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Sample records for cell wall glycoproteins

  1. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the plant cell wall)

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the chemistry and architecture of plant cells walls, the extracellular matrices that taken together shape the plant and provide mechanical support for the plant. Cell walls are dynamic structures that regulate, or are the site of, many physiological processes, in addition to being the cells' first line of defense against invading pathogens. In the past year we have examined the role of the cell wall enzyme ascorbic acid oxidase as related to the structure of the wall and its possible interactions with hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the wall.

  2. Secondary cell-wall-specific glycoprotein(s) from French bean hypocotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, P; Bolwell, G P

    1995-01-01

    Specific labeling of secondary cell walls of tracheary elements and of xylary and phloem fibers has been observed when wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and anti-WGA antibodies were used during ultrastructural studies of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) hypocotyls. In this report we demonstrate that at least part of this labeling is due to the presence of secondary cell-wall-specific glycoproteins. Three major novel glycoproteins with relative molecular weights of 55,000, 86,000, and 90,000, purified by means of WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatography, have been characterized. Their amino acid composition indicates that they are not the members of known classes of structural cell-wall proteins, since they contain no hydroxyproline, a lower level of glycine than seen in glycine-rich proteins, and very little proline. N-terminal sequences of all three proteins show no significant homology with other proteins. Antibodies were raised against electrophoretically pure 90-kD glycoprotein. These were used to localize this protein in secondary cell walls of xylem tracheary elements and in xylary and phloem fibers, i.e. in the same compartments where labeling with WGA has been observed. To our knowledge this is one of the first biochemical and ultrastructural demonstrations of secondary cell-wall-specific glycoproteins. PMID:7630932

  3. Glycoproteins from the cell wall of Phaseolus coccineus.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, M A; Selvendran, R R

    1980-04-01

    1. The use of a modified sodium chlorite/acetic acid delignification procedure for the solubilization of a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein fraction from the depectinated cell walls of Phaseolus coccineus is described. 2. The crude glycoprotein was associated with some pectic material; hydroxyproline and serine were the most abundant amino acids, and arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid the predominant monosaccharides. 3. The bulk of the hydroxyproline is O-glycosidically substituted with tetra- and tri-arabinofuranosides. From methylation analysis the linkages in these arabinosides could be inferred. 4. Ion-exchange chromatography of the crude glycoprotein gave one major and two minor hydroxyproline-rich fractions, with similar amino acid but different monosaccharide composition. 5. In the major fraction, serine appears to be O-glycosidically substituted with a single galactopyranoside residue that can be removed by the action of alpha-galactosidase but not beta-galactosidase. Removal of arabinofuranoside residues by partial acid hydrolysis greatly enhanced the action of alpha-galactosidase. 6. Methylation followed by carboxy reduction with LiAl2H4 has shown the presence of (1 leads to 4)-linked galacturonic acid in the crude glycoprotein fraction but not in the major fraction from the ion-exchange column. Hence the bulk of the pectic material is not associated with the major glycoprotein component. It is suggested that the glycoprotein is held in the wall by phenolic cross-links. 7. Similarities with the glycopeptide moiety of potato lectin provides further evidence for a class of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins with common features.

  4. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  5. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewisa substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  6. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review.

  7. Enhancement of non-Candida antibody responses by Candida albicans cell wall glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Domer, J E; Elkins, K L; Ennist, D L; Stashak, P W; Garner, R E; Baker, P J

    1987-11-01

    Two cell wall glycoprotein extracts from Candida albicans (glycoprotein [GP] and peptidoglucomannan [PGM]) were tested for their influence on antibody responses to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide and sheep erythrocytes. GP was isolated from lipid-extracted cell walls with ethylenediamine, whereas PGM was extracted with dilute sodium hydroxide. Both glycoproteins increased the number of antibody-producing plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with type III polysaccharide or sheep erythrocytes, although PGM appeared to be about 10 times more effective. PGM could be administered up to 3 days prior to immunization with sheep erythrocytes to elicit enhancement; it did not have to be administered by the same route as the immunogen to cause significant enhancement. Enhancement did not appear to be the result of a direct mitogenic effect of GP and PGM on lymphocytes, nor did these glycoproteins appear to stimulate the production of B-cell growth factors or interleukin 2.

  8. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H[sub 2]O[sub 2] production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H[sub 2]O[sub 2] is involved in normal lignification.

  9. The cell-wall glycoproteins of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The predominant cell-wall polypeptide of Scenedesmus obliquus is related to the cell-wall glycoprotein gp3 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Stolarczyk, Adam; Zych, Maria; Malec, Przemysław; Burczyk, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains a multilayered cell wall, ultrastructurally similar to that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although its proportion of hydroxyproline is considerably lower. Therefore, we have investigated the polypeptide composition of the insoluble and the chaotrope-soluble wall fractions of S. obliquus. The polypeptide pattern of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction was strongly modified by chemical deglycosylation with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) in pyridine indicating that most of these polypeptides are glycosylated. Polypeptide constituents of the chaotrope-soluble cell-wall fraction with apparent molecular masses of 240, 270, 265, and 135 kDa cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 100 kDa deglycosylation product of the C. reinhardtii cell-wall glycoprotein GP3B. Chemical deglycosylation of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction resulted in a 135 kDa major polypeptide and a 106 kDa minor component reacting with the same antibody. This antibody recognized specific peptide epitopes of GP3B. When the insoluble wall fraction of S. obliquus was treated with anhydrous HF/pyridine, three polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 144, 135, and 65 kDa were solubilized, which also occured in the deglycosylated chaotrope-soluble wall fraction. These findings indicate that theses glycoproteins are cross-linked to the insoluble wall fraction via HF-sensitive bonds.

  10. The cell-wall glycoproteins of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The predominant cell-wall polypeptide of Scenedesmus obliquus is related to the cell-wall glycoprotein gp3 of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Stolarczyk, Adam; Zych, Maria; Malec, Przemysław; Burczyk, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus obliquus contains a multilayered cell wall, ultrastructurally similar to that of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, although its proportion of hydroxyproline is considerably lower. Therefore, we have investigated the polypeptide composition of the insoluble and the chaotrope-soluble wall fractions of S. obliquus. The polypeptide pattern of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction was strongly modified by chemical deglycosylation with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (HF) in pyridine indicating that most of these polypeptides are glycosylated. Polypeptide constituents of the chaotrope-soluble cell-wall fraction with apparent molecular masses of 240, 270, 265, and 135 kDa cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody raised against the 100 kDa deglycosylation product of the C. reinhardtii cell-wall glycoprotein GP3B. Chemical deglycosylation of the chaotrope-soluble wall fraction resulted in a 135 kDa major polypeptide and a 106 kDa minor component reacting with the same antibody. This antibody recognized specific peptide epitopes of GP3B. When the insoluble wall fraction of S. obliquus was treated with anhydrous HF/pyridine, three polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 144, 135, and 65 kDa were solubilized, which also occured in the deglycosylated chaotrope-soluble wall fraction. These findings indicate that theses glycoproteins are cross-linked to the insoluble wall fraction via HF-sensitive bonds. PMID:24388513

  11. Cell wall glycoproteins at interaction sites between parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its host Pelargonium zonale.

    PubMed

    Striberny, Bernd; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The process of host plant penetration by parasitic dodder (genus Cuscuta) is accompanied by molecular and structural changes at the host/parasite interface. Recently, changes in pectin methyl esterification levels in the host cell walls abutting parasitic cells in established infection sites were reported. In addition to that, we show here that the composition of cell wall glycoproteins in Cuscuta-infected Pelargonium zonale undergoes substantial changes. While several arabinogalactan protein epitopes exhibit decreased abundances in the vicinity of the Cuscuta reflexa haustorium, extensins tend to increase in the infected areas.

  12. Cell wall glycoproteins at interaction sites between parasitic giant dodder (Cuscuta reflexa) and its host Pelargonium zonale.

    PubMed

    Striberny, Bernd; Krause, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The process of host plant penetration by parasitic dodder (genus Cuscuta) is accompanied by molecular and structural changes at the host/parasite interface. Recently, changes in pectin methyl esterification levels in the host cell walls abutting parasitic cells in established infection sites were reported. In addition to that, we show here that the composition of cell wall glycoproteins in Cuscuta-infected Pelargonium zonale undergoes substantial changes. While several arabinogalactan protein epitopes exhibit decreased abundances in the vicinity of the Cuscuta reflexa haustorium, extensins tend to increase in the infected areas. PMID:26367804

  13. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of fungal wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing Yuan; de Groot, Piet W J; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2008-01-01

    The manifold functions of fungal wall glycoproteins include maintenance of cell wall integrity, homotypic and heterotypic adhesion, biofilm formation, acquisition of iron and sterols, protein degradation and coping with oxidative stress. Transcriptome studies indicate that the expression levels of most cell wall glycoproteins can vary widely and are tightly controlled. However, owing to their complex and variable glycosylation, fungal wall glycoproteins are difficult to analyze using traditional proteomics approaches. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have enabled rapid and sensitive identification and quantitation of fungal wall glycoproteins; this will be particularly useful for studying the dynamics of the subproteome of fungal wall glycoproteins, and for the development of novel vaccines and diagnostic tools.

  14. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein of the plant cell wall): Report on work from June 1987 to June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    In soybean seed costs the accumulation of the hydroxproline-rich glycoprotein extensin is regulated in a developmental and tissue-specific manner. The time course of appearance of extensin during seed development was studied by Western blot analysis and by immunogold-silver localization. Using these techniques extensin was first detected at 16 to 18 d after anthesis, increasing during development to high levels at 24 d after anthesis. Immunogold-silver localization of extensin in the seed coat showed marked depostion of the glycoprotein in the walls of palisade epidermal cells and hourglass cells. The immunolocalization of extensin in developing soybean seeds was also made by a new technique - tissue printing on nitrocellulose paper. This technique shows that extensin is primarily localized in the seed coal, hilum, and vascular elements of the seed.

  15. The first biantennary bacterial secondary cell wall polymer and its influence on S-layer glycoprotein assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christian; Schäffer, Christina; Wugeditsch, Thomas; Graninger, Michael; Matecko, Irena; Müller, Norbert; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The cell surface of Aneurinibacillus thermoaerophilus DSM 10155 is covered with a square surface (S)-layer glycoprotein lattice. This S-layer glycoprotein, which was extracted with aqueous buffers after a freeze-thaw cycle of the bacterial cells, is the only completely water-soluble S-layer glycoprotein to be reported to date. The purified S-layer glycoprotein preparation had an overall carbohydrate content of 19%. Detailed chemical investigations indicated that the S-layer O-glycans of previously established structure accounted for 13% of total glycosylation. The remainder could be attributed to a peptidoglycan-associated secondary cell wall polymer. Structure analysis was performed using purified secondary cell wall polymer-peptidoglycan complexes. NMR spectroscopy revealed the first biantennary secondary cell wall polymer from the domain Bacteria, with the structure alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->4)-[alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->4)-beta-L-Gal p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)]-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-beta-L-Man p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->3)-alpha-L-Glc p NAc-(1-->O)-PO(2)(-)-O-PO(2)(-)-(O-->6)-MurNAc- (where MurNAc is N -acetylmuramic acid). The neutral polysaccharide is linked via a pyrophosphate bond to the C-6 atom of every fourth N -acetylmuramic acid residue, in average, of the A1gamma-type peptidoglycan. In vivo, the biantennary polymer anchored the S-layer glycoprotein very effectively to the cell wall, probably due to the doubling of motifs for a proposed lectin-like binding between the polymer and the N-terminus of the S-layer protein. When the cellular support was removed during S-layer glycoprotein isolation, the co-purified polymer mediated the solubility of the S

  16. The Neurospora crassa dfg5 and dcw1 Genes Encode α-1,6-Mannanases That Function in the Incorporation of Glycoproteins into the Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Maddi, Abhiram; Fu, Ci; Free, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The covalent cross-linking of cell wall proteins into the cell wall glucan/chitin matrix is an important step in the biogenesis of the fungal cell wall. We demonstrate that the Neurospora crassa DFG5 (NCU03770) and DCW1 (NCU08127) enzymes function in vivo to cross-link glycoproteins into the cell wall. Mutants lacking DFG5 or DCW1 release slightly elevated levels of cell wall proteins into their growth medium. Mutants lacking both DFG5 and DCW1 have substantially reduced levels of cell wall proteins in their cell walls and release large amounts of known cell wall proteins into the medium. DFG5 and DCW1 are members of the GH76 family of glycosyl hydrolases, which have specificity to recognize and cleave α-1,6-mannans. A model for incorporation of glycoproteins into the cell wall through the α-1,6-mannan core of the N-linked galactomannan is presented. In this model, DFG5 and DCW1 recognize the N-linked galactomannan present on glycoproteins and cross-link it into the cell wall glucan/chitin matrix. PMID:22701726

  17. Carbohydrate-Dependent Binding of Langerin to SodC, a Cell Wall Glycoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jin; Brennan, Patrick J.; Heaslip, Darragh; Udey, Mark C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells participate in the immune response in leprosy by their ability to activate T cells that recognize the pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae, in a langerin-dependent manner. We hypothesized that langerin, the distinguishing C-type lectin of Langerhans cells, would recognize the highly mannosylated structures in pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. The coding region for the extracellular and neck domain of human langerin was cloned and expressed to produce a recombinant active trimeric form of human langerin (r-langerin). Binding assays performed in microtiter plates, by two-dimensional (2D) Western blotting, and by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that r-langerin possessed carbohydrate-dependent affinity to glycoproteins in the cell wall of M. leprae. This lectin, however, yielded less binding to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and even lower levels of binding to phosphatidylinositol mannosides. However, the superoxide dismutase C (SodC) protein of the M. leprae cell wall was identified as a langerin-reactive ligand. Tandem mass spectrometry verified the glycosylation of a recombinant form of M. leprae SodC (rSodC) produced in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Analysis of r-langerin affinity by surface plasmon resonance revealed a carbohydrate-dependent affinity of rSodC (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] = 0.862 μM) that was 20-fold greater than for M. leprae ManLAM (KD = 18.69 μM). These data strongly suggest that a subset of the presumptively mannosylated M. leprae glycoproteins act as ligands for langerin and may facilitate the interaction of M. leprae with Langerhans cells. PMID:25422308

  18. Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G1 Directed against Aspergillus fumigatus Cell Wall Glycoprotein Protects against Experimental Murine Aspergillosis†

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Kavishwar, A.; Keshava, G. B. Shiva; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    Most of the biological functions related to pathogenicity and virulence reside in the fungal cell wall, which, being the outermost part of the cell, mediates the host-fungus interplay. For these reasons much effort has focused on the discovery of useful inhibitors of cell wall glucan, chitin, and mannoprotein biosynthesis. In the absence of a wide-spectrum, safe, and potent antifungal agent, a new strategy for antifungal therapy is directed towards the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In the present study the MAb A9 (immunoglobulin G1 [IgG1]) was identified from hybridomas raised in BALB/c mice immunized with cell wall antigen of Aspergillus fumigatus. The immunoreactive epitopes for this IgG1 MAb appeared to be associated with a peptide moiety, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed its binding to the cell wall surface of hyphae as well as with swollen conidia. MAb A9 inhibited hyphal development as observed by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay (25.76%), reduced the duration of spore germination, and exerted an in vitro cidal effect against Aspergillus fumigatus. The in vivo protective efficacy of MAb A9 was also evaluated in a murine model of invasive aspergillosis, where a reduction in CFU (>4 log10 units) was observed in kidney tissue of BALB/c mice challenged with A. fumigatus (2 × 105 CFU/ml) and where enhanced mean survival times (19.5 days) compared to the control (7.1 days) and an irrelevant MAb (6.1 days) were also observed. PMID:16148172

  19. Mitochondrial Function in Cell Wall Glycoprotein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 (Wild Type) and [rho0] Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iung, Annie Rakotoarivony; Coulon, Joël; Kiss, Ferenc; Ekome, Jacques Ngondi; Vallner, Judit; Bonaly, Roger

    1999-01-01

    We studied phosphopeptidomannans (PPMs) of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 strains (S. diastaticus): a wild type strain grown aerobically, anaerobically, and in the presence of antimycin and a [rho0] mutant grown aerobically and anaerobically. The aerobic wild-type cultures were highly flocculent, but all others were weakly flocculent. Ligands implicated in flocculation of mutants or antimycin-treated cells were not aggregated as much by concanavalin A as were those of the wild type. The [rho0] mutants and antimycin-treated cells differ from the wild type in PPM composition and invertase, acid phosphatase, and glucoamylase activities. PPMs extracted from different cells differ in the protein but not in the glycosidic moiety. The PPMs were less stable in mitochondrion-deficient cells than in wild-type cells grown aerobically, and this difference may be attributable to defective mitochondrial function during cell wall synthesis. The reduced flocculation of cells grown in the presence of antimycin, under anaerobiosis, or carrying a [rho0] mutation may be the consequence of alterations of PPM structures which are the ligands of lectins, both involved in this cell-cell recognition phenomenon. These respiratory chain alterations also affect peripheral, biologically active glycoproteins such as extracellular enzymes and peripheral PPMs. PMID:10583995

  20. [Hydroxyproline: Rich glycoproteins of the plant and cell wall]. Annual technical progress report, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since xylem tissue includes the main cell types which are lignified, we are interested in gene expression of glycine-rich proteins and proline-rich proteins, and other proteins which are involved in secondary cell wall thickening during xylogenesis. Since the main feature of xylogenesis is the deposition of additional wall components, study of the mechanism of xylogenesis will greatly advance our knowledge of the synthesis and assembly of wall macromolecules. We are using the in vitro xylogenesis system from isolated Zinnia mesophyll cells to isolate genes which are specifically expressed during xylogenesis. We have used subtractive hybridization methods to isolate a number of cDNA clones for differentially regulated genes from the cells after hormonal induction. So far, we have partially characterized 18 different cDNA clones from 239 positive clones. These differentially regulated genes can be divided into three sets according to the characteristics of gene expression in the induction medium and the control medium. The first set is induced in both the induction medium and the control medium without hormones. The second set is induced mainly in the induction medium and in the control medium with the addition of NAA alone. Two of thesegenes are exclusively induced by auxin. The third set of genes is induced mainly in the induction medium. Since these genes are not induced by either auxin or cytokinin alone, they may be directly involved in the process of xylogenesis. Our experiments on the localization of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production reinforce the earlier ideas of others that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is involved in normal lignification.

  1. Unique N-glycan moieties of the 66-kDa cell wall glycoprotein from the red microalga Porphyridium sp.

    PubMed

    Levy-Ontman, Oshrat; Arad, Shoshana Malis; Harvey, David J; Parsons, Thomas B; Fairbanks, Antony; Tekoah, Yoram

    2011-06-17

    We report here the structural determination of the N-linked glycans in the 66-kDa glycoprotein, part of the unique sulfated complex cell wall polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. Structures were elucidated by a combination of normal phase/reverse phase HPLC, positive ion MALDI-TOF MS, negative ion electrospray ionization, and MS/MS. The sugar moieties of the glycoprotein consisted of at least four fractions of N-linked glycans, each composed of the same four monosaccharides, GlcNAc, Man, 6-O-MeMan, and Xyl, with compositions Man(8-9)Xyl(1-2)Me(3)GlcNAc(2). The present study is the first report of N-glycans with the terminal Xyl attached to the 6-mannose branch of the 6-antenna and to the 3-oxygen of the penultimate (core) GlcNAc. Another novel finding was that all four glycans contain three O-methylmannose residues in positions that have never been reported before. Although it is known that some lower organisms are able to methylate terminal monosaccharides in glycans, the present study on Porphyridium sp. is the first describing an organism that is able to methylate non-terminal mannose residues. This study will thus contribute to understanding of N-glycosylation in algae and might shed light on the evolutionary development from prokaryotes to multicellular organisms. It also may contribute to our understanding of the red algae polysaccharide formation. The additional importance of this research lies in its potential for biotechnological applications, especially in evaluating the use of microalgae as cell factories for the production of therapeutic proteins.

  2. An update on post-translational modifications of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins: toward a model highlighting their contribution to plant cell wall architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Velasquez, Silvia M.; Jamet, Elisabeth; Estevez, José M.; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composite structures mainly composed of polysaccharides, also containing a large set of proteins involved in diverse functions such as growth, environmental sensing, signaling, and defense. Research on cell wall proteins (CWPs) is a challenging field since present knowledge of their role into the structure and function of cell walls is very incomplete. Among CWPs, hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich O-glycoproteins (HRGPs) were classified into three categories: (i) moderately glycosylated extensins (EXTs) able to form covalent scaffolds; (ii) hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs); and (iii) Hyp/proline (Pro)-Rich proteins (H/PRPs) that may be non-, weakly- or highly-glycosylated. In this review, we provide a description of the main features of their post-translational modifications (PTMs), biosynthesis, structure, and function. We propose a new model integrating HRGPs and their partners in cell walls. Altogether, they could form a continuous glyco-network with non-cellulosic polysaccharides via covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions, thus strongly contributing to cell wall architecture. PMID:25177325

  3. Cell wall integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Bellincampi, Daniela; Zabotina, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The plant cell wall, a dynamic network of polysaccharides and glycoproteins of significant compositional and structural complexity, functions in plant growth, development and stress responses. In recent years, the existence of plant cell wall integrity (CWI) maintenance mechanisms has been demonstrated, but little is known about the signaling pathways involved, or their components. Examination of key mutants has shed light on the relationships between cell wall remodeling and plant cell responses, indicating a central role for the regulatory network that monitors and controls cell wall performance and integrity. In this review, we present a short overview of cell wall composition and discuss post-synthetic cell wall modification as a valuable approach for studying CWI perception and signaling pathways. PMID:23857352

  4. Honey Glycoproteins Containing Antimicrobial Peptides, Jelleins of the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, Are Responsible for the Cell Wall Lytic and Bactericidal Activities of Honey

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified the bacterial cell wall as the cellular target for honey antibacterial compounds; however, the chemical nature of these compounds remained to be elucidated. Using Concavalin A- affinity chromatography, we found that isolated glycoprotein fractions (glps), but not flow-through fractions, exhibited strong growth inhibitory and bactericidal properties. The glps possessed two distinct functionalities: (a) specific binding and agglutination of bacterial cells, but not rat erythrocytes and (b) non-specific membrane permeabilization of both bacterial cells and erythrocytes. The isolated glps induced concentration- and time-dependent changes in the cell shape of both E. coli and B. subtilis as visualized by light and SEM microscopy. The appearance of filaments and spheroplasts correlated with growth inhibition and bactericidal effects, respectively. The time-kill kinetics showed a rapid, >5-log10 reduction of viable cells within 15 min incubation at 1xMBC, indicating that the glps-induced damage of the cell wall was lethal. Unexpectedly, MALDI-TOF and electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry, (ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis of glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. The presence of high-mannose structures explained the lectin-like activity of MRJP1, while the presence of Jelleins in MRJP1 may explain cell wall disruptions. Thus, the observed damages induced by the MRJP1 to the bacterial cell wall constitute the mechanism by which the antibacterial effects were produced. Antibacterial activity of MRJP1 glps directly correlated with the overall antibacterial activity of honey, suggesting that it is honey’s active principle responsible for this activity. PMID:25830314

  5. Honey glycoproteins containing antimicrobial peptides, Jelleins of the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1, are responsible for the cell wall lytic and bactericidal activities of honey.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2015-01-01

    We have recently identified the bacterial cell wall as the cellular target for honey antibacterial compounds; however, the chemical nature of these compounds remained to be elucidated. Using Concavalin A-affinity chromatography, we found that isolated glycoprotein fractions (glps), but not flow-through fractions, exhibited strong growth inhibitory and bactericidal properties. The glps possessed two distinct functionalities: (a) specific binding and agglutination of bacterial cells, but not rat erythrocytes and (b) non-specific membrane permeabilization of both bacterial cells and erythrocytes. The isolated glps induced concentration- and time-dependent changes in the cell shape of both E. coli and B. subtilis as visualized by light and SEM microscopy. The appearance of filaments and spheroplasts correlated with growth inhibition and bactericidal effects, respectively. The time-kill kinetics showed a rapid, >5-log10 reduction of viable cells within 15 min incubation at 1xMBC, indicating that the glps-induced damage of the cell wall was lethal. Unexpectedly, MALDI-TOF and electrospray quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry, (ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS) analysis of glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. The presence of high-mannose structures explained the lectin-like activity of MRJP1, while the presence of Jelleins in MRJP1 may explain cell wall disruptions. Thus, the observed damages induced by the MRJP1 to the bacterial cell wall constitute the mechanism by which the antibacterial effects were produced. Antibacterial activity of MRJP1 glps directly correlated with the overall antibacterial activity of honey, suggesting that it is honey's active principle responsible for this activity. PMID:25830314

  6. Complementary immunolocalization patterns of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins studied with the use of antibodies directed against different carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed

    Swords, K M; Staehelin, L A

    1993-07-01

    Antisera raised against the major hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) in carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproot, extensin-1, and a minor HRGP, extensin-2, were characterized by western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and periodate oxidation and found to be directed against carbohydrate epitopes shared by both glycoproteins. The anti-extensin-1 antibodies (gE1) target periodate-sensitive epitopes and may recognize the terminal alpha-1,3-arabinoside of extensin-1. The anti-extensin-2 antibodies (gE2) recognize periodate-insensitive epitopes, possibly binding the reducing, internal beta-1,2-arabinosides on the carbohydrate side chains. Despite the cross-reactivity of these antibodies, immunolocalization studies of carrot taproot and green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf tissues reveal a spatial segregation of gE1- and gE2-labeling patterns. The gE1 antibodies bind only to the cellulose-rich region of the cell wall (J.P. Staehelin and L.A. Stafstrom [1988] Planta 174: 321-332), whereas gE2 labeling is restricted to the expanded middle lamella at three cell junctions. Periodate oxidation of nonosmicated, thin-sectioned tissue abolishes gE1 labeling but leads to labeling of the entire cell wall by gE2, presumably as a result of unmasking cryptic epitopes on extensin-1 in the cellulose layer. Purified extensin-2 protein is more efficient than extensin-1 protein at agglutinating avirulent Pseudomonas strains lacking extracellular polysaccharide. Our results indicate that extensin-2 does not form a heterologous HRGP network with extensin-1 and that, in contrast to extensin-1, which appears to serve a structural role, extensin-2 could participate in passive defense responses against phytopathogenic bacteria.

  7. Complementary immunolocalization patterns of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins studied with the use of antibodies directed against different carbohydrate epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Swords, K M; Staehelin, L A

    1993-01-01

    Antisera raised against the major hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) in carrot (Daucus carota L.) taproot, extensin-1, and a minor HRGP, extensin-2, were characterized by western blot analysis, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and periodate oxidation and found to be directed against carbohydrate epitopes shared by both glycoproteins. The anti-extensin-1 antibodies (gE1) target periodate-sensitive epitopes and may recognize the terminal alpha-1,3-arabinoside of extensin-1. The anti-extensin-2 antibodies (gE2) recognize periodate-insensitive epitopes, possibly binding the reducing, internal beta-1,2-arabinosides on the carbohydrate side chains. Despite the cross-reactivity of these antibodies, immunolocalization studies of carrot taproot and green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaf tissues reveal a spatial segregation of gE1- and gE2-labeling patterns. The gE1 antibodies bind only to the cellulose-rich region of the cell wall (J.P. Staehelin and L.A. Stafstrom [1988] Planta 174: 321-332), whereas gE2 labeling is restricted to the expanded middle lamella at three cell junctions. Periodate oxidation of nonosmicated, thin-sectioned tissue abolishes gE1 labeling but leads to labeling of the entire cell wall by gE2, presumably as a result of unmasking cryptic epitopes on extensin-1 in the cellulose layer. Purified extensin-2 protein is more efficient than extensin-1 protein at agglutinating avirulent Pseudomonas strains lacking extracellular polysaccharide. Our results indicate that extensin-2 does not form a heterologous HRGP network with extensin-1 and that, in contrast to extensin-1, which appears to serve a structural role, extensin-2 could participate in passive defense responses against phytopathogenic bacteria. PMID:7506427

  8. Induction of mRNA accumulation corresponding to a gene encoding a cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein by fungal elicitors.

    PubMed

    García-Muniz, N; Martínez-Izquierdo, J A; Puigdomènech, P

    1998-11-01

    The Hrgp (hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein) gene codes in maize for one of the most abundant proteins of the cell wall. HRGPs may contribute to the structural support of the wall and they have also been involved in plant defense mechanisms. This second aspect has been tested for the Hrgp gene in maize where, in contrast with the situation in dicot species, the gene is encoded by a single-copy sequence. Hrgp mRNA accumulation is induced in maize suspension-cultured cells by elicitors, isolated either from maize pathogenic or non-pathogenic fungi. The induction of Hrgp mRNA accumulation by elicitor extracted from Fusarium moniliforme has been studied in detail. The level of induction depends on elicitor concentration and remains high until at least 24 h. Ethylene and protein phosphorylation appear to be involved in the transduction pathway of Hrgp gene activation by the F. moniliforme elicitor but not by 5 microM methyl jasmonate or 1 mM salycilic acid. Different compounds known to participate in plant stress responses such as ascorbic acid or reduced glutathione have also a positive effect on Hrgp mRNA accumulation.

  9. Tunicamycins: translocase-I inhibitors that target bacterial cell wall and mammalian N-glycoproteins. The potential for selective inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tunicamycins are a heterologous family of nucleoside antibiotics that target the biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan and eukaryotic N-glycoproteins. The mechanism of action is known, with the tunicamycin-Mg2+ complex established as a transition state analog for hexosamine-1-phosphate: prenol pho...

  10. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; López-Romero, Everardo; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response. PMID:27051673

  11. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; López-Romero, Everardo; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response.

  12. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A.; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response. PMID:27051673

  13. A workflow for large-scale empirical identification of cell wall N-linked glycoproteins of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Thannhauser, Theodore W.; Shen, Miaoqing; Sherwood, Robert; Howe, Kevin; Fish, Tara; Yang, Yong; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of plant proteins that impacts a large number of important biological processes. Nevertheless, the impacts of differential site occupancy and the nature of specific glycoforms are obscure. Historically, characterization of glycoproteins has been difficult due to the distinct physicochemical properties of the peptidyl and glycan moieties, the variable and dynamic nature of the glycosylation process, their heterogeneous nature, and the low relative abundance of each glycoform. In this study, we explore a new pipeline developed for large-scale empirical identification of N-linked glycoproteins of tomato fruit as part of our ongoing efforts to characterize the tomato secretome. The workflow presented involves a combination of lectin affinity, tryptic digestion, ion-pairing HILIC and precursor ion-driven data dependent MS/MS analysis with a script to facilitate the identification and characterization of occupied N-linked glycosylation sites. A total of 212 glycoproteins were identified in this study, in which 26 glycopeptides from 24 glycoproteins were successfully characterized in just one HILIC fraction. Further precursor ion discovery (PID)-based MS/MS and deglycosylation followed by high accuracy and resolution MS analysis were used to confirm the glycosylation sites and determine site occupancy rates. The workflow reported is robust and capable of producing large amounts of empirical data involving N-linked glycosylation sites and their associated glycoforms. PMID:23580464

  14. The Lamportian cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Keiliszewski, M.; Lamport, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The Lamportian Warp-Weft hypothesis suggests a cellulose-extensin interpenetrating network where extensin mechanically couples the load-bearing cellulose microfibrils in a wall matrix that is best described as a microcomposite. This model is based on data gathered from the extensin-rich walls of tomato and sycamore cell suspension culture, wherein extensin precursors are insolubilized into the wall by undefined crosslinks. The authors recent work with cell walls isolated from intact tissue as well as walls from suspension cultured cells of the graminaceous monocots maize and rice, the non-graminaceous monocot asparagus, the primitive herbaceous dicot sugar beet, and the gymnosperm Douglas Fir indicate that although extensins are ubiquitous to all plant species examined, they are not the major structural protein component of most walls examined. Amino acid analyses of intact and HF-treated walls shows a major component neither an HRGP, nor directly comparable to the glycine-rich wall proteins such as those associated with seed coat walls or the 67 mole% glycine-rich proteins cloned from petunia and soybean. Clearly, structural wall protein alternatives to extensin exist and any cell wall model must take that into account. If we assume that extracellular matrices are a priori network structures, then new Hypless' structural proteins in the maize cell wall raise questions about the sort of network these proteins create: the kinds of crosslinks involved; how they are formed; and the roles played by the small amounts of HRGPs.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. )

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  16. Cell wall remodeling under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Plants exposed to abiotic stress respond to unfavorable conditions on multiple levels. One challenge under drought stress is to reduce shoot growth while maintaining root growth, a process requiring differential cell wall synthesis and remodeling. Key players in this process are the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxidases, which initially cross-link phenolic compounds and glycoproteins of the cell walls causing stiffening. The function of ROS shifts after having converted all the peroxidase substrates in the cell wall. If ROS-levels remain high during prolonged stress, OH°-radicals are formed which lead to polymer cleavage. In concert with xyloglucan modifying enzymes and expansins, the resulting cell wall loosening allows further growth of stressed organs. PMID:25709610

  17. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. PMID:26301520

  18. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  19. Identification of the Abundant Hydroxyproline-Rich Glycoproteins in the Root Walls of Wild-Type Arabidopsis, an ext3 Mutant Line, and Its Phenotypic Revertant

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Ye, Dening; Held, Michael A.; Cannon, Maura C.; Ray, Tui; Saha, Prasenjit; Frye, Alexandra N.; Mort, Andrew J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Extensins are members of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) superfamily that form covalently cross-linked networks in primary cell walls. A knockout mutation in EXT3 (AT1G21310), the gene coding EXTENSIN 3 (EXT3) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta resulted in a lethal phenotype, although about 20% of the knockout plants have an apparently normal phenotype (ANP). In this study the root cell wall HRGP components of wild-type, ANP and the ext3 mutant seedlings were characterized by peptide fractionation of trypsin digested anhydrous hydrogen fluoride deglycosylated wall residues and by sequencing using LC-MS/MS. Several HRGPs, including EXT3, were identified in the wild-type root walls but not in walls of the ANP and lethal mutant. Indeed the ANP walls and walls of mutants displaying the lethal phenotype possessed HRGPs, but the profiles suggest that changes in the amount and perhaps type may account for the corresponding phenotypes. PMID:27135319

  20. The effect of ginger extract on glycoproteins of Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Nassir-Ud-Din; Kohan, Haleemeh Kabini; Kadivar, Mehdi; Kalyee, Zahra; Rad, Behzad Laame; Iravani, Ayda; Rahimi, Nourooz Ali; Wahabi, Farideh; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Pourfallah, Fatemeh; Arjmand, Mohammad

    2014-01-15

    Protein glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of specific diseases, including cancers. The ginger rhizome is known to have anti-cancer and anti-fungal properties. This investigation was carried out to study the effect of ginger on glycoproteins of Raji cells. A 10% yield of ginger extract was mixed with 0.01% DMSO and added to 6 x 10(4) Raji cells at different concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 degrees C. Their half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined and analyzed statistically using Graphpad prism software. Cell extracts were prepared and their glycoproteins purified using lectin-affinity chromatography (Q proteome total glycoprotein and O glycoprotein kits) and SDS PAGE was carried out. IC50 of ginger extract on Raji cells was 20 microg mL(-1) at 72 h with < 0.01 significance. Silver staining of purified glycoprotiens in Raji cells indicated the presence of O-glycans and N-glycans. N-linked mannose and N-linked sialic acids were detected with the total glycoprotein kit. O-linked galactose and O-linked sialic acids were identified with the O-glycoprotein. Ginger reduced the expression of O-linked sialic acid and also N-linked mannose on Raji cells but had no effect on other glycoproteins. Sialic acid is now well known as a cancer marker and investigations are on to use it as a drug-target in cancerous tissues.

  1. Bacterial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginsberg, Cynthia; Brown, Stephanie; Walker, Suzanne

    Bacterial cell-surface polysaccharides cells are surrounded by a variety of cell-surface structures that allow them to thrive in extreme environments. Components of the cell envelope and extracellular matrix are responsible for providing the cells with structural support, mediating intercellular communication, allowing the cells to move or to adhere to surfaces, protecting the cells from attack by antibiotics or the immune system, and facilitating the uptake of nutrients. Some of the most important cell wall components are polysaccharide structures. This review discusses the occurrence, structure, function, and biosynthesis of the most prevalent bacterial cell surface polysaccharides: peptidoglycan, lipopolysaccharide, arabinogalactan, and lipoarabinomannan, and capsular and extracellular polysaccharides. The roles of these polysaccharides in medicine, both as drug targets and as therapeutic agents, are also described.

  2. Array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desired glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Yongtae; Son, Young Dok; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kim, Eunkyung; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jung Hoe; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and in vivo biological function of a glycoprotein is significantly affected by its glycosylation profile. For the development of glycoproteins with therapeutic applications, selection of cell lines producing a glycoprotein with adequate glycoform is crucial. Here, we demonstrate an array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid and efficient selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desirable glycosylation. Our approach relies on microengraving and interrogation of glycoproteins produced by individual cells in a microwell array in terms of glycosylation profile as well as the produced amount. On the basis of statistical analysis of the interrogation, single cells which are predicted to produce a desired glycoprotein are selected, retrieved, and expanded. We applied the approach to human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO)-producing CHO cells and verified the selection of a single CHO cell that produces rhEPO with a high sialylation degree. Human erythropoietin (hEPO) bearing highly sialylated oligosaccharide was shown to display a much longer plasma half-life, resulting in high therapeutic efficacy. This method may find widespread use in the clonal selection for the production of other glycoproteins with specific glycosylation as well as analysis of the heterogeneity in cell populations in a high-throughput manner.

  3. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  4. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  5. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes generation 2 bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation, and separation. Ultimately, it is desired to combine as man...

  6. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with those expressed by a nonmalignant set. The average number of spectral counts (proportional to relative protein abundance) and the total number of glycopeptides in the malignant samples were reduced to about two-thirds of the level in the nonmalignant samples. Most glycoproteins were expressed at a different level in the malignant samples, with nearly as many increasing as decreasing. The glycoproteins with reduced expression accounted for a larger change in spectral counts, and hence for the net loss of spectral counts in the malignant lines. Similar results were found when the glycoproteins were studied via identified glycosylation sites only, or through identified sites together with non-glycopeptides. The overall reduction is largely due to the loss of integrins, laminins and other proteins that form or interact with the basement membrane.

  7. Recent Advances on the Posttranslational Modifications of EXTs and Their Roles in Plant Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Melina; Salter, Juan Salgado; Dorosz, Javier Gloazzo; Petersen, Bent L; Estevez, José M

    2012-01-01

    The genetic set up and the enzymes that define the O-glycosylation sites and transfer the activated sugars to cell wall glycoprotein Extensins (EXTs) have remained unknown for a long time. We are now beginning to see the emerging components of the molecular machinery that assembles these complex O-glycoproteins on the plant cell wall. Genes conferring the posttranslational modifications, i.e., proline hydroxylation and subsequent O-glycosylation, of the EXTs have been recently identified. In this review we summarize the enzymes that define the O-glycosylation sites on the O-glycoproteins, i.e., the prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs), the glycosyltransferases that transfer arabinose units (named arabinosyltransferases, AraTs), and the one responsible for transferring a single galactose (galactosyltransferase, GalT) on the protein EXT backbones. We discuss the effects of posttranslational modifications on the structure and function of extensins in plant cell walls.

  8. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Talmadge, Kenneth W.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Albersheim, Peter

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan. The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall. The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an α-(1 → 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 → 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 → 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan. The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  9. Nucleated assembly of Chlamydomonas and Volvox cell walls.

    PubMed

    Adair, W S; Steinmetz, S A; Mattson, D M; Goodenough, U W; Heuser, J E

    1987-11-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cell wall is made up of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, arranged in five distinct layers. The W6 (crystalline) layer contains three major glycoproteins (GP1, GP2, GP3), selectively extractable with chaotropic agents, that self-assemble into crystals in vitro. A system to study W6 assembly in a quantitative fashion was developed that employs perchlorate-extracted Chlamydomonas cells as nucleating agents. Wall reconstitution by biotinylated W6 monomers was monitored by FITC-streptavidin fluorescence and quick-freeze/deep-etch electron microscopy. Optimal reconstitution was obtained at monomer concentrations (0.2-0.3 mg/ml) well below those required for nonnucleated assembly. Assembly occurred from multiple nucleation sites, and faithfully reflected the structure of the intact W6 layer. Specificity of nucleated assembly was demonstrated using two cell-wall mutants (cw-2 and cw-15); neither served as a substrate for assembly of wild-type monomers. In addition, W6 sublayers were assembled from purified components: GP2 and GP3 coassembled to form the inner (W6A) sublayer; this then served as a substrate for self-assembly of GP1 into the outer (W6B) sublayer. Finally, evolutionary relationships between C. reinhardtii and two additional members of the Volvocales (Chlamydomonas eugametos and Volvox carteri) were explored by performing interspecific reconstitutions. Hybrid walls were obtained between C. reinhardtii and Volvox but not with C. eugametos, confirming taxonomic assignments based on structural criteria. PMID:3680387

  10. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  11. Back wall solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar cell is disclosed which comprises a first semiconductor material of one conductivity type with one face having the same conductivity type but more heavily doped to form a field region arranged to receive the radiant energy to be converted to electrical energy, and a layer of a second semiconductor material, preferably highly doped, of opposite conductivity type on the first semiconductor material adjacent the first semiconductor material at an interface remote from the heavily doped field region. Instead of the opposite conductivity layer, a metallic Schottky diode layer may be used, in which case no additional back contact is needed. A contact such as a gridded contact, previous to the radiant energy may be applied to the heavily doped field region of the more heavily doped, same conductivity material for its contact.

  12. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  13. Effect of reduced temperature on glycoprotein (Ig, HLA) processing and transport in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Brand, M; Jansen, E; Ploegh, H L

    1985-07-01

    Secretion of Igs and surface expression of HLA antigens was examined in lymphoid cells as a function of temp. Upon reducing the temp from 37 to 20 degrees C a progressive decrease in the secretion of Ig and surface expression of HLA antigens was noted. When the status of the oligosaccharides present on these glycoproteins was examined, conversion of high-mannose [endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase-(Endo H) sensitive] to complex-type (Endo H resistant) oligosaccharides diminished with decreasing temp. At no time was an accumulation of Endo H resistant glycoproteins seen intracellularly. These results show that the phenomenon observed for synthesis and intracellular transport of viral glycoproteins in epithelial cells at reduced temp, namely intracellular accumulation of viral glycoproteins carrying complex sugar moieties, does not necessarily apply to glycoprotein transport in lymphoid cells. A difference in subcellular organization of epithelial and lymphoid cells may be responsible for this discrepancy.

  14. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  15. Structural studies of complex carbohydrates of plant cell walls. Progress report, September 1985-July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Albersheim, P.

    1986-07-01

    The polymers that have been identified as components of cell walls include two hemicelluloses (xyloglucan and xylan), three pectine polysaccharides (homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan I, and rhamnogalacturonan II, and hydroxproline- and glycine-rich glycoproteins. This report discribes the results of studies into the molecular structure if these plant polysaccharides. 5 figs.

  16. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  17. Chemistry-enabled methods for the visualization of cell-surface glycoproteins in Metazoans.

    PubMed

    Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    The majority of cell-surface and secreted proteins are glycosylated, which can directly affect their macromolecular interactions, stability, and localization. Investigating these effects is critical to developing a complete understanding of the role of glycoproteins in fundamental biology and human disease. The development of selective and unique chemical reactions have revolutionized the visualization, identification, and characterization of glycoproteins. Here, we review the chemical methods that have been created to enable the visualization of the major types of cell-surface glycoproteins in living systems, from mammalian cells to whole animals.

  18. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yutaka; Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  19. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  20. Thyroid Hormone and P-Glycoprotein in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Paul J.; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sudha, Thangirala; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp; multidrug resistance pump 1, MDR1; ABCB1) is a plasma membrane efflux pump that when activated in cancer cells exports chemotherapeutic agents. Transcription of the P-gp gene (MDR1) and activity of the P-gp protein are known to be affected by thyroid hormone. A cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone on integrin αvβ3 also binds tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac), a derivative of L-thyroxine (T4) that blocks nongenomic actions of T4 and of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) at αvβ3. Covalently bound to a nanoparticle, tetrac as nanotetrac acts at the integrin to increase intracellular residence time of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin and etoposide that are substrates of P-gp. This action chemosensitizes cancer cells. In this review, we examine possible molecular mechanisms for the inhibitory effect of nanotetrac on P-gp activity. Mechanisms for consideration include cancer cell acidification via action of tetrac/nanotetrac on the Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) and hormone analogue effects on calmodulin-dependent processes and on interactions of P-gp with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and osteopontin (OPN), apparently via αvβ3. Intracellular acidification and decreased H+ efflux induced by tetrac/nanotetrac via NHE1 is the most attractive explanation for the actions on P-gp and consequent increase in cancer cell retention of chemotherapeutic agent-ligands of MDR1 protein. PMID:25866761

  1. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  2. Moss cell walls: structure and biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alison W.; Roberts, Eric M.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    The genome sequence of the moss Physcomitrella patens has stimulated new research examining the cell wall polysaccharides of mosses and the glycosyl transferases that synthesize them as a means to understand fundamental processes of cell wall biosynthesis and plant cell wall evolution. The cell walls of mosses and vascular plants are composed of the same classes of polysaccharides, but with differences in side chain composition and structure. Similarly, the genomes of P. patens and angiosperms encode the same families of cell wall glycosyl transferases, yet, in many cases these families have diversified independently in each lineage. Our understanding of land plant evolution could be enhanced by more complete knowledge of the relationships among glycosyl transferase functional diversification, cell wall structural and biochemical specialization, and the roles of cell walls in plant adaptation. As a foundation for these studies, we review the features of P. patens as an experimental system, analyses of cell wall composition in various moss species, recent studies that elucidate the structure and biosynthesis of cell wall polysaccharides in P. patens, and phylogenetic analysis of P. patens genes potentially involved in cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:22833752

  3. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2014-12-23

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increasedmore » wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. In conclusion, these data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.« less

  4. Changes in cell wall properties coincide with overexpression of extensin fusion proteins in suspension cultured tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Kieliszewski, Marcia J

    2014-01-01

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. These data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  5. Changes in Cell Wall Properties Coincide with Overexpression of Extensin Fusion Proteins in Suspension Cultured Tobacco Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Li; Pu, Yunqiao; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Avci, Utku; Qian, Jin; Arter, Allison; Chen, Liwei; Hahn, Michael G.; Ragauskas, Arthur J.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.

    2014-12-23

    Extensins are one subfamily of the cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, containing characteristic SerHyp4 glycosylation motifs and intermolecular cross-linking motifs such as the TyrXaaTyr sequence. Extensins are believed to form a cross-linked network in the plant cell wall through the tyrosine-derivatives isodityrosine, pulcherosine, and di-isodityrosine. Overexpression of three synthetic genes encoding different elastin-arabinogalactan protein-extensin hybrids in tobacco suspension cultured cells yielded novel cross-linking glycoproteins that shared features of the extensins, arabinogalactan proteins and elastin. The cell wall properties of the three transgenic cell lines were all changed, but in different ways. One transgenic cell line showed decreased cellulose crystallinity and increased wall xyloglucan content; the second transgenic cell line contained dramatically increased hydration capacity and notably increased cell wall biomass, increased di-isodityrosine, and increased protein content; the third transgenic cell line displayed wall phenotypes similar to wild type cells, except changed xyloglucan epitope extractability. In conclusion, these data indicate that overexpression of modified extensins may be a route to engineer plants for bioenergy and biomaterial production.

  6. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Campbell, Liam; Turner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) are produced by specialized plant cell types, and are particularly important in those cells providing mechanical support or involved in water transport. As the main constituent of plant biomass, secondary cell walls are central to attempts to generate second-generation biofuels. Partly as a consequence of this renewed economic importance, excellent progress has been made in understanding how cell wall components are synthesized. SCWs are largely composed of three main polymers: cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. In this review, we will attempt to highlight the most recent progress in understanding the biosynthetic pathways for secondary cell wall components, how these pathways are regulated, and how this knowledge may be exploited to improve cell wall properties that facilitate breakdown without compromising plant growth and productivity. While knowledge of individual components in the pathway has improved dramatically, how they function together to make the final polymers and how these individual polymers are incorporated into the wall remain less well understood.

  7. Polyamines in cell walls of chlorococcalean microalgae.

    PubMed

    Burczyk, Jan; Zych, Maria; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology of microalgae represents a very attractive alternative as a source of energy and substances of high value when compared with plant cultivation. Cell walls of green microalgae have an extraordinary chemical and mechanical resistance and may impede some steps in the biotechnological/industrial exploitation of algae. The aim of the present contribution was to check the presence of polyamines in the cell walls of chlorococcalean green microalgae. Polyamines are nitrogenous compounds synthesized normally in cells and may affect the properties of the cell wall. Our work included strains either forming or not forming the polymer algaenan, allowing us to conclude that algaenan is not a prerequisite for the presence of polyamines in the cell walls. Polyamines were detected in isolated cell walls of Scenedesmus obliquus, Chlorella fusca, Chlorella saccharophila, and Chlorella vulgaris. Their concentration in isolated cell walls ranged between 0.4 and 8.4 nmol/mg dry weight. PMID:24772826

  8. Architecture of dermatophyte cell Walls: Electron microscopic and biochemical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.; Kitajima, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 83 references on the cell wall structure of dermatophytes is presented. Topics discussed include separation and preparation of cell walls; microstructure of cell walls by electron microscopy; chemical composition of cell walls; structural model of cell walls; and morphological structure of cell walls.

  9. Identification of glycoproteins associated with HIV latently infected cells using quantitative glycoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiming; Jackson, Brooks; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    HIV infection is not curable due to viral latency. Compelling reports suggest that there is a distinct profile of surface proteins that can be used for targeting latently infected cells. We have recently reported that glycoproteins were differentially secreted from HIV latently infected ACH-2 cells compared to the parental A3.01 cells. This finding suggests that glycophenotype might be different in these two cell lines. To determine the difference, the ACH-2 and A3.01 cell lines were subjected to a glycoproteomic analysis. A total number of 940 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 515 glycoproteins were identified. Among the glycoproteins, 365 and 104 were annotated as cell surface and membrane-associated proteins, respectively. Quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis revealed a change of 236 glycosite-containing peptides from 172 glycoproteins between the two cell lines without reactivation. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that cell adhesion, immune response, glycoprotein metabolic process, cell motion, and cell activation were associated with the changed proteins. After reactivation of latency, changes in glycosite-containing peptides were observed in both cell lines. The changed proteins suggest that cell migration, response to wounding and immune response might be impaired in reactivated latently infected cells. Glycoproteomics merits future application using primary cells to discover reveal mechanisms in HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27195445

  10. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae). PMID:22329798

  11. Plant cell walls to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Douglas B; Bowman, Michael J; Braker, Jay D; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Lee, Charles C; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Wagschal, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    Conversion of plant cell walls to ethanol constitutes second generation bioethanol production. The process consists of several steps: biomass selection/genetic modification, physiochemical pretreatment, enzymatic saccharification, fermentation and separation. Ultimately, it is desirable to combine as many of the biochemical steps as possible in a single organism to achieve CBP (consolidated bioprocessing). A commercially ready CBP organism is currently unreported. Production of second generation bioethanol is hindered by economics, particularly in the cost of pretreatment (including waste management and solvent recovery), the cost of saccharification enzymes (particularly exocellulases and endocellulases displaying kcat ~1 s-1 on crystalline cellulose), and the inefficiency of co-fermentation of 5- and 6-carbon monosaccharides (owing in part to redox cofactor imbalances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

  12. Impact of Cell Wall Composition on Maize Resistance to Pests and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Rogelio; Barros-Rios, Jaime; Malvar, Rosa A.

    2013-01-01

    In cereals, the primary cell wall is built of a skeleton of cellulosic microfibrils embedded in a matrix of hemicelluloses and smaller amounts of pectins, glycoproteins and hydroxycinnamates. Later, during secondary wall development, p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols are copolymerized to form mixed lignins. Several of these cell wall components show a determinative role in maize resistance to pest and diseases. However, defense mechanisms are very complex and vary among the same plant species, different tissues or even the same tissue at different developmental stages. Thus, it is important to highlight that the role of the cell wall components needs to be tested in diverse genotypes and specific tissues where the feeding or attacking by the pathogen takes place. Understanding the role of cell wall constituents as defense mechanisms may allow modifications of crops to withstand pests and diseases. PMID:23535334

  13. Identification of sialylated glycoproteins in Doxorubicin-treated hepatoma cells with glycoproteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kanako; Serada, Satoshi; Takamatsu, Shinji; Terao, Naoko; Takeishi, Shunsaku; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Naka, Tetsuji; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2014-11-01

    Sialylation is one of the most important types of glycosylation involved in carcinogenesis and establishment of cancer stemness. We previously showed that increased sialylation is a characteristic glycan change in cancer stem cells (CSCs) from hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the identities of glycoproteins targeted for sialylation remain unknown. In the present study, we identified glycoproteins targeted for sialylation in doxorubicin (DXR)-treated hepatocarcinoma cell line, Huh7, using glycoproteomic analyses. Since CSCs constitute a small subset of cells within carcinoma cell lines, it is difficult to identify sialylated proteins using general glycoproteomic strategies. It is known that treatment with anticancer drug can condense CSCs, we used DXR to concentrate CSCs. In DXR-treated Huh7 cells, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis identified 17 sialylated glycoproteins. Most of the identified glycoproteins were cancer-associated proteins. Furthermore, two proteins of approximately 70 kDa were detected using Sambucus sieboldoana agglutinin (SSA) blot analysis and identified as beta-galactosidase and alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein (fetuin-A) by SSA precipitation followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses. Sialylation levels of fetuin-A were increased in DXR-treated Huh7 cell lysates. These changes in sialylation of glycoproteins might be involved in the establishment of cancer stemness.

