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Sample records for cell wall-acting antibiotics

  1. Isolated cell behavior drives the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Artemova, Tatiana; Gerardin, Ylaine; Dudley, Carmel; Vega, Nicole M; Gore, Jeff

    2015-07-29

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is typically quantified by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), which is defined as the minimal concentration of antibiotic that inhibits bacterial growth starting from a standard cell density. However, when antibiotic resistance is mediated by degradation, the collective inactivation of antibiotic by the bacterial population can cause the measured MIC to depend strongly on the initial cell density. In cases where this inoculum effect is strong, the relationship between MIC and bacterial fitness in the antibiotic is not well defined. Here, we demonstrate that the resistance of a single, isolated cell-which we call the single-cell MIC (scMIC)-provides a superior metric for quantifying antibiotic resistance. Unlike the MIC, we find that the scMIC predicts the direction of selection and also specifies the antibiotic concentration at which selection begins to favor new mutants. Understanding the cooperative nature of bacterial growth in antibiotics is therefore essential in predicting the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Side Effects of Culture Media Antibiotics on Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Llobet, Laura; Montoya, Julio; López-Gallardo, Ester; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Besides the advance in scientific knowledge and the production of different compounds, cell culture can now be used to obtain cells for regenerative medicine. To avoid microbial contamination, antibiotics were usually incorporated into culture media. However, these compounds affect cell biochemistry and may modify the differentiation potential of cultured cells. To check this possibility, we grew human adipose tissue-derived stem cells and differentiated them to adipocyte with or without antibiotics commonly used in these culture protocols, such as a penicillin-streptomycin-amphotericin mix or gentamicin. We show that these antibiotics affect cell differentiation. Therefore, antibiotics should not be used in cell culture because aseptic techniques make these compounds unnecessary.

  3. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  4. Inactivation of an integrated antibiotic resistance gene in mammalian cells to re-enable antibiotic selection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Peiling; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Haixia; Chen, Lingyi

    2014-01-01

    Removing an antibiotic resistance gene allows the same antibiotic to be re-used in the next round of genetic manipulation. Here we applied the CRISPR/Cas system to disrupt the puromycin resistance gene in an engineered mouse embryonic stem cell line and then re-used puromycin selection in the resulting cells to establish stable reporter cell lines. With the CRISPR/Cas system, pre-engineered sequences, such as loxP or FRT, are not required. Thus, this technique can be used to disrupt antibiotic resistance genes that cannot be removed by the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems.

  5. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Andreu, José M; Monasterio, Octavio

    2014-08-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of proteins and the availability of crystal structures has increased our knowledge on bacterial cell division considerably in this century. Consequently, bacterial cell division proteins are more and more recognized as potential new antibiotic targets. An international effort to find small molecules that inhibit the cell division initiating protein FtsZ has yielded many compounds of which some are promising as leads for preclinical use. The essential transglycosylase activity of peptidoglycan synthases has recently become accessible to inhibitor screening. Enzymatic assays for and structural information on essential integral membrane proteins such as MraY and FtsW involved in lipid II (the peptidoglycan building block precursor) biosynthesis have put these proteins on the list of potential new targets. This review summarises and discusses the results and approaches to the development of lead compounds that inhibit bacterial cell division.

  6. Mutations in mmpL and in the cell wall stress stimulon contribute to resistance to oxadiazole antibiotics in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiaobin; Vakulenko, Sergei; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2014-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of hospital- and community-acquired infections, which exhibit broad resistance to various antibiotics. We recently disclosed the discovery of the oxadiazole class of antibiotics, which has in vitro and in vivo activities against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We report herein that MmpL, a putative member of the resistance, nodulation, and cell division (RND) family of proteins, contributes to oxadiazole resistance in the S. aureus strain COL. Through serial passages, we generated two S. aureus COL variants that showed diminished susceptibilities to an oxadiazole antibiotic. The MICs for the oxadiazole against one strain (designated S. aureus COL(I)) increased reproducibly 2-fold (to 4 μg/ml), while against the other strain (S. aureus COL(R)), they increased >4-fold (to >8 μg/ml, the limit of solubility). The COL(R) strain was derived from the COL(I) strain. Whole-genome sequencing revealed 31 mutations in S. aureus COL(R), of which 29 were shared with COL(I). Consistent with our previous finding that oxadiazole antibiotics inhibit cell wall biosynthesis, we found 13 mutations that occurred either in structural genes or in promoters of the genes of the cell wall stress stimulon. Two unique mutations in S. aureus COL(R) were substitutions in two genes that encode the putative thioredoxin (SACOL1794) and MmpL (SACOL2566). A role for mmpL in resistance to oxadiazoles was discerned from gene deletion and complementation experiments. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a cell wall-acting antibiotic selects for mutations in the cell wall stress stimulon and the first to implicate MmpL in resistance to antibiotics in S. aureus.

  7. Bacterial cell division as a target for new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sass, Peter; Brötz-Oesterhelt, Heike

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial resistance to currently applied antibiotics complicates the treatment of infections and demands the evaluation of new strategies to counteract multidrug-resistant bacteria. In recent years, the inhibition of the bacterial divisome, mainly by targeting the central cell division mediator FtsZ, has been recognized as a promising strategy for antibiotic attack. New antibiotics were shown to either interfere with the natural dynamics and functions of FtsZ during the cell cycle or to activate a bacterial protease to degrade FtsZ and thus bring about bacterial death in a suicidal manner. Their efficacy in animal models of infection together with resistance-breaking properties prove the potential of such drugs and validate the inhibition of bacterial cell division as an attractive approach for antibiotic intervention.

  8. Raman spectroscopic identification of single bacterial cells under antibiotic influence.

    PubMed

    Münchberg, Ute; Rösch, Petra; Bauer, Michael; Popp, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The identification of pathogenic bacteria is a frequently required task. Current identification procedures are usually either time-consuming due to necessary cultivation steps or expensive and demanding in their application. Furthermore, previous treatment of a patient with antibiotics often renders routine analysis by culturing difficult. Since Raman microspectroscopy allows for the identification of single bacterial cells, it can be used to identify such difficult to culture bacteria. Yet until now, there have been no investigations whether antibiotic treatment of the bacteria influences the Raman spectroscopic identification. This study aims to rapidly identify bacteria that have been subjected to antibiotic treatment on single cell level with Raman microspectroscopy. Two strains of Escherichia coli and two species of Pseudomonas have been treated with four antibiotics, all targeting different sites of the bacteria. With Raman spectra from untreated bacteria, a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) model is built, which successfully identifies the species of independent untreated bacteria. Upon treatment of the bacteria with subinhibitory concentrations of ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, and sulfamethoxazole, the LDA model achieves species identification accuracies of 85.4, 95.3, 89.9, and 97.3 %, respectively. Increasing the antibiotic concentrations has no effect on the identification performance. An ampicillin-resistant strain of E. coli and a sample of P. aeruginosa are successfully identified as well. General representation of antibiotic stress in the training data improves species identification performance, while representation of a specific antibiotic improves strain distinction capability. In conclusion, the identification of antibiotically treated bacteria is possible with Raman microspectroscopy for diverse antibiotics on single cell level.

  9. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  10. Endothelial Cell Toxicity of Vancomycin Infusion Combined with Other Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Maryline; Chai, Feng; Barthélémy, Christine; Lebuffe, Gilles; Debaene, Bertrand; Décaudin, Bertrand; Odou, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    French guidelines recommend central intravenous (i.v.) infusion for high concentrations of vancomycin, but peripheral intravenous (p.i.v.) infusion is often preferred in intensive care units. Vancomycin infusion has been implicated in cases of phlebitis, with endothelial toxicity depending on the drug concentration and the duration of the infusion. Vancomycin is frequently infused in combination with other i.v. antibiotics through the same administrative Y site, but the local toxicity of such combinations has been poorly evaluated. Such an assessment could improve vancomycin infusion procedures in hospitals. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were challenged with clinical doses of vancomycin over 24 h with or without other i.v. antibiotics. Cell death was measured with the alamarBlue test. We observed an excess cellular death rate without any synergistic effect but dependent on the numbers of combined infusions when vancomycin and erythromycin or gentamicin were infused through the same Y site. Incompatibility between vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam was not observed in our study, and rinsing the cells between the two antibiotic infusions did not reduce endothelial toxicity. No endothelial toxicity of imipenem-cilastatin was observed when combined with vancomycin. p.i.v. vancomycin infusion in combination with other medications requires new recommendations to prevent phlebitis, including limiting coinfusion on the same line, reducing the infusion rate, and choosing an intermittent infusion method. Further studies need to be carried out to explore other drug combinations in long-term vancomycin p.i.v. therapy so as to gain insight into the mechanisms of drug incompatibility under multidrug infusion conditions.

  11. Resistance to antibiotics targeted to the bacterial cell wall.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, I; Favini-Stabile, S; Dessen, A

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan is the main component of the bacterial cell wall. It is a complex, three-dimensional mesh that surrounds the entire cell and is composed of strands of alternating glycan units crosslinked by short peptides. Its biosynthetic machinery has been, for the past five decades, a preferred target for the discovery of antibacterials. Synthesis of the peptidoglycan occurs sequentially within three cellular compartments (cytoplasm, membrane, and periplasm), and inhibitors of proteins that catalyze each stage have been identified, although not all are applicable for clinical use. A number of these antimicrobials, however, have been rendered inactive by resistance mechanisms. The employment of structural biology techniques has been instrumental in the understanding of such processes, as well as the development of strategies to overcome them. This review provides an overview of resistance mechanisms developed toward antibiotics that target bacterial cell wall precursors and its biosynthetic machinery. Strategies toward the development of novel inhibitors that could overcome resistance are also discussed.

  12. Antibiotic regimen based on population analysis of residing persister cells eradicates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shoufeng; Hay, Iain D; Cameron, David R; Speir, Mary; Cui, Bintao; Su, Feifei; Peleg, Anton Y; Lithgow, Trevor; Deighton, Margaret A; Qu, Yue

    2015-12-21

    Biofilm formation is a major pathogenicity strategy of Staphylococcus epidermidis causing various medical-device infections. Persister cells have been implicated in treatment failure of such infections. We sought to profile bacterial subpopulations residing in S. epidermidis biofilms, and to establish persister-targeting treatment strategies to eradicate biofilms. Population analysis was performed by challenging single biofilm cells with antibiotics at increasing concentrations ranging from planktonic minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) to biofilm MBCs (MBCbiofilm). Two populations of "persister cells" were observed: bacteria that survived antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for 24/48 hours were referred to as dormant cells; those selected with antibiotics at 8 X MICs for 3 hours (excluding dormant cells) were defined as tolerant-but-killable (TBK) cells. Antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells were tested in vitro for their efficacies in eradicating persister cells and intact biofilms. This study confirmed that there are at least three subpopulations within a S. epidermidis biofilm: normal cells, dormant cells, and TBK cells. Biofilms comprise more TBK cells and dormant cells than their log-planktonic counterparts. Using antibiotic regimens targeting dormant cells, i.e. effective antibiotics at MBCbiofilm for an extended period, might eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms. Potential uses for this strategy are in antibiotic lock techniques and inhaled aerosolized antibiotics.

  13. Bactericidal antibiotics induce mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Spina, Catherine S; Costello, James C; Liesa, Marc; Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Slomovic, Shimyn; Molina, Anthony; Shirihai, Orian S; Collins, James J

    2013-07-03

    Prolonged antibiotic treatment can lead to detrimental side effects in patients, including ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and tendinopathy, yet the mechanisms underlying the effects of antibiotics in mammalian systems remain unclear. It has been suggested that bactericidal antibiotics induce the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria. We show that clinically relevant doses of bactericidal antibiotics-quinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams-cause mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS overproduction in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that these bactericidal antibiotic-induced effects lead to oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Mice treated with bactericidal antibiotics exhibited elevated oxidative stress markers in the blood, oxidative tissue damage, and up-regulated expression of key genes involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms, which points to the potential physiological relevance of these antibiotic effects. The deleterious effects of bactericidal antibiotics were alleviated in cell culture and in mice by the administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine or prevented by preferential use of bacteriostatic antibiotics. This work highlights the role of antibiotics in the production of oxidative tissue damage in mammalian cells and presents strategies to mitigate or prevent the resulting damage, with the goal of improving the safety of antibiotic treatment in people.

  14. Dielectrophoretic characterization of antibiotic-treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shinnosuke; Lee, Hyun-Boo; Becker, Annie L; Weigel, Kris M; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has become a serious concern for proper treatment of patients. As a phenotypic method, dielectrophoresis can be useful but is yet to be attempted to evaluate Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex cells. This paper investigates the dielectrophoretic behavior of Mycobacterium bovis (Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, BCG) cells that are treated with heat or antibiotics rifampin (RIF) or isoniazid (INH). The experimental parameters are designed on the basis of our sensitivity analysis. The medium conductivity (σ(m)) and the frequency (f) for a crossover frequency (f(xo1)) test are decided to detect the change of σ(m)-f(xo1) in conjunction with the drug mechanism. Statistical modeling is conducted to estimate the distributions of viable and nonviable cells from the discrete measurement of f (xo1). Finally, the parameters of the electrophysiology of BCG cells, C(envelope) and σ(cyto), are extracted through a sampling algorithm. This is the first evaluation of the dielectrophoresis (DEP) approach as a means to assess the effects of antimicrobial drugs on M. tuberculosis complex cells.

  15. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Oxidative Damage in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costello, James C.; Liesa, Marc; Morones-Ramirez, J Ruben; Slomovic, Shimyn; Molina, Anthony; Shirihai, Orian S.; Collins, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged antibiotic treatment can lead to detrimental side effects in patients, including ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and tendinopathy, yet the mechanisms underlying the effects of antibiotics in mammalian systems remain unclear. It has been suggested that bactericidal antibiotics induce the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in bacteria. We show that clinically relevant doses of bactericidal antibiotics—quinolones, aminoglycosides, and β-lactams—cause mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS overproduction in mammalian cells. We demonstrate that these bactericidal antibiotic–induced effects lead to oxidative damage to DNA, proteins, and membrane lipids. Mice treated with bactericidal antibiotics exhibited elevated oxidative stress markers in the blood, oxidative tissue damage, and up-regulated expression of key genes involved in antioxidant defense mechanisms, which points to the potential physiological relevance of these antibiotic effects. The deleterious effects of bactericidal antibiotics were alleviated in cell culture and in mice by the administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or prevented by preferential use of bacteriostatic antibiotics. This work highlights the role of antibiotics in the production of oxidative tissue damage in mammalian cells and presents strategies to mitigate or prevent the resulting damage, with the goal of improving the safety of antibiotic treatment in people. PMID:23825301

  16. Antibiotics and immunity: effects of antibiotics on natural killer, antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M S; Maged, Z A; Haron, A; Khalil, R Y; Attallah, A M

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of antibiotics on natural killer (NK), antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and immunoglobulin production. When human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated overnight with the antibiotic before the assay, nitrofurantoin significantly reduced NK but not ADCC activity. Nitrofurantoin also suppressed both spontaneous and interferon-enhanced NK activities in a dose-dependent fashion. Though it did not affect spontaneous ADCC activity, nitrofurantoin suppressed interferon enhancement of ADCC. Chloramphenicol significantly decreased the number of plaque forming cells in mice. In addition to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin, cephalothin, polymyxin B and nitrofurantoin reduced mitogen-induced polycloned immunoglobulin synthesis. Results of this study may have clinical relevance, especially in treating immunocompromised patients.

  17. An azido-oxazolidinone antibiotic for live bacterial cell imaging and generation of antibiotic variants

    PubMed Central

    Phetsang, Wanida; Blaskovich, Mark A.T.; Butler, Mark S.; Huang, Johnny X.; Zuegg, Johannes; Mamidyala, Sreeman K.; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela M.; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    An azide-functionalised analogue of the oxazolidinone antibiotic linezolid was synthesised and shown to retain antimicrobial activity. Using facile ‘click’ chemistry, this versatile intermediate can be further functionalised to explore antimicrobial structure–activity relationships or conjugated to fluorophores to generate fluorescent probes. Such probes can report bacteria and their location in a sample in real time. Modelling of the structures bound to the cognate 50S ribosome target demonstrates binding to the same site as linezolid is possible. The fluorescent probes were successfully used to image Gram-positive bacteria using confocal microscopy. PMID:25023540

  18. Unraveling the genetic driving forces enabling antibiotic resistance at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Julia

    Bacteria are champions at finding ways to quickly respond and adapt to environments like the human gut, known as the epicentre of antibiotic resistance. How do they do it? Combining molecular biology tools to microfluidic and fluorescence microscopy technologies, we monitor the behavior of bacteria at the single cell level in the presence of non-toxic doses of antibiotics. By tracking the chromosome dynamics of Escherichia coli cells upon antibiotic treatment, we examine the changes in the number, localization and content of the chromosome copies within one cell compartment or between adjacent cells. I will discuss how our work pictures the bacterial genomic plasticity as a driving force in evolution and how it provides access to the mechanisms controlling the subtle balance between genetic diversity and stability in the development of antibiotic resistance.

  19. A comparison of 2 white blood cell count devices to aid judicious antibiotic prescribing.

    PubMed

    Casey, Janet R; Pichichero, Michael E

    2009-04-01

    A low or normal white blood cell (WBC) count is usually associated with viral illnesses. This study evaluated the reliability of a new point-of-care, inexpensive, WBC count device which requires only 10 microL (1 drop) of whole blood from a finger stick to an automated Cell-Dyn counter in a busy office practice setting and assessed its reliability to assist in avoiding antibiotic prescribing. A total of 120 acutely ill children and potential antibiotic recipients were studied from October 2007 to March 2008. The mean WBC count was 7.4x10(9)/L and 8.1x10( 9)/L for the new WBC device and the automated Cell-Dyn counter, respectively. The correlation between the 2 devices was high (r=.988, P=.005). A total of 88 children (73%) did not receive antibiotics and mean WBC was 7.2x10(9)/L. In all, 32 children (27%) received an antibiotic and 1 (3%) returned for a follow-up office visit for the same or a related illness. Of the 88 children with a low blood count who did not receive an antibiotic, 3 (3%) had return visit within 30 days and received an antibiotic. A simple and quick point-of-care WBC count device produces similar results as achievable with a Cell-Dyn counter for total WBCs and may assist in judicious antibiotic prescribing.

  20. Single-Cell Tracking Reveals Antibiotic-Induced Changes in Mycobacterial Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Emre; McKinney, John D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT ATP is a key molecule of cell physiology, but despite its importance, there are currently no methods for monitoring single-cell ATP fluctuations in live bacteria. This is a major obstacle in studies of bacterial energy metabolism, because there is a growing awareness that bacteria respond to stressors such as antibiotics in a highly individualistic manner. Here, we present a method for long-term single-cell tracking of ATP levels in Mycobacterium smegmatis based on a combination of microfluidics, time-lapse microscopy, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based ATP biosensors. Upon treating cells with antibiotics, we observed that individual cells undergo an abrupt and irreversible switch from high to low intracellular ATP levels. The kinetics and extent of ATP switching clearly discriminate between an inhibitor of ATP synthesis and other classes of antibiotics. Cells that resume growth after 24 h of antibiotic treatment maintain high ATP levels throughout the exposure period. In contrast, antibiotic-treated cells that switch from ATP-high to ATP-low states never resume growth after antibiotic washout. Surprisingly, only a subset of these nongrowing ATP-low cells stains with propidium iodide (PI), a widely used live/dead cell marker. These experiments also reveal a cryptic subset of cells that do not resume growth after antibiotic washout despite remaining ATP high and PI negative. We conclude that ATP tracking is a more dynamic, sensitive, reliable, and discriminating marker of cell viability than staining with PI. This method could be used in studies to evaluate antimicrobial effectiveness and mechanism of action, as well as for high-throughput screening. PMID:25691591

  1. Stochastic expression of a multiple antibiotic resistance activator confers transient resistance in single cells.

    PubMed

    El Meouche, Imane; Siu, Yik; Dunlop, Mary J

    2016-01-13

    Transient resistance can allow microorganisms to temporarily survive lethal concentrations of antibiotics. This can be accomplished through stochastic mechanisms, where individual cells within a population display diverse phenotypes to hedge against the appearance of an antibiotic. To date, research on transient stochastic resistance has focused primarily on mechanisms where a subpopulation of cells enters a dormant, drug-tolerant state. However, a fundamental question is whether stochastic gene expression can also generate variable resistance levels among growing cells in a population. We hypothesized that stochastic expression of antibiotic-inducible resistance mechanisms might play such a role. To investigate this, we focused on a prototypical example of such a system: the multiple antibiotic resistance activator MarA. Previous studies have shown that induction of MarA can lead to a multidrug resistant phenotype at the population level. We asked whether MarA expression also has a stochastic component, even when uninduced. Time lapse microscopy showed that isogenic cells express heterogeneous, dynamic levels of MarA, which were correlated with transient antibiotic survival. This finding has important clinical implications, as stochastic expression of resistance genes may be widespread, allowing populations to hedge against the sudden appearance of an antibiotic.

  2. Dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in microbial fuel cell-coupled constructed wetlands treating antibiotic-polluted water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Song, Hai-Liang; Yang, Xiao-Li; Huang, Shan; Dai, Zhe-Qin; Li, Hua; Zhang, Yu-Yue

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell-coupled constructed wetlands (CW-MFCs) use electrochemical, biological, and ecological functions to treat wastewater. However, few studies have investigated the risks of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) when using such systems to remove antibiotics. Therefore, three CW-MFCs were designed to assess the dynamics of ARGs in filler biofilm and effluent over 5000 h of operation. The experimental results indicated that relatively high steady voltages of 605.8 mV, 613.7 mV, and 541.4 mV were obtained at total influent antibiotic concentrations of 400, 1,000, and 1600 μg L(-1), respectively. The 16S rRNA gene level in the cathode layer was higher than those in the anode and two middle layers, but the opposite trend was observed for the sul and tet genes. The relative abundance of the three tested sul genes were in the order sulI > sulII > sulIII, and those of the five tet genes were in the order tetA > tetC > tetW > tetO > tetQ. The levels of sul and tet genes in the media biofilm showed an increase over the treatment period. The effluent water had relatively low abundances of sul and tet genes compared with the filler biofilm. No increases were observed for most ARGs over the treatment period, and no significant correlations were observed between the ARGs and 16S rRNA gene copy numbers, except for sulI and tetW in the effluent. However, significant correlations were observed among most of the ARG copy numbers.

  3. Mathematical Modeling and Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Cell Growth in Response to Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Suoqin; Niu, Lili; Wang, Gang; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-06-01

    This study is devoted to the revelation of the dynamical mechanisms of cell growth in response to antibiotics. We establish a mathematical model of ordinary differential equations for an antibiotic-resistant growth system with one positive feedback loop. We perform a dynamical analysis of the behavior of this model system. We present adequate sets of conditions that can guarantee the existence and stability of biologically-reasonable steady states. Using bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation, we show that the relative growth rate, which is defined as the ratio of the cell growth rate to the basal cell growth rate in the absence of antibiotics, can exhibit bistable behavior in an extensive range of parameters that correspond to a growth state and a nongrowth state in biology. We discover that both antibiotic and antibiotic resistance genes can cooperatively enhance bistability, whereas the cooperative coefficient of feedback can contribute to the onset of bistability. These results would contribute to a better understanding of not only the evolution of antibiotics but also the emergence of drug resistance in other diseases.

  4. Evaluation of the use of dry cow antibiotics in low somatic cell count cows.

    PubMed

    Scherpenzeel, C G M; den Uijl, I E M; van Schaik, G; Olde Riekerink, R G M; Keurentjes, J M; Lam, T J G M

    2014-01-01

    The goal of dry cow therapy (DCT) is to reduce the prevalence of intramammary infections (IMI) by eliminating existing IMI at drying off and preventing new IMI from occurring during the dry period. Due to public health concerns, however, preventive use of antibiotics has become questionable. This study evaluated selective DCT in 1,657 cows with low somatic cell count (SCC) at the last milk recording before drying off in 97 Dutch dairy herds. Low SCC was defined as <150,000 cells/mL for primiparous and <250,000 cells/mL for multiparous cows. A split-udder design was used in which 2 quarters of each cow were treated with dry cow antibiotics and the other 2 quarters remained as untreated controls. The effect of DCT on clinical mastitis (CM), bacteriological status, SCC, and antibiotic use were determined at the quarter level using logistic regression and chi-squared tests. The incidence rate of CM was found to be 1.7 times (95% confidence interval = 1.4-2.1) higher in quarters dried off without antibiotics as compared with quarters dried off with antibiotics. Streptococcus uberis was the predominant organism causing CM in both groups. Somatic cell count at calving and 14 d in milk was significantly higher in quarters dried off without antibiotics (772,000 and 46,000 cells/mL, respectively) as compared with the quarters dried off with antibiotics (578,000 and 30,000 cells/mL, respectively). Quarters with an elevated SCC at drying off and quarters with a positive culture for major pathogens at drying off had a higher risk for an SCC above 200,000 cells/mL at 14 d in milk as compared with quarters with a low SCC at drying off and quarters with a negative culture for major pathogens at drying off. For quarters that were culture-positive for major pathogens at drying off, a trend for a higher risk on CM was also found. Selective DCT, not using DCT in cows that had a low SCC at the last milk recording before drying off, significantly increased the incidence rate of CM and

  5. Cecum Lymph Node Dendritic Cells Harbor Slow-Growing Bacteria Phenotypically Tolerant to Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Lengefeld, Jette; Slack, Emma; Grant, Andrew J.; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN), the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%–20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103+CX3CR1−CD11c+ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics. PMID:24558351

  6. Effect of Various Concentrations of Antibiotics on Osteogenic Cell Viability and Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    ciprofloxacin , colistinmethanesulfonate, and gentamicin; their cell number and ALPwere significantly less than control at drug concentrations200 mg/ ml...taxime sodium sulfate (C7912), ciprofloxacin (17850), colistin methanesulfonate sodium (C1511), doxycycline hyclate (D9891), gentamicin sulfate...doxycycline, nafcillin, penicillin, ciprofloxacin , colistinmethanesulfo- nate, and gentamicin reduced both cell number and ALP (Fig. 1). For antibiotics

  7. Microspectrometric insights on the uptake of antibiotics at the single bacterial cell level.

    PubMed

    Cinquin, Bertrand; Maigre, Laure; Pinet, Elizabeth; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Stavenger, Robert A; Mills, Scott; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-12-11

    Bacterial multidrug resistance is a significant health issue. A key challenge, particularly in Gram-negative antibacterial research, is to better understand membrane permeation of antibiotics in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. Passing through the membrane barrier to reach the required concentration inside the bacterium is a pivotal step for most antibacterials. Spectrometric methodology has been developed to detect drugs inside bacteria and recent studies have focused on bacterial cell imaging. Ultimately, we seek to use this method to identify pharmacophoric groups which improve penetration, and therefore accumulation, of small-molecule antibiotics inside bacteria. We developed a method to quantify the time scale of antibiotic accumulation in living bacterial cells. Tunable ultraviolet excitation provided by DISCO beamline (synchrotron Soleil) combined with microscopy allows spectroscopic analysis of the antibiotic signal in individual bacterial cells. Robust controls and measurement of the crosstalk between fluorescence channels can provide real time quantification of drug. This technique represents a new method to assay drug translocation inside the cell and therefore incorporate rational drug design to impact antibiotic uptake.

  8. Antibiotic discovery: combatting bacterial resistance in cells and in biofilm communities.

    PubMed

    Penesyan, Anahit; Gillings, Michael; Paulsen, Ian T

    2015-03-24

    Bacterial resistance is a rapidly escalating threat to public health as our arsenal of effective antibiotics dwindles. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics. Drug discovery has historically focused on bacteria growing in planktonic cultures. Many antibiotics were originally developed to target individual bacterial cells, being assessed in vitro against microorganisms in a planktonic mode of life. However, towards the end of the 20th century it became clear that many bacteria live as complex communities called biofilms in their natural habitat, and this includes habitats within a human host. The biofilm mode of life provides advantages to microorganisms, such as enhanced resistance towards environmental stresses, including antibiotic challenge. The community level resistance provided by biofilms is distinct from resistance mechanisms that operate at a cellular level, and cannot be overlooked in the development of novel strategies to combat infectious diseases. The review compares mechanisms of antibiotic resistance at cellular and community levels in the light of past and present antibiotic discovery efforts. Future perspectives on novel strategies for treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases are explored.

