ziyi; Wang, Chuanying; Zhu, Mingjie; Lu, Yunshu; Ding, Longlong; Wang, Yongkun; Cheng, Xianhua; Lin, Qing; Wu, Kejin

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major cause of treatment resistance in breast cancer. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) exhibit unique properties that make them promising candidates for breast cancer treatment. In the present study, a new functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube carrying oxygen was synthesized; it was determined whether this material could increase chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cell lines, and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. MDA-MB-231 cells growing in folic acid (FA) free medium, MDA-MB-231 cells growing in medium containing FA and ZR-75-1 cells were treated with chemotherapy drugs or radiotherapy with or without tombarthite-modified-FA-chitosan (R-O2-FA-CHI)-SWCNTs under hypoxic conditions, and the cell viability was determined by water-soluble tetrazolium salts-1 assay. The cell surviving fractions were determined by colony forming assay. Cell apoptosis induction was monitored by flow cytometry. Expression of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), survivin, hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α (HIF-1α), multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1), P-glycoprotein (P-gp), RAD51 and Ku80 was monitored by western blotting. The novel synthesized R-O2-FA-CHI-SWCNTs were able to significantly enhance the chemosensitivity and radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cell lines and the material exhibited its expected function by downregulating the expression of Bcl-2, survivin, HIF-1α, P-gp, MRP-1, RAD51 and Ku80. PMID:28123543

  4. Reduced cell surface expression of processed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in the presence of Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, O; Rivière, Y; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1993-01-01

    nef genes from two laboratory grown human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and from two proviruses that had not been propagated in vitro were introduced into CD4+ lymphoblastoid CEM cells. The stable expression of all four Nef proteins was associated with an almost complete abrogation of CD4 cell surface localization. The consequences of the presence of Nef on gp160 cleavage, gp120 surface localization, and envelope-induced cytopathic effect were examined in CEM cells in which the HIV-1 env gene was expressed from a vaccinia virus vector. The presence of Nef did not modify the processing of gp160 into its subunits but resulted in a significant decrease of cell surface levels of gp120, associated with a dramatic reduction of the fusion-mediated cell death. Surface levels of mutant envelope glycoproteins unable to bind CD4 were not altered in Nef-expressing cells, suggesting that the phenomenon was CD4 dependent. The intracellular accumulation of fully processed envelope glycoproteins could significantly delay the cytopathic effect associated with envelope surface expression in HIV-infected cells and may be relevant to the selective advantage associated with Nef during the in vivo infectious process. Images PMID:8497051

  5. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  6. Cell Walls and the Convergent Evolution of the Viral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Jan P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Why some viruses are enveloped while others lack an outer lipid bilayer is a major question in viral evolution but one that has received relatively little attention. The viral envelope serves several functions, including protecting the RNA or DNA molecule(s), evading recognition by the immune system, and facilitating virus entry. Despite these commonalities, viral envelopes come in a wide variety of shapes and configurations. The evolution of the viral envelope is made more puzzling by the fact that nonenveloped viruses are able to infect a diverse range of hosts across the tree of life. We reviewed the entry, transmission, and exit pathways of all (101) viral families on the 2013 International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) list. By doing this, we revealed a strong association between the lack of a viral envelope and the presence of a cell wall in the hosts these viruses infect. We were able to propose a new hypothesis for the existence of enveloped and nonenveloped viruses, in which the latter represent an adaptation to cells surrounded by a cell wall, while the former are an adaptation to animal cells where cell walls are absent. In particular, cell walls inhibit viral entry and exit, as well as viral transport within an organism, all of which are critical waypoints for successful infection and spread. Finally, we discuss how this new model for the origin of the viral envelope impacts our overall understanding of virus evolution. PMID:26378223

  7. P-glycoprotein induction in Caco-2 cells by newly synthetized thioxanthones prevents paraquat cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Palmeira, Andreia; Carmo, Helena; Barbosa, Daniel José; Gameiro, Mariline; Gomes, Ana; Paiva, Ana Mafalda; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The induction of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, has been proposed as a strategy against the toxicity induced by P-gp substrates such as the herbicide paraquat (PQ). The aim of this study was to screen five newly synthetized thioxanthonic derivatives, a group known to interact with P-gp, as potential inducers of the pump's expression and/or activity and to evaluate whether they would afford protection against PQ-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells. All five thioxanthones (20 µM) caused a significant increase in both P-gp expression and activity as evaluated by flow cytometry using the UIC2 antibody and rhodamine 123, respectively. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the tested compounds, when present only during the efflux of rhodamine 123, rapidly induced an activation of P-gp. The tested compounds also increased P-gp ATPase activity in MDR1-Sf9 membrane vesicles, indicating that all derivatives acted as P-gp substrates. PQ cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of four thioxanthone derivatives, and this protective effect was reversed upon incubation with a specific P-gp inhibitor. In silico studies showed that all the tested thioxanthones fitted onto a previously described three-feature P-gp induction pharmacophore. Moreover, in silico interactions between thioxanthones and P-gp in the presence of PQ suggested that a co-transport mechanism may be operating. Based on the in vitro activation results, a pharmacophore model for P-gp activation was built, which will be of further use in the screening for new P-gp activators. In conclusion, the study demonstrated the potential of the tested thioxanthonic compounds in protecting against toxic effects induced by P-gp substrates through P-gp induction and activation.

  8. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-02

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  9. MECHANISM OF CELL WALL PENETRATION BY VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Theodore T.; Lee, Howard H.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of radioactively labelled host cells with T1 or T2 bacteriophages induces a leakage of cellular P and S into the medium. Evidence is presented showing that this increased cell permeability is not the result of complete lysis of a small fraction of the cells, but rather is made up of contributions from all or most of the infected population. This leakage of cellular constituents exhibits the following characteristics: (a) Infection of a cell with a single virus suffices to evoke the reaction; (b) Increasing the multiplicity up to 7 to 8 virus particles per cell does not affect the extent of leakage produced; (c) Some leakage does occur at 0°C., but much less than at 37°C.; (d) Infection by T1 virus results in a smaller amount of leakage than in the case of T2, but the pattern of response to varying virus multiplicity is the same; (e) The P resulting from such leakage contains no DNA and chemically resembles that which elutes in smaller amounts from uninfected cells; (f) At 37°C. the virus-induced leakage reaction appears within a matter of seconds, and usually decreases after 2 to 3 minutes; (g) The reaction is inhibited by 0.025 M Mg++. Theoretical considerations are presented suggesting the place of this reaction in the sequence of events constituting the virus penetration reaction; its relationship to the phenomenon of lysis-from-without; and its resemblance to the leakage reaction produced by electrostatic binding of ionized compounds to cell surfaces. The existence of similar effects in avian-mammalian virus systems is noted. PMID:13163323

  10. A novel way to spread drug resistance in tumor cells: functional intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1)

    PubMed Central

    Ambudkar, Suresh V.; Sauna, Zuben E.; Gottesman, Michael M.; Szakacs, Gergely

    2005-01-01

    Intercellular transfer of proteins is a mode of communication between cells that is crucial for certain physiological processes. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for ~50% of all cancers. However, multidrug resistance mediated by drug-efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) minimizes the effectiveness of such therapy in a large number of patients. A new study demonstrates the functional intercellular transfer of Pgp. Non-genetic transfer of the multidrug resistance phenotype raises fascinating questions about the mechanism and regulation of cell-surface membrane-protein-mediated spread of traits. PMID:15978680

  11. Interaction of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium with Dendritic Cells Is Defined by Targeting to Compartments Lacking Lysosomal Membrane Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Jungnitz, Heidrun; Rohde, Manfred; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the generation of acquired immunity to infections by pathogenic microorganisms. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium is known to survive and proliferate intracellularly within macrophages and nonphagocytic cells, but no data exist on how this pathogen interacts with DCs. In this report, we show the capacity of serotype Typhimurium to survive within the established mouse DC line CB1. In contrast to the case for the macrophage model, the compartments of DCs containing serotype Typhimurium are devoid of lysosomal membrane glycoproteins and the PhoPQ two-component regulatory system is not essential for pathogen intracellular survival. PMID:10768999

  12. Domain conservation in several volvocalean cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Woessner, J P; Molendijk, A J; van Egmond, P; Klis, F M; Goodenough, U W; Haring, M A

    1994-11-01

    Based on our previous work demonstrating that (SerPro)x epitopes are common to extensin-like cell wall proteins in Chlamydomonas' reinhardtii, we looked for similar proteins in the distantly related species C. eugametos. Using a polyclonal antiserum against a (SerPro)10 oligopeptide, we found distinct sets of stage-specific polypeptides immunoprecipitated from in vitro translations of C. eugametos RNA. Screening of a C. eugametos cDNA expression library with the antiserum led to the isolation of a cDNA (WP6) encoding a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. Analysis of a similarly selected cDNA (VSP-3) from a C. reinhardtii cDNA expression library revealed that it also coded for a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. The C-terminal rod domains of VSP-3 and WP6 are highly homologous, while the N-terminal domains are dissimilar; however, the N-terminal domain of VSP-3 is homologous to the globular domain of a cell wall protein from Volvox carteri. Exon shuffling might be responsible for this example of domain conservation over 350 million years of volvocalean cell wall protein evolution.

  13. A model of cell wall expansion based on thermodynamics of polymer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veytsman, B. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of cell wall extension is proposed. It is shown that macroscopic properties of cell walls can be explained through the microscopic properties of interpenetrating networks of cellulose and hemicellulose. The qualitative conclusions of the theory agree with the existing experimental data. The dependence of the cell wall yield threshold on the secretion of the wall components is discussed.

  14. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-specific proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses in humans immunized with an HSF type 2 glycoprotein subunit vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, J.M.; Moran, P.A.; Brewer, L.; Ashley, R.; Corey, L.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether immunization of humans with a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein-subunit vaccine would result in the priming of both HSV-specific proliferating cells and cytotoxic T cells. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from all eight vaccinees studied responded by proliferating after stimulation with HSV-2, HSV-1, and glycoprotein gB-1. The PBL of five of these eight vaccinees proliferated following stimulation with gD-2, whereas stimulation with Gd-1 resulted in relatively low or no proliferative responses. T-cell clones were generated from HSV-2-stimulated PBL of three vaccinees who demonstrated strong proliferative responses to HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of 12 clones studied in lymphoproliferative assays, 9 were found to be cross-reactive for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Of the approximately 90 T-cell clones isolated, 14 demonstrated HSV-specific cytotoxic activity. Radioimmunoprecipitation-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analyses confirmed that the vaccinees had antibodies only to HSV glycoproteins, not to proteins which are absent in the subunit vaccine, indicating that these vaccinees had not become infected with HSV. Immunization of humans with an HSV-2 glycoprotein-subunit vaccine thus results in the priming of T cells that proliferate in response to stimulation with HSV and its glycoproteins and T cells that have cytotoxic activity against HSV-infected cells. Such HSV-specific memory T cells were detected as late as 2 years following the last boost with the subunit vaccine.

  15. Surface expression of influenza virus neuraminidase, an amino-terminally anchored viral membrane glycoprotein, in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L V; Compans, R W; Davis, A R; Bos, T J; Nayak, D P

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated the site of surface expression of the neuraminidase (NA) glycoprotein of influenza A virus, which, in contrast to the hemagglutinin, is bound to membranes by hydrophobic residues near the NH2-terminus. Madin-Darby canine kidney or primary African green monkey kidney cells infected with influenza A/WSN/33 virus and subsequently labeled with monoclonal antibody to the NA and then with a colloidal gold- or ferritin-conjugated second antibody exhibited specific labeling of apical surfaces. Using simian virus 40 late expression vectors, we also studied the surface expression of the complete NA gene (SNC) and a truncated NA gene (SN10) in either primary or a polarized continuous line (MA104) of African green monkey kidney cells. The polypeptides encoded by the cloned NA cDNAs were expressed on the surface of both cell types. Analysis of [3H]mannose-labeled polypeptides from recombinant virus-infected MA104 cells showed that the products of cloned NA cDNA comigrated with glycosylated NA from influenza virus-infected cells. Both the complete and the truncated glycoproteins were found to be preferentially expressed on apical plasma membranes, as detected by immunogold labeling. These results indicate that the NA polypeptide contains structural features capable of directing the transport of the protein to apical cell surfaces and the first 10 amino-terminal residues of the NA polypeptide are not involved in this process. Images PMID:3016520

  16. Cell-wall composition and structure of yeast cells and conjugation tubes of Tremella mesenterica.

    PubMed

    Reid, I D; Bartnicki-Garcia, S

    1976-09-01

    Cell walls prepared from vegetative yeast cells and from hormone-induced conjugation tubes of the basidiomycete Tremella mesenterica had similar compositions. Evidence was found for 1,3-alpha-glucan (yeast 38%, tube 25%), 1,3-beta-1,6-beta-glucan (yeast 33%, tube 48%) and chitin (both less than 3%) in the walls. The walls also contained xylose (5 to 7%), mannose (6%), glucuronic acid (approx. 2%), and traces of galactose. Protein amounted to less than 2% of the wall weight. The cell capsule was very insoluble and could not be removed from the cell wall. The conjugation hormone did not appear to exert its effect on cell shape by causing gross changes in wall composition.

  17. An Arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Taylor-Teeples, M.; Lin, L.; de Lucas, M.; ...

    2014-12-24

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. In this paper, we present a protein–DNA network between Arabidopsis thaliana transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated bymore » a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. Finally, these interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component.« less

  18. Wood Contains a Cell-Wall Structural Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wuli; O'Malley, David M.; Sederoff, Ronald R.

    1992-07-01

    A pine extensin-like protein (PELP) has been localized in metabolically active cells of differentiating xylem and in mature wood of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). This proline-rich glycosylated protein was purified from cell walls of differentiating xylem by differential solubility and gel electrophoresis. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against the deglycosylated purified protein (dPELP) and purified antibody was used for immunolocalization. Immunogold and alkaline phosphatase secondary antibody staining both show antigen in secondary cell walls of earlywood and less staining in latewood. Immunoassays of milled dry wood were developed and used to show increased availability of antigen after hydrogen fluoride or cellulase treatment and decreased antigen after chlorite treatment. The specificity of the antigen-antibody reaction was confirmed by competition assays and by preadsorption of antibody to the purified protein. We propose that extensin-like protein is present in xylem cell walls during lignification and that the protein remains as a structural component of cell walls in wood for many years after xylogenesis. We suggest that such structural proteins play important roles in the differentiation of xylem and thereby could affect the properties of wood.

  19. Post-translational folding of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF: defective processing in cells expressing the cloned gene.

    PubMed

    Szepanski, S; Veit, M; Pleschka, S; Klenk, H D; Schmidt, M F; Herrler, G

    1994-05-01

    The post-translational processing of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF was analysed. In cells infected with influenza C virus, HEF protein is synthesized as a glycosylated 80K polypeptide. A post-translational conformational rearrangement involving the formation of intramolecular disulphide bonds results in a decrease in its electrophoretic mobility. Therefore, SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions suggests an Mr of about 100K, whereas under reducing conditions an 80K protein is observed which is in accordance with the sequence data. The 100K form was detected 10 min after synthesis of HEF, and transport to the cell surface took about 60 min. This result indicates that the conformational change presumably occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum. A difference in post-translational processing was observed when the HEF gene was expressed in the absence of other influenza C virus genes. In cells infected with recombinant simian virus 40, the 80K precursor was synthesized, but this protein was neither converted to the 100K form nor transported to the cell surface. Deletion of the short cytoplasmic tail of HEF (Arg-Thr-Lys) or replacement of the two basic amino acids by hydrophobic (Ile) or acidic residues (Glu) resulted in HEF protein which was partially converted to the 100K form. Influenza C virus glycoprotein obtained after transient expression of the HEF gene using the vaccinia virus system was completely converted to the 100K form. However, in neither expression system was HEF transported to the cell surface. The possibility is discussed that the interaction of HEF with another viral protein is required for the post-translational folding and transport of this glycoprotein. The M protein of influenza C virus is suggested as a candidate for the chaperone which might interact with the cytoplasmic tail of HEF.

  20. Cell-wall recovery after irreversible deformation of wood.

    PubMed

    Keckes, Jozef; Burgert, Ingo; Frühmann, Klaus; Müller, Martin; Kölln, Klaas; Hamilton, Myles; Burghammer, Manfred; Roth, Stephan V; Stanzl-Tschegg, Stefanie; Fratzl, Peter

    2003-12-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of biological materials reside in their complex hierarchical architecture and in specific molecular mechanistic phenomena. The fundamental importance of molecular interactions and bond recovery has been suggested by studies on deformation and fracture of bone and nacre. Like these mineral-based materials, wood also represents a complex nanocomposite with excellent mechanical performance, despite the fact that it is mainly based on polymers. In wood, however, the mechanistic contribution of processes in the cell wall is not fully understood. Here we have combined tensile tests on individual wood cells and on wood foils with simultaneous synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis in order to separate deformation mechanisms inside the cell wall from those mediated by cell-cell interactions. We show that tensile deformation beyond the yield point does not deteriorate the stiffness of either individual cells or foils. This indicates that there is a dominant recovery mechanism that re-forms the amorphous matrix between the cellulose microfibrils within the cell wall, maintaining its mechanical properties. This stick-slip mechanism, rather like Velcro operating at the nanometre level, provides a 'plastic response' similar to that effected by moving dislocations in metals. We suggest that the molecular recovery mechanism in the cell matrix is a universal phenomenon dominating the tensile deformation of different wood tissue types.