  14. Natural Paradigms of Plant Cell Wall Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H.; Xu, Q.; Taylor, L. E.; Baker, J. O.; Tucker, M. P.; Ding, S. Y.

    2009-01-01

    Natural processes of recycling carbon from plant cell walls are slow but very efficient, generally involving microbial communities and their secreted enzymes. Efficient combinations of microbial communities and enzymes act in a sequential and synergistic manner to degrade plant cell walls. Recent understanding of plant cell wall ultra-structure, as well as the carbon metabolism, ATP production, and ecology of participating microbial communities, and the biochemical properties of their cellulolytic enzymes have led to new perspectives on saccharification of biomass. Microbial communities are dynamic functions of the chemical and structural compositions of plant cell wall components. The primitive 'multicellularity' exhibited by certain cellulolytic microorganisms may play a role in facilitating cell-cell communication and cell-plant cell wall-substrate interaction.

  15. Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Larry; Albersheim, Peter

    1979-01-01

    Wild type Bacillus subtilis, when grown on beet araban, secretes into its culture medium an endo-arabanase and two arabinosidases. An alternate procedure to one previously described (Kaji A, T Saheki 1975 Biochim Biophys Acta 410: 354-360) has been developed for the purification of the endo-arabanase. The purified endo-arabanase is shown to be homogeneous by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea disc gel electrophoresis (molecular weight ≃ 32,000) and by isoelectric focusing (pI = 9.3). The endo-arabanase, acting on a branched araban substrate, has maximal activity at pH 6.0 and preferentially cleaves 5-linked arabinosyl residues. One of the arabinosidases (molecular weight ≃ 65,000, pI = 5.3) has been purified to the point that it contains only one quantitatively minor contaminant, as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-urea disc gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. The purified arabinosidase, acting on p-nitrophenyl-α-l-arabinofuranoside, has maximal activity at pH 6.5, and, when acting on a branched araban substrate, preferentially attacks nonreducing terminal arabinosyl residues linked to the 2 or 3 position of other arabinosyl residues. Neither of the two purified enzymes is capable of hydrolyzing a variety of carbohydrate substrates which lack arabinosidic linkages. The purified endo-arabinase is shown to be capable of releasing arabinosyl oligomers from the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells, thereby suggesting its usefulness as a probe in studying the structure of the araban component of primary cell walls. PMID:16660741

  16. Serologic Response to Cell Wall Mannoproteins and Proteins of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, José P.; Gil, M. Luisa; López-Ribot, José L.; Chaffin, W. LaJean

    1998-01-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans not only is the structure in which many biological functions essential for the fungal cells reside but also is a significant source of candidal antigens. The major cell wall components that elicit a response from the host immune system are proteins and glycoproteins, the latter being predominantly mannoproteins. Both the carbohydrate and protein moieties are able to trigger immune responses. Although cell-mediated immunity is often considered to be the most important line of defense against candidiasis, cell wall protein and glycoprotein components also elicit a potent humoral response from the host that may include some protective antibodies. Proteins and glycoproteins exposed at the most external layers of the wall structure are involved in several types of interactions of fungal cells with the exocellular environment. Thus, coating of fungal cells with host antibodies has the potential to influence profoundly the host-parasite interaction by affecting antibody-mediated functions such as opsonin-enhanced phagocytosis and blocking the binding activity of fungal adhesins for host ligands. In this review, the various members of the protein and glycoprotein fraction of the C. albicans cell wall that elicit an antibody response in vivo are examined. Although a number of proteins have been shown to stimulate an antibody response, for some of these species the response is not universal. On the other hand, some of the studies demonstrate that certain cell wall antigens and anti-cell wall antibodies may be the basis for developing specific and sensitive serologic tests for the diagnosis of candidasis, particularly the disseminated form. In addition, recent studies have focused on the potential for antibodies to cell wall protein determinants to protect the host against infection. Hence, a better understanding of the humoral response to cell wall antigens of C. albicans may provide the basis for the development of (i) effective procedures

  17. How do plant cell walls extend?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    This article briefly summarizes recent work that identifies the biophysical and biochemical processes that give rise to the extension of plant cell walls. I begin with the biophysical notion of stress relaxation of the wall and follow with recent studies of wall enzymes thought to catalyze wall extension and relaxation. Readers should refer to detailed reviews for more comprehensive discussion of earlier literature (Taiz, 1984; Carpita and Gibeaut, 1993; Cosgrove, 1993).

  18. Production of cell surface and secreted glycoproteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seiradake, Elena; Zhao, Yuguang; Lu, Weixian; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian protein expression systems are becoming increasingly popular for the production of eukaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins. Here we describe methods to produce recombinant proteins in adherent or suspension human embryonic kidney cell cultures, using transient transfection or stable cell lines. The protocols are easy to scale up and cost-efficient, making them suitable for protein crystallization projects and other applications that require high protein yields. PMID:25502196

  19. Glycoprotein isolated from Solanum nigrum L. kills HT-29 cells through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2005-01-01

    Solanum nigrum L. (SNL) has been used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory activity. We previously isolated glycoprotein from SNL and observed that it decreased viable HT-29 cell numbers at a low concentration (60 microg/mL). This study investigated the apoptotic signal pathway triggered by glycoprotein isolated from SNL in HT-29 cells. Treatment of HT-29 cells with SNL glycoprotein (60 microg/mL) for 4 hours resulted in a cytotoxic effect of more than 60%, compared with the control. To explain the apoptotic effects of SNL glycoprotein, we investigated its effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) alpha activity and DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor (NF) kappaB in HT-29 cells, using western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results from these experiments showed that SNL glycoprotein has remarkable inhibitory effects on the activities of TPA (100 nM)-stimulated PKCalpha and NF-kappaB in HT-29 cells. They also substantiated that PKCalpha is a part of the TPA-activated upstream signal pathway of NF-kappaB, since NF-kappaB activity was inhibited by staurosporine (a PKC inhibitor) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an NF-kappaB inhibitor) in a western blot analysis. Furthermore, to verify the triggering of apoptosis by the SNL glycoprotein, we performed DNA fragmentation, nuclear staining, and protein expression assays of apoptotic-related proteins. The amount of DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell numbers increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with SNL glycoprotein. Apoptosis-related protein assays demonstrated that SNL glycoprotein-induced apoptosis is associated with the regulation of bcl-2 and Bax expression. Taken together, the results of this study showed that the activation of PKCalpha, NF-kappaB, and Bax expression by SNL glycoprotein is possibly involved in the apoptotic process. Consequently, these results indicate that SNL glycoprotein causes HT-29 cell death through

  20. Method of using alpha-1 acid glycoprotein on T-cells as a marker for alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Fudenberg, H.H.

    1989-01-31

    A method is described of diagnosing a dementia of the Alzheimer's type characterized by a change in the percentage of T-cells bearing surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein which comprises providing T-cells from a subject, determining the percentage of those T cells which bear surface membrane alpha-1 acid glycoprotein, and comparing that percentage of the percentage of T cells which bear the glycoprotein in a control, whereby the dementia is diagnosed.

  1. Identification of a Streptococcus salivarius Cell Wall Component Mediating Coaggregation with Veillonella alcalescens VI

    PubMed Central

    Weerkamp, Anton H.; McBride, Barry C.

    1981-01-01

    Cell walls of Streptococcus salivarius HB aggregated Veillonella alcalescens V1, but cell walls of the mutant S. salivarius HB-V5 did not. We found no correlation between the presence of fimbriae on streptococcal walls and the ability to aggregate Veillonella strains. Treatment of the walls with lysozyme solubilized a fraction which possessed Veillonella-aggregating activity. Solubilized cell wall preparations of strain HB contained three major (glyco)proteins as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and at least four antigens as determined by immunoelectrophoresis with antiserum prepared against strain HB walls. A specific antiserum, which was obtained by adsorption of anti-HB serum on strain HB-V5 cells, contained monospecific antibody that reacted with the solubilized strain HB wall preparation. Similar fractions prepared from strain HB-V5 cell walls did not possess aggregating activity and lacked one protein band (protein I) after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and one antigen (antigen b) after immunoelectrophoresis. The same antigen was absent when lysozyme-solubilized wall preparations of strain HB were reacted with anti-HB-V5 serum. Crossed-immunoisoelectric focusing indicated that this specific (glyco)protein and this antigen were identical and had an isoelectric point of 4.60. Protein I and antigen b were specifically adsorbed when solubilized strain HB cell walls were incubated with V. alcalescens V1 but were not adsorbed by nonaggregating Veillonella parvula ATCC 10790 cells. Culture supernatants of strain HB contained V. alcalescens V1-aggregating activity. Antigen b was present in the culture supernatant, but was not found in cultures of strain HB-V5. A total of 18 S. salivarius isolates possessing the streptococcal group K antigen released aggregating activity and antigen b into the culture medium, but 11 strains which lacked the K-antigen did not. Images PMID:7251145

  2. Morphogenesis of the Fission Yeast Cell through Cell Wall Expansion.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Erdinc; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Chang, Fred

    2015-08-17

    The shape of walled cells such as fungi, bacteria, and plants are determined by the cell wall. Models for cell morphogenesis postulate that the effects of turgor pressure and mechanical properties of the cell wall can explain the shapes of these diverse cell types. However, in general, these models await validation through quantitative experiments. Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are rod-shaped cells that grow by tip extension and then divide medially through formation of a cell wall septum. Upon cell separation after cytokinesis, the new cell ends adopt a rounded morphology. Here, we show that this shape is generated by a very simple mechanical-based mechanism in which turgor pressure inflates the elastic cell wall in the absence of cell growth. This process is independent of actin and new cell wall synthesis. To model this morphological change, we first estimate the mechanical properties of the cell wall using several approaches. The lateral cell wall behaves as an isotropic elastic material with a Young's modulus of 50 ± 10 MPa inflated by a turgor pressure estimated to be 1.5 ± 0.2 MPa. Based upon these parameters, we develop a quantitative mechanical-based model for new end formation that reveals that the cell wall at the new end expands into its characteristic rounded shape in part because it is softer than the mature lateral wall. These studies provide a simple example of how turgor pressure expands the elastic cell wall to generate a particular cell shape.

  3. Cell wall proteins in seedling cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J G; Cardemil, L

    1994-01-01

    Four cell wall proteins of cotyledons of Prosopis chilensis seedlings were characterized by PAGE and Western analyses using a polyclonal antibody, generated against soybean seed coat extensin. These proteins had M(r)s of 180,000, 126,000, 107,000 and 63,000, as determined by SDS-PAGE. The proteins exhibited a fluorescent positive reaction with dansylhydrazine suggesting that they are glycoproteins; they did not show peroxidase activity. The cell wall proteins were also characterized by their amino acid composition and by their amino-terminal sequence. These analyses revealed that there are two groups of related cell wall proteins in the cotyledons. The first group comprises the proteins of M(r)s 180,000, 126,000, 107,000 which are rich in glutamic acid/glutamine and aspartic acid/asparagine and they have almost identical NH2-terminal sequences. The second group comprises the M(r) 63,000 protein which is rich in proline, glycine, valine and tyrosine, with an NH2-terminal sequence which was very similar to that of soybean proline-rich proteins.

  4. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  5. Do plant cell walls have a code?

    PubMed

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-12-01

    A code is a set of rules that establish correspondence between two worlds, signs (consisting of encrypted information) and meaning (of the decrypted message). A third element, the adaptor, connects both worlds, assigning meaning to a code. We propose that a Glycomic Code exists in plant cell walls where signs are represented by monosaccharides and phenylpropanoids and meaning is cell wall architecture with its highly complex association of polymers. Cell wall biosynthetic mechanisms, structure, architecture and properties are addressed according to Code Biology perspective, focusing on how they oppose to cell wall deconstruction. Cell wall hydrolysis is mainly focused as a mechanism of decryption of the Glycomic Code. Evidence for encoded information in cell wall polymers fine structure is highlighted and the implications of the existence of the Glycomic Code are discussed. Aspects related to fine structure are responsible for polysaccharide packing and polymer-polymer interactions, affecting the final cell wall architecture. The question whether polymers assembly within a wall display similar properties as other biological macromolecules (i.e. proteins, DNA, histones) is addressed, i.e. do they display a code?

  6. Furin cleavage of the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein enhances cell-cell fusion but does not affect virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Follis, Kathryn E.; York, Joanne; Nunberg, Jack H. . E-mail: jack.nunberg@umontana.edu

    2006-07-05

    The fusogenic potential of Class I viral envelope glycoproteins is activated by proteloytic cleavage of the precursor glycoprotein to generate the mature receptor-binding and transmembrane fusion subunits. Although the coronavirus (CoV) S glycoproteins share membership in this class of envelope glycoproteins, cleavage to generate the respective S1 and S2 subunits appears absent in a subset of CoV species, including that responsible for the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). To determine whether proteolytic cleavage of the S glycoprotein might be important for the newly emerged SARS-CoV, we introduced a furin recognition site at single basic residues within the putative S1-S2 junctional region. We show that furin cleavage at the modified R667 position generates discrete S1 and S2 subunits and potentiates membrane fusion activity. This effect on the cell-cell fusion activity by the S glycoprotein is not, however, reflected in the infectivity of pseudotyped lentiviruses bearing the cleaved glycoprotein. The lack of effect of furin cleavage on virion infectivity mirrors that observed in the normally cleaved S glycoprotein of the murine coronavirus and highlights an additional level of complexity in coronavirus entry.

  7. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  8. Glucocorticoid-regulated glycoprotein maturation in wild-type and mutant rat cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones can regulate the posttranslational maturation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MTV) precursor polyproteins in M1.54, a stably infected rat hepatoma cell line. We have used complement- mediated cytolysis to recover variants of M1.54 that fail to express MTV cell surface glycoproteins in a hormone-regulated manner (Firestone, G.L., and K.R. Yamamoto, 1983, Mol. Cell. Biol., 3:149- 160). One such clonal isolate, CR4, is similar to wild-type with respect to synthesis of MTV mRNAs, production of the MTV glycoprotein precursor (gPr74env) and a glycosylated maturation product (gp51), and hormone-induced processing of two MTV phosphoproteins. In contrast, three viral cell surface glycoproteins (gp78, gp70, and gp32) and one extracellular species (gp70s), which derive from gPr74env in glucocorticoid-treated wild-type cells, fail to appear in CR4. CR4 showed no apparent alterations in proliferation rate, cell shape, or expression of total functional mRNA and bulk glycoproteins. We conclude that the genetic lesion in CR4 defines a highly selective hormone- regulated glycoprotein maturation pathway that alters the fate of a restricted subset of precursor species. PMID:3023398

  9. Nonaqueous titration of amino groups in polymeric matrix of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Meychik, N R; Nikolaeva, Yu I; Ermakov, I P

    2009-08-01

    Nonaqueous titration was used for detection of free amino groups in the polymeric matrix of plant cell walls. The content of amino groups varied in the range 0.54-0.91 and total nitrogen in the range 1.0-4.2 mmol per gram dry mass of cell walls depending on the plant species. However, these data on the high content of free amino groups do not correlate with the present day concept that the nitrogen fraction in charged amino groups in plant cell wall proteins, which are assumed to be mainly amino groups of lysine and arginine residues, is about 10%. It is supposed that most detected free amino groups belong to the hydroxy-amino acids hydroxyproline and tyrosine that can be bound at the hydroxyl group with the carbohydrate part of glycoprotein or another structural cell wall polymer.

  10. The cell walls of Chara aspera Willd. (Charophyta) vegetative cells.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, H; Saranpää, P

    1989-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the vegetative cell walls of the charophyte Chara aspera Willd was studied with TEM. Thallus cells, rhizoid bulbil and rhizoidal node cells were investigated. The internodal cells transverse walls contained plasmodesmata. The longitudinal walls of the internodal cells were uniform, fibrillar, with two thin structurally distinct layers with different structure facing the cytoplasm. The outermost layers of internodal, cortical and rhizoid bulbil cells were composed of randomly orientated fibrils. The longitudinal walls of the cortical cells were helicoidal in structure. In the rhizoid bulbil cell walls, six different layers could be distinguished, but their occurrence seemed to depend on the fixation, staining and cutting procedures. A middle lamella and osmophilic deposits were found in the wall between rhizoidal node cells. The cytoplasmic structure of the internodal and cortical cells was not found to differ from other species of Chara. Charasomes were observed only in cortical cells.

  11. Phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and brain

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, R.K.; Goossen, B.; Margolis, R.U.

    1988-05-03

    PC12 pheochromocytoma cells and cultures of early postnatal rat cerebellium were labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine, (/sup 3/H)fucose, (/sup 3/H)leucine, (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine, or sodium (/sup 35/S)sulfate and treated with a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Enzyme treatment of (/sup 3/H) glucosamine- or (/sup 3/H)fucose-labeled PC12 cells led to a 15-fold increase in released glycoproteins. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel ectrophoresis, most of the released material migrated as a broad band with an apparent molecular size of 32,000 daltons (Da), which was specifically immunoprecipitated by a monoclonal antibody to the Thy-l glycoprotein. A second glycoprotein, with an apparent molecular size of 158,000 Da, was also released. After treatment with endo-..beta..-galactosidase, 40-45% of the (/sup 3/H)glucosamine of (/sup 3/H)fucose radioactivity in the phospholipase-released glycoproteins was converted to products of disaccharide size, and the molecular size of the 158-kDa glycoprotein decreased to 145 kDa, demonstrating that it contains fucosylated poly-(N-acetyllactosaminyl) oligosaccharides. The phospholipase also released labeled Thy-1 and the 158-kDa glycoprotein from PC12 cells cultured in the presence of (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine, which specifically labels this component of the phosphatidylinositol membrane-anchoring sequence,while in the lipid-free protein residue of cells not treated with phospholipase, Thy-1 and a doublet at 46/48 kDa were the only labeled proteins. Sulfated glycoproteins of 155, 132/134, 61, and 21 kDa are the predominant species released by phospholipase, which does not affect a major 44-kDa protein seen in (/sup 3/H)ethanolamine-labeled brain cultures. The 44-48- and 155/158-kDa proteins may be common to both PC12 cells and brain.

  12. The transmembrane protein of HIV-1 primary isolates modulates cell surface expression of their envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lebigot, S; Roingeard, P; Thibault, G; Lemiale, F; Verrier, B; Barin, F; Brand, D

    2001-11-10

    We have recently shown that the level of cell surface expression of envelope glycoproteins derived from various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primary isolates (PI) was lower than those of envelope glycoproteins derived from T-cell laboratory-adapted (TCLA) HIV-1 (D. Brand et al., 2000, Virology 271, 350-362). We investigated this phenomenon by comparing the cell surface expression of chimeric envelope glycoproteins constructed by swapping the gp120 surface and gp41 transmembrane glycoproteins of the TCLA HIV-1MN and the PI HIV-1(133), HIV-1G365, or HIV-1EFRA. We found that each chimeric envelope construct had a cell surface-specific pattern of expression similar to that of the parental envelope glycoproteins corresponding to the gp41. Thus, the difference in cell surface expression observed between TCLA viruses and various PI is probably due to a signal located in gp41. Identification of this signal may be important for the design of PI envelope-derived immunogens and may increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 escapes from the immune system.

  13. P-glycoprotein antibody functionalized carbon nanotube overcomes the multidrug resistance of human leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruibin; Wu, Ren'an; Zhao, Liang; Wu, Minghuo; Yang, Ling; Zou, Hanfa

    2010-03-23

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), which is related to cancer chemotherapy, tumor stem cells, and tumor metastasis, is a huge obstacle for the effective cancer therapy. One of the underlying mechanisms of MDR is the increased efflux of anticancer drugs by overexpressed P-glycoprotein (P-gp) of multidrug resistant cells. In this work, the antibody of P-gp (anti-P-gp) functionalized water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotubes (Ap-SWNTs) loaded with doxorubicin (Dox), Dox/Ap-SWNTs, were synthesized for challenging the MDR of K562 human leukemia cells. The resulting Ap-SWNTs could not only specifically recognize the multidrug resistant human leukemia cells (K562R), but also demonstrate the effective loading and controllable release performance for Dox toward the target K562R cells by exposing to near-infrared radiation (NIR). The recognition capability of Ap-SWNTs toward the K562R cells was confirmed by flow cytometry (FCM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The binding affinity of Ap-SWNTs toward drug-resistant K562R cells was ca. 23-fold higher than that toward drug-sensitive K562S cells. Additionally, CLSM indicated that Ap-SWNTs could specifically localize on the cell membrane of K562R cells and the fluorescence of Dox in K562R cells could be significantly enhanced after the employment of Ap-SWNTs as carrier. Moreover, the composite of Dox and Ap-SWNTs (Dox/Ap-SWNTs) expressed 2.4-fold higher cytotoxicity and showed the significant cell proliferation suppression toward K562R leukemia cells (p < 0.05) as compared with free Dox which is popularly employed in clinic trials. These results suggest that the Ap-SWNTs are the promising drug delivery vehicle for overcoming the MDR induced by the overexpression of P-gp on cell membrane. Ap-SWNTs loaded with drug molecules could be used to suppress the proliferation of multidrug resistant cells, destroy the tumor stem cells, and inhibit the metastasis of tumor.

  14. Polyphosphorylated fungal cell wall glycopeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Bonetti, S.J.; Black, B.; Gander, J.E.

    1987-05-01

    Penicillium charlesii secretes a 65 kDa peptidophosphogalactomannan (pPGM) containing 10 phosphodiester residues and 10 galactofuranosyl-containing galactin chains attached to a linear mannan; the polysaccharides is attached to a 3 kDa seryl- and threonyl-rich peptide. The authors have now isolated and partially characterized a form of pPGM released from mycelia of P. charlesii treated at 50/sup 0/C for 15, 30, 60 or 120 min. Two- to 3-fold more pPGM was released by heat treatment than is secreted. Crude pPGM, released by heat, was fractionated on DE-52 and was fractionated into two major fractions on the basis of its difference in negative charge. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy of these two fractions provided spectra very similar to that of secreted pPGM previously reported from this laboratory. /sup 1/H-decoupled /sup 31/P NMR showed major signals at 1.47, and 0.22 ppm and minor signals at 1.32, 1.15, 1.00, 0.91 and 0.76 ppm. These signals are upfield from phosphomonoesters and are in the region observed for (6-O-phosphorylcholine)- and (6-O-phosphorylethanolamine)-..cap alpha..-D-mannopyranosyl residues which are 0.22 and 0.90 ppm, respectively. These polymers contain 30 phosphodiester residues per molecule of 70 kDa mass compared with 10 phosphodiesters in secreted pPGM. Acid phosphatase and alkaline protease were the only lytic enzymes released by heat treatment. The evidence suggests that much of the pPGM is derived from cell walls; and that the polysaccharide is highly phosphorylated.

  15. Cell wall, cytoskeleton, and cell expansion in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Bashline, Logan; Lei, Lei; Li, Shundai; Gu, Ying

    2014-04-01

    To accommodate two seemingly contradictory biological roles in plant physiology, providing both the rigid structural support of plant cells and the adjustable elasticity needed for cell expansion, the composition of the plant cell wall has evolved to become an intricate network of cellulosic, hemicellulosic, and pectic polysaccharides and protein. Due to its complexity, many aspects of the cell wall influence plant cell expansion, and many new and insightful observations and technologies are forthcoming. The biosynthesis of cell wall polymers and the roles of the variety of proteins involved in polysaccharide synthesis continue to be characterized. The interactions within the cell wall polymer network and the modification of these interactions provide insight into how the plant cell wall provides its dual function. The complex cell wall architecture is controlled and organized in part by the dynamic intracellular cytoskeleton and by diverse trafficking pathways of the cell wall polymers and cell wall-related machinery. Meanwhile, the cell wall is continually influenced by hormonal and integrity sensing stimuli that are perceived by the cell. These many processes cooperate to construct, maintain, and manipulate the intricate plant cell wall--an essential structure for the sustaining of the plant stature, growth, and life.

  16. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized.

  17. Molecular regulation of plant cell wall extensibility.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, D J

    1998-05-01

    Gravity responses in plants often involve spatial and temporal changes in cell growth, which is regulated primarily by controlling the ability of the cell wall to extend. The wall is thought to be a cellulose-hemicellulose network embedded in a hydrated matrix of complex polysaccharides and a small amount of structural protein. The wall extends by a form of polymer creep, which is mediated by expansins, a novel group of wall-loosening proteins. Expansins were discovered during a molecular dissection of the "acid growth" behavior of cell walls. Expansin alters the rheology of plant walls in profound ways, yet its molecular mechanism of action is still uncertain. It lacks detectable hydrolytic activity against the major components of the wall, but it is able to disrupt noncovalent adhesion between wall polysaccharides. The discovery of a second family of expansins (beta-expansins) sheds light on the biological role of a major group of pollen allergens and implies that expansins have evolved for diverse developmental functions. Finally, the contribution of other processes to wall extensibility is briefly summarized. PMID:11540640

  18. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  19. Life behind cell walls: paradigm lost, paradigm regained.

    PubMed

    Lamport, D T

    2001-09-01

    This review of the living cell wall and its protein components is in two parts. The first is anecdotal. A personal account spanning over 40 years research may perhaps be an antidote to one stereotypical view of scientists as detached and humorless. The second part deals with the meaning of function, particularly as it applies to hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Function is a difficult word to define objectively. However, with help from such luminaries as Humpty Dumpty: "A word means what I want it to mean, neither more nor less," and Wittgenstein: "Giving examples of usage ... is the only way to talk about meaning," it is possible to construct a ziggurat representing increasingly complex levels of organization from molecular structure to ecology. Forty years ago I suggested that hydroxyproline-rich structural proteins played a key role in cell wall functioning. But because the bulk of the wall is carbohydrate, there has been an understandable resistance to paradigm change. Expansins, paradoxically, contribute greatly to this resistance because their modus operandi as cell-wall-loosening proteins is based on the idea that they break hydrogen bonds between polysaccharide chains allowing slippage. However, this view is not consistent with the recent discovery [Grobe et al. (1999) Eur. J. Biochem 263: 33-40] that beta-expansins may be proteases, as it implies that the extensin network is not a straightjacket but a substrate for expansin in muro. Such a direct role for extensins in both negative and positive regulation of cell expansion and elongation may constitute a major morphogenetic mechanism operating at all levels of plant growth and development.

  20. Refractive index of plant cell walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.; Escobar, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Air was replaced with media of higher refractive indices by vacuum infiltration in leaves of cucumber, blackeye pea, tomato, and string bean plants, and reflectance of noninfiltrated and infiltrated leaves was spectrophotometrically measured. Infiltrated leaves reflected less light than noninfiltrated leaves over the 500-2500-nm wavelength interval because cell wall-air interfaces were partly eliminated. Minimal reflectance should occur when the average refractive index of plant cell walls was matched by the infiltrating fluid. Although refractive indices that resulted in minimal reflectance differed among the four plant genera, an average value of 1.425 approximates the refractive index of plant cell walls for the four plant genera.

  1. Binding partners for the myelin-associated glycoprotein of N2A neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Kelm, S

    1999-02-01

    The myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) has been proposed to be important for the integrity of myelinated axons. For a better understanding of the interactions involved in the binding of MAG to neuronal axons, we performed this study to identify the binding partners for MAG on neuronal cells. Experiments with glycosylation inhibitors revealed that sialylated N-glycans of glycoproteins represent the major binding sites for MAG on the neuroblastoma cell line N2A. From extracts of [3H]glucosamine-labelled N2A cells several glycoproteins with molecular weights between 20 and 230 kDa were affinity-precipitated using immobilised MAG. The interactions of these proteins with MAG were sialic acid-dependent and specific for MAG. PMID:10037148

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry of plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Liangshiou; Varner, J.E. ); Yuen, H.K. )

    1991-03-15

    High-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry has been used to study the phase transition of cell wall preparations of the elongating and mature regions of soybean hypocotyls and of celery epidermis and collenchyma strands. A step-like transition believed to be glass transition was observed in walls isolated from the elongating region of soybean hypocotyls at 52.9C. Addition of 1 mM CaCl{sub 2} to the cell wall preparation increased the transition temperature to 60.8C and greatly reduced the transition magnitude. In walls from the mature region, the transition was small and occurred at a higher temperature (60.1C). Addition of calcium to the mature region cell wall had little effect on the transition. Based on the known interactions between calcium and pectin, the authors propose that calcium affects the glass transition by binding to the polygalacturonate backbone of wall pectin, resulting in a more rigid wall with a smaller transition at a higher temperature. The mature region either has more calcium in the wall or has more methyl-esterified pectin, making it less responsive to added calcium.

  3. Role of cell wall deconstructing enzymes in the proanthocyanidin-cell wall adsorption-desorption phenomena.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, Liliana del Rocío; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna; Ortega-Regules, Ana; Lozada, Daniel; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén

    2016-04-01

    The transference of proanthocyanidins from grapes to wine is quite low. This could be due, among other causes, to proanthocyanidins being bound to grape cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations in the must. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from grapes will depend on the ability to disrupt these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the behavior of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions when commercial maceration enzymes are present in the solution. The results showed that cell wall polysaccharides adsorbed a high amount of proanthocyanidins and only a limited quantity of proanthocyanidins could be desorbed from the cell walls after washing with a model solution. The presence of enzymes in the solution reduced the proanthocyanidin-cell wall interaction, probably through the elimination of pectins from the cell wall network.

  4. An efficient platform for screening expression and crystallization of glycoproteins produced in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeffrey E.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2010-01-01

    Glycoproteins mediate multiple, diverse and critical cellular functions, that are desirable to explore by structural analysis. However, structure determination of these molecules has been hindered by difficulties expressing milligram quantities of stable, homogeneous protein and in determining, which modifications will yield samples amenable to structural studies. We describe a platform proven effective for rapidly screening expression and crystallization of challenging glycoprotein targets produced in mammalian cells. Here, multiple glycoprotein constructs are produced in parallel by transient expression of adherent human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells and subsequently screened in small quantities for crystallization by microfluidic free interface diffusion. As a result, recombinant proteins are produced and processed in a native, mammalian environment and crystallization screening can be accomplished with as little as 65 μg of protein. Moreover, large numbers of constructs can be screened for expression and crystallization and scaled up for structural studies in a matter of five weeks. PMID:19373230

  5. P-glycoprotein expression in canine mammary gland tumours related with myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, N-H; Hwang, Y-H; Im, K-S; Kim, J-H; Chon, S-K; Kim, H-Y; Sur, J-H

    2012-12-01

    P-glycoprotein is influential in chemotherapy-resistance in numerous cancers and has been widely studied in human breast cancer research, but is less studied in canine mammary gland tumour (MGT). The study was to evaluate P-glycoprotein expression and its localisations related with prognostic factors with monoclonal antibody C219, by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 68 cases of canine malignant (n=54) and benign (n=14) MGT. Additional immunofluorescence (IF) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were also performed. There was a novel finding that P-glycoprotein expression with C219 localised at two different cell types: epithelial and myoepithelial cells. Myoepithelial localised tumours were 5 benign (35.5%) and 21 malignant (63.6%), while epithelial localised tumours were 12 cases, all malignant (36.5%). Unlike conventional belief, semi-quantitative evaluation of IHC intensity scores of C219 expression in malignant MGT was related with favourable histopathological parameters. PMID:22554937

  6. Membrane Glycoproteins Associated with Breast Tumor Cell Progression Identified by a Lectin Affinity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanfei; Ao, Xiaoping; Vuong, Huy; Konanur, Meghana; Miller, Fred R.; Goodison, Steve; Lubman, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The membrane glycoprotein component of the cellular proteome represents a promising source for potential disease biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Here we describe the development of a method that facilitates the analysis of membrane glycoproteins and apply it to the differential analysis of breast tumor cells with distinct malignant phenotypes. The approach combines two membrane extraction procedures, and enrichment using ConA and WGA lectin affinity columns, prior to digestion and analysis by LC–MS/MS. The glycoproteins are identified and quantified by spectral counting. Although the distribution of glycoprotein expression as a function of MW and pI was very similar between the two related cell lines tested, the approach enabled the identification of several distinct membrane glycoproteins with an expression index correlated with either a precancerous (MCF10AT1), or a malignant, metastatic cellular phenotype (MCF10CA1a). Among the proteins associated with the malignant phenotype, Gamma-glutamyl hydrolase, CD44, Galectin-3-binding protein, and Syndecan-1 protein have been reported as potential biomarkers of breast cancer. PMID:18729497

  7. Analysis of COPII Vesicles Indicates a Role for the Emp47-Ssp120 Complex in Transport of Cell Surface Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Neil G; Wilson, Joshua D; Bentivoglio, Christine M; Dhungel, Nripesh; Gitler, Aaron D; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Coat protein complex II (COPII) vesicle formation at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transports nascent secretory proteins forward to the Golgi complex. To further define the machinery that packages secretory cargo and targets vesicles to Golgi membranes, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of purified COPII vesicles. In addition to previously known proteins, we identified new vesicle proteins including Coy1, Sly41 and Ssp120, which were efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles for trafficking between the ER and Golgi compartments. Further characterization of the putative calcium-binding Ssp120 protein revealed a tight association with Emp47 and in emp47Δ cells Ssp120 was mislocalized and secreted. Genetic analyses demonstrated that EMP47 and SSP120 display identical synthetic positive interactions with IRE1 and synthetic negative interactions with genes involved in cell wall assembly. Our findings support a model in which the Emp47-Ssp120 complex functions in transport of plasma membrane glycoproteins through the early secretory pathway.

  8. Identification of a glycoprotein ligand for E-selectin on mouse myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    E-selectin is an inducible endothelial cell adhesion molecule for neutrophils which functions as a Ca(2+)-dependent lectin. Using a recombinant, antibody-like form of mouse E-selectin, we have searched for glycoprotein ligands on mouse neutrophils and the neutrophil progenitor cell line 32D cl 3. We have identified a 150-kD glycoprotein as the only protein which could be affinity-isolated with soluble E- selectin from [35S]methionine/[35S]cysteine-labeled 32D cl 3 cells. Binding of this protein was strictly Ca(2+)-dependent, was blocked by a cell adhesion-blocking mAb against mouse E-selectin, and required the presence of sialic acid on the 150-kD ligand. This glycoprotein was also affinity-isolated from mature neutrophils, in addition to a minor component at 250 kD, but could not be isolated from several other non- myeloid cell lines. The 150-kD glycoprotein was the only protein from 32D cl 3 cells, which was detectable by silver-staining after a one- step affinity-isolation. PMID:7682218

  9. P-glycoprotein regulates trafficking of CD8(+) T cells to the brain parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Kooij, Gijs; Kroon, Jeffrey; Paul, Debayon; Reijerkerk, Arie; Geerts, Dirk; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Het Hof, Bert; Drexhage, Joost A; van Vliet, Sandra J; Hekking, Liesbeth H P; van Buul, Jaap D; Pachter, Joel S; de Vries, Helga E

    2014-05-01

    The trafficking of cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes across the lining of the cerebral vasculature is key to the onset of the chronic neuro-inflammatory disorder multiple sclerosis. However, the mechanisms controlling their final transmigration across the brain endothelium remain unknown. Here, we describe that CD8(+) T lymphocyte trafficking into the brain is dependent on the activity of the brain endothelial adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter P-glycoprotein. Silencing P-glycoprotein activity selectively reduced the trafficking of CD8(+) T cells across the brain endothelium in vitro as well as in vivo. In response to formation of the T cell-endothelial synapse, P-glycoprotein was found to regulate secretion of endothelial (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), a chemokine that mediates CD8(+) T cell migration in vitro. Notably, CCL2 levels were significantly enhanced in microvessels isolated from human multiple sclerosis lesions in comparison with non-neurological controls. Endothelial cell-specific elimination of CCL2 in mice subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis also significantly diminished the accumulation of CD8(+) T cells compared to wild-type animals. Collectively, these results highlight a novel (patho)physiological role for P-glycoprotein in CD8(+) T cell trafficking into the central nervous system during neuro-inflammation and illustrate CCL2 secretion as a potential link in this mechanism.

  10. Structure of Plant Cell Walls 1

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tadashi; Thomas, Jerry; Darvill, Alan; Albersheim, Peter

    1989-01-01

    Considerable information has been obtained about the primary structures of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cell-wall pectic polysaccharides, i.e. rhamnogalacturonan I, rhamnogalacturonan II, and homogalacturonan. However, these polysaccharides, which are solubilized from the walls by endo-α-1,4-polygalacturonase, account for only about half of the pectic polysaccharides known to be present in sycamore cell walls. We now report that, after exhaustive treatment with endo-α-1,4-polygalacturonase, additional pectic polysaccharides were extracted from sycamore cell walls by treatment with Na2CO3 at 1 and 22°C. These previously uncharacterized polysaccharides accounted for ∼4% of the cell wall. Based on the glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage compositions and the nature of the products obtained by treating the quantitatively predominant NaCO3-extracted polysaccharides with lithium metal dissolved in ethylenediamine, the polysaccharides were found to strongly resemble rhamnogalacturonan I. However, unlike rhamnogalacturonan I that characteristically had equal amounts of 2- and 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues in its backbone, the polysaccharides extracted in Na2CO3 at 1°C had markedly disparate ratios of 2- to 2,4-linked rhamnosyl residues. We concluded that polysaccharides similar to rhamnogalacturonan I but with different degrees of branching are present in the walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. PMID:16666559

  11. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to the Rho1 GTPase, which mobilizes a physiologic response through a variety of effectors. Activation of CWI signaling regulates the production of various carbohydrate polymers of the cell wall, as well as their polarized delivery to the site of cell wall remodeling. This review article centers on CWI signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the cell cycle and in response to cell wall stress. The interface of this signaling pathway with other pathways that contribute to the maintenance of cell wall integrity is also discussed. PMID:22174182

  12. On-line identification of P-glycoprotein substrates by monitoring of extracellular acidification and respiration rates in living cells.

    PubMed

    Seeland, Swen; Treiber, Alexander; Hafner, Mathias; Huwyler, Jörg

    2011-07-01

    The influence of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) in drug resistance as well as drug absorption and disposition is an important factor to be considered during the development of new drugs. Thus, the early identification and exclusion of compounds showing a high affinity towards P-glycoprotein can help to select drug candidates. The aim of our study was to implement a label-free assay for the identification of P-glycoprotein substrates in living cells. For this approach, a multiparametric, chip-based sensor system was used to determine extracellular acidification, cell respiration and adhesion upon stimulation with P-glycoprotein substrates. Using L-MDR1 cells, a human P-glycoprotein overexpressing cell line, the influence of P-glycoprotein activity was determined for seven different compounds, demonstrating the applicability of the system for P-glycoprotein substrate identification. Effects were concentration dependent, as shown for the P-glycoprotein substrate verapamil, and were associated with cellular acidification and respiration. P-glycoprotein ATPase activation by verapamil could be described by a Michaelis-Menten type kinetic profile showing saturation at high substrate concentrations. The Michaelis-Menten constants K(M) were determined to be 0.92μM (calculated based on extracellular acidification) and 4.9μM (calculated based on cellular respiration). Control experiments using 100nM of the P-glycoprotein inhibitor elacridar indicated that the observed effects were related to P-glycoprotein ATPase activity. In contrast, wild-type LLC-PK1 cells not expressing P-glycoprotein were not responsive towards stimulation with different P-glycoprotein substrates. Summarizing these findings, the used microsensor system is a generic system suitable for the identification of P-glycoprotein substrates. In contrast to biochemical P-glycoprotein assays, activation of the drug efflux pump can be monitored on-line in living cells to identify P-glycoprotein substrates and to study the

  13. Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle Momany

    2009-10-26

    Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

  14. Modes of deformation of walled cells.

    PubMed

    Dumais, Jacques

    2013-11-01

    The bewildering morphological diversity found in cells is one of the starkest illustrations of life's ability to self-organize. Yet the morphogenetic mechanisms that produce the multifarious shapes of cells are still poorly understood. The shared similarities between the walled cells of prokaryotes, many protists, fungi, and plants make these groups particularly appealing to begin investigating how morphological diversity is generated at the cell level. In this review, I attempt a first classification of the different modes of surface deformation used by walled cells. Five modes of deformation were identified: inextensional bending, equi-area shear, elastic stretching, processive intussusception, and chemorheological growth. The two most restrictive modes-inextensional and equi-area deformations-are embodied in the exine of pollen grains and the wall-like pellicle of euglenoids, respectively. For these modes, it is possible to express the deformed geometry of the cell explicitly in terms of the undeformed geometry and other easily observable geometrical parameters. The greatest morphogenetic power is reached with the processive intussusception and chemorheological growth mechanisms that underlie the expansive growth of walled cells. A comparison of these two growth mechanisms suggests a possible way to tackle the complexity behind wall growth.

  15. A cytochemical and immunocytochemical analysis of the wall labyrinth apparatus in leaf transfer cells in Elodea canadensis

    PubMed Central

    Ligrone, Roberto; Vaughn, Kevin C.; Rascio, Nicoletta

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Transfer cells are plant cells specialized in apoplast/symplast transport and characterized by a distinctive wall labyrinth apparatus. The molecular architecture and biochemistry of the labyrinth apparatus are poorly known. The leaf lamina in the aquatic angiosperm Elodea canadensis consists of only two cell layers, with the abaxial cells developing as transfer cells. The present study investigated biochemical properties of wall ingrowths and associated plasmalemma in these cells. Methods Leaves of Elodea were examined by light and electron microscopy and ATPase activity was localized cytochemically. Immunogold electron microscopy was employed to localize carbohydrate epitopes associated with major cell wall polysaccharides and glycoproteins. Key Results The plasmalemma associated with the wall labyrinth is strongly enriched in light-dependent ATPase activity. The wall ingrowths and an underlying wall layer share an LM11 epitope probably associated with glucuronoarabinoxylan and a CCRC-M7 epitope typically associated with rhamnogalacturonan I. No labelling was observed with LM10, an antibody that recognizes low-substituted and unsubstituted xylan, a polysaccharide consistently associated with secondary cell walls. The JIM5 and JIM7 epitopes, associated with homogalacturonan with different degrees of methylation, appear to be absent in the wall labyrinth but present in the rest of cell walls. Conclusions The wall labyrinth apparatus of leaf transfer cells in Elodea is a specialized structure with distinctive biochemical properties. The high level of light-dependent ATPase activity in the plasmalemma lining the wall labyrinth is consistent with a formerly suggested role of leaf transfer cells in enhancing inorganic carbon inflow. The wall labyrinth is a part of the primary cell wall. The discovery that the wall ingrowths in Elodea have an antibody-binding pattern divergent, in part, from that of the rest of cell wall suggests that their

  16. Planctomycetes do possess a peptidoglycan cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Olga; Schüler, Margarete; Schumann, Peter; Schneider, Alexander; Boedeker, Christian; Jogler, Mareike; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Rohde, Manfred; Mayer, Christoph; Engelhardt, Harald; Spring, Stefan; Jogler, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Most bacteria contain a peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall, which is critical for maintenance of shape and important for cell division. In contrast, Planctomycetes have been proposed to produce a proteinaceous cell wall devoid of PG. The apparent absence of PG has been used as an argument for the putative planctomycetal ancestry of all bacterial lineages. Here we show, employing multiple bioinformatic methods, that planctomycetal genomes encode proteins required for PG synthesis. Furthermore, we biochemically demonstrate the presence of the sugar and the peptide components of PG in Planctomycetes. In addition, light and electron microscopic experiments reveal planctomycetal PG sacculi that are susceptible to lysozyme treatment. Finally, cryo-electron tomography demonstrates that Planctomycetes possess a typical PG cell wall and that their cellular architecture is thus more similar to that of other Gram-negative bacteria. Our findings shed new light on the cellular architecture and cell division of the maverick Planctomycetes. PMID:25964217

  17. An Arabidopsis Cell Wall Proteoglycan Consists of Pectin and Arabinoxylan Covalently Linked to an Arabinogalactan Protein[W

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Eberhard, Stefan; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Warder, Clayton; Glushka, John; Yuan, Chunhua; Hao, Zhangying; Zhu, Xiang; Avci, Utku; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Baldwin, David; Pham, Charles; Orlando, Ronald; Darvill, Alan; Hahn, Michael G.; Kieliszewski, Marcia J.; Mohnen, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls are comprised largely of the polysaccharides cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin, along with ∼10% protein and up to 40% lignin. These wall polymers interact covalently and noncovalently to form the functional cell wall. Characterized cross-links in the wall include covalent linkages between wall glycoprotein extensins between rhamnogalacturonan II monomer domains and between polysaccharides and lignin phenolic residues. Here, we show that two isoforms of a purified Arabidopsis thaliana arabinogalactan protein (AGP) encoded by hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein family protein gene At3g45230 are covalently attached to wall matrix hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides, with rhamnogalacturonan I (RG I)/homogalacturonan linked to the rhamnosyl residue in the arabinogalactan (AG) of the AGP and with arabinoxylan attached to either a rhamnosyl residue in the RG I domain or directly to an arabinosyl residue in the AG glycan domain. The existence of this wall structure, named ARABINOXYLAN PECTIN ARABINOGALACTAN PROTEIN1 (APAP1), is contrary to prevailing cell wall models that depict separate protein, pectin, and hemicellulose polysaccharide networks. The modified sugar composition and increased extractability of pectin and xylan immunoreactive epitopes in apap1 mutant aerial biomass support a role for the APAP1 proteoglycan in plant wall architecture and function. PMID:23371948

  18. Carbohydrate Structure of Sindbis Virus Glycoprotein E2 from Virus Grown in Hamster and Chicken Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Keegstra, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    Sindbis virus was used as a probe to examine glycosylation processes in two different species of cultured cells. Parallel studies were carried out analyzing the carbohydrate added to Sindbis glycoprotein E2 when the virus was grown in chicken embryo cells and BHK cells. The Pronase glycopeptides of Sindbis glycoprotein E2 were purified by a combination of ion-exchange and gel filtration chromatography. Four glycopeptides were resolved, ranging in molecular weight from 1,800 to 2,700. Structures are proposed for each of the four glycopeptides, based on data obtained by quantitative composition analyses, methylation analyses, and degradation of the glycopeptides using purified exo- and endoglycosidases. The largest three glycopeptides (S1, S2, and S3) have similar structures but differ in the extent of sialylation. All three contain N-acetylglucosamine, mannose, galactose, and fucose, in a structure similar to oligosaccharides found on other glycoproteins. Glycopeptide S1 has two residues of sialic acid, whereas glycopeptides S2 and S3 contain 1 and 0 residues of sialic acid, respectively. The smallest glycopeptide, S4, contains only N-acetyglucosamine and mannose, and is also similar to mannose-rich oligosaccharides found on other glycoproteins. Each of the complex glycopeptides (S1, S2, or S3) from virus grown in BHK cells is indistinguishable from the corresponding glycopeptides derived from virus grown in chicken cells. Glycopeptide S4 is also very similar in size, composition, and sugar linkages from virus derived from the two hosts. These results suggest that chicken cells and BHK cells have similar glycosylation mechanisms and glycosylate Sindbis glycoprotein E2 in nearly identical ways. PMID:430605

  19. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Wolfgang D.; Talmadge, Kenneth W.; Keegstra, Kenneth; Albersheim, Peter

    1973-01-01

    The molecular structure, chemical properties, and biological function of the xyloglucan polysaccharide isolated from cell walls of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells are described. The sycamore wall xyloglucan is compared to the extracellular xyloglucan secreted by suspension-cultured sycamore cells into their culture medium and is also compared to the seed “amyloid” xyloglucans. Xyloglucan—or fragments of xyloglucan—and acidic fragments of the pectic polysaccharides are released from endopolygalacturonase-pretreated sycamore walls by treatment of these walls with 8 m urea, endoglucanase, or 0.5 n NaOH. Some of the xyloglucan thus released is found to cochromatograph with the acidic pectic fragments on diethylaminoethyl Sephadex. The chemical or enzymic treatments required for the release of xyloglucan from the walls and the cochromatography of xyloglucan with the acidic pectic fragments indicate that xyloglucan is covalently linked to the pectic polysaccharides and is noncovalently bound to the cellulose fibrils of the sycamore cell wall. The molecular structure of sycamore xyloglucan was characterized by methylation analysis of the oligosaccharides obtained by endoglucanase treatment of the polymer. The structure of the polymer is based on a repeating heptasaccharide unit which consists of 4 residues of β-1-4-linked glucose and 3 residues of terminal xylose. A single xylose residue is glycosidically linked to carbon 6 of 3 of the glucosyl residues. PMID:16658281

  20. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Tanja C; Maisner, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  1. Altering Entry Site Preference of Lentiviral Vectors into Neuronal Cells by Pseudotyping with Envelope Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato, Shigeki; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Takada, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    A lentiviral vector system provides a powerful strategy for gene therapy trials against a variety of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Pseudotyping of lentiviral vectors with different envelope glycoproteins not only confers the neurotropism to the vectors, but also alters the preference of sites of vector entry into neuronal cells. One major group of lentiviral vectors is a pseudotype with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) that enters preferentially cell body areas (somata/dendrites) of neurons and transduces them. Another group contains lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with fusion envelope glycoproteins composed of different sets of rabies virus glycoprotein and VSV-G segments that enter predominantly axon terminals of neurons and are transported through axons retrogradely to their cell bodies, resulting in enhanced retrograde gene transfer. This retrograde gene transfer takes a considerable advantage of delivering the transgene into neuronal cell bodies situated in regions distant from the injection site of the vectors. The rational use of these two vector groups characterized by different entry mechanisms will further extend the strategy for gene therapy of neurological and neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Sialic Acids on Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein B Are Required for Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Matsumoto, Maki; Arisawa, Fuminori; Kohyama, Masako; Hirayasu, Kouyuki; Mori, Yasuko; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the human Herpesvirus family that causes varicella (chicken pox) and zoster (shingles). VZV latently infects sensory ganglia and is also responsible for encephalomyelitis. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a member of the sialic acid (SA)-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin family, is mainly expressed in neural tissues. VZV glycoprotein B (gB) associates with MAG and mediates membrane fusion during VZV entry into host cells. The SA requirements of MAG when associating with its ligands vary depending on the specific ligand, but it is unclear whether the SAs on gB are involved in the association with MAG. In this study, we found that SAs on gB are essential for the association with MAG as well as for membrane fusion during VZV infection. MAG with a point mutation in the SA-binding site did not bind to gB and did not mediate cell-cell fusion or VZV entry. Cell-cell fusion and VZV entry mediated by the gB-MAG interaction were blocked by sialidase treatment. N-glycosylation or O-glycosylation inhibitors also inhibited the fusion and entry mediated by gB-MAG interaction. Furthermore, gB with mutations in N-glycosylation sites, i.e. asparagine residues 557 and 686, did not associate with MAG, and the cell-cell fusion efficiency was low. Fusion between the viral envelope and cellular membrane is essential for host cell entry by herpesviruses. Therefore, these results suggest that SAs on gB play important roles in MAG-mediated VZV infection.

  3. Enzymatic cell wall degradation of Chlorella vulgaris and other microalgae for biofuels production.

    PubMed

    Gerken, Henri G; Donohoe, Bryon; Knoshaug, Eric P

    2013-01-01

    Cell walls of microalgae consist of a polysaccharide and glycoprotein matrix providing the cells with a formidable defense against its environment. We characterized enzymes that can digest the cell wall and weaken this defense for the purpose of protoplasting or lipid extraction. A growth inhibition screen demonstrated that chitinase, lysozyme, pectinase, sulfatase, β-glucuronidase, and laminarinase had the broadest effect across the various Chlorella strains tested and also inhibited Nannochloropsis and Nannochloris strains. Chlorella is typically most sensitive to chitinases and lysozymes, both enzymes that degrade polymers containing N-acetylglucosamine. Using a fluorescent DNA stain, we developed rapid methodology to quantify changes in permeability in response to enzyme digestion and found that treatment with lysozyme in conjunction with other enzymes has a drastic effect on cell permeability. Transmission electron microscopy of enzymatically treated Chlorella vulgaris indicates that lysozyme degrades the outer surface of the cell wall and removes hair-like fibers protruding from the surface, which differs from the activity of chitinase. This action on the outer surface of the cell causes visible protuberances on the cell surface and presumably leads to the increased settling rate when cells are treated with lysozyme. We demonstrate radical ultrastructural changes to the cell wall in response to treatment with various enzyme combinations which, in some cases, causes a greater than twofold increase in the thickness of the cell wall. The enzymes characterized in this study should prove useful in the engineering and extraction of oils from microalgae.