  9. Electrooptical Analysis of Microbial Cell Suspensions forDetermination of Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Guliy, Olga I; Bunin, Victor D; Korzhenevich, Vyacheslav I; Volkov, Alexey A; Ignatov, Oleg V

    2016-12-01

    The effects of ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline on electrophysical characteristics of cells of sensitive (ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol) and resistant (ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline) Escherichia coli strains were studied. Under the action of antibiotics sensitive and resistant E. coli strains acquire different electro-optical properties. Changes in suspension-orientational spectra, that are observed under the action of ampicillin; kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline can be used in determination of antibiotic resistance of the studied bacterial strains. In our opinion, the methods of microbial suspension electro-optical analysis can be used in microbiology, mеdicinе, veterinary, and are an effective tool for solving the problems connected with determination of microbial cell antibiotic resistance.

  10. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  11. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    PubMed Central

    Haaber, Jakob; Leisner, Jørgen J.; Cohn, Marianne T.; Catalan-Moreno, Arancha; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Westh, Henrik; Penadés, José R.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S. aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction', allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence model (wax moth larvae) and enables it to proliferate under strong antibiotic selection pressure. Our results may help to explain the rapid exchange of antibiotic resistance genes observed in S. aureus. PMID:27819286

  12. Bacterial cell wall composition and the influence of antibiotics by cell-wall and whole-cell NMR

    PubMed Central

    Romaniuk, Joseph A. H.; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-01-01

    The ability to characterize bacterial cell-wall composition and structure is crucial to understanding the function of the bacterial cell wall, determining drug modes of action and developing new-generation therapeutics. Solid-state NMR has emerged as a powerful tool to quantify chemical composition and to map cell-wall architecture in bacteria and plants, even in the context of unperturbed intact whole cells. In this review, we discuss solid-state NMR approaches to define peptidoglycan composition and to characterize the modes of action of old and new antibiotics, focusing on examples in Staphylococcus aureus. We provide perspectives regarding the selected NMR strategies as we describe the exciting and still-developing cell-wall and whole-cell NMR toolkit. We also discuss specific discoveries regarding the modes of action of vancomycin analogues, including oritavancin, and briefly address the reconsideration of the killing action of β-lactam antibiotics. In such chemical genetics approaches, there is still much to be learned from perturbations enacted by cell-wall assembly inhibitors, and solid-state NMR approaches are poised to address questions of cell-wall composition and assembly in S. aureus and other organisms. PMID:26370936

  13. Suppression of methanogenesis for hydrogen production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells using various antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Catal, Tunc; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens can utilize the hydrogen produced in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), thereby decreasing the hydrogen generation efficiency. However, various antibiotics have previously been shown to inhibit methanogenesis. In the present study antibiotics, including neomycin sulfate, 2-bromoethane sulfonate, 2-chloroethane sulfonate, 8-aza-hypoxanthine, were examined to determine if hydrogen production could be improved through inhibition of methanogenesis but not hydrogen production in MECs. 1.1mM neomycin sulfate inhibited both methane and hydrogen production while 2-chloroethane sulfonate (20mM), 2-bromoethane sulfonate (20mM), and 8-aza-hypoxanthine (3.6mM) can inhibited methane generation and with concurrent increases in hydrogen production. Our results indicated that adding select antibiotics to the mixed species community in MECs could be a suitable method to enhance hydrogen production efficiency.

  14. Antibiotic treatment enhances the genome-wide mutation rate of target cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Hongan; Miller, Samuel F; Strauss, Chloe; Zhao, Chaoxian; Cheng, Lei; Ye, Zhiqiang; Griffin, Katherine; Te, Ronald; Lee, Heewook; Chen, Chi-Chun; Lynch, Michael

    2016-05-03

    Although it is well known that microbial populations can respond adaptively to challenges from antibiotics, empirical difficulties in distinguishing the roles of de novo mutation and natural selection have left several issues unresolved. Here, we explore the mutational properties of Escherichia coli exposed to long-term sublethal levels of the antibiotic norfloxacin, using a mutation accumulation design combined with whole-genome sequencing of replicate lines. The genome-wide mutation rate significantly increases with norfloxacin concentration. This response is associated with enhanced expression of error-prone DNA polymerases and may also involve indirect effects of norfloxacin on DNA mismatch and oxidative-damage repair. Moreover, we find that acquisition of antibiotic resistance can be enhanced solely by accelerated mutagenesis, i.e., without direct involvement of selection. Our results suggest that antibiotics may generally enhance the mutation rates of target cells, thereby accelerating the rate of adaptation not only to the antibiotic itself but to additional challenges faced by invasive pathogens.

  15. Antibiotic treatment enhances the genome-wide mutation rate of target cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hongan; Miller, Samuel F.; Strauss, Chloe; Zhao, Chaoxian; Cheng, Lei; Ye, Zhiqiang; Griffin, Katherine; Te, Ronald; Lee, Heewook; Chen, Chi-Chun; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that microbial populations can respond adaptively to challenges from antibiotics, empirical difficulties in distinguishing the roles of de novo mutation and natural selection have left several issues unresolved. Here, we explore the mutational properties of Escherichia coli exposed to long-term sublethal levels of the antibiotic norfloxacin, using a mutation accumulation design combined with whole-genome sequencing of replicate lines. The genome-wide mutation rate significantly increases with norfloxacin concentration. This response is associated with enhanced expression of error-prone DNA polymerases and may also involve indirect effects of norfloxacin on DNA mismatch and oxidative-damage repair. Moreover, we find that acquisition of antibiotic resistance can be enhanced solely by accelerated mutagenesis, i.e., without direct involvement of selection. Our results suggest that antibiotics may generally enhance the mutation rates of target cells, thereby accelerating the rate of adaptation not only to the antibiotic itself but to additional challenges faced by invasive pathogens. PMID:27091991

  16. Studies on penetration of antibiotic in bacterial cells in space conditions (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tixador, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Cytos 2 experiment was performed aboard Salyut 7 in order to test the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria cultivated in vitro in space. An increase of the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) in the inflight cultures (i.e., an increase of the antibiotic resistance) was observed. Complementary studies of the ultrastructure showed a thickening of the cell envelope. In order to confirm the results of the Cytos 2 experiment, we performed the ANTIBIO experiment during the D1 mission to try to differentiate, by means of the 1 g centrifuge in the Biorack, between the biological effects of cosmic rays and those caused by microgravity conditions. The originality of this experiment was in the fact that it was designed to test the antibiotic sensitivity of bacteria cultivated in vitro during the orbital phase of the flight. The results show an increase in resistance to Colistin in in-flight bacteria. The MIC is practically double in the in-flight cultures. A cell count of living bacteria in the cultures containing the different Colistin concentrations showed a significant difference between the cultures developed during space flight and the ground based cultures. The comparison between the 1 g and 0 g in-flight cultures show similar behavior for the two sets. Nevertheless, a small difference between the two sets of ground based control cultures was noted. The cultures developed on the ground centrifuge (1.4 g) present a slight decrease in comparison with the cultures developed in the static rack (1 g). In order to approach the mechanisms of the increase of antibiotic resistance on bacteria cultivated in vitro in space, we have proposed the study on penetration of antibiotics in bacterial cells in space conditions. This experiment was selected for the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission.

  17. [Saccharomyces boulardii modulates dendritic cell properties and intestinal microbiota disruption after antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Collignon, A; Sandré, C; Barc, M-C

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a non-pathogenic yeast with biotherapeutic properties that has been used successfully to prevent and to treat various infectious and antibiotic-associated diarrheas. The intestinal microbiota is responsible for colonization resistance and immune response to pathogens but can be disrupted by antibiotics and lose its barrier effect. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system with the ability to initiate a primary immune response or immune tolerance. In a human microbiota-associated mouse model, we evaluated the influence of S. boulardii on the composition of the microbiota and on the properties of dendritic cells in normal homeostatic conditions and after antibiotic-induced stress. The DCs were derived from splenic precursors. Membrane antigen expression and phagocytosis of FITC-latex beads by DCs were evaluated by flow cytometry. The molecular analysis of the microbiota was performed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with flow cytometry or confocal microscopy using group specific 16S rRNA targeted probes. This evaluation was conducted during and after a 7-day oral treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid alone and in combination with the administration of the yeast. The antibiotic treatment increased the phagocytic activity of DCs. Their antigen presenting function (MHC class II antigen and CD 86 costimulatory molecule membrane expression) was up-regulated. This reflects a functional activation of DCs. In the presence of S. boulardii, the modification of membrane antigen expression was down regulated. To correlate these modifications to the microbiota disruption, we analyzed in parallel the composition of the intestinal microbiota. As previously shown, the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatment, both alone and with S. boulardii, did not quantitatively alter the total microbiota. In contrast, after one day of the antibiotic treatment the Clostridium coccoides group decreased

  18. Reducing the Level of Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase Has Complex Effects on Susceptibility to Cell Wall Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Heon; Helmann, John D

    2013-06-24

    Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UppS) catalyzes the formation of the C55 lipid carrier (UPP) that is essential for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Here we selected a vancomycin (VAN)-resistant derivative of Bacillus subtilis W168 which contains a single-point mutation in the ribosome-binding site (RBS) of the uppS gene designated uppS1. Genetic reconstruction experiments demonstrate that the uppS1 allele is sufficient to confer low-level VAN resistance and causes reduced UppS translation. The decreased level of UppS renders B. subtilis slightly more susceptible to many late-acting cell wall antibiotics including β-lactams, but significantly more resistant to fosfomycin and D-cycloserine, antibiotics that interfere with the very early steps of cell wall synthesis. We further show that the uppS1 allele leads to slightly elevated expression of the σ(M) regulon, possibly helping to compensate for the stress caused by a decrease in UPP levels. Notably, the uppS1 mutation increases resistance to VAN, fosfomycin, and D-cycloserine in wild-type cells, but this effect is greatly reduced or eliminated in a sigM mutant background. Our findings suggest that, although UppS is an attractive antibacterial target, incomplete inhibition of UppS function may lead to increased resistance to some cell wall-active antibiotics.

  19. Single-cell level methods for studying the effect of antibiotics on bacteria during infection.

    PubMed

    Kogermann, Karin; Putrinš, Marta; Tenson, Tanel

    2016-12-01

    Considerable evidence about phenotypic heterogeneity among bacteria during infection has accumulated during recent years. This heterogeneity has to be considered if the mechanisms of infection and antibiotic action are to be understood, so we need to implement existing and find novel methods to monitor the effects of antibiotics on bacteria at the single-cell level. This review provides an overview of methods by which this aim can be achieved. Fluorescence label-based methods and Raman scattering as a label-free approach are discussed in particular detail. Other label-free methods that can provide single-cell level information, such as impedance spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance, are briefly summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of these different methods are discussed in light of a challenging in vivo environment.

  20. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  1. Nitrite Modulates Bacterial Antibiotic Susceptibility and Biofilm Formation in Association with Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zemke, Anna C; Shiva, Sruti; Burn, Jane L.; Moskowitz, Samuel M.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Bomberger, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the major pathogenic bacteria in cystic fibrosis and other forms of bronchiectasis. Growth in antibiotic resistant biofilms contributes to the virulence of this organism. Sodium nitrite has antimicrobial properties and has been tolerated as a nebulized compound at high concentrations in human subjects with pulmonary hypertension; however, its effects have not been evaluated on biotic biofilms or in combination with other clinically useful antibiotics. We grew P. aeruginosa on the apical surface of primary human airway epithelial cells to test the efficacy of sodium nitrite against biotic biofilms. Nitrite alone prevented 99% of biofilm growth. We then identified significant cooperative interactions between nitrite and polymyxins. For P. aeruginosa growing on primary CF airway cells, combining nitrite and colistimethate resulted in an additional log of bacterial inhibition compared to treating with either agent alone. Nitrite and colistimethate additively inhibited oxygen consumption by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly, while the antimicrobial effects of nitrite in planktonic, aerated cultures are nitric oxide (NO) dependent, antimicrobial effects in other growth conditions are not. The inhibitory effect of nitrite on bacterial oxygen consumption and biofilm growth did not require NO as an intermediate as chemically scavenging NO did not block growth inhibition. These data suggest an NO-radical independent nitrosative or oxidative inhibition of respiration. The combination of nebulized sodium nitrite and colistimethate may provide a novel therapy for chronic P. aeruginosa airway infections, because sodium nitrite, unlike other antibiotic respiratory chain ‘poisons’, can be safely nebulized at high concentration in humans. PMID:25229185

  2. Detection and antibiotic treatment of Mycoplasma arginini contamination in a mouse epithelial cell line restore normal cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Boslett, Brianna; Nag, Subhra; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination of cultured cell lines is difficult to detect by routine observation. Infected cells can display normal morphology and the slow growth rate of mycoplasma can delay detection for extended periods of time, compromising experimental results. Positive identification of mycoplasma typically requires cells to be either fixed and stained for DNA or processed with PCR. We present a method to detect mycoplasma using live-cell optical microscopy typically used for routine observation of cell cultures. Images of untreated mycoplasma-infected epithelial cells alongside images of infected cells treated with Plasmocin, a commercially available antibiotic targeted to mycoplasma, are shown. We found that optical imaging is an effective screening tool for detection of mycoplasma contamination. Importantly, we found that cells regained normal function after the contamination was cleared. In conclusion, we present a technique to diagnose probable mycoplasma infections in live cultures without fixation, resulting in faster response times and decreased loss of cell material.

  3. New insights into glycopeptide antibiotic binding to cell wall precursors using SPR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Juan; Bayón, Carlos; Ardá, Ana; Marinelli, Flavia; Gandolfi, Raffaella; Molinari, Francesco; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesús; Hernáiz, María J

    2014-06-10

    Glycopeptide antibiotics, such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, are used to treat life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. They inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis by binding to the D-Ala-D-Ala C-terminus of peptidoglycan precursors. Vancomycin-resistant bacteria replace the dipeptide with the D-Ala-D-Lac depsipeptide, thus reducing the binding affinity of the antibiotics with their molecular targets. Herein, studies of the interaction of teicoplanin, teicoplanin-like A40926, and of their semisynthetic derivatives (mideplanin, MDL63,246, dalbavancin) with peptide analogues of cell-wall precursors by NMR spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are reported. NMR spectroscopy revealed the existence of two different complexes in solution, when the different glycopeptides interact with Ac2KdAlaDAlaOH. Despite the NMR experimental conditions, which are different from those employed for the SPR measurements, the NMR spectroscopy results parallel those deduced in the chip with respect to the drastic binding difference existing between the D-Ala and the D-Lac terminating analogues, confirming that all these antibiotics share the same primary molecular mechanism of action and resistance. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between the glycopeptide antibiotics and immobilized AcKdAlaDAlaOH by SPR suggest a dimerization process that was not observed by NMR spectroscopy in DMSO solution. Moreover, in SPR, all glycopeptides with a hydrophobic acyl chain present stronger binding with a hydrophobic surface than vancomycin, indicating that additional interactions through the employed surface are involved. In conclusion, SPR provides a tool to differentiate between vancomycin and other glycopeptides, and the calculated binding affinities at the surface seem to be more relevant to in vitro antimicrobial activity than the estimations from NMR spectroscopy analysis.

  4. A Novel Cell-Associated Protection Assay Demonstrates the Ability of Certain Antibiotics To Protect Ocular Surface Cell Lines from Subsequent Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Challenge▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wingard, J. B.; Romanowski, E. G.; Kowalski, R. P.; Mah, F. S.; Ling, Y.; Bilonick, R. A.; Shanks, R. M. Q.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo effectiveness of topical antibiotics may depend on their ability to associate with epithelial cells to provide continued protection, but this contribution is not measured by standard antibiotic susceptibility tests. We report a new in vitro method that measures the ability of test antibiotics azithromycin (AZM), erythromycin (ERY), tetracycline (TET), and bacitracin (BAC) to associate with mammalian cells and to protect these cells from destruction by bacteria. Mammalian cell lines were grown to confluence using antibiotic-free medium and then incubated in medium containing a single antibiotic (0 to 512 μg/ml). After incubation, the cells were challenged with Staphylococcus aureus ocular isolates, without antibiotics added to the culture medium. Epithelial cell layer integrity was assessed by gentian violet staining, and the minimum cell layer protective concentration (MCPC) of an antibiotic sufficient to protect the mammalian cells from S. aureus was determined. Staining was also quantified and analyzed. Bacterial viability was determined by culture turbidity and growth on agar plates. Preincubation of Chang and human corneal limbal epithelial cells with AZM, ERY, and TET at ≥64 μg/ml provided protection against AZM-susceptible S. aureus strains, with increasing protection at higher concentrations. TET toxicity was demonstrated at >64 μg/ml, whereas AZM displayed toxicity to one cell line at 512 μg/ml. BAC failed to show consistent protection at any dose, despite bacterial susceptibility to BAC as determined by traditional antibiotic susceptibility testing. A range of antibiotic effectiveness was displayed in this cell association assay, providing data that may be considered in addition to traditional testing when determining therapeutic dosing regimens. PMID:21628536

  5. Triggering of autolytic cell wall degradation in Escherichia coli by beta-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, K; Tomasz, A

    1979-01-01

    A biochemical method was developed to quantitatively compare the effectiveness of beta-lactams in triggering murein degradation (autolysin activity) in Escherichia coli. Bacteria prelabeled in their cell walls with radioactive diaminopimelic acid in growth medium were exposed for 10 min to the antibiotics at the appropriate minimal growth inhibitory concentrations and at multiples of these values, and the rate of cell wall degradation was followed during subsequent penicillin-binding protein (PBP)-1 were the most effective triggers of autolytic wall degradation; beta-lactams selective for PBP-2 were the poorest; and antibiotics preferentially binding to PBP-3 showed intermediate activities. The relative effectiveness of beta-lactams in autolysin triggering was found to parallel the effectiveness of the same drugs in causing rapid loss of viability, culture lysis, and spheroplast formation. Autolysin triggering was suppressed by inhibitors of protein and ribonucleic acid biosynthesis but not by inhibitors of deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis. The beta-lactam-induced cell wall degradation did not seem to involve a direct stimulation of enzyme activity or synthesis of new enzyme molecules, and murein sacculi isolated from cells that had been preexposed to a triggering dose of beta-lactam treatment exhibited the same sensitivity to crude, homologous autolysins as sacculi prepared from untreated control bacteria. On the basis of these observations, mechanisms are considered for the triggering of E. coli autolysins and for the role of autolytic activity in bacterial spheroplast formation, lysis, and death. Images PMID:93877

  6. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrelli, K.; Galy, O.; Latour-Lambert, P.; Kirwan, L.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.; Henry, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms.

  7. Dental pulp stem cell responses to novel antibiotic-containing scaffolds for regenerative endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kamocki, K.; Nör, J. E.; Bottino, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate both the drug release profile and the effects on human dental pulp stem cells’ (hDPSC) proliferation and viability of novel bi-mix antibiotic-containing scaffolds intended for use as a drug-delivery system for root canal disinfection prior to regenerative endodontics. Methodology Polydioxanone (PDS)-based fibrous scaffolds containing both metronidazole (MET) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) at selected ratios were synthesized via electrospinning. Fibre diameter was evaluated based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Pure PDS scaffolds and a saturated CIP/MET solution (i.e. 50 mg of each antibiotic in 1 mL) (hereafter referred to as DAP) served as both negative (non-toxic) and positive (toxic) controls, respectively. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was done to investigate the amount of drug(s) released from the scaffolds. WST-1® proliferation assay was used to evaluate the effect of the scaffolds on cell proliferation. LIVE/DEAD® assay was used to qualitatively assess cell viability. Data obtained from drug release and proliferation assays were statistically analysed at the 5% significance level. Results A burst release of CIP and MET was noted within the first 24 h, followed by a sustained maintenance of the drug(s) concentration for 14 days. A concentration-dependent trend was noticed upon hDPSCs’ exposure to all CIP-containing scaffolds, where increasing the CIP concentration resulted in reduced cell proliferation (P<0.05) and viability. In groups exposed to pure MET or pure PDS scaffolds, no changes in proliferation were observed. Conclusions Synthesized antibiotic-containing scaffolds had significantly lower effects on hDPSCs proliferation when compared to the saturated CIP/MET solution (DAP). PMID:25425048

  8. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  9. Suppression of the Lytic and Bactericidal Effects of Cell Wall-Inhibitory Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Ruben; Ronda-Lain, Conchita; Tapia, Alfonso; Waks, Susan B.; Tomasz, Alexander

    1976-01-01

    The bacteriolytic effect of beta-lactam antibiotics on Bacillus subtilis and on Streptococcus pneumoniae was found to be a function of the pH; lysis was suppressed if the pH of the pneumococcal culture was below 6.0 during penicillin treatment. In the case of B. subtilis, growth at pH 6.6 prevented penicillin-induced lysis. In pneumococci, the addition of trypsin to the growth medium also protected against lysis. The pH-dependent protection phenomenon resembled in several respects the antibiotic “tolerance” of pneumococci with a defective autolytic system. (i) At the pH nonpermissive for lysis, the bacteria retained their normal sensitivity to beta-lactam and to other cell wall inhibitors; however, instead of lysis, the drug-treated bacteria simply stopped growing. Loss of viability of the cells was also greatly reduced. (ii) Protection against lysis was independent of the dose and chemical nature of the cell wall inhibitors. (iii) The protection effect was reversible; lysis and loss of viability could be triggered by a postincubation of the drug-treated bacteria at the pH permissive for lysis. PMID:10831

  10. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  11. Modelling antibiotic and cytotoxic isoquinoline effects in Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Cecil, Alexander; Ohlsen, Knut; Menzel, Thomas; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Fischer, Adrien; Dörries, Kirsten; Selle, Martina; Lalk, Michael; Hantzschmann, Julia; Dittrich, Marcus; Liang, Chunguang; Bernhardt, Jörg; Ölschläger, Tobias A; Bringmann, Gerhard; Bruhn, Heike; Unger, Matthias; Ponte-Sucre, Alicia; Lehmann, Leane; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Isoquinolines (IQs) are natural substances with an antibiotic potential we aim to optimize. Specifically, IQ-238 is a synthetic analog of the novel-type N,C-coupled naphthylisoquinoline (NIQ) alkaloid ancisheynine. Recently, we developed and tested other IQs such as IQ-143. By utilizing genome-wide gene expression data, metabolic network modelling and Voronoi tessalation based data analysis - as well as cytotoxicity measurements, chemical properties calculations and principal component analysis of the NIQs - we show that IQ-238 has strong antibiotic potential for staphylococci and low cytotoxicity against murine or human cells. Compared to IQ-143, systemic effects are less pronounced. Most enzyme activity changes due to IQ-238 are located in the carbohydrate metabolism. Validation includes metabolite measurements on biological replicates. IQ-238 delineates key properties and a chemical space for a good therapeutic window. The combination of analysis methods allows suggestions for further lead development and yields an in-depth look at staphylococcal adaptation and network changes after antibiosis. Results are compared to eukaryotic host cells.

  12. Effect of antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on human embryonic stem cells undifferentiated status, pluripotency, cell viability and growth.

    PubMed

    Romorini, Leonardo; Riva, Diego Ariel; Blüguermann, Carolina; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustin; Scassa, Maria Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication) on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line) cells were effectively cured with a 14 days Plasmocin(TM) 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment) while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment) and H5 and WA09 (H9) hESCs treated with Plasmocin(TM) 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment) for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog) at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm) was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that Plasmocin(TM) and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal.

  13. Effect of Antibiotics against Mycoplasma sp. on Human Embryonic Stem Cells Undifferentiated Status, Pluripotency, Cell Viability and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Romorini, Leonardo; Riva, Diego Ariel; Blüguermann, Carolina; Videla Richardson, Guillermo Agustin; Scassa, Maria Elida; Sevlever, Gustavo Emilio; Miriuka, Santiago Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that can differentiate into specialized cells and hold great promise as models for human development and disease studies, cell-replacement therapies, drug discovery and in vitro cytotoxicity tests. The culture and differentiation of these cells are both complex and expensive, so it is essential to extreme aseptic conditions. hESCs are susceptible to Mycoplasma sp. infection, which is hard to detect and alters stem cell-associated properties. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic effect of PlasmocinTM and ciprofloxacin (specific antibiotics used for Mycoplasma sp. eradication) on hESCs. Mycoplasma sp. infected HUES-5 884 (H5 884, stable hESCs H5-brachyury promoter-GFP line) cells were effectively cured with a 14 days PlasmocinTM 25 µg/ml treatment (curative treatment) while maintaining stemness characteristic features. Furthermore, cured H5 884 cells exhibit the same karyotype as the parental H5 line and expressed GFP, through up-regulation of brachyury promoter, at day 4 of differentiation onset. Moreover, H5 cells treated with ciprofloxacin 10 µg/ml for 14 days (mimic of curative treatment) and H5 and WA09 (H9) hESCs treated with PlasmocinTM 5 µg/ml (prophylactic treatment) for 5 passages retained hESCs features, as judged by the expression of stemness-related genes (TRA1-60, TRA1-81, SSEA-4, Oct-4, Nanog) at mRNA and protein levels. In addition, the presence of specific markers of the three germ layers (brachyury, Nkx2.5 and cTnT: mesoderm; AFP: endoderm; nestin and Pax-6: ectoderm) was verified in in vitro differentiated antibiotic-treated hESCs. In conclusion, we found that PlasmocinTM and ciprofloxacin do not affect hESCs stemness and pluripotency nor cell viability. However, curative treatments slightly diminished cell growth rate. This cytotoxic effect was reversible as cells regained normal growth rate upon antibiotic withdrawal. PMID:23936178

  14. Antibiotic drug tigecycline reduces neuroblastoma cells proliferation by inhibiting Akt activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Erhu; Tang, Chunling; Zhang, Weibo; Tan, Juan; Dong, Zhen; Ding, Han-Fei; Cui, Hongjuan

    2016-06-01

    As the first member of glycylcycline bacteriostatic agents, tigecycline is approved as a novel expanded-spectrum antibiotic, which is clinically available. However, accumulating evidence indicated that tigecycline was provided with the potential application in cancer therapy. In this paper, tigecycline was shown to exert an anti-proliferative effect on neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, it was found that tigecycline induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest instead of apoptosis by means of Akt pathway inhibition. In neuroblastoma cell lines, the Akt activator insulin-like growth factor-1 (hereafter referred to as IGF-1) reversed tigecycline-induced cell cycle arrest. Besides, tigecycline inhibited colony formation and suppressed neuroblastoma cells xenograft formation and growth. After tigecycline treatment in vivo, the Akt pathway inhibition was confirmed as well. Collectively, our data provided strong evidences that tigecycline inhibited neuroblastoma cells growth and proliferation through the Akt pathway inhibition in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these results were supported by previous studies concerning the application of tigecycline in human tumors treatment, suggesting that tigecycline might act as a potential candidate agent for neuroblastoma treatment.