  1. Identifying the differences in mechanisms of mycophenolic acid controlling fucose content of glycoproteins expressed in different CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, An; Tsang, Valerie Liu; Markely, Lam R; Kurt, Lutfiye; Huang, Yao-Ming; Prajapati, Shashi; Kshirsagar, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, glycosylation is a critical quality attribute that can modulate the efficacy of a therapeutic glycoprotein. Obtaining a consistent glycoform profile is desired because molecular function can be defined by its carbohydrate structures. Specifically, the fucose content of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins is one of the most important attributes that can significantly affect antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. It is therefore important to understand the fucosylation pathway and be able to control fucosylation at the desired level to match predecessor materials in late stage and biosimilar programs. Several strategies were explored in this study and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was able to finely modulate the fucose content with the least undesired side effects. However, the response was significantly different between CHO cell lines of different lineages. Further experiments were then performed for a deeper understanding of the mechanism of fucosylation in different CHO cell lines. Results indicated that changes in the intracellular nucleotide involved in fucosylation pathway after MPA treatment are the main cause of the differences in fucosylation level response in different CHO cell lines. Differences in MPA metabolism in the various CHO cell lines directly resulted in different levels of afucosylation measured in antibodies produced by the CHO cell lines. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2367-2376. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  3. Titration of Isolated Cell Walls of Lemna minor L 1

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Claudine; Demarty, Maurice; Thellier, Michel

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model has been built to bypass the equation of titration of the cell wall. This equation, which is an extension of the Henderson-Hasselbach equation, underlines the importance of the exchange constant, the ionic strength as well as the rate of neutralization. The model is restricted to the case when the ionization degree is equal to the neutralization degree. The shape of the titration curve is shown to be strongly dependent on the valency of the base used. Experimental results have shown that isolated cell walls bear at least two kinds of sites. The first sites which are titrated after a short time of equilibration are attributed to polyuronic acids (capacity: 0.3 milliequivalents per gram fresh cell walls). The second sites, are obtained after a long time of equilibration (capacity: 1.2 to 1.3 milliequivalents per gram, fresh cell walls). Titrations have been performed with different bases [KOH, NaOH, and Ca(OH)2] and under different ionic strengths. The results obtained with NaOH and KOH do not exhibit any difference of selectivity. Conversely, the sites have a much bigger affinity for the Ca2+ ions than for the monovalent ones. The apparent pKa of the uronic acids was estimated to lie between 3.0 and 3.4; this is consistent with the values obtained with polyuronic acid solutions. PMID:16660868

  4. Imaging of plant cell walls by confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gierlinger, Notburga; Keplinger, Tobias; Harrington, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Raman imaging of plant cell walls represents a nondestructive technique that can provide insights into chemical composition in context with structure at the micrometer level (<0.5 μm). The major steps of the experimental procedure are described: sample preparation (embedding and microcutting), setting the mapping parameters, and finally the calculation of chemical images on the basis of the acquired Raman spectra. Every Raman image is based on thousands of spectra, each being a spatially resolved molecular 'fingerprint' of the cell wall. Multiple components are analyzed within the native cell walls, and insights into polymer composition as well as the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils can be gained. The most labor-intensive step of this process is often the sample preparation, as the imaging approach requires a flat surface of the plant tissue with intact cell walls. After finishing the map (acquisition time is ∼10 min to 10 h, depending on the size of the region of interest and scanning parameters), many possibilities exist for the analysis of spectral data and image generation.

  5. Polymer mobility in cell walls of cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, K. M.; Apperley, D. C.; Cosgrove, D. J.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from the growing region of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hypocotyls and examined by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, in both enzymically active and inactivated states. The rigidity of individual polymer segments within the hydrated cell walls was assessed from the proton magnetic relaxation parameter, T2, and from the kinetics of cross-polarisation from 1H to 13C. The microfibrils, including most of the xyloglucan in the cell wall, as well as cellulose, behaved as very rigid solids. A minor xyloglucan fraction, which may correspond to cross-links between microfibrils, shared a lower level of rigidity with some of the pectic galacturonan. Other pectins, including most of the galactan side-chain residues of rhamnogalacturonan I, were much more mobile and behaved in a manner intermediate between the solid and liquid states. The only difference observed between the enzymically active and inactive cell walls, was the loss of a highly mobile, methyl-esterified galacturonan fraction, as the result of pectinesterase activity.

  6. Determination of carbohydrate profile in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) cell walls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet germplasms USH20, C869, EL55, EL54 were used, and different tissues at different developmental stages were sampled, including dry seeds, germinating seedlings, developing leaves, mature leaves, petioles, hypocotyls, mature roots, flowering stems and inflorescences. Cell Wall Composition An...

  7. Using isolated cell wall xylan to identify recalcitrant oligosaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Herbaceous biomass is a renewable source of carbohydrates with potential for use in microbial conversion to biofuels. Xylan comprises 20-40% of herbaceous biomass cell wall material and its full depolymerization benefits the economics of bioconversion. To understand the limitations of commercial enz...

  8. Biosynthesis and assembly of cell wall polysaccharides in cereal grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, N.C.

    1991-04-01

    We have just completed the second year of a three-year project entitled Biosynthesis assembly of cell wall polysaccharides in cereal grasses.'' We made significant progress on two aspects of cell wall synthesis in grasses and greatly refined gas-liquid and high- performance liquid chromatographic techniques necessary to identify the products of synthesis in vitro and in vivo. First, Dr. David Gibeaut, a post-doctoral associate, devised a convenient procedure for the enrichment of Golgi membranes by flotation centrifugation following initial downward rate-zonal separation. Based on comparison of the IDPase marker enzyme, flotation centrifugation enriched the Golgi apparatus almost 7-fold after the initial downward separation. This system is now used in our studies of the synthesis in vitro of the mixed-linkage {beta}-D-glucan. Second, Gibeaut and I have devised a simple technique to feed radioactive sugars into intact growing seedlings and follow incorporation of radioactivity into and turnover from specific cell wall polysaccharides. The project has also provided a few spin-off projects that have been productive as well. First, in collaboration with the group of Prof. Peter Kaufman, University of Michigan, we examined changes in cell wall structure concomitant with reaction to gravistimulation in the gravisensing oat pulvinus. Second, Dr. Gibeaut developed a simple clean-up procedure for partially methylated alditol derivatives to remove a large amount of undesirable interfering compounds that confound separation of the derivatives by gas-liquid chromatography. 5 refs.

  9. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14590.001 PMID:27304077

  10. A mixture of peptides and sugars derived from plant cell walls increases plant defense responses to stress and attenuates ageing-associated molecular changes in cultured skin cells.

    PubMed

    Apone, Fabio; Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Arciello, Stefania; Tortora, Assunta; Filippini, Lucio; Monoli, Irene; Cucchiara, Mirna; Gibertoni, Simone; Chrispeels, Maarten J; Colucci, Gabriella

    2010-02-15

    Small peptides and aminoacid derivatives have been extensively studied for their effect of inducing plant defense responses, and thus increasing plant tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Similarly to plants, these compounds can activate different signaling pathways in mammalian skin cells as well, leading to the up-regulation of anti-aging specific genes. This suggests the existence of analogous defense response mechanisms, well conserved both in plants and animal cells. In this article, we describe the preparation of a new mixture of peptides and sugars derived from the chemical and enzymatic digestion of plant cell wall glycoproteins. We investigate the multiple roles of this product as potential "biostimulator" to protect plants from abiotic stresses, and also as potential cosmeceutical. In particular, the molecular effects of the peptide/sugar mixture of inducing plant defense responsive genes and protecting cultured skin cells from oxidative burst damages were deeply evaluated.

  11. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  12. Inhibitory effect of glycoprotein isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO on activities of allergy-mediators in compound 48/80-stimulated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the anti-allergy potentials of glycoprotein (90kDa) isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO (OFI glycoprotein) in vivo (ICR mice) and in vitro (RBL-2H3 cells). At first, to know whether the OFI glycoprotein has an inhibitory ability for allergy in vivo, we evaluated the activities of allergy-related factors such as histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in compound 48/80 (8 ml/kg BW)-treated ICR mice. After that, we studied to found the effect for anti-allergy in vitro such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, arachidonic acid, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in compound 48/80 (5 microg/ml)-treated RBL-2H3 cells. Our results showed that the OFI glycoprotein (5 mg/kg) inhibited histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in mice serum. Also OFI glycoprotein (25 microg/ml) has suppressive effects on the expression of MAPK (ERK1/2), and on protein expression of anti-allergic proteins (iNOS and COX-2). Thus, we speculate that the OFI glycoprotein is an example of natural compound that blocks anti-allergic signal transduction pathways.

  13. Glycoprotein C of equine herpesvirus 4 plays a role in viral binding to cell surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Azab, Walid; Tsujimura, Koji; Maeda, Ken; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Mohamed, Yassir Mahgoub; Kato, Kentaro; Matsumura, Tomio; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2010-07-01

    Heparan sulfate moieties of cell surface proteoglycans serve as receptors for several herpesviruses. For herpes simplex virus 1, pseudorabies virus and equine herpesvirus 1, glycoprotein C (gC) homologues have been shown to mediate the binding to cell surface heparan sulfate. However, the role of gC in equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) infection has not yet been analyzed. Using pull-down assay, we first determined that EHV-4 gC as well as gB are heparin-binding glycoproteins. To study the role of gC in EHV-4 infection, we constructed a gC-deletion mutant, WA79DeltagC, where the kanamycin resistant gene was inserted instead of the open reading frame encoding gC. We found that soluble heparin was capable of blocking both wild-type EHV-4 and WA79DeltagC infection of fetal horse kidney. Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with heparinase reduces considerably the ability of both viruses to adsorb to these cells and to form plaques. Similar results were obtained when cellular glycosaminoglycan synthesis was inhibited by chlorate treatment. In addition, we did find that gC protects EHV-4 from complement-mediated neutralization. These results suggest that, like other herpesviruses, EHV-4 gC plays a role in the interaction of the virus with cellular heparan sulfate. Moreover, gC can protect the virus from complement-mediated neutralization.

  14. The role of eukaryotic subtilisin-like endoproteases for the activation of human immunodeficiency virus glycoproteins in natural host cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hallenberger, S; Moulard, M; Sordel, M; Klenk, H D; Garten, W

    1997-01-01

    Proteolytic activation of the precursor envelope glycoproteins gp160 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and gp140 of HIV-2, a prerequisite for viral infection, results in the formation of gp120/gp41 and gp125/gp36, respectively. Cleavage is mediated by cellular proteases. Furin, a member of the eukaryotic subtilisin family, has been shown to be an activating protease for HIV. Here, we compared the presence of furin and other mammalian subtilisins in lymphatic cells and tissues. Northern blot analyses revealed that furin and the recently discovered protease LPC/PC7 were the only subtilisin-like enzymes transcribed in such cells. Furin was identified as an enzymatically active endoprotease present in different lymphocytic, as well as monocytic, cell lines. When expressed from vaccinia virus vectors, the proprotein convertases were correctly processed, transported, and secreted into the media and enzymatically active. Coexpression of different subtilisins with the HIV envelope precursors revealed that furin and LPC/PC7 are able to cleave HIV-1 gp160. Moreover, both enzymes proteolytically processed the envelope precursor of HIV-2. gp140 was also cleaved to some extent by PC1, which is not, however, present in lymphatic cells. Furin- and LPC/PC7-catalyzed cleavage of HIV-1 gp160 resulted in biologically active envelope protein. In conclusion, among the known members of the subtilisin family, only furin and LPC/PC7 fulfill the requirements of a protease responsible for in vivo activation of HIV envelope glycoproteins. PMID:8995623

  15. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions. PMID:26633461

  16. Analysis of cell wall extracts of Candida albicans by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Ponton, J; Jones, J M

    1986-01-01

    Cell walls of intact yeast- and mycelial-phase Candida albicans B311 were extracted with different compounds: dithiothreitol, dithiothreitol with protease, dithiothreitol with lyticase, and dithiothreitol with protease followed by beta-glucuronidase with chitinase. Extracts were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot techniques. Dithiothreitol extracts contained the most satisfactory array of components for study. Analysis of these extracts demonstrated that the outer cell wall layers of Candida blastoconidia and germ tubes contained a complex array of polysaccharides, glycoproteins, and proteins. The proteins contributed to a latticework stabilized by covalent bonds that was important in determining the porosity of the outer cell wall layers. When equivalent weights were analyzed, mycelial-phase extract contained a more varied array of proteins than did yeast-phase extract. Only a portion of proteins in mycelial-phase extract elicited antibody responses in hyperimmunized rabbits or infected humans. A polysaccharide-rich, high-molecular-weight component (migrating at a position that would correspond to proteins having molecular weights of 235,000 to 250,000) and a protein component (molecular weight, 19,000) were readily demonstrable in the mycelial-phase extract but could not be identified in the yeast-phase extract. Images PMID:3527986

  17. Concanavalin A binds to a mannose-containing ligand in the cell wall of some lichen phycobionts.

    PubMed

    Fontaniella, Blanca; Millanes, Ana-María; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, María-Estrella

    2004-12-01

    Concanavalin A, the lectin from Canavalia ensiformis, develops arginase activity depending on Mn(2+). The cation cannot be substituted by Ca(2+) which, in addition, inhibits Mn(2+)-supported activity. Fluorescein-labeled Concanavalin A is able to bind to the cell wall of algal cells recently isolated from Evernia prunastri and Xanthoria parietina thalli. This binding involves a ligand, probably a glycoprotein containing mannose, which can be isolated by affinity chromatography. Analysis by SDS-PAGE reveals that the ligand is a dimeric protein composed by two monomers of 54 and 48 kDa. This ligand shows to be different from the receptor for natural lichen lectins, previously identified as a polygalactosylated urease.

  18. Structure and heterologous expression of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein from Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    PubMed

    Wakai, H; Takada, K; Nakamura, S; Horikoshi, K

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 was cloned and sequenced. The structural gene consisted from an open reading frame of 2,586 bp. A potential promoter sequence was found about 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG revealed that the mature CSG consisted of 828 amino acids. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature sequence. The cloned CSG gene of Ha. japonica was expressed in closely-related halophilic archaea.

  19. A novel curcumin derivative which inhibits P-glycoprotein, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Oliveira, Ana; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Pinto, Madalena; Lima, Raquel T; Sousa, Emília; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2017-01-15

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major limitation to the success of cancer treatment and is highly associated with the overexpression of drug efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In order to achieve more effective chemotherapeutic treatments, it is important to develop P-gp inhibitors to block/decrease its activity. Curcumin (1) is a secondary metabolite isolated from the turmeric of Curcuma longa L.. Diverse biological activities have been identified for this compound, particularly, MDR modulation in various cancer cell models. However, curcumin (1) has low chemical stability, which severely limits its application. In order to improve stability and P-gp inhibitory effect, two potential more stable curcumin derivatives were synthesized as building blocks, followed by several curcumin derivatives. These compounds were then analyzed in terms of antitumor and anti-P-gp activity, in two MDR and sensitive tumor lines (from chronic myeloid leukemia and non-small cell lung cancer). We identified from a series of curcumin derivatives a novel curcumin derivative (1,7-bis(3-methoxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)phenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione, 10) with more potent antitumor and anti-P-gp activity than curcumin (1). This compound (10) was shown to promote cell cycle arrest (at the G2/M phase) and induce apoptosis in the MDR chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. Therefore it is a really interesting P-gp inhibitor due to its ability to inhibit both P-gp function and expression.

  20. Heat shock protein 70 and glycoprotein 96 are differentially expressed on the surface of malignant and nonmalignant breast cells.

    PubMed

    Melendez, Karla; Wallen, Erik S; Edwards, Bruce S; Mobarak, Charlotte D; Bear, David G; Moseley, Pope L

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are important for a number of different intracellular functions, are occasionally found on the surface of cells. The function of heat shock protein on the cell surface is not understood, although it has been shown to be greater in some tumor cells and some virally infected cells. Surface expression of both glycoprotein 96 (gp96) and Hsp70 occurs on tumor cells, and this expression correlates with natural killer cell killing of the cells. We examined the surface expression of gp96 and Hsp70 on human breast cell lines MCF7, MCF10A, AU565, and HS578, and in primary human mammary epithelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The nonmalignant cell lines HS578, MCF10A, and HMEC showed no surface expression of gp96, whereas malignant cell lines MCF7 and AU565 were positive for gp96 surface expression. All of the breast cell lines examined showed Hsp70 surface expression. These results also confirm previous studies, demonstrating that Hsp70 is on the plasma membrane of tumor cell lines. Given the involvement of heat shock proteins, gp96 and Hsp70, in innate and adaptive immunity, these observations may be important in the immune response to tumor cells.