  4. Influence of N-glycans on Expression of Cell Wall Remodeling Related Genes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; Pessoni, André Moreira; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. It is caused by the temperature-dependent dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The P. brasiliensis cell wall is a dynamic outer structure, composed of a network of glycoproteins and polysaccharides, such as chitin, glucan and N-glycosylated proteins. These glycoproteins can interact with the host to affect infection rates, and are known to perform other functions. We inhibited N-linked glycosylation using tunicamycin (TM), and then evaluated the expression of P. brasiliensis genes related to cell wall remodeling. Our results suggest that cell wall synthesis related genes, such as β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase (PbGEL3), 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1), and α-1,4-amylase (PbAMY), as well as cell wall degrading related genes, such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (PbNAG1), α-1,3-glucanase (PbAGN), and β-1,3-glucanase (PbBGN1 and PbBGN2), have their expression increased by the N-glycosylation inhibition, as detected by qRT-PCR. The observed increases in gene expression levels reveal possible compensatory mechanisms for diminished enzyme activity due to the lack of glycosylation caused by TM. PMID:27226767

  5. Influence of N-glycans on Expression of Cell Wall Remodeling Related Genes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Fausto; Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; Pessoni, André Moreira; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-04-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. It is caused by the temperature-dependent dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The P. brasiliensis cell wall is a dynamic outer structure, composed of a network of glycoproteins and polysaccharides, such as chitin, glucan and N-glycosylated proteins. These glycoproteins can interact with the host to affect infection rates, and are known to perform other functions. We inhibited N-linked glycosylation using tunicamycin (TM), and then evaluated the expression of P. brasiliensis genes related to cell wall remodeling. Our results suggest that cell wall synthesis related genes, such as β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase (PbGEL3), 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1), and α-1,4-amylase (PbAMY), as well as cell wall degrading related genes, such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (PbNAG1), α-1,3-glucanase (PbAGN), and β-1,3-glucanase (PbBGN1 and PbBGN2), have their expression increased by the N-glycosylation inhibition, as detected by qRT-PCR. The observed increases in gene expression levels reveal possible compensatory mechanisms for diminished enzyme activity due to the lack of glycosylation caused by TM.

  6. The charophycean green algae provide insights into the early origins of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Bacic, Antony; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Fei, Zhangzhun; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2011-10-01

    Numerous evolutionary innovations were required to enable freshwater green algae to colonize terrestrial habitats and thereby initiate the evolution of land plants (embryophytes). These adaptations probably included changes in cell-wall composition and architecture that were to become essential for embryophyte development and radiation. However, it is not known to what extent the polymers that are characteristic of embryophyte cell walls, including pectins, hemicelluloses, glycoproteins and lignin, evolved in response to the demands of the terrestrial environment or whether they pre-existed in their algal ancestors. Here we show that members of the advanced charophycean green algae (CGA), including the Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, but not basal CGA (Klebsormidiales and Chlorokybales), have cell walls that are comparable in several respects to the primary walls of embryophytes. Moreover, we provide both chemical and immunocytochemical evidence that selected Coleochaete species have cell walls that contain small amounts of lignin or lignin-like polymers derived from radical coupling of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. Thus, the ability to synthesize many of the components that characterize extant embryophyte walls evolved during divergence within CGA. Our study provides new insight into the evolutionary window during which the structurally complex walls of embryophytes originated, and the significance of the advanced CGA during these events. PMID:21707800

  7. The charophycean green algae provide insights into the early origins of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Pettolino, Filomena A; Bacic, Antony; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; O'Neill, Malcolm A; Fei, Zhangzhun; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2011-10-01

    Numerous evolutionary innovations were required to enable freshwater green algae to colonize terrestrial habitats and thereby initiate the evolution of land plants (embryophytes). These adaptations probably included changes in cell-wall composition and architecture that were to become essential for embryophyte development and radiation. However, it is not known to what extent the polymers that are characteristic of embryophyte cell walls, including pectins, hemicelluloses, glycoproteins and lignin, evolved in response to the demands of the terrestrial environment or whether they pre-existed in their algal ancestors. Here we show that members of the advanced charophycean green algae (CGA), including the Charales, Coleochaetales and Zygnematales, but not basal CGA (Klebsormidiales and Chlorokybales), have cell walls that are comparable in several respects to the primary walls of embryophytes. Moreover, we provide both chemical and immunocytochemical evidence that selected Coleochaete species have cell walls that contain small amounts of lignin or lignin-like polymers derived from radical coupling of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols. Thus, the ability to synthesize many of the components that characterize extant embryophyte walls evolved during divergence within CGA. Our study provides new insight into the evolutionary window during which the structurally complex walls of embryophytes originated, and the significance of the advanced CGA during these events.

  8. A novel baculovirus vector for the production of nonfucosylated recombinant glycoproteins in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mabashi-Asazuma, Hideaki; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Jarvis, Donald L

    2014-03-01

    Glycosylation is an important attribute of baculovirus-insect cell expression systems, but some insect cell lines produce core α1,3-fucosylated N-glycans, which are highly immunogenic and render recombinant glycoproteins unsuitable for human use. To address this problem, we exploited a bacterial enzyme, guanosine-5'-diphospho (GDP)-4-dehydro-6-deoxy-d-mannose reductase (Rmd), which consumes the GDP-l-fucose precursor. We expected this enzyme to block glycoprotein fucosylation by blocking the production of GDP-l-fucose, the donor substrate required for this process. Initially, we engineered two different insect cell lines to constitutively express Rmd and isolated subclones with fucosylation-negative phenotypes. However, we found the fucosylation-negative phenotypes induced by Rmd expression were unstable, indicating that this host cell engineering approach is ineffective in insect systems. Thus, we constructed a baculovirus vector designed to express Rmd immediately after infection and facilitate the insertion of genes encoding any glycoprotein of interest for expression later after infection. We used this vector to produce a daughter encoding rituximab and found, in contrast to an Rmd-negative control, that insect cells infected with this virus produced a nonfucosylated form of this therapeutic antibody. These results indicate that our Rmd(+) baculoviral vector can be used to solve the immunogenic core α1,3-fucosylation problem associated with the baculovirus-insect cell system. In conjunction with existing glycoengineered insect cell lines, this vector extends the utility of the baculovirus-insect cell system to include therapeutic glycoprotein production. This new vector also extends the utility of the baculovirus-insect cell system to include the production of recombinant antibodies with enhanced effector functions, due to its ability to block core α1,6-fucosylation.

  9. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-inhibitors, ABT-737 and ABT-263, are substrates for P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Meike; Dickens, David; Dyer, Martin J.S.; Owen, Andrew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Cohen, Gerald M.

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The BCL2-inhibitor ABT-263 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein. {yields} Apoptosis is inhibited by P-glycoprotein expression. {yields} Overexpression of P-glycoprotein may contribute to resistance to ABT-263 or ABT-737. -- Abstract: Inhibition of BCL2 proteins is one of the most promising new approaches to targeted cancer therapy resulting in the induction of apoptosis. Amongst the most specific BCL2-inhibitors identified are ABT-737 and ABT-263. However, targeted therapy is often only effective for a limited amount of time because of the occurrence of drug resistance. In this study, the interaction of BCL2-inhibitors with the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein was investigated. Using {sup 3}H labelled ABT-263, we found that cells with high P-glycoprotein activity accumulated less drug. In addition, cells with increased P-glycoprotein expression were more resistant to apoptosis induced by either ABT-737 or ABT-263. Addition of tariquidar or verapamil sensitized the cells to BCL2-inhibitor treatment, resulting in higher apoptosis. Our data suggest that the BCL2-inhibitors ABT-737 and ABT-263 are substrates for P-glycoprotein. Over-expression of P-glycoprotein may be, at least partly, responsible for resistance to these BCL2-inhibitors.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae structural cell wall mannoprotein.

    PubMed

    Frevert, J; Ballou, C E

    1985-01-29

    A novel mannoprotein fraction with an average molecular weight of 180 000 has been isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mnn9 mutant cell wall that was solubilized by beta-glucanase digestion. The same material could be extracted from purified wall fragments with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The protein component, 12% by weight, is rich in proline, whereas the carbohydrate, mainly mannose, is about evenly distributed between asparagine and hydroxyamino acids. Endoglucosaminidase H digestion of the isolated mannoprotein reduced its average molecular weight to 150 000, but the mannoprotein, while still embedded in the cell wall, was inaccessible to the enzyme. Biosynthesis and translocation of the mannoprotein were investigated by following incorporation of [3H]proline into this fraction. In the presence of tunicamycin, both mnn9 and wild-type X2180 cells made a mannoprotein fraction with an average molecular weight of 140 000, whereas in the absence of the glycosylation inhibitor, the mnn9 mutant made material with a molecular weight of 180 000 and the mannoprotein made by wild-type cells was too large to penetrate the polyacrylamide gel. Although the cell wall mannoprotein was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes, attempts to isolate the carbohydrate-free component failed to yield any characteristic peptide material. PMID:3888262

  11. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall. PMID:26539200

  12. Reconstitution of a Secondary Cell Wall in a Secondary Cell Wall-Deficient Arabidopsis Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2015-01-01

    The secondary cell wall constitutes a rigid frame of cells in plant tissues where rigidity is required. Deposition of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells contributes to the production of wood in woody plants. The secondary cell wall is assembled through co-operative activities of many enzymes, and their gene expression is precisely regulated by a pyramidal cascade of transcription factors. Deposition of a transmuted secondary cell wall in empty fiber cells by expressing selected gene(s) in this cascade has not been attempted previously. In this proof-of-concept study, we expressed chimeric activators of 24 transcription factors that are preferentially expressed in the stem, in empty fiber cells of the Arabidopsis nst1-1 nst3-1 double mutant, which lacks a secondary cell wall in fiber cells, under the control of the NST3 promoter. The chimeric activators of MYB46, SND2 and ANAC075, as well as NST3, reconstituted a secondary cell wall with different characteristics from those of the wild type in terms of its composition. The transgenic lines expressing the SND2 or ANAC075 chimeric activator showed increased glucose and xylose, and lower lignin content, whereas the transgenic line expressing the MYB46 chimeric activator showed increased mannose content. The expression profile of downstream genes in each transgenic line was also different from that of the wild type. This study proposed a new screening strategy to identify factors of secondary wall formation and also suggested the potential of the artificially reconstituted secondary cell walls as a novel raw material for production of bioethanol and other chemicals. PMID:25535195

  13. Reconstitution of a secondary cell wall in a secondary cell wall-deficient Arabidopsis mutant.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shingo; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2015-02-01

    The secondary cell wall constitutes a rigid frame of cells in plant tissues where rigidity is required. Deposition of the secondary cell wall in fiber cells contributes to the production of wood in woody plants. The secondary cell wall is assembled through co-operative activities of many enzymes, and their gene expression is precisely regulated by a pyramidal cascade of transcription factors. Deposition of a transmuted secondary cell wall in empty fiber cells by expressing selected gene(s) in this cascade has not been attempted previously. In this proof-of-concept study, we expressed chimeric activators of 24 transcription factors that are preferentially expressed in the stem, in empty fiber cells of the Arabidopsis nst1-1 nst3-1 double mutant, which lacks a secondary cell wall in fiber cells, under the control of the NST3 promoter. The chimeric activators of MYB46, SND2 and ANAC075, as well as NST3, reconstituted a secondary cell wall with different characteristics from those of the wild type in terms of its composition. The transgenic lines expressing the SND2 or ANAC075 chimeric activator showed increased glucose and xylose, and lower lignin content, whereas the transgenic line expressing the MYB46 chimeric activator showed increased mannose content. The expression profile of downstream genes in each transgenic line was also different from that of the wild type. This study proposed a new screening strategy to identify factors of secondary wall formation and also suggested the potential of the artificially reconstituted secondary cell walls as a novel raw material for production of bioethanol and other chemicals.

  14. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  15. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought.

  16. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought. PMID:27458437

  17. Monospecific and common glycoprotein ligands for E- and P-selectin on myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    E- and P-selectin are inducible cell adhesion molecules on endothelial cells, which function as Ca(2+)-dependent lectins and mediate the binding of neutrophils and monocytes. We have recently identified a 150- kD glycoprotein ligand for E-selectin on mouse myeloid cells, using a recombinant antibody-like form of mouse E-selectin. Here, we report that this ligand does not bind to an analogous P-selectin fusion protein. Instead, the chimeric P-selectin-IgG protein recognizes a 160- kD glycoprotein on the mouse neutrophil progenitor 32D cl 3, on mature mouse neutrophils and on human HL60 cells. The binding is Ca(2+)- dependent and requires the presence of sialic acid on the ligand. This P-selectin-ligand is not recognized by E-selectin. Removal of N-linked carbohydrate side chains from the 150-kD and the 160-kD monospecific selectin ligands abolishes the binding of both ligands to the respective selectin. Treatment of HL60 cells with Peptide: N- glycosidase F inhibited cell binding to P- and E-selectin. In addition, glycoproteins of 230 and 130 kD were found on mature mouse neutrophils, which bound both to E- and P-selectin in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion. The signals detected for these ligands were 15-20-fold weaker than those for the monospecific ligands. Both proteins were heavily sialylated and selectin-binding was blocked by removal of sialic acid, but not by removal of N-linked carbohydrates. Our data reveal that E- and P-selectin recognize two categories of glycoprotein ligands: one type requires N-linked carbohydrates for binding and is monospecific for each of the two selectins and the other type binds independent of N- linked carbohydrates and is common for both endothelial selectins. PMID:7512971

  18. A pathway for cell wall anchorage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, C F; Kurjan, J; Lipke, P N

    1994-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin is a cell wall-anchored adhesion glycoprotein. The previously identified 140-kDa form, which contains a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (D. Wojciechowicz, C.-F. Lu, J. Kurjan, and P. N. Lipke, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2554-2563, 1993), and additional forms of 80, 150, 250 to 300, and > 300 kDa had the properties of intermediates in a transport and cell wall anchorage pathway. N glycosylation and additional modifications resulted in successive increases in size during transport. The 150- and 250- to 300-kDa forms were membrane associated and are likely to be intermediates between the 140-kDa form and a cell surface GPI-anchored form of > 300 kDa. A soluble form of > 300 kDa that lacked the GPI anchor had properties of a periplasmic intermediate between the plasma membrane form and the > 300-kDa cell wall-anchored form. These results constitute experimental support for the hypothesis that GPI anchors act to localize alpha-agglutinin to the plasma membrane and that cell wall anchorage involves release from the GPI anchor to produce a periplasmic intermediate followed by linkage to the cell wall. Images PMID:8007981

  19. Examination and Disruption of the Yeast Cell Wall.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroki; Kono, Keiko; Neiman, Aaron M; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a complicated extracellular organelle. Although the barrier may seem like a technical nuisance for researchers studying intracellular biomolecules or conditions, the rigid wall is an essential aspect of the yeast cell. Without it, yeast cells are unable to proliferate or carry out their life cycle. The chemical composition of the cell wall and the biosynthetic pathways and signal transduction mechanisms involved in cell wall remodeling have been studied extensively, but many unanswered questions remain. This introduction describes techniques for investigating abnormalities in the cell and spore walls and performing cell wall disruption. PMID:27480724

  20. Glycoconjugates and polysaccharides of fungal cell wall and activation of immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, M.R.; Barreto-Bergter, E.; Taborda, C.P.

    2008-01-01

    Glycoproteins, glycosphingolipids and polysaccharides exposed at the most external layers of the wall are involved in several types of interactions of fungal cells with the exocellular environment. These molecules are fundamental building blocks of organisms, contributing to the structure, integrity, cell growth, differentiation and signaling. Several of them are immunologically active compounds with potential as regulators of pathogenesis and the immune response of the host. Some of these structures can be specifically recognized by antibodies from patients’ sera, suggesting that they can be also useful in the diagnosis of fungal infections. PMID:24031202

  1. Expression of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein is restricted to basolateral surfaces of polarized epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, R.J.; Compans, R.W.

    1989-02-01

    Polarized epithelial cells exhibit apical (lumenal) and basolateral (serosal) membrane domains that are separated by circumferential tight junctions. In such cells, enveloped viruses that mature by budding at cell surfaces are released at particular membrane domains. The authors have used a vaccinia virus recombinant to investigate the site of surface expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. Cells were infected with the vaccinia virus recombinant, and surface expression of the glycoprotein was analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence, /sup 125/I-protein A binding, and immunoelectron microscopy. The glycoprotein appeared exclusively at the basolateral surface as early as 2 h postinfection and reached a maximum level at 8 h postinfection. The gp120 glycoprotein was found to be secreted efficiently into culture medium, and this secretion occurred exclusively at the basolateral surface.

  2. Impact of a human CMP-sialic acid transporter on recombinant glycoprotein sialylation in glycoengineered insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mabashi-Asazuma, Hideaki; Shi, Xianzong; Geisler, Christoph; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Jarvis, Donald L

    2013-02-01

    Insect cells are widely used for recombinant glycoprotein production, but they cannot provide the glycosylation patterns required for some biotechnological applications. This problem has been addressed by genetically engineering insect cells to express mammalian genes encoding various glycoprotein glycan processing functions. However, for various reasons, the impact of a mammalian cytosine-5'-monophospho (CMP)-sialic acid transporter has not yet been examined. Thus, we transformed Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells with six mammalian genes to generate a new cell line, SfSWT-4, that can produce sialylated glycoproteins when cultured with the sialic acid precursor, N-acetylmannosamine. We then super-transformed SfSWT-4 with a human CMP-sialic acid transporter (hCSAT) gene to isolate a daughter cell line, SfSWT-6, which expressed the hCSAT gene in addition to the other mammalian glycogenes. SfSWT-6 cells had higher levels of cell surface sialylation and also supported higher levels of recombinant glycoprotein sialylation, particularly when cultured with low concentrations of N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, hCSAT expression has an impact on glycoprotein sialylation, can reduce the cost of recombinant glycoprotein production and therefore should be included in ongoing efforts to glycoengineer the baculovirus-insect cell system. The results of this study also contributed new insights into the endogenous mechanism and potential mechanisms of CMP-sialic acid accumulation in the Golgi apparatus of lepidopteran insect cells.

  3. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes.

  4. Characterization of the Sclerotinia sclerotiorum cell wall proteome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Longzhou; Free, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    We used a proteomic analysis to identify cell wall proteins released from Sclerotinia sclerotiorum hyphal and sclerotial cell walls via a trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (TFMS) digestion. Cell walls from hyphae grown in Vogel's glucose medium (a synthetic medium lacking plant materials), from hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth and from sclerotia produced on potato dextrose agar were used in the analysis. Under the conditions used, TFMS digests the glycosidic linkages in the cell walls to release intact cell wall proteins. The analysis identified 24 glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins and 30 non-GPI-anchored cell wall proteins. We found that the cell walls contained an array of cell wall biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in the cell walls of other fungi. When comparing the proteins in hyphal cell walls grown in potato dextrose broth with those in hyphal cell walls grown in the absence of plant material, it was found that a core group of cell wall biosynthetic proteins and some proteins associated with pathogenicity (secreted cellulases, pectin lyases, glucosidases and proteases) were expressed in both types of hyphae. The hyphae grown in potato dextrose broth contained a number of additional proteins (laccases, oxalate decarboxylase, peroxidase, polysaccharide deacetylase and several proteins unique to Sclerotinia and Botrytis) that might facilitate growth on a plant host. A comparison of the proteins in the sclerotial cell wall with the proteins in the hyphal cell wall demonstrated that sclerotia formation is not marked by a major shift in the composition of cell wall protein. We found that the S. sclerotiorum cell walls contained 11 cell wall proteins that were encoded only in Sclerotinia and Botrytis genomes. PMID:26661933

  5. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-06-24

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation.

  6. Evidence for P-Glycoprotein Involvement in Cell Volume Regulation Using Coulter Sizing in Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Jennifer; Rioult, Damien; Abu-Kaoud, Nadine; Hoarau-Véchot, Jessica; Marin, Matthieu; Le Foll, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cell volume is an essential function that is coupled to a variety of physiological processes such as receptor recycling, excitability and contraction, cell proliferation, migration, and programmed cell death. Under stress, cells undergo emergency swelling and respond to such a phenomenon with a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) where they release cellular ions, and other osmolytes as well as a concomitant loss of water. The link between P-glycoprotein, a transmembrane transporter, and cell volume regulation is controversial, and changes in cells volume are measured using microscopy or electrophysiology. For instance, by using the patch-clamp method, our team demonstrated that chloride currents activated in the RVD were more intense and rapid in a breast cancer cell line overexpressing the P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The Cell Lab Quanta SC is a flow cytometry system that simultaneously measures electronic volume, side scatter and three fluorescent colors; altogether this provides unsurpassed population resolution and accurate cell counting. Therefore, here we propose a novel method to follow cellular volume. By using the Coulter-type channel of the cytometer Cell Lab Quanta SC MPL (multi-platform loading), we demonstrated a role for the P-gp during different osmotic treatments, but also a differential activity of the P-gp through the cell cycle. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a role of P-gp in cell volume regulation. PMID:26114386

  7. Direct Involvement of HERV-W Env Glycoprotein in Human Trophoblast Cell Fusion and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Frendo, Jean-Louis; Olivier, Delphine; Cheynet, Valérie; Blond, Jean-Luc; Bouton, Olivier; Vidaud, Michel; Rabreau, Michèle; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Mallet, François

    2003-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the product of the HERV-W env gene, a retroviral envelope protein also dubbed syncytin, is a highly fusogenic membrane glycoprotein inducing the formation of syncytia on interaction with the type D mammalian retrovirus receptor. In addition, the detection of HERV-W Env protein (Env-W) expression in placental tissue sections led us to propose a role for this fusogenic glycoprotein in placenta formation. To evaluate this hypothesis, we analyzed the involvement of Env-W in the differentiation of primary cultures of human villous cytotrophoblasts that spontaneously differentiate by cell fusion into syncytiotrophoblasts in vitro. First, we observed that HERV-W env mRNA and glycoprotein expression are colinear with primary cytotrophoblast differentiation and with expression of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), a marker of syncytiotrophoblast formation. Second, we observed that in vitro stimulation of trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation by cyclic AMP is also associated with a concomitant increase in HERV-W env and hCG mRNA and protein expression. Finally, by using specific antisense oligonucleotides, we demonstrated that inhibition of Env-W protein expression leads to a decrease of trophoblast fusion and differentiation, with the secretion of hCG in culture medium of antisense oligonucleotide-treated cells being decreased by fivefold. Taken together, these results strongly support a direct role for Env-W in human trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation. PMID:12724415

  8. Roles of bovine viral diarrhea virus envelope glycoproteins in inducing autophagy in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Shi, Huijun; Shi, Mengting; Meng, Luping; Bao, Haiyang; Zhang, Guoqi; Ren, Yan; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Fei; Qiao, Jun; Jia, Bin; Wang, Pengyan; Ni, Wei; Sheng, Jinliang; Chen, Chuangfu

    2014-11-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved control process that maintains cellular homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Autophagy principally serves an adaptive role to degrade dysfunctional proteins and to clean damaged organelles in response to pathogenic, viral, or microbial infection, nutrient deprivation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In previous study, we showed bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) NADL infection induced autophagy and significantly elevated the expression levels of autophagy-related genes, Beclin1 and ATG14, at 12 h post-infection in MDBK cells. However, the specific mechanisms involved in controlling autophagic activity remain unclear. Here, we investigate the effects of BVDV NADL envelope glycoproteins overexpression on inducing autophagy. The results show that viral envelope glycoproteins E(rns) and E2 overexpression mediated by lentivirus increase the formation of autophagosome, the percentage of GFP-LC3 puncta-positive cells and the expression levels of Beclin1 and ATG14. Whereas E1 overexpression doesn't affect autophagic activity. Collectively, these findings suggest that the viral envelope glycoproteins E(rns) and E2 are involved in inducing autophagy, and provide a mechanistic insight into the regulation of autophagy in viral infected cells.

  9. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  10. Cell Wall Heterogeneity in Root Development of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Somssich, Marc; Khan, Ghazanfar Abbas; Persson, Staffan

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide stability and protection to plant cells. During growth and development the composition of cell walls changes, but provides enough strength to withstand the turgor of the cells. Hence, cell walls are highly flexible and diverse in nature. These characteristics are important during root growth, as plant roots consist of radial patterns of cells that have diverse functions and that are at different developmental stages along the growth axis. Young stem cell daughters undergo a series of rapid cell divisions, during which new cell walls are formed that are highly dynamic, and that support rapid anisotropic cell expansion. Once the cells have differentiated, the walls of specific cell types need to comply with and support different cell functions. For example, a newly formed root hair needs to be able to break through the surrounding soil, while endodermal cells modify their walls at distinct positions to form Casparian strips between them. Hence, the cell walls are modified and rebuilt while cells transit through different developmental stages. In addition, the cell walls of roots readjust to their environment to support growth and to maximize nutrient uptake. Many of these modifications are likely driven by different developmental and stress signaling pathways. However, our understanding of how such pathways affect cell wall modifications and what enzymes are involved remain largely unknown. In this review we aim to compile data linking cell wall content and re-modeling to developmental stages of root cells, and dissect how root cell walls respond to certain environmental changes. PMID:27582757

  11. Expression and Purification of E2 Glycoprotein from Insect Cells (Sf9) for Use in Serology.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chong Long; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne arbovirus which poses a major threat to global public health. Definitive CHIKV diagnosis is crucial, especially in distinguishing the disease from dengue virus, which co-circulates in endemic areas and shares the same mosquito vectors. Laboratory diagnosis is mainly based on serological or molecular approaches. The E2 glycoprotein is a good candidate for serological diagnosis since it is the immunodominant antigen during the course of infection, and reacts with seropositive CHIKV sera. In this chapter, we describe the generation of stable clone Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells expressing secreted, soluble, and native recombinant CHIKV E2 glycoprotein. We use direct plasmid expression in insect cells, rather than the traditional technique of generating recombinant baculovirus. This recombinant protein is useful for serological diagnosis of CHIKV infection. PMID:27233260

  12. Baculovirus Coinfection Strategy for Improved Galactosylation of Recombinant Glycoprotein Produced by Insect Cell Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Yap Wei; Rahman, Badarulhisam Abdul; Aziz, Azila Abdul

    Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is widely used for the production of recombinant glycoproteins, but it is not ideal for pharmaceutical glycoprotein production due to incomplete glycosylation. The factors that ensure successful glycosylation are the presence of sufficient amount of glycosyltransferases, sugar nucleotides as the substrate donor and the recombinant protein as the substrate acceptor. In this study, we analyzed the galactosylation process by the introduction of ß-1,4galactosyltransferase (ß-1,4GalT) as the glycosyltransferase of interest and uridine-5`-diphosphogalactose (UDP-Gal) as the substrate donor. Recombinant human transferrin (rhTf) as a model protein was used as the substrate acceptor. Insect cell lines have been reported to produce a small amount of ß-1,4GalT and thus insufficient for effective galactosylation. In this study, we developed a method to produce galactosylated rhTf and optimized the expression of rhTf with better N-glycan quality. Recombinant ß-1,4GalT was introduced during protein expression by the coinfection of the BEVS with baculovirus carrying bovine ß-1,4GalT. To evaluate the extent of galactosylation by the coinfection strategy, a binding assay was established. In this binding assay, glycoprotein acceptor was absorbed onto ELISA plate surface. A lectin known as Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) labeled with peroxidase, was added and allowed to recognize Gal ß1>4GlcNAc group on the N-glycan of the glycoprotein, followed by appropriate color reaction measurements. Coexpression between rhTf and ß-1,4GalT did not show encouraging results due to the reduction of UDP-Gal upon baculovirus infection. This interesting finding suggested that the introduction of ß-1,4GalT alone was not sufficient for successful galactosylation. Alternatively, post harvest glycosylation method strategy seems to be a promising technique in the improvement of glycoprotein quality.

  13. At the border: the plasma membrane-cell wall continuum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zengyu; Persson, Staffan; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Clara

    2015-03-01

    Plant cells rely on their cell walls for directed growth and environmental adaptation. Synthesis and remodelling of the cell walls are membrane-related processes. During cell growth and exposure to external stimuli, there is a constant exchange of lipids, proteins, and other cell wall components between the cytosol and the plasma membrane/apoplast. This exchange of material and the localization of cell wall proteins at certain spots in the plasma membrane seem to rely on a particular membrane composition. In addition, sensors at the plasma membrane detect changes in the cell wall architecture, and activate cytoplasmic signalling schemes and ultimately cell wall remodelling. The apoplastic polysaccharide matrix is, on the other hand, crucial for preventing proteins diffusing uncontrollably in the membrane. Therefore, the cell wall-plasma membrane link is essential for plant development and responses to external stimuli. This review focuses on the relationship between the cell wall and plasma membrane, and its importance for plant tissue organization.

  14. Castanospermine inhibits glucosidase I and glycoprotein secretion in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sasak, V W; Ordovas, J M; Elbein, A D; Berninger, R W

    1985-01-01

    We studied the effect of the plant alkaloid castanospermine on the biosynthesis and secretion of human hepatoma glycoproteins. The HepG-2 cells, grown in the presence or absence of the alkaloid, were labelled with [2-3H]mannose and then the labelled glycopeptides were prepared by Pronase digestion. This material was analysed by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. Castanospermine caused an accumulation of high-mannose oligosaccharides, by 70-75% over control. The major accumulated product, which could also be labelled with [3H]galactose and was only partially susceptible to alpha-mannosidase digestion, was identified by h.p.l.c. as a Glc3Man9GlcNAc. Thus the alkaloid inhibits glucosidase I in the human hepatoma cells. Analysis of total glycoproteins secreted by the cells into the medium revealed the presence of only complex oligosaccharides in both control and treated cultures, and the amount of the oligosaccharides labelled with radioactive mannose, galactose or N-acetylmannosamine, secreted by treated cells, was decreased by about 60%. The rate of secretion of total protein labelled with [35S]methionine and precipitated from the medium with trichloroacetic acid was inhibited by up to 40% in the presence of castanospermine. Pulse-chase studies utilizing [35S]methionine labelling were performed to study the effect of the alkaloid on secretion of individual plasma proteins. Immunoprecipitation at different chase times with monospecific antisera showed that castanospermine markedly decreased the secretion rates of alpha 1-antitrypsin, caeruloplasmin and, to a lesser extent, that of antithrombin-III. Secretions of apolipoprotein E, a glycoprotein containing only O-linked oligosaccharide(s), and albumin, a non-glycosylated protein, were not affected by the drug. It is suggested that castanospermine inhibits secretion of at least some glycoproteins containing N-linked oligosaccharides, owing to the inhibition

  15. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Snider, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with /sup 125/I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(/sup 3/H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with /sup 125/I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells.

  16. Measuring in vitro extensibility of growing plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the theory and practical aspects of measuring cell wall properties by four different extensometer techniques and how the results of these methods relate to the concept and ideal measurement of cell wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. These in vivo techniques are particularly useful for studies of the molecular basis of cell wall extension. Measurements of breaking strength, elastic compliance, and plastic compliance may be informative about changes in cell wall structure, whereas measurements of wall stress relaxation and creep are sensitive to both changes in wall structure and wall-loosening processes, such as those mediated by expansins and some lytic enzymes. A combination of methods is needed to obtain a broader view of cell wall behavior and properties connected with the concept of cell wall extensibility.

  17. Measuring in-vitro extensibility of growth plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Cosgrove, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the theory and practical aspects of measuring cell wall properties by four different extensometer techniques and how the results of these methods relate to the concept and ideal measurement of cell wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. These in vivo techniques are particularly useful for studies of the molecular basis of cell wall extension. Measurements of breaking strength, elastic compliance, and plastic compliance may be informative about changes in cell wall structure, whereas measurements of wall stress relaxation and creep are sensitive to both changes in wall structure and wall-loosening processes, such as those mediated by expansins and some lytic enzymes. A combination of methods is needed to obtain a broader view of cell wall behavior and properties connected with the concept of cell wall extensibility.

  18. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis. PMID:27611066

  19. Interconnections between cell wall polymers, wall mechanics, and cortical microtubules: Teasing out causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chaowen; Anderson, Charles T

    2016-09-01

    In plants, cell wall components including cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins interact with each other to form complex extracellular network structures that control cell growth and maintain cell shape. However, it is still not clear exactly how different wall polymers interact, how the conformations and interactions of cell wall polymers relate to wall mechanics, and how these factors impinge on intracellular structures such as the cortical microtubule cytoskeleton. Here, based on studies of Arabidopsis thaliana xxt1 xxt2 mutants, which lack detectable xyloglucan in their walls and display aberrant wall mechanics, altered cellulose patterning and biosynthesis, and reduced cortical microtubule stability, we discuss the potential relationships between cell wall biosynthesis, wall mechanics, and cytoskeletal dynamics in an effort to better understand their roles in controlling plant growth and morphogenesis.

  20. The cell surface expressed nucleolin is a glycoprotein that triggers calcium entry into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Losfeld, Marie-Estelle; Khoury, Diala El; Mariot, Pascal; Carpentier, Mathieu; Krust, Bernard; Briand, Jean-Paul; Mazurier, Joel; Hovanessian, Ara G.; Legrand, Dominique

    2009-01-15

    Nucleolin is an ubiquitous nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in fundamental aspects of transcription regulation, cell proliferation and growth. It has also been described as a shuttling molecule between nucleus, cytosol and the cell surface. Several studies have demonstrated that surface nucleolin serves as a receptor for various extracellular ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that nucleolin in the extranuclear cell compartment is a glycoprotein containing N- and O-glycans. In the present study, we show that glycosylation is an essential requirement for surface nucleolin expression, since it is prevented when cells are cultured in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation. Accordingly, surface but not nuclear nucleolin is radioactively labeled upon metabolic labeling of cells with [{sup 3}H]glucosamine. Besides its well-demonstrated role in the internalization of specific ligands, here we show that ligand binding to surface nucleolin could also induce Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells. Indeed, by flow cytometry, microscopy and patch-clamp experiments, we show that the HB-19 pseudopeptide, which binds specifically surface nucleolin, triggers rapid and intense membrane Ca{sup 2+} fluxes in various types of cells. The use of several drugs then indicated that Store-Operated Ca{sup 2+} Entry (SOCE)-like channels are involved in the generation of these fluxes. Taken together, our findings suggest that binding of an extracellular ligand to surface nucleolin could be involved in the activation of signaling pathways by promoting Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells.

  1. Suppression of Arabidopsis peroxidase 72 alters cell wall and phenylpropanoid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María A; Novo-Uzal, Esther

    2015-10-01

    Class III peroxidases are glycoproteins with a major role in cell wall maturation such as lignin formation. Peroxidases are usually present in a high number of isoenzymes, which complicates to assign specific functions to individual peroxidase isoenzymes. Arabidopsis genome encodes for 73 peroxidases, among which AtPrx72 has been shown to participate in lignification. Here, we report by using knock out peroxidase mutants how the disruption of AtPrx72 causes thinner secondary walls in interfascicular fibres but not in the xylem of the stem. This effect is also age-dependent, and AtPrx72 function seems to be particularly important when lignification prevails over elongation processes. Finally, the suppression AtPrx72 leads to the down-regulation of lignin biosynthesis pathway, as well as genes and transcription factors involved in secondary wall thickening.

  2. Celery (Apium graveolens) parenchyma cell walls: cell walls with minimal xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Thimm, Julian C.; Burritt, David J.; Sims, Ian M.; Newman, Roger H.; Ducker, William A.; Melton, Laurence D.

    2002-10-01

    The primary walls of celery (Apium graveolens L.) parenchyma cells were isolated and their polysaccharide components characterized by glycosyl linkage analysis, cross-polarization magic-angle spinning solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS 13C NMR) and X-ray diffraction. Glycosyl linkage analysis showed that the cell walls consisted of mainly cellulose (43 mol%) and pectic polysaccharides (51 mol%), comprising rhamnogalacturonan (28 mol%), arabinan (12 mol%) and galactan (11 mol%). The amounts of xyloglucan (2 mol%) and xylan (2 mol%) detected in the cell walls were strikingly low. The small amount of xyloglucan present means that it cannot coat the cellulose microfibrils. Solid-state 13C NMR signals were consistent with the constituents identified by glycosyl linkage analysis and allowed the walls to be divided into three domains, based on the rigidity of the polymers. Cellulose (rigid) and rhamnogalacturonan (semi-mobile) polymers responded to the CP/MAS 13C NMR pulse sequence and were distinguished by differences in proton spin relaxation time constants. The arabinans, the most mobile polymers, responded to single-pulse excitation (SPE), but not CP/MAS 13C NMR. From solid-state 13C NMR of the cell walls the diameter of the crystalline cellulose microfibrils was determined to be approximately 3 nm while X-ray diffraction of the cell walls gave a value for the diameter of approximately 2 nm.

  3. Food applications of bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Callewaert, Lien; Walmagh, Maarten; Michiels, Chris W; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial cell wall hydrolases (BCWHs) display a remarkable structural and functional diversity that offers perspectives for novel food applications, reaching beyond those of the archetype BCWH and established biopreservative hen egg white lysozyme. Insights in BCWHs from bacteriophages to animals have provided concepts for tailoring BCWHs to target specific pathogens or spoilage bacteria, or, conversely, to expand their working range to Gram-negative bacteria. Genetically modified foods expressing BCWHs in situ showed successful, but face regulatory and ethical concerns. An interesting spin-off development is the use of cell wall binding domains of bacteriophage BCWHs for detection and removal of foodborne pathogens. Besides for improving food safety or stability, BCWHs may also find use as functional food ingredients with specific health effects.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Interactions With Human and Bat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Annika; Hoffmann, Markus; Müller, Marcel A.; Munster, Vincent J.; Gnirß, Kerstin; Kiene, Miriam; Tsegaye, Theodros Solomon; Behrens, Georg; Herrler, Georg; Feldmann, Heinz; Drosten, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Ebola virus (EBOV) causes hemorrhagic fever in humans with high case-fatality rates. The EBOV-glycoprotein (EBOV-GP) facilitates viral entry and promotes viral release from human cells. African fruit bats are believed not to develop disease upon EBOV infection and have been proposed as a natural reservoir of EBOV. We compared EBOV-GP interactions with human cells and cells from African fruit bats. We found that susceptibility to EBOV-GP–dependent infection was not limited to bat cells from potential reservoir species, and we observed that GP displayed similar biological properties in human and bat cells. The only exception was GP localization, which was to a greater extent intracellular in bat cells as compared to human cells. Collectively, our results suggest that GP interactions with fruit bat and human cells are similar and do not limit EBOV tropism for certain bat species. PMID:21987760

  5. Revealing the structural and functional diversity of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    The extensive knowledge of the chemistry of isolated cell wall polymers, and that relating to the identification and partial annotation of gene families involved in their synthesis and modification, is not yet matched by a sophisticated understanding of the occurrence of the polymers within cell walls of the diverse cell types within a growing organ. Currently, the main sets of tools that are used to determine cell-type-specific configurations of cell wall polymers and aspects of cell wall microstructures are antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) and microspectroscopies. As these tools are applied we see that cell wall polymers are extensively developmentally regulated and that there is a range of structurally distinct primary and secondary cell walls within organs and across species. The challenge now is to document cell wall structures in relation to diverse cell biological events and to integrate this knowledge with the emerging understanding of polymer functions.

  6. Cytosolic and cell-wall-bound acid invertases from leaves of Urtica dioica L.: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Fahrendorf, T; Beck, E

    1990-01-01

    Two different forms of acid invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) were extracted from expanding leaves of the stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.). One form was soluble and could be localized within the cytosol, whereas the other was ionically bound to the cell-wall and could not be detected in protoplasts. Both forms were purified, the latter to homogeneity. Western blotting with antibodies against the pure enzyme from cell walls was positive with the cell-wall enzyme but negative with the soluble form of acid invertase. Both forms are glycoproteins with identical molecular weights of 58 kDa. The Km values for sucrose (raffinose) are 5 mM (4.8 mM) for the soluble and 1.2 mM (3.6 mM) for the cell-wall-bound enzyme. The pH optimum of the latter is slightly more acidic (4.5) than that of the soluble invertase (5.5). Both forms could easily be distinguished by their isoelectric points which were determined at pH 4.6 for the soluble and pH 9.3 for the wall-bound enzyme. When extraction and purification were carried out in the absence of protease inhibitors, both acid invertases showed microheterogeneity ('multiple forms'). However, with benzamidine and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride as protease inhibitors each invertase produced only one protein band upon isoelectric focusing and gel electrophoresis, respectively. PMID:24201951

  7. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  8. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C; Ryckman, Brent J; Britt, William J; Kamil, Jeremy P

    2015-04-01

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes.

  9. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C.; Ryckman, Brent J.; Britt, William J.; Kamil, Jeremy P.

    2015-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes. PMID:25831500

  10. Cell wall of Fusarium sulphureum; I. Chemical composition of the hyphal wall.

    PubMed

    Barran, L R; Schneider, E F; Wood, P J; Madhosingh, C; Miller, R W

    1975-05-01

    The hyphae wall of Fusarium sulphureum Schlect. (Isolate 1) was isolated and purified. Electron microscopy studies showed that the isolated cell wall consisted of two distinct layers, an outer electron dense layer and a broader electron transparent inner layer. Chemical analysis revealed that the cell wall contained 66% carbohydrate, 7.3% protein, 5.5% lipid and 1.8% ash. The major cell wall component N-acetylglucosamine (39%) was shown by X-ray diffraction analysis to be present as chitin. Glucose constituted 14% of the cell wall, while mannose, galactose, and glucuronic acid, accounted for 15% of the cell wall. Glucuronic acid appears to be predominantly linked to galactose in the intact wall.

  11. Beyond growth: novel functions for bacterial cell wall hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Timna J; Taylor, Jennifer A; Salama, Nina R

    2012-11-01

    The peptidoglycan cell wall maintains turgor pressure and cell shape of most bacteria. Cell wall hydrolases are essential, together with synthases, for growth and daughter cell separation. Recent work in diverse organisms has uncovered new cell wall hydrolases that act autonomously or on neighboring cells to modulate invasion of prey cells, cell shape, innate immune detection, intercellular communication, and competitor lysis. The hydrolases involved in these processes catalyze the cleavage of bonds throughout the sugar and peptide moities of peptidoglycan. Phenotypes associated with these diverse hydrolases reveal new functions of the bacterial cell wall beyond growth and division.

  12. Mass spectrometric quantitation of covalently bound cell wall proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qing Yuan; de Groot, Piet W J; de Jong, Luitzen; Klis, Frans M; De Koster, Chris G

    2007-01-01

    The cell wall of yeast consists of an internal skeletal layer and an external layer of glycoproteins covalently linked to the stress-bearing polysaccharides. The cell wall protein (CWP) population consists of over 20 different proteins, and may vary in composition. We present two complementary methods for quantifying CWPs, based on isobaric tagging and tandem MS: (1) absolute quantitation of individual CWPs, allowing estimation of surface densities; and (2) relative quantitation of CWPs, allowing monitoring of the dynamics of the CWP population. For absolute quantitation, we selected a representative group of five proteins (Cwp1p, Crh1p, Scw4p, Gas1p, and Ecm33p), which had 67 × 103, 44 × 103, 38 × 103, 11 × 103 and 6.5 × 103 of wall-bound copies per cell, respectively. As Cwp1p is predominantly incorporated in the birth scar, this corresponds to a protein density of c. 22 × 103 copies μm−2. For relative quantitation, we compared wild-type cells to gas1Δ cells, in which the cell wall integrity pathway is constitutively activated. The levels of Crh1p, Crh2p, Ecm33p, Gas5p, Pst1p and Pir3p increased about three- to fivefold, whereas the level of Scw4p was significantly decreased. We propose that our methods are widely applicable to other fungi. PMID:17617218

  13. Polarized endocytosis by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with functional chicken liver glycoprotein receptor

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the expression of the chicken hepatic glycoprotein receptor (chicken hepatic lectin [CHL]) in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, by transfection of its cDNA under the control of a retroviral promotor. Transfected cell lines stably express 87,000 surface receptors/cell with a kd = 13 nM. In confluent monolayers, approximately 40% of CHL is localized at the plasma membrane. 98% of the surface CHL is expressed at the basolateral surface where it performs polarized endocytosis and degradation of glycoproteins carrying terminal N-acetylglucosamine at a rate of 50,000 ligand molecules/h. Studies of the half-life of metabolically labeled receptor and of the stability of biotinylated cell surface receptor after internalization indicate that transfected CHL performs several rounds of uptake and recycling before it gets degraded. The successful expression of a functional basolateral receptor in MDCK cells opens the way for the characterization of the mechanisms that control targeting and recycling of proteins to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells. PMID:2687287

  14. Lactobacillus plantarum L67 glycoprotein protects against cadmium chloride toxicity in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Sooyeon; Oh, Sejong; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-03-01

    The food and water we consume may be contaminated with a range of chemicals and heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, and mercury by accumulation through the food chain. Cadmium is known to be one of the major components in cigarette smoke and can cause lesions in many organs. Some lactobacilli can bind and remove heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and copper. However, the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and inhibition by probiotics are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that glycoprotein (18 kDa) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 protected RAW 264.7 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (100 µM). Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of cadmium using the MTT assay and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, and assessed activities of activator protein kinase C (PKC-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, activator protein (AP)-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases using immunoblot. Our results indicated that glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 inhibited intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. It also significantly suppressed inflammatory factors such as AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our findings suggest that the 24-kDa glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 might be used as a food component for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion. PMID:26774722

  15. Lactobacillus plantarum L67 glycoprotein protects against cadmium chloride toxicity in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Sooyeon; Oh, Sejong; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-03-01

    The food and water we consume may be contaminated with a range of chemicals and heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, and mercury by accumulation through the food chain. Cadmium is known to be one of the major components in cigarette smoke and can cause lesions in many organs. Some lactobacilli can bind and remove heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and copper. However, the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and inhibition by probiotics are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that glycoprotein (18 kDa) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 protected RAW 264.7 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (100 µM). Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of cadmium using the MTT assay and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, and assessed activities of activator protein kinase C (PKC-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, activator protein (AP)-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases using immunoblot. Our results indicated that glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 inhibited intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. It also significantly suppressed inflammatory factors such as AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our findings suggest that the 24-kDa glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 might be used as a food component for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion.

  16. A recombinant measles vaccine virus expressing wild-type glycoproteins: consequences for viral spread and cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Johnston, I C; ter Meulen, V; Schneider-Schaulies, J; Schneider-Schaulies, S

    1999-08-01

    Wild-type, lymphotropic strains of measles virus (MV) and tissue culture-adapted MV vaccine strains possess different cell tropisms. This observation has led to attempts to identify the viral receptors and to characterize the functions of the MV glycoproteins. We have functionally analyzed the interactions of MV hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of vaccine (Edmonston) and wild-type (WTF) strains in different combinations in transfected cells. Cell-cell fusion occurs when both Edmonston F and H proteins are expressed in HeLa or Vero cells. The expression of WTF glycoproteins in HeLa cells did not result in syncytia, yet they fused efficiently with cells of lymphocytic origin. To further investigate the role of the MV glycoproteins in virus cell entry and also the role of other viral proteins in cell tropism, we generated recombinant vaccine MVs containing one or both glycoproteins from WTF. These viruses were viable and grew similarly in lymphocytic cells. Recombinant viruses expressing the WTFH protein showed a restricted spread in HeLa cells but spread efficiently in Vero cells. Parental WTF remained restricted in both cell types. Therefore, not only differential receptor usage but also other cell-specific factors are important in determining MV cell tropism. PMID:10400788

  17. Plant cell wall proteomics: the leadership of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Albenne, Cécile; Canut, Hervé; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) progressively emerged as crucial components of cell walls although present in minor amounts. Cell wall polysaccharides such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and cellulose represent more than 90% of primary cell wall mass, whereas hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignins are the main components of lignified secondary walls. All these polymers provide mechanical properties to cell walls, participate in cell shape and prevent water loss in aerial organs. However, cell walls need to be modified and customized during plant development and in response to environmental cues, thus contributing to plant adaptation. CWPs play essential roles in all these physiological processes and particularly in the dynamics of cell walls, which requires organization and rearrangements of polysaccharides as well as cell-to-cell communication. In the last 10 years, plant cell wall proteomics has greatly contributed to a wider knowledge of CWPs. This update will deal with (i) a survey of plant cell wall proteomics studies with a focus on Arabidopsis thaliana; (ii) the main protein families identified and the still missing peptides; (iii) the persistent issue of the non-canonical CWPs; (iv) the present challenges to overcome technological bottlenecks; and (v) the perspectives beyond cell wall proteomics to understand CWP functions. PMID:23641247

  18. Roles and regulation of plant cell walls surrounding plasmodesmata.

    PubMed

    Knox, J Paul; Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin

    2014-12-01

    In plants, the intercellular transport of simple and complex molecules can occur symplastically through plasmodesmata. These are membranous channels embedded in cell walls that connect neighbouring cells. The properties of the cell walls surrounding plasmodesmata determine their transport capacity and permeability. These cell wall micro-domains are enriched in callose and have a characteristic pectin distribution. Cell wall modifications, leading to changes in plasmodesmata structure, have been reported to occur during development and in response to environmental signals. Cell wall remodelling enzymes target plasmodesmata to rapidly control intercellular communication in situ. Here we describe current knowledge on the composition of cell walls at plasmodesmata sites and on the proteins and signals that modify cell walls to regulate plasmodesmata aperture.

  19. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: I. The Macromolecular Components of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells with a Detailed Analysis of the Pectic Polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Bauer, W D; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers dealing with the structure of cell walls isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus). These studies have been made possible by the availability of purified hydrolytic enzymes and by recent improvements in the techniques of methylation analysis. These techniques have permitted us to identify and quantitate the macromolecular components of sycamore cell walls. These walls are composed of 10% arabinan, 2% 3,6-linked arabinogalactan, 23% cellulose, 9% oligo-arabinosides (attached to hydroxyproline), 8% 4-linked galactan, 10% hydroxyproline-rich protein, 16% rhamnogalacturonan, and 21% xyloglucan.The structures of the pectic polymers (the neutral arabinan, the neutral galactan, and the acidic rhamnogalacturonan) were obtained, in part, by methylation analysis of fragments of these polymers which were released from the sycamore walls by the action of a highly purified endopolygalacturonase. The data suggest a branched arabinan and a linear 4-linked galactan occurring as side chains on the rhamnogalacturonan. Small amounts or pieces of a xyloglucan, the wall hemicellulose, appear to be covalently linked to some of the galactan chains. Thus, the galactan appears to serve as a bridge between the xyloglucan and rhamnogalacturonan components of the wall.The rhamnogalacturonan consists of an alpha-(1 --> 4)-linked galacturonan chain which is interspersed with 2-linked rhamnosyl residues. The rhamnosyl residues are not randomly distributed in the chain but probably occur in units of rhamnosyl- (1 --> 4)-galacturonosyl- (1 --> 2)-rhamnosyl. This sequence appears to alternate with a homogalacturonan sequence containing approximately 8 residues of 4-linked galacturonic acid. About half of the rhamnosyl residues are branched, having a substituent attached to carbon 4. This is likely to be the site of attachment of the 4-linked galactan.The hydroxyprolyl oligo-arabinosides of the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein

  20. Naturally occurring variability in the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 and development of cell entry inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brower, Evan T; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2010-03-23

    Naturally occurring genetic variability across HIV-1 subtypes causes amino acid polymorphisms in encoded HIV-1 proteins including the envelope glycoproteins associated with viral entry. The effects of amino acid polymorphisms on the mechanism of HIV-1 entry into cells, a process initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor, are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that amino acid polymorphisms affect the structural stability and domain cooperativity of gp120 and that those differences are reflected in the binding mechanism of the viral envelope glycoprotein to the cell surface receptor and coreceptor. Moreover, subtype differences also affect the binding behavior of experimental HIV cell entry inhibitors. While gp120-A has a slightly lower denaturation temperature than gp120-B, the most notable stability difference is that for gp120-B the van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratio (DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH) is 0.95 whereas for gp120-A is 0.6, indicative of more cooperative domain/domain interactions in gp120-B, as this protein more closely approaches a two-state transition. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that CD4 and 17b (a surrogate antibody for the chemokine coreceptor) exhibit 7- and 3-fold weaker binding affinities for gp120-A. The binding of these proteins as well as that of the experimental entry inhibitor NBD-556 induces smaller conformational changes in gp120-A as evidenced by significantly smaller binding enthalpies and binding entropies. Together, these results describe the effects of gp120 polymorphisms on binding to host cell receptors and emphasize that guidelines for developing future entry inhibitors must recognize and deal with genomic differences between HIV strains.

  1. Cell wall sorting of lipoproteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Navarre, W W; Daefler, S; Schneewind, O

    1996-01-01

    Many surface proteins are thought to be anchored to the cell wall of gram-positive organisms via their C termini, while the N-terminal domains of these molecules are displayed on the bacterial surface. Cell wall anchoring of surface proteins in Staphylococcus aureus requires both an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. By fusing the cell wall sorting of protein A to the C terminus of staphylococcal beta-lactamase, we demonstrate here that lipoproteins can also be anchored to the cell wall of S. aureus. The topology of cell wall-anchored beta-lactamase is reminiscent of that described for Braun's murein lipoprotein in that the N terminus of the polypeptide chain is membrane anchored whereas the C-terminal end is tethered to the bacterial cell wall. PMID:8550464

  2. Cell Wall Loosening in the Fungus, Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Truong, Jason T.; Munoz, Cindy M.; Ramirez, David G.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been conducted to determine how cell walls are loosened to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth in plant and algal cells. The same cannot be said about fungal cells. Almost nothing is known about how fungal cells loosen their walls to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth. In this study, anoxia is used to chemically isolate the wall from the protoplasm of the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The experimental results provide direct evidence of the existence of chemistry within the fungal wall that is responsible for wall loosening, irreversible wall deformation and elongation growth. In addition, constant-tension extension experiments are conducted on frozen-thawed sporangiophore walls to obtain insight into the wall chemistry and wall loosening mechanism. It is found that a decrease in pH to 4.6 produces creep extension in the frozen-thawed sporangiophore wall that is similar, but not identical, to that found in frozen-thawed higher plant cell walls. Experimental results from frozen-thawed and boiled sporangiophore walls suggest that protein activity may be involved in the creep extension. PMID:27135318

  3. Cell wall-associated kinases and pectin perception.

    PubMed

    Kohorn, Bruce D

    2016-01-01

    The pectin matrix of the angiosperm cell wall is regulated in both synthesis and modification and greatly influences the direction and extent of cell growth. Pathogens, herbivory and mechanical stresses all influence this pectin matrix and consequently plant form and function. The cell wall-associated kinases (WAKs) bind to pectin and regulate cell expansion or stress responses depending upon the state of the pectin. This review explores the WAKs in the context of cell wall biology and signal transduction pathways.