  15. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Biofilm Cells and Molecular Characterisation of Staphylococcus hominis Isolates from Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Morfín-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; González, Gloria M.; Casillas-Vega, Néstor; Garza-González, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to characterise the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, genetic relatedness, biofilm formation and composition, icaADBC genes detection, icaD expression, and antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus hominis isolates from blood. Methods The study included 67 S. hominis blood isolates. Methicillin resistance was evaluated with the cefoxitin disk test. mecA gene and SCCmec were detected by multiplex PCR. Genetic relatedness was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Biofilm formation and composition were evaluated by staining with crystal violet and by detachment assay, respectively; and the biofilm index (BI) was determined. Detection and expression of icaADBC genes were performed by multiplex PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Antibiotic susceptibilities of planktonic cells (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC) and biofilm cells (minimum biofilm eradication concentration, MBEC) were determined by the broth dilution method. Results Eighty-five percent (57/67) of isolates were methicillin resistant and mecA positive. Of the mecA-positive isolates, 66.7% (38/57) carried a new putative SCCmec type. Four clones were detected, with two to five isolates each. Among all isolates, 91% (61/67) were categorised as strong biofilm producers. Biofilm biomass composition was heterogeneous (polysaccharides, proteins and DNA). All isolates presented the icaD gene, and 6.66% (1/15) isolates expressed icaD. This isolate presented the five genes of ica operon. Higher BI and MBEC values than the MIC values were observed for amikacin, vancomycin, linezolid, oxacillin, ciprofloxacin, and chloramphenicol. Conclusions S. hominis isolates were highly resistant to methicillin and other antimicrobials. Most of the detected SCCmec types were different than those described for S. aureus. Isolates indicated low clonality. The results indicate that S. hominis is a strong biofilm producer with an extracellular

  16. Antimycoplasma properties and application in cell culture of surfactin, a lipopeptide antibiotic from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Vollenbroich, D; Pauli, G; Ozel, M; Vater, J

    1997-01-01

    Surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic and biosurfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis, is well-known for its interactions with artificial and biomembrane systems (e.g., bacterial protoplasts or enveloped viruses). To assess the applicability of this antiviral and antibacterial drug, we determined the cytotoxicity of surfactin with a 50% cytotoxic concentration of 30 to 64 microM for a variety of human and animal cell lines in vitro. Concomitantly, we observed an improvement in proliferation rates and changes in the morphology of mycoplasma-contaminated mammalian cells after treatment with this drug. A single treatment over one passage led to complete removal of viable Mycoplasma hyorhinis cells from various adherent cell lines, and Mycoplasma orale was removed from nonadherent human T-lymphoid cell lines by double treatment. This effect was monitored by a DNA fluorescence test, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and two different PCR methods. Disintegration of the mycoplasma membranes as observed by electron microscopy indicated the mode of action of surfactin. Disintegration is obviously due to a physicochemical interaction of the membrane-active surfactant with the outer part of the lipid membrane bilayer, which causes permeability changes and at higher concentrations leads finally to disintegration of the mycoplasma membrane system by a detergent effect. The low cytotoxicity of surfactin for mammalian cells permits specific inactivation of mycoplasmas without significant deleterious effects on cell metabolism and the proliferation rate in cell culture. These results were used to develop a fast and simple method for complete and permanent inactivation of mycoplasmas in mammalian monolayer and suspension cell cultures.

  17. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Ceri; Owusu-Ofori, Shirley

    2014-11-06

    Background This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002, and previously updated in 2012. People with sickle cell disease are particularly susceptible to infection. Infants and very young children are especially vulnerable, and the 'Co-operative Study of Sickle Cell Disease' observed an incidence rate of 10 per 100 patient years of pneumococcal septicaemia in children under the age of three.Vaccines, including customary pneumococcal vaccines, may be of limited use in this age group. Therefore, prophylactic penicillin regimens may be advisable for this population.Objectives To assess the effects of prophylactic antibiotic regimens for preventing pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease.Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which is comprised of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search: 26 June 2014.Selection criteria All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing prophylactic antibiotics to prevent pneumococcal infection in children with sickle cell disease with placebo, no treatment or a comparator drug.Data collection and analysis Both authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality.Main results Five trials were identified by the initial search, of which three trials met the inclusion criteria. All of the included trials showed a reduced incidence of infection in children with sickle cell disease (SS or Sβ0Thal) receiving prophylactic penicillin. In trials which investigated initiation of penicillin on risk of pneumococcal infection, the odds ratio was 0.37 (95% CI 0.16 to 0.86), while for withdrawal the odds ratio was 0.49 (95% CI 0.09 to 2.71). Adverse drug effects were rare and minor. Rates of pneumococcal infection were found to be relatively low in children over the age

  18. Synthetic Beta-Lactam Antibiotic as a Selective Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis Inducer: Significance in Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    organ transplant. The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, FK228, has been recently isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum (22). This antibiotic is a...Okuhara: Action of FR901228, a novel antitumor bicyclic depsipeptide produced by Chromobacterium violaceum no. 968, on Ha-ras transformed NIH3T3 cells

  19. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets ...

  20. Side effects of antibiotics during bacterial infection: mitochondria, the main target in host cell.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rochika; Sripada, Lakshmi; Singh, Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotics are frontline therapy against microbial infectious diseases. Many antibiotics are known to cause several side effects in humans. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the main target of antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis. According to the endosymbiont theory, mitochondrion is of bacterial origin and their molecular and structural components of the protein expression system are almost similar. It has been observed that the rate of mutations in mitochondrial rRNA is higher as compared to that of nuclear rRNA. The presence of these mutations may mimic prokaryotic rRNA structure and bind to antibiotics targeted to ribosomes of bacteria. Mitochondrial functions are compromised hence may be one of the major causes of side effects observed during antibiotic therapy. The current review had summarized the studies on the role of antibiotics on mitochondrial functions and its relevance to the observed side effects in physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. AdeIJK, a Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Pump Effluxing Multiple Antibiotics in Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Damier-Piolle, Laurence; Magnet, Sophie; Brémont, Sylvie; Lambert, Thierry; Courvalin, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We have identified a second resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux pump, AdeIJK, in clinical isolate Acinetobacter baumannii BM4454. The adeI, adeJ, and adeK genes encode, respectively, the membrane fusion, RND, and outer membrane components of the pump. AdeJ belongs to the AcrB protein family (57% identity with AcrB from Escherichia coli). mRNA analysis by Northern blotting and reverse transcription-PCR indicated that the genes were cotranscribed. Overexpression of the cloned adeIJK operon was toxic in both E. coli and Acinetobacter. The adeIJK genes were detected in all of the 60 strains of A. baumannii tested. The two latter observations suggest that the AdeIJK complex might contribute to intrinsic but not to acquired antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter. To characterize the substrate specificity of the pump, we have constructed derivatives of BM4454 in which adeIJK (strain BM4579), adeABC (strain BM4561), or both groups of genes (strain BM4652) were inactivated by deletion-insertion. Determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of these strains and of BM4652 and BM4579, in which the adeIJK operon was provided in trans, indicated that the AdeIJK pump contributes to resistance to β-lactams, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, erythromycin, lincosamides, fluoroquinolones, fusidic acid, novobiocin, rifampin, trimethoprim, acridine, safranin, pyronine, and sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical structure of these molecules suggests that amphiphilic compounds are the preferred substrates. The AdeABC and AdeIJK efflux systems contributed in a more than additive fashion to tigecycline resistance. PMID:18086852

  2. The Membrane Steps of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Antibiotic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Breukink, Eefjan

    2016-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is the major component of the cell envelope of virtually all bacteria. It has structural roles and acts as a selective sieve for molecules from the outer environment. Peptidoglycan synthesis is therefore one of the most important biogenesis pathways in bacteria and has been studied extensively over the last twenty years. The pathway starts in the cytoplasm, continues in the cytoplasmic membrane and finishes in the periplasmic space, where the precursor is polymerized into the peptidoglycan layer. A number of proteins involved in this pathway, such as the Mur enzymes and the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), have been studied and regarded as good targets for antibiotics. The present review focuses on the membrane steps of peptidoglycan synthesis that involve two enzymes, MraY and MurG, the inhibitors of these enzymes and the inhibition mechanisms. We also discuss the challenges of targeting these two cytoplasmic membrane (associated) proteins in bacterial cells and the perspectives on how to overcome the issues. PMID:27571111

  3. Antibiotic-Induced Cell Wall Fragments of Staphylococcus aureus Increase Endothelial Chemokine Secretion and Adhesiveness for Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    van Langevelde, P.; Ravensbergen, E.; Grashoff, P.; Beekhuizen, H.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; van Dissel, J. T.

    1999-01-01

    Antibiotics release inflammatory fragments, such as lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and peptidoglycan (PG), from the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we exposed S. aureus cultures to a number of β-lactam antibiotics (imipenem, flucloxacillin, and cefamandole) and protein synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics (erythromycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin) and investigated whether supernatants of these cultures differ in their capacity to stimulate endothelial cells (EC). After 24 h of incubation, endothelial adhesiveness for leukocytes, surface expression of various adhesion molecules, and secretion of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) were measured. Supernatants of β-lactam-exposed cultures (designated β-lactam supernatants) enhanced the adhesiveness of EC for granulocytes, whereas those of protein synthesis-inhibiting antibiotic-exposed cultures (designated protein synthesis-inhibitor supernatants) did not. This hyperadhesiveness coincided with a higher intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression on the surface of the stimulated EC. In addition, EC stimulated with β-lactam supernatants secreted significantly higher concentrations of the chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 than those stimulated with protein synthesis-inhibitor supernatants. The finding that the concentrations of LTA and PG in β-lactam supernatants were much higher than those in protein synthesis-inhibitor supernatants suggests that the observed differences in stimulatory effect between these supernatants are a result of differences in the release of cell wall fragments, although the presence of other stimulatory factors in the supernatants cannot be excluded. In conclusion, our results argue for a release of LTA and PG from S. aureus after exposure to β-lactam antibiotics that enhances the development of a systemic inflammatory response by stimulating EC such that adhesiveness for granulocytes is increased and large amounts of IL-8 and MCP-1 are secreted

  4. Carrier-mediated uptake of grepafloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, by the isolated rat lung cells.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Kato, Yukio; Suzuki, Takashi; Itose, Minoru; Miyamoto, Gohachiro; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2005-12-01

    Grepafloxacin (GPFX) is a new quinolone antibiotic (NQ) which is highly distributed to the lung and other tissues. In the present study, to characterize the distribution mechanism of GPFX to the lung, the uptake of GPFX by isolated rat lung cells was examined in vitro. GPFX was rapidly taken up by the cells, and the uptake reached a steady-state within 5 min. The cell-to-medium concentration ratio at equilibrium was 56.8+/-1.9 microL/mg protein, which was much higher than the cellular volume. GPFX uptake consisted of a saturable component (Km: 264+/-181 microM, Vmax: 2.94+/-2.33 nmol/min/mg protein) and a nonsaturable component (Pdif: 7.04+/-2.17 microL/min/mg protein). The uptake of GPFX was reduced in the presence of ATP-depletors (FCCP and Rotenone) and by the replacement of sodium with choline in the medium, suggesting that GPFX uptake is at least partially mediated by an Na+- and energy-dependent process. GPFX uptake tended to be reduced in the presence of other NQs such as levofloxacin, lomefloxacin and sparfloxacin, but was only minimally affected by the substrates of several uptake mechanisms already identified in the liver and kidney such as taurocholate, p-aminohippurate, L-carnitine and tetraethylammonium. These results suggested that GPFX is taken up by the lung partially via carrier-mediated transport system(s), distinct from the identified transporters, and such active transport systems may at least partially account for the efficient distribution of GPFX to the lung.

  5. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Structures and Interactions of Vancomycin Antibiotics with Cell Wall Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhibo; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Laskin, Julia

    2008-10-01

    Surface-induced dissociation (SID) of the singly protonated complex of vancomycin antibiotic with cell wall peptide analogue (Nα,Nε-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala) was studied using a 6 T Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for SID experiments. The binding energy between the vancomycin and the peptide was obtained from the RRKM modeling of the time- and energy resolved fragmentation efficiency curves (TFECs) of the precursor ion and its fragments. Electronic structure calculations of the geometries, proton affinities and binding energies were performed for several model systems including vancomycin (V), vancomycin aglycon (VA), Nα,Nε-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, and non-covalent complexes of VA with N-acetyl-D-Ala-D-Ala and Nα,Nε-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory. Comparison between the experimental and computational results suggests that the most probable structure of the complex observed in our experiments corresponds to the neutral peptide bound to the vancomycin protonated at the secondary amino group of the N-methyl-leucine residue. The experimental binding energy of 30.9 ± 1.8 kcal/mol is in good agreement with the binding energy of 29.3 ± 2.5 kcal/mol calculated for the model system representing the preferred structure of the complex.

  7. Antibiotic-mediated modification of the intestinal microbiome in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Whangbo, J; Ritz, J; Bhatt, A

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many patients with severe benign and malignant hematologic disorders. The success of allogeneic HSCT is limited by the development of transplant-related complications such as acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Early pre-clinical studies suggested that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of acute GvHD, and that growth suppression or eradication of intestinal bacteria prevented the development of acute GvHD even in MHC-mismatched transplants. These observations led to the practice of gut decontamination (GD) with oral non-absorbable antibiotics in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT as a method of acute GvHD prophylaxis. Microbiome studies in the modern sequencing era are beginning to challenge the benefit of this practice. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the practice of GD and highlight findings from the limited number of clinical trials evaluating the use of GD for acute GvHD prevention in allogeneic HSCT patients. In addition, we examine the role of the gut microbiota in allogeneic HSCT in the context of recent studies linking the microflora to regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis. We discuss the implications of these findings for future strategies to reduce acute GvHD risk by selective manipulation of the microbiota. PMID:27526283

  8. Mycobacteriophage SWU1 gp39 can potentiate multiple antibiotics against Mycobacterium via altering the cell wall permeability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiming; Zhou, Mingliang; Fan, Xiangyu; Yan, Jianlong; Li, Weimin; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    M. tuberculosis is intrinsically tolerant to many antibiotics largely due to the imperviousness of its unusual mycolic acid-containing cell wall to most antimicrobials. The emergence and increasingly widespread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) revitalized keen interest in phage-inspired therapy. SWU1gp39 is a novel gene from mycobacteriophage SWU1 with unknown function. SWU1gp39 expressed in M. smegmatis conferred the host cell increased susceptibility to multiple antibiotics, including isoniazid, erythromycin, norfloxacin, ampicillin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, rifampicin and vancomycin, and multiple environment stresses such as H2O2, heat shock, low pH and SDS. By using EtBr/Nile red uptake assays, WT-pAL-gp39 strain showed higher cell wall permeability than control strain WT-pAL. Moreover, the WT-pAL-gp39 strain produced more reactive oxygen species and reduced NAD+/NADH ratio. RNA-Seq transcriptomes of the WT-pAL-gp39 and WT-pAL revealed that the transcription of 867 genes was differentially regulated, including genes associated with lipid metabolism. Taken together, our results implicated that SWU1gp39, a novel gene from mycobacteriophage, disrupted the lipid metabolism of host and increased cell wall permeability, ultimately potentiated the efficacy of multiple antibiotics and stresses against mycobacteria. PMID:27350398

  9. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  10. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  11. [Distribution and accumulation of antibiotics in cells and tissues and toxicity studies by immunocytochemistry].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    No true immunocytochemistry (ICC) for drugs nor its application to pharmacokinetic studies is available. Recently, our studies have shown that ICC for drugs is extremely useful for such studies by utilizing easy and safe techniques, and gives direct evidence of drug localization. We have therefore developed antibodies and a series of pretreatment conditions for the immunodetection of drugs and have localized sites of drug uptake or accumulation in several tissues of rats following the administration of drugs. This review describes preparation of anti-drug antibody, specificity of antibody, fixation of drug in situ in rat tissues and cells, treatment of paraffin section specimens prior to immunoreaction, precision, and their application to a variety of types of antibiotics anti-cancer anthracyclines daunorubicin, doxorubicin, and epirubicin, bleomycin analog peplomycin, antimicrobial agents gentamicin, and amoxicillin. ICC for the anti-cancer anthracyclines demonstrated that the drug accumulates in a characteristic pattern in the heart, liver, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, and hair follicles, which represent the sites targeted by the drug toxicity. Some, but not all, of these drug accumulations are associated with the induction of apoptosis. It was also noted that there are striking differences in accumulation among the anthracyclines in rat tissues, maybe contributing the mechanisms of the differences in anti-tumor activities of the anthracyclines. Both ICCs for gentamicin and peplomycin identified characteristic necrotic-like cells in the specific sites of the kidney, suggesting the sites are readily affected by some chemotherapeutic agents. ICC for amoxicillin demonstrated that the sites of the drug accumulation in small intestine, liver and kidney are closely correlated with the specific sites in which certain transporter systems for penicillin occur. Thus, an ICC method is a potential new tool for pharmacokinetic studies of wide variety types of drugs

  12. Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: treating cancer like an infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Rebecca; Ozsvari, Bela; Lisanti, Camilla L; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2015-03-10

    Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of "stemness", independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point - a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known "side-effect", which could be harnessed instead as a "therapeutic effect". Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally, recent

  13. Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types: Treating cancer like an infectious disease

    PubMed Central

    Lisanti, Camilla L.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of “stemness”, independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point – a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for the clonal expansion and survival of cancer stem cells. Interestingly, several classes of FDA-approved antibiotics inhibit mitochondrial biogenesis as a known “side-effect”, which could be harnessed instead as a “therapeutic effect”. Based on this analysis, we now show that 4-to-5 different classes of FDA-approved drugs can be used to eradicate cancer stem cells, in 12 different cancer cell lines, across 8 different tumor types (breast, DCIS, ovarian, prostate, lung, pancreatic, melanoma, and glioblastoma (brain)). These five classes of mitochondrially-targeted antibiotics include: the erythromycins, the tetracyclines, the glycylcyclines, an anti-parasitic drug, and chloramphenicol. Functional data are presented for one antibiotic in each drug class: azithromycin, doxycycline, tigecycline, pyrvinium pamoate, as well as chloramphenicol, as proof-of-concept. Importantly, many of these drugs are non-toxic for normal cells, likely reducing the side effects of anti-cancer therapy. Thus, we now propose to treat cancer like an infectious disease, by repurposing FDA-approved antibiotics for anti-cancer therapy, across multiple tumor types. These drug classes should also be considered for prevention studies, specifically focused on the prevention of tumor recurrence and distant metastasis. Finally

  14. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... resistance develops, the antibiotic is not able to kill the germs causing the infection. Your infection may ... to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this ...

  15. Bacterial cheating limits antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao Chao, Hui; Yurtsev, Eugene; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tanya; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain---which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic---may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  16. Mutations in the primary sigma factor σA and termination factor rho that reduce susceptibility to cell wall antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Heon; Helmann, John D

    2014-11-01

    Combinations of glycopeptides and β-lactams exert synergistic antibacterial activity, but the evolutionary mechanisms driving resistance to both antibiotics remain largely unexplored. By repeated subculturing with increasing vancomycin (VAN) and cefuroxime (CEF) concentrations, we isolated an evolved strain of the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis with reduced susceptibility to both antibiotics. Whole-genome sequencing revealed point mutations in genes encoding the major σ factor of RNA polymerase (sigA), a cell shape-determining protein (mreB), and the ρ termination factor (rho). Genetic-reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the G-to-C substitution at position 336 encoded by sigA (sigA(G336C)), in the domain that recognizes the -35 promoter region, is sufficient to reduce susceptibility to VAN and works cooperatively with the rho(G56C) substitution to increase CEF resistance. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the sigA(G336C) substitution has wide-ranging effects, including elevated expression of the general stress σ factor (σ(B)) regulon, which is required for CEF resistance, and decreased expression of the glpTQ genes, which leads to fosfomycin (FOS) resistance. Our findings suggest that mutations in the core transcriptional machinery may facilitate the evolution of resistance to multiple cell wall antibiotics.

  17. Microbiota Disruption Induced by Early Use of Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics Is an Independent Risk Factor of Outcome after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniela; Jenq, Robert R; Peled, Jonathan U; Taur, Ying; Hiergeist, Andreas; Koestler, Josef; Dettmer, Katja; Weber, Markus; Wolff, Daniel; Hahn, Joachim; Pamer, Eric G; Herr, Wolfgang; Gessner, André; Oefner, Peter J; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Holler, Ernst

    2017-02-14

    In allogeneic stem cell transplantation (ASCT), systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics are frequently used for treatment of infectious complications, but their effect on microbiota composition is still poorly understood. This retrospective analysis of 621 patients who underwent ASCT at the University Medical Center of Regensburg and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York assessed the impact of timing of peritransplant antibiotic treatment on intestinal microbiota composition as well as transplant-related mortality (TRM) and overall survival. Early exposure to antibiotics was associated with lower urinary 3-indoxyl sulfate levels (P < .001) and a decrease in fecal abundance of commensal Clostridiales (P = .03) compared with late antibiotic treatment, which was particularly significant (P = .005) for Clostridium cluster XIVa in the Regensburg group. Earlier antibiotic treatment before ASCT was further associated with a higher TRM (34%, 79/236) compared with post-ASCT (21%, 62/297, P = .001) or no antibiotics (7%, 6/88, P < .001). Timing of antibiotic treatment was the dominant independent risk factor for TRM (HR, 2.0; P ≤ .001) in multivariate analysis besides increase age (HR, 2.15; P = .004), reduced Karnofsky performance status (HR, 1.47; P = .03), and female donor-male recipient sex combination (HR, 1.56; P = .02) A competing risk analysis revealed the independent effect of early initiation of antibiotics on graft-versus-host disease-related TRM (P = .004) in contrast to infection-related TRM and relapse (not significant). The poor outcome associated with early administration of antibiotic therapy that is active against commensal organisms, and specifically the possibly protective Clostridiales, calls for the use of Clostridiales-sparing antibiotics and rapid restoration of microbiota diversity after cessation of antibiotic treatment.

  18. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  19. The Rcs phosphorelay is a cell envelope stress response activated by peptidoglycan stress and contributes to intrinsic antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Laubacher, Mary E; Ades, Sarah E

    2008-03-01

    Gram-negative bacteria possess stress responses to maintain the integrity of the cell envelope. Stress sensors monitor outer membrane permeability, envelope protein folding, and energization of the inner membrane. The systems used by gram-negative bacteria to sense and combat stress resulting from disruption of the peptidoglycan layer are not well characterized. The peptidoglycan layer is a single molecule that completely surrounds the cell and ensures its structural integrity. During cell growth, new peptidoglycan subunits are incorporated into the peptidoglycan layer by a series of enzymes called the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). To explore how gram-negative bacteria respond to peptidoglycan stress, global gene expression analysis was used to identify Escherichia coli stress responses activated following inhibition of specific PBPs by the beta-lactam antibiotics amdinocillin (mecillinam) and cefsulodin. Inhibition of PBPs with different roles in peptidoglycan synthesis has different consequences for cell morphology and viability, suggesting that not all perturbations to the peptidoglycan layer generate equivalent stresses. We demonstrate that inhibition of different PBPs resulted in both shared and unique stress responses. The regulation of capsular synthesis (Rcs) phosphorelay was activated by inhibition of all PBPs tested. Furthermore, we show that activation of the Rcs phosphorelay increased survival in the presence of these antibiotics, independently of capsule synthesis. Both activation of the phosphorelay and survival required signal transduction via the outer membrane lipoprotein RcsF and the response regulator RcsB. We propose that the Rcs pathway responds to peptidoglycan damage and contributes to the intrinsic resistance of E. coli to beta-lactam antibiotics.

  20. The Bacterial Cell Wall in the Antibiotic Era: An Ontology in Transit Between Morphology and Metabolism, 1940s-1960s.

    PubMed

    Santesmases, María Jesús

    2016-02-01

    This essay details a historical crossroad in biochemistry and microbiology in which penicillin was a co-agent. I narrate the trajectory of the bacterial cell wall as the precise target for antibiotic action. As a strategic object of research, the bacterial cell wall remained at the core of experimental practices, scientific narratives and research funding appeals throughout the antibiotic era. The research laboratory was dedicated to the search for new antibiotics while remaining the site at which the mode of action of this new substance was investigated. This combination of circumstances made the bacterial wall an ontology in transit. As invisible as the bacterial wall was for clinical purposes, in the biological laboratory, cellular meaning in regard to the action of penicillin made the bacterial wall visible within both microbiology and biochemistry. As a border to be crossed, some components of the bacterial cell wall and the biochemical destruction produced by penicillin became known during the 1950s and 1960s. The cell wall was constructed piece by piece in a transatlantic circulation of methods, names, and images of the shape of the wall itself. From 1955 onwards, microbiologists and biochemists mobilized new names and associated conceptual meanings. The composition of this thin and rigid layer would account for its shape, growth and destruction. This paper presents a history of biochemical morphology: a chemistry of shape - the shape of bacteria, as provided by its wall - that accounted for biology, for life itself. While penicillin was being established as an industrially-manufactured object, it remained a scientific tool within the research laboratory, contributing to the circulation of further scientific objects.

  1. The Ribosome: The Cell's Protein-Synthesizing Machine and How Antibiotics Disrupt It

    SciTech Connect

    Venki Ramakrishnan

    2009-10-08

    Determining the structure of the ribosome has made it possible for Ramakrishnan and his colleagues to image antibiotics bound to the ribosome, leading to a better understanding of their action, which could help in the development of novel drugs. In his ta

  2. The Ribosome: The Cell's Protein-Synthesizing Machine and How Antibiotics Disrupt It

    ScienceCinema

    Venki Ramakrishnan

    2016-07-12

    Determining the structure of the ribosome has made it possible for Ramakrishnan and his colleagues to image antibiotics bound to the ribosome, leading to a better understanding of their action, which could help in the development of novel drugs. In his ta

  3. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  4. Brefeldin A-induced increase of sphingomyelin synthesis. Assay for the action of the antibiotic in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Brüning, A; Karrenbauer, A; Schnabel, E; Wieland, F T

    1992-03-15

    Brefeldin A leads to an increase of sphingomyelin in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The antibiotic is known to cause a dramatic morphological change of the endomembrane system in various mammalian cells resulting in a redistribution of Golgi resident proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (Lippincott-Schwartz, J., Donaldson, J. G., Schweizer, A., Berger, E. G., Hauri, H. P., Yuan, L. C., and Klausner, R. D. (1990) Cell 60, 821-836). A strict correlation was found between the brefeldin A-induced increase of sphingomyelin and the biochemical criteria that apply for this morphological change. From our data we conclude that the increase in sphingomyelin caused by brefeldin A reflects translocation of the enzyme sphingomyelin synthase from the Golgi apparatus to the endoplasmic reticulum. Using a radioactively labeled truncated ceramide this increase in sphingomyelin synthesis is easily detectable, and thus this method can serve as a convenient biochemical assay for the action of brefeldin A in mammalian cells.

  5. Assessment of three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division drug efflux transporters of Burkholderia cenocepacia in intrinsic antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Burkholderia cenocepacia are opportunistic Gram-negative bacteria that can cause chronic pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These bacteria demonstrate a high-level of intrinsic antibiotic resistance to most clinically useful antibiotics complicating treatment. We previously identified 14 genes encoding putative Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division (RND) efflux pumps in the genome of B. cenocepacia J2315, but the contribution of these pumps to the intrinsic drug resistance of this bacterium remains unclear. Results To investigate the contribution of efflux pumps to intrinsic drug resistance of B. cenocepacia J2315, we deleted 3 operons encoding the putative RND transporters RND-1, RND-3, and RND-4 containing the genes BCAS0591-BCAS0593, BCAL1674-BCAL1676, and BCAL2822-BCAL2820. Each deletion included the genes encoding the RND transporter itself and those encoding predicted periplasmic proteins and outer membrane pores. In addition, the deletion of rnd-3 also included BCAL1672, encoding a putative TetR regulator. The B. cenocepacia rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated increased sensitivity to inhibitory compounds, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in drug resistance. Moreover, the rnd-3 and rnd-4 mutants demonstrated reduced accumulation of N-acyl homoserine lactones in the growth medium. In contrast, deletion of the rnd-1 operon had no detectable phenotypes under the conditions assayed. Conclusion Two of the three inactivated RND efflux pumps in B. cenocepacia J2315 contribute to the high level of intrinsic resistance of this strain to some antibiotics and other inhibitory compounds. Furthermore, these efflux systems also mediate accumulation in the growth medium of quorum sensing molecules that have been shown to contribute to infection. A systematic study of RND efflux systems in B. cenocepacia is required to provide a full picture of intrinsic antibiotic resistance in this opportunistic bacterium. PMID:19761586

  6. Bacillus subtilis as a platform for molecular characterisation of regulatory mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chong; Stiegeler, Emanuel; Cook, Gregory M; Mascher, Thorsten; Gebhard, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    To combat antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms, particularly of antibiotic detection, signal transduction and gene regulation is needed. Because molecular studies in this bacterium can be challenging, we aimed at exploiting the genetically highly tractable Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis as a heterologous host. Two fundamentally different regulators of E. faecalis resistance against cell wall antibiotics, the bacitracin sensor BcrR and the vancomycin-sensing two-component system VanSB-VanRB, were produced in B. subtilis and their functions were monitored using target promoters fused to reporter genes (lacZ and luxABCDE). The bacitracin resistance system BcrR-BcrAB of E. faecalis was fully functional in B. subtilis, both regarding regulation of bcrAB expression and resistance mediated by the transporter BcrAB. Removal of intrinsic bacitracin resistance of B. subtilis increased the sensitivity of the system. The lacZ and luxABCDE reporters were found to both offer sensitive detection of promoter induction on solid media, which is useful for screening of large mutant libraries. The VanSB-VanRB system displayed a gradual dose-response behaviour to vancomycin, but only when produced at low levels in the cell. Taken together, our data show that B. subtilis is a well-suited host for the molecular characterization of regulatory systems controlling resistance against cell wall active compounds in E. faecalis. Importantly, B. subtilis facilitates the careful adjustment of expression levels and genetic background required for full functionality of the introduced regulators.