  1. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells is increased by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Buettner, Manuela; Naim, Hassan Y.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) significantly contribute to BBB function. Multiple signaling pathways modulate the expression and activity of Pgp in response to xenobiotics and disease. A non-genetic way of intercellular transfer of Pgp occurs in cancer cells, but whether this also occurs in non-cancer cells such as endothelial cells that form the BBB is not known. A human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) was used to study whether cell-to-cell Pgp transfer occurs during co-culturing with Pgp-EGFP expressing hCMEC/D3 cells. The Pgp-EGFP fusion protein was transferred from donor to recipient cells by cell-to-cell contact and Pgp-EGFP enriched vesicles, which were exocytosed by donor cells and endocytosed by adherent recipient cells. Flow cytometry experiments with the Pgp substrate eFLUXX-ID Gold demonstrated that the transferred Pgp is functional in the recipient cells. Exposure of the donor cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) resulted in an enhanced intercellular Pgp transfer. Non-genetic transfer of a resistance phenotype and its regulation by HDACs is a novel mechanism of altering BBB functionality. This mechanism may have important implications for understanding drug-induced alterations in Pgp expression and activity. PMID:27375084

  2. Engineering of plant cell walls for enhanced biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V; Pauly, Markus

    2015-06-01

    The biomass of plants consists predominately of cell walls, a sophisticated composite material composed of various polymer networks including numerous polysaccharides and the polyphenol lignin. In order to utilize this renewable, highly abundant resource for the production of commodity chemicals such as biofuels, major hurdles have to be surpassed to reach economical viability. Recently, major advances in the basic understanding of the synthesis of the various wall polymers and its regulation has enabled strategies to alter the qualitative composition of wall materials. Such emerging strategies include a reduction/alteration of the lignin network to enhance polysaccharide accessibility, reduction of polymer derived processing inhibitors, and increases in polysaccharides with a high hexose/pentose ratio.

  3. Influence of colchicine and vinblastine on the intracellular migration of secretory and membrane glycoproteins: I. Inhibition of glycoprotein migration in various rat cell types as shown by light microscope radioautography after injection of 3H-fucose

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.; Parsons, S.; Carlet, E.

    1984-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that colchicine and vinblastine inhibit secretion in many cell types by interrupting the normal intracellular migration of secretory products. In the present work, radioautography has been used to study the effects of these drugs on migration of membrane and secretory glycoproteins in a variety of cell types. Young (40 gm) rats were given a single intravenous injection of colchicine (4.0 mg) or vinblastine (2.0 mg). At 10 min after colchicine and 30 min after vinblastine administration, the rats were injected with 3H-fucose. Control rats received 3H-fucose only. All rats were sacrificed 90 min after 3H-fucose injection and their tissues processed for light microscope radioautography. Examination of secretory cell types such as ameloblasts and thyroid follicular cells in control animals revealed reactions of approximately equal intensity over the Golgi region and over extracellular secretion products, while in drug-treated rats most of the reaction was confined to the Golgi region. In a variety of other cell types, including endocrine cells (e.g., hepatocytes) and cells generally considered as nonsecretory (e.g., intestinal columnar cells), reaction in control animals occurred both over the Golgi region and over various portions of the cell surface. In drug-treated animals, a strong Golgi reaction was present, but reaction over the cell surface was weak or absent. These results indicate that in many cell types, colchicine and vinblastine inhibit migration out of the Golgi region not only of secretory glycoproteins, but also of membrane glycoproteins destined for the plasma membrane.

  4. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed.

  5. Endothelial Lu/BCAM glycoproteins are novel ligands for red blood cell alpha4beta1 integrin: role in adhesion of sickle red blood cells to endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    El Nemer, Wassim; Wautier, Marie-Paule; Rahuel, Cécile; Gane, Pierre; Hermand, Patricia; Galactéros, Frédéric; Wautier, Jean-Luc; Cartron, Jean-Pierre; Colin, Yves; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2007-04-15

    The Lutheran (Lu) blood group and basal cell adhesion molecule (BCAM) antigens are both carried by 2 glycoprotein isoforms of the immunoglobulin superfamily representing receptors for the laminin alpha(5) chain. In addition to red blood cells, Lu/BCAM proteins are highly expressed in endothelial cells. Abnormal adhesion of red blood cells to the endothelium could potentially contribute to the vaso-occlusive episodes in sickle cell disease. Considering the presence of integrin consensus-binding sites in Lu/BCAM proteins, we investigated their potential interaction with integrin alpha(4)beta(1), the unique integrin expressed on immature circulating sickle red cells. Using cell adhesion assays under static and flow conditions, we demonstrated that integrin alpha(4)beta(1) expressed on transfected cells bound to chimeric Lu-Fc protein. We showed that epinephrine-stimulated sickle cells, but not control red cells, adhered to Lu-Fc via integrin alpha(4)beta(1) under flow conditions. Antibody-mediated activation of integrin alpha(4)beta(1) induced adhesion of sickle red cells to primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells; this adhesion was inhibited by soluble Lu-Fc and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1)-Fc proteins. This novel interaction between integrin alpha(4)beta(1) in sickle red cells and endothelial Lu/BCAM proteins could participate in sickle cell adhesion to endothelium and potentially play a role in vaso-occlusive episodes.

  6. Cell wall metabolism in Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger: accumulation of wall polymers in the supernatant of chemostat cultures.

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, W; Kruyssen, F J; Wouters, J T

    1981-01-01

    Cell wall polymers were measured both in the cells and in the cell-free medium of samples from steady-state chemostat cultures of Bacillus subtilis, growing at various rates under magnesium or phosphate limitation. The presence of both peptidoglycan and anionic wall polymers in the culture supernatant showed the occurrence of wall turnover in these cultures. Variable proportions of the total peptidoglycan present in the culture samples were found outside the cells in duplicate cultures, indicating that the rate of peptidoglycan turnover is variable in B. subtilis. Besides peptidoglycan, anionic wall polymers were detected in the culture supernatant: teichoic acid in magnesium-limited cultures and teichuronic acid in phosphate-limited cultures. In several samples, the ratio between the peptidoglycan and the anionic polymer concentrations was significantly lower in the extracellular fluid than in the walls. This divergency was attributed to the occurrence of direct secretion of anionic polymers after their synthesis. PMID:6787016

  7. Dynamic rheological properties of plant cell-wall particle dispersions.

    PubMed

    Day, Li; Xu, Mi; Øiseth, Sofia K; Lundin, Leif; Hemar, Yacine

    2010-12-01

    The rheological behaviour of plant cell-wall particle dispersions was investigated using dynamic oscillatory measurements. Two starting plant materials, broccoli stem and carrot were used and two types of particles were obtained by mechanically shearing blanched (80°C, 10 min) or cooked (100°C, 15 min) plant tissues. Blanching resulted in cell-wall particles made up of a collection of clusters of cells with an average particles size of ∼200 μm, while cooking generated nearly all single-cell particles with an average particle size of ∼80 μm. The rheological measurements showed that in the range of weight concentrations considered (∼0.5% to ∼8%) the dispersions behaved as elastic materials with the elastic modulus G' higher than G″ within the frequency range (0.01-10 Hz). This study shows that the behaviour of the complex modulus G* as a function of the effective volume fraction ϕ can be modelled using different theoretical equations. To do so, it is assumed that below a critical volume fraction ϕc a network of plant cell-wall particles was formed and G* as a function of ϕ obeys a power-law relationship. However above ϕc, where the particles were highly packed, G* could be modelled using theoretical equations developed for concentrated emulsions and elastic particle dispersions.

  8. The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, encoding a putative N-acetylglucosamine transferase, is involved in cell wall architecture and virulence.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. Δgnt2 mutants had αalterations in cell wall properties related to terminal αor β-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. Δgnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity.

  9. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  10. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng; Ronald, Palmela; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  11. Restrictive glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor synthesis in cwh6/gpi3 yeast cells causes aberrant biogenesis of cell wall proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Vossen, J H; Müller, W H; Lipke, P N; Klis, F M

    1997-01-01

    We previously reported that the defects in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cwh6 Calcofluor white-hypersensitive cell wall mutant are caused by a mutation in SPT14/GPI3, a gene involved in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor biosynthesis. Here we describe the effect of cwh6/spt14/gpi3 on the biogenesis of cell wall proteins. It was found that the release of precursors of cell wall proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was retarded. This was accompanied by proliferation of ER structures. The majority of the cell wall protein precursors that eventually left the ER were not covalently incorporated into the cell wall but were secreted into the growth medium. Despite the inefficient incorporation of cell wall proteins, there was no net effect on the protein level in the cell wall. It is postulated that the availability of GPI-dependent cell wall proteins determines the rate of cell wall construction and limits growth rate. PMID:9079905

  12. Machupo Virus Glycoprotein Determinants for Human Transferrin Receptor 1 Binding and Cell Entry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    and SABV [17,18], and a major determinant of host adaptation. However, studies on receptor use and cellular tropism suggest that the non-pathogenic...938–948. 19. Oldenburg J, Reignier T, Flanagan ML, Hamilton GA, Cannon PM (2007) Differences in tropism and pH dependence for glycoproteins from the...2010) Investigation of clade B New World arenavirus tropism by using chimeric GP1 proteins. J Virol 84: 1176–1182. 24. Bowden TA, Crispin M, Graham SC

  13. Topology and Function of Human p-Glycoprotein in Multidrug Resistant Breast Cancer Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    analysis and both drug transport and regulation of swelling-activated chloride currents were examined. To date our results are incomplete to draw any...glycoprotein, topology, 15. NUMBEROF PAGES Breast Cancer 32 swelling-activated chloride currents 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18. SECURITY... CFTR ) (1;2). This superfamily is generally characterized by a structural motif, which contains two homologous halves, each consisting of six

  14. Posttranslational modifications of Sindbis virus glycoproteins: electrophoretic analysis of pulse-chase-labeled infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bonatti, S; Cancedda, F D

    1982-01-01

    Cytoplasmic extracts prepared from Sindbis virus-infected chicken embryo fibroblasts pulse-chase-labeled with [35S]methionine 6 h postinfection were analyzed on a highly resolving sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel either directly or after various treatments. The results we obtained suggest that (i) the proteolytic cleavage which converts PE2 to E2 glycoprotein takes place intracellularly, before or at least during the formation of complex-type oligosaccharide side chains; and (ii) E1 glycoprotein undergoes a complex maturation pattern. Newly synthesized E1 has a molecular weight of 53,000: shortly thereafter, this 53,000 (53K) form was converted to a 50K form. Subsequently, the 50K form decreased its apparent molecular weight progressively and eventually comigrated with E1 glycoprotein present in the extracellular virus, which displays a molecular weight of 51,000 to 52,000. The conversion of the 53K to the 50K form was not the result of a proteolytic processing and did not depend on glycosylation or disulfide bridge formation and exchange. The possible mechanisms of this conversion are discussed. The second conversion step (from the 50K to the 51-52K form) was due to the formation of complex-type oligosaccharide and was reversed by incubating the cellular extracts with neuraminidase before electrophoretic analysis. Images PMID:7045394

  15. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    SciTech Connect

    Imber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast ..cap alpha../sub 2/-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-..cap alpha../sub 2/M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal ..cap alpha..(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -..cap alpha../sub 2/M forms, ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-trypsin and ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-MeNH/sub 2/ cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins.

  16. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Jose; Caba, Octavio; Cabeza, Laura; Berdasco, Maria; Gónzalez, Beatriz; Melguizo, Consolación

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of temozolomide (TMZ) has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR) complex, P-glycoprotein, and/or the presence of cancer stem cells may also be implicated. Methods Four nervous system tumor cell lines were used to analyze the modulation of MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation by TMZ treatment. Furthermore, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine was used to demethylate the MGMT promoter and O(6)-benzylguanine to block GMT activity. In addition, MMR complex and P-glycoprotein expression were studied before and after TMZ exposure and correlated with MGMT expression. Finally, the effect of TMZ exposure on CD133 expression was analyzed. Results Our results showed two clearly differentiated groups of tumor cells characterized by low (A172 and LN229) and high (SF268 and SK-N-SH) basal MGMT expression. Interestingly, cell lines with no MGMT expression and low TMZ IC50 showed a high MMR complex expression, whereas cell lines with high MGMT expression and high TMZ IC50 did not express the MMR complex. In addition, modulation of MGMT expression in A172 and LN229 cell lines was accompanied by a significant increase in the TMZ IC50, whereas no differences were observed in SF268 and SK-N-SH cell lines. In contrast, P-glycoprotein and CD133 was found to be unrelated to TMZ resistance in these cell lines. Conclusions These results may be relevant in understanding the phenomenon of TMZ resistance, especially in glioblastoma multiforme patients laking MGMT expression, and may also aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of TMZ in glioblastoma

  17. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall.

  18. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Hayot, Céline M.; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic parameters of the walls of same-age similarly positioned cells of the Arabidopsis ecotypes (Col 0 and Ws 2). The technique is also shown to be sensitive enough to detect changes in cell wall properties in cells deficient in the activity of the chromatin modifier ATX1. Extensive computational modelling of the experimental measurements (i.e. modelling the cell as a viscoelastic pressure vessel) is used to analyse the influence of the wall thickness, as well as the turgor pressure, at the positions of our measurements. By combining the nanoDMA technique with finite element simulations quantifiable measurements of the viscoelastic properties of plant cell walls are achieved. Such techniques are expected to find broader applications in quantifying the influence of genetic, biological, and environmental factors on the nanoscale mechanical properties of the cell wall. PMID:22291130

  19. T-helper cell and associated antibody response to synthetic peptides of the E glycoprotein of Murray Valley encephalitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, J H; Allan, J E; Roehrig, J T; Brubaker, J R; Uren, M F; Hunt, A R

    1991-01-01

    A battery of 16 synthetic peptides, selected primarily by computer analysis for predicted B- and T-cell epitopes, was prepared from the deduced amino acid sequence of the envelope (E) glycoprotein of Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE) virus. We examined all of the peptides for T-helper (Th)-cell recognition and antibody induction in three strains of mice: C57BL/6, BALB/c, and C3H. Lymphoproliferative and interleukin-2 assays were performed on splenic T cells from mice inoculated with peptides in Freund's incomplete adjuvant or with MVE virus. Several peptides found to contain predicted T-cell epitopes elicited a Th-cell response in at least one strain of mice, usually with a concomitant antibody response. Peptides 145 (amino acids 145 to 169) and 17 (amino acids 356 to 376) were strongly recognized by T cells from all three inbred strains of mice. Peptide 06 (amino acids 230 to 251) primed C57BL/6 mice for Th- and B-cell reactivity with native MVE virus, and T cells from virus-immune mice were stimulated by this peptide. Peptide 06 was recognized by several Th-cell clones prepared from mice immunized with MVE, West Nile, or Kunjin virus. These results indicate that it may be feasible to design synthetic flavivirus peptides that define T-cell epitopes capable of generating a helper cell response for B-cell epitopes involved in protective immunity. PMID:1832722

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  4. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  5. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  6. Glycoprotein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  7. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  8. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  9. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  10. Penium margaritaceum as a model organism for cell wall analysis of expanding plant cells.

    PubMed

    Rydahl, Maja G; Fangel, Jonatan U; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Johansen, I Elisabeth; Andreas, Amanda; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Jørgensen, Bodil; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2015-01-01

    The growth of a plant cell encompasses a complex set of subcellular components interacting in a highly coordinated fashion. Ultimately, these activities create specific cell wall structural domains that regulate the prime force of expansion, internally generated turgor pressure. The precise organization of the polymeric networks of the cell wall around the protoplast also contributes to the direction of growth, the shape of the cell, and the proper positioning of the cell in a tissue. In essence, plant cell expansion represents the foundation of development. Most studies of plant cell expansion have focused primarily upon late divergent multicellular land plants and specialized cell types (e.g., pollen tubes, root hairs). Here, we describe a unicellular green alga, Penium margaritaceum (Penium), which can serve as a valuable model organism for understanding cell expansion and the underlying mechanics of the cell wall in a single plant cell.

  11. (Rapid regulatory control of plant cell expansion and wall relaxation)

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    This section presents a brief overview of accomplishments related to this project in the past 3-year period. Our work has focused on the basic mechanisms of plant cell expansion, particularly on the interrelations of water and solute transport with cell wall relaxation and expansion. To study these processes, we have developed new methods and used these methods to analyze the dynamic behavior of growth processes and to examine how various agents (GA, drought, light, genetic lesions) alter the growth machinery of the cell.

  12. Tomato Fruit Cell Wall Synthesis during Development and Senescence : In Vivo Radiolabeling of Wall Fractions Using [C]Sucrose.

    PubMed

    Mitcham, E J; Gross, K C; Ng, T J

    1989-02-01

    The pedicel of tomato fruit (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., cv ;Rutgers') of different developmental stages from immature-green (IG) to red was injected on the vine with 7 microcuries [(14)C(U)]sucrose and harvested after 18 hours. Cell walls were isolated from outer pericarp and further fractionated yielding ionically associated pectin, covalently bound pectin, hemicellulosic fraction I, hemicellulosic fraction II, and cellulosic fraction II. The dry weight of the total cell wall and of each cell wall fraction per gram fresh weight of pericarp tissue decreased after the mature-green (MG) stage of development. Incorporation of radiolabeled sugars into each fraction decreased from the IG to MG3 (locules jellied but still green) stage. Incorporation in all fractions increased from MG3 to breaker and turning (T) and then decreased from T to red. Data indicate that cell wall synthesis continues throughout ripening and increases transiently from MG4 (locules jellied and yellow to pink in color) to T, corresponding to the peak in respiration and ethylene synthesis during the climacteric. Synthesis continued at a time when total cell wall fraction dry weight decreased indicating the occurrence of cell wall turnover. Synthesis and insertion of a modified polymer with removal of other polymers may produce a less rigid cell wall and allow softening of the tissue integrity during ripening.