  4. Cortical microtubule rearrangements and cell wall patterning

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Plant cortical microtubules, which form a highly ordered array beneath the plasma membrane, play essential roles in determining cell shape and function by directing the arrangement of cellulosic and non-cellulosic compounds on the cell surface. Interphase transverse arrays of cortical microtubules self-organize through their dynamic instability and inter-microtubule interactions, and by branch-form microtubule nucleation and severing. Recent studies revealed that distinct spatial signals including ROP GTPase, cellular geometry, and mechanical stress regulate the behavior of cortical microtubules at the subcellular and supercellular levels, giving rise to dramatic rearrangements in the cortical microtubule array in response to internal and external cues. Increasing evidence indicates that negative regulators of microtubules also contribute to the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array. In this review, I summarize recent insights into how the rearrangement of the cortical microtubule array leads to proper, flexible cell wall patterning. PMID:25904930

  5. N-Glycoprotein Surfaceomes of Four Developmentally Distinct Mouse Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Kropp, Erin M.; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Waas, Matthew; Chuppa, Sandra L.; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Gundry, Rebekah L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Detailed knowledge of cell surface proteins present during early embryonic development remains limited for most cell lineages. Due to the relevance of cell surface proteins in their functional roles controlling cell signaling and their utility as accessible, non-genetic markers for cell identification and sorting, the goal of this study was to provide new information regarding the cell surface proteins present during early mouse embryonic development. Experimental Design Using the Cell Surface Capture Technology, the cell surface N-glycoproteomes of three cell lines and one in vitro differentiated cell type representing distinct cell fates and stages in mouse embryogenesis were assessed. Results Altogether, more than 600 cell surface N-glycoproteins were identified represented by >5500 N-glycopeptides. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance The development of new, informative cell surface markers for the reliable identification and isolation of functionally defined subsets of cells from early developmental stages will advance the use of stem cell technologies for mechanistic developmental studies, including disease modeling and drug discovery. PMID:24920426

  6. Conformational Evaluation of HIV-1 Trimeric Envelope Glycoproteins Using a Cell-based ELISA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Veillette, Maxime; Désormeaux, Anik; Roger, Michel; Finzi, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate viral entry into target cells and are essential to the infectious cycle. Understanding how those glycoproteins are able to fuel the fusion process through their conformational changes could lead to the design of better, more effective immunogens for vaccine strategies. Here we describe a cell-based ELISA assay that allows studying the recognition of trimeric HIV-1 Env by monoclonal antibodies. Following expression of HIV-1 trimeric Env at the surface of transfected cells, conformation specific anti-Env antibodies are incubated with the cells. A horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody and a simple chemiluminescence reaction are then used to detect bound antibodies. This system is highly flexible and can detect Env conformational changes induced by soluble CD4 or cellular proteins. It requires minimal amount of material and no highly-specialized equipment or know-how. Thus, this technique can be established for medium to high throughput screening of antigens and antibodies, such as newly-isolated antibodies. PMID:25286159

  7. Cell Wall Invertase in Tobacco Crown Gall Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Marion; Rausch, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The cell wall invertase from an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-transformed Nicotiana tabacum cell line (SR1-C58) was purified. The heterogeneously glycosylated enzyme has the following properties: Mr 63,000, pH optimum at 4.7, Km sucrose 0.6 millimolar (at pH 4.7), pl 9.5. Enzyme activity is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of HgCl2 but is insensitive to H2O2, N-ethylmaleimide and dithiothreitol. Upon transfer of transformed cells from the stationary phase to fresh medium, a cycloheximide- and tunicamycin-sensitive de novo formation of cell wall invertase is demonstrated in the absence or presence of sucrose. While in an auxin mutant (lacking gene 1;SR1-3845) 1 micromolar 1-naphthaleneacetic acid led to a further increased activity, the wild-type transformed cell line (SR1-C58) responded with a decreased activity compared to the control. An analysis of cell wall invertase in and around tumors initiated with Agrobacterium tumefaciens (strain C58) on Nicotiana tabacum stem and Kalanchoë daigremontiana leaves revealed gradients of activity. The results indicate that the auxin-stimulated cell wall invertase is essential for the establishment of the tumor sink. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667892

  8. Plant and algal cell walls: diversity and functionality

    PubMed Central

    Popper, Zoë A.; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Domozych, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although plants and many algae (e.g. the Phaeophyceae, brown, and Rhodophyceae, red) are only very distantly related they are united in their possession of carbohydrate-rich cell walls, which are of integral importance being involved in many physiological processes. Furthermore, wall components have applications within food, fuel, pharmaceuticals, fibres (e.g. for textiles and paper) and building materials and have long been an active topic of research. As shown in the 27 papers in this Special Issue, as the major deposit of photosynthetically fixed carbon, and therefore energy investment, cell walls are of undisputed importance to the organisms that possess them, the photosynthetic eukaryotes (plants and algae). The complexities of cell wall components along with their interactions with the biotic and abiotic environment are becoming increasingly revealed. Scope The importance of plant and algal cell walls and their individual components to the function and survival of the organism, and for a number of industrial applications, are illustrated by the breadth of topics covered in this issue, which includes papers concentrating on various plants and algae, developmental stages, organs, cell wall components, and techniques. Although we acknowledge that there are many alternative ways in which the papers could be categorized (and many would fit within several topics), we have organized them as follows: (1) cell wall biosynthesis and remodelling, (2) cell wall diversity, and (3) application of new technologies to cell walls. Finally, we will consider future directions within plant cell wall research. Expansion of the industrial uses of cell walls and potentially novel uses of cell wall components are both avenues likely to direct future research activities. Fundamentally, it is the continued progression from characterization (structure, metabolism, properties and localization) of individual cell wall components through to defining their roles in almost every

  9. Release of an Mr 140,000 glycoprotein in the culture media of certain human sarcoma and melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bízik, J; Grófová, M; Svec, J

    1985-03-01

    A 140 K glycoprotein was detected in the culture media of human sarcoma and melanoma cell lines by labeling with several radioactive amino acid and sugar precursors, followed by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. In contrast to this, in the culture media of metabolically labeled embryonic and skin fibroblasts this glycoprotein was not found. Likewise, a protein with an identical molecular weight of 140 K was also found in culture media after cell surface labeling of the neoplastic cells but not in the culture media from control cells. The [35S]methionine-labeled 140 K was not split by collagenase and did not appear to be a fragment of fibronectin. We discuss the possibility that secretion of the 140 K glycoprotein is a transformation-related phenomenon.

  10. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  11. Revealing Glycoproteins in the Secretome of MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Aik-Aun; Phang, Wai-Mei; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major issues in the field of oncology, reported with a higher prevalence rate in women worldwide. In attempt to reveal the potential biomarkers for breast cancer, the findings of differentially glycosylated haptoglobin and osteonectin in previous study have drawn our attention towards glycoproteins of secretome from the MCF-7 cancer cell line. In the present study, further analyses were performed on the medium of MCF-7 cells by subjecting it to two-dimensional analyses followed by image analysis in contrast to the medium of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEpC) as a negative control. Carboxypeptidase A4 (CPA4), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), haptoglobin (HP), and HSC70 were detected in the medium of MCF-7, while only CPA4 and osteonectin (ON) were detected in HMEpC medium. In addition, CPA4 was detected as upregulated in the MCF-7 medium. Further analysis by lectin showed that CPA4, AAT, HP, and HSC70 were secreted as N-glycan in the medium of MCF-7, with HP also showing differentially N-glycosylated isoforms. For the HMEpC, only CPA4 was detected as N-glycan. No O-glycan was detected in the medium of HMEpC but MCF-7 expressed O-glycosylated CPA4 and HSC70. All these revealed that glycoproteins could be used as glycan-based biomarkers for the prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:26167486

  12. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteria and nematodes need to degrade the plant cell wall at a certain stage of their infection process, to obtain nutrients for their growth. Plants have developed a system for sensing pathogens and monitoring the cell wall integrity, upon which they activate defense responses that lead to a dynamic cell wall remodeling required to prevent the disease. Pathogens, on the other hand, may exploit the host cell wall metabolism to support the infection. We review here the strategies utilized by both plants and pathogens to prevail in the cell wall battleground.

  13. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteria and nematodes need to degrade the plant cell wall at a certain stage of their infection process, to obtain nutrients for their growth. Plants have developed a system for sensing pathogens and monitoring the cell wall integrity, upon which they activate defense responses that lead to a dynamic cell wall remodeling required to prevent the disease. Pathogens, on the other hand, may exploit the host cell wall metabolism to support the infection. We review here the strategies utilized by both plants and pathogens to prevail in the cell wall battleground. PMID:24904623

  14. Disruption of cell walls for enhanced lipid recovery

    DOEpatents

    Knoshaug, Eric P; Donohoe, Bryon S; Gerken, Henri; Laurens, Lieve; Van Wychen, Stefanie Rose

    2015-03-24

    Presented herein are methods of using cell wall degrading enzymes for recovery of internal lipid bodies from biomass sources such as algae. Also provided are algal cells that express at least one exogenous gene encoding a cell wall degrading enzyme and methods for recovering lipids from the cells.

  15. Recombinant pestivirus E2 glycoproteins prevent viral attachment to permissive and non permissive cells with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Asfor, A S; Wakeley, P R; Drew, T W; Paton, D J

    2014-08-30

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen, which like other pestiviruses has similar molecular biological features to hepaciviruses, including human Hepatitis C virus. The pestivirus E2 glycoproteins are the major target for virus-neutralising antibodies, as well as playing a role in receptor binding and host range restriction. In this study, recombinant E2 glycoproteins (rE2) derived from three different pestivirus species were examined for their inhibitory effects on pestivirus infectivity in cell culture. Histidine-tagged rE2 glycoproteins of BVDV type 2 strain 178003, BVDV type 1 strain Oregon C24V and CSFV strain Alfort 187 were produced in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells and purified under native conditions. The ability of rE2 glycoprotein to inhibit the infection of permissive cells by both homologous and heterologous virus was compared, revealing that the inhibitory effects of rE2 glycoproteins correlated with the predicted similarity of the E2 structures in the recombinant protein and the test virus. This result suggests that the sequence and structure of E2 are likely to be involved in the host specificity of pestiviruses at their point of uptake into cells.

  16. Accessory human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein US9 in the unique short component of the viral genome promotes cell-to-cell transmission of virus in polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maidji, E; Tugizov, S; Jones, T; Zheng, Z; Pereira, L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) encodes accessory glycoproteins that are dispensable for virus growth in nonpolarized cells in culture. We report that CMV deletion mutants lacking the gene for accessory glycoprotein US9 in the unique short component of the viral genome are impaired in plaque formation in polarized human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Comparison of CMV deletion mutants in US9 with herpes simplex virus type 1 deletion mutants lacking glycoproteins gE and gI showed that both of these mutants are impaired in altering junctional complexes and increasing paracellular permeability in polarized ARPE-19 cells cultured on permeable filter supports. Results of functional studies indicate that CMV US9 and homologs of gE have analogous roles in promoting virus spread across lateral membranes of polarized epithelial cells. PMID:8970961

  17. Opposite polarity of virus budding and of viral envelope glycoprotein distribution in epithelial cells derived from different tissues

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We compared the surface envelope glycoprotein distribution and the budding polarity of four RNA viruses in Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells and in CaCo-2 cells derived from a human colon carcinoma. Whereas both FRT and CaCo-2 cells sort similarly influenza hemagglutinin and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein, respectively, to apical and basolateral membrane domains, they differ in their handling of two togaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus (SFV). By conventional EM Sindbis virus and SFV were shown to bud apically in FRT cells and basolaterally in CaCo-2 cells. Consistent with this finding, the distribution of the p62/E2 envelope glycoprotein of SFV, assayed by immunoelectronmicroscopy and by domain-selective surface biotinylation was predominantly apical on FRT cells and basolateral on CaCo-2 cells. We conclude that a given virus and its envelope glycoprotein can be delivered to opposite membrane domains in epithelial cells derived from different tissues. The tissue specificity in the polarity of virus budding and viral envelope glycoprotein distribution indicate that the sorting machinery varies considerably between different epithelial cell types. PMID:1572895

  18. Metabolic Labeling of Caenorhabditis elegans Primary Embryonic Cells with Azido-Sugars as a Tool for Glycoprotein Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R.; Snodgrass, Casey J.; Johnson, Anna M.; Kiyoshi, Conrad M.; Buzby, Sarah E.; Gruner, Matt R.; Berninsone, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycobiology research with Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has benefitted from the numerous genetic and cell biology tools available in this system. However, the lack of a cell line and the relative inaccessibility of C. elegans somatic cells in vivo have limited the biochemical approaches available in this model. Here we report that C. elegans primary embryonic cells in culture incorporate azido-sugar analogs of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), and that the labeled glycoproteins can be analyzed by mass spectrometry. By using this metabolic labeling approach, we have identified a set of novel C. elegans glycoprotein candidates, which include several mitochondrially-annotated proteins. This observation was unexpected given that mitochondrial glycoproteins have only rarely been reported, and it suggests that glycosylation of mitochondrially-annotated proteins might occur more frequently than previously thought. Using independent experimental strategies, we validated a subset of our glycoprotein candidates. These include a mitochondrial, atypical glycoprotein (ATP synthase α-subunit), a predicted glycoprotein (aspartyl protease, ASP-4), and a protein family with established glycosylation in other species (actin). Additionally, we observed a glycosylated isoform of ATP synthase α-subunit in bovine heart tissue and a primate cell line (COS-7). Overall, our finding that C. elegans primary embryonic cells are amenable to metabolic labeling demonstrates that biochemical studies in C. elegans are feasible, which opens the door to labeling C. elegans cells with other radioactive or azido-substrates and should enable the identification of additional post-translationally modified targets and analysis of the genes required for their modification using C. elegans mutant libraries. PMID:23152843

  19. Plant cell wall extensibility: connecting plant cell growth with cell wall structure, mechanics, and the action of wall-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of user-friendly instruments for measuring force/deflection curves of plant surfaces at high spatial resolution has resulted in a recent outpouring of reports of the 'Young's modulus' of plant cell walls. The stimulus for these mechanical measurements comes from biomechanical models of morphogenesis of meristems and other tissues, as well as single cells, in which cell wall stress feeds back to regulate microtubule organization, auxin transport, cellulose deposition, and future growth directionality. In this article I review the differences between elastic modulus and wall extensibility in the context of cell growth. Some of the inherent complexities, assumptions, and potential pitfalls in the interpretation of indentation force/deflection curves are discussed. Reported values of elastic moduli from surface indentation measurements appear to be 10- to >1000-fold smaller than realistic tensile elastic moduli in the plane of plant cell walls. Potential reasons for this disparity are discussed, but further work is needed to make sense of the huge range in reported values. The significance of wall stress relaxation for growth is reviewed and connected to recent advances and remaining enigmas in our concepts of how cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins are assembled to make an extensible cell wall. A comparison of the loosening action of α-expansin and Cel12A endoglucanase is used to illustrate two different ways in which cell walls may be made more extensible and the divergent effects on wall mechanics.

  20. Evolution and diversity of green plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Popper, Zoë A

    2008-06-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by a dynamic cell wall that performs many essential biological roles, including regulation of cell expansion, the control of tissue cohesion, ion-exchange and defence against microbes. Recent evidence shows that the suite of polysaccharides and wall proteins from which the plant cell wall is composed shows variation between monophyletic plant taxa. This is likely to have been generated during the evolution of plant groups in response to environmental stress. Understanding the natural variation and diversity that exists between cell walls from different taxa is key to facilitating their future exploitation and manipulation, for example by increasing lignocellulosic content or reducing its recalcitrance for use in biofuel generation.

  1. Two endogenous proteins that induce cell wall extension in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQueen-Mason, S.; Durachko, D. M.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Plant cell enlargement is regulated by wall relaxation and yielding, which is thought to be catalyzed by elusive "wall-loosening" enzymes. By employing a reconstitution approach, we found that a crude protein extract from the cell walls of growing cucumber seedlings possessed the ability to induce the extension of isolated cell walls. This activity was restricted to the growing region of the stem and could induce the extension of isolated cell walls from various dicot stems and the leaves of amaryllidaceous monocots, but was less effective on grass coleoptile walls. Endogenous and reconstituted wall extension activities showed similar sensitivities to pH, metal ions, thiol reducing agents, proteases, and boiling in methanol or water. Sequential HPLC fractionation of the active wall extract revealed two proteins with molecular masses of 29 and 30 kD associated with the activity. Each protein, by itself, could induce wall extension without detectable hydrolytic breakdown of the wall. These proteins appear to mediate "acid growth" responses of isolated walls and may catalyze plant cell wall extension by a novel biochemical mechanism.

  2. Screening for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Modified Cell Wall Proteins in Pichia pastoris and Their Recombinant Expression on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Shuli; Zhou, Xinying; Jin, Zi; Jiang, Fengchun; Han, Shuangyan; Zheng, Suiping

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycoproteins have various intrinsic functions in yeasts and different uses in vitro. In the present study, the genome of Pichia pastoris GS115 was screened for potential GPI-modified cell wall proteins. Fifty putative GPI-anchored proteins were selected on the basis of (i) the presence of a C-terminal GPI attachment signal sequence, (ii) the presence of an N-terminal signal sequence for secretion, and (iii) the absence of transmembrane domains in mature protein. The predicted GPI-anchored proteins were fused to an alpha-factor secretion signal as a substitute for their own N-terminal signal peptides and tagged with the chimeric reporters FLAG tag and mature Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB). The expression of fusion proteins on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 was determined by whole-cell flow cytometry and immunoblotting analysis of the cell wall extracts obtained by β-1,3-glucanase digestion. CALB displayed on the cell surface of P. pastoris GS115 with the predicted GPI-anchored proteins was examined on the basis of potential hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl butyrate. Finally, 13 proteins were confirmed to be GPI-modified cell wall proteins in P. pastoris GS115, which can be used to display heterologous proteins on the yeast cell surface. PMID:23835174

  3. Analysis of Glycoproteins for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    He, Jintang; Liu, Yashu; Wu, Jing; Lubman, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins play an important role in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction. The alterations of glycoproteins are often relevant to progression of diseases and these changed glycoproteins can be important biomarkers. The lectin-based glycoproteomic technology has extensively been used for high-throughput screening of potential glycoprotein biomarkers. Here we describe a multi-lectin affinity chromatography and label-free quantitative glycoproteomic approach for discovery of glycoprotein biomarkers relevant to differentiation of glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:23625399

  4. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function.

  5. Multidimensional solid-state NMR spectroscopy of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Phyo, Pyae; Hong, Mei

    2016-09-01

    Plant biomass has become an important source of bio-renewable energy in modern society. The molecular structure of plant cell walls is difficult to characterize by most atomic-resolution techniques due to the insoluble and disordered nature of the cell wall. Solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy is uniquely suited for studying native hydrated plant cell walls at the molecular level with chemical resolution. Significant progress has been made in the last five years to elucidate the molecular structures and interactions of cellulose and matrix polysaccharides in plant cell walls. These studies have focused on primary cell walls of growing plants in both the dicotyledonous and grass families, as represented by the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana, Brachypodium distachyon, and Zea mays. To date, these SSNMR results have shown that 1) cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins form a single network in the primary cell wall; 2) in dicot cell walls, the protein expansin targets the hemicellulose-enriched region of the cellulose microfibril for its wall-loosening function; and 3) primary wall cellulose has polymorphic structures that are distinct from the microbial cellulose structures. This article summarizes these key findings, and points out future directions of investigation to advance our fundamental understanding of plant cell wall structure and function. PMID:27552739

  6. Impregnation of softwood cell walls with melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Gindl, W; Zargar-Yaghubi, F; Wimmer, R

    2003-05-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resin impregnation has shown considerable potential to improve a number of wood properties, such as surface hardness and weathering resistance. In this study, selected factors influencing the uptake of MF resin into the cell wall of softwood were studied. Using UV-microspectroscopy, it could be shown that water soluble MF diffused well into the secondary cell wall and the middle lamella. Concentrations as high as 24% (v/v) were achieved after an impregnation of 20 h. High cell wall moisture content, high water content of the resin used for impregnation, and low extractive content are factors which are favourable for MF resin uptake into the cell wall. For dry cell walls, solvent exchange drying improved resin uptake to a similar extent, as was the case when cell walls were soaked in water.

  7. Impregnation of softwood cell walls with melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Gindl, W; Zargar-Yaghubi, F; Wimmer, R

    2003-05-01

    Melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resin impregnation has shown considerable potential to improve a number of wood properties, such as surface hardness and weathering resistance. In this study, selected factors influencing the uptake of MF resin into the cell wall of softwood were studied. Using UV-microspectroscopy, it could be shown that water soluble MF diffused well into the secondary cell wall and the middle lamella. Concentrations as high as 24% (v/v) were achieved after an impregnation of 20 h. High cell wall moisture content, high water content of the resin used for impregnation, and low extractive content are factors which are favourable for MF resin uptake into the cell wall. For dry cell walls, solvent exchange drying improved resin uptake to a similar extent, as was the case when cell walls were soaked in water. PMID:12507874

  8. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells. PMID:24354860

  9. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, Joseph A H; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-10-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms.

  10. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Joseph A. H.; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms. PMID:26370936

  11. Modulation of oligosaccharide processing in an exocrine secretory glycoprotein of rat parotid cells by beta-adrenoreceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kousvelari, E E; Banerjee, D K; Grant, S R; Baum, B J

    1988-01-01

    Such stimulation of rat parotid acinar cells in vitro modulated the rate of processing of N-linked oligosaccharides in a high-molecular weight (220 kdalton) secretory glycoprotein. Conversion of polymannose-type oligosaccharides to complex-type oligosaccharides was evaluated by sensitivity to endoglucosaminidase H and alpha-mannosidase, and with a specific inhibitor of glucosidases I/II. Oligosaccharide maturation in the 220 kdalton glycoprotein required one-third to half less time in cells exposed to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol than in controls. PMID:2971345

  12. (The structure of pectins from cotton suspension culture cell walls)

    SciTech Connect

    Mort, A.

    1990-01-01

    We have made progress on several projects to do with determining the structure of pectins. These include: (1) Devising a new sensitive method to determine the degree of methyl esterification (DOM) of pectins; (2) solubilization of all of RGI from cotton cell walls; (3) solubilization of RGII from cotton cell walls; (4) characterization of xyloglucan from cotton cell walls; and (5) investigation giving an indication of a cross-link between extension and pectin.

  13. Disintegrin-like domain of glycoprotein B regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection of cells.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lia R; Hussein, Hosni A M; Akula, Shaw M

    2014-08-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) glycoprotein B (gB) is a lytic structural protein expressed on the envelope of mature virions and on the membrane of cells supporting lytic infection. In addition to this viral glycoprotein's interaction with integrins via its RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) motif, KSHV gB possesses a disintegrin-like domain (DLD), which binds integrins as well. Prior to this study, there has been minimal research involving the less common integrin-binding motif, DLD, of gB as it pertains to herpesvirus infection. By using phage display peptide library screening and molecular biology techniques, the DLD of KSHV gB was shown to interact specifically with non-RGD binding α9β1 integrins. Similarly, monitoring wild-type infection confirmed α9β1:DLD interactions to be critical to successful KSHV infection of human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d) compared with 293 cells. To further demonstrate the importance of the DLD of gB in KSHV infection, two recombinant virus constructs were generated using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system harbouring the KSHV genome (BAC36): BAC36ΔD-KSHV (lacking a functionally intact DLD of gB and containing an introduced tetracycline cassette) and BAC36.T-KSHV (containing an intact DLD sequence and an introduced tetracycline cassette). Accordingly, BAC36ΔD-KSHV presented significantly lower infection rates in HFF and HMVEC-d cells compared with the comparable infection rates achieved by wild-type BAC36-KSHV and BAC36.T-KSHV. Thus, the present report has delineated a critical role for the DLD of gB in KSHV infection, which may lead to a broader knowledge regarding the sophisticated mechanisms utilized by virus-encoded structural proteins in KSHV entry and infection.

  14. DUSP1 induces paclitaxel resistance through the regulation of p-glycoprotein expression in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Seon; Seok, Hyun-Jeong; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Yuna; Yun, Seok-Joong; Min, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Sun Jin; Kim, Jang-Seong

    2016-09-01

    The heterogeneity and genetic instability of ovarian cancer cells often lead to the development of drug resistance, closely related with the increased cancer-related mortality. In this study, we investigated the role of dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) in the development of the resistance in human ovarian cancer cells against paclitaxel. Overexpression of DUSP1 in HeyA8 human ovarian cancer cells (HeyA8-DUSP1) up-regulated the expression of the drug efflux pump, p-glycoprotein. Consequently, HeyA8-DUSP1 cells are highly resistant to paclitaxel, with the resistance comparable to that of a multi-drug resistance cell line (HeyA8-MDR). Moreover, over expression of DUSP1 significantly increased the activation of p38 MAPK, leaving the activation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 unaffected. Pharmacological suppression of p38 MAPK activity prevents the up-regulation of p-glycoprotein expression and the consequent resistance against paclitaxel in HeyA8-DUSP1 cells. By contrast, HeyA8-MDR cells expressed a significantly higher level of DUSP1, but treatment with small interference RNA against DUSP1 significantly suppressed the expression of p-glycoprotein and the resistance against paclitaxel in HeyA8-MDR cells. Ectopic expression of MKK3, an upstream activator of p38 MAPK, significantly up-regulated the expression of p-glycoprotein and increased the consequent resistance against paclitaxel in HeyA8 cells. Collectively, these data indicated that DUSP1 may induce the resistance against paclitaxel through the p38 MAPK-mediated overexpression of p-glycoprotein in human ovarian cancer cells.

  15. DUSP1 induces paclitaxel resistance through the regulation of p-glycoprotein expression in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu-Seon; Seok, Hyun-Jeong; Jeong, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Yuna; Yun, Seok-Joong; Min, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Sun Jin; Kim, Jang-Seong

    2016-09-01

    The heterogeneity and genetic instability of ovarian cancer cells often lead to the development of drug resistance, closely related with the increased cancer-related mortality. In this study, we investigated the role of dual-specificity phosphatase 1 (DUSP1) in the development of the resistance in human ovarian cancer cells against paclitaxel. Overexpression of DUSP1 in HeyA8 human ovarian cancer cells (HeyA8-DUSP1) up-regulated the expression of the drug efflux pump, p-glycoprotein. Consequently, HeyA8-DUSP1 cells are highly resistant to paclitaxel, with the resistance comparable to that of a multi-drug resistance cell line (HeyA8-MDR). Moreover, over expression of DUSP1 significantly increased the activation of p38 MAPK, leaving the activation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 unaffected. Pharmacological suppression of p38 MAPK activity prevents the up-regulation of p-glycoprotein expression and the consequent resistance against paclitaxel in HeyA8-DUSP1 cells. By contrast, HeyA8-MDR cells expressed a significantly higher level of DUSP1, but treatment with small interference RNA against DUSP1 significantly suppressed the expression of p-glycoprotein and the resistance against paclitaxel in HeyA8-MDR cells. Ectopic expression of MKK3, an upstream activator of p38 MAPK, significantly up-regulated the expression of p-glycoprotein and increased the consequent resistance against paclitaxel in HeyA8 cells. Collectively, these data indicated that DUSP1 may induce the resistance against paclitaxel through the p38 MAPK-mediated overexpression of p-glycoprotein in human ovarian cancer cells. PMID:27422607

  16. An arabidopsis gene regulatory network for secondary cell wall synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptiona...

  17. A low-toxic artificial fluorescent glycoprotein can serve as an efficient cytoplasmic labeling in living cell.

    PubMed

    Si, Jiangju; Liang, Dawei; Kong, Dan; Wu, Sufang; Yuan, Lan; Xiang, Yan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-01

    To maintain the virtue of good optical property and discard the dross of conventional fluorescent staining dyes, we provide a strategy for designing new fluorescent scaffolds. In this study, a novel fluorescent labeling glycoprotein (chitosan-poly-L-cysteine, CPC) was synthesized through graft copolymerization. CPC gives emission peak at 465-470 nm when excited at 386 nm. The submicro-scale CPC microspheres could be localized and persisted specifically in the cytoplasm of living cells, with strong blue fluorescence. Moreover, CPC was highly resistant to photo bleaching, the fluorescence was remained stable for up to 72 h as the cells grew and developed. The glycoprotein CPC was bio-compatible and in zero grade cytotoxicity as quantified by MTT assay. The fluorescent labeling process with our newly designed glycoprotein CPC is exceptionally efficient.

  18. Multidrug-resistance gene (P-glycoprotein) is expressed by endothelial cells at blood-brain barrier sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cordon-Cardo, C.; O'Brien, J.P.; Casals, D.; Biedler, J.L.; Melamed, M.R.; Bertino, J.R. ); Rittman-Grauer, L. )

    1989-01-01

    Endothelial cells of human capillary blood vessels at the blood-brain and other blood-tissue barrier sites express P-glycoprotein as detected by mouse monoclonal antibodies against the human multidrug-resistance gene product. This pattern of endothelial cell expression may indicate a physiological role for P-glycoprotein in regulating the entry of certain molecules into the central nervous system and other anatomic compartments, such as the testes. These tissues, which limit the access of systemic drugs, are known pharmacologic sanctuaries for metastatic cancer. P-glycoprotein expression in capillary endothelium of brain and testes and not other tissues (i.e., kidney and placenta) may in part explain this phenomenon and could have important implications in cancer chemotherapy.

  19. Cell wall degradation in the autolysis of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Perez-Leblic, M I; Reyes, F; Martinez, M J; Lahoz, R

    1982-12-27

    A systematic study on autolysis of the cell walls of fungi has been made on Neurospora crassa, Botrytis cinerea, Polystictus versicolor, Aspergillus nidulans, Schizophyllum commune, Aspergillus niger, and Mucor mucedo. During autolysis each fungus produces the necessary lytic enzymes for its autodegradation. From autolyzed cultures of each fungus enzymatic precipitates were obtained. The degree of lysis of the cell walls, obtained from non-autolyzed mycelia, was studied by incubating these cell walls with and without a supply of their own lytic enzymes. The degree of lysis increased with the incubation time and generally was higher with a supply of lytic enzymes. Cell walls from mycelia of different ages were obtained. A higher degree of lysis was always found, in young cell walls than in older cell walls, when exogenous lytic enzymes were present. In all the fungi studied, there is lysis of the cell walls during autolysis. This is confirmed by the change of the cell wall structure as well as by the degree of lysis reached by the cell wall and the release of substances, principally glucose and N-acetylglucosamine in the medium.

  20. Broad target cell selectivity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion and virion entry

    SciTech Connect

    Kaleeba, Johnan A.R.; Berger, Edward A. . E-mail: edward_berger@nih.gov

    2006-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8) entry is poorly understood. We tested a broad variety of cell types of diverse species and tissue origin for their ability to function as targets in a quantitative reporter gene assay for KSHV-glycoprotein-mediated cell fusion. Several human, non-human primate, and rabbit cell lines were efficient targets, whereas rodent and all human lymphoblastoid cell lines were weak targets. Parallel findings were obtained with a virion entry assay using a recombinant KSHV encoding a reporter gene. No correlation was observed between target cell activity and surface expression of {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin, a proposed KSHV receptor. We hypothesize that target cell permissiveness in both the cell fusion and virion entry assays reflects the presence of a putative KSHV fusion-entry receptor.

  1. Laurus nobilis L. Seed Extract Reveals Collateral Sensitivity in Multidrug-Resistant P-Glycoprotein-Expressing Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Saab, Antoine M; Guerrini, Alessandra; Zeino, Maen; Wiench, Benjamin; Rossi, Damiano; Gambari, Roberto; Sacchetti, Gianni; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The frequent failure of standard cancer chemotherapy requires the development of novel drugs capable of killing otherwise drug-resistant tumors. Here, we have investigated a chloroform extract of Laurus nobilis seeds. Fatty acids and 23 constituents of the volatile fraction were identified by gas chromotography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), in good agreement with (1)H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectrum. Multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein-expressing CEM/ADR5000 leukemia cells were hypersensitive (collaterally sensitive) toward this extract compared to drug-sensitive CCRF-CEM cells, whereas CEM/ADR5000 cells were 2586-fold resistant to doxorubicin as control drug. Collateral sensitivity was verified by measurement of apoptotic cells by flow cytometry. The log10IC50 values of 3 compounds in the extract (limonene, eucalyptol, oleic acid) did not correlate with mRNA expression of the P-glycoprotein-coding ABCB1/MDR1 gene and accumulation of the P-glycoprotein substrate rhodamine in the NCI panel of tumor cell lines. A microarray-based profile of 20 genes predicted resistance to doxorubicin and 7 other anticancer drugs involved in the multidrug resistance phenotype but not to limonene, eucalyptol and oleic acid. In conclusion, our results show that Laurus nobilis seed extract is suitable to kill multidrug-resistant P-glycoprotein expressing tumor cells.

  2. Genistein modulates the decreased drug accumulation in non-P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Versantvoort, C. H.; Schuurhuis, G. J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Eekman, C. A.; Kuiper, C. M.; Lankelma, J.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    In tumour cells the pharmacological basis for multidrug resistance (MDR) often appears to be a reduced cellular cytostatic drug accumulation caused by the drug efflux protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp MDR), or by other drug transporters (non-Pgp MDR). Here we report the reversal of the decreased daunorubicin (DNR) accumulation in five non-Pgp MDR cell lines (GLC4/ADR, SW-1573/2R120, HT1080/DR4, MCF7/Mitox and HL60/ADR) by genistein. Genistein inhibited the enhanced DNR efflux in the GLC4/ADR cells. In these cells the decreased VP-16 accumulation was also reversed by genistein. Three other (iso)flavonoids biochanin A, apigenin and quercetin also increased the DNR accumulation in the GLC4/ADR cells. In contrast to the effects on non-Pgp MDR cells, 200 microM genistein did not increase the reduced DNR accumulation in three Pgp MDR cell lines (SW-1573/2R160, MCF7/DOX40 and KB8-5) or in the parental cell lines. In conclusion the use of genistein provides a means to probe non-Pgp related drug accumulation defects. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8105867

  3. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis, patterned deposition and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Secondary walls are mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses (xylan and glucomannan) and lignin, and are deposited in some specialized cells, such as tracheary elements, fibers and other sclerenchymatous cells. Secondary walls provide strength to these cells, which lend mechanical support and protection to the plant body and, in the case of tracheary elements, enable them to function as conduits for transporting water. Formation of secondary walls is a complex process that requires the co-ordinated expression of secondary wall biosynthetic genes, biosynthesis and targeted secretion of secondary wall components, and patterned deposition and assembly of secondary walls. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition. Most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary wall components, including cellulose, xylan, glucomannan and lignin, have been identified and their co-ordinated activation has been shown to be mediated by a transcriptional network encompassing the secondary wall NAC and MYB master switches and their downstream transcription factors. It has been demonstrated that cortical microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins play important roles in the targeted secretion of cellulose synthase complexes, the oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils and the patterned deposition of secondary walls. Further investigation of many secondary wall-associated genes with unknown functions will provide new insights into the mechanisms controlling the formation of secondary walls that constitute the bulk of plant biomass.

  4. Visualization of cellulose synthases in Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Meents, M J; McDonnell, L M; Barkwill, S; Sampathkumar, A; Cartwright, H N; Demura, T; Ehrhardt, D W; Samuels, A L; Mansfield, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis in plant secondary cell walls forms the basis of vascular development in land plants, with xylem tissues constituting the vast majority of terrestrial biomass. We used plant lines that contained an inducible master transcription factor controlling xylem cell fate to quantitatively image fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase enzymes during cellulose deposition in living protoxylem cells. The formation of secondary cell wall thickenings was associated with a redistribution and enrichment of CESA7-containing cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) into narrow membrane domains. The velocities of secondary cell wall-specific CSCs were faster than those of primary cell wall CSCs during abundant cellulose production. Dynamic intracellular of endomembranes, in combination with increased velocity and high density of CSCs, enables cellulose to be synthesized rapidly in secondary cell walls. PMID:26450210

  5. Visualization of cellulose synthases in Arabidopsis secondary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Meents, M J; McDonnell, L M; Barkwill, S; Sampathkumar, A; Cartwright, H N; Demura, T; Ehrhardt, D W; Samuels, A L; Mansfield, S D

    2015-10-01

    Cellulose biosynthesis in plant secondary cell walls forms the basis of vascular development in land plants, with xylem tissues constituting the vast majority of terrestrial biomass. We used plant lines that contained an inducible master transcription factor controlling xylem cell fate to quantitatively image fluorescently tagged cellulose synthase enzymes during cellulose deposition in living protoxylem cells. The formation of secondary cell wall thickenings was associated with a redistribution and enrichment of CESA7-containing cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs) into narrow membrane domains. The velocities of secondary cell wall-specific CSCs were faster than those of primary cell wall CSCs during abundant cellulose production. Dynamic intracellular of endomembranes, in combination with increased velocity and high density of CSCs, enables cellulose to be synthesized rapidly in secondary cell walls.

  6. Cell wall structure and biogenesis in Aspergillus species.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Akira; Miyazawa, Ken; Abe, Keietsu

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi from the viewpoints of industry, pathogenesis, and mycotoxin production. Fungal cells are exposed to a variety of environmental stimuli, including changes in osmolality, temperature, and pH, which create stresses that primarily act on fungal cell walls. In addition, fungal cell walls are the first interactions with host cells in either human or plants. Thus, understanding cell wall structure and the mechanism of their biogenesis is important for the industrial, medical, and agricultural fields. Here, we provide a systematic review of fungal cell wall structure and recent findings regarding the cell wall integrity signaling pathways in aspergilli. This accumulated knowledge will be useful for understanding and improving the use of industrial aspergilli fermentation processes as well as treatments for some fungal infections.

  7. Tissue-Specific Expression of Cell Wall Proteins in Developing Soybean Tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, ZH; Varner, JE

    1991-01-01

    Cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) and glycine-rich proteins (GRPs) were examined at the protein and at the mRNA levels in developing soybean tissues by tissue print immunoblots and RNA blots. In young soybean stems, HRGPs are expressed most heavily in cambium cells, in a few layers of cortex cells surrounding primary phloem, and in some parenchyma cells around the primary xylem, whereas GRPs are highly expressed in the primary xylem and also in the primary phloem. In older soybean stems, HRGP genes are expressed exclusively in cambium cells and GRP genes are most heavily expressed in newly differentiated secondary xylem cells. Similar expression patterns of HRGPs and of GRPs were found in soybean petioles, seedcoats, and young hypocotyls, and also in bean petioles and stems. HRGPs and GRPs become insolubilized in soybean stem cell walls. Three major HRGP mRNAs and two major GRP mRNAs accumulate in soybean stems. Soluble HRGPs are abundant in young hypocotyl apical regions and young root apical regions, whereas in hypocotyl and root mature regions, soluble HRGPs are found only in a few layers of cortex cells surrounding the vascular bundles. GRPs are specifically localized in primary xylem cell walls of young root. These results show that the gene expression of HRGPs and GRPs is developmentally regulated in a tissue-specific manner. In soybean tissues, HRGPs are most heavily expressed in meristematic cells and in some of those cells that may be under stress, whereas GRPs are expressed in all cells that are or are going to be lignified. PMID:12324579

  8. Trans-differentiation of prostatic stromal cells leads to decreased glycoprotein hormone alpha production.

    PubMed

    Rumpold, Holger; Mascher, Katarina; Untergasser, Gerold; Plas, Eugen; Hermann, Martin; Berger, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Age-related development of benign prostatic hyperplasia is an important health issue in developed countries. The histopathogenetic hallmark of this disease is the increase in relative and absolute numbers of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit (GPHalpha) is expressed in the human prostate, and, because of its structural similarities to other cystine knot growth factors, it has been considered to have growth regulatory functions of its own. Primary cell cultures allowing for selective cultivation of prostatic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and SMC were established. Directed trans-differentiation and cellular homogeneity was pursued by confocal scanning laser microscopy with cell type-specific markers. GPHalpha production by these cells was assessed by immunofluorimetric assays. Its predominant source was young fibroblasts, whereas replicative senescent fibroblasts, SMC, and control fibroblasts from foreskin did not produce significant amounts. Functionally, GPHalpha reduced growth of stromal cells at concentrations of 10 and 100 nmol/liter as shown by cell viability assays. It is concluded that histogenetic reorganization over the adult lifetime, guided by endocrine factors like steroid hormones together with senescence of fibroblasts, leads to a decreased production of growth inhibitors, such as GPHalpha, favoring proliferation and the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  9. Unicellular Algal Growth: A Biomechanical Approach to Cell Wall Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Royce; Levine, Herbert

    1997-11-01

    We model a growing cell in a calcium solution as an elastic shell on short time scales. The turgor pressure and elastic properties (Young's modulus, thickness) of the cell wall determine a stressed cell shape. Enzyme-mediated relaxation of the unstressed toward the stressed configuration results in a slow (plastic) deformation of the cell. The cell wall thickness is then modulated by calcium-mediated fusion of material and elongation. We analyze small perturbations to a circular cell and find an instability related to modulations of the wall thickness, leading to growth rates which peak at a finite wave number.

  10. The glycoprotein-hormones activin A and inhibin A interfere with dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Sabine E; Müller, Nora; Brandt, Jens van den; Kapp, Michaela; Dietl, Johannes; Reichardt, Holger M; Rieger, Lorenz; Kämmerer, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    Background Pregnancy represents an exclusive situation in which the immune and the endocrine system cooperate to prevent rejection of the embryo by the maternal immune system. While immature dendritic cells (iDC) in the early pregnancy decidua presumably contribute to the establishment of peripheral tolerance, glycoprotein-hormones of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family including activin A (ActA) and inhibin A (InA) are candidates that could direct the differentiation of DCs into a tolerance-inducing phenotype. Methods To test this hypothesis we generated iDCs from peripheral-blood-monocytes and exposed them to TGF-beta1, ActA, as well as InA and Dexamethasone (Dex) as controls. Results Both glycoprotein-hormones prevented up-regulation of HLA-DR during cytokine-induced DC maturation similar to Dex but did not influence the expression of CD 40, CD 83 and CD 86. Visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton confirmed that the DCs retained a partially immature phenotype under these conditions. The T-cell stimulatory capacity of DCs was reduced after ActA and InA exposure while the secretion of cytokines and chemokines was unaffected. Conclusion These findings suggest that ActA and InA interfere with selected aspects of DC maturation and may thereby help preventing activation of allogenic T-cells by the embryo. Thus, we have identified two novel members of the TGF-beta superfamily that could promote the generation of tolerance-inducing DCs. PMID:18460206

  11. Preparation of Cell Wall Antigens of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, J. J.; Tipper, Donald J.; Berman, David T.

    1970-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from Staphylococcus aureus strains Copenhagen and 263 by high-speed mixing in the presence of glass beads followed by differential centrifugation. Insoluble peptidoglycan complexes were derived from cell walls by extraction of teichoic acid with 10% trichloroacetic acid. Intact teichoic acid was prepared from each strain by digestion of cell walls with lysostaphin and isolated by column chromatography. Soluble glycopeptide (peptidoglycan in which only the glycan has been fragmented) and the stable complex of teichoic acid with glycopeptide were prepared by digestion of cell walls with Chalaropsis B endo-N-acetylmuramidase and were separated by column chromatography. Amino acid and amino sugar contents of walls and subunits of walls were comparable to those reported by others. Images PMID:16557799

  12. Screening and characterization of plant cell walls using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls built largely from complex carbohydrates. The primary walls of growing plant cells consist of interdependent networks of three polysaccharide classes: cellulose, cross-linking glycans (also known as hemicelluloses), and pectins. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered together by cross-linking glycans, and this assembly forms the major load-bearing component of primary walls, which is infiltrated with pectic polymers. In the secondary walls of woody tissues, pectins are much reduced and walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin. Plant cell walls are essential for plant life and also have numerous industrial applications, ranging from wood to nutraceuticals. Enhancing our knowledge of cell wall biology and the effective use of cell wall materials is dependent to a large extent on being able to analyse their fine structures. We have developed a suite of techniques based on microarrays probed with monoclonal antibodies with specificity for cell wall components, and here we present practical protocols for this type of analysis.

  13. Apoptosis induced by glycoprotein (150-kDa) isolated from Solanum nigrum L. is not related to intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2006-04-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the apoptotic effects of glycoprotein [Solanum nigrum L. (SNL) glycoprotein, 150-kDa] isolated from Solanum nigrum L., which has been used as an antipyretic and anticancer agent in folk medicine. With the purified SNL glycoprotein, we evaluated the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of SNL glycoprotein on HCT-116 cells, DNA fragmentation and nuclear staining assays, respectively. SNL glycoprotein has an apparent cytotoxic and apoptotic effect at a concentration of 40 microg/ml after 4 h. To further verify the apoptotic effect, we investigated the changes in activity of the apoptotic-related proteins [Bid, cytochrome c, caspases and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP)] triggered by SNL glycoprotein, using a western blot analysis. The results in this study indicated that SNL glycoprotein has a stimulatory effect on Bid activation, resulting in the release of cytochrome c, the stimulation of caspase-8, -9 and -3 activities, and the cleavage of PARP in HCT-116 cells. However, SNL glycoprotein did not significantly stimulate an increase in levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). From the results in this experiment, it is suggested that SNL glycoprotein induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic signal pathway in HCT-116 cells, rather than through intracellular ROS. PMID:16208518

  14. Ultrastructural localization of capsules, cell wall polysaccharide, cell wall proteins, and F antigen in pneumococci.

    PubMed Central

    Skov Sørensen, U B; Blom, J; Birch-Andersen, A; Henrichsen, J

    1988-01-01

    The localization of pneumococcal capsular and cell wall antigens was examined by immunoelectron microscopy. C polysaccharide (C-Ps), a common component of all pneumococci, was uniformly distributed on both the inside and outside of the cell walls. The thickness of the C-Ps varied with the strain. Encapsulated strains were covered by varied amounts of capsular polysaccharide concealing the C-Ps of the bacteria so as to render it inaccessible to anti-C-Ps antibodies. In addition to C-Ps, protein antigens were demonstrable on the surface of nonencapsulated pneumococci. The proteins were not masked by the C-Ps layer. An extra layer on the cell walls was conspicuous on electron micrographs of both rough and encapsulated pneumococci. The nature of this extra layer has not been disclosed. F antigen, another common antigen of pneumococci, was uniformly distributed on the surface of the plasma membranes. During the course of the experimental work a reproducible method of gold labeling immunoglobulins was developed. Images PMID:3397179

  15. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  16. Genes and plant cell walls: a difficult relationship.

    PubMed

    Wojtaszek, P

    2000-08-01

    Chemical information, carried by genes, is one of several types of information important for the functioning of cells and organisms. While genes govern the two-dimensional flow of information, the cell walls are at the basis of a structural, three-dimensional framework of plant form and growth. Recent data show the walls to be a cellular 'organelle' undergoing dynamic changes in response to a plethora of stimuli. In this review, an integrated approach, rooted in the organismal perspective, is taken to consider the role of cell walls in the biology of plants. First, the complexity of molecular and biochemical events leading to the biosynthesis of wall components is described within the framework of its spatial cellular organisation, and the major regulatory check-points are characterised. Second, cell walls form a structural and functional continuum within the whole plant and thus could be defined in relation to the protoplasts that produce them and in relation to the plant itself. Model systems of suspension-cultured cells are used to reveal the existence of a bidirectional exchange of information between the protoplast and its walls. The 'plasticity' of plant cell reactions, seen in defence responses or in changes in wall composition, to e.g. stress, plant growth regulators or chemical agents as well as the role of cell walls and/or wall components in somatic embryogenesis are also discussed. Third, being a continuum within the plant body, the walls fulfil vital functions in plant growth and development. The examples characterised include the determination of cellular polarity and the plane of cell division, cytokinesis, and the role of plasmodesmata in cell-to-cell communication and the formation of functional symplastic domains. Fourth, the exocellular control of morphogenetic processes is described and the potential of cell walls as determinants or reservoirs of positional information is indicated. Particular emphasis is put on the (bio)chemical signals coming

  17. Mutation of Herpesvirus Saimiri ORF51 Glycoprotein Specifically Targets Infectivity to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Turrell, Susan J.; Whitehouse, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) is a gamma herpesvirus with several properties that make it an amenable gene therapy vector; namely its large packaging capacity, its ability to persist as a nonintegrated episome, and its ability to infect numerous human cell types. We used RecA-mediated recombination to develop an HVS vector with a mutated virion protein. The heparan sulphate-binding region of HVS ORF51 was substituted for a peptide sequence which interacts with somatostatin receptors (SSTRs), overexpressed on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. HVS mORF51 showed reduced infectivity in non-HCC human cell lines compared to wild-type virus. Strikingly, HVS mORF51 retained its ability to infect HCC cell lines efficiently. However, neutralisation assays suggest that HVS mORF51 has no enhanced binding to SSTRs. Therefore, mutation of the ORF51 glycoprotein has specifically targeted HVS to HCC cell lines by reducing the infectivity of other cell types; however, the mechanism for this targeting is unknown. PMID:21197456

  18. Assembly and enlargement of the primary cell wall in plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    Growing plant cells are shaped by an extensible wall that is a complex amalgam of cellulose microfibrils bonded noncovalently to a matrix of hemicelluloses, pectins, and structural proteins. Cellulose is synthesized by complexes in the plasma membrane and is extruded as a self-assembling microfibril, whereas the matrix polymers are secreted by the Golgi apparatus and become integrated into the wall network by poorly understood mechanisms. The growing wall is under high tensile stress from cell turgor and is able to enlarge by a combination of stress relaxation and polymer creep. A pH-dependent mechanism of wall loosening, known as acid growth, is characteristic of growing walls and is mediated by a group of unusual wall proteins called expansins. Expansins appear to disrupt the noncovalent bonding of matrix hemicelluloses to the microfibril, thereby allowing the wall to yield to the mechanical forces generated by cell turgor. Other wall enzymes, such as (1-->4) beta-glucanases and pectinases, may make the wall more responsive to expansin-mediated wall creep whereas pectin methylesterases and peroxidases may alter the wall so as to make it resistant to expansin-mediated creep.

  19. Structural Studies of Complex Carbohydrates of Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Darvill, Alan; Hahn, Michael G.; O'Neill, Malcolm A.; York, William S.

    2015-02-17

    Most of the solar energy captured by land plants is converted into the polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin) that are the predominant components of the cell wall. These walls, which account for the bulk of plant biomass, have numerous roles in the growth and development of plants. Moreover, these walls have a major impact on human life as they are a renewable source of biomass, a source of diverse commercially useful polymers, a major component of wood, and a source of nutrition for humans and livestock. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms that lead to wall assembly and how cell walls and their component polysaccharides contribute to plant growth and development is essential to improve and extend the productivity and value of plant materials. The proposed research will develop and apply advanced analytical and immunological techniques to study specific changes in the structures and interactions of the hemicellulosic and pectic polysaccharides that occur during differentiation and in response to genetic modification and chemical treatments that affect wall biosynthesis. These new techniques will make it possible to accurately characterize minute amounts of cell wall polysaccharides so that subtle changes in structure that occur in individual cell types can be identified and correlated to the physiological or developmental state of the plant. Successful implementation of this research will reveal fundamental relationships between polysaccharide structure, cell wall architecture, and cell wall functions.

  20. Glycosylation of stress glycoprotein GP62 in cells exposed to heat-shock and subculturing.

    PubMed

    Dumić, J; Lauc, G; Flögel, M

    1999-11-01

    GP62 is a member of the stress glycoprotein family that was proposed to have a chaperone-like function in the heat-shock response. Using lectin blotting we have studied glycosylation of GP62 and determined that in addition to heat-shock, even simple subculturing of cells is a sufficient stimulus to provoke induction of GP62. Interestingly, both kinetics of induction and glycosylation of GP62 induced by subculturing were different than when GP62 was induced by heat-shock. While GP62 induced by heat-shock was recognized by SNA, DSA and PHA-E lectins, and not by BSA I, Con A, RCA I, SJA, UEA I, VVA, and WGA lectins, GP62 induced by subculturing was also recognized by RCA I and WGA lectins.