  7. An Inactivated Antibiotic-Exposed Whole-Cell Vaccine Enhances Bactericidal Activities Against Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Meng-Hooi; MatRahim, NorAziyah; NorAmdan, NurAsyura; Pang, Sui-Ping; Hashim, Sharina H.; Phoon, Wai-Hong; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination may be an alternative treatment for infection with multidrug-resistance (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. The study reported here evaluated the bactericidal antibody responses following immunization of mice using an inactivated whole-cell vaccine derived from antibiotic-exposed MDR A. baumannii (I-M28-47-114). Mice inoculated with I-M28-47 (non-antibiotic-exposed control) and I-M28-47-114 showed a high IgG antibody response by day 5 post-inoculation. Sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114 collected on day 30 resulted in 80.7 ± 12.0% complement-mediated bacteriolysis in vitro of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem, which was a higher level of bacteriolysis over sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. Macrophage-like U937 cells eliminated 49.3 ± 11.6% of the test MDR A. baumannii treated with imipenem when opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47-114, which was a higher level of elimination than observed for test MDR A. baumannii opsonized with sera from mice inoculated with I-M28-47. These results suggest that vaccination with I-M28-47-114 stimulated antibody responses capable of mounting high bactericidal killing of MDR A. baumannii. Therefore, the inactivated antibiotic-exposed whole-cell vaccine (I-M28-47-114) has potential for development as a candidate vaccine for broad clearance and protection against MDR A. baumannii infections. PMID:26923424

  8. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    PubMed

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  9. Early transcriptional response to aminoglycoside antibiotic suggests alternate pathways leading to apoptosis in sensory hair cells in the mouse inner ear

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Litao; Segil, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are “the drug of choice” for treating many bacterial infections, but their administration results in hearing loss in up to one fourth of the patients who receive them. Several biochemical pathways have been implicated in aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity; however, little is known about how hair cells respond to aminoglycoside antibiotics at the transcriptome level. Here we have investigated the genome-wide response to the aminoglycoside antibiotic gentamicin. Using organotypic cultures of the perinatal organ of Corti, we performed RNA sequencing using cDNA libraries obtained from FACS-purified hair cells. Within 3 h of gentamicin treatment, the messenger RNA level of more than three thousand genes in hair cells changed significantly. Bioinformatic analysis of these changes highlighted several known signal transduction pathways, including the JNK pathway and the NF-κB pathway, in addition to genes involved in the stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle control, and DNA damage repair. In contrast, only 698 genes, mainly involved in cell cycle and metabolite biosynthetic processes, were significantly affected in the non-hair cell population. The gene expression profiles of hair cells in response to gentamicin share a considerable similarity with those previously observed in gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Our findings suggest that previously observed early responses to gentamicin in hair cells in specific signaling pathways are reflected in changes in gene expression. Additionally, the observed changes in gene expression of cell cycle regulatory genes indicate a disruption of the postmitotic state, which may suggest an alternate pathway regulating gentamicin-induced apoptotic hair cell death. This work provides a more comprehensive view of aminoglycoside antibiotic ototoxicity, and thus contributes to identifying potential pathways or therapeutic targets to alleviate this important side effect of aminoglycoside antibiotics. PMID

  10. Effects of sustained antibiotic bactericidal treatment on Chlamydia trachomatis-infected epithelial-like cells (HeLa) and monocyte-like cells (THP-1 and U-937).

    PubMed

    Mpiga, Philomene; Ravaoarinoro, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a human pathogen that causes multiple diseases worldwide. Despite appropriate therapy with existing antichlamydial antibiotics, chronic exacerbated diseases often occur and lead to serious sequelae. Since C. trachomatis has been found to enter a persistent state after exposure to deleterious conditions, the role of persistence in the failure of chlamydial antibiotherapy is questioned. HeLa, THP-1 and U-937 cells were infected with 10(4)C. trachomatis serovar L2 infectious particles. Three days later the infected cells were treated with minimal bactericidal concentrations of doxycycline (DOX), erythromycin (ERY) or tetracycline (TET) for 24 days or 30 days. Antibiotic efficacy was assessed by measuring chlamydial inclusions and infectious particles, by investigating the resumption of chlamydial growth after antibiotic removal and by testing Chlamydia viability using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction targeting unprocessed 16S rRNA, processed 16S rRNA and Omp-1 mRNA. Treatment of infected HeLa cells with the usual antichlamydial antibiotics suppressed chlamydial active growth. The infection remained unapparent. However, 24 days post treatment the bacterium was found to be viable, as proved by continued expression of unprocessed and processed 16S rRNA and Omp-1 mRNA. This inactive unapparent chlamydial state is not infectious, suggesting Chlamydia persistence. Chlamydia trachomatis also developed persistence both in permissive THP-1 and non-permissive U-937 cells. Unlike in HeLa cells, persistent chlamydial infection in THP-1 and U-937 cells was resolved after 30 days of DOX treatment. Of interest, we noticed that only THP-1 and U-937 cells that were persistently infected following their interaction with infected HeLa cells remained capable of transmitting active infection to HeLa cells. These findings suggest that DOX, TET and ERY, usually administered to combat chlamydial diseases, fail to resolve persistent infection occurring

  11. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  12. Macrolide Antibiotics Exhibit Cytotoxic Effect under Amino Acid-Depleted Culture Condition by Blocking Autophagy Flux in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Shota; Miyahara, Kana; Kazama, Hiromi; Hirota, Ayako; Takemura, Jun; Abe, Akihisa; Inazu, Masato; Hiramoto, Masaki; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, a self-digestive system for cytoplasmic components, is required to maintain the amino acid pool for cellular homeostasis. We previously reported that the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin (AZM) and clarithromycin (CAM) have an inhibitory effect on autophagy flux, and they potently enhance the cytocidal effect of various anticancer reagents in vitro. This suggests that macrolide antibiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy. Since cancer cells require a larger metabolic demand than normal cells because of their exuberant growth, upregulated autophagy in tumor cells has now become the target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we examined whether macrolides exhibit cytotoxic effect under an amino acid-starving condition in head and neck squamous cancer cell lines such as CAL 27 and Detroit 562 as models of solid tumors with an upregulated autophagy in the central region owing to hypovascularity. AZM and CAM induced cell death under the amino acid-depleted (AAD) culture condition in these cell lines along with CHOP upregulation, although they showed no cytotoxicity under the complete culture medium. CHOP knockdown by siRNA in the CAL 27 cells significantly suppressed macrolide-induced cell death under the AAD culture condition. CHOP-/- murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines also attenuated AZM-induced cell death compared with CHOP+/+ MEF cell lines. Using a tet-off atg5 MEF cell line, knockout of atg5, an essential gene for autophagy, also induced cell death and CHOP in the AAD culture medium but not in the complete culture medium. This suggest that macrolide-induced cell death via CHOP induction is dependent on autophagy inhibition. The cytotoxicity of macrolide with CHOP induction was completely cancelled by the addition of amino acids in the culture medium, indicating that the cytotoxicity is due to the insufficient amino acid pool. These data suggest the possibility of using macrolides for “tumor-starving therapy”. PMID

  13. Therapeutic intervention of clinical sepsis with intravenous immunoglobulin, white blood cells and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G W; Weisman, L E

    1990-01-01

    Antibiotics are the mainstay of therapy for acute bacterial infections. However, recent studies have suggested that adjunctive therapy designed to augment host immunity, might reduce morbidity and mortality. Many bacterial pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Group B streptococcus are encapsulated and require opsonic antibody to promote efficient phagocytosis and killing by neutrophils. Children with bacterial sepsis may be deficient in both of these components of immunity. This is a particularly serious problem in premature babies who may not receive protective amounts of antibodies from their mothers, since most antibody crosses the placenta in the last 4-6 weeks of pregnancy. Septic infants may also deplete their neutrophil reserves and develop neutropenia during infection. Since efficient clearance of encapsulated bacteria require both neutrophils and antibody, these babies are at high risk for treatment failure even with appropriate antibiotic therapy. Several studies have analyzed the role of neutrophil transfusions and immunoglobulin therapy in septic infants. However, relatively few patients have been prospectively evaluated in controlled studies. In addition, the logistical problems related to rapidly collecting neutrophils for therapy of bacterial sepsis are considerable and have decreased the usefulness of this approach. The availability of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has made the use of immunoglobulin feasible even in rapidly progressing bacterial sepsis. Animal studies have demonstrated the potential usefulness of IVIG and studies in septic babies strongly suggest that IVIG as an adjunct to antibiotics might improve mortality in septic neonates. Further research is needed to improve the logistics of obtaining neutrophils and to improve the availability of pathogen-specific immunoglobulin preparations.

  14. Contribution of Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division Efflux Systems to Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Formation in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Nait Chabane, Yassine; Goussard, Sylvie; Snesrud, Erik; Courvalin, Patrice; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen of increasing importance due to its multiple resistance to antibiotics and ability to survive in the hospital environment linked to its capacity to form biofilms. To fully characterize the contribution of AdeABC, AdeFGH, and AdeIJK resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type efflux systems to acquired and intrinsic resistance, we constructed, from an entirely sequenced susceptible A. baumannii strain, a set of isogenic mutants overexpressing each system following introduction of a point mutation in their cognate regulator or a deletion for the pump by allelic replacement. Pairwise comparison of every derivative with the parental strain indicated that AdeABC and AdeFGH are tightly regulated and contribute to acquisition of antibiotic resistance when overproduced. AdeABC had a broad substrate range, including β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, tetracyclines-tigecycline, macrolides-lincosamides, and chloramphenicol, and conferred clinical resistance to aminoglycosides. Importantly, when combined with enzymatic resistance to carbapenems and aminoglycosides, this pump contributed in a synergistic fashion to the level of resistance of the host. In contrast, AdeIJK was expressed constitutively and was responsible for intrinsic resistance to the same major drug classes as AdeABC as well as antifolates and fusidic acid. Surprisingly, overproduction of AdeABC and AdeIJK altered bacterial membrane composition, resulting in decreased biofilm formation but not motility. Natural transformation and plasmid transfer were diminished in recipients overproducing AdeABC. It thus appears that alteration in the expression of efflux systems leads to multiple changes in the relationship between the host and its environment, in addition to antibiotic resistance. PMID:25805730

  15. The MexGHI-OpmD multidrug efflux pump controls growth, antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa via 4-quinolone-dependent cell-to-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Aendekerk, Séverine; Diggle, Stephen P; Song, Zhijun; Høiby, Niels; Cornelis, Pierre; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2005-04-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the production of multiple virulence factors depends on cell-to-cell communication through the integration of N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)- and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS)- dependent signalling. Mutation of genes encoding the efflux protein MexI and the porin OpmD from the MexGHI-OpmD pump resulted in the inability to produce N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-c12-hsl) and pqs and a marked reduction in n-butanoyl-L-homoserine lactone levels. Both pump mutants were impaired in growth and exhibited enhanced rather than reduced antibiotic resistance. Provision of exogenous PQS improved growth and restored AHL and virulence factor production as well as antibiotic susceptibility, indicating that the pump mutants retained their capacity to respond to PQS. RT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of the PQS biosynthetic genes, phnA and pqsA, was inhibited when the mutants reached stationary phase, suggesting that the pleiotropic phenotype observed may be due to intracellular accumulation of a toxic PQS precursor. To explore this hypothesis, double mexI phnA (unable to produce anthranilate, the precursor of PQS) and mexI pqsA mutants were constructed; the improved growth of the former suggested that the toxic compound is likely to be anthranilate or a metabolite of it. Mutations in mexI and opmD also resulted in the attenuation of virulence in rat and plant infection models. In plants, addition of PQS restored the virulence of mexI and opmD mutants. Collectively, these results demonstrate an essential function for the MexGHI-OpmD pump in facilitating cell-to-cell communication, antibiotic susceptibility and promoting virulence and growth in P. aeruginosa.

  16. [Antibiotic stewardship].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-09-01

    Resistance against antibiotics is continuously increasing throughout the world and has become a very serious problem. For just this reason "Antibiotic Stewardship Programs" have been developed. These programs are intended to lead to a sustained improvement in the situation and to assure a rational practice for the prescription of anti-infective agents in medical facilities. The aim is to prescribe the correct antibiotic therapy to the right patient at the most appropriate point in time. An AWMF S3 guideline on this topic published by the German Society for Infectiology (S3-Leitlinie StrategienzurSicherungrationalerAntibiotika-AnwendungimKrankenhaus.AWMF-Registernummer 092/001 - S3 Guideline on Strategies for the Rational Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals. AWMF - Registry Number 092/001) has been available since the end of 2013. An essential aspect therein is the expert interdisciplinary cooperation of a team comprising a clinically experienced infectiologist, a hospital pharmacist and a consultant for microbiology.

  17. Molecular responses to photogenotoxic stress induced by the antibiotic lomefloxacin in human skin cells: from DNA damage to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marrot, Laurent; Belaïdi, Jean Phillipe; Jones, Christophe; Perez, Phillipe; Riou, Lydia; Sarasin, Alain; Meunier, Jean Roch

    2003-09-01

    Photo-unstable chemicals sometimes behave as phototoxins in skin, inducing untoward clinical side-effects when exposed to sunlight. Some drugs, such as psoralens or fluoroquinolones, can damage genomic DNA, thus increasing the risk of photocarcinogenesis. Here, lomefloxacin, an antibiotic from the fluoroquinolone family known to be involved in skin tumor development in photoexposed mice, was studied using normal human skin cells in culture: fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and Caucasian melanocytes. When treated cells were exposed to simulated solar ultraviolet A (320-400 nm), lomefloxacin induced damage such as strand breaks and pyrimidine dimers in genomic DNA. Lomefloxacin also triggered various stress responses: heme-oxygenase-1 expression in fibroblasts, changes in p53 status as shown by the accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins or the induction of MDM2 and GADD45 genes, and stimulation of melanogenesis by increasing the tyrosinase activity in melanocytes. Lomefloxacin could also lead to apoptosis in keratinocytes exposed to ultraviolet A: caspase-3 was activated and FAS-L gene was induced. Moreover, keratinocytes were shown to be the most sensitive cell type to lomefloxacin phototoxic effects, in spite of the well-established effectiveness of their antioxidant equipment. These data show that the phototoxicity of a given drug can be driven by different mechanisms and that its biologic impact varies according to cell type.

  18. Mycobacterial Cultures Contain Cell Size and Density Specific Sub-populations of Cells with Significant Differential Susceptibility to Antibiotics, Oxidative and Nitrite Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Nair, Rashmi Ravindran; Sharan, Deepti; Jakkala, Kishor; Mukkayyan, Nagaraja; Swaminath, Sharmada; Pradhan, Atul; Joshi, Niranjan V.; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2017-01-01

    The present study shows the existence of two specific sub-populations of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells differing in size and density, in the mid-log phase (MLP) cultures, with significant differential susceptibility to antibiotic, oxidative, and nitrite stress. One of these sub-populations (~10% of the total population), contained short-sized cells (SCs) generated through highly-deviated asymmetric cell division (ACD) of normal/long-sized mother cells and symmetric cell divisions (SCD) of short-sized mother cells. The other sub-population (~90% of the total population) contained normal/long-sized cells (NCs). The SCs were acid-fast stainable and heat-susceptible, and contained high density of membrane vesicles (MVs, known to be lipid-rich) on their surface, while the NCs possessed negligible density of MVs on the surface, as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Percoll density gradient fractionation of MLP cultures showed the SCs-enriched fraction (SCF) at lower density (probably indicating lipid-richness) and the NCs-enriched fraction (NCF) at higher density of percoll fractions. While live cell imaging showed that the SCs and the NCs could grow and divide to form colony on agarose pads, the SCF, and NCF cells could independently regenerate MLP populations in liquid and solid media, indicating their full genomic content and population regeneration potential. CFU based assays showed the SCF cells to be significantly more susceptible than NCF cells to a range of concentrations of rifampicin and isoniazid (antibiotic stress), H2O2 (oxidative stress),and acidified NaNO2 (nitrite stress). Live cell imaging showed significantly higher susceptibility of the SCs of SC-NC sister daughter cell pairs, formed from highly-deviated ACD of normal/long-sized mother cells, to rifampicin and H2O2, as compared to the sister daughter NCs, irrespective of their comparable growth rates. The SC-SC sister daughter cell pairs, formed

  19. Antibiotic drug levofloxacin inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of lung cancer cells through inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Song, Meijun; Wu, Hongcheng; Wu, Shibo; Ge, Ting; Wang, Guoan; Zhou, Yingyan; Sheng, Shimo; Jiang, Jingbo

    2016-12-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide and its clinical management remains challenge. Here, we repurposed antibiotic levofloxacin for lung cancer treatment. We show that levofloxacin is effectively against a panel of lung cancer cell lines via inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis, regardless of cellular origin and genetic pattern, in in vitro cell culture system and in vivo xenograft lung tumor model. Mechanistically, levofloxacin inhibits activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I and III, leading to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and reduction of ATP production. In addition, levofloxacin significantly increases levels of ROS, mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in vitro and oxidative stress markers (HEL and 4-HNE) in vivo. Antioxidants, such as NAC and vitamin C, prevent the inhibitory effects of levofloxacin, confirming the induction of oxidative damage as the mechanism of its action in lung cancer cells. Our work demonstrates that levofloxacin is a useful addition to the treatment of lung cancer. Our work also suggests that targeting mitochondria may be an alternative therapeutic strategy for lung cancer treatment.

  20. Collective antibiotic tolerance: Mechanisms, dynamics, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Hannah R.; Srimani, Jaydeep K.; Lee, Anna J.; Lopatkin, Allison J.; You, Lingchong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at an alarming rate, considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics, and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. In contrast, a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming, and inter-population interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment, and provide a time window for otherwise susceptible bacteria to acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy. PMID:25689336

  1. Antibiotic-Induced Depletion of Anti-Inflammatory Clostridia is Associated with the Development of GVHD in Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Simms-Waldrip, Tiffany R; Sunkersett, Gauri; Coughlin, Laura A; Savani, Milan R; Arana, Carlos; Kim, Jiwoong; Kim, Minsoo; Zhan, Xiaowei; Greenberg, David E; Xie, Yang; Davies, Stella M; Koh, Andrew Y

    2017-02-09

    Adult stem cell transplantation (SCT) patients with graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) exhibit significant disruptions in gut microbial communities. These changes are associated with higher overall mortality and appear to be driven by specific antibiotic therapies. It is unclear whether pediatric SCT patients who develop GVHD exhibit similar antibiotic-induced gut microbiota community changes. Here, we show that pediatric SCT patients (from Children's Medical Center Dallas, n=8, and Cincinnati Children's Hospital, n=7) who develop GVHD show a significant decline, up to 10-log fold, in gut anti-inflammatory Clostridia (AIC), compared to those without GVHD. In fact, the development of GVHD is significantly associated with this AIC decline and with cumulative antibiotic exposure, particularly antibiotics effective against anaerobic bacteria (p= 0.003, Firth logistic regression analysis). Using metagenomic shotgun sequencing analysis, we were able to identify specific commensal bacterial species, including AIC, that were significantly depleted in GVHD patients. We then used a preclinical GVHD model to verify our clinical observations. Clindamycin depleted AIC and exacerbated GVHD in mice, whereas oral AIC supplementation increased gut AIC levels and mitigated GVHD in mice. Together, these data suggest that an antibiotic-induced AIC depletion in the gut microbiota is associated with the development of GVHD in pediatric SCT patients.

  2. Biofilm-Grown Burkholderia cepacia Complex Cells Survive Antibiotic Treatment by Avoiding Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen; Sass, Andrea; Bazzini, Silvia; De Roy, Karen; Udine, Claudia; Messiaen, Thomas; Riccardi, Giovanna; Boon, Nico; Nelis, Hans J.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Coenye, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The presence of persister cells has been proposed as a factor in biofilm resilience. In the present study we investigated whether persister cells are present in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) biofilms, what the molecular basis of antimicrobial tolerance in Bcc persisters is, and how persisters can be eradicated from Bcc biofilms. After treatment of Bcc biofilms with high concentrations of various antibiotics often a small subpopulation survived. To investigate the molecular mechanism of tolerance in this subpopulation, Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms were treated with 1024 µg/ml of tobramycin. Using ROS-specific staining and flow cytometry, we showed that tobramycin increased ROS production in treated sessile cells. However, approximately 0.1% of all sessile cells survived the treatment. A transcriptome analysis showed that several genes from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and genes involved in the electron transport chain were downregulated. In contrast, genes from the glyoxylate shunt were upregulated. These data indicate that protection against ROS is important for the survival of persisters. To confirm this, we determined the number of persisters in biofilms formed by catalase mutants. The persister fraction in ΔkatA and ΔkatB biofilms was significantly reduced, confirming the role of ROS detoxification in persister survival. Pretreatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with itaconate, an inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (ICL), the first enzyme in the glyoxylate shunt, reduced the persister fraction approx. 10-fold when the biofilms were subsequently treated with tobramycin. In conclusion, most Bcc biofilms contain a significant fraction of persisters that survive treatment with high doses of tobramycin. The surviving persister cells downregulate the TCA cycle to avoid production of ROS and at the same time activate an alternative pathway, the glyoxylate shunt. This pathway may present a novel target for combination therapy. PMID:23516582

  3. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  4. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  5. Detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Abdul; Kashif, Natasha; Kifayat, Nasira; Ahmad, Shabeer

    2016-09-01

    The antibiotic residues in poultry meat can pose certain hazards to human health among them are sensitivity to antibiotics, allergic reactions, mutation in cells, imbalance of intestinal micro biota and bacterial resistance to antibiotics. The purpose of the present paper was to detect antibiotic residue in poultry meat. During the present study a total of 80 poultry kidney and liver samples were collected and tested for detection of different antibiotic residues at different pH levels Eschericha coli at pH 6, 7 and Staphyloccocus aureus at pH 8 & 9. Out of 80 samples only 4 samples were positive for antibiotic residues. The highest concentrations of antibiotic residue found in these tissues were tetracycline (8%) followed by ampicilin (4%), streptomycine (2%) and aminoglycosides (1%) as compared to other antibiotics like sulfonamides, neomycine and gentamycine. It was concluded that these microorganism at these pH levels could be effectively used for detection of antibiotic residues in poultry meat.

  6. A Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Targets to Render Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sensitive to Lysozyme and Cell Wall-Targeting Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Lee, Keehoon; Go, Junhyeok; Park, In Ho; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Jik; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing airway infections. Human airway mucus contains a large amount of lysozyme, which hydrolyzes bacterial cell walls. P. aeruginosa, however, is known to be resistant to lysozyme. Here, we performed a genetic screen using a mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain, and identified two mutants (ΔbamB and ΔfabY) that exhibited decrease in survival after lysozyme treatment. The bamB and fabY genes encode an outer membrane assembly protein and a fatty acid synthesis enzyme, respectively. These two mutants displayed retarded growth in the airway mucus secretion (AMS). In addition, these mutants exhibited reduced virulence and compromised survival fitness in two different in vivo infection models. The mutants also showed susceptibility to several antibiotics. Especially, ΔbamB mutant was very sensitive to vancomycin, ampicillin, and ceftazidime that target cell wall synthesis. The ΔfabY displayed compromised membrane integrity. In conclusion, this study uncovered a common aspect of two different P. aeruginosa mutants with pleiotropic phenotypes, and suggests that BamB and FabY could be novel potential drug targets for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:28299285

  7. A Genetic Screen Reveals Novel Targets to Render Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sensitive to Lysozyme and Cell Wall-Targeting Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang-Mu; Lee, Keehoon; Go, Junhyeok; Park, In Ho; Shin, Jeon-Soo; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Hyun Jik; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of establishing airway infections. Human airway mucus contains a large amount of lysozyme, which hydrolyzes bacterial cell walls. P. aeruginosa, however, is known to be resistant to lysozyme. Here, we performed a genetic screen using a mutant library of PAO1, a prototype P. aeruginosa strain, and identified two mutants (ΔbamB and ΔfabY) that exhibited decrease in survival after lysozyme treatment. The bamB and fabY genes encode an outer membrane assembly protein and a fatty acid synthesis enzyme, respectively. These two mutants displayed retarded growth in the airway mucus secretion (AMS). In addition, these mutants exhibited reduced virulence and compromised survival fitness in two different in vivo infection models. The mutants also showed susceptibility to several antibiotics. Especially, ΔbamB mutant was very sensitive to vancomycin, ampicillin, and ceftazidime that target cell wall synthesis. The ΔfabY displayed compromised membrane integrity. In conclusion, this study uncovered a common aspect of two different P. aeruginosa mutants with pleiotropic phenotypes, and suggests that BamB and FabY could be novel potential drug targets for the treatment of P. aeruginosa infection.

  8. Novel anti-infective molecule from innate immune cells as an antibiotic-alternative to control infections caused by Apicomplexa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing needs for the global animal industry to address the regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production, there is much interest to find alternatives to AGPs. To develop alternatives to antibiotics against the major poultry parasitic disease, ...

  9. The antifungal antibiotic, clotrimazole, inhibits Cl- secretion by polarized monolayers of human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rufo, P A; Jiang, L; Moe, S J; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L; Lencer, W I

    1996-01-01

    Clotrimazole (CLT) prevents dehydration of the human HbSS red cell through inhibition of Ca++-dependent (Gardos) K+ channels in vitro (1993. J. Clin Invest. 92:520-526.) and in patients (1996. J. Clin Invest. 97:1227-1234.). Basolateral membrane K+ channels of intestinal crypt epithelial cells also participate in secretagogue-stimulated Cl- secretion. We examined the ability of CLT to block intestinal Cl- secretion by inhibition of K+ transport. Cl- secretion was measured as short-circuit current (Isc) across monolayers of T84 cells. CLT reversibly inhibited Cl- secretory responses to both cAMP- and Ca2+-dependent agonists with IC50 values of approximately 5 microM. Onset of inhibition was more rapid when CLT was applied to the basolateral cell surface. Apical Cl- channel and basolateral NaK2Cl cotransporter activities were unaffected by CLT treatment as assessed by isotopic flux measurement. In contrast, CLT strongly inhibited basolateral 86Rb efflux. These data provide evidence that CLT reversibly inhibits Cl- secretion elicited by cAMP-, cGMP-, or Ca2+-dependent agonists in T84 cells. CLT acts distal to the generation of cAMP and Ca2+ signals, and appears to inhibit basolateral K+ channels directly. CLT and related drugs may serve as novel antidiarrheal agents in humans and animals. PMID:8903326

  10. Co-immobilization of active antibiotics and cell adhesion peptides on calcium based biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Palchesko, Rachelle N; Buckholtz, Gavin A; Romeo, Jared D; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2014-07-01

    Two bioactive molecules with unrelated functions, vancomycin and a cell adhesion peptide, were immobilized on the surface of a potential bone scaffold material, calcium aluminum oxide. In order to accomplish immobilization and retain bioactivity three sequential surface functionalization strategies were compared: 1.) vancomycin was chemically immobilized before a cell adhesion peptide (KRSR), 2.) vancomycin was chemically immobilized after KRSR and 3.) vancomycin was adsorbed after binding the cell adhesion peptide. Both molecules remained on the surface and active using all three reaction sequences and after autoclave sterilization based on osteoblast attachment, bacterial turbidity and bacterial zone inhibition test results. However, the second strategy was superior at enhancing osteoblast attachment and significantly decreasing bacterial growth when compared to the other sequences.