  13. Orbital wall infarction in child with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Janssens, C; Claeys, L; Maes, P; Boiy, T; Wojciechowski, M

    2015-12-01

    We present the case of a 17-year-old boy, known with homozygous sickle cell disease, who was admitted because of generalised pain. He developed bilateral periorbital oedema and proptosis, without pain or visual disturbances. In addition to hyperhydration, oxygen and analgesia IV antibiotics were started, to cover a possible osteomyelitis. Patients with sickle cell disease are at risk for vaso-occlusive crises, when the abnormally shaped red blood cells aggregate and block the capillaries. Such a crisis typically presents at a location with high bone marrow activity, as the vertebrae and long bones. At an early age, the bone marrow is still active at other sites, for example the orbital wall, and thus infarction can also occur there. Thus, in young persons with sickle cell disease, it is important to consider orbital wall infarction in the differential diagnosis, since the approach is different from osteomyelitis. If the disease is complicated by an orbital compression syndrome, corticosteroids or surgical intervention may be necessary to preserve the vision. In our patient, an MRI of the orbitae demonstrated periorbital oedema with bone anomalies in the orbital and frontal bones, confirming orbital wall infarction. Ophthalmological examination revealed no signs of pressure on the nervus opticus. The patient recovered gradually with conservative treatment.

  14. The aberrant cell walls of boron-deficient bean root nodules have no covalently bound hydroxyproline-/proline-rich proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, I; Mergold-Villaseñor, C; Campos, M E; Sánchez, N; Pérez, H; López, L; Castrejón, L; Sánchez, F; Cassab, G I

    1997-01-01

    B-deficient bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) nodules examined by light microscopy showed dramatic anatomical changes, mainly in the parenchyma region. Western analysis of total nodule extracts examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that one 116-kD polypeptide was recognized by antibodies raised against hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) from the soybean (Glycine max) seed coat. A protein with a comparable molecular mass of 116 kD was purified from the cell walls of soybean root nodules. The amino acid composition of this protein is similar to the early nodulin (ENOD2) gene. Immunoprecipitation of the soybean ENOD2 in vitro translation product showed that the soybean seed coat anti-HRGP antibodies recognized this early nodulin. Furthermore, we used these antibodies to localize the ENOD2 homolog in bean nodules. Immunocytochemistry revealed that in B-deficient nodules ENOD2 was absent in the walls of the nodule parenchyma. The absence of ENOD2 in B-deficient nodules was corroborated by performing hydroxyproline assays. Northern analysis showed that ENOD2 mRNA is present in B-deficient nodules; therefore, the accumulation of ENOD2 is not affected by B deficiency, but its assembly into the cell wall is. B-deficient nodules fix much less N2 than control nodules, probably because the nodule parenchyma is no longer an effective O2 barrier. PMID:9414547

  15. Plant cell walls: Protecting the barrier from degradation by microbial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lagaert, Stijn; Beliën, Tim; Volckaert, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Plant cell walls are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, which are connected in a strong, yet resilient network. They determine the size and shape of plant cells and form the interface between the cell and its often hostile environment. To penetrate the cell wall and thus infect plants, most phytopathogens secrete numerous cell wall degrading enzymes. Conversely, as a first line of defense, plant cell walls contain an array of inhibitors of these enzymes. Scientific knowledge on these inhibitors significantly progressed in the past years and this review is meant to give a comprehensive overview of plant inhibitors against microbial cell wall degrading enzymes and their role in plant protection.

  16. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  17. Characterisation of cell wall polysaccharides from rapeseed (Brassica napus) meal.

    PubMed

    Pustjens, Annemieke M; Schols, Henk A; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2013-11-06

    To enable structural characteristics of individual cell wall polysaccharides from rapeseed (Brassica napus) meal (RSM) to be studied, polysaccharide fractions were sequentially extracted. Fractions were analysed for their carbohydrate (linkage) composition and polysaccharide structures were also studied by enzymatic fingerprinting. The RSM fractions analysed contained pectic polysaccharides: homogalacturonan in which 60% of the galacturonic acid residues are methyl-esterified, arabinan branched at the O-2 position and arabinogalactan mainly type II. This differs from characteristics previously reported for Brassica campestris meal, another rapeseed cultivar. Also, in the alkali extracts hemicelluloses were analysed as xyloglucan both of the XXGG- and XXXG-type decorated with galactosyl, fucosyl and arabinosyl residues, and as xylan with O-methyl-uronic acid attached. The final residue after extraction still contained xyloglucan and remaining (pectic) polysaccharides next to cellulose, showing that the cell wall matrix of RSM is very strongly interconnected.

  18. Compounds active against cell walls of medically important fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Hector, R F

    1993-01-01

    A number of substances that directly or indirectly affect the cell walls of fungi have been identified. Those that actively interfere with the synthesis or degradation of polysaccharide components share the property of being produced by soil microbes as secondary metabolites. Compounds specifically interfering with chitin or beta-glucan synthesis have proven effective in studies of preclinical models of mycoses, though they appear to have a restricted spectrum of coverage. Semisynthetic derivatives of some of the natural products have offered improvements in activity, toxicology, or pharmacokinetic behavior. Compounds which act on the cell wall indirectly or by a secondary mechanism of action, such as the azoles, act against diverse fungi but are usually fungistatic in nature. Overall, these compounds are attractive candidates for further development. PMID:8457977

  19. Cell wall teichoic acids of two Brevibacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Shashkov, A S; Potekhina, N V; Evtushenko, L I; Naumova, I B

    2004-06-01

    Structurally identical teichoic acids were detected in cell walls of two soil isolates assigned to Brevibacterium linens based on phylogenetic data. Both cell walls contain unsubstituted 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate) and poly(glycosylglycerol phosphate). Repeating units of the latter--alpha-D-GlcpNAc-(1-->4)-beta-D-Galp-(1-->1)-Gro--are bound by phosphodiester bonds including OH-3 of galactose and OH-3 of glycerol. Some of the N-acetylglucosamine residues have 4,6-pyruvic acid acetal, amounts of the latter in the two strains being unequal. Species-specificity of the structures of teichoic acids in the genus Brevibacterium is discussed.

  20. Glycoprotein isolated from Rhus verniciflua Stokes inhibits inflammation-related protein and nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2007-01-01

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) has traditionally been used for medical purpose, such as healing of inflammatory diseases in South Korea. Glycoprotein (36 kDa) was isolated from RVS fruit, purified and used to evaluate the inhibitory effect on inflammatory-related proteins and nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 200 ng/ml)-stimulated RAW 264.7 (murine macrophage cell line). Our results were showed that RVS glycoprotein has a strong antioxidative activity against lipid peroxyl radicals in cell-free system, and inhibits NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. To elucidate the inhibitory effect of RVS glycoprotein on activities of inflammatory-related proteins, we firstly evaluated the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and expression of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC), nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, and activator protein-1 (AP-1). The results in the present study showed that RVS glycoprotein (200 microg/ml) inhibits ROS production and PKCalpha translocation, and down-regulates the expression of NF-kappaB and AP-1. Such upstream signals consequently inhibited the levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. Therefore, we speculate that RVS glycoprotein inhibits the inflammatory-related protein and can act as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  1. Comparison of P-glycoprotein expression in cell lines and xenogragraft sections using I-125 MRK-16 monoclonal antibody (MAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, B.M.; Kostakoglu, L.; Levchenko, A.

    1994-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is known to be associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). Quantitation of P-glycoprotein expression may permit appropriate therapy depending on Pgp expression in tumors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of quantitative autoradiography (QAR) in the quantification of MDR using MRK-16, a murine IgG mAb reactive against Pgp. Balb/c mice were xenografted with colchicine resistant BE(2)C/CHC cells. Animals with established tumors were sacrificed, and 8 {mu}m tumor sections were prepared. Mab MRK-16 was labeled with I-125 (150 {mu}Ci/0.625 nmole) by the iodogen method and subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. Consecutive tumor sections were incubated overnight at 4{degrees}C with serial dilutions of I-125 MRK-16. Similarly cell suspensions containing 1 X 10{sup 7} cells per ml were also incubated with serial dilutions. QAR analysis of tissue sections of BE(2)C/CHC tumors growing as xenografts in nude mice, determined the binding affinity (K{sub a}) for MRK-16 to be 1 x 10{sup 9} L/M and the number of binding sites (B{sub max}) to be 137, 700 per cell (222 picomols/g); it compared very well with the K{sub a} value of 5 x 10{sup 8} L/M and the B{sub max} value of 130,000 per cell (217 picomols/g) obtained from binding analysis with cell suspensions.

  2. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. PMID:27605377

  3. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells.

  4. Single-molecule imaging reveals modulation of cell wall synthesis dynamics in live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timothy K.; Meng, Kevin; Shi, Handuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2016-01-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall is an integral organelle critical for bacterial cell shape and stability. Proper cell wall construction requires the interaction of synthesis enzymes and the cytoskeleton, but it is unclear how the activities of individual proteins are coordinated to preserve the morphology and integrity of the cell wall during growth. To elucidate this coordination, we used single-molecule imaging to follow the behaviours of the two major peptidoglycan synthases in live, elongating Escherichia coli cells and after perturbation. We observed heterogeneous localization dynamics of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 1A, the synthase predominantly associated with cell wall elongation, with individual PBP1A molecules distributed between mobile and immobile populations. Perturbations to PBP1A activity, either directly through antibiotics or indirectly through PBP1A's interaction with its lipoprotein activator or other synthases, shifted the fraction of mobile molecules. Our results suggest that multiple levels of regulation control the activity of enzymes to coordinate peptidoglycan synthesis. PMID:27774981

  5. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  6. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  7. Regulation of plant cells, cell walls and development by mechanical signals

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerowitz, Elliot M.

    2016-06-14

    The overall goal of the revised scope of work for the final year of funding was to characterize cell wall biosynthesis in developing cotyledons and in the shoot apical meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana, as a way of learning about developmental control of cell wall biosynthesis in plants, and interactions between cell wall biosynthesis and the microtubule cytoskeleton. The proposed work had two parts – to look at the effect of mutation in the SPIRAL2 gene on microtubule organization and reorganization, and to thoroughly characterize the glycosyltransferase genes expressed in shoot apical meristems by RNA-seq experiments, by in situ hybridization of the RNAs expressed in the meristem, and by antibody staining of the products of the glycosyltransferases in meristems. Both parts were completed; the spiral2 mutant was found to speed microtubule reorientation after ablation of adjacent cells, supporting our hypothesis that reorganization correlates with microtubule severing, the rate of which is increased by the mutation. The glycosyltransferase characterization was completed and published as Yang et al. (2016). Among the new things learned was that primary cell wall biosynthesis is strongly controlled both by cell type, and by stage of cell cycle, implying not only that different, even adjacent, cells can have different sugar linkages in their (nonshared) walls, but also that a surprisingly large proportion of glycosyltransferases is regulated in the cell cycle, and therefore that the cell cycle regulates wall maturation to a degree previously unrecognized.

  8. Progress toward the tomato fruit cell wall proteome

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-May, Eliel; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall (CW) compartment, or apoplast, is host to a highly dynamic proteome, comprising large numbers of both enzymatic and structural proteins. This reflects its importance as the interface between adjacent cells and the external environment, the presence of numerous extracellular metabolic and signaling pathways, and the complex nature of wall structural assembly and remodeling during cell growth and differentiation. Tomato fruit ontogeny, with its distinct phases of rapid growth and ripening, provides a valuable experimental model system for CW proteomic studies, in that it involves substantial wall assembly, remodeling, and coordinated disassembly. Moreover, diverse populations of secreted proteins must be deployed to resist microbial infection and protect against abiotic stresses. Tomato fruits also provide substantial amounts of biological material, which is a significant advantage for many types of biochemical analyses, and facilitates the detection of lower abundance proteins. In this review, we describe a variety of orthogonal techniques that have been applied to identify CW localized proteins from tomato fruit, including approaches that: target the proteome of the CW and the overlying cuticle; functional “secretome” screens; lectin affinity chromatography; and computational analyses to predict proteins that enter the secretory pathway. Each has its merits and limitations, but collectively they are providing important insights into CW proteome composition and dynamics, as well as some potentially controversial issues, such as the prevalence of non-canonical protein secretion. PMID:23755055

  9. Lignin variability in plant cell walls: contribution of new models.

    PubMed

    Neutelings, Godfrey

    2011-10-01

    Lignin is a major component of certain plant cell walls. The enzymes and corresponding genes associated with the metabolic pathway leading to the production of this complex phenolic polymer have been studied for many years now and are relatively well characterized. The use of genetically modified model plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, poplar.) and mutants has contributed greatly to our current understanding of this process. The recent utilisation and/or development of a number of dedicated genomic and transcriptomic tools for other species opens new perspectives for advancing our knowledge of the biological role of this important polymer in less typical situations and/or species. In this context, studies on the formation of hypolignified G-type fibres in angiosperm tension wood, and the natural hypolignification of secondary cell walls in plant bast fibre species such as hemp (Cannabis sativa), flax (Linum usitatissimum) or ramie (Boehmeria nivea) are starting to provide novel information about how plants control secondary cell wall formation. Finally, other biologically interesting species for which few molecular resources currently exist could also represent interesting future models.

  10. Cell Wall β-(1,6)-Glucan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Clavaud, Cécile; Simenel, Catherine; Fontaine, Thierry; Delepierre, Muriel; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Despite its essential role in the yeast cell wall, the exact composition of the β-(1,6)-glucan component is not well characterized. While solubilizing the cell wall alkali-insoluble fraction from a wild type strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a recombinant β-(1,3)-glucanase followed by chromatographic characterization of the digest on an anion exchange column, we observed a soluble polymer that eluted at the end of the solvent gradient run. Further characterization indicated this soluble polymer to have a molecular mass of ∼38 kDa and could be hydrolyzed only by β-(1,6)-glucanase. Gas chromatographymass spectrometry and NMR (1H and 13C) analyses confirmed it to be a β-(1,6)-glucan polymer with, on average, branching at every fifth residue with one or two β-(1,3)-linked glucose units in the side chain. This polymer peak was significantly reduced in the corresponding digests from mutants of the kre genes (kre9 and kre5) that are known to play a crucial role in the β-(1,6)-glucan biosynthesis. In the current study, we have developed a biochemical assay wherein incubation of UDP-[14C]glucose with permeabilized S. cerevisiae yeasts resulted in the synthesis of a polymer chemically identical to the branched β-(1,6)-glucan isolated from the cell wall. Using this assay, parameters essential for β-(1,6)-glucan synthetic activity were defined. PMID:19279004

  11. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G. . E-mail: vtgusk@lsu.edu

    2007-04-10

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion.

  12. Adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on Rhizopus oryzae cell walls: application of cosolvent models for validating the cell wall-water partition coefficient.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Xu, Minmin; Wang, Jiaojiao; Chen, Huaihai; He, Yan; Wu, Laosheng; Wang, Haizhen; Xu, Jianming

    2011-11-01

    The cell wall-cosolvent partition coefficients (Km) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined for Rhizopus oryzae cell walls by controlling the volume fraction of methanol (f) ranging from 0.1 to 0.5. Five cosolvent models were employed for extrapolating the cell wall-water partition coefficients (Kw) in pure water. The extrapolated Kw values of four PAHs on R. oryzae cell walls were ranged from 2.9 to 5.1. Comparison of various Kw values of pyrene generated from extrapolation and the QSPR model, together with predicted different (PD), mean percentage deviations (MPD), and root mean square errors (RSE), revealed that the performance of the LL and Bayesian models were the best among all five tested cosolvent models. This study suggests that R. oryzae cell walls play an important role in the partitioning of PAHs during bioremediation because of the high Kw of fungal cell walls.

  13. Proline-rich cell wall proteins accumulate in growing regions and phloem tissue in response to water deficit in common bean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Solórzano, Rosa M; Hernández, Magdalena; Cuéllar-Ortiz, Sonia; García-Gómez, Blanca; Márquez, Judith; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2007-04-01

    Plant cell walls undergo dynamic changes in response to different environmental stress conditions. In response to water deficit, two related proline-rich glycoproteins, called p33 and p36, accumulate in the soluble fraction of the cell walls in Phaseolus vulgaris (Covarrubias et al. in Plant Physiol 107:1119-1128, 1995). In this work, we show that p33 and p36 are able to form a 240 kDa oligomer, which is found in the cell wall soluble fraction. We present evidence indicating that the highest accumulation of these proteins in response to water deficit occurs in the growing regions of common bean seedlings, particularly in the phloem tissues. These proteins were detected in P. vulgaris cell suspension cultures, where the p33/p36 ratio was higher under hyperosmotic conditions than in bean seedlings subjected to the same treatment. The results support a role for these proteins during the plant cell response to changes in its water status, and suggest that cell wall modifications are induced in active growing cells of common bean in response to water limitation.

  14. Alkamides from Echinacea angustifolia Interact with P-glycoprotein of primary brain capillary endothelial cells isolated from porcine brain blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mahringer, Anne; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bauer, Rudolf; Fricker, Gert; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of toxic compounds from blood circulation into brain tissue. Unfortunately, drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, brain tumors, and other diseases also do not cross the blood-brain barrier. In the present investigation, we used isolated porcine brain capillary endothelial cells and a flow cytometric calcein-AM assay to analyze inhibition of P-glycoprotein, a major constituent of the blood-brain barrier. We tested 8 alkamides isolated from Echinacea angustifolia and found that four of them inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated calcein transport in porcine brain capillary endothelial cells.