  1. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  2. Engineering the Oryza sativa cell wall with rice NAC transcription factors regulating secondary wall formation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kouki; Sakamoto, Shingo; Kawai, Tetsushi; Kobayashi, Yoshinori; Sato, Kazuhito; Ichinose, Yasunori; Yaoi, Katsuro; Akiyoshi-Endo, Miho; Sato, Hiroko; Takamizo, Tadashi; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-01-01

    Plant tissues that require structural rigidity synthesize a thick, strong secondary cell wall of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses in a complicated bridged structure. Master regulators of secondary wall synthesis were identified in dicots, and orthologs of these regulators have been identified in monocots, but regulation of secondary cell wall formation in monocots has not been extensively studied. Here we demonstrate that the rice transcription factors SECONDARY WALL NAC DOMAIN PROTEINs (SWNs) can regulate secondary wall formation in rice (Oryza sativa) and are potentially useful for engineering the monocot cell wall. The OsSWN1 promoter is highly active in sclerenchymatous cells of the leaf blade and less active in xylem cells. By contrast, the OsSWN2 promoter is highly active in xylem cells and less active in sclerenchymatous cells. OsSWN2 splicing variants encode two proteins; the shorter protein (OsSWN2S) has very low transcriptional activation ability, but the longer protein (OsSWN2L) and OsSWN1 have strong transcriptional activation ability. In rice, expression of an OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN2 promoter, resulted in stunted growth and para-wilting (leaf rolling and browning under normal water conditions) due to impaired vascular vessels. The same OsSWN2S chimeric repressor, driven by the OsSWN1 promoter, caused a reduction of cell wall thickening in sclerenchymatous cells, a drooping leaf phenotype, reduced lignin and xylose contents and increased digestibility as forage. These data suggest that OsSWNs regulate secondary wall formation in rice and manipulation of OsSWNs may enable improvements in monocotyledonous crops for forage or biofuel applications. PMID:24098302

  3. 7. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. WALL MAP IN CENTRAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. WALL MAP IN CENTRAL BASEMENT OFFICE AREA. LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA

  4. The role of wall calcium in the extension of cell walls of soybean hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virk, S. S.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Calcium crosslinks are load-bearing bonds in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) hypocotyl cell walls, but they are not the same load-bearing bonds that are broken during acid-mediated cell elongation. This conclusion is reached by studying the relationship between wall calcium, pH and the facilitated creep of frozen-thawed soybean hypocotyl sections. Supporting data include the following observations: 1) 2-[(2-bis-[carboxymethyl]amino-5-methylphenoxy)methyl]-6-methoxy-8-bis[car boxymethyl]aminoquinoline (Quin 2) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) caused only limited facilitated creep as compared with acid, despite removal of comparable or larger amounts of wall calcium; 2) the pH-response curves for calcium removal and acid-facilitated creep were different; 3) reversible acid-extension occurred even after removal of almost all wall calcium with Quin 2; and 4) growth of abraded sections did not involve a proportional loss of wall calcium. Removal of wall calcium, however, increased the capacity of the walls to undergo acid-facilitated creep. These data indicate that breakage of calcium crosslinks is not a major mechanism of cell-wall loosening in soybean hypocotyl tissues.

  5. On-off switches for secondary cell wall biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan-Zhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    Secondary cell walls provide plants with rigidity and strength to support their body weight and ensure water and nutrient transport. They also provide textiles, timber, and potentially second-generation biofuels for human use. Genes responsible for synthesis of the different cell wall components, namely cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, are coordinately expressed and under transcriptional regulation. In the past several years, cell wall-related NAC and MYB transcription factors have been intensively investigated in different species and shown to be master switches of secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Positive and negative regulators, which function upstream of NAC master switches, have also been identified in different plant tissues. Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of cell wall synthesis will facilitate the engineering of plant feedstocks suitable for biofuel production. PMID:22138968

  6. Signaling role of oligogalacturonides derived during cell wall degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vallarino, José G.; Osorio, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the role of the cell wall as a physical barrier against pathogens, some of its constituents, such as pectin-derived oligogalacturonides (OGAs) are essential components to trigger signaling pathways that induce rapid defense responses. Many pathogens directly penetrate the cell wall to access water and nutrients of the plant protoplast, and a rigid cell wall can fend off pathogen attack by forming an impenetrable physical barrier. Thus, cell wall integrity sensing is one mechanism by which plants may detect pathogen attack. Moreover, when the plant-pathogen interaction occurred, OGAs released during cell wall modification can trigger plant defense (e.g., production of reactive oxygen species, production of anti-microbial metabolites and synthesis of pathogenesis-related proteins). This review documents and discusses studies suggesting that OGAs play a dual signaling role during pathogen attack by inducing defense responses and plant architecture adjustment. PMID:22918501

  7. Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides

    DOEpatents

    Berka, Randy; Cherry, Joel

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

  8. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C B; Hashim, Onn H; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  9. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  10. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA Glycoprotein Adheres to Human Intestine Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  11. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli TibA glycoprotein adheres to human intestine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    2001-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileum and colon. Two separate invasion loci (tia and tib) that direct noninvasive E. coli strains to adhere to and invade cultured human intestine epithelial cells have previously been isolated from the classical ETEC strain H10407. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane glycoprotein. Synthesis of TibA is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes of the tib locus, suggesting that this protein is an adhesin and invasin. Here we report the purification of TibA and characterization of its biological activity. TibA was purified by continuous-elution preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Purified TibA was biotin labeled and then shown to bind to HCT8 human ileocecal epithelial cells in a specific and saturable manner. Unlabeled TibA competed with biotin-labeled TibA, suggesting the presence of a specific TibA receptor in HCT8 cells. These results show that TibA acts as an adhesin. Polyclonal anti-TibA antiserum inhibited invasion of ETEC strain H10407 and of recombinant E. coli bearing tib locus clones, suggesting that TibA also acts as an invasin. The ability of TibA to direct epithelial cell adhesion suggests a role for this protein in ETEC pathogenesis. PMID:11119488

  12. Collenchyma: a versatile mechanical tissue with dynamic cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Background Collenchyma has remained in the shadow of commercially exploited mechanical tissues such as wood and fibres, and therefore has received little attention since it was first described. However, collenchyma is highly dynamic, especially compared with sclerenchyma. It is the main supporting tissue of growing organs with walls thickening during and after elongation. In older organs, collenchyma may become more rigid due to changes in cell wall composition or may undergo sclerification through lignification of newly deposited cell wall material. While much is known about the systematic and organographic distribution of collenchyma, there is rather less information regarding the molecular architecture and properties of its cell walls. Scope and conclusions This review summarizes several aspects that have not previously been extensively discussed including the origin of the term ‘collenchyma’ and the history of its typology. As the cell walls of collenchyma largely determine the dynamic characteristics of this tissue, I summarize the current state of knowledge regarding their structure and molecular composition. Unfortunately, to date, detailed studies specifically focusing on collenchyma cell walls have not been undertaken. However, generating a more detailed understanding of the structural and compositional modifications associated with the transition from plastic to elastic collenchyma cell wall properties is likely to provide significant insights into how specific configurations of cell wall polymers result in specific functional properties. This approach, focusing on architecture and functional properties, is likely to provide improved clarity on the controversial definition of collenchyma. PMID:22933416

  13. [Effect of Siwu decoction on function and expression of P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cells].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi; Ma, Zeng-chun; Huang, Xian-ju; You, Qing; Tan, Hong-ling; Wang, Yu-guang; Liang, Qian-de; Tang, Xiang-lin; Xiao, Cheng-rong; Gao, Yue

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect of Siwu decoction on the function and expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in Caco-2 cells. The Real-time quantitative poly-merase chain reaction (Q-PCR) was used to analyze the mRNA expression of MDR1 gene in Caco-2 cells. Flow cytometer was used to study the effect of Siwu decoction on the uptake of Rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 cells, in order to evaluate the efflux function of P-gp. Western blotting method was used to detect the effect of Siwu decoction on the P-gp protein expression of Caco-2 cells. Compared with the blank control group, after Caco-2 incubation with Siwu decoction at concentrations of 3.3, 5.0, 10.0 g x L(-1) for 24, 48, 72 h, the mRNA expression of MDR1 was up-regulated, suggesting the effect of Siwu decoction in inducing the expression of MDR1. After the administration with Siwu decoction in Caco-2 cells for 48 h, the uptake of Rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 cells decreased by respectively 16.6%, 22.1% (P < 0.05) and 45.4% (P < 0.01), indicating that the long-term administration of Siwu decoction can enhance the P-gp efflux function of Caco-2 cells. After the incubation of Caco-2 cells with Siwu decoction for 48 h, the P-gp protein expression on Caco-2 cell emebranes, demonstrating the effect of Siwu decoction in inducing the protein expression of P-gp.

  14. Revealing the fate of cell surface human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1): The lysosomal degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Kazuhiro; Kapoor, Khyati; Ohnuma, Shinobu; Patel, Atish; Swaim, William; Ambudkar, Indu S; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) transports a variety of chemically dissimilar amphipathic compounds including anticancer drugs. Although mechanisms of P-gp drug transport are widely studied, the pathways involving its internalization are poorly understood. The present study is aimed at elucidating the pathways involved in degradation of cell surface P-gp. The fate of P-gp at the cell surface was determined by biotinylating cell surface proteins followed by flow cytometry and Western blotting. Our data shows that the half-life of endogenously expressed P-gp is 26.7±1.1 h in human colorectal cancer HCT-15 cells. Treatment of cells with Bafilomycin A1 (BafA1) a vacuolar H+ ATPase inhibitor increased the half-life of P-gp at the cell surface to 36.1±0.5 h. Interestingly, treatment with the proteasomal inhibitors MG132, MG115 or lactacystin alone did not alter the half-life of the protein. When cells were treated with both lysosomal and proteasomal inhibitors (BafA1 and MG132), the half-life was further prolonged to 39-50 h. Functional assays done with rhodamine 123 or calcein-AM, fluorescent substrates of P-gp, indicated that the transport function of P-gp was not affected by either biotinylation or treatment with BafA1 or proteasomal inhibitors. Immunofluorescence studies done with the antibody against lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the P-gp-specific antibody UIC2 in permeabilized cells indicated that intracellular P-gp is primarily localized in the lysosomal compartment. Our results suggest that the lysosomal degradation system could be targeted to increase the sensitivity of P-gp- expressing cancer cells towards chemotherapeutic drugs.

  15. The soluble viral glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus efficiently sensitizes target cells for lysis by CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Browning, M; Reiss, C S; Huang, A S

    1990-01-01

    The soluble glycoprotein Gs of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), at approximately 10(4) molecules per cell, sensitized target cells for lysis by clones of CD4+ cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL). In addition to lysis, the clones responded by proliferation and interleukin-2 release. Targets sensitized by Gs competed effectively with VSV-infected cells for recognition. Immune cytolysis by these CD4+ CTLs was restricted by class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and was specific to VSV. The specific class II MHC antigen which was restricting for each clone remained the same whether the targets were sensitized by infection with VSV or by exogenously added soluble antigen. Sensitization by Gs appeared to require prior processing because the antigen-presenting cells that were fixed prior to exposure to Gs failed to be recognized by the CTL clones. The high efficiency of this uptake and processing was suggested by the inability of Gs at concentrations up to 10(7) per cell to block superinfection by VSV or to effect the RNA-synthetic machinery of uninfected cells. Also, Gs failed to hemolyze sheep erythrocytes when there was hemolysis by virions or an amino-terminal peptide of the VSV glycoprotein. Extrapolation of these results to viral diseases was possible because soluble viral glycoproteins were naturally synthesized during many viral infections and class II MHC antigens were inducible in cells of nonlymphoid origin. Therefore, CD4+ CTLs may be important participants in increasing virus-induced pathology, especially among adjacent uninfected cells. PMID:2164598

  16. Structure of plant cell walls: XIX. Isolation and characterization of wall polysaccharides from suspension-cultured Douglas fir cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R.; McNeil, M.; Darvill, A.G.; Albersheim, P.

    1987-03-01

    The partial purification and characterization of cell wall polysaccharides isolated from suspension-cultured Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) cells are described. Extraction of isolated cell walls from 1.0 M LiCl solubilized pectic polysaccharides with glycosyl-linkage compositions similar to those of rhamnogalacturonans I and II, pectic polysaccharides isolated from walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. Treatment of LiCl-extracted Douglas fir walls with an endo-..cap alpha..-1,4-polygalacturonase released only small, additional amounts of pectic polysaccharide, which had a glycosyl-linkage composition similar to that of rhamnogalacturonan I. Xyloglucan oligosaccharides were released from the endo-..cap alpha..-1,4-polygalacturonase-treated walls by treatment with an endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase. These oligosaccharides included hepta- and nonasaccharides similar or identical to those released from sycamore cell walls by the same enzyme, and structurally related octa- and decasaccharides similar to those isolated from various angiosperms. Finally, additional xyloglucan and small amounts of xylan were extracted from the endo-..beta..-1,4-glucanase-treated walls by 0.5 N NaOH. The xylan resembled that extracted by NaOH from dicot cell walls in that it contained 2,4- but not 3,4-linked xylosyl residues. In this study, a total of 15% of the cell wall was isolated as pectic material, 10% as xyloglucan, and less than 1% as xylan. The noncellulosic polysaccharides accounted for 25% of the cell walls, cellulose for 23%, protein for 34%, and ash for 5%, for a total of 88% of the cell wall.

  17. Anti-metastatic effects of antrodan, the Antrodia cinnamomea mycelia glycoprotein, in lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fa, Kuan-Ning; Yang, Chih-Min; Chen, Pei-Chun; Lee, Yin-Ying; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the anti-metastatic effects of antrodan, the glycoprotein from Antrodia cinnamomea (AC) mycelia, through direct actions and indirect immunomodulatory effects in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC). Antrodan was isolated from AC mycelia by alkali extraction, acid precipitation, and purification using sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. In the direct anti-metastatic action, antrodan (30-70 μg/mL) was found to significantly inhibit invasion and migration of LLC cells, and these effects involved up-regulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, TIMP-2, and nm23-H1 protein expression leading to decreased activities and protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9. For testing the indirect immunomodulatory effect, antrodan was incubated for 3d with mononuclear cells (MNCs) isolated from human peripheral blood to obtain the condition medium (CM). Antrodan significantly increased interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-1β levels, but decreased TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 levels in the MMC-CM, which also significantly inhibited invasion, migration, and the activities and protein expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, but significantly increased protein expression of TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and nm23-H1 in LLC cells. The indirect immunomodulatory effect of antrodan was stronger than the direct anti-metastatic effect at the same concentrations (50 and 60 μg/mL). Overall, the results suggest the anti-metastatic potential of antrodan in LLC cells.

  18. Retargeting of Coronavirus by Substitution of the Spike Glycoprotein Ectodomain: Crossing the Host Cell Species Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Lili; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Raamsman, Martin J. B.; Masters, Paul S.; Rottier, Peter J. M.

    2000-01-01

    Coronaviruses generally have a narrow host range, infecting one or just a few species. Using targeted RNA recombination, we constructed a mutant of the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) in which the ectodomain of the spike glycoprotein (S) was replaced with the highly divergent ectodomain of the S protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus. The resulting chimeric virus, designated fMHV, acquired the ability to infect feline cells and simultaneously lost the ability to infect murine cells in tissue culture. This reciprocal switch of species specificity strongly supports the notion that coronavirus host cell range is determined primarily at the level of interactions between the S protein and the virus receptor. The isolation of fMHV allowed the localization of the region responsible for S protein incorporation into virions to the carboxy-terminal 64 of the 1,324 residues of this protein. This establishes a basis for further definition of elements involved in virion assembly. In addition, fMHV is potentially the ideal recipient virus for carrying out reverse genetics of MHV by targeted RNA recombination, since it presents the possibility of selecting recombinants, no matter how defective, that have regained the ability to replicate in murine cells. PMID:10627550

  19. P-glycoprotein inhibition of drug resistant cell lines by nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manu Smriti; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-01-01

    Several pharmaceutical excipients are known for their ability to interact with cell membrane lipids and reverse the phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer. Interestingly, many excipients act as stabilizers and are key ingredients in a variety of nano-formulations. In this study, representatives of ionic and non-ionic excipients were used as surface active agents in nanoparticle (NP) formulations to utilize their MDR reversing potential. In-vitro assays were performed to elucidate particle-cell interaction and accumulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates-rhodamine-123 and calcein AM, in highly drug resistant glioma cell lines. Chemosensitization achieved using NPs and their equivalent dose of free excipients was assessed with the co-administered anti-cancer drug doxorubicin. Among the excipients used, non-ionic surfactant, Cremophor® EL, and cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonuium bromide (CTAB), demonstrated highest P-gp modulatory activity in both free solution form (up to 7-fold lower IC50) and as a formulation (up to 4.7-fold lower IC50) as compared to doxorubicin treatment alone. Solutol® HS15 and Tween® 80 exhibited considerable chemosensitization as free solution but not when incorporated into a formulation. Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-based nanocarriers resulted in slightly improved cytotoxicity. Overall, the results highlight and envisage the usage of excipient in nano-formulations in a bid to improve chemosensitization of drug resistant cancer cells towards anti-cancer drugs.

  20. Comparative studies on glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type N-glycans in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yosuke; Yamada, Keita; Hara, Sayaka; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2012-11-01

    In the series of our previous reports, we showed that some cancer cell lines specifically express polylactosamine-type N-glycans and such glycans were often modified with fucose and sulfate residues. To confirm the proteins expressing these glycans, glycopeptide mixture obtained by digestion of whole protein fractions with trypsin was captured by a polylactosamine-specific lectin, Datura strasmonium agglutinin (DSA). And the peptides and glycans of the captured glycopeptides after digestion with N-glycoamidase F were extensively analyzed by HPLC and MS techniques. We found that some glycoproteins such as CD107a and CD107b commonly contained polylactosamine-type glycans in all the examined cancer cells. But integrin-α5 (CD49e) and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CD66e) having these glycans were specifically found in U937 (human T-lymphoma) and MKN45 (human gastric cancer) cells, respectively. These data clearly indicate that specific glycans attached to specific proteins will be promising markers for specific tumors with high accuracy. PMID:22795310

  1. Retargeting of coronavirus by substitution of the spike glycoprotein ectodomain: crossing the host cell species barrier.

    PubMed

    Kuo, L; Godeke, G J; Raamsman, M J; Masters, P S; Rottier, P J

    2000-02-01

    Coronaviruses generally have a narrow host range, infecting one or just a few species. Using targeted RNA recombination, we constructed a mutant of the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) in which the ectodomain of the spike glycoprotein (S) was replaced with the highly divergent ectodomain of the S protein of feline infectious peritonitis virus. The resulting chimeric virus, designated fMHV, acquired the ability to infect feline cells and simultaneously lost the ability to infect murine cells in tissue culture. This reciprocal switch of species specificity strongly supports the notion that coronavirus host cell range is determined primarily at the level of interactions between the S protein and the virus receptor. The isolation of fMHV allowed the localization of the region responsible for S protein incorporation into virions to the carboxy-terminal 64 of the 1,324 residues of this protein. This establishes a basis for further definition of elements involved in virion assembly. In addition, fMHV is potentially the ideal recipient virus for carrying out reverse genetics of MHV by targeted RNA recombination, since it presents the possibility of selecting recombinants, no matter how defective, that have regained the ability to replicate in murine cells.

  2. Host Cell P-glycoprotein Is Essential for Cholesterol Uptake and Replication of Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Bottova, Iveta; Hehl, Adrian B.; Štefanić, Saša; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Pieters, Jean; Sonda, Sabrina

    2009-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane-bound efflux pump that actively exports a wide range of compounds from the cell and is associated with the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. However, the role of P-gp in normal physiological processes remains elusive. Using P-gp-deficient fibroblasts, we showed that P-gp was critical for the replication of the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii but was not involved in invasion of host cells by the parasite. Importantly, we found that the protein participated in the transport of host-derived cholesterol to the intracellular parasite. T. gondii replication in P-gp-deficient host cells not only resulted in reduced cholesterol content in the parasite but also altered its sphingolipid metabolism. In addition, we found that different levels of P-gp expression modified the cholesterol metabolism in uninfected fibroblasts. Collectively our findings reveal a key and previously undocumented role of P-gp in host-parasite interaction and suggest a physiological role for P-gp in cholesterol trafficking in mammalian cells. PMID:19389707

  3. Host cell P-glycoprotein is essential for cholesterol uptake and replication of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bottova, Iveta; Hehl, Adrian B; Stefanić, Sasa; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Pieters, Jean; Sonda, Sabrina

    2009-06-26

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane-bound efflux pump that actively exports a wide range of compounds from the cell and is associated with the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. However, the role of P-gp in normal physiological processes remains elusive. Using P-gp-deficient fibroblasts, we showed that P-gp was critical for the replication of the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii but was not involved in invasion of host cells by the parasite. Importantly, we found that the protein participated in the transport of host-derived cholesterol to the intracellular parasite. T. gondii replication in P-gp-deficient host cells not only resulted in reduced cholesterol content in the parasite but also altered its sphingolipid metabolism. In addition, we found that different levels of P-gp expression modified the cholesterol metabolism in uninfected fibroblasts. Collectively our findings reveal a key and previously undocumented role of P-gp in host-parasite interaction and suggest a physiological role for P-gp in cholesterol trafficking in mammalian cells. PMID:19389707

  4. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells to hepatitis C virus recombinant envelope glycoprotein 2 protein exposure

    PubMed Central

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Rudnicki, Martina; Ferrer, Renila; da Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; da Costa, Paulo Inácio

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes approximately 10 different structural and non-structural proteins, including the envelope glycoprotein 2 (E2). HCV proteins, especially the envelope proteins, bind to cell receptors and can damage tissues. Endothelial inflammation is the most important determinant of fibrosis progression and, consequently, cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to two recombinant forms of the HCV E2 protein produced in different expression systems (Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris). We observed the induction of cell death and the production of nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated by the two recombinant E2 proteins. The E2-induced apoptosis of HUVECs was confirmed using the molecular marker PARP. The apoptosis rescue observed when the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was used suggests that reactive oxygen species are involved in E2-induced apoptosis. We propose that these proteins are involved in the chronic inflammation caused by HCV. PMID:25317702

  5. Multinet growth in the cell wall of Nitella.

    PubMed

    GREEN, P B

    1960-04-01

    Plant cell walls typically consist of crystalline microfibrils embedded in a non-crystalline matrix. The growing cylindrical Nitella cell wall contains microfibrils predominantly oriented in the transverse direction. The present study has shown that the transversely oriented microfibrils are primarily located toward the inner surface of the wall and that, proceeding outward from the inner surface, the wall contains microfibrils of ever poorer transverse orientation, the fibrils being randomly or axially arranged in the outermost regions of the wall. Because cell expansion is primarily in the axial direction, the texture of the fibrillar elements of the wall can be explained by assuming that new microfibrils of transverse orientation are added only at the inner surface of the wall and that they become passively reoriented to the axial direction during cell elongation. The described structure corresponds to that proposed by Roelofsen and Houwink for cells showing "multi-net growth." The demonstration of a continuous gradient of microfibrillar arrangement and its partial quantitative description was accomplished by the analysis, with the polarized light and interference microscopes, of wedge-like torn edges of developing cell walls which were 1 micron or less in optical thickness.

  6. The plant cell wall: a dynamic barrier against pathogen invasion.

    PubMed

    Underwood, William

    2012-01-01

    Prospective plant pathogens must overcome the physical barrier presented by the plant cell wall. In addition to being a preformed, passive barrier limiting access of pathogens to plant cells, the cell wall is actively remodeled and reinforced specifically at discrete sites of interaction with potentially pathogenic microbes. Active reinforcement of the cell wall through the deposition of cell wall appositions, referred to as papillae, is an early response to perception of numerous categories of pathogens including fungi and bacteria. Rapid deposition of papillae is generally correlated with resistance to fungal pathogens that attempt to penetrate plant cell walls for the establishment of feeding structures. Despite the ubiquity and apparent importance of this early defense response, relatively little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms and cellular processes involved in the targeting and assembly of papillae. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of cell wall-associated defenses induced by pathogen perception as well as the impact of changes in cell wall polymers on interactions with pathogens and highlights significant unanswered questions driving future research in the area.

  7. [Effect of cryptotanshinone on imatinib sensitivity and P-glycoprotein expression of chronic myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Ge, Yu-qing; Cheng, Ru-bin; Yang, Bo; Huang, Zhen; Chen, Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Cryptotanshinone (CPT), a lipid soluble active compound in Salvia miltiorrhiza, has a significant inhibitory effect on multiple malignant tumors, e. g. chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and can effectively enhance imatinib's chemotherapeutic effect. However, its functional molecular mechanism remained unclear. In this experiment, the authors conducted a systematic study on the effect of CPT on the imatinib sensitivity and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in CML cells by using CML cells K562 and imatinib persister K562-R. The MTT assays were performed to determine CPT's impact on the inhibitory effect of imatinib. Annexin V-FITC/PI staining analysis was used to detect the changes in the cell apoptosis rate. The active changes in apoptosis regulatory proteins Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PARP were determined by Western blot. After the cells were pretreated with the gradient concentration of CPT, the expression of P-gp was analyzed by Western blot and flow cytometry. The changes in intracellular concentrations of imatinib were determined by HPLC analysis. The results indicated that the pretreatment with CPT significantly increased the proliferation inhibiting and apoptosis inducing effects of imatinib on K562 and K562-R cells as well as the degradation product expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Caspase-3, Caspase-9 and PARP, with a significant difference with the control group (P < 0.01). However, CPT showed no impact on the P-gp expression in CML cells and the intracellular concentrations of imatinib. In summary, the findings suggested that CPT enhanced the sensitivity of CML cells to imatinib. Its mechanism is not dependent on the inhibition in P-gp expression and the increase in intracellular drug concentration. PMID:26591531

  8. A Fungal Endoglucanase with Plant Cell Wall Extension Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Sheng; Wu, Yajun; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    We have identified a wall hydrolytic enzyme from Trichoderma reesei with potent ability to induce extension of heat-inactivated type I cell walls. It is a small (23-kD) endo-1,4-β-glucanase (Cel12A) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 12. Extension of heat-inactivated walls from cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv Burpee Pickler) hypocotyls was induced by Cel12A after a distinct lag time and was accompanied by a large increase in wall plasticity and elasticity. Cel12A also increased the rate of stress relaxation of isolated walls at very short times (<200 ms; equivalent to reducing t0, a parameter that estimates the minimum relaxation time). Similar changes in wall plasticity and elasticity were observed in wheat (Triticum aestivum cv Pennmore Winter) coleoptile (type II) walls, which showed only a negligible extension in response to Cel12A treatment. Thus, Cel12A modifies both type I and II walls, but substantial extension is found only in type I walls. Cel12A has strong endo-glucanase activity against xyloglucan and (1→3,1→4)-β-glucan, but did not exhibit endo-xylanase, endo-mannase, or endo-galactanase activities. In terms of kinetics of action and effects on wall rheology, wall loosening by Cel12A differs qualitatively from the action by expansins, which induce wall extension by a non-hydrolytic polymer creep mechanism. The action by Cel12A mimics some of the changes in wall rheology found after auxin-induced growth. The strategy used here to identify Cel12A could be used to identify analogous plant enzymes that cause auxin-induced changes in cell wall rheology. PMID:11553760

  9. Fungal Cell Wall Septation and Cytokinesis Are Inhibited by Bleomycins

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Carol W.; McKoy, Judith; Del Valle, Robert; Armstrong, Donald; Bernard, Edward M.; Katz, Norman; Gordon, Ronald E.

    2003-01-01

    When the essential and distinctive cell walls of either pathogenic or nonpathogenic fungi break, cytoplasmic membranes rupture and fungi die. This fungicidal activity was discovered previously on nonproliferating Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells treated briefly with the oxidative tool and anticancer drug family of bleomycins. The present studies investigated effects of bleomycin on growing fungal organisms. These included the medically important Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans, as well as the emerging human pathogen and fungal model, S. cerevisiae. Bleomycin had its highest potency against A. fumigatus. Scanning electron microscopy and thin-section transmission electron microscopy were used to study morphological growth characteristics. Killing and growth inhibition were also measured. Long, thin, and segmented hyphae were observed when A. fumigatus was grown without bleomycin but were never observed when the mold was grown with the drug. Bleomycin arrested conidial germination, hyphal development, and the progression and completion of cell wall septation. Similarly, the drug inhibited the construction of yeast cell wall septa, preventing cytokinesis and progression in the cell division cycle of S. cerevisiae. Even when cytoplasms of mother and daughter cells separated, septation and cell division did not necessarily occur. Bizarre cell configurations, abnormally thickened cell walls at mother-daughter necks, abnormal polarized growth, large undivided cells, fragmented cells, and empty cell ghosts were also produced. This is the first report of a fungicidal agent that arrests fungal growth and development, septum formation, and cytokinesis and that also preferentially localizes to cell walls and alters isolated cell walls as well as intact cell walls on nongrowing cells. PMID:14506042

  10. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  11. A Multifaceted Study of Scedosporium boydii Cell Wall Changes during Germination and Identification of GPI-Anchored Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ghamrawi, Sarah; Gastebois, Amandine; Zykwinska, Agata; Vandeputte, Patrick; Marot, Agnès; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Cuenot, Stéphane; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Scedosporium boydii is a pathogenic filamentous fungus that causes a wide range of human infections, notably respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. The development of new therapeutic strategies targeting S. boydii necessitates a better understanding of the physiology of this fungus and the identification of new molecular targets. In this work, we studied the conidium-to-germ tube transition using a variety of techniques including scanning and transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, two-phase partitioning, microelectrophoresis and cationized ferritin labeling, chemical force spectroscopy, lectin labeling, and nanoLC-MS/MS for cell wall GPI-anchored protein analysis. We demonstrated that the cell wall undergoes structural changes with germination accompanied with a lower hydrophobicity, electrostatic charge and binding capacity to cationized ferritin. Changes during germination also included a higher accessibility of some cell wall polysaccharides to lectins and less CH3/CH3 interactions (hydrophobic adhesion forces mainly due to glycoproteins). We also extracted and identified 20 GPI-anchored proteins from the cell wall of S. boydii, among which one was detected only in the conidial wall extract and 12 only in the mycelial wall extract. The identified sequences belonged to protein families involved in virulence in other fungi like Gelp/Gasp, Crhp, Bglp/Bgtp families and a superoxide dismutase. These results highlighted the cell wall remodeling during germination in S. boydii with the identification of a substantial number of cell wall GPI-anchored conidial or hyphal specific proteins, which provides a basis to investigate the role of these molecules in the host-pathogen interaction and fungal virulence. PMID:26038837

  12. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression of functional bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein gIV in transfected bovine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tikoo, S K; Fitzpatrick, D R; Babiuk, L A; Zamb, T J

    1990-01-01

    The gene encoding bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) glycoprotein gIV was mapped, cloned, and sequenced. The gene is situated between map units 0.892 and 0.902 and encodes a predicted protein of 417 amino acids with a signal sequence cleavage site between amino acids 18 and 19. Comparison of the BHV-1 amino acid sequence with the homologous glycoproteins of other alphaherpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein gD, revealed significant homology in the amino-terminal half of the molecules, including six invariant cysteine residues. The identity of the open reading frame was verified by expression of the authentic recombinant BHV-1 gIV in bovine cells by using eucaryotic expression vectors pRSDneo (strong, constitutive promoter) and pMSG (weak, dexamethasone-inducible promoter). Constitutive expression of gIV proved toxic to cells, since stable cell lines could only be established when the gIV gene was placed under the control of an inducible promoter. Expression of gIV was cell associated and localized predominantly in the perinuclear region, although nuclear and plasma membrane staining was also observed. Radioimmunoprecipitation revealed that the recombinant glycoprotein was efficiently processed and had a molecular weight similar to that of the native form of gIV expressed in BHV-1-infected bovine cells. Recombinant gIV produced in the transfected bovine cells induced cell fusion, polykaryon formation, and nuclear fusion. In addition, expression of gIV interfered with BHV-1 replication in the transfected bovine cells. Images PMID:2168991

  13. p180, a novel recycling transmembrane glycoprotein with restricted cell type expression.

    PubMed Central

    Isacke, C M; van der Geer, P; Hunter, T; Trowbridge, I S

    1990-01-01

    A 180-kilodalton (kDa) protein (p180) was identified among the antigens for a panel of monoclonal antibodies raised against human fibroblast cell surface proteins. Binding studies with 125I-Fab' fragments of an anti-p180 monoclonal antibody demonstrated that 10 to 30% of p180 was located on the plasma membrane and that the remaining 70 to 90% was on intracellular membranes. p180 was rapidly internalized from the cell surface at 37 degrees C, and kinetic analyses indicated that this was a constitutive process followed by the recycling of p180 back to the plasma membrane. Morphological studies demonstrated that on the cell surface p180 was concentrated in coated pits, whereas inside the cell it was found in endosomes as suggested by its colocalization with the transferrin receptor. Immunoblot analysis with a polyclonal antiserum raised against purified human protein showed that p180 has a restricted distribution with expression at high levels in fibroblast cultures and in tissues containing cells of mesodermal origin. A biochemical characterization of p180 showed it to be a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain, which consists of approximately 30 kDa of complex oligosaccharides attached to at least 45 kDa of the protein core. The cytoplasmic domain of p180 was found to contain a serine residue(s) that was phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro by activated protein kinase C. p180 was purified by subjecting solubilized membrane proteins from a human osteosarcoma cell line to immunoaffinity chromatography and gel filtration. The N-terminal sequence information obtained from the purified protein showed no homology to other known proteins. It was concluded that p180 may be a novel recycling receptor which is highly restricted in its expression to fibroblastlike cells. Images PMID:2188094

  14. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Tourkova, Irina L; Witt, Michelle R; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J; Blair, Harry C

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone-formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express FSH-R, to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1-3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short-term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones.

  15. Temozolomide competes for P-glycoprotein and contributes to chemoresistance in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Jessian L; Walker, Nykia D; Scotto, Kathleen W; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2015-10-10

    Chemotherapeutic resistance can occur by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a 12-transmembrane ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. Glioblastoma (GBM) has poor survival rate and uniformly acquired chemoresistance to its frontline agent, Temozolomide (TMZ). Despite much effort, overcoming TMZ resistance remains a challenge. We reported on autonomous induction of TMZ resistance by increased transcription MDR1, the gene for P-gp. This study investigated how P-gp and TMZ interact to gain resistance. Using an experimental model of Adriamycin-resistant DC3F cells (DC3F/Adx), we showed that increased P-gp caused TMZ resistance. Increasing concentrations of TMZ competed with Calcein for P-gp, resulting in reduced efflux in the DC3F/Adx cells. Three different inhibitors of P-gp reversed the resistance to TMZ in two different GBM cell lines, by increasing active Caspase 3. Molecular modeling predicted the binding sites to be the intracellular region of P-gp and also identified specific amino acids and kinetics of energy for the efflux of TMZ. Taken together, we confirmed P-gp targeting of TMZ, a crucial regulator of TMZ resistance in GBM. This study provides insights on the effectiveness by which TMZ competes with other P-gp substrates, thereby opening the door for combined targeted therapies.

  16. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  17. The inhibitory and combinative mechanism of HZ08 with P-glycoprotein expressed on the membrane of Caco-2 cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Yahui; Feng, Yidong; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Fang, Weirong; Li, Yunman; Huang, Wenlong

    2014-01-15

    Recently, the research and development of agents to reverse the phenomenon of multidrug resistance has been an attractive goal as well as a key approach to elevating the clinical survival of cancer patients. Although three generations of P-glycoprotein modulators have been identified, poor clearance and metabolism render these agents too toxic to be used in clinical application. HZ08, which has been under investigation for several years, shows a dramatic reversal effect with low cytotoxicity. For the first time, we aimed to describe the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cell line in which P-glycoprotein is overexpressed naturally. Cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance reversal assays, together with flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and siRNA interference as well as Caco-2 monolayer transport model were employed in this study to evaluate the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein. This study revealed that HZ08 was capable of reversing adriamycin resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein as a result of intracellular enhancement of adriamycin accumulation, which was found to be superior to verapamil. In addition, we confirmed that HZ08 suppressed the transport of Rhodamine123 in the Caco-2 monolayer model but had little effect on P-glycoprotein expression. The transport of HZ08 was diminished by P-glycoprotein inhibitors (verapamil and LY335979) and its accumulation was increased via siRNA targeting MDR1 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, considering the binding site of P-glycoprotein, verapamil performed as a competitive inhibitor with HZ08. In conclusion, as a P-glycoprotein substrate, HZ08 inhibited P-glycoprotein activity and may share the same binding site of verapamil to P-glycoprotein.

  18. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP) expression on T cells and on a natural-killer-cell sub-population.

    PubMed

    Moller, M J; Kammerer, R; Grunert, F; von Kleist, S

    1996-03-15

    Human T and natural-killer (NK) cells, that are thought to be the major cytotoxic effector-cell populations in the defence against neoplastic cells, were isolated from blood and decidua in order to analyze their expression of carcinoembronic-antigen-(CEA)-family-member proteins. Biliary glycoprotein (BGP,CD66a) was the only member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family detected. While freshly isolated T-cells expressed low amounts of BGP, freshly isolated NK cells were negative. After in vitro stimulation for 3 days, T cells up-regulated their BGP expression and a sub-group of NK cells (CD16- CD56+), known to predominate in decidua revealed de novo expression of BGP. In contrast, stimulated CD16+ CD56+ NK cells, which occur exclusively in the blood, remained negative. The expression of BGP could be shown on the protein level by using a panel of 12 well-defined MAbs and on the transcription level in rt-PCR and subsequent oligonucleotide hybridization. Interestingly, rIL-2-stimulated T cells expressed 3-fold higher levels of BGP compared with those seen after stimulation with phytohemagglutinin (PHA). PHA, on the other hand, induced a higher expression of HLA-DR, an activation marker of T cells. The differential regulation implies a distinct function of BGP and HLA-DR.

  19. Vincristine-induced overexpression of P-glycoprotein in L1210 cells is associated with remodeling of cell surface saccharides.

    PubMed

    Sulová, Zdenka; Mislovicová, Danica; Gibalová, Lenka; Vajcnerová, Zuzana; Poláková, Eva; Uhrík, Branislav; Tylková, Lucia; Kovarova, Annámaria; Sedlák, Ján; Breier, Albert

    2009-02-01

    Multidrug resistance of murine leukemic cell line L1210/VCR (R), obtained by adaptation of parental L1210 cells (S) on vincristine, is associated with overexpression of P glycoprotein (P-gp, the ATP-dependent drug efflux pump). Previously, we found that cytochemical staining of negatively charged cell surface binding sites (probably sialic acid) by ruthenium red (RR) revealed a compact layer of RR bound to the external coat of S cells. This is in contrast to R cells and L1210/VCR cells cultured in the presence of vincristine during the last cultivation prior to the experiment (V cells), where the RR layer was either reduced or absent. In the current paper, we observed differences in the interactions of S, R and V cells with Concanavalin A (ConA) and tomato lectin (lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, LEA). ConA bound and induced cell damage more effectively in S cells than in R or V cells. Both of these effects could be prevented by methyl-manopyranose, but not by N-acetylglucosamine. In contrast, LEA lectin preferentially bound to R and V cells. While LEA agglutinated cells more effectively than ConA, it did not cause cell damage comparable to ConA. Binding of LEA to the cell surface could be prevented by chitooligosaccharides. Both LEA and ConA failed to identify P-gp in lectin blots. Thus, changes in ConA and LEA interactions are not caused by massive expression of P-gp in the plasma membrane and the consequent exposure of the inner saccharides to the external side of the plasma membrane.Taken together, the above facts suggest that S cells differ from R and V cells in the composition of cell surface glycosides not directly linked to P-gp.

  20. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation.

  1. Murine cell surface glycoproteins. Characterization of a major component of 80,000 daltons as a polymorphic differentiation antigen of mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Hughes, E N; Mengod, G; August, J T

    1981-07-10

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with NIH/3T3 cell surface antigens were obtained from hybridomas of murine myeloma cells fused to spleen cells of rats immunized with NIH/3T3 cell plasma membranes. Four of the antibodies, of forty that have been studied, appeared to react with allospecific antigenic determinants: they bound to NIH/3T3 cells but not to BALB/ 3T3 cells. Each of these four antibodies immunoprecipitated a glycoprotein of about 80,000 daltons that migrated to an isoelectric point of about pH 5.0. Polypeptides of identical molecular weight and isoelectric points, and yielding the same proteolytic cleavage fragments, were present in BALB/3T3 cells, but were not antigenically reactive. The 80,000-dalton glycoprotein was a major constituent of the plasma membrane. It was a predominant lactoperoxidase iodinated component of intact NIH/3T3 cells, and saturation binding of 125I-labeled antibody indicated that there were about 10(6) antigenic sites/cell. Studies of the distribution of the immunoreactive glycoprotein among different strains of mice confirmed the polymorphic expression of the determinant: Spleen cells of BALB/c, DBA/1, DBA/2, and CBA mice did not bind anti-80,000-dalton glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies, whereas spleen cells of a large number of other strains of mice were positive for antibody-binding. The antigenic reactivity varied markedly among different cell lines and was greatest with the NIH/3T3 mouse embryo fibroblast, G8-1 Swiss Webster myoblast, and IC-21 SV40-transformed C57BL/6 mouse peritoneal macrophage. The properties of the 80,000-dalton glycoprotein characterized this molecule as a new cell surface differentiation alloantigen of murine mesenchymal cells. PMID:6787057

  2. Dynamic microtubules and the texture of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Clive

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between microtubules and cell-wall texture has had a fitful history in which progress in one area has not been matched by progress in the other. For example, the idea that wall texture arises entirely from self-assembly, independently of microtubules, originated with electron microscopic analyses of fixed cells that gave no clue to the ability of microtubules to reorganize. Since then, live-cell studies have established the surprising dynamicity of plant microtubules involving collisions, changes in angle, parallelization, and rotation of microtubule tracks. Combined with proof that cellulose synthases do track along shifting microtubules, this offers more realistic models for the dynamic influence of microtubules on wall texture than could have been imagined in the electron microscopic era-the era from which most ideas on wall texture originate. This review revisits the classical literature on wall organization from the vantage point of current knowledge of microtubule dynamics.

  3. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable or even understandable ways.

  4. Plant expansins: diversity and interactions with plant cell walls

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Expansins were discovered two decades ago as cell wall proteins that mediate acid-induced growth by catalyzing loosening of plant cell walls without lysis of wall polymers. In the interim our understanding of expansins has gotten more complex through bioinformatic analysis of expansin distribution and evolution, as well as through expression analysis, dissection of the upstream transcription factors regulating expression, and identification of additional classes of expansin by sequence and structural similarities. Molecular analyses of expansins from bacteria have identified residues essential for wall loosening activity and clarified the bifunctional nature of expansin binding to complex cell walls. Transgenic modulation of expansin expression modifies growth and stress physiology of plants, but not always in predictable and even understandable ways. PMID:26057089

  5. Modulation of P-glycoprotein function and multidrug resistance in cancer cells by Thai plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Takano, M; Kakizoe, S; Kawami, M; Nagai, J; Patanasethnont, D; Sripanidkulchai, B; Yumoto, R

    2014-11-01

    The effects of ethanol extracts from Thai plants belonging to the families of Annonaceae, Rutaceae, and Zingiberaceae on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) function and multidrug resistance were examined in paclitaxel-resistant HepG2 (PR-HepG2) cells. All the extracts tested, significantly increased the accumulation of [3H]paclitaxel, a P-gp substrate, in the cells. Among nine extracts, Z01 and Z02, extracts from Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata (Zingiberaceae family), respectively, potently increased the accumulation. In addition, Z01 and Z02 increased the accumulation of other P-gp substrates, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, in PR-HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Increased accumulation of rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin by Z01 and Z02 was also confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The effect of Z01 and Z02 pretreatment on the expression of MDR1 mRNA was also examined. The expression of MDR1 mRNA was not affected by the treatment of PR-HepG2 cells with these extracts for 48 hours. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel was examined by XTT and protein assays in the absence and presence of Z02. Z02 potentiated the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in PR-HepG2 cells. These results suggest that Curcuma comosa and Kaempferia marginata belonging to Zingiberaceae are useful sources to search for new P-gp modulator(s) that can be used to overcome multidrug resistance of cancer cells.

  6. Measurement of pectin methylation in plant cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    McFeeters, R.F.; Armstrong, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure was developed to measure the degree of pectin methylation in small samples of isolated cell walls from nonlignified plant tissues or pectin solutions. Galacturonic acid was determined colorimetrically with the 3,5-dimethylphenol reagent. Methylation was measured by base hydrolysis of galacturonic acid methyl esters, followed by gas chromatographic determination of released methanol. Estimates of the precision of analysis of pectin and cell wall samples were made. The coefficient of variation for estimates of the pectin esterification in cell walls isolated from 10-g samples of cucumber tissue ranged from 7.7 to 13.2%.

  7. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  8. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Hyacinthe Le; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions. PMID:27135320

  9. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Hyacinthe; Philippe, Florian; Domon, Jean-Marc; Gillet, Françoise; Pelloux, Jérôme; Rayon, Catherine

    2015-02-16

    This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic), transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i) an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH) and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii) an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  10. An Arabidopsis Gene Regulatory Network for Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Teeples, M; Lin, L; de Lucas, M; Turco, G; Toal, TW; Gaudinier, A; Young, NF; Trabucco, GM; Veling, MT; Lamothe, R; Handakumbura, PP; Xiong, G; Wang, C; Corwin, J; Tsoukalas, A; Zhang, L; Ware, D; Pauly, M; Kliebenstein, DJ; Dehesh, K; Tagkopoulos, I; Breton, G; Pruneda-Paz, JL; Ahnert, SE; Kay, SA; Hazen, SP; Brady, SM

    2014-01-01

    Summary The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here, we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component. PMID:25533953

  11. Functional and structural characterization of P40, a mouse glycoprotein with T-cell growth factor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Uyttenhove, C; Simpson, R J; Van Snick, J

    1988-01-01

    Antigen-independent cell lines were derived from mouse helper T-cell clones by culture in autologous supernatant obtained after stimulation with concanavalin A. A factor, termed P40, supporting the growth of these lines was purified and characterized as a basic 32- to 39-kDa single-chain glycoprotein functionally distinct from previously identified T-cell growth factors and apparently unrelated structurally to any known protein. Of a number of cell lines, only helper T cells responded to P40, and this response was not mediated by either interleukin 2 or interleukin 4. Images PMID:3137580

  12. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  13. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  14. The inhibitory and combinative mechanism of HZ08 with P-glycoprotein expressed on the membrane of Caco-2 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Yahui; Feng, Yidong; Kodithuwakku, Nandani Darshika; Fang, Weirong; Li, Yunman; Huang, Wenlong

    2014-01-15

    Recently, the research and development of agents to reverse the phenomenon of multidrug resistance has been an attractive goal as well as a key approach to elevating the clinical survival of cancer patients. Although three generations of P-glycoprotein modulators have been identified, poor clearance and metabolism render these agents too toxic to be used in clinical application. HZ08, which has been under investigation for several years, shows a dramatic reversal effect with low cytotoxicity. For the first time, we aimed to describe the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein in Caco-2 cell line in which P-glycoprotein is overexpressed naturally. Cytotoxicity and multidrug resistance reversal assays, together with flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy and siRNA interference as well as Caco-2 monolayer transport model were employed in this study to evaluate the interaction between HZ08 and P-glycoprotein. This study revealed that HZ08 was capable of reversing adriamycin resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein as a result of intracellular enhancement of adriamycin accumulation, which was found to be superior to verapamil. In addition, we confirmed that HZ08 suppressed the transport of Rhodamine123 in the Caco-2 monolayer model but had little effect on P-glycoprotein expression. The transport of HZ08 was diminished by P-glycoprotein inhibitors (verapamil and LY335979) and its accumulation was increased via siRNA targeting MDR1 in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, considering the binding site of P-glycoprotein, verapamil performed as a competitive inhibitor with HZ08. In conclusion, as a P-glycoprotein substrate, HZ08 inhibited P-glycoprotein activity and may share the same binding site of verapamil to P-glycoprotein. - Highlights: • The cytotoxicity and reversing effect of HZ08 was measured in Caco-2 cell line. • HZ08 inhibited the transport of Rhodamine123 across Caco-2 cell monolayer. • The efflux ratio of HZ08 was dropped when combined with P-glycoprotein

  15. Arabinogalactan protein-rich cell walls, paramural deposits and ergastic globules define the hyaline bodies of rhinanthoid Orobanchaceae haustoria

    PubMed Central

    Pielach, Anna; Leroux, Olivier; Domozych, David S.; Knox, J. Paul; Popper, Zoë A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Parasitic plants obtain nutrients from their hosts through organs called haustoria. The hyaline body is a specialized parenchymatous tissue occupying the central parts of haustoria in many Orobanchaceae species. The structure and functions of hyaline bodies are poorly understood despite their apparent necessity for the proper functioning of haustoria. Reported here is a cell wall-focused immunohistochemical study of the hyaline bodies of three species from the ecologically important clade of rhinanthoid Orobanchaceae. Methods Haustoria collected from laboratory-grown and field-collected plants of Rhinanthus minor, Odontites vernus and Melampyrum pratense attached to various hosts were immunolabelled for cell wall matrix glycans and glycoproteins using specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Key Results Hyaline body cell wall architecture differed from that of the surrounding parenchyma in all species investigated. Enrichment in arabinogalactan protein (AGP) epitopes labelled with mAbs LM2, JIM8, JIM13, JIM14 and CCRC-M7 was prominent and coincided with reduced labelling of de-esterified homogalacturonan with mAbs JIM5, LM18 and LM19. Furthermore, paramural bodies, intercellular deposits and globular ergastic bodies composed of pectins, xyloglucans, extensins and AGPs were common. In Rhinanthus they were particularly abundant in pairings with legume hosts. Hyaline body cells were not in direct contact with haustorial xylem, which was surrounded by a single layer of paratracheal parenchyma with thickened cell walls abutting the xylem. Conclusions The distinctive anatomy and cell wall architecture indicate hyaline body specialization. Altered proportions of AGPs and pectins may affect the mechanical properties of hyaline body cell walls. This and the association with a transfer-like type of paratracheal parenchyma suggest a role in nutrient translocation. Organelle-rich protoplasts and the presence of exceptionally profuse intra- and intercellular

  16. Structural characteristics of developing Nitella internodal cell walls.

    PubMed

    GREEN, P B

    1958-09-25

    The Nilella intermodal cell is formed by a division of the segment cell, the latter being a direct derivative of the shoot apical cell. The internodal cell is remarkable in that it elongates from an initial length of about 20 microns to a mature length of about 60 millimeters. The structures of the apical and segment cells, and the internodal cells in all stages of development were examined with the techniques of interference, polarization, and electron microscopy. The apical and segment cells were found to be isotropic. The upper part of the segment cell, destined to form a node, shows a curious pitted structure that was characteristic of certain node structures. The lower part of the segment cell, destined to become an internodal cell, shows a vague transverse arrangement of fibrils at the inner wall surface. The internodal cells, from the time they are first formed, show negative birefringence and a transverse arrangement of microfibrils at the inner wall surface. The elongation of the internodal cell is characterized by a rise, dip, and rise in both the optical thickness and retardation of the cell wall. The dip in both these variables coincides with the attainment of the maximum relative elongation rate. After the cessation of elongation, wall deposition continues, but the fibrils at .the inner surface of the wall are now seen to occur in fields of nearly parallel microfibrils. These fields, with varying fibrillar directions, may partly overlap each other or may merge with one another. Unlike the growing wall, this wall which is deposited after the end of elongation is isotropic.

  17. Bovine herpesvirus type 1 glycoprotein C expression in MDBK cells and its reactivity in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P K; Saini, M; Bandyopadhyay, S K; Garg, S K

    1998-12-01

    Glycoprotein C (gC) of bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1) is a major viral glycoprotein expressed at high level on the surface of infected cells and on the virion envelope. This glycoprotein is also a major target of immune response at both humoral and cellular levels. The plasmid pRSV-gC having complete coding gene for BHV-1 gC was transfected into MDBK cells and the expression of gC in these cells was detected by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblot analysis. Transcription of the gC gene was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) of total RNA isolated from transfected cells. MDBK cells expressing BHV-1 gC were used as antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of antibodies against BHV-1 in field sera. The results were found comparable (92.44%) with those obtained with BHV-1 purified antigen.

  18. A tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein accompanying p53 overexpression and higher growth potential for gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Kakeji, Y.; Endo, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    Tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein is associated with tumour progression in gastric cancer. We investigated the biological significance of tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein, determined by the binding of Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), with regard to survival time and to the malignant potential of cancer cells in serosally invasive gastric cancer in 119 patients. HPA was positively stained in 75 of 119 patients (63.0%) with gastric cancer with serosal invasion. In patients with HPA-positive tissue, the tumour was larger than in HPA-negative cases and was frequently located in the middle third of the stomach. The incidence of lymph node metastasis was higher than in patients with HPA-negative tissue. There were no differences between the cases staining negatively and positively with HPA with respect to the other factors examined. Gastric cancer tissues with HPA-positive staining revealed a higher positive rate of abnormal p53 staining and a higher concentration of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labelling. The survival time of the patients with HPA positive staining was shorter than for those whose tissues were HPA negative. Thus, tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein is apparently closely related to the malignant potential of serosally invasive gastric cancer. PMID:7537520

  19. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    PubMed

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  20. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Jean-Claude; Leroux, Christelle; Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed. PMID:27137369

  1. Contribution of mdr1b-type P-glycoprotein to okadaic acid resistance in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ritz, V; Marwitz, J; Sieder, S; Ziemann, C; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Quentin, I; Steinfelder, H J

    1999-08-01

    Okadaic acid as well as other, structurally different, inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A induce apoptosis in pituitary GH3 cells. Incubation with stepwise raised concentrations of okadaic acid resulted in the isolation of cells that were increasingly less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of this agent. After about 18 months cells were selected that survived at 300 nM okadaic acid, which is about 30 times the initially lethal concentration. This study revealed that a major pharmacokinetic mechanism underlying cell survival was the development of a P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The increase in mRNA levels of the mdr1b P-glycoprotein isoform correlated with the extent of drug resistance. Functional assays revealed that increasing drug resistance was paralleled by a decreased accumulation of rhodamine 123, a fluorescent dye which is a substrate of mdr1-mediated efflux activity. Resistance could be abolished by structurally different chemosensitizers of P-glycoprotein function like verapamil and reserpine but not by the leukotriene receptor antagonist MK571 which is a modulator of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). Okadaic acid resistance included cross-resistance to other cytotoxic agents that are substrates of mdr1-type P-glycoproteins, like doxorubicin and actinomycin D, but not to non-substrates of mdr1, e.g. cytosine arabinoside. Thus, functional as well as biochemical features support the conclusion that okadaic acid is a substrate of the mdr1-mediated efflux activity in rat pituitary GH3 cells. Maintenance of resistance after withdrawal of okadaic acid as well as metaphase spreads of 100 nM okadaic acid-resistant cells suggested a stable MDR genotype without indications for the occurrence of extrachromosomal amplifications, e.g. double minute chromosomes.