  11. Novel Antibiotic Susceptibility Tests by the ATP-Bioluminescence Method Using Filamentous Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Noriaki; Nakajima, Moto-O; O’Hara, Koji; Sawai, Tetsuo

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by the ATP-bioluminescence method has been noted for its speed; it provides susceptibility results within 2 to 5 h. However, several disagreements between the ATP method and standard methodology have been reported. The present paper describes a novel ATP method in a 3.5-h test which overcomes these deficiencies through the elimination of false-resistance discrepancies in tests on gram-negative bacteria with β-lactam agents. In our test model using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and piperacillin, it was shown that ATP in filamentous cells accounted for the false resistance. We found that 0.5% 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) extracted ATP from the filamentous cells without affecting normal cells and that 0.3 U of adenosine phosphate deaminase (APDase)/ml simultaneously digested the extracted ATP. We used the mixture of these reagents for the pretreatment of cells in a procedure we named filamentous cell treatment, prior to ATP measurements. This novel ATP method with the filamentous cell treatment eliminated false-resistance discrepancies in tests on P. aeruginosa with β-lactam agents, including piperacillin, cefoperazone, aztreonam, imipenem-cilastatin, ceftazidime, and cefsulodin. Furthermore, this novel methodology produced results which agreed with those of the standard microdilution method in other tests on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis, for non-β-lactam agents, such as fosfomycin, ofloxacin, minocycline, and aminoglycosides. MICs obtained by the novel ATP method were also in agreement with those obtained by the agar dilution method of susceptibility testing. From these results, it was shown that the novel ATP method could be used successfully to test the activities of antimicrobial agents with the elimination of the previously reported discrepancies. PMID:9624485

  12. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues.

  13. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  14. On the Origin of Mitochondrial Mutants: Evidence for Intracellular Selection of Mitochondria in the Origin of Antibiotic-Resistant Cells in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Birky, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    In wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, erythromycin and certain other antibacterial antibiotics inhibit the formation of respiratory enzymes in mitochondria by inhibiting translation on mitochondrial ribosomes. This paper is concerned with the origin of mutant cells, resistant to erythromycin by virtue of having a homogeneous population of mutant mitochondrial DNA molecules. Such mutant cells are obtained by plating wild-type (sensitive) cells on a nonfermentable substrate plus the antibiotic. Colonies of mutant cells appear first about four days after the time of appearance of established mutant cells; new colonies continue to appear, often at a constant rate, for many days. Application of the Newcombe respreading experiment demonstrates that most or all of the mutant cells which form the resistant colonies on selective medium arise only after exposure of the population to erythromycin. It is suggested that this result is most probably due to intracellular selection for mitochondrial genomes. Resistant mitochondria arising from spontaneous mutation are postulated to be at a selective disadvantage in the absence of erythromycin; reproducing more slowly than wild-type sensitive mitochondria, they cannot easily accumulate in sufficient numbers in a cell to render it resistant as a whole. In the presence of erythromycin, resistant mitochondria can continue to reproduce while sensitive mitochondria cannot, until there is a sufficient number to make the cell resistant, i.e. to permit normal cell growth. The same phenomenon is seen with respect to chloramphenicol resistance. Intracellular selection is considered more likely than direct induction of mutation by the antibiotic, since mutant cells do not accumulate in the presence of erythromycin if the mitochondrial genome is rendered non-essential by growth on glucose or nontranslatable by chloramphenicol. Intra-cellular selection provides a mechanism for direct adaptation at the cell level, compatible with currently

  15. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  16. Phenotype overlap in Xylella fastidiosa is controlled by the cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase Eal in response to antibiotic exposure and diffusible signal factor-mediated cell-cell signaling.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Eal is an EAL domain protein in Xylella fastidiosa homologous to one involved in resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EAL and HD-GYP domain proteins are implicated in the hydrolysis of the secondary messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (cyclic di-GMP). Cell density-dependent communication mediated by a Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) also modulates cyclic di-GMP levels in X. fastidiosa, thereby controlling the expression of virulence genes and genes involved in insect transmission. The possible linkage of Eal to both extrinsic factors such as antibiotics and intrinsic factors such as quorum sensing, and whether both affect virulence, was thus addressed. Expression of eal was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, and an eal deletion mutant was more susceptible to this antibiotic than the wild-type strain and exhibited phenotypes similar to those of an rpfF deletion mutant blocked in DSF production, such as hypermotility, reduced biofilm formation, and hypervirulence to grape. Consistent with that, the rpfF mutant was more susceptible than the wild-type strain to tobramycin. Therefore, we propose that cell-cell communication and antibiotic stress can apparently lead to similar modulations of cyclic di-GMP in X. fastidiosa, resulting in similar phenotypes. However, the effect of cell density is dominant compared to that of antibiotic stress, since eal is suppressed by RpfF, which may prevent inappropriate behavioral changes in response to antibiotic stress when DSF accumulates.

  17. Ofloxacin-like antibiotics inhibit pneumococcal cell wall-degrading virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; García, Ernesto; de Pascual-Teresa, Beatriz; López, Rubens; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Romero, Antonio

    2005-05-20

    The search for new drugs against Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is driven by the 1.5 million deaths it causes annually. Choline-binding proteins attach to the pneumococcal cell wall through domains that recognize choline moieties, and their involvement in pneumococcal virulence makes them potential targets for drug development. We have defined chemical criteria involved in the docking of small molecules from a three-dimensional structural library to the major pneumococcal autolysin (LytA) choline binding domain. These criteria were used to identify compounds that could interfere with the attachment of this protein to the cell wall, and several quinolones that fit this framework were found to inhibit the cell wall-degrading activity of LytA. Furthermore, these compounds produced similar effects on other enzymes with different catalytic activities but that contained a similar choline binding domain; that is, autolysin (LytC) and the phage lytic enzyme (Cpl-1). Finally, we resolved the crystal structure of the complex between the choline binding domain of LytA and ofloxacin at a resolution of 2.6 Angstroms. These data constitute an important launch pad from which effective drugs to combat pneumococcal infections can be developed.

  18. Efficient mineralization of the antibiotic trimethoprim by solar assisted photoelectro-Fenton process driven by a photovoltaic cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyu; Wang, Aimin; Tian, Xiujun; Wen, Zhenjun; Lv, Hanjiao; Li, Desheng; Li, Jiuyi

    2016-11-15

    In this study, a novel self-sustainable solar assisted photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) system driven by a solar photovoltaic cell was developed for the efficient mineralization of antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) in water. A comparative degradation of 200mgL(-1) TMP by RuO2/Ti anodic oxidation (AO), anodic oxidation with H2O2 electrogeneration (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and SPEF was investigated. SPEF was proved to exhibit the highest oxidation power, i.e., more than 80% TOC was removed after 360min SPEF treatment of 200mgL(-1) of TMP under optimal conditions at pH 3.0, 1.0mM Fe(2+) and 18mAcm(-2). Influences of current density, pH, initial Fe(2+) and initial TMP concentration on SPEF process were also studied. Ten aromatic intermediates generated from hydroxylation, carbonylation and demethylation reactions were identified using UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS system during the SPEF treatment, together with three carboxylic acids (oxamic, oxalic and formic acids) and two inorganic ions (NH4(+) and NO3(-)) measured. Therefore, a reasonable pathway of TMP degradation in SPEF process was proposed.

  19. Heteroresistance at the Single-Cell Level: Adapting to Antibiotic Stress through a Population-Based Strategy and Growth-Controlled Interphenotypic Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaorong; Kang, Yu; Luo, Chunxiong; Zhao, Tong; Liu, Lin; Jiang, Xiangdan; Fu, Rongrong; An, Shuchang; Chen, Jichao; Jiang, Ning; Ren, Lufeng; Wang, Qi; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Gao, Zhancheng; Yu, Jun

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heteroresistance refers to phenotypic heterogeneity of microbial clonal populations under antibiotic stress, and it has been thought to be an allocation of a subset of “resistant” cells for surviving in higher concentrations of antibiotic. The assumption fits the so-called bet-hedging strategy, where a bacterial population “hedges” its “bet” on different phenotypes to be selected by unpredicted environment stresses. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a heteroresistance model by introducing a blaCTX-M-14 gene (coding for a cephalosporin hydrolase) into a sensitive Escherichia coli strain. We confirmed heteroresistance in this clone and that a subset of the cells expressed more hydrolase and formed more colonies in the presence of ceftriaxone (exhibited stronger “resistance”). However, subsequent single-cell-level investigation by using a microfluidic device showed that a subset of cells with a distinguishable phenotype of slowed growth and intensified hydrolase expression emerged, and they were not positively selected but increased their proportion in the population with ascending antibiotic concentrations. Therefore, heteroresistance—the gradually decreased colony-forming capability in the presence of antibiotic—was a result of a decreased growth rate rather than of selection for resistant cells. Using a mock strain without the resistance gene, we further demonstrated the existence of two nested growth-centric feedback loops that control the expression of the hydrolase and maximize population growth in various antibiotic concentrations. In conclusion, phenotypic heterogeneity is a population-based strategy beneficial for bacterial survival and propagation through task allocation and interphenotypic collaboration, and the growth rate provides a critical control for the expression of stress-related genes and an essential mechanism in responding to environmental stresses. PMID:24520060

  20. Factors influencing variation of bulk milk antibiotic residue occurrence, somatic cell count, and total bacterial count in dairy sheep flocks.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, C; Carriedo, J A; García-Jimeno, M C; Pérez-Bilbao, M; de la Fuente, L F

    2010-04-01

    To study the variations of bulk tank milk variables in dairy ewe flocks and to identify the main target practices and flock groups to improve milk quality and safety, a total of 71,228 records of antibiotic residue (AR) and milk yield and 68,781 records of somatic cell count (SCC) and total bacterial count (TBC) were obtained over 5 yr from the same 209 dairy ewe flocks of the Assaf breed belonging to the Consortium for Ovine Promotion of Castilla-León (Spain). Based on a logistic regression model, year, month, semester, SCC, TBC, dry therapy, and milk yield significantly contributed to AR variation. High SCC was associated with increased AR violations. When antibiotic dry therapy was implemented, AR occurrence was higher than when this practice was not used. A polynomial monthly distribution throughout the year was observed for AR occurrence; the highest values were in autumn, coinciding with low milk yields per flock. Yearly occurrences drastically diminished from 2004 (1.36%) to 2008 (0.30%), probably as a result of effective educational programs. The mixed-model ANOVA of factors influencing variation in SCC and TBC indicated that year, month, AR, dry therapy group, milking type, and year interactions were significant variation factors for SCC and TBC; mathematical model accounted for 74.1 and 35.4% of total variance for each variable, respectively. Differences in management and hygiene practice caused significant SCC and TBC variations among flocks and within flocks throughout the 5-yr study. Over time, continuously dry treated flocks showed lower logSCC (5.80) and logTBC (4.92) than untreated (6.10 and 5.18, respectively) or discontinuously dry treated (6.01 and 5.05, respectively) flocks. Continuously dry treated flocks had lower AR occurrences than did discontinuously dry treated flocks. As a whole, AR occurrence and SCC and TBC bulk tank milk variables can be used for monitoring mammary health and milk hygiene and safety in dairy sheep throughout time.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2011-04-14

    Over the past decade, resistance to antibiotics has emerged as a crisis of global proportion. Microbes resistant to many and even all clinically approved antibiotics are increasingly common and easily spread across continents. At the same time there are fewer new antibiotic drugs coming to market. We are reaching a point where we are no longer able to confidently treat a growing number of bacterial infections. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance provide the essential knowledge on new drug development and clinical use. These mechanisms include enzyme catalyzed antibiotic modifications, bypass of antibiotic targets and active efflux of drugs from the cell. Understanding the chemical rationale and underpinnings of resistance is an essential component of our response to this clinical challenge.

  2. Experimental manipulation of sponge/bacterial symbiont community composition with antibiotics: sponge cell aggregates as a unique tool to study animal/microorganism symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Crystal; Hill, Malcolm; Marks, Carolyn; Runyen-Janecky, Laura; Hill, April

    2012-08-01

    Marine sponges can harbor dense and diverse bacterial communities, yet we have a limited understanding of important aspects of this symbiosis. We developed an experimental methodology that permits manipulating the composition of the microbial community. Specifically, we evaluated sponge cell aggregates (SCA) from Clathria prolifera that had been treated with different classes of antibiotics to determine whether this system might offer novel experimental approaches to the study of sponge/bacterial symbioses. Microscopic analysis of the SCA demonstrated that two distinct morphological types of microbiota existed on the external surface vs. the internal regions of the SCA. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries indicated that we were unable to create entirely aposymbiotic SCA but that different classes of antibiotics produced distinctive shifts in the SCA-associated bacterial community. After exposure to antibiotics, some bacterial species were 'revealed', thus uncovering novel components of the sponge-associated community. The antibiotic treatments used here had little discernible effect on the formation of SCA or subsequent development of the adult. The experimental approach we describe offers empirical options for studying the role symbionts play in sponge growth and development and for ascertaining relationships among bacterial species in communities residing in sponges.

  3. A High Speed Detection Platform Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering for Monitoring Antibiotic-Induced Chemical Changes in Bacteria Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Lin, You-Hsuan; Hung, Chia-Sui; Liu, Tian-Jiun; Chen, Yu; Huang, Yung-Ching; Tsai, Tsung-Heng; Wang, Huai-Hsien; Wang, Da-Wei; Wang, Juen-Kai; Wang, Yuh-Lin; Lin, Chi-Hung

    2009-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis for pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility is critical for controlling bacterial infections. Conventional methods for determining bacterium's sensitivity to antibiotic depend mostly on measuring the change of microbial proliferation in response to the drug. Such “biological assay” inevitably takes time, ranging from days for fast-growing bacteria to weeks for slow-growers. Here, a novel tool has been developed to detect the “chemical features” of bacterial cell wall that enables rapid identification of drug resistant bacteria within hours. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique based on our newly developed SERS-active substrate was applied to assess the fine structures of the bacterial cell wall. The SERS profiles recorded by such a platform are sensitive and stable, that could readily reflect different bacterial cell walls found in Gram-positive, Gram-negative, or mycobacteria groups. Moreover, characteristic changes in SERS profile were noticed in the drug-sensitive bacteria at the early period (i.e., ∼1 hr) of antibiotic exposure, which could be used to differentiate them from the drug-resistant ones. The SERS-based diagnosis could be applied to a single bacterium. The high-speed SERS detection represents a novel approach for microbial diagnostics. The single-bacterium detection capability of SERS makes possible analyses directly on clinical specimen instead of pure cultured bacteria. PMID:19421405

  4. Delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng-Hua; Bao, Yan; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jun

    2014-11-30

    Despite the wide use of antibiotics, bacterial infection is still one of the leading causes of hospitalization and mortality. The clinical failure of antibiotic therapy is linked with low bioavailability, poor penetration to bacterial infection sites, and the side effects of antibiotics, as well as the antibiotic resistance properties of bacteria. Antibiotics encapsulated in nanoparticles or microparticles made up of a biodegradable polymer have shown great potential in replacing the administration of antibiotics in their "free" form. Polymeric particles provide protection to antibiotics against environmental deactivation and alter antibiotic pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Polymeric particles can overcome tissue and cellular barriers and deliver antibiotics into very dense tissues and inaccessible target cells. Polymeric particles can be modified to target or respond to particular tissues, cells, and even bacteria, and thereby facilitate the selective concentration or release of the antibiotic at infection sites, respectively. Thus, the delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles augments the level of the bioactive drug at the site of infection while reducing the dosage and the dosing frequency. The end results are improved therapeutic effects as well as decreased "pill burden" and drug side effects in patients. The main objective of this review is to analyze recent advances and current perspectives in the use of polymeric antibiotic delivery systems in the treatment of bacterial infection.

  5. Mushroom Polysaccharides: Chemistry and Antiobesity, Antidiabetes, Anticancer, and Antibiotic Properties in Cells, Rodents, and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Mendel

    2016-01-01

    More than 2000 species of edible and/or medicinal mushrooms have been identified to date, many of which are widely consumed, stimulating much research on their health-promoting properties. These properties are associated with bioactive compounds produced by the mushrooms, including polysaccharides. Although β-glucans (homopolysaccharides) are believed to be the major bioactive polysaccharides of mushrooms, other types of mushroom polysaccharides (heteropolysaccharides) also possess biological properties. Here we survey the chemistry of such health-promoting polysaccharides and their reported antiobesity and antidiabetic properties as well as selected anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial, and antiviral effects that demonstrate their multiple health-promoting potential. The associated antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulating activities in fat cells, rodents, and humans are also discussed. The mechanisms of action involve the gut microbiota, meaning the polysaccharides act as prebiotics in the digestive system. Also covered here are the nutritional, functional food, clinical, and epidemiological studies designed to assess the health-promoting properties of polysaccharides, individually and as blended mixtures, against obesity, diabetes, cancer, and infectious diseases, and suggestions for further research. The collated information and suggested research needs might guide further studies needed for a better understanding of the health-promoting properties of mushroom polysaccharides and enhance their use to help prevent and treat human chronic diseases. PMID:28231175

  6. Mushroom Polysaccharides: Chemistry and Antiobesity, Antidiabetes, Anticancer, and Antibiotic Properties in Cells, Rodents, and Humans.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel

    2016-11-29

    More than 2000 species of edible and/or medicinal mushrooms have been identified to date, many of which are widely consumed, stimulating much research on their health-promoting properties. These properties are associated with bioactive compounds produced by the mushrooms, including polysaccharides. Although β-glucans (homopolysaccharides) are believed to be the major bioactive polysaccharides of mushrooms, other types of mushroom polysaccharides (heteropolysaccharides) also possess biological properties. Here we survey the chemistry of such health-promoting polysaccharides and their reported antiobesity and antidiabetic properties as well as selected anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial, and antiviral effects that demonstrate their multiple health-promoting potential. The associated antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulating activities in fat cells, rodents, and humans are also discussed. The mechanisms of action involve the gut microbiota, meaning the polysaccharides act as prebiotics in the digestive system. Also covered here are the nutritional, functional food, clinical, and epidemiological studies designed to assess the health-promoting properties of polysaccharides, individually and as blended mixtures, against obesity, diabetes, cancer, and infectious diseases, and suggestions for further research. The collated information and suggested research needs might guide further studies needed for a better understanding of the health-promoting properties of mushroom polysaccharides and enhance their use to help prevent and treat human chronic diseases.

  7. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    El-Halfawy, Omar M.; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Loutet, Slade A.; Murphy, Michael E. P.; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo. These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo. Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins. PMID:28292982

  8. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment.

  9. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment. PMID:27438061

  10. Annexin A2 is a target of autoimmune T and B cell responses associated with synovial fibroblast proliferation in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pianta, Annalisa; Drouin, Elise E; Crowley, Jameson T; Arvikar, Sheila; Strle, Klemen; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-10-01

    In this study, autoantibody responses to annexin A2 were found in 11-15% of 278 patients with Lyme disease, including in those with erythema migrans (EM), an early sign of the illness, and in those with antibiotic-responsive or antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA), a late disease manifestation. In contrast, robust T cell reactivity to annexin A2 peptides was found only in patients with responsive or refractory LA. In LA patients, annexin A2 protein levels, which were higher in the refractory group, correlated with annexin A2 antibody levels in sera and synovial fluid. In addition, in patients with antibiotic-refractory LA who had anti-annexin A2 antibodies, synovial tissue had intense staining for annexin A2 protein, greater synovial fibroblast proliferation and more tissue fibrosis. Thus, a subset of LA patients had T and B cell responses to annexin A2, and in the refractory group, annexin A2 autoantibodies were associated with specific pathologic findings.

  11. The Role of mgrA and sarA in Autolysis and Resistance to Cell Wall-Active Antibiotics in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Trotonda, María Pilar; Xiong, Yan Q.; Memmi, Guido; Bayer, Arnold S.; Cheung, Ambrose L.

    2009-01-01

    Background We have previously shown the importance of mgrA and sarA in controlling autolysis of Staphylococcus aureus, with MgrA and SarA both being negative regulators of murein hydrolases. Methods In this study, we analyzed the effects of mgrA and sarA on antibiotic-mediated lysis in vitro, and on the responses to cell wall-active antibiotic therapy in an experimental endocarditis model using two representative MRSA strains: laboratory strain COL and community-acquired clinical isolate, MW2. Results We found that mgrA and sarA independently down-regulated sarV (a marker for autolysis), although the alteration in sarV expression did not correlate directly with the autolysis profiles of single mgrA and sarA mutants. Importantly, the mgrA/sarA double mutants of both strains were more autolytic in vitro as compared with the single mutants. In vivo, we demonstrated that, despite equivalent intrinsic virulence between the parents and their isogenic mgrA/sarA double mutants in the endocarditis model, oxacillin and vancomycin treatment of the mgrA/sarA double mutants of MRSA strains COL and MW2 yielded significant reductions in vegetation bacterial densities vs. their respective parents. Conclusions These results suggest that down-regulation of mgrA/sarA in combination with cell wall-active antibiotics may represent a novel approach to treat MRSA infections. PMID:19072553

  12. Increased GVHD-related mortality with broad-spectrum antibiotic use after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in human patients and mice

    PubMed Central

    Shono, Yusuke; Docampo, Melissa D.; Peled, Jonathan U.; Perobelli, Suelen M.; Velardi, Enrico; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Slingerland, Ann E.; Smith, Odette M.; Young, Lauren F.; Gupta, Jyotsna; Lieberman, Sophia R.; Jay, Hillary V.; Ahr, Katya F.; Rodriguez, Kori A. Porosnicu; Xu, Ke; Calarfiore, Marco; Poeck, Hendrik; Caballero, Silvia; Devlin, Sean M.; Rapaport, Franck; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Murphy, George F.; Gomes, Camilla; Liu, Chen; Moss, Eli L.; Falconer, Shannon B.; Bhatt, Ami S.; Taur, Ying; Pamer, Eric G.

    2016-01-01

    After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), intestinal bacteria modulate risks of infection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Neutropenic fever is common and treated with a choice of clinically equivalent antibiotics that target obligately anaerobic bacteria (anaerobes) to varying degrees. We retrospectively examined 857 allo-HSCT recipients and found that treatment of neutropenic fever with imipenem-cilastatin and piperacillin-tazobactam was associated with increased GVHD-related mortality at 5 years (21.5% in imipenem-cilastatin-treated patients vs. 13.1% in untreated patients, p=0.025, and 19.8% in piperacillin-tazobactam-treated patients vs. 11.9% in untreated patients, p=0.007). However, two other antibiotics also used to treat neutropenic fever, aztreonam and cefepime, were not associated with GVHD-related mortality (p=0.78 and p=0.98, respectively). Analysis of stool microbiota composition showed that piperacillin-tazobactam administration was associated with increased compositional perturbation. Studies in mouse models demonstrated similar effects of these antibiotics, as well as aggravated GVHD mortality with imipenem-cilastatin or piperacillin-tazobactm compared to aztreonam (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). We found pathological evidence for increased GVHD in the colon of imipenem-cilastatin-treated mice (p<0.05), but no differences in short-chain fatty acid concentrations or regulatory T cells numbers. Notably, imipenem-cilastatin treatment of mice with GVHD led to loss of the protective lining of mucus in the colon (p<0.01) and intestinal barrier function was compromised (p<0.05). Sequencing of mouse stool specimens showed expansion of Akkermansia muciniphila (p<0.001), a commensal bacterium with mucus-degrading capabilities, raising the possibility that mucus degradation can contribute to murine GVHD. We demonstrate an underappreciated risk for antibiotics with activity against anaerobes to exacerbate colonic GVHD after

  13. Non-coding RNAs as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    Colameco, Savannah; Elliot, Marie A

    2016-12-22

    Antibiotics inhibit a wide range of essential processes in the bacterial cell, including replication, transcription, translation and cell wall synthesis. In many instances, these antibiotics exert their effects through association with non-coding RNAs. This review highlights many classical antibiotic targets (e.g. rRNAs and the ribosome), explores a number of emerging targets (e.g. tRNAs, RNase P, riboswitches and small RNAs), and discusses the future directions and challenges associated with non-coding RNAs as antibiotic targets.

  14. Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte‐derived dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian, Katrin; Ott, Hagen; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele; Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens Malte

    2012-08-01

    Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides – which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions – were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte‐derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1β, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines. -- Highlights: ► We tested the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs in vitro. ► In vitro assays were performed with moDCs and THP-1 cells. ► Beta-lactam antibiotics can be recognized as sensitizing compounds. ► They affect the expression of metabolic enzymes, cytokines and transcription factors. ► Sulfamethoxazole has no measurable effect on THP-1 cells and moDCs.

  15. The membrane protein PrsS mimics σS in protecting Staphylococcus aureus against cell wall-targeting antibiotics and DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Krute, Christina N; Bell-Temin, Harris; Miller, Halie K; Rivera, Frances E; Weiss, Andy; Stevens, Stanley M; Shaw, Lindsey N

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a lone extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factor, σ(S). In Bacillus subtilis, the ECF sigma factor, σ(W), is activated through a proteolytic cascade that begins with cleavage of the RsiW anti-sigma factor by a site-1 protease (S1P), PrsW. We have identified a PrsW homologue in S. aureus (termed PrsS) and explored its role in σ(S) regulation. Herein, we demonstrate that although a cognate σ(S) anti-sigma factor currently remains elusive, prsS phenocopies sigS in a wealth of regards. Specifically, prsS expression mimics the upregulation observed for sigS in response to DNA-damaging agents, cell wall-targeting antibiotics and during ex vivo growth in human serum and murine macrophages. prsS mutants also display the same sensitivities of sigS mutants to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide, and the cell wall-targeting antibiotics ampicillin, bacitracin and penicillin-G. These phenotypes appear to be explained by alterations in abundance of proteins involved in drug resistance (Pbp2a, FemB, HmrA) and the response to DNA damage (BmrA, Hpt, Tag). Our findings seem to be mediated by putative proteolytic activity of PrsS, as site-directed mutagenesis of predicted catalytic residues fails to rescue the sensitivity of the mutant to H2O2 and MMS. Finally, a role for PrsS in S. aureus virulence was identified using human and murine models of infection. Collectively, our data indicate that PrsS and σ(S) function in a similar manner, and perhaps mediate virulence and resistance to DNA damage and cell wall-targeting antibiotics, via a common pathway.

  16. Control of Biofilm Formation: Antibiotics and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Algburi, Ammar; Comito, Nicole; Kashtanov, Dimitri; Dicks, Leon M T; Chikindas, Michael L

    2017-02-01

    Biofilm-associated bacteria are less sensitive to antibiotics than free-living (planktonic) cells. Furthermore, with variations in the concentration of antibiotics throughout a biofilm, microbial cells are often exposed to levels below inhibitory concentrations and may develop resistance. This, as well as the irresponsible use of antibiotics, leads to the selection of pathogens that are difficult to eradicate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention use the terms "antibiotic" and "antimicrobial agent" interchangeably. However, a clear distinction between these two terms is required for the purpose of this assessment. Therefore, we define "antibiotics" as pharmaceutically formulated and medically administered substances and "antimicrobials" as a broad category of substances which are not regulated as drugs. This comprehensive minireview evaluates the effect of natural antimicrobials on pathogens in biofilms when used instead of, or in combination with, commonly prescribed antibiotics.