  15. Hypergravity Effects on Dendritic Cells and Vascular Wall Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellik, L.; Parenti, A.; Ledda, F.; Basile, V.; Romano, G.; Fusi, F.; Monici, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen-presenting cells inducing specific immune responses, are involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this inflammatory disease, DCs increase in number, being particularly abundant in the shoulder regions of plaques. Since the exposure to altered gravitational conditions results in a significant impairment of the immune function, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of hypergravity on both the function of DCs and their interactions with the vascular wall cells. Monocytes from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers were sorted by CD14+ magnetic beads selection, cultured for 6 days in medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4, followed by a further maturation stimulus. DC phenotype, assessed by flow cytometry, showed a high expression of the specific DC markers CD80, CD86, HLA-DR and CD83. The DCs obtained were then exposed to hypergravitational stimuli and their phenotype, cytoskeleton, ability to activate lymphocytes and interaction with vascular wall cells were investigated. The findings showed that the exposure to hypergravity conditions resulted in a significant impairment of DC cytoskeletal organization, without affecting the expression of DC markers. Moreover, an increase in DC adhesion to human vascular smooth muscle cells and in their ability to activate lymphocytes was observed.

  16. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall components by 2-fluoro 2-deoxy-L-fucose induces defects in root cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Marie; Lehner, Arnaud; Bardor, Muriel; Burel, Carole; Vauzeilles, Boris; Lerouxel, Olivier; Anderson, Charles T; Mollet, Jean-Claude; Lerouge, Patrice

    2015-12-01

    Screening of commercially available fluoro monosaccharides as putative growth inhibitors in Arabidopsis thaliana revealed that 2-fluoro 2-l-fucose (2F-Fuc) reduces root growth at micromolar concentrations. The inability of 2F-Fuc to affect an Atfkgp mutant that is defective in the fucose salvage pathway indicates that 2F-Fuc must be converted to its cognate GDP nucleotide sugar in order to inhibit root growth. Chemical analysis of cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins demonstrated that fucosylation of xyloglucans and of N-linked glycans is fully inhibited by 10 μm 2F-Fuc in Arabidopsis seedling roots, but genetic evidence indicates that these alterations are not responsible for the inhibition of root development by 2F-Fuc. Inhibition of fucosylation of cell wall polysaccharides also affected pectic rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II). At low concentrations, 2F-Fuc induced a decrease in RG-II dimerization. Both RG-II dimerization and root growth were partially restored in 2F-Fuc-treated seedlings by addition of boric acid, suggesting that the growth phenotype caused by 2F-Fuc was due to a deficiency of RG-II dimerization. Closer investigation of the 2F-Fuc-induced growth phenotype demonstrated that cell division is not affected by 2F-Fuc treatments. In contrast, the inhibitor suppressed elongation of root cells and promoted the emergence of adventitious roots. This study further emphasizes the importance of RG-II in cell elongation and the utility of glycosyltransferase inhibitors as new tools for studying the functions of cell wall polysaccharides in plant development. Moreover, supplementation experiments with borate suggest that the function of boron in plants might not be restricted to RG-II cross-linking, but that it might also be a signal molecule in the cell wall integrity-sensing mechanism.

  17. SJSZ glycoprotein (38 kDa) inhibits cell cycle and oxidative stress in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2013-05-01

    The initiation stage of liver cancer is closely related to abnormal cell proliferation as observed for other types of carcinogenesis. Recently, we isolated a glycoprotein from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein), which consists of a carbohydrate moiety (52.64%) and a protein moiety (47.36%). In this study, the antitumoric mechanism of SJSZ glycoprotein during the initiation stage in N-Methyl-N`-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG; 40 mg/kg, BW)-induced ICR was investigated. First, we evaluated the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and activities of antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT)] in mouse liver tissue and serum. The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cell cycle-related factors [cyclin D1/ cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4], cell cycle inhibitors (CKIs; p53, p21, and p27), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were then assessed using Western Blot analysis. The results of this analysis showed that the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW) decreased the levels of LDH, ALT, TBARS, and the expression of AFP but it increased the activity of hepatic anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT). In addition, the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW)was shown to decrease the expression of cyclin D1/CDK4 and PCNA and increase the expression of CKIs (p53, p21, and p27). The results in this study indicate that the SJSZ glycoprotein displays anti-oxidative stress and anti-cell proliferation activity in MNNG induced ICR.

  18. Targeting the Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii cell wall using lectins: study of the carbohydrate-binding domain.

    PubMed

    de Brito Ximenes, Pamella; Beltrão, Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Buonafina, Maria Daniela Silva; de Lima-Neto, Reginaldo Gonçalves; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2015-02-25

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is considered to be the major cause of cryptococcosis in immunosuppressed patients. Understanding cell wall glycoproteins using lectins is of medical interest and can contribute to specific therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carbohydrates on the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii clinical isolates, using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-lectin binding protocol. Thirty yeast strains stocked in the culture collection were cultivated for 2 days at 30 °C with shaking. Cells were obtained by centrifugation, washed in phosphate-buffered saline, and a suspension of 107 cells/mL was obtained. To determine the binding profile of lectins, concanavalin A (Con A), wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), and peanut agglutinin (PNA) conjugated to fluorescein were used. All the tested clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were intensely stained by WGA, moderately stained by Con A, and weakly stained by PNA and UEA-I. Thus, Cryptococcus can be detected in clinical specimens such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid using the fluorescent lectin WGA, which may be considered as an option for detection in cases of suspected cryptococcosis with low laboratory sensitivity. Future applications may be developed using this basic tool.

  19. Evaluating fundamental position-dependent differences in wood cell wall adhesion using nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Obersriebnig, Michael; Konnerth, Johannes; Gindl-Altmutter, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Spruce wood specimens were bonded with one-component polyurethane (PUR) and urea-formaldehyde (UF) adhesive, respectively. The adhesion of the adhesives to the wood cell wall was evaluated at two different locations by means of a new micromechanical assay based on nanoindentation. One location tested corresponded to the interface between the adhesive and the natural inner cell wall surface of the secondary cell wall layer 3 (S3), whereas the second location corresponded to the interface between the adhesive and the freshly cut secondary cell wall layer 2 (S2). Overall, a trend towards reduced cell wall adhesion was found for PUR compared to UF. Position-resolved examination revealed excellent adhesion of UF to freshly cut cell walls (S2) but significantly diminished adhesion to the inner cell wall surface (S3). In contrast, PUR showed better adhesion to the inner cell wall surface and less adhesion to freshly cut cell walls. Atomic force microscopy revealed a less polar character for the inner cell wall surface (S3) compared to freshly cut cell walls (S2). It is proposed that differences in the polarity of the used adhesives and the surface chemistry of the two cell wall surfaces examined account for the observed trends.

  20. Cell Wall Composition and Candidate Biosynthesis Gene Expression During Rice Development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan; Manisseri, Chithra; Fagerström, Alexandra; Peck, Matthew L; Vega-Sánchez, Miguel E; Williams, Brian; Chiniquy, Dawn M; Saha, Prasenjit; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Conlin, Brian; Zhu, Lan; Hahn, Michael G; Willats, William G T; Scheller, Henrik V; Ronald, Pamela C; Bartley, Laura E

    2016-10-01

    Cell walls of grasses, including cereal crops and biofuel grasses, comprise the majority of plant biomass and intimately influence plant growth, development and physiology. However, the functions of many cell wall synthesis genes, and the relationships among and the functions of cell wall components remain obscure. To better understand the patterns of cell wall accumulation and identify genes that act in grass cell wall biosynthesis, we characterized 30 samples from aerial organs of rice (Oryza sativa cv. Kitaake) at 10 developmental time points, 3-100 d post-germination. Within these samples, we measured 15 cell wall chemical components, enzymatic digestibility and 18 cell wall polysaccharide epitopes/ligands. We also used quantitative reverse transcription-PCR to measure expression of 50 glycosyltransferases, 15 acyltransferases and eight phenylpropanoid genes, many of which had previously been identified as being highly expressed in rice. Most cell wall components vary significantly during development, and correlations among them support current understanding of cell walls. We identified 92 significant correlations between cell wall components and gene expression and establish nine strong hypotheses for genes that synthesize xylans, mixed linkage glucan and pectin components. This work provides an extensive analysis of cell wall composition throughout rice development, identifies genes likely to synthesize grass cell walls, and provides a framework for development of genetically improved grasses for use in lignocellulosic biofuel production and agriculture.

  1. Preparation of VSV-G viral envelope glycoprotein from Pichia pastoris enhances transfection of DNA into animal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Dong, Ying; Wang, Jingquan; Li, Long; Zhong, Zhenmin; Li, Yun-Pan; Chen, Shao-Jun; Fu, Yu-Cai; Xu, Wen-Can; Wei, Chi-Ju

    2017-03-15

    Vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein (VSV-G) has been widely used for pseudotyping retroviral, lentiviral and artificial viral vectors. The objective of this study was to establish a potential approach for large scale production of VSV-G. To this end, VSV-G was cloned with a N-terminal His-tag into Pichia pastoris expression vector pPIC3.5K. Three clones (Mut(s)) containing the VSV-G expression cassette were identified by PCR. All clones proliferated normally in expansion medium, while the proliferation was reduced significantly under induction conditions. VSV-G protein was detected in cell lysates by Western Blot, and the highest expression level was observed at 96 h post induction. VSV-G could also be obtained from the condition medium of yeast protoplasts. Further, VSV-G could be incorporated into Ad293 cells and was able to induce cell fusion, leading to the transfer of cytoplasmic protein. Finally, VSV-G mediated DNA transfection was assayed by flow cytometry and luciferase measurement. Incubation of VSV-G lysate with pGL3-control DNA complex increased luciferase activity in Ad293 and HeLa cells by about 3-fold. Likewise, incubation of VSV-G lysate with pCMV-DsRed DNA complex improved transfection efficiency into Ad293 by 10% and HeLa cells by about 1-fold. In conclusions, these results demonstrated that VSV-G could be produced from Pichia pastoris with bio-functionalities, demonstrating large scale production of the viral glycoprotein is feasible.

  2. Modeling of thin, back-wall silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baraona, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of silicon solar cells with p-n junctions on the nonilluminated surface (i.e., upside-down or back-wall cells) was calculated. These structures consisted of a uniformly shaped p-type substrate layer, a p(+)-type field layer on the front (illuminated) surface, and a shallow, n-type junction on the back (nonilluminated) surface. A four-layer solar cell model was used to calculate efficiency, open-circuit voltage, and short-circuit current. The effect on performance of p-layer thickness and resistivity was determined. The diffusion length was varied to simulate the effect of radiation damage. The results show that peak initial efficiencies greater than 15 percent are possible for cell thicknesses or 100 micrometers or less. After 10 years of radiation damage in geosynchronous orbit, thin (25 to 50 micrometers thick) cells made from 10 to 100 ohm cm material show the smallest decrease (approximately 10 percent) in performance.

  3. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-surface glycoprotein apa as a potential adhesin to colonize target cells via the innate immune system pulmonary C-type lectin surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Ragas, Aude; Roussel, Lucie; Puzo, Germain; Rivière, Michel

    2007-02-23

    Tuberculosis is still a major health problem, and understanding the mechanism by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) invades and colonizes its host target cells remains an important issue for the control of infection. The innate immune system C-type lectins (C-TLs), including the human pulmonary surfactant protein A (PSP-A), have been recently identified as determinant players in the early recognition of the invading pathogen and in mounting the host defense response. Although the antigenic lipoglycan mannosylated lipoarabinomannan is currently considered to be the major C-TL target on the mycobacterial surface, the recognition by some C-TLs of the only mycobacterial species composing the "Mtb complex" indicates that mannosylated lipoarabinomannan cannot account alone for this specificity. Thus, we searched for the mycobacterial molecules targeted by human PSP-A, focusing our attention on the Mtb surface glycoproteins. We developed an original functional proteomic approach based on a lectin blot assay using crude human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as a source of physiological PSP-A. Combined with selective cell-surface protein extraction and mass spectrometry peptide mapping, this strategy allowed us to identify the Apa (alanine- and proline-rich antigenic) glycoprotein as new potential target for PSP-A. This result was supported by direct binding of PSP-A to purified Apa. Moreover, EDTA addition or deglycosylation of purified Apa samples completely abolished the interaction, demonstrating that the interaction is calcium- and mannose-dependent, as expected. Finally, we provide convincing evidence that Apa, formerly considered as mainly secreted, is associated with the cell wall for a sufficiently long time to aid in the attachment of PSP-A. Because, to date, Apa seems to be restricted to the Mtb complex strains, we propose that it may account for the selective recognition of those strains by PSP-A and other immune system C-TLs containing homologous functional

  4. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan Rahman, Anwar Abdul Hamzah, Mohd Arif Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-22

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  5. Evidence for 'silicon' within the cell walls of suspension-cultured rice cells.

    PubMed

    He, Congwu; Wang, Lijun; Liu, Jian; Liu, Xin; Li, Xiuli; Ma, Jie; Lin, Yongjun; Xu, Fangsen

    2013-11-01

    Despite the ubiquity and beneficial role of silicon (Si) in plant biology, structural and chemical mechanisms operating at the single-cell level have not been extensively studied. To obtain insights regarding the effect of Si on individual cells, we cultivated suspended rice (Oryza sativa) cells in the absence and presence of Si and analyzed single cells using a combination of physical techniques including atomic force microscopy (AFM). Si is naturally present as a constituent of the cell walls, where it is firmly bound to the cell wall matrix rather than occurring within intra- or extracellular silica deposition, as determined by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This species of Si, linked with the cell wall matrix, improves the structural stability of cell walls during their expansion and subsequent cell division. Maintaining cell shape is thereby enhanced, which may be crucial for the function and survival of cells. This study provides further evidence that organosilicon is present in plant cell walls, which broadens our understanding of the chemical nature of 'anomalous Si' in plant biology.

  6. Pro-inflammatory human Th17 cells selectively express P-glycoprotein and are refractory to glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Radha; Kozhaya, Lina; McKevitt, Kelly; Djuretic, Ivana M; Carlson, Thaddeus J; Quintero, Maria A; McCauley, Jacob L; Abreu, Maria T; Unutmaz, Derya; Sundrud, Mark S

    2014-01-13

    IL-17A-expressing CD4(+) T cells (Th17 cells) are generally regarded as key effectors of autoimmune inflammation. However, not all Th17 cells are pro-inflammatory. Pathogenic Th17 cells that induce autoimmunity in mice are distinguished from nonpathogenic Th17 cells by a unique transcriptional signature, including high Il23r expression, and these cells require Il23r for their inflammatory function. In contrast, defining features of human pro-inflammatory Th17 cells are unknown. We show that pro-inflammatory human Th17 cells are restricted to a subset of CCR6(+)CXCR3(hi)CCR4(lo)CCR10(-)CD161(+) cells that transiently express c-Kit and stably express P-glycoprotein (P-gp)/multi-drug resistance type 1 (MDR1). In contrast to MDR1(-) Th1 or Th17 cells, MDR1(+) Th17 cells produce both Th17 (IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22) and Th1 (IFN-γ) cytokines upon TCR stimulation and do not express IL-10 or other anti-inflammatory molecules. These cells also display a transcriptional signature akin to pathogenic mouse Th17 cells and show heightened functional responses to IL-23 stimulation. In vivo, MDR1(+) Th17 cells are enriched and activated in the gut of Crohn's disease patients. Furthermore, MDR1(+) Th17 cells are refractory to several glucocorticoids used to treat clinical autoimmune disease. Thus, MDR1(+) Th17 cells may be important mediators of chronic inflammation, particularly in clinical settings of steroid resistant inflammatory disease.

  7. Stressor-dependent Alterations in Glycoprotein 130: Implications for Glial Cell Reactivity, Cytokine Signaling and Ganglion Cell Health in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, FD; Walker, CC; Abella, SK; Won, M; Sappington, RM

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and glial reactivity in glaucoma. The purpose of this study was to evaluate glaucoma-related changes in glycoprotein-130 (gp130), the common signal transducer of the IL-6 family of cytokines, as they relate to RGC health, glial reactivity and expression of IL-6 cytokine family members. Methods: For all experiments, we examined healthy retina (young C57), aged retina (aged C57), retina predisposed to glaucoma (young DBA/2) and retina with IOP-induced glaucoma (aged DBA/2). We determined retinal gene expression of gp130 and IL-6 family members, using quantitative PCR, and protein expression of gp130, using multiplex ELISA. For protein localization and cell-specific expression, we performed co-immunolabeling for gp130 and cell type-specific markers. We used quantitative microscopy to measure layer-specific expression of gp130 and its relationships to astrocyte and Müller glia reactivity and RGC axonal transport, as determined by uptake and transport of cholera toxin β-subunit (CTB). Results: Gene expression of gp130 was elevated with all glaucoma-related stressors, but only normal aging increased protein levels. In healthy retina, gp130 localized primarily to the inner retina, where it was expressed by astrocytes, Müller cells and RGCs. Layer-specific analysis of gp130 expression revealed increased expression in aging retina and decreased expression in glaucomatous retina that was eccentricity-dependent. These glaucoma-related changes in gp130 expression correlated with the level of GFAP and glutamine synthetase expression, as well as axonal transport in RGCs. The relationships between gp130, glial reactivity and RGC health could impact signaling by many IL-6 family cytokines, which exhibited overall increased expression in a stressor-dependent manner. Conclusions: Glaucoma-related stressors, including normal aging, glaucoma predisposition and IOP

  8. In situ analysis of cell wall polymers associated with phloem fibre cells in stems of hemp, Cannabis sativa L.

    PubMed

    Blake, Anthony W; Marcus, Susan E; Copeland, James E; Blackburn, Richard S; Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    A study of stem anatomy and the sclerenchyma fibre cells associated with the phloem tissues of hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) plants is of interest for both understanding the formation of secondary cell walls and for the enhancement of fibre utility as industrial fibres and textiles. Using a range of molecular probes for cell wall polysaccharides we have surveyed the presence of cell wall components in stems of hemp in conjunction with an anatomical survey of stem and phloem fibre development. The only polysaccharide detected to occur abundantly throughout the secondary cell walls of phloem fibres was cellulose. Pectic homogalacturonan epitopes were detected in the primary cell walls/intercellular matrices between the phloem fibres although these epitopes were present at a lower level than in the surrounding parenchyma cell walls. Arabinogalactan-protein glycan epitopes displayed a diversity of occurrence in relation to fibre development and the JIM14 epitope was specific to fibre cells, binding to the inner surface of secondary cell walls, throughout development. Xylan epitopes were found to be present in the fibre cells (and xylem secondary cell walls) and absent from adjacent parenchyma cell walls. Analysis of xylan occurrence in the phloem fibre cells of hemp and flax indicated that xylan epitopes were restricted to the primary cell walls of fibre cells and were not present in the secondary cell walls of these cells.