  2. Machupo Virus Glycoprotein Determinants for Human Transferrin Receptor 1 Binding and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Longobardi, Lindsay E.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Retterer, Cary; Dong, Lian; Clester, Jeremiah C.; Kota, Krishna; Carra, John; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). TfR1 residues essential for this interaction have been described, and a co-crystal of MACV GP1 bound to TfR1 suggests GP1 residues important for this association. We created MACV GP1 variants and tested their effect on TfR1 binding and virus entry to evaluate the functional significance of some of these and additional residues in human and simian cells. We found residues R111, D123, Y122, and F226 to be essential, D155, and P160 important, and D114, S116, D140, and K169 expendable for the GP1-TfR1 interaction and MACV entry. Several MACV GP1 residues that are critical for the interaction with TfR1 are conserved among other New World arenaviruses, indicating a common basis of receptor interaction. Our findings also open avenues for the rational development of viral entry inhibitors. PMID:21750710

  3. Cell Surface Glycoprotein of Reactive Stromal Fibroblasts as a Potential Antibody Target in Human Epithelial Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garin-Chesa, Pilar; Old, Lloyd J.; Rettig, Wolfgang J.

    1990-09-01

    The F19 antigen is a cell surface glycoprotein (M_r, 95,000) of human sarcomas and proliferating, cultured fibroblasts that is absent from resting fibroblasts in normal adult tissues. Normal and malignant epithelial cells are also F19^-. The present immunohistochemical study describes induction of F19 in the reactive mesenchyme of epithelial tumors. F19^+ fibroblasts were found in primary and metastatic carcinomas, including colorectal (18 of 18 cases studied), breast (14/14), ovarian (21/21), bladder (9/10), and lung carcinomas (13/13). In contrast, the stroma of benign colorectal adenomas, fibrocystic disease and fibroadenomas of breast, benign prostate hyperplasia, in situ bladder carcinomas, and benign ovarian tumors showed no or only moderate numbers of F19^+ fibroblasts. Analysis of dermal incision wounds revealed that F19 is strongly induced during scar formation. Comparison of F19 with the extracellular matrix protein tenascin, a putative marker of tumor mesenchyme, showed a cellular staining pattern for F19 vs. the extracellular matrix pattern for tenascin and widespread expression of tenascin in F19^- normal tissues and benign tumors. Our results suggest that the F19^+ phenotype correlates with specialized fibroblast functions in wound healing and malignant tumor growth. Because of its abundance in tumor mesenchyme, F19 may serve as a target for antibodies labeled with radioisotopes or toxic agents, or inflammatogenic antibodies, in carcinoma patients.

  4. Machupo virus glycoprotein determinants for human transferrin receptor 1 binding and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Longobardi, Lindsay E; Kuhn, Jens H; Retterer, Cary; Dong, Lian; Clester, Jeremiah C; Kota, Krishna; Carra, John; Bavari, Sina

    2011-01-01

    Machupo virus (MACV) is a highly pathogenic New World arenavirus that causes hemorrhagic fever in humans. MACV, as well as other pathogenic New World arenaviruses, enter cells after their GP1 attachment glycoprotein binds to their cellular receptor, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1). TfR1 residues essential for this interaction have been described, and a co-crystal of MACV GP1 bound to TfR1 suggests GP1 residues important for this association. We created MACV GP1 variants and tested their effect on TfR1 binding and virus entry to evaluate the functional significance of some of these and additional residues in human and simian cells. We found residues R111, D123, Y122, and F226 to be essential, D155, and P160 important, and D114, S116, D140, and K169 expendable for the GP1-TfR1 interaction and MACV entry. Several MACV GP1 residues that are critical for the interaction with TfR1 are conserved among other New World arenaviruses, indicating a common basis of receptor interaction. Our findings also open avenues for the rational development of viral entry inhibitors.

  5. P-glycoprotein-dependent resistance of cancer cells toward the extrinsic TRAIL apoptosis signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Galski, Hanan; Oved-Gelber, Tamar; Simanovsky, Masha; Lazarovici, Philip; Gottesman, Michael M; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-09-01

    The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL or Apo2L) preferentially cause apoptosis of malignant cells in vitro and in vivo without severe toxicity. Therefore, TRAIL or agonist antibodies to the TRAIL DR4 and DR5 receptors are used in cancer therapy. However, many malignant cells are intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to TRAIL. It has been previously proposed that the multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) might play a role in resistance of cells to intrinsic apoptotic pathways by interfering with components of ceramide metabolism or by modulating the electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In this study we investigated whether Pgp also confers resistance toward extrinsic death ligands of the TNF family. To this end we focused our study on HeLa cells carrying a tetracycline-repressible plasmid system which shuts down Pgp expression in the presence of tetracycline. Our findings demonstrate that expression of Pgp is a significant factor conferring resistance to TRAIL administration, but not to other death ligands such as TNF-α and Fas ligand. Moreover, blocking Pgp transport activity sensitizes the malignant cells toward TRAIL. Therefore, Pgp transport function is required to confer resistance to TRAIL. Although the resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis is Pgp specific, TRAIL itself is not a direct substrate of Pgp. Pgp expression has no effect on the level of the TRAIL receptors DR4 and DR5. These findings might have clinical implications since the combination of TRAIL therapy with administration of Pgp modulators might sensitize TRAIL resistant tumors. PMID:23774624

  6. ZPDC glycoprotein (24 kDa) induces apoptosis and enhances activity of NK cells in N-nitrosodiethylamine-injected Balb/c.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have anti-tumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using secreting granules and cytotoxic ability. Recently, we isolated glycoprotein from Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) has anti-oxidant effect and anti-cancer effect. The objective of this study was to determine whether ZPDC glycoprotein enhances activity of NK cells and induces apoptosis of liver cancer cells in diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-treated Balb/c mice. This study evaluated the secreting of perforin and granzyme B and cytotoxicity of NK cells, interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-12, apoptosis-related factors (bid, cytochrome c, and caspase-3) in liver tissue using Immunoblot and ELISA. The results demonstrated that ZPDC glycoprotein (20mg/kg, BW) induces secretion of perforin and granzyme B and NK cells activity. Also, it induces expression of apoptosis-related factors (bid, cytochrome c, and caspase-3) in liver tissues. Collectively, ZPDC glycoprotein may have potential applications to prevent hepatocarcinogenesis without immunosuppression.

  7. Revertant analysis of a temperature-sensitive mutant of Newcastle disease virus with defective glycoproteins: implication of the fusion glycoprotein in cell killing and isolation of a neuraminidase-deficient hemagglutinating virus.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G W; Hightower, L E

    1982-01-01

    Biological and molecular properties of a temperature-sensitive mutant (C1) of Newcastle disease virus and its revertants were analyzed. C1 exhibited three temperature-sensitive alterations (plaque formation, virion assembly, and cytopathogenicity) and several defects which were also present at the permissive temperature. C1 virions contained low amounts of hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycopeptides and consequently were deficient in hemagglutinating and neuraminidase activities. These virions also contained defective fusion glycoproteins which rendered them poorly hemolytic and slow to penetrate cultured chicken embryo cells. The biological activities of the membrane glycoproteins were recovered sequentially in a series of plaque-forming revertants. The coreversion of hemolysis, membrane-penetrating activities, and cytopathogenicity in the first-step revertant (S1) suggested that fusion glycoproteins were major contributors to cellular destruction. This revertant also provided evidence of a role for fusion glycoproteins in virion assembly. From S1 we isolated a large-plaque-forming revertant (L1) that assembled wild-type amounts of biologically active hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoproteins into virions. Although it was normal for hemagglutination, L1 had less than 3% of the neuraminidase activity of the wild type, demonstrating that these two activities can be uncoupled genetically. The neuraminidase deficiency of L1 did not impair its virulence in ovo or its reproduction in cultured cells. PMID:6896347

  8. A formin-nucleated actin aster concentrates cell wall hydrolases for cell fusion in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Dudin, Omaya; Bendezú, Felipe O.; Groux, Raphael; Laroche, Thierry; Seitz, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Cell–cell fusion is essential for fertilization. For fusion of walled cells, the cell wall must be degraded at a precise location but maintained in surrounding regions to protect against lysis. In fission yeast cells, the formin Fus1, which nucleates linear actin filaments, is essential for this process. In this paper, we show that this formin organizes a specific actin structure—the actin fusion focus. Structured illumination microscopy and live-cell imaging of Fus1, actin, and type V myosins revealed an aster of actin filaments whose barbed ends are focalized near the plasma membrane. Focalization requires Fus1 and type V myosins and happens asynchronously always in the M cell first. Type V myosins are essential for fusion and concentrate cell wall hydrolases, but not cell wall synthases, at the fusion focus. Thus, the fusion focus focalizes cell wall dissolution within a broader cell wall synthesis zone to shift from cell growth to cell fusion. PMID:25825517

  9. Co-amplification of double minute chromosomes, multiple drug resistance, and cell surface P-glycoprotein in DNA-mediated transformants of mouse cells.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, S M; Ling, V; Stanners, C P

    1984-01-01

    A genetic system comprised of mammalian cell mutants which demonstrate concomitant resistance to a number of unrelated drugs has been described previously. The resistance is due to reduced cell membrane permeability and is correlated with the presence of large amounts of a plasma membrane glycoprotein termed P-glycoprotein. This system could represent a model for multiple drug resistance which develops in cancer patients treated with chemotherapeutic drugs. We demonstrate here that the multiple drug resistance phenotype can be transferred to mouse cells with DNA from a drug-resistant mutant and then amplified quantitatively by culture in media containing increasing concentrations of drug. The amount of P-glycoprotein was correlated directly with the degree of drug resistance in the transformants and amplified transformants. In addition, the drug resistance and expression of P-glycoprotein of the transformants were unstable and associated quantitatively with the number of double minute chromosomes. We suggest that the gene for multiple drug resistance and P-glycoprotein is contained in these extrachromosomal particles and is amplified by increases in double minute chromosome number. The potential use of this system for manipulation of mammalian genes in general is discussed. Images PMID:6144041

  10. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    PubMed

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products. PMID:27451197

  11. Plant cell wall characterization using scanning probe microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Yarbrough, John M; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2009-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is today considered a promising renewable resource for bioenergy production. A combined chemical and biological process is currently under consideration for the conversion of polysaccharides from plant cell wall materials, mainly cellulose and hemicelluloses, to simple sugars that can be fermented to biofuels. Native plant cellulose forms nanometer-scale microfibrils that are embedded in a polymeric network of hemicelluloses, pectins, and lignins; this explains, in part, the recalcitrance of biomass to deconstruction. The chemical and structural characteristics of these plant cell wall constituents remain largely unknown today. Scanning probe microscopy techniques, particularly atomic force microscopy and its application in characterizing plant cell wall structure, are reviewed here. We also further discuss future developments based on scanning probe microscopy techniques that combine linear and nonlinear optical techniques to characterize plant cell wall nanometer-scale structures, specifically apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. PMID:19703302

  12. Modification of cell wall polysaccharides during retting of cassava roots.

    PubMed

    Ngolong Ngea, Guillaume Legrand; Guillon, Fabienne; Essia Ngang, Jean Justin; Bonnin, Estelle; Bouchet, Brigitte; Saulnier, Luc

    2016-12-15

    Retting is an important step in traditional cassava processing that involves tissue softening of the roots to transform the cassava into flour and various food products. The tissue softening that occurs during retting was attributed to the degradation of cell wall pectins through the action of pectin-methylesterase and pectate-lyase that possibly originated from a microbial source or the cassava plant itself. Changes in cell wall composition were investigated during retting using chemical analysis, specific glycanase degradation and immuno-labelling of cell wall polysaccharides. Pectic 1,4-β-d-galactan was the main cell wall polysaccharide affected during the retting of cassava roots. This result suggested that better control of pectic galactan degradation and a better understanding of the degradation mechanism by endogenous endo-galactanase and/or exogenous microbial enzymes might contribute to improve the texture properties of cassava products.

  13. A versatile strategy for grafting polymers to wood cell walls.

    PubMed

    Keplinger, T; Cabane, E; Chanana, M; Hass, P; Merk, V; Gierlinger, N; Burgert, I

    2015-01-01

    The hierarchical structure of wood is composed of a cellulose skeleton of high structural order at various length scales. At the nanoscale and microscale the specific structural features of the cells and cell walls result in a lightweight structure with an anisotropic material profile of excellent mechanical performance. By being able to specifically functionalize wood at the level of cell and cell walls one can insert new properties and inevitably upscale them along the intrinsic hierarchical structure, to a level of large-scale engineering materials applications. For this purpose, however, precise control of the spatial distribution of the modifying substances in the complex wood structure is needed. Here we demonstrate a method to insert methacryl groups into wood cell walls using two different chemistry routes. By using these methacryl groups as the anchor points for grafting, various polymers can be inserted into the wood structure. Strikingly, depending on the methacryl precursor, the spatial distribution of the polymer differs strongly. As a proof of concept we grafted polystyrene as a model compound in the second modification step. In the case of methacryloyl chloride the polymer was located mainly at the interface between the cell lumina and the cell wall covering the inner surface of the cells and being traceable up to 2-3 μm in the cell wall, whereas in the case of methacrylic anhydride the polymer was located inside the whole cell wall. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and especially Raman spectroscopy were used for an in-depth analysis of the modified wood at the cell wall level.

  14. Interleukin-6: A Constitutive Modulator of Glycoprotein 130, Neuroinflammatory and Cell Survival Signaling in Retina

    PubMed Central

    Echevarria, Franklin D.; Rickman, Abigayle E.; Sappington, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The interleukin-6 (IL-6) family of cytokines and their signal transducer glycoprotein (gp130) are implicated in inflammatory and cell survival functions in glaucoma. There are several avenues for interdependent modulation of IL-6 family members and gp130 signaling. Here we investigated whether IL-6 modulates gp130 and related neuroinflammatory, cell survival and regulatory signaling in both healthy and glaucomatous retina. Methods In naïve and glaucomatous (Microbead Occlusion Model), wildtype (WT) and IL-6 knockout (IL-6−/−) mice, we examined gp130 protein expression and localization, using western blot and immunohistochemistry. Gene targets related to IL-6 and gp130 signaling and pertinent to neuroinflammation (TNFα, IL-1β), cell health (Bax, Bcl-xl) and STAT3 regulation (Socs3) were quantified using qRTPCR. Results In the naïve retina, IL-6−/− retina contained significantly less gp130 compared to WT retina. This IL-6-related decrease in gp130 was accompanied by a reduction in mRNA expression of TNFα, Socs3 and Bax. After 4 weeks of microbead-induced ocular hypertension, both microbead- and saline-injected (control) eyes of IL-6−/− mice exhibited higher expression of TNFα, compared to WT mice. IL-1β expression was also reduced specifically in IL-6−/− retina with microbead-induced glaucoma. While saline and microbead injection increased Bcl-xl and Socs3 mRNA in both WT and IL-6−/− mice, IL-6−/− deficiency led to smaller increases for both Bcl-xl and Socs3. Conclusions Our findings support a role for IL-6 in setting baseline parameters for neuroinflammatory, cell health and gp130 regulatory signaling that can impact the nature and magnitude of retinal responses to glaucoma-related stressors.

  15. P-Glycoprotein Induction Ameliorates Colistin Induced Nephrotoxicity in Cultured Human Proximal Tubular Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-hyo; Kim, Jin-sun; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Song, Ho-yeon; Hong, Sae-yong

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colistin induced nephrotoxicity is poorly understood. Currently there are no effective therapeutic or prophylactic agents available. This study was aimed to determine the mechanism of colistin induced nephrotoxicity and to determine whether P-glycoprotein (P-gp) induction could prevent colistin induced nephrotoxicity. Colistin induced cell toxicity in cultured human proximal tubular cells in both dose and time dependent manner. Colistin provoked ROS in a dose dependent manner as measured by DCF-DA. To investigate apoptosis, caspase 3/7 activity was determined. Caspase 3/7 activity was increased dose dependently (25, 50, 100 μg/ml) at 6 h. Autophagosome formation was assessed by measuring LC3- II/LC3-I ratio. The ratio of LC3-II to LC3- I was increased at 2 h (25 μg/ml). Suppression of autophagosome formation increased colistin induced nephrotoxicity. The expression of P-gp and the cell toxicity was determined in colistin with or without dexamethasone (P-gp inducer) and verapamil (selective P-gp inhibitor). Colistin itself suppressed the expression of P-gp. P-gp expression and activity decreased colistin induced nephrotoxicity with dexamethasone treatment. In addition induced P-gp transporter was shown to improve the efflux effect on colistin treated HK2 cell line, which was demonstrated by calcein-AM fluorescence accumulation assay. The increased activity could be blocked by N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, colistin induces nephrotoxicity by suppressing P-gp. Induction of P-gp could ameliorate colistin induced nephrotoxicity by decreasing apoptosis.

  16. P-glycoprotein-mediated colchicine resistance in different cell lines correlates with the effects of colchicine on P-glycoprotein conformation.

    PubMed

    Druley, T E; Stein, W D; Ruth, A; Roninson, I B

    2001-04-10

    The multidrug transporter P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is an ATPase efflux pump for multiple cytotoxic agents, including vinblastine and colchicine. We have found that resistance to vinblastine but not to colchicine in cell lines derived from different types of tissues and expressing the wild-type human Pgp correlates with the Pgp density. Vinblastine induces a conformational change in Pgp, evidenced by increased reactivity with a conformation-sensitive monoclonal antibody UIC2, in all the tested cell lines. In contrast, colchicine increases the UIC2 reactivity in only some of the cell lines. In those lines where colchicine alone did not affect UIC2 reactivity, this drug was, however, able to reverse the vinblastine-induced increase in UIC2 reactivity. The magnitude of the increase in UIC2 reactivity in the presence of saturating concentrations of colchicine correlates with the relative ability of Pgp to confer colchicine resistance in different cell lines, suggesting the existence of some cell-specific factors that have a coordinate effect on the ability of colchicine to induce conformational transitions and to be transported by Pgp. Colchicine, like vinblastine, reverses the decrease in UIC2 reactivity produced by nonhydrolyzable nucleotides, but unlike vinblastine, it does not reverse the effect of ATP at a high concentration. Colchicine, however, decreases the Hill number for the effect of ATP on the UIC2 reactivity from 2 to 1. Colchicine increases the UIC2 reactivity and reverses the effect of ATP in ATPase-deficient Pgp mutants, but not in the wild-type Pgp expressed in the same cellular background, suggesting that ATP hydrolysis counteracts the effects of colchicine on the Pgp conformation.

  17. Vascular wall progenitor cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Simari, Robert D

    2015-04-10

    The vasculature plays an indispensible role in organ development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis, such that disturbances to it impact greatly on developmental and postnatal health. Although cell turnover in healthy blood vessels is low, it increases considerably under pathological conditions. The principle sources for this phenomenon have long been considered to be the recruitment of cells from the peripheral circulation and the re-entry of mature cells in the vessel wall back into cell cycle. However, recent discoveries have also uncovered the presence of a range of multipotent and lineage-restricted progenitor cells in the mural layers of postnatal blood vessels, possessing high proliferative capacity and potential to generate endothelial, smooth muscle, hematopoietic or mesenchymal cell progeny. In particular, the tunica adventitia has emerged as a progenitor-rich compartment with niche-like characteristics that support and regulate vascular wall progenitor cells. Preliminary data indicate the involvement of some of these vascular wall progenitor cells in vascular disease states, adding weight to the notion that the adventitia is integral to vascular wall pathogenesis, and raising potential implications for clinical therapies. This review discusses the current body of evidence for the existence of vascular wall progenitor cell subpopulations from development to adulthood and addresses the gains made and significant challenges that lie ahead in trying to accurately delineate their identities, origins, regulatory pathways, and relevance to normal vascular structure and function, as well as disease.

  18. Re-evaluation of the role of P-glycoprotein in in vitro drug permeability studies with the bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hakkarainen, Jenni J; Rilla, Kirsi; Suhonen, Marjukka; Ruponen, Marika; Forsberg, Markus M

    2014-03-01

    1.  Currently available in vitro blood-brain barrier models all have recognized restrictions. In addition to leakiness, inconsistent data about P-glycoprotein mediated efflux limit the attractiveness of the primary bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs). Therefore, we re-evaluated the role of P-glycoprotein mediated efflux with two culture conditions in BBMECs for prediction of drug permeability of potential P-glycoprotein substrates. 2.  BBMECs were monocultured on filters on petri dishes and on filter inserts, and expression and localization of P-glycoprotein were compared by using western blot and confocal microscopy, respectively. The functionality of P-glycoprotein was assessed by using cellular uptake, calcein-AM and bidirectional transport assays. 3.  P-glycoprotein expression was higher in BBMECs cultured on filter inserts decreasing the permeability of digoxin and paclitaxel, but not the permeability of vinblastine. However, the monocultured BBMECs were not able to demonstrate efflux in the bidirectional transport assays. Under certain culture conditions, occludin may not be correctly located, perhaps explaining in part the leakiness of BBMECs. 4.  In conclusion, BBMECs, despite possessing a functional P-glycoprotein, under certain culture conditions may not be a suitable in vitro model for the bidirectional transport assays and for predicting the permeability of drugs and xenobiotics that are potential P-glycoprotein substrates.

  19. Dual split protein-based fusion assay reveals that mutations to herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein gB alter the kinetics of cell-cell fusion induced by HSV entry glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Gallagher, John R; Hannah, Brian P; Matsuda, Zene; Whitbeck, J Charles; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. We propose that receptor-activated changes to gD cause it to activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB into an active form. We employed a dual split-protein (DSP) assay to monitor the kinetics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell-cell fusion. This assay measures content mixing between two cells, i.e., fusion, within the same cell population in real time (minutes to hours). Titration experiments suggest that both gD and gH/gL act in a catalytic fashion to trigger gB. In fact, fusion rates are governed by the amount of gB on the cell surface. We then used the DSP assay to focus on mutants in two functional regions (FRs) of gB, FR1 and FR3. FR1 contains the fusion loops (FL1 and FL2), and FR3 encompasses the crown at the trimer top. All FL mutants initiated fusion very slowly, if at all. However, the fusion rates caused by some FL2 mutants increased over time, so that total fusion by 8 h looked much like that of the WT. Two distinct kinetic patterns, "slow and fast," emerged for mutants in the crown of gB (FR3), again showing differences in initiation and ongoing fusion. Of note are the fusion kinetics of the gB syn mutant (LL871/872AA). Although this mutant was originally included as an ongoing high-rate-of-fusion control, its initiation of fusion is so rapid that it appears to be on a "hair trigger." Thus, the DSP assay affords a unique way to examine the dynamics of HSV glycoprotein-induced cell fusion.

  20. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  1. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  2. The Permeability of Plant Cell Walls as Measured by Gel Filtration Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepeer, Mark; Taylor, Iain E. P.

    1981-08-01

    The permeability of plant cell walls to macromolecules may limit the ability of enzymes to alter the biochemical and physical properties of the wall. Proteins of molecular weight up to 60,000 can permeate a substantial portion of the cell wall. Measurements of wall permeability in which cells are exposed to hypertonic solutions of macromolecules may seriously underestimate wall permeability.

  3. Ultrastructure and Composition of the Nannochloropsis gaditana Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Matthew J.; Weiss, Taylor L.; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Jing, Jia; Roth, Robyn; Goodenough, Ursula; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Marine algae of the genus Nannochloropsis are promising producers of biofuel precursors and nutraceuticals and are also harvested commercially for aquaculture feed. We have used quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and carbohydrate analyses to characterize the architecture of the Nannochloropsis gaditana (strain CCMP 526) cell wall, whose recalcitrance presents a significant barrier to biocommodity extraction. The data indicate a bilayer structure consisting of a cellulosic inner wall (∼75% of the mass balance) protected by an outer hydrophobic algaenan layer. Cellulase treatment of walls purified after cell lysis generates highly enriched algaenan preparations without using the harsh chemical treatments typically used in algaenan isolation and characterization. Nannochloropsis algaenan was determined to comprise long, straight-chain, saturated aliphatics with ether cross-links, which closely resembles the cutan of vascular plants. Chemical identification of >85% of the isolated cell wall mass is detailed, and genome analysis is used to identify candidate biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:25239976

  4. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    PubMed

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants.

  5. Ferulic acid is esterified to glucuronoarabinoxylans in pineapple cell walls.

    PubMed

    Smith, B G; Harris, P J

    2001-03-01

    The ester-linkage of ferulic acid (mainly E) to polysaccharides in primary cell walls of pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) (Bromeliaceae) was investigated by treating a cell-wall preparation with 'Driselase' which contains a mixture of endo- and exo-glycanases, but no hydroxycinnamoyl esterase activity. The most abundant feruloyl oligosaccharide released was O-[5-O-(E-feruloyl)-alpha-L-arabinofuranosyl](1-->3)-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->4)-D-xylopyranose (FAXX). This indicated that the ferulic acid is ester-linked to glucuronoarabinoxylans in the same way as in the primary walls of grasses and cereals (Poaceae). Glucuronoarabinoxylans are the major non-cellulosic polysaccharides in the pineapple cell walls.

  6. Live cell imaging of the cytoskeleton and cell wall enzymes in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Arun; Wightman, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The use of live imaging techniques to visualize the dynamic changes and interactions within plant cells has given us detailed information on the function and organization of the cytoskeleton and cell wall associated proteins. This information has grown with the constant improvement in imaging hardware and molecular tools. In this chapter, we describe the procedure for the preparation and live visualization of fluorescent protein fusions associated with the cytoskeleton and the cell wall in Arabidopsis. PMID:25408450

  7. Beta-agonists and secretory cell number and intracellular glycoproteins in airway epithelium. The effect of isoproterenol and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R.; Reid, L.

    1979-01-01

    This study describes the effect of systemic administration of the beta-adrenergic agonists isoproterenol and salbutamol on the secretory cell populations in seven regions of rat airway epithelium (three extrapulmonary and four intrapulmonary) and on the size of salivary glands and heart. Isoproterenol (a nonselective beta-adrenergic agonist) significantly increases secretory cell number in all airway regions except the midtrachea; salbutamol (a selective beta 2 agonist) increases secretory cell number only in proximal and peripheral regions. The absolute number of secretory cells is greatest in the most peripheral region after isoproterenol administration and in the most proximal region after salbutamol, although both drugs produce the greatest relative increase at the periphery. In proximal and, particularly, peripheral regions, the increase by isoproterenol (less than 3- and 14-fold, respectively) is greater than by salbutamol (less than 2- and less than 3-fold, respectively). In all airway regions, both drugs modify intracellular glycoprotein in the secretory cell population; within a given region, modification is much the same. In the most proximal region, the population of cells synthesizing only granules of neutral glycoprotein significantly increases while in other regions increase is in cells synthesizing only granules of acid. A significant shift in glycoprotein synthesis occurs whether or not the secretory cell population is increased, which suggests that existing as well as newly appearing cells modify their product. Isoproterenol significantly increases the size of the parotid and submaxillary glands; salbutamol increases the size of the parotid only. Isoproterenol significantly increases the weight of both ventricles of the heart; salbutamol has no such effect. PMID:36762

  8. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  9. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    PubMed

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  10. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells. PMID:25329559

  11. Determining the polysaccharide composition of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Pettolino, Filomena A; Walsh, Cherie; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Bacic, Antony

    2012-09-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex structure composed mostly of polysaccharides. Detailed analyses of these cell wall polysaccharides are essential for our understanding of plant development and for our use of plant biomass (largely wall material) in the food, agriculture, fabric, timber, biofuel and biocomposite industries. We present analytical techniques not only to define the fine chemical structures of individual cell wall polysaccharides but also to estimate the overall polysaccharide composition of cell wall preparations. The procedure covers the preparation of cell walls, together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based methods, for both the analysis of monosaccharides as their volatile alditol acetate derivatives and for methylation analysis to determine linkage positions between monosaccharide residues as their volatile partially methylated alditol acetate derivatives. Analysis time will vary depending on both the method used and the tissue type, and ranges from 2 d for a simple neutral sugar composition to 2 weeks for a carboxyl reduction/methylation linkage analysis. PMID:22864200

  12. Determining the polysaccharide composition of plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Pettolino, Filomena A; Walsh, Cherie; Fincher, Geoffrey B; Bacic, Antony

    2012-09-01

    The plant cell wall is a chemically complex structure composed mostly of polysaccharides. Detailed analyses of these cell wall polysaccharides are essential for our understanding of plant development and for our use of plant biomass (largely wall material) in the food, agriculture, fabric, timber, biofuel and biocomposite industries. We present analytical techniques not only to define the fine chemical structures of individual cell wall polysaccharides but also to estimate the overall polysaccharide composition of cell wall preparations. The procedure covers the preparation of cell walls, together with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based methods, for both the analysis of monosaccharides as their volatile alditol acetate derivatives and for methylation analysis to determine linkage positions between monosaccharide residues as their volatile partially methylated alditol acetate derivatives. Analysis time will vary depending on both the method used and the tissue type, and ranges from 2 d for a simple neutral sugar composition to 2 weeks for a carboxyl reduction/methylation linkage analysis.

  13. Production Model Press for the Preparation of Bacterial Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, T. D.; Ribi, E.; Maki, W.; Miller, B.; Oertli, E.

    1962-01-01

    A modification of the apparatus previously described permits the preparation of cell walls in quantity. This consists of a heavy duty, double-acting hydraulic press with motor-driven pump, and a superstrength alloy steel pressure cell which is corrosion resistant. Liquid cooling of the jet is substituted for the previously used gas cooling to minimize aerosol formation and to facilitate subsequent treatment of the products. The device produces cell walls of excellent quality in good yield. The pressure cell has been used satisfactorily up to about 60,000 psi. Design details are given. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 6 PMID:14485524

  14. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, R; González, C; Muñoz, N; Mendoza, S

    1966-05-01

    Virgilio, Rafael (Escuela de Química y Farmacia, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), C. González, Nubia Muñoz, and Silvia Mendoza. Electron microscopy of Staphylococcus aureus cell wall lysis. J. Bacteriol. 91:2018-2024. 1966.-A crude suspension of Staphylococcus aureus cell walls (strain Cowan III) in buffer solution was shown by electron microscopy to lyse slightly after 16 hr, probably owing to the action of autolysin. The lysis was considerably faster and more intense after the addition of lysozyme. A remarkable reduction in thickness and rigidity of the cell walls, together with the appearance of many irregular protrusions in their outlines, was observed after 2 hr; after 16 hr, there remained only a few recognizable cell wall fragments but many residual particulate remnants. When autolysin was previously inactivated by trypsin, there was a complete inhibition of the lytic action of lysozyme; on the other hand, when autolysin was inactivated by heat and lysozyme was added, a distinct decrease in the thickness of the cell walls was observed, but there was no destruction of the walls. The lytic action of lysozyme, after treatment with hot 5% trichloroacetic acid, gave rise to a marked dissolution of the structure of the cell walls, which became lost against the background, without, however, showing ostensible alteration of wall outlines. From a morphological point of view, the lytic action of autolysin plus lysozyme was quite different from that of trichloroacetic acid plus lysozyme, as shown by electron micrographs, but in both cases it was very intense. This would suggest different mechanisms of action for these agents.

  15. Analysis of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes in single K562 cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hua; Yang, Lisong; Zou, Hanfa; Yang, Ling; Le, X Chris

    2007-01-01

    Short oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) were derivatized with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC). Capillary electrophoresis coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (CE-LIF) was then used to separate and detect the fluorescently labeled carbon-nanotube probes (CNTP) in multidrug-resistant cells (K562A) and the parent cells (K562S). Greater expression of P-glycoprotein in K562A cells than in K562S cells was confirmed by use of anti-P-glycoprotein antibody and flow-cytometric analysis. Analyses of CNTP in both cell lines using both CE-LIF and flow cytometry showed that CNTP could traverse the cellular membrane without being pumped out by P-glycoprotein. The CNTP distributed in both cell lines was analyzed at the single cell level and the results were compared with those from analysis of ten cells and of the lysate from bulk cells. The results revealed the CE-LIF method could be used for quantitative analysis of CNT in single cells in studies of drug delivery and multidrug resistance.

  16. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Ruben R.; Muth, Anke; Schneider, Irene C.; Friedel, Thorsten; Hartmann, Jessica; Plückthun, Andreas; Maisner, Andrea; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs) can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV) glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance). Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV) glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4) was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs. PMID:27281338

  17. Receptor-Targeted Nipah Virus Glycoproteins Improve Cell-Type Selective Gene Delivery and Reveal a Preference for Membrane-Proximal Cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ruben R; Muth, Anke; Schneider, Irene C; Friedel, Thorsten; Hartmann, Jessica; Plückthun, Andreas; Maisner, Andrea; Buchholz, Christian J

    2016-06-01

    Receptor-targeted lentiviral vectors (LVs) can be an effective tool for selective transfer of genes into distinct cell types of choice. Moreover, they can be used to determine the molecular properties that cell surface proteins must fulfill to act as receptors for viral glycoproteins. Here we show that LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted Nipah virus (NiV) glycoproteins effectively enter into cells when they use cell surface proteins as receptors that bring them closely enough to the cell membrane (less than 100 Å distance). Then, they were flexible in receptor usage as demonstrated by successful targeting of EpCAM, CD20, and CD8, and as selective as LVs pseudotyped with receptor-targeted measles virus (MV) glycoproteins, the current standard for cell-type specific gene delivery. Remarkably, NiV-LVs could be produced at up to two orders of magnitude higher titers compared to their MV-based counterparts and were at least 10,000-fold less effectively neutralized than MV glycoprotein pseudotyped LVs by pooled human intravenous immunoglobulin. An important finding for NiV-LVs targeted to Her2/neu was an about 100-fold higher gene transfer activity when particles were targeted to membrane-proximal regions as compared to particles binding to a more membrane-distal epitope. Likewise, the low gene transfer activity mediated by NiV-LV particles bound to the membrane distal domains of CD117 or the glutamate receptor subunit 4 (GluA4) was substantially enhanced by reducing receptor size to below 100 Å. Overall, the data suggest that the NiV glycoproteins are optimally suited for cell-type specific gene delivery with LVs and, in addition, for the first time define which parts of a cell surface protein should be targeted to achieve optimal gene transfer rates with receptor-targeted LVs. PMID:27281338

  18. Intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins: two closely related histocompatibility antigens differ in their rates of transit to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular transport of two closely related membrane glycoproteins was studied in the murine B cell lymphoma line, AKTB-1b. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, the kinetics of appearance of the class I histocompatibility antigens, H-2Kk and H-2Dk, at the cell surface were compared and found to be remarkably different. Newly synthesized H-2Kk is transported rapidly such that all radiolabeled molecules reach the surface within 1 h. In contrast, the H-2Dk antigen is transported slowly with a half-time of 4-5 h. The rates of surface appearance for the two antigens closely resemble the rates at which their Asn-linked oligosaccharides mature from endoglucosaminidase H (endo H)-sensitive to endo H-resistant forms, a process that occurs in the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that the rate-limiting step in the transport of H-2Dk to the cell surface occurs before the formation of endo H-resistant oligosaccharides in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation experiments confirmed this conclusion by identifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as the site where the H-2Dk antigen accumulates. The retention of this glycoprotein in the ER does not appear to be due to a lack of solubility or an inability of the H-2Dk heavy chain to associate with beta 2-microglobulin. Our data is inconsistent with a passive membrane flow mechanism for the intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins. Rather, it suggests that one or more receptors localized to the ER membrane may mediate the selective transport of membrane glycoproteins out of the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The fact that H-2Kk and H-2Dk are highly homologous (greater than or equal to 80%) indicates that this process can be strongly influenced by limited alterations in protein structure. PMID:3928633

  19. Intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins: two closely related histocompatibility antigens differ in their rates of transit to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Williams, D B; Swiedler, S J; Hart, G W

    1985-09-01

    The intracellular transport of two closely related membrane glycoproteins was studied in the murine B cell lymphoma line, AKTB-1b. Using pulse-chase radiolabeling, the kinetics of appearance of the class I histocompatibility antigens, H-2Kk and H-2Dk, at the cell surface were compared and found to be remarkably different. Newly synthesized H-2Kk is transported rapidly such that all radiolabeled molecules reach the surface within 1 h. In contrast, the H-2Dk antigen is transported slowly with a half-time of 4-5 h. The rates of surface appearance for the two antigens closely resemble the rates at which their Asn-linked oligosaccharides mature from endoglucosaminidase H (endo H)-sensitive to endo H-resistant forms, a process that occurs in the Golgi apparatus. This suggests that the rate-limiting step in the transport of H-2Dk to the cell surface occurs before the formation of endo H-resistant oligosaccharides in the Golgi apparatus. Subcellular fractionation experiments confirmed this conclusion by identifying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as the site where the H-2Dk antigen accumulates. The retention of this glycoprotein in the ER does not appear to be due to a lack of solubility or an inability of the H-2Dk heavy chain to associate with beta 2-microglobulin. Our data is inconsistent with a passive membrane flow mechanism for the intracellular transport of membrane glycoproteins. Rather, it suggests that one or more receptors localized to the ER membrane may mediate the selective transport of membrane glycoproteins out of the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The fact that H-2Kk and H-2Dk are highly homologous (greater than or equal to 80%) indicates that this process can be strongly influenced by limited alterations in protein structure. PMID:3928633

  20. Growth of recombinant Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 cells producing rabies virus glycoprotein in bioreactor employing serum-free medium

    PubMed Central

    Galesi, Adriana L. L.; Aguiar, Marcelo A.; Astray, Renato M.; Augusto, Elisabeth F. P.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells have been increasingly used as a suitable expression system for the production of different recombinant proteins, and the employment of bioreactors for large-scale culture is an important tool for this purpose. In this work, Drosophila S2 cells producing the rabies virus glycoprotein RVGP were cultivated in bioreactor, employing a serum-free medium, aiming an improvement in cell growth and in glycoprotein production. To overcome cell growth limitation commonly observed in stirred flasks, different experiments in bioreactor were performed, in which some system modifications were carried out to attain the desired goal. The study showed that this cell line is considerably sensitive to hydrodynamic forces, and a high cell density (about 16.0 × 106 cells mL−1) was only obtained when Pluronic F68® percentage was increased to 0.6% (w/v). Despite ammonium concentration affected RVGP production, and also cell growth, an elevated amount of the target protein was obtained, attaining 563 ng 10−7 cells. PMID:19003175

  1. Identification and isolation of a 140 kd cell surface glycoprotein with properties expected of a fibronectin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Pytela, R.; Pierschbacher, M.D.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1985-01-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify a putative cell surface receptor for fibronectin. A large cell-attachment-promoting fibronectin fragment was used as the affinity matrix, and specific elution was effected by using synthetic peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp, which is derived from the cell recognition sequence in the fibronectin cell attachment site. A 140 kd protein was bound by the affinity matrix from octylglucoside extracts of MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells and specifically eluted with the synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro. The 140 kd protein was labeled by cell surface specific radioiodination and became incorporated into liposomes at a high efficiency. Liposomes containing this protein showed specific affinity toward fibronectin-coated surfaces, and this binding could be selectively inhibited by the synthetic cell-attachment peptide but not by inactive peptides. Affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose showed that the 140 kd protein is a glycoprotein and, in combination with the fibronectin fragment chromatography, gave highly enriched preparations of the 140 kd protein. These properties suggest that the 140 kd glycoprotein is a membrane-embedded cell surface protein directly involved in the initial step of cell adhesion to fibronectin substrates.

  2. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    PubMed

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper.

  3. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    PubMed

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  4. A widespread family of bacterial cell wall assembly proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Marles-Wright, Jon; Cleverley, Robert M; Emmins, Robyn; Ishikawa, Shu; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Heinz, Nadja; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hoyland, Christopher N; Ogasawara, Naotake; Lewis, Richard J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Daniel, Richard A; Errington, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Teichoic acids and acidic capsular polysaccharides are major anionic cell wall polymers (APs) in many bacteria, with various critical cell functions, including maintenance of cell shape and structural integrity, charge and cation homeostasis, and multiple aspects of pathogenesis. We have identified the widespread LytR–Cps2A–Psr (LCP) protein family, of previously unknown function, as novel enzymes required for AP synthesis. Structural and biochemical analysis of several LCP proteins suggest that they carry out the final step of transferring APs from their lipid-linked precursor to cell wall peptidoglycan (PG). In Bacillus subtilis, LCP proteins are found in association with the MreB cytoskeleton, suggesting that MreB proteins coordinate the insertion of the major polymers, PG and AP, into the cell wall. PMID:21964069

  5. Sorting of an apical plasma membrane glycoprotein occurs before it reaches the cell surface in cultured epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    In Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells (a polarized epithelial cell line) infected with influenza virus, the hemagglutinin behaves as an apical plasma membrane glycoprotein. To determine biochemically the domain on the plasma membrane, apical or basolateral, where newly synthesized hemagglutinin first appears, cells were cultured on Millipore filters to make both cell surface domains independently accessible. Hemagglutinin in virus-infected cells was pulse-labeled, chased, and detected on the plasma membrane with a sensitive trypsin assay. Under all conditions tested, newly made hemagglutinin appeared simultaneously on both domains, with the bulk found in the apical membrane. When trypsin was continuously present on the basolateral surface during the chase, little hemagglutinin was cleaved relative to the amount transported apically. In addition, specific antibodies against the hemagglutinin placed basolaterally had no effect on transport to the apical domain. These observations suggested that most newly synthesized hemagglutinin does not transiently appear on the basolateral surface but rather is delivered directly to the apical surface in amounts that account for its final polarized distribution. PMID:6501415

  6. Microfabricated alkali vapor cell with anti-relaxation wall coating

    SciTech Connect

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Rooij, N. F. de; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Mileti, G.

    2014-07-28

    We present a microfabricated alkali vapor cell equipped with an anti-relaxation wall coating. The anti-relaxation coating used is octadecyltrichlorosilane and the cell was sealed by thin-film indium-bonding at a low temperature of 140 °C. The cell body is made of silicon and Pyrex and features a double-chamber design. Depolarizing properties due to liquid Rb droplets are avoided by confining the Rb droplets to one chamber only. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on this wall-coated cell are used to evaluate the cell's relaxation properties and a potential gas contamination. Double-resonance signals obtained from the cell show an intrinsic linewidth that is significantly lower than the linewidth that would be expected in case the cell had no wall coating but only contained a buffer-gas contamination on the level measured by optical spectroscopy. Combined with further experimental evidence this proves the presence of a working anti-relaxation wall coating in the cell. Such cells are of interest for applications in miniature atomic clocks, magnetometers, and other quantum sensors.

  7. Expression of bovine herpesvirus 1 glycoproteins gI and gIII in transfected murine cells.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, D R; Zamb, T; Parker, M D; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, S; Babiuk, L A; Lawman, M J

    1988-11-01

    Genes encoding two of the major glycoproteins of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1), gI and gIII, were cloned into the eucaryotic expression vectors pRSVcat and pSV2neo and transfected into murine LMTK- cells, and cloned cell lines were established. The relative amounts of gI or gIII expressed from the two vectors were similar. Expression of gI was cell associated and localized predominantly in the perinuclear region, but nuclear and plasma membrane staining was also observed. Expression of gI was additionally associated with cell fusion and the formation of polykaryons and giant cells. Expression of gIII was localized predominantly in the nuclear and plasma membranes. Radioimmunoprecipitation in the presence or absence of tunicamycin revealed that the recombinant glycoproteins were proteolytically processed and glycosylated and had molecular weights similar to those of the forms of gI and gIII expressed in BHV-1-infected bovine cells. However, both recombinant glycoproteins were glycosylated to a lesser extent than were the forms found in BHV-1-infected bovine cells. For gI, a deficiency in N-linked glycosylation of the amino-terminal half of the protein was identified; for gIII, a deficiency in O-linked glycosylation was implicated. The reactivity pattern of a panel of gI- and gIII-specific monoclonal antibodies, including six which recognize conformation-dependent epitopes, was found to be unaffected by the glycosylation differences and was identical for transfected or BHV-1-infected murine cells. Use of the transfected cells as targets in immune-mediated cytotoxicity assays demonstrated the functional recognition of recombinant gI and gIII by murine antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Immunization of mice with the transfected cells elicited BHV-1-specific virus-neutralizing antibody, thus verifying the antigenic authenticity of the recombinant glycoproteins and the important role of gI and gIII as targets of the immune response to BHV-1 in this murine model system.

  8. Mapping and sequence of the gene for the pseudorabies virus glycoprotein which accumulates in the medium of infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rea, T J; Timmins, J G; Long, G W; Post, L E

    1985-01-01

    RNA from pseudorabies virus (PRV)-infected cells was translated in a reticulocyte lysate with and without the addition of dog pancreas microsomes. Upon addition of the microsomes to the translation reaction, an additional prominent protein product was observed that was not present when microsomes were omitted. The gene coding for this processed protein and its lower-molecular-weight precursor was mapped within the small unique region of the genome by hybridization of mRNA to cloned fragments of PRV DNA and translation of the selected mRNAs. A fragment of the coding region of this gene was inserted into an open reading frame cloning vector to express part of this gene as a hybrid protein in Escherichia coli. This hybrid protein was injected into mice to raise an antiserum which was found to precipitate the glycoprotein which accumulates in the medium of PRV-infected cells. This allows us to conclude that the gene for the "excreted" glycoprotein (gX) maps to the small unique region of the genome, and that the precursor of this glycoprotein is readily processed by dog pancreas microsomes. The region of the PRV genome which codes for this glycoprotein was sequenced and found to include an open reading frame coding for 498 amino acids, flanked by sequences which contain features common to eucaryotic promoters and polyadenylation signals. The predicted protein sequence includes a hydrophobic sequence at the N-terminus which could be a signal sequence, and a hydrophobic sequence followed by a hydrophilic sequence at the C-terminus. Images PMID:2983115

  9. Candidate topical microbicides bind herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B and prevent viral entry and cell-to-cell spread.

    PubMed

    Cheshenko, Natalia; Keller, Marla J; MasCasullo, Veronica; Jarvis, Gary A; Cheng, Hui; John, Minnie; Li, Jin-Hua; Hogarty, Kathleen; Anderson, Robert A; Waller, Donald P; Zaneveld, Lourens J D; Profy, Albert T; Klotman, Mary E; Herold, Betsy C

    2004-06-01

    Topical microbicides designed to prevent acquisition of sexually transmitted infections are urgently needed. Nonoxynol-9, the only commercially available spermicide, damages epithelium and may enhance human immunodeficiency virus transmission. The observation that herpes simplex virus (HSV) and human immunodeficiency virus bind heparan sulfate provided the rationale for the development of sulfated or sulfonated polymers as topical agents. Although several of the polymers have advanced to clinical trials, the spectrum and mechanism of anti-HSV activity and the effects on soluble mediators of inflammation have not been evaluated. The present studies address these gaps. The results indicate that PRO 2000, polystyrene sulfonate, cellulose sulfate, and polymethylenehydroquinone sulfonate inhibit HSV infection 10,000-fold and are active against clinical isolates, including an acyclovir-resistant variant. The compounds formed stable complexes with glycoprotein B and inhibit viral binding, entry, and cell-to-cell spread. The effects may be long lasting due to the high affinity and stability of the sulfated compound-virus complex, as evidenced by surface plasmon resonance studies. The candidate microbicides retained their antiviral activities in the presence of cervical secretions and over a broad pH range. There was little reduction in cell viability following repeated exposure of human endocervical cells to these compounds, although a reduction in secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor levels was observed. These studies support further development and rigorous evaluation of these candidate microbicides. PMID:15155195

  10. Characterization of rhamnogalacturonan I from cotton suspension culture cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Progress has been made on the project of determining the structure of pectins. From recent progress, a covalent crosslink between rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) and xyloglucan was hypothesized and a structure for RGI was proposed. The development of a method to determine the distribution of methyl esterification with pectins also progressed. The degree of methyl esterification of cotton cotyledon cell walls was compared to that of cotton suspension cultures. Cotyledon wall were found to have {approximately}55% of the galacturonic acid esterified whereas suspension culture wall were only about 14% methyl esterified. 10 refs. (SM)

  11. Inhibitory effects of neochamaejasmin B on P-glycoprotein in MDCK-hMDR1 cells and molecular docking of NCB binding in P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lanying; Hu, Haihong; Wang, Xiangjun; Yu, Lushan; Jiang, Huidi; Chen, Jianzhong; Lou, Yan; Zeng, Su

    2015-01-01

    Stellera chamaejasme L. (Thymelaeaceae) is widely distributed in Mongolia, Tibet and the northern parts of China. Its roots are commonly used as "Langdu", which is embodied in the Pharmacopoeia of the P.R. China (2010) as a toxic Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is claimed to have antivirus, antitumor and antibacterial properties in China and other Asian countries. Studies were carried out to characterize the inhibition of neochamaejasmin B (NCB) on P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1, MDR1). Rhodamine-123 (R-123) transport and accumulation studies were performed in MDCK-hMDR1 cells. ABCB1 (MDR1) mRNA gene expression and P-gp protein expression were analyzed. Binding selectivity studies based on molecular docking were explored. R-123 transport and accumulation studies in MDCK-hMDR1 cells indicated that NCB inhibited the P-gp-mediated efflux in a concentration-dependent manner. RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated that the P-gp expression was suppressed by NCB. To investigate the inhibition type of NCB on P-gp, Ki and Ki' values were determined by double-reciprocal plots in R-123 accumulation studies. Since Ki was greater than Ki', the inhibition of NCB on P-gp was likely a mixed type of competitive and non-competitive inhibition. The results were confirmed by molecular docking in our current work. The docking data indicated that NCB had higher affinity to P-gp than to Lig1 ((S)-5,7-dihydroxy-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)chroman-4-one).

  12. Co-delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in the same vesicle for coordinated fungal cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hacker, Christian; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Gurr, Sarah J; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are surrounded by an extracellular cell wall. This complex matrix of proteins and polysaccharides protects against adverse stresses and determines the shape of fungal cells. The polysaccharides of the fungal wall include 1,3-β-glucan and chitin, which are synthesized by membrane-bound synthases at the growing cell tip. A hallmark of filamentous fungi is the class V chitin synthase, which carries a myosin-motor domain. In the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, the myosin-chitin synthase Mcs1 moves to the plasma membrane in secretory vesicles, being delivered by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. The myosin domain of Mcs1 enhances polar secretion by tethering vesicles at the site of exocytosis. It remains elusive, however, how other cell-wall-forming enzymes are delivered and how their activity is coordinated post secretion. Here, we show that the U. maydis class VII chitin synthase and 1,3-β-glucan synthase travel in Mcs1-containing vesicles, and that their apical secretion depends on Mcs1. Once in the plasma membrane, anchorage requires enzyme activity, which suggests co-synthesis of chitin and 1,3-β-glucan polysaccharides at sites of exocytosis. Thus, delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in Mcs1 vesicles ensures local foci of fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27563844

  13. Co-delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in the same vesicle for coordinated fungal cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Martin-Urdiroz, Magdalena; Higuchi, Yujiro; Hacker, Christian; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Gurr, Sarah J; Steinberg, Gero

    2016-01-01

    Fungal cells are surrounded by an extracellular cell wall. This complex matrix of proteins and polysaccharides protects against adverse stresses and determines the shape of fungal cells. The polysaccharides of the fungal wall include 1,3-β-glucan and chitin, which are synthesized by membrane-bound synthases at the growing cell tip. A hallmark of filamentous fungi is the class V chitin synthase, which carries a myosin-motor domain. In the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis, the myosin-chitin synthase Mcs1 moves to the plasma membrane in secretory vesicles, being delivered by kinesin-1 and myosin-5. The myosin domain of Mcs1 enhances polar secretion by tethering vesicles at the site of exocytosis. It remains elusive, however, how other cell-wall-forming enzymes are delivered and how their activity is coordinated post secretion. Here, we show that the U. maydis class VII chitin synthase and 1,3-β-glucan synthase travel in Mcs1-containing vesicles, and that their apical secretion depends on Mcs1. Once in the plasma membrane, anchorage requires enzyme activity, which suggests co-synthesis of chitin and 1,3-β-glucan polysaccharides at sites of exocytosis. Thus, delivery of cell-wall-forming enzymes in Mcs1 vesicles ensures local foci of fungal cell wall formation.