  17. In vitro evaluation of a fibrin gel antibiotic delivery system containing mesenchymal stem cells and vancomycin alginate beads for treating bone infections and facilitating bone formation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tianyong; Xu, Jianzhong; Li, Qiang; Feng, Jianghua; Zen, Ling

    2008-07-01

    Bone infection and defects are two major problems that occur in the course of treating posttraumatic open bone fractures and osteomyelitis for which local antibiotic delivery is efficacious. Further, hemostasis is an essential treatment after removal of infected bones. Herein we report a new antibiotics delivery system made of vancomycin alginate beads embedded in a fibrin gel (Vanco-AB-FG) to treat bone infections, with the addition of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) seeded in the fibrin gel to promote bone formation. The proliferation of BMMSCs was measured under different conditions of three-dimensional (3D) gel or monolayer, with or without Vanco-AB; cells were labeled by enhanced green fluorescence protein, and their morphology and distribution were observed. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, real-time RT-PCR, and von Kossa staining were used for determining the osteogenic differentiation of BMMSCs. The concentrations of vancomycin resulting from the antibiotic delivery were determined; the antibiotic activity was evaluated by an assay with standard Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) as a biological target. The results showed that for Vanco-AB-FG, vancomycin concentrations remained above the breakpoint sensitivity for 22 days. The 3D culture within the gel and the addition of Vanco-AB affected the cell behavior. The morphology of BMMSCs within the 3D gel was different from that in monolayer. The proliferation of the cells within the 3D gel was lower than that in monolayer in early stage, but in later stage the number of BMMSCs in Vanco-AB-FG was similar to that in monolayer. The ALP activity was higher in the 3D gel, and the addition of Vanco-AB slightly increased ALP activity. The osteogenic gene expression levels of ALP, osteopontin, and alpha1 chain of collagen I were higher in the 3D gel than those in monolayer, and additional Vanco-AB could also increase their expression. The von Kossa staining showed that the deposition of

  18. Development of Multiple Antibiotic Resistance in Bacillus subtilis Cells Exposed to Microgravity: the BRIC-18 Experiment to the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Moeller, Ralf; Nicholson, Wayne; Narvel, Raed

    Increased pathogenicity of opportunistic bacteria during long-term spaceflight is considered an astronaut risk. Because only a limited pharmacy can be carried on long-duration missions, the development of resistance to multiple antibiotics is a concern for mission planning. In support of the BRIC-18 experiment to the ISS, we have performed ground-based experiments to address the question whether simulated microgravity affects the frequency of resistance to the model antibiotics rifampicin (RFM) and trimethoprim (TMP). In these experiments, the model bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were cultivated for 6 days at ISS ambient temperature in 10-ml High Aspect Ratio Vessels (HARVs) on two 4-place clinostats (Synthecon) oriented either vertically (V) or horizontally (H). Cells were harvested, enumerated and plated onto medium containing RFM (5 micrograms/ml). The frequency of mutation to RFM resistance was calculated, and RFM-resistant mutants were plated onto medium containing the second antibiotic, TMP (5 micrograms/ml) to determine the frequency of mutation to double (RFM+TMP) resistance. After 6 days of cultivation, V-cultures showed higher cell densities and than H-cultures for both bacteria. However, only in B. subtilis did V-cultures show higher frequencies of mutation to RFM resistance than H-cultures. Launch of BRIC-18 to the ISS is currently scheduled for March 16, 2014 and return 30 days later. Results from both the spaceflight and ground control experiments will be presented. Supported by NASA-SAIP fellowship to R.N. and NASA grant (NNX12AN70G) to P.F.-C., R.M., and W.L.N.

  19. Specific binding of nisin to the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II combines pore formation and inhibition of cell wall biosynthesis for potent antibiotic activity.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, I; Breukink, E; van Kraaij, C; Kuipers, O P; Bierbaum, G; de Kruijff, B; Sahl, H G

    2001-01-19

    Unlike numerous pore-forming amphiphilic peptide antibiotics, the lantibiotic nisin is active in nanomolar concentrations, which results from its ability to use the lipid-bound cell wall precursor lipid II as a docking molecule for subsequent pore formation. Here we use genetically engineered nisin variants to identify the structural requirements for the interaction of the peptide with lipid II. Mutations affecting the conformation of the N-terminal part of nisin comprising rings A through C, e.g. [S3T]nisin, led to reduced binding and increased the peptide concentration necessary for pore formation. The binding constant for the S3T mutant was 0.043 x 10(7) m(-1) compared with 2 x 10(7) m(-1) for the wild-type peptide, and the minimum concentration for pore formation increased from the 1 nm to the 50 nm range. In contrast, peptides mutated in the flexible hinge region, e.g. [DeltaN20/DeltaM21]nisin, were completely inactive in the pore formation assay, but were reduced to some extent in their in vivo activity. We found the remaining in vivo activity to result from the unaltered capacity of the mutated peptide to bind to lipid II and thus to inhibit its incorporation into the peptidoglycan network. Therefore, through interaction with the membrane-bound cell wall precursor lipid II, nisin inhibits peptidoglycan synthesis and forms highly specific pores. The combination of two killing mechanisms in one molecule potentiates antibiotic activity and results in nanomolar MIC values, a strategy that may well be worth considering for the construction of novel antibiotics.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against antibiotic-resistant strains of the cell wall-free bacteria Ureaplasma parvum and Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    PubMed

    Hillitt, K L; Jenkins, R E; Spiller, O B; Beeton, M L

    2017-03-01

    The susceptibility of the cell wall-free bacterial pathogens Ureaplasma spp. to Manuka honey was examined. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Manuka honey for four Ureaplasma urealyticum and four Ureaplasma parvum isolates was determined. Sensitivity to honey was also compared to clinical isolates with resistance to tetracycline, macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Finally step-wise resistance training was utilized in an attempt to induce increased tolerance to honey. The MIC was dependent on the initial bacterial load with 7·5 and 18·0% w/v honey required to inhibit U. urealyticum at 1 and 10(6) colour changing units (CCU), respectively, and 4·8 and 15·3% w/v required to inhibit U. parvum at 1 and 10(6)  CCU respectively. MIC values were consistently lower for U. parvum compared with U. urealyticum. Antimicrobial activity was seen against tetracycline-resistant, erythromycin-resistant and ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates at 10(5)  CCU. No resistance to honey was observed with 50 consecutive challenges at increasing concentrations of honey. This is the first report of the antimicrobial activity of Manuka honey against a cell wall-free bacterial pathogen. The antimicrobial activity was retained against antibiotic-resistant strains and it was not possible to generate resistant mutants.

  1. Antibiotic Capture by Bacterial Lipocalins Uncovers an Extracellular Mechanism of Intrinsic Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Klett, Javier; Ingram, Rebecca J; Loutet, Slade A; Murphy, Michael E P; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Valvano, Miguel A

    2017-03-14

    The potential for microbes to overcome antibiotics of different classes before they reach bacterial cells is largely unexplored. Here we show that a soluble bacterial lipocalin produced by Burkholderia cenocepacia upon exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations increases resistance to diverse antibiotics in vitro and in vivo These phenotypes were recapitulated by heterologous expression in B. cenocepacia of lipocalin genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Purified lipocalin bound different classes of bactericidal antibiotics and contributed to bacterial survival in vivo Experimental and X-ray crystal structure-guided computational studies revealed that lipocalins counteract antibiotic action by capturing antibiotics in the extracellular space. We also demonstrated that fat-soluble vitamins prevent antibiotic capture by binding bacterial lipocalin with higher affinity than antibiotics. Therefore, bacterial lipocalins contribute to antimicrobial resistance by capturing diverse antibiotics in the extracellular space at the site of infection, which can be counteracted by known vitamins.IMPORTANCE Current research on antibiotic action and resistance focuses on targeting essential functions within bacterial cells. We discovered a previously unrecognized mode of general bacterial antibiotic resistance operating in the extracellular space, which depends on bacterial protein molecules called lipocalins. These molecules are highly conserved in most bacteria and have the ability to capture different classes of antibiotics outside bacterial cells. We also discovered that liposoluble vitamins, such as vitamin E, overcome in vitro and in vivo antibiotic resistance mediated by bacterial lipocalins, providing an unexpected new alternative to combat resistance by using this vitamin or its derivatives as antibiotic adjuvants.

  2. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  3. Boosting bacterial metabolism to combat antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Prerna; Collins, James J

    2015-02-03

    The metabolic state of a bacterial cell influences its susceptibility to antibiotics. In this issue, Peng et al. (2015) show that resistant bacteria can be sensitized to antibiotic treatment through the addition of exogenous metabolites that stimulate central metabolic pathways and increase drug uptake.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  5. Assessment of yeast cell wall as replacements for antibiotic growth promoters in broiler diets: effects on performance, intestinal histo-morphology and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, T K; Haldar, S; Bedford, M R; Muthusami, N; Samanta, I

    2012-04-01

    The study compared the effects of an antibiotic growth promoter (AGP), yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and yeast cell wall (YCW) on performance, microbiology and histo-morphology of the small intestine and humoral immune responses in Ross 308 broilers. The treatments (eight replicates/treatment, n = 12/replicate) were negative control (NC, without AGP), positive control (PC, supplemented with bacitracin methylene disalicylate, 400 mg/kg), Y and YCW (supplemented with yeast and YCW, respectively, 1000 mg/kg). Live weight at 42 days improved (p = 0.086) in the PC, Y and YCW groups. Feed conversion ratio was better (p = 0.039) in the YCW group compared with the other groups. Antibiotic growth promoter in the PC group shortened the villi in duodenum (p = 0.044). Mucosal Escherichia coli number was higher in the PC group (p < 0.001), whereas in the digesta E. coli number was lower (p = 0.001) in the PC, Y and YCW groups in relation to the NC. Mucosal Salmonella populations increased (p = 0.0001) in the PC group, whereas in the digesta, all treatments reduced the Salmonella (p = 0.0001). Following oral challenge with Salmonella pullorum, YCW increased E. coli numbers on the mucosa (p < 0.001) whereas in the digesta the Y group had lower (p < 0.0001) number of E. coli. In the digesta, Salmonella count was lower in the YCW group compared with the other treatments (p < 0.01). Yeast cell wall -treated birds exhibited better (p < 0.05) humoral immune response against Newcastle disease which was far more persistent over time than in any other treatments. It was concluded that the yeast and the yeast cell wall may have effects identical to BMD on performance of broilers and thus may constitute an effective replacement strategy in the dietary regimens for broiler chickens.

  6. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  7. Bactericidal antibiotics induce programmed metabolic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Aislinn D.; Cabral, Damien J.; Belenky, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The misuse of antibiotics has led to the development and spread of antibiotic resistance in clinically important pathogens. These resistant infections are having a significant impact on treatment outcomes and contribute to approximately 25,000 deaths in the U.S. annually. If additional therapeutic options are not identified, the number of annual deaths is predicted to rise to 317,000 in North America and 10,000,000 worldwide by 2050. Identifying therapeutic methodologies that utilize our antibiotic arsenal more effectively is one potential way to extend the useful lifespan of our current antibiotics. Recent studies have indicated that modulating metabolic activity is one possible strategy that can impact the efficacy of antibiotic therapy. In this review, we will address recent advances in our knowledge about the impacts of bacterial metabolism on antibiotic effectiveness and the impacts of antibiotics on bacterial metabolism. We will particularly focus on two studies, Lobritz, et al. (PNAS, 112(27): 8173-8180) and Belenky et al. (Cell Reports, 13(5): 968-980) that together demonstrate that bactericidal antibiotics induce metabolic perturbations that are linked to and required for bactericidal antibiotic toxicity.

  8. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  9. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  10. Use of small-angle X-ray scattering to resolve intracellular structure changes of Escherichia coli cells induced by antibiotic treatment1

    PubMed Central

    von Gundlach, A. R.; Garamus, V. M.; Willey, T. M.; Ilavsky, J.; Hilpert, K.; Rosenhahn, A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to whole Escherichia coli cells is challenging owing to the variety of internal constituents. To resolve their contributions, the outer shape was captured by ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering and combined with the internal structure resolved by SAXS. Building on these data, a model for the major structural components of E. coli was developed. It was possible to deduce information on the occupied volume, occurrence and average size of the most important intracellular constituents: ribosomes, DNA and proteins. E. coli was studied after treatment with three different antibiotic agents (chloramphenicol, tetracycline and rifampicin) and the impact on the intracellular constituents was monitored. PMID:27980516

  11. Antibiotics: a new hope.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2012-01-27

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant challenges to the health care sector in the 21st century. A myriad of resistance mechanisms have emerged over the past decades and are widely disseminated worldwide through bacterial populations. At the same time there have been ever fewer new antibiotics brought to market, and the pharmaceutical industry increasingly sees antibiotics as a poor investment. Paradoxically, we are in a Golden Age of understanding how antibiotics work and where resistance comes from. This knowledge is fueling a renaissance of interest and innovation in antibiotic discovery, synthesis, and mechanism that is poised to inform drug discovery to address pressing clinical needs.

  12. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  13. Appropriate Antibiotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Allison, Michael G; Heil, Emily L; Hayes, Bryan D

    2017-02-01

    Prescribing antibiotics is an essential component of initial therapy in sepsis. Early antibiotics are an important component of therapy, but speed of administration should not overshadow the patient-specific characteristics that determine the optimal breadth of antimicrobial therapy. Cultures should be drawn before antibiotic therapy if it does not significantly delay administration. Combination antibiotic therapy against gram-negative infections is not routinely required, and combination therapy involving vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam is associated with an increase in acute kidney injury. Emergency practitioners should be aware of special considerations in the administration and dosing of antibiotics in order to deliver optimal care to septic patients.

  14. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  15. Relative sensitivity of fish and mammalian cells to the antibiotic, trimethoprim: cytotoxic and genotoxic responses as determined by neutral red retention, Comet and micronucleus assays.

    PubMed

    Papis, Elena; Davies, Simon J; Jha, Awadhesh N

    2011-01-01

    Relative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of a widely used antibiotic, trimethoprim (TRIMP) was evaluated under in vitro conditions using rainbow trout gonad-2 (RTG-2) and Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO-K1) cells. Whilst cytotoxicity was determined using neutral red retention (NRR) assay, the genotoxicity was determined using single cell gel electrophoresis or the Comet assay and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. For NRR assay, concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect was observed for both the cell lines (estimated EC(50) values: 671.82 ± 21.78 and 611.6 ± 20.4 μg ml(-1) for RTG-2 and CHO-K1 cells, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between the two cell lines for this assay. For the Comet assay, standard 6 h exposure to TRIMP did not show any positive response for any of the cell types used. However, 48 h exposure to RTG-2 cells showed a concentration-dependent induction of DNA damage (r = 0.86). The highest concentration of TRIMP used (i.e. 100 μg ml(-1)) showed relatively higher DNA damage, compared to ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS; 1 μg ml(-1) or 8 mM), a reference genotoxic agent, used concurrently. In contrast, 24 h exposure time for CHO-K1 cells did not show any concentration-dependent increase for this assay. For MN assay, a significant correlation was found between the MN induction and TRIMP concentration for both the cell lines (RTG-2: r = 0.68; CHO-K1: r = 0.79), although only the highest concentration used showed a significant increase for binucleated (BN) cell with micronuclei (BNMN). The study suggests that whilst the cells of different origin could exhibit similar cytotoxicity, they could display differential genotoxic effects. Furthermore, genotoxic effects of TRIMP are primarily exposure period dependent phenomena and, in addition to inhibiting the action of dihydrofolate reductase, oxidative stress could also contribute for the observed toxic effects, fish cells in general being more sensitive for genotoxic

  16. Antibiotic efficacy is linked to bacterial cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Lobritz, Michael A; Belenky, Peter; Porter, Caroline B M; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Yang, Jason H; Schwarz, Eric G; Dwyer, Daniel J; Khalil, Ahmad S; Collins, James J

    2015-07-07

    Bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotic treatments result in two fundamentally different phenotypic outcomes--the inhibition of bacterial growth or, alternatively, cell death. Most antibiotics inhibit processes that are major consumers of cellular energy output, suggesting that antibiotic treatment may have important downstream consequences on bacterial metabolism. We hypothesized that the specific metabolic effects of bacteriostatic and bactericidal antibiotics contribute to their overall efficacy. We leveraged the opposing phenotypes of bacteriostatic and bactericidal drugs in combination to investigate their activity. Growth inhibition from bacteriostatic antibiotics was associated with suppressed cellular respiration whereas cell death from most bactericidal antibiotics was associated with accelerated respiration. In combination, suppression of cellular respiration by the bacteriostatic antibiotic was the dominant effect, blocking bactericidal killing. Global metabolic profiling of bacteriostatic antibiotic treatment revealed that accumulation of metabolites involved in specific drug target activity was linked to the buildup of energy metabolites that feed the electron transport chain. Inhibition of cellular respiration by knockout of the cytochrome oxidases was sufficient to attenuate bactericidal lethality whereas acceleration of basal respiration by genetically uncoupling ATP synthesis from electron transport resulted in potentiation of the killing effect of bactericidal antibiotics. This work identifies a link between antibiotic-induced cellular respiration and bactericidal lethality and demonstrates that bactericidal activity can be arrested by attenuated respiration and potentiated by accelerated respiration. Our data collectively show that antibiotics perturb the metabolic state of bacteria and that the metabolic state of bacteria impacts antibiotic efficacy.

  17. Gastrointestinal syndrome and mucosal clonogenic cells: relationships between target cell sensitivities, LD/sub 50/ and cell survival, and their modification by antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, J.H.; Potten, C.S.; Roberts, N.P.

    1983-10-01

    The sensitivity of the target cells responsible for the gastrointestinal syndrome in mice was deduced from the steepness of the dose-survival curve for mice assessed on Day 7 after irradiation. The D/sub 0/ value was 1.25 +- 0.22 Gy, virtually identical to the value of 1.23 +- 0.08 measured for microcolony-forming cells (clonogens) over about the same range of dose in concurrent experiments. The survival of clonogens was similar when assayed in mice surviving to Days 3, 4, or 5, but clonogenic sensitivity was lower when assessed on Day 7. This was shown at one dose to be due largely to a selection of mice with high colony counts with only a small contribution from crypt budding. The LD/sub 50/ for mice corresponded to a surviving fraction of crypts of about 0.35. An injection of 5 mg streptomycin sulphate ip daily for 5 days after irradition increased the latent period by about 1 day, increased the LD/sub 50/ by about 1.4 Gy, but did not significantly change the survival of clonogens. These studies are the first to test and satisfy the interpretation of a dose-response curve for animal survival in terms of target cell survival, where measurements of both are made over a similar range of dose in concurrent experiments.

  18. Two Small RNAs Conserved in Enterobacteriaceae Provide Intrinsic Resistance to Antibiotics Targeting the Cell Wall Biosynthesis Enzyme Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muna A.; Göpel, Yvonne; Milewski, Slawomir; Görke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Formation of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) by enzyme GlcN6P synthase (GlmS) represents the first step in bacterial cell envelope synthesis. In Escherichia coli, expression of glmS is controlled by small RNAs (sRNAs) GlmY and GlmZ. GlmZ activates the glmS mRNA by base-pairing. When not required, GlmZ is bound by adapter protein RapZ and recruited to cleavage by RNase E inactivating the sRNA. The homologous sRNA GlmY activates glmS indirectly. When present at high levels, GlmY sequesters RapZ by an RNA mimicry mechanism suppressing cleavage of GlmZ. The interplay of both sRNAs is believed to adjust GlmS synthesis to the needs of the cell, i.e., to achieve GlcN6P homeostasis. Bacilysin (tetaine) and Nva-FMDP are dipeptide antibiotics that impair cell envelope synthesis by inhibition of enzyme GlmS through covalent modification. However, although taken up efficiently, these antibiotics are less active against E. coli for reasons unknown so far. Here we show that the GlmY/GlmZ circuit provides resistance. Inhibition of GlmS causes GlcN6P deprivation leading to activation of GlmY and GlmZ, which in turn trigger glmS overexpression in a dosage-dependent manner. Mutation of glmY or glmZ disables this response and renders the bacteria highly susceptible to GlmS inhibitors. Thus, E. coli compensates inhibition of GlmS by increasing its synthesis through the GlmY/GlmZ pathway. This mechanism is also operative in Salmonella indicating that it is conserved in Enterobacteriaceae possessing these sRNAs. As GlmY apparently responds to GlcN6P, co-application of a non-metabolizable GlcN6P analog may prevent activation of the sRNAs and thereby increase the bactericidal activity of GlmS inhibitors against wild-type bacteria. Initial experiments using glucosamine-6-sulfate support this possibility. Thus, GlcN6P analogs might be considered for co-application with GlmS inhibitors in combined therapy to treat infections caused by pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27379045

  19. [Antibiotic prophylaxis before kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Robles, N R; Gallego, E; Anaya, F; Franco, A; Valderrábano, F

    1990-02-01

    The effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period of renal transplantation (RT). Before RT, the patients were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: 1) cefotaxime (intravenous infusion of 1 g one hour before the operation). 2) Ceftriaxone (1 g i.v. given in a similar way). 3) Control (without antibiotics). Patients who required antibiotic therapy during the first 3 postoperative weeks were excluded. 20 recipients of cadaveric renal grafts were included in each group. There were 39 males and 21 females with a mean age of 39.9 years. One patient from the cefotaxime group (5%), 2 from the ceftriaxone group (10%) and 2 from the control group (10%) developed infection of the surgical wound, all due to grampositive organisms. 19 patients had urinary tract infections: 7 from the control group (35%), 7 from the cefotaxime group (35%), and 5 from the ceftriaxone group (25%). The development of wound infection was not correlated with urea, creatinine, hemoglobin or total protein levels, or with urinary tract infection or fistula, diabetes or fever. The mean packed red cell volume of the patients who developed wound infection was 24.7 +/- 1.2 vs 28.6 +/- 6.6 in those who did not (p less than 0.01). All patients with visible hematoma and 3 of 10 with perirenal blood collection had wound infection. It was concluded that antibiotic prophylaxis for renal transplantation was useless in our patients.

  20. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant.

  1. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  2. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent “population biologies.” Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of “clinical” antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  3. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P; Coque, Teresa M

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent "population biologies." Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of "clinical" antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  4. Bacterial Cheating Limits the Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Xiao Chao, Hui; Datta, Manoshi; Artemova, Tatiana; Gore, Jeff

    2012-02-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removal of the antibiotic. The presence of a cooperative mechanism of resistance suggests that a cheater strain - which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic - may be able to take advantage of resistant cells. We find experimentally that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We use a simple model in conjunction with difference equations to explain the observed population dynamics as a function of cell density and antibiotic concentration. Our experimental difference equations resemble the logistic map, raising the possibility of oscillations or even chaotic dynamics.

  5. A multiplexed microfluidic platform for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Ritika; Mukherjee, Arnab; Sevgen, Selami E; Sanpitakseree, Chotitath; Lee, Jaebum; Schroeder, Charles M; Kenis, Paul J A

    2013-11-15

    Effective treatment of clinical infections is critically dependent on the ability to rapidly screen patient samples to identify antibiograms of infecting pathogens. Existing methods for antibiotic susceptibility testing suffer from several disadvantages, including long turnaround times, excess sample and reagent consumption, poor detection sensitivity, and limited combinatorial capabilities. Unfortunately, these factors preclude the timely administration of appropriate antibiotics, complicating management of infections and exacerbating the development of antibiotic resistance. Here, we seek to address these issues by developing a microfluidic platform that relies on fluorescence detection of bacteria that express green fluorescent protein for highly sensitive and rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing. This platform possesses several advantages compared to conventional methods: (1) analysis of antibiotic action in two to four hours, (2) enhanced detection sensitivity (≈ 1 cell), (3) minimal consumption of cell samples and antibiotic reagents (<6 µL), and (4) improved portability through the implementation of normally closed valves. We employed this platform to quantify the effects of four antibiotics (ampicillin, cefalexin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline) and their combinations on Escherichia coli. Within four hours, the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics can be determined by detecting variations in maxima of local fluorescence intensity over time. As expected, cell density is a major determinant of antibiotic efficacy. Our results also revealed that combinations of three or more antibiotics are not necessarily better for eradicating pathogens compared to pairs of antibiotics. Overall, this microfluidic based biosensor technology has the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies by identifying the antibiograms of pathogens.

  6. Coping with antibiotic resistance: combining nanoparticles with antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Kon, Kateryna Volodymyrivna; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Bagirova, Malahat; Rafailovich, Miriam

    2011-11-01

    The worldwide escalation of bacterial resistance to conventional medical antibiotics is a serious concern for modern medicine. High prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria among bacteria-based infections decreases effectiveness of current treatments and causes thousands of deaths. New improvements in present methods and novel strategies are urgently needed to cope with this problem. Owing to their antibacterial activities, metallic nanoparticles represent an effective solution for overcoming bacterial resistance. However, metallic nanoparticles are toxic, which causes restrictions in their use. Recent studies have shown that combining nanoparticles with antibiotics not only reduces the toxicity of both agents towards human cells by decreasing the requirement for high dosages but also enhances their bactericidal properties. Combining antibiotics with nanoparticles also restores their ability to destroy bacteria that have acquired resistance to them. Furthermore, nanoparticles tagged with antibiotics have been shown to increase the concentration of antibiotics at the site of bacterium-antibiotic interaction, and to facilitate binding of antibiotics to bacteria. Likewise, combining nanoparticles with antimicrobial peptides and essential oils generates genuine synergy against bacterial resistance. In this article, we aim to summarize recent studies on interactions between nanoparticles and antibiotics, as well as other antibacterial agents to formulate new prospects for future studies. Based on the promising data that demonstrated the synergistic effects of antimicrobial agents with nanoparticles, we believe that this combination is a potential candidate for more research into treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

  7. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  8. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  9. Setamycin, a new antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Otoguro, K; Nishikiori, T; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y

    1981-10-01

    A new antibiotic, setamycin, was extracted from the mycelia of a rare actinomycete strain KM-6054. The antibiotic, the molecular formula of which was found to be C42H61NO12 (tentative), is a yellow powder showing activity against some fungi, trichomonads and weakly against Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. [Side effects of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Hoigné, R

    1975-03-01

    The clinically severe and newer forms of antibiotic side effects are reviewed. The study covers the following antibiotics: penicillins, cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and polymyxins, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol and thiamphenicol, macrolides and lincomycin, rifamycins and sulfonamides. Special reference is made to (1) hematologic side effects, and (2) general evaluation of drug reactions. The relationship between reaction time and clinical symptoms is of particular practical significance.

  11. History of Antibiotics Research.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  12. Origin of diderm (Gram-negative) bacteria: antibiotic selection pressure rather than endosymbiosis likely led to the evolution of bacterial cells with two membranes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2011-08-01

    The prokaryotic organisms can be divided into two main groups depending upon whether their cell envelopes contain one membrane (monoderms) or two membranes (diderms). It is important to understand how these and other variations that are observed in the cell envelopes of prokaryotic organisms have originated. In 2009, James Lake proposed that cells with two membranes (primarily Gram-negative bacteria) originated from an ancient endosymbiotic event involving an Actinobacteria and a Clostridia (Lake 2009). However, this Perspective argues that this proposal is based on a number of incorrect assumptions and the data presented in support of this model are also of questionable nature. Thus, there is no reliable evidence to support the endosymbiotic origin of double membrane bacteria. In contrast, many observations suggest that antibiotic selection pressure was an important selective force in prokaryotic evolution and that it likely played a central role in the evolution of diderm (Gram-negative) bacteria. Some bacterial phyla, such as Deinococcus-Thermus, which lack lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and yet contain some characteristics of the diderm bacteria, are postulated as evolutionary intermediates (simple diderms) in the transition between the monoderm bacterial taxa and the bacterial groups that have the archetypal LPS-containing outer cell membrane found in Gram-negative bacteria. It is possible to distinguish the two stages in the evolution of diderm-LPS cells (viz. monoderm bacteria → simple diderms lacking LPS → LPS containing archetypal diderm bacteria) by means of conserved inserts in the Hsp70 and Hsp60 proteins. The insert in the Hsp60 protein also distinguishes the traditional Gram-negative diderm bacterial phyla from atypical taxa of diderm bacteria (viz. Negativicutes, Fusobacteria, Synergistetes and Elusimicrobia). The Gram-negative bacterial phyla with an LPS-diderm cell envelope, as defined by the presence of the Hsp60 insert, are indicated to form a

  13. [Antibiotics and gait disorders].

    PubMed

    Gomez-Porro, P; Vinagre-Aragon, A; Zabala-Goiburu, J A

    2016-12-01

    The neurological toxicity of many antibiotics has been reported in a number of articles and clinical notes. In this review antibiotics are classified according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that can give rise to a gait disorder, taking both clinical and experimental data into account. An exhaustive search was conducted in Google Scholar and PubMed with the aim of finding reviews, articles and clinical cases dealing with gait disorders secondary to different antibiotics. The different antibiotics were separated according to the physiopathogenic mechanism that could cause them to trigger a gait disorder. They were classified into antibiotics capable of producing cerebellar ataxia, vestibular ataxia, sensitive ataxia or an extrapyramidal gait disorder. The main aim was to group all the drugs that can give rise to a gait disorder, in order to facilitate the clinical suspicion and, consequently, the management of patients.