  9. A multivariate approach using attenuated total reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy to measure the surface mannoproteins and β-glucans of yeast cell walls during wine fermentations.

    PubMed

    Moore, John P; Zhang, Song-Lei; Nieuwoudt, Hélène; Divol, Benoit; Trygg, Johan; Bauer, Florian F

    2015-11-18

    Yeast cells possess a cell wall comprising primarily glycoproteins, mannans, and glucan polymers. Several yeast phenotypes relevant for fermentation, wine processing, and wine quality are correlated with cell wall properties. To investigate the effect of wine fermentation on cell wall composition, a study was performed using mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate methods (i.e., PCA and OPLS-DA). A total of 40 yeast strains were evaluated, including Saccharomyces strains (laboratory and industrial) and non-Saccharomyces species. Cells were fermented in both synthetic MS300 and Chardonnay grape must to stationery phase, processed, and scanned in the MIR spectrum. PCA of the fingerprint spectral region showed distinct separation of Saccharomyces strains from non-Saccharomyces species; furthermore, industrial wine yeast strains separated from laboratory strains. PCA loading plots and the use of OPLS-DA to the data sets suggested that industrial strains were enriched with cell wall proteins (e.g., mannoproteins), whereas laboratory strains were composed mainly of mannan and glucan polymers.

  10. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  11. Enzymology and molecular biology of cell wall biosynthesis. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P.M.

    1993-03-20

    In order to be able to explore the control of cell wall polysaccharide synthesis at the molecular level, which inter alia might eventually lead to means for useful modification of plant biomass polysaccharide production, the immediate goals of this project are to identify polypeptides responsible for wall polysaccharide synthase activities and to obtain clones of the genes that encode them. We are concentrating on plasma membraneassociated (1,3)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-II or GS-II) and Golgi-associated (1,4)-{beta}-glucan synthase (glucan synthase-I or GS-I), of growing pea stem tissue. Our progress has been much more rapid with respect to GS-II than regarding GS-I.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules, and the detection of polysaccharides in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Cécile; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are diverse composites of complex polysaccharides. Molecular probes such as monoclonal antibodies (MABs) and carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are important tools to detect and dissect cell wall structures in plant materials. We provide an account of methods that can be used to detect cell wall polysaccharide structures (epitopes) in plant materials and also describe treatments that can provide information on the masking of sets of polysaccharides that may prevent detection. These masking -phenomena may indicate potential interactions between sets of cell wall polysaccharides, and methods to uncover them are an important aspect of cell wall immunocytochemistry.

  13. Comparative structure and biomechanics of plant primary and secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J; Jarvis, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Recent insights into the physical biology of plant cell walls are reviewed, summarizing the essential differences between primary and secondary cell walls and identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of their structure and biomechanics. Unexpected parallels are identified between the mechanism of expansion of primary cell walls during growth and the mechanisms by which hydrated wood deforms under external tension. There is a particular need to revise current "cartoons" of plant cell walls to be more consistent with data from diverse approaches and to go beyond summarizing limited aspects of cell walls, serving instead as guides for future experiments and for the application of new techniques.

  14. Scattering properties of microalgae: the effect of cell size and cell wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Øyvind; Frette, Øyvind; Rune Erga, Svein

    2007-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate how the cell size and the presence of a cell wall influence the scattering properties of the green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The growth cycle of two strains, one with a cell wall and one without, was synchronized to be in the same growth phase. Measurements were conducted at two different phases of the growth cycle on both strains of the algae. It was found that the shape of the scattering phase function was very similar for both strains at both growth phases, but the regular strain with a cell wall scatters more strongly than the wall-less mutant. It was also found that the mutant strain has a stronger increase in scattering than the regular strain, as the algae grow, and that the scattering from the regular strain is more wavelength dependent than from the mutant strain.

  15. Identification of Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall Mannan Chemotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cawley, T. N.; Ballou, Clinton E.

    1972-01-01

    We have obtained evidence for two structurally and antigenically different Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall mannans. One, which occurs widely and is found in S. cerevisiae strain 238C, is already known to be a neutral mannan which yields mannose, mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannotetraose on acetolysis of the (1 → 6)-linked backbone. The other, which was found in S. cerevisiae brewer's strains, is a phosphomannan with a structure very similar to that of Kloeckera brevis mannan. S. cerevisiae (brewer's yeast strain) was agglutinated by antiserum prepared against Kloeckera brevis cells. The mannan, isolated from a proteolytic digest of the cell wall of the former, did not react with S. cerevisiae 238C antiserum, whereas it cross-reacted strongly with K. brevis antiserum. Controlled acetolysis cleaved the (1 → 6)-linkages in the polysaccharide backbone and released mannose, mannobiose, mannotriose, and mannotriose phosphate. Mild acid treatment of the phosphomannan hydrolyzed the phosphodiester linkage, yielding phosphomonoester mannan and mannose. The resulting phosphomonoester mannan reacted with antiserum prepared against K. brevis possessing monoester phosphate groups on the cell surface. α-d-Mannose-1-phosphate completely inhibited the precipitin reaction between brewer's yeast mannan and the homologous antiserum. Flocculent and nonflocculent strains of this yeast were shown to have similar structural and immunological properties. PMID:4559821

  16. Human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 1a (PSG1a) induces alternative activation in human and mouse monocytes and suppresses the accessory cell-dependent T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Motrán, Claudia Cristina; Díaz, Fernando López; Gruppi, Adriana; Slavin, Daniela; Chatton, Bruno; Bocco, José Luis

    2002-09-01

    It has been proposed that pregnancy-specific factors induce the suppression of a specific arm of the maternal response accompanied by activation of the nonspecific, innate immune system. The aim of this study was to determine whether pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 1a (PSG1a), the major variant of PSG polypeptides, is able to modulate the monocyte/macrophage (Mo) metabolism to regulate T cell activation and proliferation. Using the recombinant form of this glycoprotein (rec-PSG1a), expressed in mammalian cells with a vaccinia-based expression vector, we have demonstrated that human PSG1a induces arginase activity in peripheral blood human Mo and human and murine Mo cell lines. In addition, rec-PSG1a is able to induce alternative activation because it up-regulates the arginase activity and inhibits the nitric oxide production in Mo activated by lipopolysaccharides. We also observed that rec-PSG1a is an important accessory cells-dependent T cell suppressor factor that causes partial growth arrest at the S/G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, an impaired T cell proliferative response induced by mitogens and specific antigen was observed in BALB/c mice upon in vivo expression of PSG1a. Our results suggest that PSG1a function contributes to the immunomodulation during pregnancy, having opposite effects on maternal innate and adaptative systems.

  17. Escherichia coli common pilus (ECP) targets arabinosyl residues in plant cell walls to mediate adhesion to fresh produce plants.

    PubMed

    Rossez, Yannick; Holmes, Ashleigh; Lodberg-Pedersen, Henriette; Birse, Louise; Marshall, Jacqueline; Willats, William G T; Toth, Ian K; Holden, Nicola J

    2014-12-05

    Outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli are often associated with fresh produce. However, the molecular basis to adherence is unknown beyond ionic lipid-flagellum interactions in plant cell membranes. We demonstrate that arabinans present in different constituents of plant cell walls are targeted for adherence by E. coli common pilus (ECP; or meningitis-associated and temperature-regulated (Mat) fimbriae) for E. coli serotypes O157:H7 and O18:K1:H7. l-Arabinose is a common constituent of plant cell wall that is rarely found in other organisms, whereas ECP is widespread in E. coli and other environmental enteric species. ECP bound to oligosaccharides of at least arabinotriose or longer in a glycan array, plant cell wall pectic polysaccharides, and plant glycoproteins. Recognition overlapped with the antibody LM13, which binds arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitopes, and showed a preferential affinity for (1→5)-α-linked l-arabinosyl residues and longer chains of arabinan as demonstrated with the use of arabinan-degrading enzymes. Functional adherence in planta was mediated by the adhesin EcpD in combination with the structural subunit, EcpA, and expression was demonstrated with an ecpR-GFP fusion and ECP antibodies. Spinach was found to be enriched for ECP/LM13 targets compared with lettuce. Specific recognition of arabinosyl residues may help explain the persistence of E. coli in the wider environment and association of verotoxigenic E. coli with some fresh produce plants by exploitation of a glycan found only in plant, not animal, cells.

  18. The Neurospora crassa CPS-1 polysaccharide synthase functions in cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ci; Sokolow, Eleanor; Rupert, Christopher B; Free, Stephen J

    2014-08-01

    The Neurospora crassa cps-1 gene encodes a polysaccharide synthase with homology to the Cryptococcus neoformans hyaluronic acid synthase Cps1p. Homologs of the cps-1 gene are found in the genomes of many fungi. Loss of CPS-1 results in a cell wall defect that affects all stages of the N. crassa life cycle, including vegetative growth, protoperithecia (female mating structure) development, and conidia (asexual spore) development. The cell wall of cps-1 deletion mutants is sensitive to cell wall perturbation reagents. Our results demonstrate that CPS-1 is required for the incorporation of cell wall proteins into the cell wall and plays a critical role in cell wall biogenesis. We found that the N. crassa cell wall is devoid of hyaluronic acid, and conclude that the polysaccharide produced by the CPS-1 is not hyaluronic acid.

  19. Immunological and structural homology between human T-cell leukemia virus type I envelope glycoprotein and a region of human interleukin-2 implicated in binding the. beta. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kohtz, D.S.; Kohtz, J.D.; Puszkin, S. ); Altman, A. )

    1988-02-01

    The N-terminal segment of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2) appears to mediate binding of the {beta} hIL-2 receptor. An affinity-purified antibody prepared against this peptide segment (p81) is shown here to cross-react with a homologous region of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) envelope glycoprotein, raising the interesting possibility that the envelope glycoprotein of HTLV-I can interact with the {beta} hIL-2 receptor.

  20. Soluble Signals from Cells Identified at the Cell Wall Establish a Developmental Pathway in Carrot.

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, P. F.; Valentine, T. A.; Forsberg, L. S.; Pennell, R. I.

    1997-01-01

    Cells in a plant differentiate according to their positions and use cell-cell communication to assess these positions. Similarly, single cells in suspension cultures can develop into somatic embryos, and cell-cell communication is thought to control this process. The monoclonal antibody JIM8 labels an epitope on cells in specific positions in plants. JIM8 also labels certain cells in carrot embryogenic suspension cultures. We have used JIM8 and secondary antibodies coupled to paramagnetic beads to label and immunomagnetically sort single cells in a carrot embryogenic suspension culture into pure populations. Cells in the JIM8(+) population develop into somatic embryos, whereas cells in the JIM8(-) population do not form somatic embryos. However, certain cells in JIM8(+) cultures (state B cells) undergo asymmetric divisions, resulting in daughter cells (state C cells) that do not label with JIM8 and that sort to JIM8(-) cultures. State C cells are competent to form somatic embryos, and we show here that a conditioned growth medium from a culture of JIM8(+) cells allows state C cells in a JIM8(-) culture to go on and develop into somatic embryos. JIM8 labels cells in suspension cultures at the cell wall. Therefore, a cell with a role in cell-cell communication and early cell fate selection can be identified by an epitope in its cell wall. PMID:12237357

  1. The CWB2 Cell Wall-Anchoring Module Is Revealed by the Crystal Structures of the Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Proteins Cwp8 and Cwp6.

    PubMed

    Usenik, Aleksandra; Renko, Miha; Mihelič, Marko; Lindič, Nataša; Borišek, Jure; Perdih, Andrej; Pretnar, Gregor; Müller, Uwe; Turk, Dušan

    2017-03-07

    Bacterial cell wall proteins play crucial roles in cell survival, growth, and environmental interactions. In Gram-positive bacteria, cell wall proteins include several types that are non-covalently attached via cell wall binding domains. Of the two conserved surface-layer (S-layer)-anchoring modules composed of three tandem SLH or CWB2 domains, the latter have so far eluded structural insight. The crystal structures of Cwp8 and Cwp6 reveal multi-domain proteins, each containing an embedded CWB2 module. It consists of a triangular trimer of Rossmann-fold CWB2 domains, a feature common to 29 cell wall proteins in Clostridium difficile 630. The structural basis of the intact module fold necessary for its binding to the cell wall is revealed. A comparison with previously reported atomic force microscopy data of S-layers suggests that C. difficile S-layers are complex oligomeric structures, likely composed of several different proteins.

  2. Effect of multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein on the hypoxia-induced multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Jiameng; Xiao, Xiyan

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study, it was demonstrated that hypoxia upregulated the multidrug resistance (MDR) of laryngeal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, with multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression also being upregulated. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of MDR1/P-gp on hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of laryngeal cancer cells to multiple drugs and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by CCK-8 assay and Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis, respectively. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in the cells served as an estimate of drug accumulation and was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). MDR1/P-gp expression was inhibited using interference RNA, and the expression of the MDR1 gene was analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. As a result, the sensitivity to multiple chemotherapeutic agents and the apoptosis rate of the hypoxic laryngeal carcinoma cells increased following a decrease in MDR1/P-gp expression (P<0.05). Additionally, FCM analysis of fluorescence intensity indicated that the downregulated expression of MDR1/P-gp markedly increased intracellular Rh123 accumulation (P<0.05). Such results suggest that MDR1/P-gp serves an important role in regulating hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells through a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation.

  3. Effect of knockdown of ezrin, radixin, and moesin on P-glycoprotein function in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kano, Takashi; Wada, Sho; Morimoto, Kaori; Kato, Yukio; Ogihara, Takuo

    2011-12-01

    Ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins regulate functional expression of certain transporters, but little is known about their effect on P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Here, we investigated the influence of ERM proteins on the expression and activity of P-gp at the transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational levels, using HepG2 as a model cell line. Knockdown of ezrin with RNA interference decreased the level of P-gp messenger RNA. On the contrary, knockdown of radixin caused a decrease of the P-gp gene product at the cell surface, but not in whole cell lysate. Furthermore, a significant increase in accumulation of rhodamine123, a typical P-gp substrate, was observed in radixin knockdown cells, compared with control cells. Knockdown of moesin did not influence the expression or function of P-gp. These results indicate that ezrin influences the expression of P-gp at the translational level, whereas radixin is involved in membrane localization of P-gp in HepG2 cells.

  4. The nectin-1{alpha} transmembrane domain, but not the cytoplasmic tail, influences cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Ravi P.; Dunn, Jennifer E.; Geraghty, Robert J. . E-mail: rgeragh@uky.edu

    2005-09-01

    Nectin-1 is a receptor for herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a cellular adhesion molecule. To study domains of nectin-1{alpha} involved in cell fusion, we measured the ability of nectin-1{alpha}/nectin-2{alpha} chimeras, nectin-1{alpha}/CD4 chimeras, and transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail mutants of nectin-1{alpha} to promote cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that only chimeras and mutants containing the entire V-like domain and a link to the plasma membrane conferred cell-fusion activity. The transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of nectin-1 were not required for any viral receptor or cell adhesion function tested. Cellular cytoplasmic factors that bind to the nectin-1{alpha} cytoplasmic tail, therefore, did not influence virus entry or cell fusion. Interestingly, the efficiency of cell fusion was reduced when membrane-spanning domains of nectin-1{alpha} and gD were replaced by glycosylphosphatidylinositol tethers, indicating that transmembrane domains may play a modulatory role in the gD/nectin-1{alpha} interaction in fusion.

  5. Biological evaluation of bishydroxymethyl-substituted cage dimeric 1,4-dihydropyridines as a novel class of p-glycoprotein modulating agents in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martin; Molnár, Jósef; Hilgeroth, Andreas

    2006-05-04

    A series of N-substituted cage dimeric 1,4-dihydropyridines 3a-e was evaluated as inhibitors of membrane efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in multidrug resistant (mdr) cancer cells. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) and cytotoxic properties are discussed. Effective concentrations for overcoming mdr have been demonstrated in competition studies with the P-gp substrate epirubicin.

  6. Transient sedimentation in a cell with top and bottom walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dance, Sarah; Maxey, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Wall boundary conditions may play a role in the screening of particle velocity fluctuations in Stokes suspensions. Using a Force-Coupling Method (Maxey and Patel, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 27 (2001)) we simulate transient sedimentation. The numerical scheme is a mixed Fourier-spectral element method, based on the Uzawa algorithm for Stokes flows. The sedimentation cell has top and bottom wall boundaries and periodic boundaries in the horizontal. These boundaries are chosen both for computational convenience, and to determine the relative importance of bottom and side walls in screening the velocity fluctuations. We consider several different box sizes, in an attempt to elucidate the connection between particle velocity fluctuation levels and box width. We quantify the evolution of particle mean velocities and fluctuations as well as the particle microstructure. In each case we observe an initial growth, followed by a decay in both the mean particle velocity and fluctuations. We also observe that a stable stratification develops. We suggest that the stratification is important in the evolution of the bulk mean velocity. We propose a mechanism involving particle cluster dynamics to explain the behaviour of the velocity fluctuations.