  14. Glycoproteins of 210,000 and 130,000 m.w. on activated T cells: cell distribution and antigenic relation to components on resting cells and T cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hemler, M E; Sanchez-Madrid, F; Flotte, T J; Krensky, A M; Burakoff, S J; Bhan, A K; Springer, T A; Strominger, J L

    1984-06-01

    A glycoprotein complex of 210,000 and 130,000 m.w., found on mitogen or alloantigen-stimulated human T cells and not on other hematopoietic cells, has been defined by a monoclonal antibody (Mab). The components of this complex are a subset of a larger family of proteins (210,000, 165,000 and 130,000 m.w.) defined by a second Mab. In a panel of hematopoietic cell lines and cell types, only activated T cells (including the cell line HUT-102) express the 210,000/130,000 complex and these cells also express the IL 2 receptor, a characteristic marker for activated T cells. The 210,000/130,000 m.w. complex (reactive with the Mab TS2/7) is present on all long-term activated T cells, including both the OKT4 and OKT8 subsets. The 210,000 m.w. subunit is expressed only on activated T cells. Other lymphoid cells express either the 130,000 m.w. subunit alone (unactivated lymphocytes, thymocytes, HUT-78) or the 130,000 subunit together with a 165,000 subunit (MOLT-4, HSB, and other leukemic T cell lines). The 210,000/130,000 m.w., 165,000/130,000 m.w. and 130,000 m.w. complexes are antigenically related in that all share reactivity with the Mab A- 1A5 . Among non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells and cell lines, none express the 210,000 m.w. chain; adherent cells (monocytes) and myeloid cell lines each express single proteins of 130,000 to 155,000 m.w. Granulocytes and red blood cells are negative and platelets express multiple bands (165,000 and 140,000 m.w.). Immunoperoxidase staining of tissue sections showed that a broad range of tissues and cell types had material cross-reactive with the lymphoid 130,000 m.w. protein. However, only a discrete subset of those tissues and cells including blood vessel walls, connective tissue, smooth muscle, kidney mesangial cells, and some non-cellular matrix tissue, had material cross-reactive with the 210,000 m.w. protein on activated T lymphocytes. PMID:6327814

  15. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions.

  16. Molecular Rigidity in Dry and Hydrated Onion Cell Walls.

    PubMed

    Ha, M. A.; Apperley, D. C.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1997-10-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation experiments can provide information on the rigidity of individual molecules within a complex structure such as a cell wall, and thus show how each polymer can potentially contribute to the rigidity of the whole structure. We measured the proton magnetic relaxation parameters T2 (spin-spin) and T1p (spin-lattice) through the 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of dry and hydrated cell walls from onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs. Dry cell walls behaved as rigid solids. The form of their T2 decay curves varied on a continuum between Gaussian, as in crystalline solids, and exponential, as in more mobile materials. The degree of molecular mobility that could be inferred from the T2 and T1p decay patterns was consistent with a crystalline state for cellulose and a glassy state for dry pectins. The theory of composite materials may be applied to explain the rigidity of dry onion cell walls in terms of their components. Hydration made little difference to the rigidity of cellulose and most of the xyloglucan shared this rigidity, but the pectic fraction became much more mobile. Therefore, the cellulose/xyloglucan microfibrils behaved as solid rods, and the most significant physical distinction within the hydrated cell wall was between the microfibrils and the predominantly pectic matrix. A minor xyloglucan fraction was much more mobile than the microfibrils and probably corresponded to cross-links between them. Away from the microfibrils, pectins expanded upon hydration into a nonhomogeneous, but much softer, almost-liquid gel. These data are consistent with a model for the stress-bearing hydrated cell wall in which pectins provide limited stiffness across the thickness of the wall, whereas the cross-linked microfibril network provides much greater rigidity in other directions. PMID:12223827

  17. Simulated microgravity inhibits cell wall regeneration of Penicillium decumbens protoplasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Sun, Y.; Yi, Z. C.; Rong, L.; Zhuang, F. Y.; Fan, Y. B.

    2010-09-01

    This work compares cell wall regeneration from protoplasts of the fungus Penicillium decumbens under rotary culture (simulated microgravity) and stationary cultures. Using an optimized lytic enzyme mixture, protoplasts were successfully released with a yield of 5.3 × 10 5 cells/mL. Under simulated microgravity conditions, the protoplast regeneration efficiency was 33.8%, lower than 44.9% under stationary conditions. Laser scanning confocal microscopy gave direct evidence for reduced formation of polysaccharides under simulated conditions. Scanning electron microscopy showed the delayed process of cell wall regeneration by simulated microgravity. The delayed regeneration of P. decumbens cell wall under simulated microgravity was likely caused by the inhibition of polysaccharide synthesis. This research contributes to the understanding of how gravitational loads affect morphological and physiological processes of fungi.

  18. Force and compliance: rethinking morphogenesis in walled cells.

    PubMed

    Harold, Franklin M

    2002-12-01

    In the turgid cells of plants, protists, fungi, and bacteria, walls resist swelling; they also confer shape on the cell. These two functions are not unrelated: cell physiologists have generally agreed that morphogenesis turns on the deformation of existing wall and the deposition of new wall, while turgor pressure produces the work of expansion. In 1990, I summed up consensus in a phrase: "localized compliance with the global force of turgor pressure." My purpose here is to survey the impact of recent discoveries on the traditional conceptual framework. Topics include the recognition of a cytoskeleton in bacteria; the tide of information and insight about budding in yeast; the role of the Spitzenkörper in hyphal extension; calcium ions and actin dynamics in shaping a tip; and the interplay of protons, expansins and cellulose fibrils in cells of higher plants.

  19. Molecular basis of preferential resistance to colchicine in multidrug-resistant human cells conferred by Gly-185 yields Val-185 substitution in P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Safa, A.R.; Stern, R.K.; Choi, Kyunghee; Agresti, M.; Tamai, Ikumi; Mehta, N.D.; Roninson, I.B. )

    1990-09-01

    Expression of P-glycoprotein, encoded by the human MDR1 gene, results in cross-resistance to many lipophilic cytotoxic drugs (multidrug resistance). P-glycoprotein is believed to function as an energy-dependent efflux pump that is responsible for decreased drug accumulation in multidrug-resistant cells. Previous work showed that preferential resistance to colchicine in a colchicine-selected multidrug-resistant cell line was caused by spontaneous mutations in the MDR1 gene that resulted in a Gly-185 {yields} Val-185 substitution in P-glycoprotein. The authors have now compared transfectant cell lines expressing the wild-type Gly-185 or the mutant Val-185 P-glycoprotein with regard to their levels of resistance to and accumulation and binding of different drugs. In cells expressing the mutant protein, increased resistance to colchicine and decreased resistance to vinblastine correlated with a decreased accumulation of colchicine and increased accumulation of vinblastine. Expression of the mutant P-glycoprotein also resulted in significantly increased resistance to epipodophyllotoxin and decreased resistance to vincristine and actinomycin D; smaller changes in resistance were observed for several other drugs. Unexpectedly, the mutant P-glycoprotein showed increased binding of photoactive analogs of vinblastine and verapamil and the photoactive compound azidopine and decreased binding of a photoactive colchicine analog. These results suggest that the Gly-185 {yields} Val-185 substitution affects not the initial drug-binding site of P-glycoprotein but another site, associated with the release of P-glycoprotein-bound drugs to the outside of the cell.

  20. Chromosome and cell wall segregation in Streptococcus faecium ATCC 9790

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.L.; Glaser, D.; Dicker, D.T.; Zito, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    Segregation was studied by measuring the positions of autoradiographic grain clusters in chains formed from single cells containing on average less than one radiolabeled chromosome strand. The degree to which chromosomal and cell wall material cosegregated was quantified by using the methods of S. Cooper and M. Weinberger, dividing the number of chains labeled at the middle. This analysis indicated that in contrast to chromosomal segregation in Escherichia coli and, in some studies, to that in gram-positive rods, chromosomal segregation in Streptococcus faecium was slightly nonrandom and did not vary with growth rate. Results were not significantly affected by strand exchange. In contrast, labeled cell wall segregated predominantly nonrandomly.

  1. Relationship between P-glycoprotein expression and cyclosporin A in kidney. An immunohistological and cell culture study.

    PubMed Central

    García del Moral, R.; O'Valle, F.; Andújar, M.; Aguilar, M.; Lucena, M. A.; López-Hidalgo, J.; Ramírez, C.; Medina-Cano, M. T.; Aguilar, D.; Gómez-Morales, M.

    1995-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded in humans by the mdr-1 gene, acts physiologically as an efflux pump to expel hydrophobic substances from cells. This glycoprotein is closely related to multidrug resistance in tumor cells and can be modulated by cyclosporin A (CsA). We investigated the relationship between CsA and P-gp in 52 renal allograft biopsies and in cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) renal tubule cells to determine whether the intrarenal accumulation of CsA or chronic stimulation with the drug modified the expression of P-gp. Expression of P-gp and CsA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was evaluated semiquantitatively. Modulation of P-gp in MDCK cells after chronic stimulation with CsA for 7, 30, and 60 days was analyzed by flow cytometry. P-gp and CsA immunostaining in renal post-transplant biopsies showed considerable overlap in all cases (Spearman's test, r = 0.577, P < 0.001). After 7 days in vitro, the number of cells expressing P-gp increased progressively; a further increase in mean fluorescence was found after 60 days (P < 0.001, Student's t-test). Our findings suggest that in non-neoplastic cells, CsA may stimulate P-gp as a mechanism of detoxification. Individual differences in the adaptive responses to glycoprotein may be responsible for the appearance of nephrotoxicity or a CsA-resistant rejection reaction in cases of overexpression on lymphocytes and macrophages. Images Figure 1 PMID:7856751

  2. 15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. View of interior, north wall of hot cell featuring radioactive materials containment box, facing east - Nevada Test Site, Reactor Maintenance & Disassembly Complex, Junior Hot Cell, Jackass Flats, Area 25, South of intersection of Roads F & G, Mercury, Nye County, NV

  3. Brachypodium distachyon grain: characterization of endosperm cell walls.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Fabienne; Bouchet, Brigitte; Jamme, Frédéric; Robert, Paul; Quéméner, Bernard; Barron, Cécile; Larré, Colette; Dumas, Paul; Saulnier, Luc

    2011-01-01

    The wild grass Brachypodium distachyon has been proposed as an alternative model species for temperate cereals. The present paper reports on the characterization of B. distachyon grain, placing emphasis on endosperm cell walls. Brachypodium distachyon is notable for its high cell wall polysaccharide content that accounts for ∼52% (w/w) of the endosperm in comparison with 2-7% (w/w) in other cereals. Starch, the typical storage polysaccharide, is low [<10% (w/w)] in the endosperm where the main polysaccharide is (1-3) (1-4)-β-glucan [40% (w/w) of the endosperm], which in all likelihood plays a role as a storage compound. In addition to (1-3) (1-4)-β-glucan, endosperm cells contain cellulose and xylan in significant amounts. Interestingly, the ratio of ferulic acid to arabinoxylan is higher in B. distachyon grain than in other investigated cereals. Feruloylated arabinoxylan is mainly found in the middle lamella and cell junction zones of the storage endosperm, suggesting a potential role in cell-cell adhesion. The present results indicate that B. distachyon grains contain all the cell wall polysaccharides encountered in other cereal grains. Thus, due to its fully sequenced genome, its short life cycle, and the genetic tools available for mutagenesis/transformation, B. distachyon is a good model to investigate cell wall polysaccharide synthesis and function in cereal grains.

  4. 47. ARAI. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. ARA-I. Interior view of operating wall of hot cell in ARA-626. Note stands for operators at viewing windows. Manipulators with hand grips extend cables and other controls into hot cell through ducts above windows. Ineel photo no. 81-27. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Membrane-wall attachments in plasmolysed plant cells.

    PubMed

    Lang, I; Barton, D A; Overall, R L

    2004-12-01

    Field emission scanning electron microscopy of plasmolysed Tradescantia virginiana leaf epidermal cells gave novel insights into the three-dimensional architecture of Hechtian strands, Hechtian reticulum, and the inner surface of the cell wall without the need for extraction. At high magnification, we observed fibres that pin the plasma membrane to the cell wall after plasmolysis. Treatment with cellulase caused these connecting fibres to be lost and the pinned out plasma membrane of the Hechtian reticulum to disintegrate into vesicles with diameters of 100-250 nm. This suggests that the fibres may be cellulose. After 4 h of plasmolysis, a fibrous meshwork that labelled with anti-callose antibodies was observed within the space between the plasmolysed protoplast and the cell wall by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Interestingly, macerase-pectinase treatment resulted in the loss of this meshwork, suggesting that it was stabilised by pectins. We suggest that cellulose microfibrils extending from strands of the Hechtian reticulum and entwining into the cell wall matrix act as anchors for the plasma membrane as it moves away from the wall during plasmolysis.

  6. Purification and characterization of a soybean cell wall protein

    SciTech Connect

    San Francisco, S.; Tierney, M.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Plant cell wall composition is thought to reflect cellular responses to developmental and environmental signals. We have purified a 33 kDa protein from cell wall extracts of soybean seedlings which is most abundant in extracts from the hook region of the hypocotyl and is rich in proline and hydroxypyroline. In vivo {sup 3}H-proline labelling of hypocotyl tissues indicates that the hook tissue is the predominant site for synthesis of this protein. In unwounded hook, label is incorporated into a 33 kDa protein, while in wounded hook this and additional proteins rich in proline are synthesized. Similarly treated cell wall extracts analyzed by Western blot analysis, using a polyclonal antibody raised against this 33kD protein, showed that the 33 kDa protein is most abundant in cell wall extracts from the hook region of unwounded seedlings and does not increase upon wounding. An immunologically related 35kD protein is also apparent in extracts from wounded hooks and appears to co-migrate with one of the labelled proteins extractable from this tissue. These data indicate that there are two related, proline-rich cell wall proteins in the hook region of soybean seedlings, one of which (33 kDa) is prominent during seedling development and another (35 kDa) which is wound inducible.

  7. Structure, function, and biosynthesis of plant cell walls: proceedings of the seventh annual symposium in botany

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, W.M.; Bartnicki-Garcia, S.

    1984-01-01

    Papers in the following areas were included in these symposium proceedings: (1) cell wall chemistry and biosynthesis; (2) cell wall hydrolysis and associated physiology; (3) cellular events associated with cell wall biosynthesis; and (4) interactions of plant cell walls with pathogens and related responses. Papers have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

  8. Sweet new world: glycoproteins in bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M Alexander; Riley, Lee W; Benz, Inga

    2003-12-01

    In eukaryotes, the combinatorial potential of carbohydrates is used for the modulation of protein function. However, despite the wealth of cell wall and surface-associated carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, the accepted dogma has been that prokaryotes are not able to glycosylate proteins. This has now changed and protein glycosylation in prokaryotes is an accepted fact. Intriguingly, in Gram-negative bacteria most glycoproteins are associated with virulence factors of medically significant pathogens. Also, important steps in pathogenesis have been linked to the glycan substitution of surface proteins, indicating that the glycosylation of bacterial proteins might serve specific functions in infection and pathogenesis and interfere with inflammatory immune responses. Therefore, the carbohydrate modifications and glycosylation pathways of bacterial proteins will become new targets for therapeutic and prophylactic measures. Here we discuss recent findings on the structure, genetics and function of glycoproteins of medically important bacteria and potential applications of bacterial glycosylation systems for the generation of novel glycoconjugates.

  9. The Structure of Plant Cell Walls: II. The Hemicellulose of the Walls of Suspension-cultured Sycamore Cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, W D; Talmadge, K W; Keegstra, K; Albersheim, P

    1973-01-01

    The molecular structure, chemical properties, and biological function of the xyloglucan polysaccharide isolated from cell walls of suspension-cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) cells are described. The sycamore wall xyloglucan is compared to the extracellular xyloglucan secreted by suspension-cultured sycamore cells into their culture medium and is also compared to the seed "amyloid" xyloglucans.Xyloglucan-or fragments of xyloglucan-and acidic fragments of the pectic polysaccharides are released from endopolygalacturonase-pretreated sycamore walls by treatment of these walls with 8 m urea, endoglucanase, or 0.5 n NaOH. Some of the xyloglucan thus released is found to cochromatograph with the acidic pectic fragments on diethylaminoethyl Sephadex. The chemical or enzymic treatments required for the release of xyloglucan from the walls and the cochromatography of xyloglucan with the acidic pectic fragments indicate that xyloglucan is covalently linked to the pectic polysaccharides and is noncovalently bound to the cellulose fibrils of the sycamore cell wall.The molecular structure of sycamore xyloglucan was characterized by methylation analysis of the oligosaccharides obtained by endoglucanase treatment of the polymer. The structure of the polymer is based on a repeating heptasaccharide unit which consists of 4 residues of beta-1-4-linked glucose and 3 residues of terminal xylose. A single xylose residue is glycosidically linked to carbon 6 of 3 of the glucosyl residues.

  10. P-glycoprotein induction in Caco-2 cells by newly synthetized thioxanthones prevents paraquat cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Palmeira, Andreia; Carmo, Helena; Barbosa, Daniel José; Gameiro, Mariline; Gomes, Ana; Paiva, Ana Mafalda; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The induction of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, has been proposed as a strategy against the toxicity induced by P-gp substrates such as the herbicide paraquat (PQ). The aim of this study was to screen five newly synthetized thioxanthonic derivatives, a group known to interact with P-gp, as potential inducers of the pump's expression and/or activity and to evaluate whether they would afford protection against PQ-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells. All five thioxanthones (20 µM) caused a significant increase in both P-gp expression and activity as evaluated by flow cytometry using the UIC2 antibody and rhodamine 123, respectively. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the tested compounds, when present only during the efflux of rhodamine 123, rapidly induced an activation of P-gp. The tested compounds also increased P-gp ATPase activity in MDR1-Sf9 membrane vesicles, indicating that all derivatives acted as P-gp substrates. PQ cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of four thioxanthone derivatives, and this protective effect was reversed upon incubation with a specific P-gp inhibitor. In silico studies showed that all the tested thioxanthones fitted onto a previously described three-feature P-gp induction pharmacophore. Moreover, in silico interactions between thioxanthones and P-gp in the presence of PQ suggested that a co-transport mechanism may be operating. Based on the in vitro activation results, a pharmacophore model for P-gp activation was built, which will be of further use in the screening for new P-gp activators. In conclusion, the study demonstrated the potential of the tested thioxanthonic compounds in protecting against toxic effects induced by P-gp substrates through P-gp induction and activation.

  11. P-glycoprotein induction in Caco-2 cells by newly synthetized thioxanthones prevents paraquat cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Palmeira, Andreia; Carmo, Helena; Barbosa, Daniel José; Gameiro, Mariline; Gomes, Ana; Paiva, Ana Mafalda; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The induction of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, has been proposed as a strategy against the toxicity induced by P-gp substrates such as the herbicide paraquat (PQ). The aim of this study was to screen five newly synthetized thioxanthonic derivatives, a group known to interact with P-gp, as potential inducers of the pump's expression and/or activity and to evaluate whether they would afford protection against PQ-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells. All five thioxanthones (20 µM) caused a significant increase in both P-gp expression and activity as evaluated by flow cytometry using the UIC2 antibody and rhodamine 123, respectively. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the tested compounds, when present only during the efflux of rhodamine 123, rapidly induced an activation of P-gp. The tested compounds also increased P-gp ATPase activity in MDR1-Sf9 membrane vesicles, indicating that all derivatives acted as P-gp substrates. PQ cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of four thioxanthone derivatives, and this protective effect was reversed upon incubation with a specific P-gp inhibitor. In silico studies showed that all the tested thioxanthones fitted onto a previously described three-feature P-gp induction pharmacophore. Moreover, in silico interactions between thioxanthones and P-gp in the presence of PQ suggested that a co-transport mechanism may be operating. Based on the in vitro activation results, a pharmacophore model for P-gp activation was built, which will be of further use in the screening for new P-gp activators. In conclusion, the study demonstrated the potential of the tested thioxanthonic compounds in protecting against toxic effects induced by P-gp substrates through P-gp induction and activation. PMID:25234084

  12. Cell Wall Alterations in the Arabidopsis emb30 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Shevell, Diane E.; Kunkel, Tim; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2000-01-01

    The Arabidopsis EMB30 gene is essential for controlling the polarity of cell growth and for normal cell adhesion during seedling development. In this article, we show that emb30 mutations also affect the growth of undifferentiated plant cells and adult tissues. EMB30 possesses a Sec7 domain and, based on similarities to other proteins, presumably functions in the secretory pathway. The plant cell wall depends on the secretory pathway to deliver its complex polysaccharides. We show that emb30 mutants have a cell wall defect that sometimes allows material to be deposited into the interstitial space between cells instead of being restricted to cell corners. In addition, pectin, a complex polysaccharide important for cell adhesion, appears to be abnormally localized in emb30 plants. In contrast, localization of epitopes associated with xyloglucan or arabinogalactan was similar in wild-type and emb30 tissues, and the localization of a marker molecule to vacuoles appeared normal. Therefore, emb30 mutations do not cause a general defect in the secretory pathway. Together, these results suggest that emb30 mutations result in an abnormal cell wall, which in turn may account for the defects in cell adhesion and polar cell growth control observed in the mutants. PMID:11090208

  13. Golgi-specific localization of transglycosylases engaged in glycoprotein biosynthesis in suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Ali, M S; Mitsui, T; Akazawa, T

    1986-12-01

    Golgi complex and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were isolated from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) by stepwise sucrose density gradient centrifugation using protoplasts as starting material. The purity of the two organelle fractions isolated was assessed by measuring marker enzyme activities. Localization of glycolipid and glycoprotein glycosyltransferase activities in the isolated Golgi and ER fractions was examined; three glycosyltransferases, i.e., galactosyltransferase, fucosyltransferase, and xylosyltransferase, proved to be almost exclusively confined to the Golgi, whereas the ER fractions contained glycolipid glycosyltransferase. The Golgi complex was further subfractionated on a discontinuous sucrose density gradient into two components, migrating at densities of 1.118 and 1.127 g/cm3. The two fractions differed in their compositional polypeptide bands discernible from Na-dodecylsulfate gel electrophoresis. Galactosyltransferase distributed nearly equally between the two protein peaks and xylosyltransferase activities using the endogenous acceptor also appeared to be localized in the two subcompartments. By contrast, fucosyltransferase, engaged in the terminal stage of glycosylation, banded in the lower density fractions. Golgi-specific alpha-mannosidase, which is presumably engaged in the sugar trimming of Asn-N-linked glycoprotein carbohydrate core, was enriched fourfold in specific activity in the fractions of the higher density. The overall experimental results indicate that the cotranslational glycosylation of Asn-N-linked glycoproteins, e.g., polyphenol oxidase (laccase), takes place in the ER, while subsequent post-translational processing of the oligosaccharide moiety proceeds successively in the two physically separable compartments of the Golgi complex.

  14. Role of membrane glycoproteins in the interaction of blood platelets with the vessel wall--the study on platelet adhesion to in vitro cultured subendothelial matrix.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Y; Handa, M; Nagai, H; Kamata, T; Anbo, H; Kawano, K; Araki, Y; Yamamoto, M; Ikeda, Y; Watanabe, K

    1989-12-01

    Adhesion of platelets to the subendothelium is an essential step in hemostasis and thrombosis. Several receptors for adhesive macromolecules have been identified on platelets and are included in the integrin family. To clarify the role of platelet membrane glycoproteins in the interaction of platelets with the subendothelium, 51Cr-labeled platelet adhesion assay and antibody-blocking experiments were performed by using in vitro cultured subendothelium under the static condition. The platelet adhesion in this assay was inhibited by anti-GPIa (VLA-2), GPIc (VLA-5) and -GPIc'-(VLA-6) antibodies, while anti-GPIb and -GPIIb/IIIa antibodies had no effect. Platelets from the patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia could also attach to the subendothelium, whereas those from a patient whose platelets lacked GPIa failed to attach to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The monoclonal antibodies against fibronectin and laminin which recognized the cell binding domain of these molecules inhibited the platelet adhesion when they were pre-treated with ECM. Furthermore, antibody-blocking experiments revealed that the percent inhibition by the combination of anti-GPIa, -GPIc and -GPIc' antibodies used herein was approximately 75%. They did not completely inhibit the attachment. These results suggest that the interactions of collagen, fibronectin and laminin with their receptors on platelets are involved in the mechanism of platelet adhesion to subendothelium.

  15. Multi-omics analysis identifies genes mediating the extension of cell walls in the Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation zone

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Michael H.; Holman, Tara J.; Sørensen, Iben; Cancho-Sanchez, Ester; Wells, Darren M.; Swarup, Ranjan; Knox, J. Paul; Willats, William G. T.; Ubeda-Tomás, Susana; Holdsworth, Michael; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Vissenberg, Kris; Hodgman, T. Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Plant cell wall composition is important for regulating growth rates, especially in roots. However, neither analyses of cell wall composition nor transcriptomes on their own can comprehensively reveal which genes and processes are mediating growth and cell elongation rates. This study reveals the benefits of carrying out multiple analyses in combination. Sections of roots from five anatomically and functionally defined zones in Arabidopsis thaliana were prepared and divided into three biological replicates. We used glycan microarrays and antibodies to identify the major classes of glycans and glycoproteins present in the cell walls of these sections, and identified the expected decrease in pectin and increase in xylan from the meristematic zone (MS), through the rapid and late elongation zones (REZ, LEZ) to the maturation zone and the rest of the root, including the emerging lateral roots. Other compositional changes included extensin and xyloglucan levels peaking in the REZ and increasing levels of arabinogalactan-proteins (AGP) epitopes from the MS to the LEZ, which remained high through the subsequent mature zones. Immuno-staining using the same antibodies identified the tissue and (sub)cellular localization of many epitopes. Extensins were localized in epidermal and cortex cell walls, while AGP glycans were specific to different tissues from root-hair cells to the stele. The transcriptome analysis found several gene families peaking in the REZ. These included a large family of peroxidases (which produce the reactive oxygen species (ROS) needed for cell expansion), and three xyloglucan endo-transglycosylase/hydrolase genes (XTH17, XTH18, and XTH19). The significance of the latter may be related to a role in breaking and re-joining xyloglucan cross-bridges between cellulose microfibrils, a process which is required for wall expansion. Knockdowns of these XTHs resulted in shorter root lengths, confirming a role of the corresponding proteins in root extension

  16. Cell growth pattern and wall microfibrillar arrangement: experiments with nitella.

    PubMed

    Gertel, E T; Green, P B

    1977-08-01

    In cylindrical cells growing throughout their length, over-all transverse reinforcement of the wall by microfibrils is believed to be required for cell elongation. The multinet theory states that in such cells microfibrils are deposited at the inner surface of the wall with transverse orientation and are then passively reoriented toward the longitudinal direction by the predominant longitudinal strain (surface expension). In the present study young Nitella cells were physically forced to grow in highly abnormal patterns: in length only, in girth only, or with localized suppression of growth. Subsequent gradients of microfibrillar arrangement within the wall cross-section were measured with polarized light and interference microscopes. The novel wall structures produced were in all cases explainable by passive reorientation, i.e. by the multinet theory. The study also showed that orientation of synthesis remains insensitive to several of the physical manipulations that strongly influence the passive behavior of wall microfibrils. Only the localized complete suppression of surface growth led to the deposition of nontransverse cellulose. These results suggest that the presence of strain is needed for continued oriented synthesis, but that the directional aspect of strain is not an "instructional" agent continuously guiding the orientation of synthesis, once this orientation has been established.

  17. Cell wall integrity signalling in human pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Dichtl, Karl; Samantaray, Sweta; Wagener, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Fungi are surrounded by a rigid structure, the fungal cell wall. Its plasticity and composition depend on active regulation of the underlying biosynthesis and restructuring processes. This involves specialised signalling pathways that control gene expression and activities of biosynthetic enzymes. The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway is the central signalling cascade required for the adaptation to a wide spectrum of cell wall perturbing conditions, including heat, oxidative stress and antifungals. In the recent years, great efforts were made to analyse the CWI pathway of diverse fungi. It turned out that the CWI signalling cascade is mostly conserved in the fungal kingdom. In this review, we summarise as well as compare the current knowledge on the canonical CWI pathway in the human pathogenic fungi Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Understanding the differences and similarities in the stress responses of these organisms could become a key to improving existing or developing new antifungal therapies. PMID:27155139

  18. Freezing stresses and hydration of isolated cell walls.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Yonghyeon; Pope, Jim; Wolfe, Joe

    2003-06-01

    The hydration of the cell walls of the giant alga Chara australis was measured as a function of temperature using quantitative deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of samples hydrated with D2O. At temperatures 23-5K below freezing, the hydration ratio (the ratio of mass of unfrozen water in microscopic phases in the cell wall to the dry mass) increases slowly with increasing temperature from about 0.2 to 0.4. It then rises rapidly with temperature in the few Kelvin below the freezing temperature. The linewidth of the NMR signal varies approximately linearly with the reciprocal of the hydration ratio, and with the freezing point depression or water potential. These empirical relations may be useful in estimating cell wall water contents in heterogeneous samples.

  19. A new method for extraction of pectin from cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maness, N.O.; Mort, A.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Pectin is often extracted from plant tissues using the Ca{sup ++} chelators ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA) or cyclohexane-trans-1,2 diamine tetraacetate (CDTA). While these chelators are effective in solubilizing pectin, even after extensive dialysis against distilled water, EDTA or CDTA remains associated with the pectin. The authors have found that if 500 mM imidazole buffer, pH 7.0 is substituted for 50 mM CDTA, pH 6.5, and for equivalent extraction periods, an equivalent amount of pectin with the same sugar composition is extracted. But, the imidazole buffer can be dialyzed away completely into distilled water. Their alternative procedure for extraction of pectin from cell walls will be presented. Utilization of the procedure for extraction of whole cell walls or cell walls pretreated with liquid hydrogen fluoride is discussed.

  20. Transcriptional wiring of cell wall-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Mutwil, Marek; Ruprecht, Colin; Giorgi, Federico M; Bringmann, Martin; Usadel, Björn; Persson, Staffan

    2009-09-01

    Transcriptional coordination, or co-expression, of genes may signify functional relatedness of the corresponding proteins. For example, several genes involved in secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis are co-expressed with genes engaged in the synthesis of xylan, which is a major component of the secondary cell wall. To extend these types of analyses, we investigated the co-expression relationships of all Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy)-related genes for Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, the intention was to transcriptionally link different cell wall-related processes to each other, and also to other biological functions. To facilitate easy manual inspection, we have displayed these interactions as networks and matrices, and created a web-based interface (http://aranet.mpimp-golm.mpg.de/corecarb) containing downloadable files for all the transcriptional associations.

  1. Modulation of Alternaria infectoria Cell Wall Chitin and Glucan Synthesis by Cell Wall Synthase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Chantal; Anjos, Jorge; Walker, Louise A.; Silva, Branca M. A.; Cortes, Luísa; Mota, Marta; Munro, Carol A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports the effects of caspofungin, a β-1,3-glucan synthase inhibitor, and nikkomycin Z, an inhibitor of chitin synthases, on two strains of Alternaria infectoria, a melanized fungus involved in opportunistic human infections and respiratory allergies. One of the strains tested, IMF006, bore phenotypic traits that conferred advantages in resisting antifungal treatment. First, the resting cell wall chitin content was higher and in response to caspofungin, the chitin level remained constant. In the other strain, IMF001, the chitin content increased upon caspofungin treatment to values similar to basal IMF006 levels. Moreover, upon caspofungin treatment, the FKS1 gene was upregulated in IMF006 and downregulated in IMF001. In addition, the resting β-glucan content was also different in both strains, with higher levels in IMF001 than in IMF006. However, this did not provide any advantage with respect to echinocandin resistance. We identified eight different chitin synthase genes and studied relative gene expression when the fungus was exposed to the antifungals under study. In both strains, exposure to caspofungin and nikkomycin Z led to modulation of the expression of class V and VII chitin synthase genes, suggesting its importance in the robustness of A. infectoria. The pattern of A. infectoria phagocytosis and activation of murine macrophages by spores was not affected by caspofungin. Monotherapy with nikkomycin Z and caspofungin provided only fungistatic inhibition, while a combination of both led to fungal cell lysis, revealing a strong synergistic action between the chitin synthase inhibitor and the β-glucan synthase inhibitor against this fungus. PMID:24614372

  2. Novel innate immune functions for galectin-1: galectin-1 inhibits cell fusion by Nipah virus envelope glycoproteins and augments dendritic cell secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Levroney, Ernest L; Aguilar, Hector C; Fulcher, Jennifer A; Kohatsu, Luciana; Pace, Karen E; Pang, Mabel; Gurney, Kevin B; Baum, Linda G; Lee, Benhur

    2005-07-01

    Galectin-1 (gal-1), an endogenous lectin secreted by a variety of cell types, has pleiotropic immunomodulatory functions, including regulation of lymphocyte survival and cytokine secretion in autoimmune, transplant disease, and parasitic infection models. However, the role of gal-1 in viral infections is unknown. Nipah virus (NiV) is an emerging pathogen that causes severe, often fatal, febrile encephalitis. The primary targets of NiV are endothelial cells. NiV infection of endothelial cells results in cell-cell fusion and syncytia formation triggered by the fusion (F) and attachment (G) envelope glycoproteins of NiV that bear glycan structures recognized by gal-1. In the present study, we report that NiV envelope-mediated cell-cell fusion is blocked by gal-1. This inhibition is specific to the Paramyxoviridae family because gal-1 did not inhibit fusion triggered by envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, including two retroviruses and a pox virus, but inhibited fusion triggered by envelope glycoproteins of the related Hendra virus and another paramyxovirus. The physiologic dimeric form of gal-1 is required for fusion inhibition because a monomeric gal-1 mutant had no inhibitory effect on cell fusion. gal-1 binds to specific N-glycans on NiV glycoproteins and aberrantly oligomerizes NiV-F and NiV-G, indicating a mechanism for fusion inhibition. gal-1 also increases dendritic cell production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, known to be protective in the setting of other viral diseases such as Ebola infections. Thus, gal-1 may have direct antiviral effects and may also augment the innate immune response against this emerging pathogen.

  3. Leucine-rich α-2-glycoprotein promotes TGFβ1-mediated growth suppression in the Lewis lung carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Norihiko; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Honda, Hiromi; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Nomura, Shintaro; Inohara, Hidenori; Naka, Tetsuji

    2015-05-10

    Leucine-rich α2-glycoprotein (LRG) is an approximately 50-kDa glycoprotein that has been found to be elevated in the sera of patients with several types of cancer. LRG directly binds to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and modulates TGFβ1 signaling in endothelial cells; however, the precise function of LRG in cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of LRG in cancer. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells hardly expressed LRG. The growth of LLC tumors allografted in the LRG knockout (KO) mice was significantly increased compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Conversely, overexpression of LRG significantly inhibited the growth of LLC tumors in WT mice. In the presence of LRG, TGFβ1 significantly inhibited the proliferation of LLC cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma Hep3B cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis via the potent activation of smad2 and its downstream signaling pathway. Furthermore, administration of a TGFβR1 inhibitor (SB431542) significantly enhanced the growth of LLC tumors in WT mice compared with LRG KO mice via inhibition of apoptosis. We propose that LRG potentiates the effect of TGFβ1 in cancer cells whose growth is suppressed in the presence of TGFβ1.

  4. Identifying the differences in mechanisms of mycophenolic acid controlling fucose content of glycoproteins expressed in different CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, An; Tsang, Valerie Liu; Markely, Lam R; Kurt, Lutfiye; Huang, Yao-Ming; Prajapati, Shashi; Kshirsagar, Rashmi

    2016-11-01

    In the biopharmaceutical industry, glycosylation is a critical quality attribute that can modulate the efficacy of a therapeutic glycoprotein. Obtaining a consistent glycoform profile is desired because molecular function can be defined by its carbohydrate structures. Specifically, the fucose content of oligosaccharides in glycoproteins is one of the most important attributes that can significantly affect antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. It is therefore important to understand the fucosylation pathway and be able to control fucosylation at the desired level to match predecessor materials in late stage and biosimilar programs. Several strategies were explored in this study and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was able to finely modulate the fucose content with the least undesired side effects. However, the response was significantly different between CHO cell lines of different lineages. Further experiments were then performed for a deeper understanding of the mechanism of fucosylation in different CHO cell lines. Results indicated that changes in the intracellular nucleotide involved in fucosylation pathway after MPA treatment are the main cause of the differences in fucosylation level response in different CHO cell lines. Differences in MPA metabolism in the various CHO cell lines directly resulted in different levels of afucosylation measured in antibodies produced by the CHO cell lines. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2367-2376. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  6. Naturally Occurring Variability in the Envelope Glycoprotein of HIV-1 and the Development of Cell Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brower, Evan T.; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring genetic variability across HIV-1 subtypes causes amino acid polymorphisms in encoded HIV-1 proteins including the envelope glycoproteins associated with viral entry. The effects of amino acid polymorphisms on the mechanism of HIV-1 entry into cells, a process initiated by the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cellular CD4 receptor, are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that amino acid polymorphisms affect the structural stability and domain cooperativity of gp120 and that those differences are reflected in the binding mechanism of the viral envelope glycoprotein to the cell surface receptor and coreceptor. Moreover, subtype differences also affect the binding behavior of experimental HIV cell entry inhibitors. While gp120-A has a slightly lower denaturation temperature than gp120-B, the most notable stability difference is that for gp120-B the van't Hoff to calorimetric enthalpy ratio (ΔHvH/ΔH) is 0.95 whereas for gp120-A is 0.6, indicative of more cooperative domain/domain interactions in gp120-B, as this protein more closely approaches a two-state transition. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that CD4 and 17b (a surrogate antibody for the chemokine coreceptor) exhibit 7 and 3-fold weaker binding affinities for gp120-A. The binding of these proteins as well as that of the experimental entry inhibitor NBD-556 induce smaller conformational changes in gp120-A as evidenced by significantly smaller binding enthalpies and binding entropies. Together, these results describe the effects of gp120 polymorphisms on binding to host cell receptors and emphasize that guidelines for developing future entry inhibitors must recognize and deal with genomic differences between HIV strains. PMID:20166763

  7. Tissue-mediated selection of viral variants: correlation between glycoprotein mutation and growth in neuronal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Villarete, L; Somasundaram, T; Ahmed, R

    1994-01-01

    Viral variants with different biological properties predominate in the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphoid tissues of carrier mice infected at birth with the Armstrong strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. The CNS isolates have the same phenotype as the parental strain and cause acute infections in adult mice, while the spleen-derived isolates cause chronic infections associated with suppressed T-cell responses and susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Our previous studies have identified a single amino acid change in the viral glycoprotein, a phenylalanine-to-leucine (F-->L) mutation at residue 260, that correlates with the tissue-specific selection and the persistent and immunosuppressive phenotype of the spleen isolates (R. Ahmed, C.S. Hahn, T. Somasundaram, L. Villarete, M. Matloubian, and J. H. Strauss, J. Virol. 65:4242-4247, 1991). In this study, we screened viral isolates obtained from the spleen, liver, kidney, and brain of carrier mice for the presence of this mutation and determined the temporal selection of variants as they appear in these organs. We found that this F-->L amino acid change is common to > 90% of the spleen and liver isolates and is selected for rapidly by day 32 postinfection (p.i.). Although the kinetics observed in the kidney are relatively slower than in the spleen and liver, this F-->L mutation predominates in the kidney-derived isolates by 250 days p.i. In contrast, the majority of the CNS isolates retain the parental sequence up to 250 days p.i. In addition, most of the brain isolates replicated efficiently in a neuronal cell line, and this enhanced growth phenotype in neurons correlated with the parental F genotype. This linkage with neurotropism, along with our earlier finding that the F-->L mutation is necessary for enhanced infection of macrophages (M. Matloubian, S. R. Kolhekar, T. Somasundaram, and R. Ahmed, J. Virol. 67:7340-7349, 1993), provides a cellular basis for the molecular changes associated with

  8. MECHANISM OF CELL WALL PENETRATION BY VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Puck, Theodore T.; Lee, Howard H.

    1954-01-01

    Treatment of radioactively labelled host cells with T1 or T2 bacteriophages induces a leakage of cellular P and S into the medium. Evidence is presented showing that this increased cell permeability is not the result of complete lysis of a small fraction of the cells, but rather is made up of contributions from all or most of the infected population. This leakage of cellular constituents exhibits the following characteristics: (a) Infection of a cell with a single virus suffices to evoke the reaction; (b) Increasing the multiplicity up to 7 to 8 virus particles per cell does not affect the extent of leakage produced; (c) Some leakage does occur at 0°C., but much less than at 37°C.; (d) Infection by T1 virus results in a smaller amount of leakage than in the case of T2, but the pattern of response to varying virus multiplicity is the same; (e) The P resulting from such leakage contains no DNA and chemically resembles that which elutes in smaller amounts from uninfected cells; (f) At 37°C. the virus-induced leakage reaction appears within a matter of seconds, and usually decreases after 2 to 3 minutes; (g) The reaction is inhibited by 0.025 M Mg++. Theoretical considerations are presented suggesting the place of this reaction in the sequence of events constituting the virus penetration reaction; its relationship to the phenomenon of lysis-from-without; and its resemblance to the leakage reaction produced by electrostatic binding of ionized compounds to cell surfaces. The existence of similar effects in avian-mammalian virus systems is noted. PMID:13163323

  9. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  10. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components. PMID:26223789

  11. Anammox Planctomycetes have a peptidoglycan cell wall

    PubMed Central

    van Teeseling, Muriel C.F.; Mesman, Rob J.; Kuru, Erkin; Espaillat, Akbar; Cava, Felipe; Brun, Yves V.; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Kartal, Boran; van Niftrik, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Planctomycetes are intriguing microorganisms that apparently lack peptidoglycan, a structure that controls the shape and integrity of almost all bacterial cells. Therefore, the planctomycetal cell envelope is considered exceptional and their cell plan uniquely compartmentalized. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) Planctomycetes play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle by releasing fixed nitrogen back to the atmosphere as N2. Here using a complementary array of state-of-the-art techniques including continuous culturing, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, peptidoglycan-specific probes and muropeptide analysis, we show that the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis contains peptidoglycan. On the basis of the thickness, composition and location of peptidoglycan in K. stuttgartiensis, we propose to redefine Planctomycetes as Gram-negative bacteria. Our results demonstrate that Planctomycetes are not an exception to the universal presence of peptidoglycan in bacteria. PMID:25962786

  12. The structure and function of glycoproteins synthesized during slime-polysaccharide production by membranes of the root-cap cells of maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed Central

    Green, J R; Northcote, D H

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of the maize root slime polysaccharides was investigated by using [1-3H]-fucose as a marker for slime production. Three fractions were separated by centrifugation in a CsCl density gradient. Two of these were glycoproteins and occurred within the membranes of the cells of the root tip; the third was the slime polysaccharides. Radioactive pulse-chase experiments showed that the glycoproteins were precursors of the slime polysaccharides, and the carbohydrate portion of the glycoproteins had a similar composition to that of the free slime. The linkage between the protein and the carbohydrate of one of the glycoproteins was shown to be a xylose-threonine bond. It is postulated that the slime polysaccharides are synthesized and transported on proteins within the membrane system of the root tip. PMID:646802

  13. Glycoprotein C plays a role in the adsorption of duck enteritis virus to chicken embryo fibroblasts cells and in infectivity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaokun; Zou, Zhong; Jin, Meilin

    2013-06-01

    Unlike glycoprotein C (gC) of many mammalian herpes viruses, gC of some avian herpes viruses does not play a principle role in the binding of virus to heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface. The roles of duck enteritis virus (DEV) gC on viral attachment remained unclear. In this study, we showed that gC expressed in vitro could bind to chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) cells and inhibit the adsorption of duck enteritis virus (DEV) onto CEF cells effectively and antiserum directed against gC inhibited the infection of DEV. Furthermore, it was confirmed that gC protein expressed in baculovirus system did not bind to heparin-Sepharose beads and virus binding to cells were independent of heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the surface of cells. Therefore, gC contributes to adsorption and infection of DEV.

  14. A model of cell wall expansion based on thermodynamics of polymer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veytsman, B. A.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    A theory of cell wall extension is proposed. It is shown that macroscopic properties of cell walls can be explained through the microscopic properties of interpenetrating networks of cellulose and hemicellulose. The qualitative conclusions of the theory agree with the existing experimental data. The dependence of the cell wall yield threshold on the secretion of the wall components is discussed.

  15. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B; Baker, Timothy S; Kuhn, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions.

  16. Human Adenovirus 52 Uses Sialic Acid-containing Glycoproteins and the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor for Binding to Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lenman, Annasara; Liaci, A. Manuel; Liu, Yan; Årdahl, Carin; Rajan, Anandi; Nilsson, Emma; Bradford, Will; Kaeshammer, Lisa; Jones, Morris S.; Frängsmyr, Lars; Feizi, Ten; Stehle, Thilo; Arnberg, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52) is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK) binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK) binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy. PMID:25674795

  17. Wood Contains a Cell-Wall Structural Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wuli; O'Malley, David M.; Sederoff, Ronald R.

    1992-07-01

    A pine extensin-like protein (PELP) has been localized in metabolically active cells of differentiating xylem and in mature wood of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). This proline-rich glycosylated protein was purified from cell walls of differentiating xylem by differential solubility and gel electrophoresis. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against the deglycosylated purified protein (dPELP) and purified antibody was used for immunolocalization. Immunogold and alkaline phosphatase secondary antibody staining both show antigen in secondary cell walls of earlywood and less staining in latewood. Immunoassays of milled dry wood were developed and used to show increased availability of antigen after hydrogen fluoride or cellulase treatment and decreased antigen after chlorite treatment. The specificity of the antigen-antibody reaction was confirmed by competition assays and by preadsorption of antibody to the purified protein. We propose that extensin-like protein is present in xylem cell walls during lignification and that the protein remains as a structural component of cell walls in wood for many years after xylogenesis. We suggest that such structural proteins play important roles in the differentiation of xylem and thereby could affect the properties of wood.

  18. Extracellular proteases modify cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Jolliffe, L K; Doyle, R J; Streips, U N

    1980-01-01

    The rate of turnover of peptidoglycan in exponentially growing cultures of Bacillus subtilis was observed to be sensitive to extracellular protease. In protease-deficient mutants the rates of cell wall turnover were greater than that of wild-type strain 168, whereas hyperprotease-producing strains exhibited decreased rates of peptidoglycan turnover. The rate of peptidogylcan turnover in a protease-deficient strain was decreased when the mutant was grown in the presence of a hyperprotease-producing strain. The addition of phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a serine protease inhibitor, to cultures of hyperprotease-producing strains increased their rates of cell wall turnover. Isolated cell walls of all protease mutants contained autolysin levels equal to or greater than that of wild-type strain 168. The presence of filaments, or cells with incomplete septa, was observed in hyperprotease-producing strains or when a protease-deficient strain was grown in the presence of subtilisin. The results suggest that the turnover of cell walls in B. subtilis may be regulated by extracellular proteases. Images PMID:6102558

  19. Comparison of affinity chromatography and adsorption to vaccinia virus recombinant infected cells for depletion of antibodies directed against respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins present in a human immunoglobulin preparation.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Patricia; Melero, José A; García-Barreno, Blanca; Palomo, Concepción

    2005-06-01

    Antibodies directed against human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) glycoproteins were depleted from a commercial immunoglobulin preparation (RespiGam) by two different methods. The first method consisted of repeated adsorption of RespiGam to Sepharose beads with covalently bound soluble forms of the two major viral glycoproteins (F or G). The second method consisted of adsorption of immunoglobulins to live cells expressing F or G glycoproteins on their surfaces after infection with vaccinia virus recombinants. While the first method removed efficiently antibodies that reacted with F and/or G glycoproteins by ELISA, it was inefficient in the elimination of anti-HRSV neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the second method removed efficiently anti-HRSV antibodies that both reacted by ELISA and neutralized virus infectivity. These results confirm that human neutralizing antibodies are directed exclusively against HRSV F and G glycoproteins, and, they raise the possibility that F and G glycoproteins inserted into cell membranes differ antigenically from their soluble forms linked covalently to Sepharose beads.

  20. Inhibitory effect of glycoprotein isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO on activities of allergy-mediators in compound 48/80-stimulated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the anti-allergy potentials of glycoprotein (90kDa) isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO (OFI glycoprotein) in vivo (ICR mice) and in vitro (RBL-2H3 cells). At first, to know whether the OFI glycoprotein has an inhibitory ability for allergy in vivo, we evaluated the activities of allergy-related factors such as histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in compound 48/80 (8 ml/kg BW)-treated ICR mice. After that, we studied to found the effect for anti-allergy in vitro such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, arachidonic acid, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in compound 48/80 (5 microg/ml)-treated RBL-2H3 cells. Our results showed that the OFI glycoprotein (5 mg/kg) inhibited histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in mice serum. Also OFI glycoprotein (25 microg/ml) has suppressive effects on the expression of MAPK (ERK1/2), and on protein expression of anti-allergic proteins (iNOS and COX-2). Thus, we speculate that the OFI glycoprotein is an example of natural compound that blocks anti-allergic signal transduction pathways.

  1. Pathogenic role of anti-ß2-glycoprotein I antibodies in antiphospholipid associated fetal loss: characterisation of ß2-glycoprotein I binding to trophoblast cells and functional effects of anti-ß2-glycoprotein I antibodies in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Di, S; Raschi, E; Testoni, C; Castellani, R; D'Asta, M; Shi, T; Krilis, S; Caruso, A; Meroni, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: Antiphospholipid antibodies reacting with ß2-glycoprotein I (ß2GPI) have been associated with recurrent fetal loss and pregnancy complications. Objective: To investigate whether specific mutations in the phospholipid binding site of ß2GPI might affect its binding to trophoblast and in turn the anti-ß2GPI antibody induced functional effects. Methods: ß2GPI adhesion to trophoblast was evaluated as human monoclonal IgM or polyclonal IgG anti-ß2GPI antibody binding to trophoblast monolayers cultured (1) in complete medium; (2) in serum-free medium; (3) after serum starvation in the presence of purified human ß2GPI; or (4) in the presence of ß2GPI with single or multiple mutations in the amino acid loop Cys281-Lys-Asn-Lys-Glu-Lys-Lys-Cys288. The effect of anti-ß2GPI binding to trophoblast was evaluated as chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) mRNA expression, and protein release by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Results: ß2GPI adhesion to trophoblast and its consequent recognition by the specific antibodies were inversely proportional to the mutation number in the phospholipid binding site. Anti-ß2GPI antibodies reduced gonadotropin release, hormone dependent hCG mRNA expression, and protein synthesis in the presence of ß2GPI, while the addition of the mutants or the absence of ß2GPI had no effect. Conclusions: ß2GPI binds to trophoblast in vitro through its fifth domain, as reported for endothelial cells, and can be recognised by anti-ß2GPI antibodies; the antibody binding downregulates trophoblast hCG synthesis and secretion. Such a mechanism might contribute to defective placentation in women with fetal loss associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:15256379

  2. Plant-originated glycoprotein (24 kDa) has an inhibitory effect on proliferation of BNL CL.2 cells in response to di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2011-08-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is one of the many environmental chemicals that are widely used in polyvinyl chloride products, vinyl flooring, food packaging and infant toys. They cause cell proliferation or dysfunction of human liver. The purpose of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of a glycoprotein (24 kDa) isolated from Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) on proliferation of liver cell in the DEHP-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. [³H]-thymidine incorporation, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular Ca²⁺ mobilization and activity of protein kinase C (PKC) were measured using radioactivity and fluorescence method respectively. The expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases [extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)], activator protein (AP)-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cell cycle-related factors (cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase [CDK] 4) were evaluated using Western blotting or electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results in this study showed that the levels of [³H]-thymidine incorporation, intracellular ROS, intracellular Ca²⁺ mobilization and activity of PKCα were inhibited by ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml) in the DEHP-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. Also, activities of ERK, JNK and AP-1 were reduced by ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml). With regard to cell proliferation, activities of PCNA and cyclin D1/CDK4 were significantly suppressed at treatment with ZPDC glycoprotein (100 µg/ml) in the presence of DEHP. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZPDC glycoprotein significantly normalized activities of PCNA and cyclin D1/CDK4, which relate to cell proliferation factors. Thus, ZPDC glycoprotein appears to be one of the compounds derived from natural products that are able to inhibit cell proliferation in the phthalate-induced BNL CL. 2 cells. PMID:21721021

  3. Glycoprotein isolated from Solanum nigrum L. modulates the apoptotic-related signals in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-stimulated MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Kyung-Sun; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2005-01-01

    Solanum nigrum L. (SNL) has been used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory activity. We isolated only the SNL glycoprotein from SNL and found that it was cytotoxic at low concentration. With respect to cytotoxicity, we investigated whether purified SNL glycoprotein is able to regulate protein kinase C (PKC) alpha activation and nuclear factor (NF)- kappaB activities in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-induced tumor promotion, and whether it has an apoptosis-inducing effect in MCF-7 cells using western blot analysis. In addition, to elucidate the relationship between PKCalpha and NF-kappaB, inhibitory studies were performed with staurosporine (an inhibitor of phospholipid/calcium-dependent protein kinase) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an inhibitor of NF-kappaB activation). To verify induction of apoptosis by the SNL glycoprotein, we performed DNA fragmentation and nuclear staining assays using ethidium bromide and bisbenzamide H33342. The results in this study indicated that SNL glycoprotein induces apoptosis through modulation of PKCalpha and NF-kappaB activity in MCF-7 cells. In fact, SNL glycoprotein interfered with PKCalpha membrane translocation and inhibited NF-kappaB (p50) protein activity in MCF-7 cells stimulated with TPA (61.68 ng/mL, 100 nM) dose-dependently. Regarding the apoptotic-inducing effect, nucleosomal DNA fragmentation and nuclear staining by SNL glycoprotein in MCF-7 cells were shown. Collectively, the data demonstrate that SNL glycoprotein is a potential natural anticancer agent because of its ability to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:15857213

  4. The transcription factor Rap1p is required for tolerance to cell-wall perturbing agents and for cell-wall maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Baranwal, Shivani; Thakare, Mayur Jankiram; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2015-01-01

    Yeast repressor activator protein (Rap1p) is involved in genomic stability and transcriptional regulation. We explored the function of Rap1p in yeast physiology using Rap1p truncation mutants. Our results revealed that the N-terminal truncation of Rap1p (Rap1ΔN) leads to hypersensitivity towards elevated temperature and cell-wall perturbing agents. Cell wall analysis showed an increase in the chitin and glucan content in Rap1ΔN cells as compared with wild type cells. Accordingly, mutant cells had a twofold thicker cell wall, as observed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, Rap1ΔN cells had increased levels of phosphorylated Slt2p, a MAP kinase of the cell wall integrity pathway. Mutant cells also had elevated levels of cell wall integrity response transcripts. Taken together, our findings suggest a connection between Rap1p and cell wall homeostasis.