  14. Antibiotic use in neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yurdakök, M

    1998-01-01

    some centers, third-generation cephalosporins in combinations with penicillin or ampicillin have been used in the initial therapy of early-onset and late-onset neonatal sepsis. Third-generation cephalosporin may also be combined with an aminoglycoside in places where aminoglycoside-resistance to this antibiotic is high. However, third-generation cephalosporins should not be used in the initial therapy of suspected sepsis, because 1) extensive use of cephalosporins for initial therapy of neonatal sepsis may lead to the emergence of drug-resistant microorganisms (this has occurred more rapidly as compared with the aminoglycosides), 2) Antagonistic interactions have been demonstrated when the other beta-lactam antibiotics (e.g. penicillins) were combined with cephalosporins. Infections due to gram-negative bacilli can be treated with the combination of a penicillin-derivative (ampicillin or extended-spectrum penicillins) and an aminoglycoside. Third-generation cephalosporins in combination with an aminoglycoside or an extended-spectrum penicillin have been used in the treatment of sepsis due to these organisms. Piperacillin and azlocillin are the most active of extended-spectrum penicillins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among the third-generation cephalosporins, cefoperazone and ceftazidime possess anti-Pseudomonas activity. Ceftazidime was found to be more active in vitro against Pseudomonas than cefoperazone or piperacillin. New antibiotics for gram-negative bacteria resistant to other agents are carbapenems, aztreonam, quinolones and isepamicin. Enterococci can be treated with a cell wall-active agent (e.g. penicillin, ampicillin, or vancomycin) and an aminoglycoside. Staphylococci are susceptible to penicillinase-resistant penicillins (e.g. oxacillin, nafcillin and methicillin). Resistant strains are uniformly sensitive to vancomycin. A penicillin or vancomycin and an aminoglycoside combination result in a more rapid bacteriocidal effect than is produced by either

  15. Antibiotic resistance in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Carlota; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Bacterial infection is one of the most frequent complications in cancer patients and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In recent years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance has become a significant problem worldwide, and cancer patients are among those affected. Treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria represents a clinical challenge, especially in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, since the therapeutic options are often very limited. As the antibiotics active against MDR bacteria present several disadvantages (limited clinical experience, higher incidence of adverse effects, and less knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of the drug), a thorough acquaintance with the main characteristics of these drugs is mandatory in order to provide safe treatment to cancer patients with MDR bacterial infections. Nevertheless, the implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs and infection control measures is the cornerstone for controlling the development and spread of these MDR pathogens.

  16. Using Chemical Reaction Kinetics to Predict Optimal Antibiotic Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Cohen, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Identifying optimal dosing of antibiotics has proven challenging—some antibiotics are most effective when they are administered periodically at high doses, while others work best when minimizing concentration fluctuations. Mechanistic explanations for why antibiotics differ in their optimal dosing are lacking, limiting our ability to predict optimal therapy and leading to long and costly experiments. We use mathematical models that describe both bacterial growth and intracellular antibiotic-target binding to investigate the effects of fluctuating antibiotic concentrations on individual bacterial cells and bacterial populations. We show that physicochemical parameters, e.g. the rate of drug transmembrane diffusion and the antibiotic-target complex half-life are sufficient to explain which treatment strategy is most effective. If the drug-target complex dissociates rapidly, the antibiotic must be kept constantly at a concentration that prevents bacterial replication. If antibiotics cross bacterial cell envelopes slowly to reach their target, there is a delay in the onset of action that may be reduced by increasing initial antibiotic concentration. Finally, slow drug-target dissociation and slow diffusion out of cells act to prolong antibiotic effects, thereby allowing for less frequent dosing. Our model can be used as a tool in the rational design of treatment for bacterial infections. It is easily adaptable to other biological systems, e.g. HIV, malaria and cancer, where the effects of physiological fluctuations of drug concentration are also poorly understood. PMID:28060813

  17. Overproduction of individual gas vesicle proteins perturbs flotation, antibiotic production and cell division in the enterobacterium Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    PubMed

    Monson, Rita E; Tashiro, Yosuke; Salmond, George P C

    2016-09-01

    Gas vesicles are intracellular proteinaceous organelles that facilitate bacterial colonization of static water columns. In the enterobacterium Serratia sp. ATCC 39006, gas vesicle formation requires the proteins GvpA1, GvpF1, GvpG, GvpA2, GvpK, GvpA3, GvpF2 and GvpF3 and the three gas vesicle regulatory proteins GvrA, GvrB and GvrC. Deletion of gvpC alters gas vesicle robustness and deletion of gvpN or gvpV results in small bicone vesicles. In this work, we assessed the impacts on gas vesicle formation when each of these 14 essential proteins was overexpressed. Overproduction of GvpF1, GvpF2, GvrA, GvrB or GvrC all resulted in significantly reduced gas vesicle synthesis. Perturbations in gas vesicle formation were also observed when GvpV and GvpA3 were in excess. In addition to impacts on gas vesicle formation, overproduction of GvrA or GvrB led to elevated biosynthesis of the tripyrrole pigment, prodigiosin, a secondary metabolite of increasing medical interest due to its antimalarial and anticancer properties. Finally, when GvpG was overexpressed, gas vesicles were still produced, but the cells exhibited a growth defect. Further analysis showed that induction of GvpG arrested cell growth and caused a drop in viable count, suggesting a possible physiological role for this protein linking gas vesicle biogenesis and binary fission. These combined results demonstrate that the stoichiometry of individual gas vesicle proteins is crucially important for controlled organelle morphogenesis and flotation and provides evidence for the first link between gas vesicle assembly and cell division, to our knowledge.

  18. Engineering persister-specific antibiotics with synergistic antimicrobial functions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Nathan W; Deshayes, Stephanie; Hawker, Sinead; Blacker, Alyssa; Kasko, Andrea M; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-23

    Most antibiotics target growth processes and are ineffective against persister bacterial cells, which tolerate antibiotics due to their reduced metabolic activity. These persisters act as a genetic reservoir for resistant mutants and constitute a root cause of antibiotic resistance, a worldwide problem in human health. We re-engineer antibiotics specifically for persisters using tobramycin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic that targets bacterial ribosomes but is ineffective against persisters with low metabolic and cellular transport activity. By giving tobramycin the ability to induce nanoscopic negative Gaussian membrane curvature via addition of 12 amino acids, we transform tobramycin itself into a transporter sequence. The resulting molecule spontaneously permeates membranes, retains the high antibiotic activity of aminoglycosides, kills E. coli and S. aureus persisters 4-6 logs better than tobramycin, but remains noncytotoxic to eukaryotes. These results suggest a promising paradigm to renovate traditional antibiotics.

  19. Sodium alginate-cross-linked polymyxin B sulphate-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles: Antibiotic resistance tests and HaCat and NIH/3T3 cell viability studies.

    PubMed

    Severino, Patrícia; Chaud, Marco V; Shimojo, Andrea; Antonini, Danilo; Lancelloti, Marcelo; Santana, Maria Helena A; Souto, Eliana B

    2015-05-01

    Polymyxins are a group of antibiotics with a common structure of a cyclic peptide with a long hydrophobic tail. Polymyxin B sulphate (PLX) has cationic charge, which is an obstacle for the efficient loading into Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLN). In the present paper, we describe an innovative method to load PLX into SLN to achieve the sustained release of the drug. PLX was firstly cross-linked with sodium alginate (SA) at different ratios (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 SA/PLX), and loaded into SLN produced by high pressure homogenization (HPH). Optimized SLN were produced applying 500bar pressure and 5 homogenization cycles. The best results were obtained with SA/PLX (1:1), recording 99.08±1.2% for the association efficiency of the drug with SA, 0.99±10g for the loading capacity and 212.07±5.84% degree of swelling. The rheological profile of aqueous SA solution followed the typical behaviour of concentrated polymeric solutions, whereas aqueous SA/PLX solution exhibited a gel-like dynamic behaviour. Micrographs show that SA/PLX depicted a porous and discontinuous amorphous phase in different ratios. The encapsulation efficiency of SA/PLX (1:1) in SLN, the mean particle diameter, polydispersity index and zeta potential were, respectively, 82.7±5.5%; 439.5±20.42nm, 0.241±0.050 and -34.8±0.55mV. The effect of SLN on cell viability was checked in HaCat and NIH/3T3 cell lines, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. SA/PLX-loaded SLN were shown to be less toxic than free PLX. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) showed the presence of the cross-linker polymer-drug complex, and SLN were shown to enhance MIC in the evaluated strains.

  20. Therapeutic effects of gold nanoparticles synthesized using Musa paradisiaca peel extract against multiple antibiotic resistant Enterococcus faecalis biofilms and human lung cancer cells (A549).

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, S; Vaseeharan, B; Malaikozhundan, B; Gopi, N; Ekambaram, P; Pachaiappan, R; Velusamy, P; Murugan, K; Benelli, G; Suresh Kumar, R; Suriyanarayanamoorthy, M

    2017-01-01

    Botanical-mediated synthesis of nanomaterials is currently emerging as a cheap and eco-friendly nanotechnology, since it does not involve the use of toxic chemicals. In the present study, we focused on the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using the aqueous peel extract of Musa paradisiaca (MPPE-AuNPs) following a facile and cheap fabrication process. The green synthesized MPPE-AuNPs were bio-physically characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR, XRD, TEM, Zeta potential analysis and EDX. MPPE-AuNPs were crystalline in nature, spherical to triangular in shape, with particle size ranging within 50 nm. The biofilm inhibition activity of MPPE-AuNPs was higher against multiple antibiotic resistant (MARS) Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis. Light and confocal laser scanning microscopic observations evidenced that the MPPE-AuNPs effectively inhibited the biofilm of E. faecalis when tested at 100 μg mL(-1). Cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that MPPE-AuNPs were effective in inhibiting the viability of human A549 lung cancer cells at higher concentrations of 100 μg mL(-1). The morphological changes in the MPPE-AuNPs treated A549 lung cancer cells were visualized under phase-contrast microscopy. Furthermore, the ecotoxicity of MPPE-AuNPs on the freshwater micro crustacean Ceriodaphnia cornuta were evaluated. Notably, no mortality was recorded in MPPE-AuNPs treated C. cornuta at 250 μg mL(-1). This study concludes that MPPE-AuNPs are non-toxic, eco-friendly and act as a multipurpose potential biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  1. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) enterococci are important nosocomial pathogens and a growing clinical challenge. These organisms have developed resistance to virtually all antimicrobials currently used in clinical practice using a diverse number of genetic strategies. Due to this ability to recruit antibiotic resistance determinants, MDR enterococci display a wide repertoire of antibiotic resistance mechanisms including modification of drug targets, inactivation of therapeutic agents, overexpression of efflux pumps and a sophisticated cell envelope adaptive response that promotes survival in the human host and the nosocomial environment. MDR enterococci are well adapted to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and can become the dominant flora under antibiotic pressure, predisposing the severely ill and immunocompromised patient to invasive infections. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci is the first step for devising strategies to control the spread of these organisms and potentially establish novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25199988

  2. Local antibiotic delivery with bovine cancellous chips.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine S; Katz, Jordan; Baker, Maribel I; Supronowicz, Peter R; Gill, Elise; Cobb, Ronald R

    2011-11-01

    Infected bone defects and osteomyelitis are encountered frequently in trauma cases. Currently, the standard of care for osteomyelitis cases is prolonged systemic antibiotic therapy and implantation of antibiotic carrier beads. However, this method requires a secondary surgery to remove the beads after the infection has cleared. In the present study a common bone void filler was investigated for its ability to be infused with an antibiotic. This study demonstrates that the xenograft material tested can be loaded with gentamicin and release clinically relevant levels of the drug for at least 14 days in vitro allowing for the inhibition of bacterial growth on the graft. This study also demonstrates that the levels of gentamicin released did not have an adverse effect on primary osteoblast cell proliferation or ability to generate alkaline phosphatase. This bone void filler may represent a viable alternative to current methods of local antibiotic delivery in orthopedic applications.

  3. Antibiotics conspicuously affect community profiles and richness, but not the density of bacterial cells associated with mucosa in the large and small intestines of mice.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Nathan J; Uwiera, Richard R E; Yanke, L Jay; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-02-01

    The influence of three antibiotics (bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate) on the mucosa-associated enteric microbiota and the intestines of mice was examined. Antibiotics caused conspicuous enlargement of ceca and an increase in overall length of the intestine. However, there were no pathologic changes associated with increased cecal size or length of the intestine. Conspicuous reductions in the richness of mucosa-associated bacteria and changes to community profiles within the small (duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum) and large (cecum, ascending colon, and descending colon) intestine occurred in mice administered antibiotics. Communities in antibiotic-treated mice were dominated by a limited number of Clostridium-like (i.e. clostridial cluster XIVa) and Bacteroides species. The richness of mucosa-associated communities within the small and large intestine increased during the 14-day recovery period. However, community profiles within the large intestine did not return to baseline (i.e. relative to the control). Although antibiotic administration greatly reduced bacterial richness, densities of mucosa-associated bacteria were not reduced correspondingly. These data showed that the antibiotics, bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate, administered for 21 days to mice did not sterilize the intestine, but did impart a tremendous and prolonged impact on mucosa-associated bacterial communities throughout the small and large intestine.

  4. Sampling the antibiotic resistome.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; McGrann, Katherine M; Hughes, Donald W; Wright, Gerard D

    2006-01-20

    Microbial resistance to antibiotics currently spans all known classes of natural and synthetic compounds. It has not only hindered our treatment of infections but also dramatically reshaped drug discovery, yet its origins have not been systematically studied. Soil-dwelling bacteria produce and encounter a myriad of antibiotics, evolving corresponding sensing and evading strategies. They are a reservoir of resistance determinants that can be mobilized into the microbial community. Study of this reservoir could provide an early warning system for future clinically relevant antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

  5. Antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia species.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine A; Schweizer, Herbert P

    2016-09-01

    The genus Burkholderia comprises metabolically diverse and adaptable Gram-negative bacteria, which thrive in often adversarial environments. A few members of the genus are prominent opportunistic pathogens. These include Burkholderia mallei and Burkholderia pseudomallei of the B. pseudomallei complex, which cause glanders and melioidosis, respectively. Burkholderia cenocepacia, Burkholderia multivorans, and Burkholderia vietnamiensis belong to the Burkholderia cepacia complex and affect mostly cystic fibrosis patients. Infections caused by these bacteria are difficult to treat because of significant antibiotic resistance. The first line of defense against antimicrobials in Burkholderia species is the outer membrane penetration barrier. Most Burkholderia contain a modified lipopolysaccharide that causes intrinsic polymyxin resistance. Contributing to reduced drug penetration are restrictive porin proteins. Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation cell division family are major players in Burkholderia multidrug resistance. Third and fourth generation β-lactam antibiotics are seminal for treatment of Burkholderia infections, but therapeutic efficacy is compromised by expression of several β-lactamases and ceftazidime target mutations. Altered DNA gyrase and dihydrofolate reductase targets cause fluoroquinolone and trimethoprim resistance, respectively. Although antibiotic resistance hampers therapy of Burkholderia infections, the characterization of resistance mechanisms lags behind other non-enteric Gram-negative pathogens, especially ESKAPE bacteria such as Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  6. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  7. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  8. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  9. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  10. Structural variations of the cell wall precursor lipid II and their influence on binding and activity of the lipoglycopeptide antibiotic oritavancin.

    PubMed

    Münch, Daniela; Engels, Ina; Müller, Anna; Reder-Christ, Katrin; Falkenstein-Paul, Hildegard; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Grein, Fabian; Bendas, Gerd; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schneider, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    Oritavancin is a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin with activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and enterococci. Compared to vancomycin, oritavancin is characterized by the presence of two additional residues, a hydrophobic 4'-chlorobiphenyl methyl moiety and a 4-epi-vancosamine substituent, which is also present in chloroeremomycin. Here, we show that oritavancin and its des-N-methylleucyl variant (des-oritavancin) effectively inhibit lipid I- and lipid II-consuming peptidoglycan biosynthesis reactions in vitro. In contrast to that for vancomycin, the binding affinity of oritavancin to the cell wall precursor lipid II appears to involve, in addition to the D-Ala-D-Ala terminus, other species-specific binding sites of the lipid II molecule, i.e., the crossbridge and D-isoglutamine in position 2 of the lipid II stem peptide, both characteristic for a number of Gram-positive pathogens, including staphylococci and enterococci. Using purified lipid II and modified lipid II variants, we studied the impact of these modifications on the binding of oritavancin and compared it to those of vancomycin, chloroeremomycin, and des-oritavancin. Analysis of the binding parameters revealed that additional intramolecular interactions of oritavancin with the peptidoglycan precursor appear to compensate for the loss of a crucial hydrogen bond in vancomycin-resistant strains, resulting in enhanced binding affinity. Augmenting previous findings, we show that amidation of the lipid II stem peptide predominantly accounts for the increased binding of oritavancin to the modified intermediates ending in D-Ala-D-Lac. Corroborating our conclusions, we further provide biochemical evidence for the phenomenon of the antagonistic effects of mecA and vanA resistance determinants in Staphylococcus aureus, thus partially explaining the low frequency of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) acquiring high

  11. [The history of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  12. Teichoic acid biosynthesis as an antibiotic target.

    PubMed

    Pasquina, Lincoln W; Santa Maria, John P; Walker, Suzanne

    2013-10-01

    The relentless spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens makes it imperative to develop new chemotherapeutic strategies to overcome infection. The bacterial cell wall has served as a rich source for both validated and unexploited pathways that are essential for virulence and survival. Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) are cell wall polymers that play fundamental roles in Gram-positive bacterial physiology and pathogenesis, and both have been proposed as novel antibacterial targets. Here we describe recent progress toward the discovery of teichoic acid biosynthesis inhibitors and their potential as antibiotics to combat Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  13. Auxotrophic markers pyrF and proC can replace antibiotic markers on protein production plasmids in high-cell-density Pseudomonas fluorescens fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jane C; Jenings, Annika F; Mun, Deborah M; McGovern, Patricia M; Chew, Lawrence C

    2005-01-01

    The use of antibiotic-resistance genes as selectable markers in transgenic organisms is coming under increased scrutiny, for fear that they may spread to human pathogens, thereby reducing the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A current Pseudomonas fluorescens protein expression system uses a tetracycline resistance gene (tetR/tetA) to maintain an expression plasmid under control of a repressible promoter and a kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) to maintain a plasmid carrying a repressor gene. We investigated using auxotrophic markers to replace these two antibiotic resistance genes: pyrF (encoding orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase) in place of tetR/tetA and proC (encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase) in place of kanR, complementing their respective precise chromosomal deletions created by allele exchange using a suicide vector carrying pyrF as a counterselectable marker. The resulting strains, devoid of antibiotic-resistance genes, were shown to achieve high productivity of nitrilase and thermostable alpha-amylase equal to that of the former antibiotic-resistant production host. The production plasmids were stable. The pyrF (uracil-dependent) background of the production host strain also allows us to sequentially alter the genome to incorporate other desired genomic changes, deletions, or insertions using 5'-fluoroorotic acid counterselection, restoring the selectable marker after each step.

  14. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  15. Strategies to minimize antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-09-12

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics.

  16. Antibacterial Compounds of Canadian Honeys Target Bacterial Cell Wall Inducing Phenotype Changes, Growth Inhibition and Cell Lysis That Resemble Action of β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin

    2014-01-01

    Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001). E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β–lactamase) remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β–lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and survival, honey

  17. Rapid methods for detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    March-Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto

    2017-03-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. Here we review the main techniques for rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, microarrays, commercial methods used in work routine, immunochromatographic methods, colorimetric methods, image methods, nephelometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence and bioluminescence, microfluids and methods based on cell disruption are analysed in detail.

  18. Antibiotics after rattlesnake envenomation.

    PubMed

    LoVecchio, Frank; Klemens, Jane; Welch, Sharon; Rodriguez, Ron

    2002-11-01

    To record the outcome, with regard to infection rate, of patients with rattlesnake bites (RSBs) who do not receive prophylactic antibiotics, a prospective observational study was performed of patients with RSBs treated at our institution during a consecutive 18-month period. The inclusion criteria were RSBs <24 h old and completion of follow-up (telephone call, mail reply, medical toxicologist, or private physician examination) 7-10 days following envenomation. Fifty-six consecutive patients (Median age: 32.8 years [range 4-67 years]) were enrolled. One patient was excluded because of presentation 38 h after envenomation and two patients failed to complete the required follow-up. One patient received a dose of antibiotics before transfer. Antibiotics were discontinued upon arrival. Of the total 56 RSB patients, 34 (61%) RSBs involved the upper extremity and 22 (39%) involved the lower extremity. Six patients (11%) applied ice and two (4%) used a tourniquet before evaluation. The mean arrival time was 2.7 h (Range <1-24 h). Forty-three patients (81%) received antivenin. Fifty-three patients (100%) had extremity swelling and 38 patients (72%) had tender proximal lymph nodes. Of the 53 patients who completed the study, 3 (6%) received antibiotics from their primary care physicians at 7-10 day follow-up, with no cases (0%) of documented infection. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in patients with rattlesnake bites.

  19. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  20. Burkholderia cepacia complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): antibiotics stimulate lytic phage activity.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Fatima; Dennis, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing.

  1. Burkholderia cepacia Complex Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): Antibiotics Stimulate Lytic Phage Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of at least 18 species of Gram-negative opportunistic pathogens that can cause chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Bcc organisms possess high levels of innate antimicrobial resistance, and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. One proposed alternative treatment is phage therapy, the therapeutic application of bacterial viruses (or bacteriophages). Recently, some phages have been observed to form larger plaques in the presence of sublethal concentrations of certain antibiotics; this effect has been termed phage-antibiotic synergy (PAS). Those reports suggest that some antibiotics stimulate increased production of phages under certain conditions. The aim of this study is to examine PAS in phages that infect Burkholderia cenocepacia strains C6433 and K56-2. Bcc phages KS12 and KS14 were tested for PAS, using 6 antibiotics representing 4 different drug classes. Of the antibiotics tested, the most pronounced effects were observed for meropenem, ciprofloxacin, and tetracycline. When grown with subinhibitory concentrations of these three antibiotics, cells developed a chain-like arrangement, an elongated morphology, and a clustered arrangement, respectively. When treated with progressively higher antibiotic concentrations, both the sizes of plaques and phage titers increased, up to a maximum. B. cenocepacia K56-2-infected Galleria mellonella larvae treated with phage KS12 and low-dose meropenem demonstrated increased survival over controls treated with KS12 or antibiotic alone. These results suggest that antibiotics can be combined with phages to stimulate increased phage production and/or activity and thus improve the efficacy of bacterial killing. PMID:25452284

  2. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A.; Yap, Sook Fan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits preadipocyte differentiation into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salinomycin inhibits transcriptional regulation of adipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmacological effects of salinomycin suggest toxicity in cancer therapy. -- Abstract: The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  3. Salinomycin, a polyether ionophoric antibiotic, inhibits adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek-Mikho, Maria; Saunders, Rudel A; Yap, Sook Fan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2012-11-30

    The polyether ionophoric antibiotics including monensin, salinomycin, and narasin, are widely used in veterinary medicine and as food additives and growth promoters in animal husbandry including poultry farming. Their effects on human health, however, are not fully understood. Recent studies showed that salinomycin is a cancer stem cell inhibitor. Since poultry consumption has risen sharply in the last three decades, we asked whether the consumption of meat tainted with growth promoting antibiotics might have effects on adipose cells. We showed in this report that the ionophoric antibiotics inhibit the differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes. The block of differentiation is not due to the induction of apoptosis nor the inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, salinomycin also suppresses the transcriptional activity of the CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ. These results suggest that the ionophoric antibiotics can be exploited as novel anti-obesity therapeutics and as pharmacological probes for the study of adipose biology. Further, the pharmacological effects of salinomycin could be a harbinger of its toxicity on the adipose tissue and other susceptible target cells in cancer therapy.

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  5. New classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moir, Donald T; Opperman, Timothy J; Butler, Michelle M; Bowlin, Terry L

    2012-10-01

    Several novel chemical classes of antibiotics are currently in human clinical studies. While most are narrow spectrum agents that inhibit unexploited targets, the susceptible pathogens are clinically important, including staphylococci, pseudomonads, and mycobacteria. Given the paucity of antibacterial agents consisting of novel chemical scaffolds that act on established targets, these new antibacterial scaffolds, which are active against new targets, represent an important advance in the battle against antibiotic resistance. Indeed, most of these compounds are unlikely to be subject to existing compound-based or target-based resistance mechanisms.

  6. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  7. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  8. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  9. Effects of antibiotic dry-cow therapy and internal teat sealant on milk somatic cell counts and clinical and subclinical mastitis in early lactation.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Hodge, A; Lean, I J

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of an internal teat sealant (TS; Teatseal; Zoetis Australia, Silverwater, NSW, Australia), when used in combination with antibiotic dry-cow therapy (ADCT) administered at dry-off, on milk individual somatic cell count (ISCC), milk production and components, and the incidence of clinical and subclinical mastitis in dairy cows up to 60 d after calving, when compared with ADCT only. Multiparous Holstein, Jersey, or Holstein cross cows (n=2,200) from 8 farms in southern and eastern Australia were randomly assigned to treatment of all 4 quarters with ADCT alone or with ADCT plus TS (ADCT + TS) at dry-off in this randomized, multisite clinical trial. Individual milk yield, fat and protein percentages, and ISCC were measured at intervals of 14±3 d after calving for the first 60 d of lactation. The first measurement occurred between 10 and 24 d after calving. Clinical mastitis and health events were recorded from dry-off to 60 d of lactation. Milk samples were collected from first cases of clinical mastitis and subjected to bacteriology. Treatment and the interaction of treatment by time did not affect milk yield, ISCC weighted by milk yield, or fat and protein percentages. Treatment with ADCT + TS decreased geometric mean ISCC compared with treatment with ADCT alone over the first 60 d of lactation. Geometric mean ISCC (×10(3) cells/mL) was 32.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 26.8 to 38.3] and 43.5 (95% CI: 36.2 to 52.1) for ADCT + TS and ADCT alone, respectively. The odds of at least 1 case of subclinical mastitis (ISCC ≥250,000 cells/mL) were 1.9 times higher (95% CI: 1.4 to 2.6) with ADCT alone in the first 60 d of lactation compared with ADCT + TS. Use of ADCT + TS reduced the estimated incidence of at least 1 case of subclinical mastitis on all 8 farms, compared with use of ADCT alone. Only 4 cows that calved 40 to 100 d after dry-off had a first case of clinical mastitis in the dry period. Five percent of

  10. Resistance-Resistant Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    New antibiotics are needed because as drug resistance is increasing, the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. Here, we discuss six possible approaches to develop ‘resistance-resistant’ antibiotics. First, multi-target inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy due to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, re-purposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multi-target therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and in some cases suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored, in otherwise drug resistant organisms. PMID:25458541

  11. Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Munita, Jose M.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2015-01-01

    Emergence of resistance among the most important bacterial pathogens is recognized as a major public health threat affecting humans worldwide. Multidrug-resistant organisms have emerged not only in the hospital environment but are now often identified in community settings, suggesting that reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present outside the hospital. The bacterial response to the antibiotic “attack” is the prime example of bacterial adaptation and the pinnacle of evolution. “Survival of the fittest” is a consequence of an immense genetic plasticity of bacterial pathogens that trigger specific responses that result in mutational adaptations, acquisition of genetic material or alteration of gene expression producing resistance to virtually all antibiotics currently available in clinical practice. Therefore, understanding the biochemical and genetic basis of resistance is of paramount importance to design strategies to curtail the emergence and spread of resistance and devise innovative therapeutic approaches against multidrug-resistant organisms. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the major mechanisms of antibiotic resistance encountered in clinical practice providing specific examples in relevant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27227291

  12. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to ...

  13. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare ...

  14. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy.

  15. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take antibiotics during pregnancy? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M. ... 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/antibiotics-and-pregnancy/ ...