  7. Forage digestibility: the intersection of cell wall lignification and plant tissue anatomy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cellulose and the other polysaccharides present in forage cell walls can be completely degraded by the rumen microflora but only when these polysaccharides have been isolated from the wall and all matrix structures eliminated. Understanding how cell wall component interactions limit microbial degrad...

  8. Cellulose-hemicellulose interaction in wood secondary cell-wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ning; Li, Shi; Xiong, Liming; Hong, Yu; Chen, Youping

    2015-12-01

    The wood cell wall features a tough and relatively rigid fiber reinforced composite structure. It acts as a pressure vessel, offering protection against mechanical stress. Cellulose microfibrils, hemicellulose and amorphous lignin are the three major components of wood. The structure of secondary cell wall could be imagined as the same as reinforced concrete, in which cellulose microfibrils acts as reinforcing steel bar and hemicellulose-lignin matrices act as the concrete. Therefore, the interface between cellulose and hemicellulose/lignin plays a significant role in determine the mechanical behavior of wood secondary cell wall. To this end, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study attempting to quantify the strength of the interface between cellulose microfibrils and hemicellulose. Since hemicellulose binds with adjacent cellulose microfibrils in various patterns, the atomistic models of hemicellulose-cellulose composites with three typical binding modes, i.e. bridge, loop and random binding modes are constructed. The effect of the shape of hemicellulose chain on the strength of hemicellulose-cellulose composites under shear loadings is investigated. The contact area as well as hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose, together with the covalent bonds in backbone of hemicellulose chain are found to be the controlling parameters which determine the strength of the interfaces in the composite system. For the bridge binding model, the effect of shear loading direction on the strength of the cellulose material is also studied. The obtained results suggest that the shear strength of wood-inspired engineering composites can be optimized through maximizing the formations of the contributing hydrogen bonds between cellulose and hemicellulose.

  9. Understanding the accumulation of P-glycoprotein substrates within cells: The effect of cholesterol on membrane partitioning.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Nandhitha; Schumann-Gillett, Alexandra; Mark, Alan E; O'Mara, Megan L

    2016-04-01

    The apparent activity of the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is enhanced by the presence of cholesterol. Whether this is due to the direct effect of cholesterol on the activity of P-gp, its effect on the local concentration of substrate in the membrane, or its effect on the rate of entry of the drug into the cell, is unknown. In this study, molecular dynamics simulation techniques coupled with potential of mean force calculations have been used to investigate the role of cholesterol in the movement of four P-gp substrates across a POPC bilayer in the presence or absence of 10% cholesterol. The simulations suggest that the presence of cholesterol lowers the free energy associated with entering the middle of the bilayer in a substrate-specific manner. These findings suggest that P-gp substrates may preferentially accumulate in cholesterol-rich regions of the membrane, which may explain its enhanced transport activity.

  10. Stable variant-specific transcripts of the variant cell surface glycoprotein gene 1. 8 expression site in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, C.; Van der Ploeg, L.H.T.

    1988-02-01

    The structure and transcriptional regulation of the 1.8 variant cell surface glycoproteins (VSG) gene expression site located on a 430-kilobase (kb) chromosome was examined in a 430-kb-chromosome-specific library. Using /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts generated by nuclear run-on, the authors selected recombinant clones derived from the 430-kb chromosome which were coordinately activated with the 1.8 VSG gene. The results show that a repetitive region with a minimum size of 27 kb is coordinately activated with the 1.8 VSG gene. As with the 1.8 VSG gene, transcription is by RNA polymerases that are insensitive to the drug alpha-amanitin at concentrations up to 1 mgml. Transcription results in the generation of several stable variant-specific mRNAs. These mRNAs most likely belong to a family of repetitive expression-site-associated genes.

  11. Changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition, gene transcription and alternative splicing in germinating barley embryos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qisen; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Pettolino, Filomena; Zhou, Gaofeng; Li, Chengdao

    2016-02-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seed germination initiates many important biological processes such as DNA, membrane and mitochondrial repairs. However, little is known on cell wall modifications in germinating embryos. We have investigated cell wall polysaccharide composition change, gene transcription and alternative splicing events in four barley varieties at 24h and 48 h germination. Cell wall components in germinating barley embryos changed rapidly, with increases in cellulose and (1,3)(1,4)-β-D-glucan (20-100%) within 24h, but decreases in heteroxylan and arabinan (3-50%). There were also significant changes in the levels of type I arabinogalactans and heteromannans. Alternative splicing played very important roles in cell wall modifications. At least 22 cell wall transcripts were detected to undergo either alternative 3' splicing, alternative 5' splicing or intron retention type of alternative splicing. These genes coded enzymes catalyzing synthesis and degradation of cellulose, heteroxylan, (1,3)(1,4)-β-D-glucan and other cell wall polymers. Furthermore, transcriptional regulation also played very important roles in cell wall modifications. Transcript levels of primary wall cellulase synthase, heteroxylan synthesizing and nucleotide sugar inter-conversion genes were very high in germinating embryos. At least 50 cell wall genes changed transcript levels significantly. Expression patterns of many cell wall genes coincided with changes in polysaccharide composition. Our data showed that cell wall polysaccharide metabolism was very active in germinating barley embryos, which was regulated at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  12. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A {beta}-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 {eta}g/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. {sup 125}I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO{sub 2} delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed.

  13. Lignification in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Arata; Kusumoto, Hiroshi; Laurans, Françoise; Pilate, Gilles; Takabe, Keiji

    2012-09-01

    The lignification process in poplar tension wood lignified cell wall layers, specifically the S(1) and S(2) layers and the compound middle lamella (CML), was analysed using ultraviolet (UV) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Variations in the thickness of the gelatinous layer (G-layer) were also measured to clarify whether the lignified cell wall layers had completed their lignification before the deposition of G-layers, or, on the contrary, if lignification of these layers was still active during G-layer formation. Observations using UV microscopy and TEM indicated that both UV absorbance and the degree of potassium permanganate staining increased in the CML and S(1) and S(2) layers during G-layer formation, suggesting that the lignification of these lignified layers is still in progress during G-layer formation. In the context of the cell-autonomous monolignol synthesis hypothesis, our observations suggest that monolignols must go through the developing G-layer during the lignification of CML and the S(1) and S(2) layers. The alternative hypothesis of external synthesis (in the rays) does not require that monolignols go through the G-layer before being deposited in the CML, or the S(1) and S(2) layers. Interestingly, the previous observation of lignin in the poplar G-layer was not confirmed with the microscopy techniques used in the present study.

  14. The mechanisms of plant cell wall deconstruction during enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lisbeth G; Thybring, Emil E; Johansen, Katja S; Felby, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble plant biomass at high dry matter contents is indispensable for the initial liquefaction step in biorefining. It is known that particle size reduction is an important part of liquefaction, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Here we put forward a simple model based on mechanical principles capable of capturing the result of the interaction between mechanical forces and cell wall weakening via hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds. This study illustrates that basic material science insights are relevant also within biochemistry, particularly when it comes to up-scaling of processes based on insoluble feed stocks.

  15. Amino acids of the cell wall of Nocardia rubra.

    PubMed

    Beaman, B L; Kim, K S; Salton, M R; Barksdale, L

    1971-11-01

    Two classes of preparations of cell walls of Nocardia rubra strain 721-A, digested by trypsin and pepsin with or without subsequent extraction in alkaline ethanol, when examined by electron microscope and analyzed quantitatively for amino acid content differ in ultrastructure and constituent amino acids. Evidence suggests that the lipid-associated amino acids (as peptide or protein) occupy a location superficial to the basal peptido-glycan layer of this nocardia. Their removal is associated with the loss of a characteristic pattern of the outer envelope.

  16. Theoretical investigation on breaking plant cell wall by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-cai; Wang, Jin-ji; Ma, Peng; Zuo, Du-luo; Wang, Xin-bing; Cheng, Zu-hai

    2011-11-01

    The experiment collected some spinach leaves which were irradiated by pulsed CO2 laser with energy 5.6J, 8.0J and 9.5J respectively. Each of them was soaked in three kinds of solvents (water, ethanol, the mixture of ethanol and petroleum ether) respectively. The experiment shows that the ethanol solution which contains the irradiated leaves turn dark green than the ethanol solution which contains the intact leaves and the color of solution with the leaves irradiated by CO2 laser with 9.5J changes the most significantly. Further, selective excitation on the molecular level of the cell wall were used to explain the phenomenon.

  17. Theoretical investigation on breaking plant cell wall by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-cai; Wang, Jin-ji; Ma, Peng; Zuo, Du-luo; Wang, Xin-bing; Cheng, Zu-hai

    2012-03-01

    The experiment collected some spinach leaves which were irradiated by pulsed CO2 laser with energy 5.6J, 8.0J and 9.5J respectively. Each of them was soaked in three kinds of solvents (water, ethanol, the mixture of ethanol and petroleum ether) respectively. The experiment shows that the ethanol solution which contains the irradiated leaves turn dark green than the ethanol solution which contains the intact leaves and the color of solution with the leaves irradiated by CO2 laser with 9.5J changes the most significantly. Further, selective excitation on the molecular level of the cell wall were used to explain the phenomenon.

  18. Structure, cell wall elasticity and polysaccharide properties of living yeast cells, as probed by AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsteens, David; Dupres, Vincent; McEvoy, Kevin; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2008-09-01

    Although the chemical composition of yeast cell walls is known, the organization, assembly, and interactions of the various macromolecules remain poorly understood. Here, we used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) in three different modes to probe the ultrastructure, cell wall elasticity and polymer properties of two brewing yeast strains, i.e. Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and S. cerevisiae. Topographic images of the two strains revealed smooth and homogeneous cell surfaces, and the presence of circular bud scars on dividing cells. Nanomechanical measurements demonstrated that the cell wall elasticity of S. carlsbergensis is homogeneous. By contrast, the bud scar of S. cerevisiae was found to be stiffer than the cell wall, presumably due to the accumulation of chitin. Notably, single molecule force spectroscopy with lectin-modified tips revealed major differences in polysaccharide properties of the two strains. Polysaccharides were clearly more extended on S. cerevisiae, suggesting that not only oligosaccharides, but also polypeptide chains of the mannoproteins were stretched. Consistent with earlier cell surface analyses, these findings may explain the very different aggregation properties of the two organisms. This study demonstrates the power of using multiple complementary AFM modalities for probing the organization and interactions of the various macromolecules of microbial cell walls.

  19. Heterogeneity in the chemistry, structure and function of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Burton, Rachel A; Gidley, Michael J; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    2010-10-01

    Higher plants resist the forces of gravity and powerful lateral forces through the cumulative strength of the walls that surround individual cells. These walls consist mainly of cellulose, noncellulosic polysaccharides and lignin, in proportions that depend upon the specific functions of the cell and its stage of development. Spatially and temporally controlled heterogeneity in the physicochemical properties of wall polysaccharides is observed at the tissue and individual cell levels, and emerging in situ technologies are providing evidence that this heterogeneity also occurs across a single cell wall. We consider the origins of cell wall heterogeneity and identify contributing factors that are inherent in the molecular mechanisms of polysaccharide biosynthesis and are crucial for the changing biological functions of the wall during growth and development. We propose several key questions to be addressed in cell wall biology, together with an alternative two-phase model for the assembly of noncellulosic polysaccharides in plants.

  20. Gangliosides are functional nerve cell ligands for myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), an inhibitor of nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Alka A; Patel, Himatkumar V; Fromholt, Susan E; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Vyas, Kavita A; Dang, Jiyoung; Schachner, Melitta; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2002-06-11

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) binds to the nerve cell surface and inhibits nerve regeneration. The nerve cell surface ligand(s) for MAG are not established, although sialic acid-bearing glycans have been implicated. We identify the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as specific functional ligands for MAG-mediated inhibition of neurite outgrowth from primary rat cerebellar granule neurons. MAG-mediated neurite outgrowth inhibition is attenuated by (i) neuraminidase treatment of the neurons; (ii) blocking neuronal ganglioside biosynthesis; (iii) genetically modifying the terminal structures of nerve cell surface gangliosides; and (iv) adding highly specific IgG-class antiganglioside mAbs. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth inhibition is mimicked by highly multivalent clustering of GD1a or GT1b by using precomplexed antiganglioside Abs. These data implicate the nerve cell surface gangliosides GD1a and GT1b as functional MAG ligands and suggest that the first step in MAG inhibition is multivalent ganglioside clustering.

  1. In situ microscopic observation of chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls in hydrothermal conditions

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, Shigeru; Tsujii, Kaoru; Horikoshi, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings of intact chitin in fossil records suggest surprisingly high recalcitrance of this biopolymer during hydrothermal treatments. We also know in the experience of everyday life that mushroom, cells of which have chitinous cell walls, do not fall apart however long they are simmered. We used in situ optical microscopy to examine chitin and fungal cells with chitinous cell walls during hydrothermal treatments, and obtained direct evidence that they remained undegraded at temperatures well over 200 °C. The results show very hot and compressed water is needed to make mushrooms mushy. PMID:26148792

  2. Effect of cigarette smoke extract on P-glycoprotein function in primary cultured and newly developed alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Naka, Ryosuke; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Nishimoto, Saori; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-12-01

    The effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function in the distal lung is unclear. In this study, we first examined the expression and function of P-gp and the effect of CSE in rat primary cultured alveolar epithelial cells. The expression of P-gp protein was observed in type I-like cells, but not in type II cells. In type I-like cells, rhodamine 123 (Rho123) accumulation was enhanced by various P-gp inhibitors such as verapamil and cyclosporine A. In addition, the expression of P-gp mRNAs, mdr1a and mdr1b, as well as P-gp activity increased along with the transdifferentiation. When type I-like cells were co-incubated with CSE, P-gp activity was suppressed. Next, we attempted to clarify the effect of CSE on P-gp function in human-derived cultured alveolar epithelial cells. For this purpose, we isolated an A549 clone (A549/P-gp) expressing P-gp, because P-gp expression in native A549 cells was negligible. In A549/P-gp cells, P-gp was functionally expressed, and the inhibitory effect of CSE on P-gp was observed. These results suggested that smoking would directly suppress P-gp activity, and that A549/P-gp cell line should be a useful model to further study the effect of xenobiotics on P-gp function in the alveolar epithelial cells.

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 specifically inhibit the CD3/T cell-antigen receptor phosphoinositide transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Cefai, D; Debre, P; Kaczorek, M; Idziorek, T; Autran, B; Bismuth, G

    1990-01-01

    The interference of the recombinant HIV-1 glycoproteins gp160 and gp120 with the CD3/T cell antigen receptor (TcR)-mediated activation process has been investigated in the CD4+ diphtheria toxoid-specific human P28D T cell clone. Both glycoproteins clearly inhibit the T cell proliferation induced in an antigen-presenting cell (APC)-free system by various cross-linked monoclonal antibodies specific for the CD3 molecule or the TcR alpha chain (up to 80% inhibition). Biochemical studies further demonstrate that exposure of the T cell clone to both glycoproteins (gps) specifically inhibits the CD3/TcR phospholipase C (PLC) transduction pathway, without affecting the CD3/TcR cell surface expression. Thus, inositol phosphate production, phosphatidic acid turnover, intracellular free calcium, and intracellular pH increase induced by CD3/TcR-specific MAbs are specifically impaired in gps-treated P28D T cells. Addition of purified soluble CD4 prevents binding of gps to T cells and overcomes all observed inhibitions. Maximal inhibitions are obtained for long-term exposure of the T cell clone to gps (16 h). No early effect of gps is observed. By contrast, gp160 and gp120 fail to suppress the CD2-triggered functional and biochemical P28D T cell responses. These results demonstrate that, in addition to their postulated role in the alteration of the interaction between CD4 on T lymphocytes and MHC class II molecules on APC, soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins may directly and specifically impair the CD3/TcR-mediated activation of PLC in uninfected T cells via the CD4 molecule. PMID:1979339

  4. Vessel wall-embedded dendritic cells induce T-cell autoreactivity and initiate vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji W; Shimada, Kazunori; Ma-Krupa, Wei; Johnson, Tiffany L; Nerem, Robert M; Goronzy, Jörg J; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2008-03-14

    Human medium-sized and large arteries are targeted by inflammation with innate and adaptive immune responses occurring within the unique microspace of the vessel wall. How 3D spatial arrangements influence immune recognition and cellular response thresholds and which cell populations sense immunoactivating ligands and function as antigen-presenting cells are incompletely understood. To mimic the 3D context of human arteries, bioartificial arteries were engineered from collagen type I matrix, human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and human endothelial cells and populated with cells implicated in antigen presentation and T-cell stimulation, including monocytes, macrophages, and myeloid dendritic cells (DCs). Responsiveness of wall-embedded antigen-presenting cells was probed with the Toll-like receptor ligand lipopolysaccharide, and inflammation was initiated by adding autologous CD4(+) T cells. DCs colonized the outermost VSMC layer, recapitulating their positioning at the media-adventitia border of normal arteries. Wall-embedded DCs responded to the microbial product lipopolysaccharide by entering the maturation program and upregulating the costimulatory ligand CD86. Activated DCs effectively stimulated autologous CD4 T cells, which produced the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma and infiltrated deeply into the VSMC layer, causing matrix damage. Lipopolysaccharide-triggered macrophages were significantly less efficacious in recruiting T cells and promoting T-cell stimulation. CD14(+) monocytes, even when preactivated, failed to support initial steps of vascular wall inflammation. Innate immune cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and DCs, display differential functions in the vessel wall. DCs are superior in sensing pathogen-derived motifs and are highly efficient in breaking T-cell tolerance, guiding T cells toward proinflammatory and tissue-invasive behavior.