  5. A mixture of peptides and sugars derived from plant cell walls increases plant defense responses to stress and attenuates ageing-associated molecular changes in cultured skin cells.

    PubMed

    Apone, Fabio; Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Arciello, Stefania; Tortora, Assunta; Filippini, Lucio; Monoli, Irene; Cucchiara, Mirna; Gibertoni, Simone; Chrispeels, Maarten J; Colucci, Gabriella

    2010-02-15

    Small peptides and aminoacid derivatives have been extensively studied for their effect of inducing plant defense responses, and thus increasing plant tolerance to a wide range of abiotic stresses. Similarly to plants, these compounds can activate different signaling pathways in mammalian skin cells as well, leading to the up-regulation of anti-aging specific genes. This suggests the existence of analogous defense response mechanisms, well conserved both in plants and animal cells. In this article, we describe the preparation of a new mixture of peptides and sugars derived from the chemical and enzymatic digestion of plant cell wall glycoproteins. We investigate the multiple roles of this product as potential "biostimulator" to protect plants from abiotic stresses, and also as potential cosmeceutical. In particular, the molecular effects of the peptide/sugar mixture of inducing plant defense responsive genes and protecting cultured skin cells from oxidative burst damages were deeply evaluated.

  6. Intercellular transfer of P-glycoprotein in human blood-brain barrier endothelial cells is increased by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Buettner, Manuela; Naim, Hassan Y.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) controls the entry of compounds into the brain, thereby regulating brain homeostasis. Efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp) significantly contribute to BBB function. Multiple signaling pathways modulate the expression and activity of Pgp in response to xenobiotics and disease. A non-genetic way of intercellular transfer of Pgp occurs in cancer cells, but whether this also occurs in non-cancer cells such as endothelial cells that form the BBB is not known. A human brain endothelial cell line (hCMEC/D3) was used to study whether cell-to-cell Pgp transfer occurs during co-culturing with Pgp-EGFP expressing hCMEC/D3 cells. The Pgp-EGFP fusion protein was transferred from donor to recipient cells by cell-to-cell contact and Pgp-EGFP enriched vesicles, which were exocytosed by donor cells and endocytosed by adherent recipient cells. Flow cytometry experiments with the Pgp substrate eFLUXX-ID Gold demonstrated that the transferred Pgp is functional in the recipient cells. Exposure of the donor cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) resulted in an enhanced intercellular Pgp transfer. Non-genetic transfer of a resistance phenotype and its regulation by HDACs is a novel mechanism of altering BBB functionality. This mechanism may have important implications for understanding drug-induced alterations in Pgp expression and activity. PMID:27375084

  7. O-Acetylation of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Gille, Sascha; Pauly, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composed of structurally diverse polymers, many of which are O-acetylated. How plants O-acetylate wall polymers and what its function is remained elusive until recently, when two protein families were identified in the model plant Arabidopsis that are involved in the O-acetylation of wall polysaccharides – the reduced wall acetylation (RWA) and the trichome birefringence-like (TBL) proteins. This review discusses the role of these two protein families in polysaccharide O-acetylation and outlines the differences and similarities of polymer acetylation mechanisms in plants, fungi, bacteria, and mammals. Members of the TBL protein family had been shown to impact pathogen resistance, freezing tolerance, and cellulose biosynthesis. The connection of TBLs to polysaccharide O-acetylation thus gives crucial leads into the biological function of wall polymer O-acetylation. From a biotechnological point understanding the O-acetylation mechanism is important as acetyl-substituents inhibit the enzymatic degradation of wall polymers and released acetate can be a potent inhibitor in microbial fermentations, thus impacting the economic viability of, e.g., lignocellulosic based biofuel production. PMID:22639638

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells redirected against hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sautto, Giuseppe A; Wisskirchen, Karin; Clementi, Nicola; Castelli, Matteo; Diotti, Roberta A; Graf, Julia; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto; Protzer, Ulrike; Mancini, Nicasio

    2016-01-01

    Objective The recent availability of novel antiviral drugs has raised new hope for a more effective treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and its severe sequelae. However, in the case of non-responding or relapsing patients, alternative strategies are needed. To this end we have used chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), a very promising approach recently used in several clinical trials to redirect primary human T cells against different tumours. In particular, we designed the first CARs against HCV targeting the HCV/E2 glycoprotein (HCV/E2). Design Anti-HCV/E2 CARs were composed of single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) obtained from a broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralising human monoclonal antibody (mAb), e137, fused to the intracellular signalling motif of the costimulatory CD28 molecule and the CD3ζ domain. Activity of CAR-grafted T cells was evaluated in vitro against HCV/E2-transfected cells as well as hepatocytes infected with cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc). Results In this proof-of-concept study, retrovirus-transduced human T cells expressing anti-HCV/E2 CARs were endowed with specific antigen recognition accompanied by degranulation and secretion of proinflammatory and antiviral cytokines, such as interferon γ, interleukin 2 and tumour necrosis factor α. Moreover, CAR-grafted T cells were capable of lysing target cells of both hepatic and non-hepatic origin expressing on their surface the HCV/E2 glycoproteins of the most clinically relevant genotypes, including 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 4 and 5. Finally, and more importantly, they were capable of lysing HCVcc-infected hepatocytes. Conclusions Clearance of HCV-infected cells is a major therapeutic goal in chronic HCV infection, and adoptive transfer of anti-HCV/E2 CARs-grafted T cells represents a promising new therapeutic tool. PMID:25661083

  9. Influence of colchicine and vinblastine on the intracellular migration of secretory and membrane glycoproteins: I. Inhibition of glycoprotein migration in various rat cell types as shown by light microscope radioautography after injection of 3H-fucose

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.; Parsons, S.; Carlet, E.

    1984-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that colchicine and vinblastine inhibit secretion in many cell types by interrupting the normal intracellular migration of secretory products. In the present work, radioautography has been used to study the effects of these drugs on migration of membrane and secretory glycoproteins in a variety of cell types. Young (40 gm) rats were given a single intravenous injection of colchicine (4.0 mg) or vinblastine (2.0 mg). At 10 min after colchicine and 30 min after vinblastine administration, the rats were injected with 3H-fucose. Control rats received 3H-fucose only. All rats were sacrificed 90 min after 3H-fucose injection and their tissues processed for light microscope radioautography. Examination of secretory cell types such as ameloblasts and thyroid follicular cells in control animals revealed reactions of approximately equal intensity over the Golgi region and over extracellular secretion products, while in drug-treated rats most of the reaction was confined to the Golgi region. In a variety of other cell types, including endocrine cells (e.g., hepatocytes) and cells generally considered as nonsecretory (e.g., intestinal columnar cells), reaction in control animals occurred both over the Golgi region and over various portions of the cell surface. In drug-treated animals, a strong Golgi reaction was present, but reaction over the cell surface was weak or absent. These results indicate that in many cell types, colchicine and vinblastine inhibit migration out of the Golgi region not only of secretory glycoproteins, but also of membrane glycoproteins destined for the plasma membrane.

  10. Cell wall structure and function in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria is a complex assemblage of glycopolymers and proteins. It consists of a thick peptidoglycan sacculus that surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane and that is decorated with teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. It plays a major role in bacterial physiology since it maintains cell shape and integrity during growth and division; in addition, it acts as the interface between the bacterium and its environment. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are traditionally and widely used to ferment food, and they are also the subject of more and more research because of their potential health-related benefits. It is now recognized that understanding the composition, structure, and properties of LAB cell walls is a crucial part of developing technological and health applications using these bacteria. In this review, we examine the different components of the Gram-positive cell wall: peptidoglycan, teichoic acids, polysaccharides, and proteins. We present recent findings regarding the structure and function of these complex compounds, results that have emerged thanks to the tandem development of structural analysis and whole genome sequencing. Although general structures and biosynthesis pathways are conserved among Gram-positive bacteria, studies have revealed that LAB cell walls demonstrate unique properties; these studies have yielded some notable, fundamental, and novel findings. Given the potential of this research to contribute to future applied strategies, in our discussion of the role played by cell wall components in LAB physiology, we pay special attention to the mechanisms controlling bacterial autolysis, bacterial sensitivity to bacteriophages and the mechanisms underlying interactions between probiotic bacteria and their hosts. PMID:25186919

  11. Direct measurement of cell wall stress stiffening and turgor pressure in live bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yi; Sun, Mingzhai; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2011-10-01

    We study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. We find strong evidence of power-law stress stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E=23±8  MPa and 49±20  MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3  kPa.

  12. Direct Measurement of Cell Wall Stress Stiffening and Turgor Pressure in Live Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yi; Sun, Mingzhai; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2011-10-01

    We study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. We find strong evidence of power-law stress stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E=23±8MPa and 49±20MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3kPa.

  13. Influence of the Cell Wall on Intracellular Delivery to Algal Cells by Electroporation and Sonication

    PubMed Central

    Azencott, Harold R.; Peter, Gary F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the cell wall’s role as a barrier to intracellular delivery, wild-type Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal cells and mutant cells lacking a cell wall were exposed to electroporation or sonication. Flow cytometry determined intracellular uptake of calcein and bovine serum albumin (BSA) and loss of cell viability as functions of electroporation transmembrane potential and acoustic energy. Electroporation of wild-type cells increased calcein uptake with increasing transmembrane potential, but delivered much less BSA. Electroporation of wall-deficient cells had similar effects on calcein uptake, but increased BSA uptake as much as 7.5-fold relative to wild-type cells, which indicated that the cell wall was a significant barrier to BSA delivery during electroporation. Sonication of wild-type cells caused calcein and BSA uptake at similar levels. This suggests that the cell wall barrier to BSA delivery can be overcome by sonication. Increased electroporation transmembrane potential or acoustic energy also caused increased loss of cell viability, where wall-deficient cells were especially susceptible to lysis. Overall, we believe this is the first study to compare the effects of electroporation and sonication in a direct fashion in any cell type. Specifically, these findings suggest that electroporation primarily transports molecules across the plasma membrane, because its mechanism is specific to lipid bilayer disruption, whereas sonication transports molecules across both the plasma membrane and cell wall, because it non-specifically disrupts cell-surface barriers. PMID:17602827

  14. Medicago truncatula as a Model for Dicot Cell Wall Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strong interest in renewable energy has promoted an upsurge of research on plant cell wall traits that influence the availability of lignocellulosic-derived sugars for fermentation in production of biofuels. We have initiated a genome-wide transcript profiling study using the model legume Medicago t...

  15. Roles of cell wall peroxidases in plant development.

    PubMed

    Francoz, Edith; Ranocha, Philippe; Nguyen-Kim, Huan; Jamet, Elisabeth; Burlat, Vincent; Dunand, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Class III peroxidases (CIII Prxs) are plant specific proteins. Based on in silico prediction and experimental evidence, they are mainly considered as cell wall localized proteins. Thanks to their dual hydroxylic and peroxidative cycles, they can produce ROS as well as oxidize cell wall aromatic compounds within proteins and phenolics that are either free or linked to polysaccharides. Thus, they are tightly associated to cell wall loosening and stiffening. They are members of large multigenic families, mostly due to an elevated rate of gene duplication in higher plants, resulting in a high risk of functional redundancy between them. However, proteomic and (micro)transcriptomic analyses have shown that CIII Prx expression profiles are highly specific. Based on these omic analyses, several reverse genetic studies have demonstrated the importance of the spatio-temporal regulation of their expression and ability to interact with cell wall microdomains in order to achieve specific activity in vivo. Each CIII Prx isoform could have specific functions in muro and this could explain the conservation of a high number of genes in plant genomes.

  16. Polymer mobility in cell walls of cucumber hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, K. M.; Apperley, D. C.; Cosgrove, D. J.; Jarvis, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Cell walls were prepared from the growing region of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) hypocotyls and examined by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy, in both enzymically active and inactivated states. The rigidity of individual polymer segments within the hydrated cell walls was assessed from the proton magnetic relaxation parameter, T2, and from the kinetics of cross-polarisation from 1H to 13C. The microfibrils, including most of the xyloglucan in the cell wall, as well as cellulose, behaved as very rigid solids. A minor xyloglucan fraction, which may correspond to cross-links between microfibrils, shared a lower level of rigidity with some of the pectic galacturonan. Other pectins, including most of the galactan side-chain residues of rhamnogalacturonan I, were much more mobile and behaved in a manner intermediate between the solid and liquid states. The only difference observed between the enzymically active and inactive cell walls, was the loss of a highly mobile, methyl-esterified galacturonan fraction, as the result of pectinesterase activity.

  17. Imaging of plant cell walls by confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Gierlinger, Notburga; Keplinger, Tobias; Harrington, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Raman imaging of plant cell walls represents a nondestructive technique that can provide insights into chemical composition in context with structure at the micrometer level (<0.5 μm). The major steps of the experimental procedure are described: sample preparation (embedding and microcutting), setting the mapping parameters, and finally the calculation of chemical images on the basis of the acquired Raman spectra. Every Raman image is based on thousands of spectra, each being a spatially resolved molecular 'fingerprint' of the cell wall. Multiple components are analyzed within the native cell walls, and insights into polymer composition as well as the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils can be gained. The most labor-intensive step of this process is often the sample preparation, as the imaging approach requires a flat surface of the plant tissue with intact cell walls. After finishing the map (acquisition time is ∼10 min to 10 h, depending on the size of the region of interest and scanning parameters), many possibilities exist for the analysis of spectral data and image generation.

  18. Determination of carbohydrate profile in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) cell walls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarbeet germplasms USH20, C869, EL55, EL54 were used, and different tissues at different developmental stages were sampled, including dry seeds, germinating seedlings, developing leaves, mature leaves, petioles, hypocotyls, mature roots, flowering stems and inflorescences. Cell Wall Composition An...

  19. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27304077

  20. Hetero-oligomeric cell wall channels (porins) of Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Kläckta, Christian; Knörzer, Philipp; Riess, Franziska; Benz, Roland

    2011-06-01

    The cell wall of Nocardia farcinica contains a cation-selective cell wall channel, which may be responsible for the limited permeability of the cell wall of N. farcinica for negatively charged antibiotics. Based on partial sequencing of the protein responsible for channel formation derived from N. farcinica ATTC 3318 we were able to identify the corresponding genes (nfa15890 and nfa15900) within the known genome of N. farcinica IFM 10152. The corresponding genes of N. farcinica ATTC 3318 were separately expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21DE3Omp8 strain and the N-terminal His10-tagged proteins were purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The pure proteins were designated NfpANHis and NfpBNHis, for N. farcinica porin A and N. farcinica porin B. The two proteins were checked separately for channel formation in lipid bilayers. Our results clearly indicate that the proteins NfpANHis and NfpBNHis expressed in E. coli could only together form a channel in lipid bilayer membranes. This means that the cell wall channel of N. farcinica is formed by a heterooligomer. NfpA and NfpB form together a channel that may structurally be related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis based on amino acid comparison and renaturation procedure.

  1. Hetero-oligomeric cell wall channels (porins) of Nocardia farcinica.

    PubMed

    Kläckta, Christian; Knörzer, Philipp; Riess, Franziska; Benz, Roland

    2011-06-01

    The cell wall of Nocardia farcinica contains a cation-selective cell wall channel, which may be responsible for the limited permeability of the cell wall of N. farcinica for negatively charged antibiotics. Based on partial sequencing of the protein responsible for channel formation derived from N. farcinica ATTC 3318 we were able to identify the corresponding genes (nfa15890 and nfa15900) within the known genome of N. farcinica IFM 10152. The corresponding genes of N. farcinica ATTC 3318 were separately expressed in the Escherichia coli BL21DE3Omp8 strain and the N-terminal His10-tagged proteins were purified to homogeneity using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. The pure proteins were designated NfpANHis and NfpBNHis, for N. farcinica porin A and N. farcinica porin B. The two proteins were checked separately for channel formation in lipid bilayers. Our results clearly indicate that the proteins NfpANHis and NfpBNHis expressed in E. coli could only together form a channel in lipid bilayer membranes. This means that the cell wall channel of N. farcinica is formed by a heterooligomer. NfpA and NfpB form together a channel that may structurally be related to MspA of Mycobacterium smegmatis based on amino acid comparison and renaturation procedure. PMID:21092733

  2. A cytoplasmic peptidoglycan amidase homologue controls mycobacterial cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C; Baer, Christina E; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Liu, Weiru; Chase, Michael R; Meniche, Xavier; Fortune, Sarah M; Sassetti, Christopher M; Ioerger, Thomas R; Rubin, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of cell wall assembly is essential for bacterial survival and contributes to pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, little is known about how the cell wall is regulated in stress. We found that CwlM, a protein homologous to peptidoglycan amidases, coordinates peptidoglycan synthesis with nutrient availability. Surprisingly, CwlM is sequestered from peptidoglycan (PG) by localization in the cytoplasm, and its enzymatic function is not essential. Rather, CwlM is phosphorylated and associates with MurA, the first enzyme in PG precursor synthesis. Phosphorylated CwlM activates MurA ~30 fold. CwlM is dephosphorylated in starvation, resulting in lower MurA activity, decreased cell wall metabolism, and increased tolerance to multiple antibiotics. A phylogenetic analysis of cwlM implies that localization in the cytoplasm drove the evolution of this factor. We describe a system that controls cell wall metabolism in response to starvation, and show that this regulation contributes to antibiotic tolerance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14590.001 PMID:27304077

  3. Biosynthesis and assembly of cell wall polysaccharides in cereal grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Carpita, N.C.

    1991-04-01

    We have just completed the second year of a three-year project entitled Biosynthesis assembly of cell wall polysaccharides in cereal grasses.'' We made significant progress on two aspects of cell wall synthesis in grasses and greatly refined gas-liquid and high- performance liquid chromatographic techniques necessary to identify the products of synthesis in vitro and in vivo. First, Dr. David Gibeaut, a post-doctoral associate, devised a convenient procedure for the enrichment of Golgi membranes by flotation centrifugation following initial downward rate-zonal separation. Based on comparison of the IDPase marker enzyme, flotation centrifugation enriched the Golgi apparatus almost 7-fold after the initial downward separation. This system is now used in our studies of the synthesis in vitro of the mixed-linkage {beta}-D-glucan. Second, Gibeaut and I have devised a simple technique to feed radioactive sugars into intact growing seedlings and follow incorporation of radioactivity into and turnover from specific cell wall polysaccharides. The project has also provided a few spin-off projects that have been productive as well. First, in collaboration with the group of Prof. Peter Kaufman, University of Michigan, we examined changes in cell wall structure concomitant with reaction to gravistimulation in the gravisensing oat pulvinus. Second, Dr. Gibeaut developed a simple clean-up procedure for partially methylated alditol derivatives to remove a large amount of undesirable interfering compounds that confound separation of the derivatives by gas-liquid chromatography. 5 refs.

  4. Secretion of Sparfloxacin from the Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cell Line Is Altered by P-Glycoprotein Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Huneau, Jean-François; Mordrelle, Agnès; Boyaka, Prosper N.; Carbon, Claude; Rubinstein, Ethan; Tomé, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of intestinal secretion of the difluorinated quinolone sparfloxacin was investigated with the epithelial cell line Caco-2 and was compared to that of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate vinblastine. The P-gp inhibitors verapamil and progesterone significantly increased the epithelial cell accumulation of both vinblastine and sparfloxacin. This increase is likely to result from an inhibition of drug secretion since both vinblastine uptake and sparfloxacin uptake are known to proceed through a passive transmembrane diffusion. The unidirectional fluxes across cell monlayers grown on permeable filters indicated that a net secretion of sparfloxacin and vinblastine occurred across Caco-2 cells. These secretions were significantly inhibited by the MDR-reversing agent verapamil. We conclude that the P-gp is likely to be involved in the intestinal elimination of the difluorinated quinolone sparfloxacin. PMID:9756763

  5. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  6. Characterization of phosphatidylserine-dependent beta2-glycoprotein I macrophage interactions. Implications for apoptotic cell clearance by phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, K; Schroit, A J

    1998-10-30

    The binding and uptake of phosphatidylserine (PS)-expressing cells appears to involve multiple receptor-mediated systems that recognize the lipid either directly or indirectly through intermediate proteins that form a molecular bridge between the cells. Here we show that beta2-glycoprotein I (beta2GPI), a 50-kDa serum glycoprotein, binds PS-containing vesicles and serves as an intermediate for the interaction of these vesicles with macrophages. Chemical modification of lysines and cysteines abolished beta2GPI-dependent PS uptake by inhibiting the binding of PS to beta2GPI and the binding of PS.beta2GPI complex to macrophages, respectively. Recognition was mediated by beta2GPI and not by the lipid because antibodies to beta2GPI inhibited binding of the complex to macrophages. These results indicate that human (THP-1-derived) macrophages bind beta2GPI only after it is bound to its lipid ligand. Competition experiments with monosaccharides that inhibit lectin-dependent interactions, and PS.beta2GPI binding experiments using deglycosylated beta2GPI, suggested that carbohydrate residues were not required for macrophage recognition of the complex. Antibodies to putative macrophage PS receptors (CD36, CD68, and CD14) did not inhibit uptake of the complex. These data suggest that beta2GPI can bind cells that fail to maintain membrane lipid asymmetry and generate a specific bridging moiety that is recognized for clearance by a phagocyte receptor that is distinct from CD36, CD68, and CD14.

  7. Alteration of the pH dependence of coronavirus-induced cell fusion: effect of mutations in the spike glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, T M; Escarmis, C; Buchmeier, M J

    1991-01-01

    Infection of susceptible murine cells with the coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus type 4 (MHV4) results in extensive cell-cell fusion at pHs from 5.5 to 8.5. The endosomotropic weak bases chloroquine and ammonium chloride do not prevent MHV4 infection. In marked contrast, we have selected variants from a neural cell line persistently infected with MHV4 which are entirely dependent on acid pH to fuse host cells and are strongly inhibited by endosomotropic weak bases. Wild-type and variant viruses were compared at the level of the fusion-active surface (S) glycoprotein gene. Cloning and sequencing of each 4,131-base open reading frame predicted a total of eight amino acid differences which fell into three distinct clusters. Each S glycoprotein, when expressed from cDNA, was synthesized in equivalent amounts, and similar proportions were transported to the cell surface. Wild-type S induced cell-cell fusion at neutral pH, whereas variant S required prolonged exposure to acidic pH to induce fusion. Expression of hybrid S genes prepared by exchange of restriction fragments between wild-type and variant cDNAs revealed that elimination of neutral pH fusion was solely dependent on amino acid alterations at positions 1067 (Q to H), 1094 (Q to H), and 1114 (L to R). These changes lie within a predicted heptad repeat region of the transmembrane cleavage fragment of S (S2). These findings demonstrate that the pH dependence of coronavirus fusion is highly variable and that this variability can be determined by as few as three amino acid residues. Images PMID:1848311

  8. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein K is required for efficient cell-to-cell spread and virus egress

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Antonie . E-mail: toni.neubauer@micro.vetmed.uni-muenchen.de; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2004-11-10

    The function of the equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) glycoprotein K (gK) homologue was investigated. Deletion of 88% of the UL53-homologous open reading frame in EHV-1 strain RacH resulted in a severe growth defect of the gK-negative virus (H{delta}gK) as reflected by a significant decrease in the production of infectious virus progeny on RK13 cells. The H{delta}gK virus induced only minute plaques, was unable to form syncytia, and its penetration efficiency into RK13 cells was reduced by approximately 40%. To further analyze gK function and intracellular trafficking, gK of strain RacH was replaced by a C-terminally truncated gK-green fluorescent protein fusion protein (gK-GFP). The generated recombinant virus was shown to replicate well on non-complementing cells, and virus penetration and syncytium formation were comparable to parental RacH. A reduction in plaque size and slightly decreased intra- and extracellular virus titers, however, were observed. The gK-GFP fusion protein was expressed with early-late kinetics, and multiple forms of the protein exhibiting M{sub r}s between 50,000 and 85,000 were detected by Western blot analysis. The various gK-GFP forms were shown to be N-glycosylated, associated with membranes of the Golgi apparatus, and were incorporated into extracellular virions. Complete processing of gK-GFP was only observed within the context of viral infection. From the results, we concluded that EHV-1 gK is required for efficient virus growth in vitro and that the carboxy-terminal amino acids are not required for its function, because the gK-GFP fusion protein was able to complement for EHV-1 growth in the absence of authentic gK.

  9. Molecular deformation mechanisms of the wood cell wall material.

    PubMed

    Jin, Kai; Qin, Zhao; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-02-01

    Wood is a biological material with outstanding mechanical properties resulting from its hierarchical structure across different scales. Although earlier work has shown that the cellular structure of wood is a key factor that renders it excellent mechanical properties at light weight, the mechanical properties of the wood cell wall material itself still needs to be understood comprehensively. The wood cell wall material features a fiber reinforced composite structure, where cellulose fibrils act as stiff fibers, and hemicellulose and lignin molecules act as soft matrix. The angle between the fiber direction and the loading direction has been found to be the key factor controlling the mechanical properties. However, how the interactions between theses constitutive molecules contribute to the overall properties is still unclear, although the shearing between fibers has been proposed as a primary deformation mechanism. Here we report a molecular model of the wood cell wall material with atomistic resolution, used to assess the mechanical behavior under shear loading in order to understand the deformation mechanisms at the molecular level. The model includes an explicit description of cellulose crystals, hemicellulose, as well as lignin molecules arranged in a layered nanocomposite. The results obtained using this model show that the wood cell wall material under shear loading deforms in an elastic and then plastic manner. The plastic regime can be divided into two parts according to the different deformation mechanisms: yielding of the matrix and sliding of matrix along the cellulose surface. Our molecular dynamics study provides insights of the mechanical behavior of wood cell wall material at the molecular level, and paves a way for the multi-scale understanding of the mechanical properties of wood.

  10. Assembling of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Core.

    PubMed

    Grzegorzewicz, Anna E; de Sousa-d'Auria, Célia; McNeil, Michael R; Huc-Claustre, Emilie; Jones, Victoria; Petit, Cécile; Angala, Shiva Kumar; Zemanová, Júlia; Wang, Qinglan; Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Gao, Qian; Ishizaki, Yoshimasa; Mikušová, Katarína; Brennan, Patrick J; Ronning, Donald R; Chami, Mohamed; Houssin, Christine; Jackson, Mary

    2016-09-01

    The unique cell wall of mycobacteria is essential to their viability and the target of many clinically used anti-tuberculosis drugs and inhibitors under development. Despite intensive efforts to identify the ligase(s) responsible for the covalent attachment of the two major heteropolysaccharides of the mycobacterial cell wall, arabinogalactan (AG) and peptidoglycan (PG), the enzyme or enzymes responsible have remained elusive. We here report on the identification of the two enzymes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, CpsA1 (Rv3267) and CpsA2 (Rv3484), responsible for this function. CpsA1 and CpsA2 belong to the widespread LytR-Cps2A-Psr (LCP) family of enzymes that has been shown to catalyze a variety of glycopolymer transfer reactions in Gram-positive bacteria, including the attachment of wall teichoic acids to PG. Although individual cpsA1 and cpsA2 knock-outs of M. tuberculosis were readily obtained, the combined inactivation of both genes appears to be lethal. In the closely related microorganism Corynebacterium glutamicum, the ortholog of cpsA1 is the only gene involved in this function, and its conditional knockdown leads to dramatic changes in the cell wall composition and morphology of the bacteria due to extensive shedding of cell wall material in the culture medium as a result of defective attachment of AG to PG. This work marks an important step in our understanding of the biogenesis of the unique cell envelope of mycobacteria and opens new opportunities for drug development.

  11. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    SciTech Connect

    Imber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast ..cap alpha../sub 2/-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-..cap alpha../sub 2/M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal ..cap alpha..(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -..cap alpha../sub 2/M forms, ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-trypsin and ..cap alpha../sub 2/M-MeNH/sub 2/ cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins.

  12. Temozolomide Resistance in Glioblastoma Cell Lines: Implication of MGMT, MMR, P-Glycoprotein and CD133 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Jose; Caba, Octavio; Cabeza, Laura; Berdasco, Maria; Gónzalez, Beatriz; Melguizo, Consolación

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of temozolomide (TMZ) has improved the prognosis for glioblastoma multiforme patients. However, TMZ resistance may be one of the main reasons why treatment fails. Although this resistance has frequently been linked to the expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) it seems that this enzyme is not the only molecular mechanism that may account for the appearance of drug resistance in glioblastoma multiforme patients as the mismatch repair (MMR) complex, P-glycoprotein, and/or the presence of cancer stem cells may also be implicated. Methods Four nervous system tumor cell lines were used to analyze the modulation of MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation by TMZ treatment. Furthermore, 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine was used to demethylate the MGMT promoter and O(6)-benzylguanine to block GMT activity. In addition, MMR complex and P-glycoprotein expression were studied before and after TMZ exposure and correlated with MGMT expression. Finally, the effect of TMZ exposure on CD133 expression was analyzed. Results Our results showed two clearly differentiated groups of tumor cells characterized by low (A172 and LN229) and high (SF268 and SK-N-SH) basal MGMT expression. Interestingly, cell lines with no MGMT expression and low TMZ IC50 showed a high MMR complex expression, whereas cell lines with high MGMT expression and high TMZ IC50 did not express the MMR complex. In addition, modulation of MGMT expression in A172 and LN229 cell lines was accompanied by a significant increase in the TMZ IC50, whereas no differences were observed in SF268 and SK-N-SH cell lines. In contrast, P-glycoprotein and CD133 was found to be unrelated to TMZ resistance in these cell lines. Conclusions These results may be relevant in understanding the phenomenon of TMZ resistance, especially in glioblastoma multiforme patients laking MGMT expression, and may also aid in the design of new therapeutic strategies to improve the efficacy of TMZ in glioblastoma

  13. Structure of Plant Cell Walls: XI. GLUCURONOARABINOXYLAN, A SECOND HEMICELLULOSE IN THE PRIMARY CELL WALLS OF SUSPENSION-CULTURED SYCAMORE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Darvill, J E; McNeil, M; Darvill, A G; Albersheim, P

    1980-12-01

    The isolation, purification, and partial characterization of a glucuronoarabinoxylan, a previously unobserved component of the primary cell walls of dicotyledonous plants, are described. The glucuronoarabinoxylan constitutes approximately 5% of the primary walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells. This glucuronoarabinoxylan possesses many of the structural characteristics of analogous polysaccharides that have been isolated from the primary and secondary cell walls of monocots as well as from the secondary cell walls of dicots. The glucuronoarabinoxylan of primary dicot cell walls has a linear beta-1,4-linked d-xylopyranosyl backbone with both neutral and acidic sidechains attached at intervals along its length. The acidic sidechains are terminated with glucuronosyl or 4-O-methyl glucuronosyl residues, whereas the neutral sidechains are composed of arabinosyl and/or xylosyl residues.

  14. Cell-Wall Polysaccharides of Developing Flax Plants.

    PubMed Central

    Gorshkova, T. A.; Wyatt, S. E.; Salnikov, V. V.; Gibeaut, D. M.; Ibragimov, M. R.; Lozovaya, V. V.; Carpita, N. C.

    1996-01-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) fibers originate from procambial cells of the protophloem and develop in cortical bundles that encircle the vascular cylinder. We determined the polysaccharide composition of the cell walls from various organs of the developing flax plant, from fiber-rich strips peeled from the stem, and from the xylem. Ammonium oxalate-soluble polysaccharides from all tissues contained 5-linked arabinans with low degrees of branching, rhamnogalacturonans, and polygalacturonic acid. The fiber-rich peels contained, in addition, substantial amounts of a buffer-soluble, 4-linked galactan branched at the 0-2 and 0-3 positions with nonreducing terminal-galactosyl units. The cross-linking glycans from all tissues were (fucogalacto)xyloglucan, typical of type-I cell walls, xylans containing (1->)-[beta]-D-xylosyl units branched exclusively at the xylosyl O-2 with t-(4-O-methyl)-glucosyluronic acid units, and (galacto)glucomannans. Tissues containing predominantly primary cell wall contained a larger proportion of xyloglucan. The xylem cells were composed of about 60% 4-xylans, 32% cellulose, and small amounts of pectin and the other cross-linking polysaccharides. The noncellulosic polysaccharides of flax exhibit an uncommonly low degree of branching compared to similar polysaccharides from other flowering plants. Although the relative abundance of the various noncellulosic polysaccharides varies widely among the different cell types, the linkage structure and degree of branching of several of the noncellulosic polysaccharides are invariant. PMID:12226214

  15. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  16. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  17. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  18. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  19. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  4. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  5. The ectodomain of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 TM glycoprotein is involved in postfusion events.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, A R; Delamarre, L; Pique, C; Pham, D; Dokhélar, M C

    1997-01-01

    To examine the contribution of the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (TM) to the infectivity of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), single amino acid substitutions were introduced throughout its ectodomain. The mutated envelopes were tested for intracellular maturation and for functions, including ability to elicit syncytium formation and ability to mediate cell-to-cell transmission of the virus. Three major phenotypes, defining three functionally distinct regions, were identified. (i) Mutations causing defects in intracellular maturation of the envelope precursor are mostly distributed in the central portion of the TM ectodomain, containing the immunosuppressive peptide. This region, which includes vicinal cysteines thought to form an intramolecular disulfide bridge, is probably essential for correct folding of the protein. (ii) Mutations resulting in reduced syncytium-forming ability despite correct intracellular maturation are clustered in the amino-terminal part of the TM ectodomain, within the leucine zipper-like motif. Similar motifs with a propensity to form coiled-coil structures have been implicated in the fusion process driven by other viral envelope proteins, and HTLV-1 may thus conform to this general rule for viral fusion. (iii) Mutants with increased syncytium-forming ability define a region immediately amino-terminal to the membrane-spanning domain. Surprisingly, these mutants exhibited severe defects in infectivity, despite competence for fusion. Existence of this phenotype indicates that capacity for cell-to-cell fusion is not sufficient to ensure viral entry, even in cell-to-cell transmission. The ectodomain of the TM glycoprotein thus may be involved in postfusion events required for full infectivity of HTLV-1, which perhaps represents a unique feature of this poorly infectious retrovirus. PMID:9311790

  6. Crushing Strength of Aluminum Honeycomb with Thinning Cell Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Nagahisa; Chiba, Norimasa; Kobayashi, Eiji; Kikuchi, Yuji

    To evaluate the crash safety of automobiles, various collision tests are performed by the auto industry. In the offset frontal collision test and the side collision test, the target is an aluminum honeycomb material which has thinning cell walls. In this study, based on the analyses of the shock absorption mechanism, a new crushing strength formula is proposed. First, load-displacement curves obtained from compression tests in quasi-static condition showed an almost linear relation between a thinning rate of cell walls and a crushing strength. Second, based on Wierzbicki's theory, a new formula was proposed, which can estimate a crushing strength of a honeycomb material with thinning wall. In addition, a correcting equation which considered an elastic deformation was also proposed. Third, parametric analyses were carried out with a FE model which can simulate a delamination between cell walls. The results obtained from the theory and FEM almost corresponded to each other for a wide range of the thinning rate. Fourth, impact tests were carried out, in which the weight was dropped freely at the speed used for the automobile tests. Those results almost agreed well with the sum of the theoretical crush strength and the inside air pressure.

  7. Boron dependent membrane glycoproteins in symbiosome development and nodule organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Reguera, María; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2008-01-01

    During the last two decades, we have analyzed the roles of boron (B) in the development of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and nodule organogenesis. As in other plant tissues, B is needed for the maintenance of nodule cell wall structure. Moreover, several symbiotic events including rhizobial infection, nodule cell invasion and symbiosome development that involve membrane related functions (i.e., vesicle targeting, secretion, or cell surface interactions) are affected by B deficiency. Using anti-rhamnogalacturonan II (anti-RGII) antiserum and immunological techniques, we recently described membrane glycoproteins (RGII-glycoproteins) developmentally regulated in Pisum sativum nodules, which are not detected by the antibody in B-deficient nodules. RGII-glycoproteins appeared related with development processes involving extensive membrane synthesis, like symbiosome maturation or cell growth, both of them negatively affected by B deficiency. Here, we suggest that, besides maintaining cell wall structure, B is both stabilizing components of the membrane glycocalyx and promoting interactions between cell surfaces glycoconjugates that are important during the establishment of the symbiosis and during nodule development. Moreover, we hypothesize that B is playing a similar role during plant or animal embryogenesis and development. PMID:19841651

  8. Evaluation of pseudorabies virus glycoprotein gp50 as a vaccine for Aujeszky's disease in mice and swine: expression by vaccinia virus and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed Central

    Marchioli, C C; Yancey, R J; Petrovskis, E A; Timmins, J G; Post, L E

    1987-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is an alphaherpesvirus which causes an economically important disease of swine. One of the PRV glycoproteins, gp50, was previously identified as the sequence homolog of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gD (E.A. Petrovskis, J.G. Timmins, M.A. Armentrout, C.C. Marchioli, R.J. Yancey, Jr., and L.E. Post, J. Virol. 59:216-223, 1986). gp50 was evaluated as a PRV subunit vaccine candidate. gp50 protected mice from PRV-induced mortality either when delivered via infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus or when administered as a subunit vaccine produced in a eucaryotic cell line, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In addition, gp50 synthesized in CHO cells protected pigs from lethal infection with PRV. This result demonstrates that a single viral glycoprotein could induce a protective immune response in the natural host of a herpesvirus infection. Images PMID:2824827

  9. Identification of a novel B-cell epitope of Hantaan virus glycoprotein recognized by neutralizing 3D8 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guolin; Zhang, Yusi; Ma, Ying; Yi, Jing; Liu, Bei; Xu, Zhuwei; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Fanglin; Xu, Zhikai; Yang, Angang; Zhuang, Ran; Jin, Boquan

    2012-12-01

    Hantaan virus (HTNV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, is a major agent causing haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, a high-mortality-rate disease threatening approximately 150 000 people around the world yearly. The 3D8 mAb displays a neutralizing activity to HTNV infection. In this study, the B-cell epitopes of HTNV glycoproteins (GPs) were finely mapped by peptide scanning. A new B-cell epitope (882)GFLCPEFPGSFRKKC(896) of HTNV, which locates on Gc, has been screened out from a set of 15-mer synthesized peptides covering the full-length of HTNV-GPs. It has been shown by the alanine-scanning technique that (885)C, (893)R, (894)K, (895)K and (896)C are the key amino acids of the binding sites of the GPs. The implications of identifying a novel B-cell epitope for hantavirus immunology and vaccinology are discussed.

  10. Engineering of plant cell walls for enhanced biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Loqué, Dominique; Scheller, Henrik V; Pauly, Markus

    2015-06-01

    The biomass of plants consists predominately of cell walls, a sophisticated composite material composed of various polymer networks including numerous polysaccharides and the polyphenol lignin. In order to utilize this renewable, highly abundant resource for the production of commodity chemicals such as biofuels, major hurdles have to be surpassed to reach economical viability. Recently, major advances in the basic understanding of the synthesis of the various wall polymers and its regulation has enabled strategies to alter the qualitative composition of wall materials. Such emerging strategies include a reduction/alteration of the lignin network to enhance polysaccharide accessibility, reduction of polymer derived processing inhibitors, and increases in polysaccharides with a high hexose/pentose ratio.

  11. MDR1-P-glycoprotein behaves as an oncofetal protein that promotes cell survival in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Alba; Compare, Debora; Liguori, Eleonora; Cianflone, Alessandra; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Tirino, Virginia; Bertoni, Alessandra; Santoriello, Margherita; Garbi, Corrado; D'Armiento, Maria; Staibano, Stefania; Nardone, Gerardo

    2012-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), traditionally linked to cancer poor prognosis and multidrug resistance, is undetectable in normal gastric mucosa and overexpressed in gastric cancer (GC). We propose that P-gp may be involved in Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-related gastric carcinogenesis by inhibiting apoptosis. Aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of P-gp in fetal stomach and in Hp-related gastric carcinogenesis, the epigenetic control of the multi-drug resistance-1 (MDR1) gene, the localization and interaction between P-gp and Bcl-x(L) and the effect of the selective silencing of P-gp on cell survival. P-gp and Bcl-xl expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry on 28 spontaneously abortive human fetuses, 66 Hp-negative subjects, 138 Hp-positive chronic gastritis (CG) of whom 28 with intestinal metaplasia (IM) and 45 intestinal type GCs. P-gp/Bcl-x(L) colocalization was investigated by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and protein-protein interaction by co-immunoprecipitation, in basal conditions and after stress-induced apoptosis, in GC cell lines AGS and MKN-28 and hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Hep-G2. The role of P-gp in controlling apoptosis was evaluated by knocking down its expression with a specific small interfering RNAs in stressed AGS and MKN-28 cell lines. P-gp is expressed in the gastric mucosa of all human fetuses while, it is undetectable in adult normal mucosa and re-expressed in 30/110 Hp-positive non-IM-CG, 28/28 IM-CG and 40/45 GCs. P-gp expression directly correlates with that of Bcl-x(L) and with the promoter hypomethylation of the MDR1 gene. In GC cell lines, P-gp is localized on the plasma membrane and mitochondria where it colocalizes with Bcl-x(L). Co-immunoprecipitation confirms the physical interaction between P-gp and Bcl-x(L) in AGS, MKN-28 and Hep-G2, at both basal level and after stress-induced apoptosis. The selective silencing of P-gp sensitizes GC cells to stress-induced apoptosis. P-gp behaves as an oncofetal protein

  12. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays. PMID:25717323

  13. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain Calcofluor White. Trypan Blue staining facilitated quantification of cell size and cell wall volume when utilizing the optical sectioning capacity of a confocal microscope. This enabled the quantification of morphological changes during growth under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of chemicals, demonstrating the potential of this approach for morphological investigations or screening assays.

  14. The Fusarium oxysporum gnt2, encoding a putative N-acetylglucosamine transferase, is involved in cell wall architecture and virulence.

    PubMed

    López-Fernández, Loida; Ruiz-Roldán, Carmen; Pareja-Jaime, Yolanda; Prieto, Alicia; Khraiwesh, Husam; Roncero, M Isabel G

    2013-01-01

    With the aim to decipher the molecular dialogue and cross talk between Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersci and its host during infection and to understand the molecular bases that govern fungal pathogenicity, we analysed genes presumably encoding N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases, involved in glycosylation of glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans or small molecule acceptors in other microorganisms. In silico analysis revealed the existence of seven putative N-glycosyl transferase encoding genes (named gnt) in F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici genome. gnt2 deletion mutants showed a dramatic reduction in virulence on both plant and animal hosts. Δgnt2 mutants had αalterations in cell wall properties related to terminal αor β-linked N-acetyl glucosamine. Mutant conidia and germlings also showed differences in structure and physicochemical surface properties. Conidial and hyphal aggregation differed between the mutant and wild type strains, in a pH independent manner. Transmission electron micrographs of germlings showed strong cell-to-cell adherence and the presence of an extracellular chemical matrix. Δgnt2 cell walls presented a significant reduction in N-linked oligosaccharides, suggesting the involvement of Gnt2 in N-glycosylation of cell wall proteins. Gnt2 was localized in Golgi-like sub-cellular compartments as determined by fluorescence microscopy of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein after treatment with the antibiotic brefeldin A or by staining with fluorescent sphingolipid BODIPY-TR ceramide. Furthermore, density gradient ultracentrifugation allowed co-localization of GFP::Gnt2 fusion protein and Vps10p in subcellular fractions enriched in Golgi specific enzymatic activities. Our results suggest that N-acetylglucosaminyl transferases are key components for cell wall structure and influence interactions of F. oxysporum with both plant and animal hosts during pathogenicity. PMID:24416097

  15. Messenger Functions of the Bacterial Cell Wall-derived Muropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Marc A.; Fisher, Jed. F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial muropeptides are soluble peptidoglycan structures central to recycling of the bacterial cell wall, and messengers in diverse cell-signaling events. Bacteria sense muropeptides as signals that antibiotics targeting cell-wall biosynthesis are present, and eukaryotes detect muropeptides during the innate immune response to bacterial infection. This review summarizes the roles of bacterial muropeptides as messengers, with a special emphasis on bacterial muropeptide structures and the relationship of structure to the biochemical events that the muropeptides elicit. Muropeptide sensing and recycling in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is discussed, followed by muropeptide sensing by eukaryotes as a crucial event to the innate immune response of insects (via peptidoglycan-recognition proteins) and mammals (through Nod-like receptors) to bacterial invasion. PMID:22409164

  16. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed. PMID:24375653

  17. Comparison of P-glycoprotein expression in cell lines and xenogragraft sections using I-125 MRK-16 monoclonal antibody (MAB)

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, B.M.; Kostakoglu, L.; Levchenko, A.

    1994-05-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is known to be associated with multidrug resistance (MDR). Quantitation of P-glycoprotein expression may permit appropriate therapy depending on Pgp expression in tumors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the utility of quantitative autoradiography (QAR) in the quantification of MDR using MRK-16, a murine IgG mAb reactive against Pgp. Balb/c mice were xenografted with colchicine resistant BE(2)C/CHC cells. Animals with established tumors were sacrificed, and 8 {mu}m tumor sections were prepared. Mab MRK-16 was labeled with I-125 (150 {mu}Ci/0.625 nmole) by the iodogen method and subsequently purified by size exclusion chromatography. Consecutive tumor sections were incubated overnight at 4{degrees}C with serial dilutions of I-125 MRK-16. Similarly cell suspensions containing 1 X 10{sup 7} cells per ml were also incubated with serial dilutions. QAR analysis of tissue sections of BE(2)C/CHC tumors growing as xenografts in nude mice, determined the binding affinity (K{sub a}) for MRK-16 to be 1 x 10{sup 9} L/M and the number of binding sites (B{sub max}) to be 137, 700 per cell (222 picomols/g); it compared very well with the K{sub a} value of 5 x 10{sup 8} L/M and the B{sub max} value of 130,000 per cell (217 picomols/g) obtained from binding analysis with cell suspensions.

  18. Identification of Cell Wall Synthesis Regulatory Genes Controlling Biomass Characteristics and Yield in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Zhaohua PEng; Ronald, Palmela; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2013-04-26

    This project aims to identify the regulatory genes of rice cell wall synthesis pathways using a cell wall removal and regeneration system. We completed the gene expression profiling studies following the time course from cell wall removal to cell wall regeneration in rice suspension cells. We also completed, total proteome, nuclear subproteome and histone modification studies following the course from cell wall removal and cell wall regeneration process. A large number of differentially expressed regulatory genes and proteins were identified. Meanwhile, we generated RNAi and over-expression transgenic rice for 45 genes with at least 10 independent transgenic lines for each gene. In addition, we ordered T-DNA and transposon insertion mutants for 60 genes from Korea, Japan, and France and characterized the mutants. Overall, we have mutants and transgenic lines for over 90 genes, exceeded our proposed goal of generating mutants for 50 genes. Interesting Discoveries a) Cell wall re-synthesis in protoplasts may involve a novel cell wall synthesis mechanism. The synthesis of the primary cell wall is initiated in late cytokinesis with further modification during cell expansion. Phragmoplast plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. It services as a scaffold for building the cell plate and formation of a new cell wall. Only one phragmoplast and one new cell wall is produced for each dividing cell. When the cell wall was removed enzymatically, we found that cell wall re-synthesis started from multiple locations simultaneously, suggesting that a novel mechanism is involved in cell wall re-synthesis. This observation raised many interesting questions, such as how the starting sites of cell wall synthesis are determined, whether phragmoplast and cell plate like structures are involved in cell wall re-synthesis, and more importantly whether the same set of enzymes and apparatus are used in cell wall re-synthesis as during cytokinesis. Given that many known cell wall

  19. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G. . E-mail: vtgusk@lsu.edu

    2007-04-10

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion.

  20. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment. PMID:25735403

  1. Ectopic lignification in primary cellulose-deficient cell walls of maize cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Mélida, Hugo; Largo-Gosens, Asier; Novo-Uzal, Esther; Santiago, Rogelio; Pomar, Federico; García, Pedro; García-Angulo, Penélope; Acebes, José Luis; Álvarez, Jesús; Encina, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) suspension-cultured cells with up to 70% less cellulose were obtained by stepwise habituation to dichlobenil (DCB), a cellulose biosynthesis inhibitor. Cellulose deficiency was accompanied by marked changes in cell wall matrix polysaccharides and phenolics as revealed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Cell wall compositional analysis indicated that the cellulose-deficient cell walls showed an enhancement of highly branched and cross-linked arabinoxylans, as well as an increased content in ferulic acid, diferulates and p-coumaric acid, and the presence of a polymer that stained positive for phloroglucinol. In accordance with this, cellulose-deficient cell walls showed a fivefold increase in Klason-type lignin. Thioacidolysis/GC-MS analysis of cellulose-deficient cell walls indicated the presence of a lignin-like polymer with a Syringyl/Guaiacyl ratio of 1.45, which differed from the sensu stricto stress-related lignin that arose in response to short-term DCB-treatments. Gene expression analysis of these cells indicated an overexpression of genes specific for the biosynthesis of monolignol units of lignin. A study of stress signaling pathways revealed an overexpression of some of the jasmonate signaling pathway genes, which might trigger ectopic lignification in response to cell wall integrity disruptions. In summary, the structural plasticity of primary cell walls is proven, since a lignification process is possible in response to cellulose impoverishment.

  2. Penium margaritaceum as a model organism for cell wall analysis of expanding plant cells.

    PubMed

    Rydahl, Maja G; Fangel, Jonatan U; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Johansen, I Elisabeth; Andreas, Amanda; Harholt, Jesper; Ulvskov, Peter; Jørgensen, Bodil; Domozych, David S; Willats, William G T

    2015-01-01

    The growth of a plant cell encompasses a complex set of subcellular components interacting in a highly coordinated fashion. Ultimately, these activities create specific cell wall structural domains that regulate the prime force of expansion, internally generated turgor pressure. The precise organization of the polymeric networks of the cell wall around the protoplast also contributes to the direction of growth, the shape of the cell, and the proper positioning of the cell in a tissue. In essence, plant cell expansion represents the foundation of development. Most studies of plant cell expansion have focused primarily upon late divergent multicellular land plants and specialized cell types (e.g., pollen tubes, root hairs). Here, we describe a unicellular green alga, Penium margaritaceum (Penium), which can serve as a valuable model organism for understanding cell expansion and the underlying mechanics of the cell wall in a single plant cell.

  3. Alkamides from Echinacea angustifolia Interact with P-glycoprotein of primary brain capillary endothelial cells isolated from porcine brain blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mahringer, Anne; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bauer, Rudolf; Fricker, Gert; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The blood-brain barrier prevents the passage of toxic compounds from blood circulation into brain tissue. Unfortunately, drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, brain tumors, and other diseases also do not cross the blood-brain barrier. In the present investigation, we used isolated porcine brain capillary endothelial cells and a flow cytometric calcein-AM assay to analyze inhibition of P-glycoprotein, a major constituent of the blood-brain barrier. We tested 8 alkamides isolated from Echinacea angustifolia and found that four of them inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated calcein transport in porcine brain capillary endothelial cells.

  4. Viscoelastic properties of cell walls of single living plant cells determined by dynamic nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Hayot, Céline M; Forouzesh, Elham; Goel, Ashwani; Avramova, Zoya; Turner, Joseph A

    2012-04-01

    Plant development results from controlled cell divisions, structural modifications, and reorganizations of the cell wall. Thereby, regulation of cell wall behaviour takes place at multiple length scales involving compositional and architectural aspects in addition to various developmental and/or environmental factors. The physical properties of the primary wall are largely determined by the nature of the complex polymer network, which exhibits time-dependent behaviour representative of viscoelastic materials. Here, a dynamic nanoindentation technique is used to measure the time-dependent response and the viscoelastic behaviour of the cell wall in single living cells at a micron or sub-micron scale. With this approach, significant changes in storage (stiffness) and loss (loss of energy) moduli are captured among the tested cells. The results reveal hitherto unknown differences in the viscoelastic para