  5. 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Jeremy, Kris P.; Plummer, Zoe E.; Head, David J.; Madgett, Tracey E.; Sanders, Kelly L.; Wallington, Amanda; Storry, Jill R.; Gilsanz, Florinda; Delaunay, Jean; Avent, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein 4.1R is an important component of the red cell membrane skeleton. It imparts structural integrity and has transmembrane signaling roles by direct interactions with transmembrane proteins and other membrane skeletal components, notably p55 and calmodulin. Design and Methods Spontaneous and ligation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure on erythrocytes from two patients with 4.1R deficiency were studied, using CD47 glycoprotein and glycophorin C as ligands. We also looked for protein abnormalities in the 4.1R - based multiprotein complex. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly increased in 4.1R-deficient erythrocytes obtained from the two different individuals when ligands to CD47 glycoprotein were bound. Spontaneous phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. 4.1R, glycophorin C and p55 were missing or sharply reduced. Furthermore there was an alteration or deficiency of CD47 glycoprotein and a lack of CD44 glycoprotein. Based on a recent study in 4.1R-deficient mice, we found that there are clear functional differences between interactions of human red cell 4.1R and its murine counterpart. Conclusions Glycophorin C is known to bind 4.1R, and we have defined previously that it also binds CD47. From our evidence, we suggest that 4.1R plays a role in the phosphatidylserine exposure signaling pathway that is of fundamental importance in red cell turnover. The linkage of CD44 to 4.1R may be relevant to this process. PMID:19794081

  6. Glycoside Hydrolase MoGls2 Controls Asexual/Sexual Development, Cell Wall Integrity and Infectious Growth in the Rice Blast Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengying; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Zhixi; Sun, Yi; Liu, Muxing; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a way of glycosylation for newly synthesized protein, which plays a key role in the maturation and transport of proteins. Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are essential in this process, and are involved in processing of N-linked glycoproteins or degradation of carbohydrate structures. Here, we identified and characterized MoGls2 in Magnaporthe oryzae, which is a yeast glucosidase II homolog Gls2 and is required for trimming the final glucose in N-linked glycans and normal cell wall synthesis. Target deletion of MoGLS2 in M. oryzae resulted in a reduced mycelial growth, an increased conidial production, delayed conidial germination and loss the ability of sexual reproduction. Pathogenicity assays revealed that the ΔMogls2 mutant showed significantly decreased in virulence and infectious growth. Further studies showed that the mutant was less sensitive to salt and osmotic stress, and increased sensitivity to cell wall stresses. Additionally, the ΔMogls2 mutant showed a defect in cell wall integrity. Our results indicate that MoGls2 is a key protein for the growth and development of M. oryzae, involving in the regulation of asexual/sexual development, stress response, cell wall integrity and infectious growth. PMID:27607237

  7. Penium margaritaceum: A Unicellular Model Organism for Studying Plant Cell Wall Architecture and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S

    2014-11-18

    Penium margaritaceum is a new and valuable unicellular model organism for studying plant cell wall structure and developmental dynamics. This charophyte has a cell wall composition remarkably similar to the primary cell wall of many higher plants and clearly-defined inclusive zones containing specific polymers. Penium has a simple cylindrical phenotype with a distinct region of focused wall synthesis. Specific polymers, particularly pectins, can be identified using monoclonal antibodies raised against polymers of higher plant cell walls. Immunofluorescence-based labeling is easily performed using live cells that subsequently can be returned to culture and monitored. This feature allows for rapid assessment of wall expansion rates and identification of multiple polymer types in the wall microarchitecture during the cell cycle. Cryofixation by means of spray freezing provides excellent transmission electron microscopy imaging of the cell, including its elaborate endomembrane and cytoskeletal systems, both integral to cell wall development. Penium's fast growth rate allows for convenient microarray screening of various agents that alter wall biosynthesis and metabolism. Finally, recent successful development of transformed cell lines has allowed for non-invasive imaging of proteins in cells and for RNAi reverse genetics that can be used for cell wall biosynthesis studies.

  8. Daughter cell separation is controlled by cytokinetic ring-activated cell wall hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Parzych, Katherine R; Dinh, Thuy; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2010-04-21

    During bacterial cytokinesis, hydrolytic enzymes are used to split wall material shared by adjacent daughter cells to promote their separation. Precise control over these enzymes is critical to prevent breaches in wall integrity that can cause cell lysis. How these potentially lethal hydrolases are regulated has remained unknown. Here, we investigate the regulation of cell wall turnover at the Escherichia coli division site. We show that two components of the division machinery with LytM domains (EnvC and NlpD) are direct regulators of the cell wall hydrolases (amidases) responsible for cell separation (AmiA, AmiB and AmiC). Using in vitro cell wall cleavage assays, we show that EnvC activates AmiA and AmiB, whereas NlpD activates AmiC. Consistent with these findings, we show that an unregulated EnvC mutant requires functional AmiA or AmiB but not AmiC to induce cell lysis, and that the loss of NlpD phenocopies an AmiC(-) defect. Overall, our results suggest that cellular amidase activity is regulated spatially and temporally by coupling their activation to the assembly of the cytokinetic ring.

  9. Daughter cell separation is controlled by cytokinetic ring-activated cell wall hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Parzych, Katherine R; Dinh, Thuy; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2010-01-01

    During bacterial cytokinesis, hydrolytic enzymes are used to split wall material shared by adjacent daughter cells to promote their separation. Precise control over these enzymes is critical to prevent breaches in wall integrity that can cause cell lysis. How these potentially lethal hydrolases are regulated has remained unknown. Here, we investigate the regulation of cell wall turnover at the Escherichia coli division site. We show that two components of the division machinery with LytM domains (EnvC and NlpD) are direct regulators of the cell wall hydrolases (amidases) responsible for cell separation (AmiA, AmiB and AmiC). Using in vitro cell wall cleavage assays, we show that EnvC activates AmiA and AmiB, whereas NlpD activates AmiC. Consistent with these findings, we show that an unregulated EnvC mutant requires functional AmiA or AmiB but not AmiC to induce cell lysis, and that the loss of NlpD phenocopies an AmiC− defect. Overall, our results suggest that cellular amidase activity is regulated spatially and temporally by coupling their activation to the assembly of the cytokinetic ring. PMID:20300061

  10. The Impact of Microfibril Orientations on the Biomechanics of Plant Cell Walls and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Ptashnyk, Mariya; Seguin, Brian

    2016-11-01

    The microscopic structure and anisotropy of plant cell walls greatly influence the mechanical properties, morphogenesis, and growth of plant cells and tissues. The microscopic structure and properties of cell walls are determined by the orientation and mechanical properties of the cellulose microfibrils and the mechanical properties of the cell wall matrix. Viewing the shape of a plant cell as a square prism with the axis aligning with the primary direction of expansion and growth, the orientation of the microfibrils within the side walls, i.e. the parts of the cell walls on the sides of the cells, is known. However, not much is known about their orientation at the upper and lower ends of the cell. Here we investigate the impact of the orientation of cellulose microfibrils within the upper and lower parts of the plant cell walls by solving the equations of linear elasticity numerically. Three different scenarios for the orientation of the microfibrils are considered. We also distinguish between the microstructure in the side walls given by microfibrils perpendicular to the main direction of the expansion and the situation where the microfibrils are rotated through the wall thickness. The macroscopic elastic properties of the cell wall are obtained using homogenization theory from the microscopic description of the elastic properties of the cell wall microfibrils and wall matrix. It is found that the orientation of the microfibrils in the upper and lower parts of the cell walls affects the expansion of the cell in the lateral directions and is particularly important in the case of forces acting on plant cell walls and tissues.

  11. Properties of lead deposits in cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus) roots.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Tatai, Yuri; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Hayatsu, Manabu; Ono, Manami; Suzuki, Suechika

    2013-01-01

    Various mechanisms are involved in detoxification of heavy metals such as lead (Pb) in plant cells. Most of the Pb taken up by plants accumulates in their roots. However, the detailed properties of Pb complexes in roots remain unclear. We have investigated the properties of Pb deposits in root cell walls of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings grown on glass beads bed containing Pb pellets, which are the source of Pb-contamination in shooting range soils. Pb deposits were tightly bound to cell walls. Cell wall fragments containing about 50,000 ppm Pb were prepared from the roots. After extracting Pb from the cell wall fragments using HCl, Pb ions were recombined with the Pb-extracted cell wall fragments in a solution containing Pb acetate. When the cell wall fragments were treated with pectinase (E.C. 3.2.1.15) and were chemically modified with 1-ethyl-3-dimethylamino-propylcarboimide, the Pb-rebinding ability of the treated cell wall fragments decreased. When acid-treated cell wall fragments were incubated in a solution containing Pb(2+) and excess amounts of a chelating agent, Pb recombined with the cell wall fragments were measured to estimate the affinity between Pb(2+) and the cell wall fragments. Our data show that Pb(2+) binds to carboxyl groups of cell walls. The source of the carboxyl groups is suggested to be pectic compounds. A stability constant of the Pb-cell wall complex was estimated to be about 10(8). The role of root cell walls in the mechanism underlying heavy metal tolerance was discussed.

  12. Cytotoxic effect of the cyclosporin PSC 833 in multidrug-resistant leukaemia cells with increased expression of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, G.; Rugstad, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anti-cancer agents is frequently associated with overexpression of the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) in cancer cells, ensuing drug expulsion and maintenance of tolerable intracellular levels of certain cytotoxic drugs. Pgp may also be present in normal tissue, providing protection against toxic substances, but the physiological role of Pgp is not fully understood. Recently, it was shown that Pgp also takes part in the transport of certain growth-regulating cytokines (Drach et al, 1996; Raghu et al, 1996). Therefore, we studied the effect of the highly potent Pgp inhibitor PSC 833 on proliferation of three pairs of MDR and parental human cell lines (HB8065 hepatoma cells, KG1a and K562 leukaemia cells). The MDR phenotypes were characterized by Pgp overexpression, which was demonstrated by flow cytometry using the anti-Pgp antibody MRK16. Electronic cell counting of 72-96 h cultures revealed a dose-dependent antiproliferative effect of PSC 833 in the resistant KG1a/200 and K562/150 cells. The half-maximal growth inhibitory concentrations (GI50) were 0.2 microM and 0.7 microM respectively. Exposure to PSC 833 induced cell death by apoptosis in both cell types, as revealed by flow cytometry and detection of 3'-hydroxy ends of DNA (the result of DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis), by terminal transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labelling (TUNEL). Similar effects were not found in the hepatoma cell lines or the parental leukaemia lines. These results demonstrated a discriminating cytotoxicity of PSC 833 in two human leukaemia MDR variants, representing a possible therapeutic indication which warrants consideration during the ongoing clinical evaluation of this drug. Images Figure 8 PMID:9744497

  13. Chemical Profiling of the Plant Cell Wall through Raman Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Singh, Seema; Sun, Lan; Simmons, Blake; Auer, Manfred; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-03-02

    This paper presents a computational framework for chemical pro.ling of the plant cell wall through the Raman spectroscopy. The system enables query of known spectral signatures and clustering of spectral data based on intrinsic properties. As a result, presence and relative concentration of speci.c chemical bonds can be quanti.ed. The primary contribution of this paper is in representation of raman pro.le in terms of .uorescence background and multiscale peak detection at each grid point (voxel). Such a representation allows ef.cient spatial segmentation based on the coupling between high-level salient properties and low-level symbolic representation at each voxel. The high-level salient properties refer to preferred peaks and their attributes for the entire image. The low-level symbolic representations are based on .uorescence background, spectral peak locations, and their attributes. We present results on a corn stover tissue section that is imaged through Raman microscopy, and the results are consistent with the literature. In addition, automatic clustering indicates several distinct layers of the cell walls with different spectral signatures.

  14. Biosynthesis of non-cellulosic polysaccharides of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Dhugga, Kanwarpal S

    2012-02-01

    Enzymes that make the polymer backbones of plant cell wall polysaccharides have proven to be recalcitrant to biochemical purification. Availability of mutational genetics and genomic tools paved the way for rapid progress in identifying genes encoding various cell wall glycan synthases. Mutational genetics, the primary tool used in unraveling cellulose biosynthesis, was ineffective in assigning function to any of the hemicellulosic, polymerizing glycan synthases. A combination of comparative genomics and functional expression in a heterologous system allowed identification of various cellulose synthase-like (Csl) sequences as being involved in the formation of β-1,4-mannan, β-1,4-glucan, and mixed-linked glucan. A number of xylose-deficient mutants have led to a variety of genes, none of which thus far possesses the motifs known to be conserved among polymerizing β-glycan synthases. Except for xylan synthase, which appears to be an agglomerate of proteins just like cellulose synthase, Golgi glycan synthases already identified suggest that the catalytic polypeptide by itself is sufficient for enzyme activity, most likely as a homodimer. Several of the Csl genes remain to be assigned a function. The possibility of the involvement of various Csl genes in making more than one product remains.

  15. Ultrastructure of the Epidermal Cell Wall and Cuticle of Tomato Fruit (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during Development.

    PubMed

    Segado, Patricia; Domínguez, Eva; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The epidermis plays a pivotal role in plant development and interaction with the environment. However, it is still poorly understood, especially its outer epidermal wall: a singular wall covered by a cuticle. Changes in the cuticle and cell wall structures are important to fully understand their functions. In this work, an ultrastructure and immunocytochemical approach was taken to identify changes in the cuticle and the main components of the epidermal cell wall during tomato fruit development. A thin and uniform procuticle was already present before fruit set. During cell division, the inner side of the procuticle showed a globular structure with vesicle-like particles in the cell wall close to the cuticle. Transition between cell division and elongation was accompanied by a dramatic increase in cuticle thickness, which represented more than half of the outer epidermal wall, and the lamellate arrangement of the non-cutinized cell wall. Changes in this non-cutinized outer wall during development showed specific features not shared with other cell walls. The coordinated nature of the changes observed in the cuticle and the epidermal cell wall indicate a deep interaction between these two supramolecular structures. Hence, the cuticle should be interpreted within the context of the outer epidermal wall.

  16. The toughness of secondary cell wall and woody tissue

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, P. W.; Tan, H. T. W.; Cheng, P. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The 'across grain' toughness of 51 woods has been determined on thin wet sections using scissors. The moisture content of sections and the varying sharpness of the scissor blades had little effect on the results. In thin sections (less than 0.6mm), toughness rose linearly with section thickness. The intercept toughness at zero thickness, estimated from regression analysis, was proportional to relative density, consistent with values reported for non-woody plant tissues. Extrapolation of the intercept toughness of these woods and other plant tissues/materials to a relative density of 1.0 predicted a toughness of 3.45kJ m-2 , which we identify with the intrinsic toughness of the cell wall. This quantity appears to predict published results from KIC tests on woods and is related to the propensity for crack deflection. The slope of the relationship between section thickness and toughness, describing the work of plastic buckling of cells, was not proportional to relative density, the lightest (balsa) and heaviest (lignum vitae) woods fracturing with less plastic work than predicted. The size of the plastic zone around the crack tip was estimated to be 0.5mm in size. From this, the hypothetical overall toughness of a thick (greater than 1 mm) block of solid cell wall material was calculated as 39.35 kJ m-2, due to both cell wall resistance (10 per cent) and the plastic buckling of cells (90 per cent). This value successfully predicts the toughness of most commercial woods (of relative densities between 0.2 and 0.8) from 'work area' tests in tension and bending. Though density was the most important factor, both fibre width/fibre length (in hardwoods) and lignin/cellulose ratios were negatively correlated with the work of plastic buckling, after correcting for density. At low densities the work of plastic buckling in the longitudinal radial (LR) direction exceeded that in longitudinal tangential (LT), but the reverse was true for relative densities above 0.25. This could

  17. The cytoplasmic tail of the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF negatively affects transport to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Oeffner, F; Klenk, H D; Herrler, G

    1999-02-01

    The surface glycoprotein, HEF, of influenza C virus (C/Johannesburg/1/66) has been shown to undergo a post-translation conformational change that is evident in a dramatic change of electrophoretic mobility. If the corresponding gene is expressed in the absence of other viral proteins, this folding process does not occur at all or only very inefficiently. A chimaeric protein, HEF-HA(Tail), in which the short cytoplasmic tail (Arg-Thr-Lys) of HEF was replaced by the cytoplasmic tail of the haemagglutinin of an influenza A virus (fowl plague virus) was constructed. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the chimaeric protein was detected on the cell surface. No further improvement of the surface expression was observed when both the transmembrane domain and the cytoplasmic tail were replaced by the corresponding domains of either the influenza A haemagglutinin or gp40, an endogenous protein of MDCK cells. For the HEF-HA(Tail) construct this study shows that a substantial amount of the protein is converted to the 100 kDa mature form that is observed in virus-infected cells. The HEF-HA expressed on the cell surface reacted positively in esterase and haemadsorption assays, indicating that it was present in a biologically active form. The results show that the short cytoplasmic tail of HEF has a negative effect on the folding and surface transport of this protein. How this effect may be prevented during a virus infection is discussed.