  16. The double life of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response.

  17. Anti-Cytotoxic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of the Macrolide Antibiotic Roxithromycin in Sulfur Mustard-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    macrolide antibiotics may serve as potential vesicant respiratory therapeutics through mechanisms independent of their antibacterial activity. 1...macrophages. The subcellular mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of macrolides remains unknown. However, it is well known that the expression...effects of macrolides on NF-κB activation. However, it is now held that the molecular mechanism (s) by which macrolides inhibit pro- inflammatory

  18. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms, and practices that can prevent or reverse this trend. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  19. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, Benjamin; Rajjoub, Lamise; Mansour, Tamer; Chen, Tony; Mumtaz, Aisha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether prophylactic antibiotic use in patients with orbital fracture prevent orbital infection. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Participants: All patients diagnosed with orbital fracture between January 1, 2008 and March 1, 2014 at The George Washington University Hospital and Clinics. Main Outcome Measures: Development of orbital infection. Results: One hundred seventy-two patients with orbital fracture met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. No orbital infections were documented. Twenty subjects (12%) received no prophylactic antibiotic, and two (1%) received only one dose of antibiotics pre-operatively for surgery. For primary antibiotic, 136 subjects (79%) received oral antibiotics, and 14 (8%) received intravenous (IV) antibiotics (excluding cefazolin). Cephalexin and amoxicillin-clavulanate were the most prescribed oral antibiotics that are equally effective. Five-to-seven day courses of antibiotics had no increased infections compared to ten-to-fourteen day courses. Calculated boundaries for effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics ranged from a Number Needed to Treat (NNT) of 75 to a Number Needed to Harm (NNH) of 198. Conclusion: Antibiotics for prevention of orbital infection in patients with orbital fractures have become widely used. Coordination between trauma teams and specialists is needed to prevent patient overmedication and antibiotic resistance. Should antibiotics be used, shorter courses and avoidance of broad spectrum agents are recommended. Additional studies are needed.

  20. The master regulator PhoP coordinates phosphate and nitrogen metabolism, respiration, cell differentiation and antibiotic biosynthesis: comparison in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Martín, Juan F; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Liras, Paloma

    2017-03-15

    Phosphate limitation is important for production of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites in Streptomyces. Phosphate control is mediated by the two-component system PhoR-PhoP. Following phosphate depletion, PhoP stimulates expression of genes involved in scavenging, transport and mobilization of phosphate, and represses the utilization of nitrogen sources. PhoP reduces expression of genes for aerobic respiration and activates nitrate respiration genes. PhoP activates genes for teichuronic acid formation and reduces expression of genes for phosphate-rich teichoic acid biosynthesis. In Streptomyces coelicolor, PhoP repressed several differentiation and pleiotropic regulatory genes, which affects development and indirectly antibiotic biosynthesis. A new bioinformatics analysis of the putative PhoP-binding sequences in Streptomyces avermitilis was made. Many sequences in S. avermitilis genome showed high weight values and were classified according to the available genetic information. These genes encode phosphate scavenging proteins, phosphate transporters and nitrogen metabolism genes. Among of the genes highlighted in the new studies was aveR, located in the avermectin gene cluster, encoding a LAL-type regulator, and afsS, which is regulated by PhoP and AfsR. The sequence logo for S. avermitilis PHO boxes is similar to that of S. coelicolor, with differences in the weight value for specific nucleotides in the sequence.The Journal of Antibiotics advance online publication, 15 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ja.2017.19.

  1. Danger of Antibiotic Overuse (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse KidsHealth > For Parents > The Danger of Antibiotic ... by not reaching for the prescription pad. How Antibiotics Work Antibiotics, first used in the 1940s, are ...

  2. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment. PMID:24860564

  3. Rapid determination of antibiotic resistance in E. coli using dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoettges, Kai F.; Dale, Jeremy W.; Hughes, Michael P.

    2007-09-01

    In recent years, infections due to antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria such as methillicin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ciprofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli are on the rise, and with them the demand for rapid antibiotic testing is also rising. Conventional tests, such as disc diffusion testing, require a primary sample to be tested in the presence of a number of antibiotics to verify which antibiotics suppress growth, which take approximately 24 h to complete and potentially place the patient at severe risk. In this paper we describe the use of dielectrophoresis as a rapid marker of cell death, by detecting changes in the electrophysiology of the cell caused by the administration of an antibiotic. In contrast to other markers, the electrophysiology of the cell changes rapidly during cell death allowing live cells to be distinguished from dead (or dying) cells without the need for culturing. Using polymyxin B as an example antibiotic, our studies indicate that significant changes in cell characteristics can be observed as soon as 1 h passes after isolating a culture from nutrient broth.

  4. Bacterial cheating limits the evolution of antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Hui Xiao; Datta, Manoshi; Yurtsev, Eugene; Gore, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has led to the evolution of resistance in bacteria. Bacteria can gain resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin by acquiring a plasmid carrying the gene beta-lactamase, which inactivates the antibiotic. This inactivation may represent a cooperative behavior, as the entire bacterial population benefits from removing the antibiotic. The cooperative nature of this growth suggests that a cheater strain--which does not contribute to breaking down the antibiotic--may be able to take advantage of cells cooperatively inactivating the antibiotic. Here we experimentally find that a ``sensitive'' bacterial strain lacking the plasmid conferring resistance can invade a population of resistant bacteria, even in antibiotic concentrations that should kill the sensitive strain. We observe stable coexistence between the two strains and find that a simple model successfully explains the behavior as a function of antibiotic concentration and cell density. We anticipate that our results will provide insight into the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors found in nature.

  5. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Margarida Moreira; Queiroz, Margarida João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-05-01

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 ± 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a β-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle-antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  6. Structural biological study of self-resistance determinants in antibiotic-producing actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    As antibiotics act to inhibit the growth of bacteria, the drugs are useful for treating bacterial infectious diseases. However, microorganisms that produce antibiotics must be protected from the lethal effect of their own antibiotic product. In this review, the fruit of our group's current research on self-protection mechanisms of Streptomyces producing antibiotics that inhibit DNA, protein and bacterial cell wall syntheses will be described.

  7. The aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin damages DNA bases in Escherichia coli: caffeine potentiates the DNA-damaging effects of kanamycin while suppressing cell killing by ciprofloxacin in Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tina Manzhu; Yuan, Jessica; Nguyen, Angelyn; Becket, Elinne; Yang, Hanjing; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2012-06-01

    The distribution of mutants in the Keio collection of Escherichia coli gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to the aminoglycosides kanamycin and neomycin indicates that damaged bases resulting from antibiotic action can lead to cell death. Strains lacking one of a number of glycosylases (e.g., AlkA, YzaB, Ogt, KsgA) or other specific repair proteins (AlkB, PhrB, SmbC) are more sensitive to these antibiotics. Mutants lacking AlkB display the strongest sensitivity among the glycosylase- or direct lesion removal-deficient strains. This perhaps suggests the involvement of ethenoadenine adducts, resulting from reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, since AlkB removes this lesion. Other sensitivities displayed by mutants lacking UvrA, polymerase V (Pol V), or components of double-strand break repair indicate that kanamycin results in damaged base pairs that need to be removed or replicated past in order to avoid double-strand breaks that saturate the cellular repair capacity. Caffeine enhances the sensitivities of these repair-deficient strains to kanamycin and neomycin. The gene knockout mutants that display increased sensitivity to caffeine (dnaQ, holC, holD, and priA knockout mutants) indicate that caffeine blocks DNA replication, ultimately leading to double-strand breaks that require recombinational repair by functions encoded by recA, recB, and recC, among others. Additionally, caffeine partially protects cells of both Escherichia coli and Bacillus anthracis from killing by the widely used fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin.

  8. Changes in antibiotic concentrations and antibiotic resistome during commercial composting of animal manures.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wan-Ying; Yang, Xin-Ping; Li, Qian; Wu, Long-Hua; Shen, Qi-Rong; Zhao, Fang-Jie

    2016-12-01

    The over-use of antibiotics in animal husbandry in China and the concomitant enhanced selection of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in animal manures are of serious concern. Thermophilic composting is an effective way of reducing hazards in organic wastes. However, its effectiveness in antibiotic degradation and ARG reduction in commercial operations remains unclear. In the present study, we determined the concentrations of 15 common veterinary antibiotics and the abundances of 213 ARGs and 10 marker genes for mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in commercial composts made from cattle, poultry and swine manures in Eastern China. High concentrations of fluoroquinolones were found in the poultry and swine composts, suggesting insufficient removal of these antibiotics by commercial thermophilic composting. Total ARGs in the cattle and poultry manures were as high as 1.9 and 5.5 copies per bacterial cell, respectively. After thermophilic composting, the ARG abundance in the mature compost decreased to 9.6% and 31.7% of that in the cattle and poultry manure, respectively. However, some ARGs (e.g. aadA, aadA2, qacEΔ1, tetL) and MGE marker genes (e.g. cintI-1, intI-1 and tnpA-04) were persistent with high abundance in the composts. The antibiotics that were detected at high levels in the composts (e.g. norfloxacin and ofloxacin) might have posed a selection pressure on ARGs. MGE marker genes were found to correlate closely with ARGs at the levels of individual gene, resistance class and total abundance, suggesting that MGEs and ARGs are closely associated in their persistence in the composts under antibiotic selection. Our research shows potential disseminations of antibiotics and ARGs via compost utilization.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Webber, Mark A; Baylay, Alison J; Ogbolu, David O; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are difficult or impossible to treat are becoming increasingly common and are causing a global health crisis. Antibiotic resistance is encoded by several genes, many of which can transfer between bacteria. New resistance mechanisms are constantly being described, and new genes and vectors of transmission are identified on a regular basis. This article reviews recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which bacteria are either intrinsically resistant or acquire resistance to antibiotics, including the prevention of access to drug targets, changes in the structure and protection of antibiotic targets and the direct modification or inactivation of antibiotics.

  10. Reviving old antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Cantón, Rafael; Giske, Christian G; Mouton, Johan W; Nation, Roger L; Paul, Mical; Turnidge, John D; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    In the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the paucity of new antimicrobial agents it has become clear that new antimicrobial strategies are urgently needed. One of these is to revisit old antibiotics to ensure that they are used correctly and to their full potential, as well as to determine whether one or several of them can help alleviate the pressure on more recent agents. Strategies are urgently needed to 're-develop' these drugs using modern standards, integrating new knowledge into regulatory frameworks and communicating the knowledge from the research bench to the bedside. Without a systematic approach to re-developing these old drugs and rigorously testing them according to today's standards, there is a significant risk of doing harm to patients and further increasing multidrug resistance. This paper describes factors to be considered and outlines steps and actions needed to re-develop old antibiotics so that they can be used effectively for the treatment of infections.

  11. Antibiotics in microbial coculture.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kenji; Beppu, Teruhiko

    2017-04-01

    Today, the frequency of discovery of new antibiotics in microbial culture is significantly decreasing. The evidence from whole-genome surveys suggests that many genes involved in the synthesis of unknown metabolites do exist but are not expressed under conventional cultivation conditions. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to study the conditions that make otherwise silent genes active in microbes. Here we overview the knowledge on the antibiotic production promoted by cocultivation of multiple microbial strains. Accumulating evidence indicates that cocultivation can be an effective way to stimulate the production of substances that are not formed during pure cultivation. Characterization of the promotive factors produced by stimulator strains is expected to give clues to the development of effective cultivation conditions for drug discovery.

  12. Antibiotics and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Scott S; Hersh, Elliot V

    2002-10-01

    With the exception of rifampin-like drugs, there is a lack of scientific evidence supporting the ability of commonly prescribed antibiotics, including all those routinely employed in outpatient dentistry, to either reduce blood levels and/or the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. To date, all clinical trials studying the effects of concomitant antibiotic therapy (with the exception of rifampin and rifabutin) have failed to demonstrate an interaction. Like all drugs, oral contraceptives are not 100% effective with the failure rate in the typical United States population reported to be as high as 3%. It is thus possible that the case reports of unintended pregnancies during antibiotic therapy may simply represent the normal failure rate of these drugs. Considering that both drug classes are prescribed frequently to women of childbearing potential, one would expect a much higher rate of oral contraceptive failure in this group of patients if a true drug:drug interaction existed. On the other hand, if the interaction does exist but is a relatively rare event, occurring in, say, 1 in 5000 women, clinical studies such as those described in this article would not detect the interaction. The pharmacokinetic studies of simultaneous antibiotic and oral contraceptive ingestion, and the retrospective studies of pregnancy rates among oral contraceptive users exposed to antibiotics, all suffer from one potential common weakness, i.e., their relatively small sample size. Sample sizes in the pharmacokinetic trials ranged from 7 to 24 participants, whereas the largest retrospective study of pregnancy rates still evaluated less than 800 total contraceptive users. Still, the incidence of such a rare interaction would not differ from the accepted normal failure rate of oral contraceptive therapy. The medico-legal ramifications of what looks like at best a rare interaction remains somewhat "murky." On one hand, we have medico-legal experts advising the profession to exercise caution

  13. [Resistance to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús Silva

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem around the world causing high rates of morbi-mortality and economic problems in hospital settings. Major bacterial causing nosocomial infections are: extended-spectrum beta-lactameses (ESBL) producing enterobacteria, methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, metallo fl-lactamases (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter baumani. This last bacteria is not very often isolated in hospital settings yet, but it is multi-resistance pathogen causing high mortality. Helicobacter pylori, which is not a nosocomial pathogen but is associated to gastric diseases (from gastritis to gastric cancer). Infections prevention, to obtain an accuracy diagnostic and effective treatment, use antibiotic wisely and pathogen dissemination prevention (hand washing), are important steps to control the bacterial resistance.

  14. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  15. [Accelerated radioisotope method of determining cholera vibrios' sensitivity to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Korol', V V; Podosinnikova, L S; Golubinskiĭ, E P; Rublev, B D

    1980-05-01

    Estimation of protein biosynthesis rate was used for rapid determination of Vibrio cholerae sensitivity to tetracycline and chloramphenicol by comparison of the bacterial cell radioactivity in samples with and without the antibiotics. For the sensitivity determination the strains were grown for 30 minutes at a temperature of 37 degrees C in nutrient media with a 14C-amino acid and antibiotic. The data of the determination were indicative of at least 10-fold difference in the amount of the amino acid assimilated by the sensitive strains in the presence and absence of the antibiotic. The value of the label incorporation into the antibiotic resistant strains under the above conditions did not differ. Complete coincidence of the results obtained upon parallel testing of the strain antibiotic sensitivity by the rapid and routine methods was observed.

  16. Structure-activity relationship for the oxadiazole class of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Spink, Edward; Ding, Derong; Peng, Zhihong; Boudreau, Marc A; Leemans, Erika; Lastochkin, Elena; Song, Wei; Lichtenwalter, Katerina; O'Daniel, Peter I; Testero, Sebastian A; Pi, Hualiang; Schroeder, Valerie A; Wolter, William R; Antunes, Nuno T; Suckow, Mark A; Vakulenko, Sergei; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2015-02-12

    The structure-activity relationship (SAR) for the newly discovered oxadiazole class of antibiotics is described with evaluation of 120 derivatives of the lead structure. This class of antibiotics was discovered by in silico docking and scoring against the crystal structure of a penicillin-binding protein. They impair cell-wall biosynthesis and exhibit activities against the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant and linezolid-resistant S. aureus. 5-(1H-Indol-5-yl)-3-(4-(4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy)phenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazole (antibiotic 75b) was efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA infection, exhibiting a long half-life, a high volume of distribution, and low clearance. This antibiotic is bactericidal and is orally bioavailable in mice. This class of antibiotics holds great promise in recourse against infections by MRSA.

  17. Novel antibody-antibiotic conjugate eliminates intracellular S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Lehar, Sophie M; Pillow, Thomas; Xu, Min; Staben, Leanna; Kajihara, Kimberly K; Vandlen, Richard; DePalatis, Laura; Raab, Helga; Hazenbos, Wouter L; Morisaki, J Hiroshi; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Darwish, Martine; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Hernandez, Hilda; Loyet, Kelly M; Lupardus, Patrick; Fong, Rina; Yan, Donghong; Chalouni, Cecile; Luis, Elizabeth; Khalfin, Yana; Plise, Emile; Cheong, Jonathan; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S; Flygare, John A; Wah Tan, Man; Brown, Eric J; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2015-11-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is considered to be an extracellular pathogen. However, survival of S. aureus within host cells may provide a reservoir relatively protected from antibiotics, thus enabling long-term colonization of the host and explaining clinical failures and relapses after antibiotic therapy. Here we confirm that intracellular reservoirs of S. aureus in mice comprise a virulent subset of bacteria that can establish infection even in the presence of vancomycin, and we introduce a novel therapeutic that effectively kills intracellular S. aureus. This antibody-antibiotic conjugate consists of an anti-S. aureus antibody conjugated to a highly efficacious antibiotic that is activated only after it is released in the proteolytic environment of the phagolysosome. The antibody-antibiotic conjugate is superior to vancomycin for treatment of bacteraemia and provides direct evidence that intracellular S. aureus represents an important component of invasive infections.

  18. A bacteria antibiotic system in space (23-F ANTIBIO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tixador, Rene; Gasset, G.; Eche, B.; Moatti, N.; Lapchine, L.; Woldringh, C.; Toorop, P.; Moatti, J. P.; Delmotte, F.; Tap, G.

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of weightlessness and cosmic radiations on the bacteria resistance to antibiotics, the Antibio 23F experiment was undertaken onboard Discovery during the 1st International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) mission. The effects of various antibiotic concentrations (dihydrostreptomycin) on Escherichia coli growth and cell division behavior were studied. The antibiotic binding was investigated using a radioactive tracer (tritium). The results showed that microgravity did not affect E. coli cells in regards the growth and the cell division. The antibiotic added to the culture medium induced an inhibition of the cultures both in the flight and ground controls. However, the antibiotic was less efficient in flight. The behavior of bacteria was modified, and the exponential growth rate was increased in flight. The incorporation of radioactive antibiotics in flight was comparatively different to ground incorporation, which indicated some perturbations in antibiotic binding. The experiments performed in the 1 g centrifuge did not show any difference in the cultures developed on the static rack, and could support a radiative effect of cosmic radiation to explain the results.

  19. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews.

  20. Lysobacter species: a potential source of novel antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Panthee, Suresh; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Paudel, Atmika; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-11-01

    Infectious diseases threaten global health due to the ability of microbes to acquire resistance against clinically used antibiotics. Continuous discovery of antibiotics with a novel mode of action is thus required. Actinomycetes and fungi are currently the major sources of antibiotics, but the decreasing rate of discovery of novel antibiotics suggests that the focus should be changed to previously untapped groups of microbes. Lysobacter species have a genome size of ~6 Mb with a relatively high G + C content of 61-70 % and are characterized by their ability to produce peptides that damage the cell walls or membranes of other microbes. Genome sequence analysis revealed that each Lysobacter species has gene clusters for the production of 12-16 secondary metabolites, most of which are peptides, thus making them 'peptide production specialists'. Given that the number of antibiotics isolated is much lower than the number of gene clusters harbored, further intensive studies of Lysobacter are likely to unearth novel antibiotics with profound biomedical applications. In this review, we summarize the structural diversity, activity and biosynthesis of lysobacterial antibiotics and highlight the importance of Lysobacter species for antibiotic production.

  1. The role of biofilms as environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Balcázar, José L.; Subirats, Jéssica; Borrego, Carles M.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a significant and growing threat to public and environmental health. To face this problem both at local and global scales, a better understanding of the sources and mechanisms that contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance is required. Recent studies demonstrate that aquatic ecosystems are reservoirs of resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes as well as potential conduits for their transmission to human pathogens. Despite the wealth of information about antibiotic pollution and its effect on the aquatic microbial resistome, the contribution of environmental biofilms to the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance has not been fully explored in aquatic systems. Biofilms are structured multicellular communities embedded in a self-produced extracellular matrix that acts as a barrier to antibiotic diffusion. High population densities and proximity of cells in biofilms also increases the chances for genetic exchange among bacterial species converting biofilms in hot spots of antibiotic resistance. This review focuses on the potential effect of antibiotic pollution on biofilm microbial communities, with special emphasis on ecological and evolutionary processes underlying acquired resistance to these compounds. PMID:26583011

  2. Persistence and resistance as complementary bacterial adaptations to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Vogwill, T; Comfort, A C; Furió, V; MacLean, R C

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial persistence represents a simple of phenotypic heterogeneity, whereby a proportion of cells in an isogenic bacterial population can survive exposure to lethal stresses such as antibiotics. In contrast, genetically based antibiotic resistance allows for continued growth in the presence of antibiotics. It is unclear, however, whether resistance and persistence are complementary or alternative evolutionary adaptations to antibiotics. Here, we investigate the co-evolution of resistance and persistence across the genus Pseudomonas using comparative methods that correct for phylogenetic nonindependence. We find that strains of Pseudomonas vary extensively in both their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and rifampicin) and persistence following exposure to these antibiotics. Crucially, we find that persistence correlates positively to antibiotic resistance across strains. However, we find that different genes control resistance and persistence implying that they are independent traits. Specifically, we find that the number of type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) in the genome of a strain is correlated to persistence, but not resistance. Our study shows that persistence and antibiotic resistance are complementary, but independent, evolutionary adaptations to stress and it highlights the key role played by TAs in the evolution of persistence.

  3. Silver enhances antibiotic activity against gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Morones-Ramirez, Jose Ruben; Winkler, Jonathan A; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-06-19

    A declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it imperative to develop more effective antimicrobial therapies, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens. Silver has been used as an antimicrobial since antiquity, yet its mechanism of action remains unclear. We show that silver disrupts multiple bacterial cellular processes, including disulfide bond formation, metabolism, and iron homeostasis. These changes lead to increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased membrane permeability of Gram-negative bacteria that can potentiate the activity of a broad range of antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria in different metabolic states, as well as restore antibiotic susceptibility to a resistant bacterial strain. We show both in vitro and in a mouse model of urinary tract infection that the ability of silver to induce oxidative stress can be harnessed to potentiate antibiotic activity. Additionally, we demonstrate in vitro and in two different mouse models of peritonitis that silver sensitizes Gram-negative bacteria to the Gram-positive-specific antibiotic vancomycin, thereby expanding the antibacterial spectrum of this drug. Finally, we used silver and antibiotic combinations in vitro to eradicate bacterial persister cells, and show both in vitro and in a mouse biofilm infection model that silver can enhance antibacterial action against bacteria that produce biofilms. This work shows that silver can be used to enhance the action of existing antibiotics against Gram-negative bacteria, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for fighting bacterial infections.

  4. The MAR1 transporter is an opportunistic entry point for antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Conte, Sarah S; Lloyd, Alan M

    2010-01-01

    The vast quantities of antibiotics used in modern agriculture contaminate the environment and threaten human health. Recent studies have shown that crop plants grown in soil fertilized with manure from antibiotic-treated animals can accumulate antibiotic within the plant body, thus making them an additional antibiotic exposure route for consumers. Until recently, mechanisms of antibiotic entry and subcellular partitioning within plant cells were virtually unknown. We have uncovered and characterized a transporter gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, MAR1, which appears to control antibiotic entry into the chloroplast. Antibiotic resistance via MAR1 is specific to the aminoglycoside class, and is conferred by loss-of-function mutations, which is rather unusual, since most transporter-based antibiotic resistance is conferred by overexpression or gain-of-function mutations in efflux pumps with poor substrate specificity. Since MAR1 overexpression lines exhibit various iron starvation phenotypes, we propose that MAR1 transports an iron chelation molecule that is mimicked specifically by aminoglycoside antibiotics, and this facilitates their entry into the chloroplast. Knowledge about MAR1 enhances our understanding of how antibiotics might enter the plant cell, which may aid in the production of crop plants that are incapable of antibiotic accumulation, as well as further the development of new plant-based antibiotic resistance markers.

  5. The antifungal antibiotic, clotrimazole, inhibits chloride secretion by human intestinal T84 cells via blockade of distinct basolateral K+ conductances. Demonstration of efficacy in intact rabbit colon and in an in vivo mouse model of cholera.

    PubMed Central

    Rufo, P A; Merlin, D; Riegler, M; Ferguson-Maltzman, M H; Dickinson, B L; Brugnara, C; Alper, S L; Lencer, W I

    1997-01-01

    The antifungal antibiotic clotrimazole (CLT) blocks directly and with high potency the Ca2+-activated K+ channels of human erythrocytes, erythroleukemia cells, and ferret vascular smooth muscle cells. We recently reported that CLT inhibits Cl- secretion in human intestinal T84 cells, likely by affecting K+ transport (Rufo, P.A., L. Jiang, S.J. Moe, C. Brugnara, S.L. Alper, and W.I. Lencer. 1996. J. Clin. Invest. 98:2066-2075). To determine if CLT had direct effects on K+ conductances in T84 cells, we selectively permeabilized apical membranes of confluent T84 cell monolayers using the ionophore amphotericin B. This technique permits direct measurement of basolateral K+ transport. We found that CLT and a stable des-imidazolyl derivative inhibited directly two pharmacologically distinct basolateral membrane K+conductances, but had no effect on apical membrane Cl- conductances. The effects of CLT on Cl- secretion were also examined in intact tissue. CLT inhibited forskolin-induced Cl- secretion in rabbit colonic mucosal sheets mounted in Ussing chambers by 91%. CLT also inhibited cholera toxin-induced intestinal Cl- secretion in intact mice by 94%. These data provide direct evidence that CLT blocks Cl- secretion in intestinal T84 cells by inhibition of basolateral K+ conductances, and show that CLT inhibits salt and water secretion from intact tissue in vitro and in vivo. The results further support the suggestion that CLT and its metabolites may show clinical efficacy in the treatment of secretory diarrheas of diverse etiologies. PMID:9399958

  6. Chloroquinolines block antibiotic efflux pumps in antibiotic-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Didier; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Chevalier, Jacqueline; Baitiche, Milad; Martino, Michèle; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Barbe, Jacques

    2006-06-01

    Efflux mechanisms protect bacterial cells by pumping out toxic compounds and actively contribute to bacterial multidrug resistance. Agents inhibiting efflux pumps are of interest for the control of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. Herein we report the effects of new chloroquinoline derivatives that render resistant Enterobacter aerogenes isolates noticeably more susceptible to structurally unrelated antibiotics. In addition, some of these chloroquinolines increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol. Some of the molecules tested in this work are able to inhibit the main efflux pump (AcrAB-TolC), which is involved in E. aerogenes antibiotic resistance.

  7. Immobilized antibiotics to prevent orthopedic implant infections

    PubMed Central

    Hickok, Noreen J.; Shapiro, Irving M.

    2012-01-01

    Many surgical procedures require the placement of an inert or tissue-derived implant deep within the body cavity. While the majority of these implants do not become colonized by bacteria, a small percentage develops a biofilm layer that harbors invasive microorganisms. In orthopaedic surgery, unresolved periprosthetic infections can lead to implant loosening, arthrodeses, amputations and sometimes death. The focus of this review is to describe development of an implant in which an antibiotic tethered to the metal surface is used to prevent bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. Building on well-established chemical syntheses, studies show that antibiotics can be linked to titanium through a self-assembled monolayer of siloxy amines. The stable metal-antibiotic construct resists bacterial colonization and biofilm formation while remaining amenable to osteoblastic cell adhesion and maturation. In an animal model, the antibiotic modified implant resists challenges by bacteria that are commonly present in periprosthetic infections. While the long-term efficacy and stability is still to be established, ongoing studies support the view that this novel type of bioactive surface has a real potential to mitigate or prevent the devastating consequences of orthopaedic infection. PMID:22512927

  8. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  9. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  10. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  11. [Enteropathogens and antibiotics].

    PubMed

    González-Torralba, Ana; García-Esteban, Coral; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-08-12

    Infectious gastroenteritis remains a public health problem. The most severe cases are of bacterial origin. In Spain, Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most prevalent bacterial genus, while Yersinia and Shigella are much less frequent. Most cases are usually self-limiting and antibiotic therapy is not generally indicated, unless patients have risk factors for severe infection and shigellosis. Ciprofloxacin, third generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and doxycycline are the most recommended drugs. The susceptibility pattern of the different bacteria determines the choice of the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to analyse the current situation, developments, and evolution of resistance and multidrug resistance in these 4 enteric pathogens.

  12. Endless Resistance. Endless Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine was profoundly transformed by the introduction of the antibiotics (compounds isolated from Nature) and the antibacterials (compounds prepared by synthesis) for the control of bacterial infection. As a result of the extraordinary success of these compounds over decades of time, a timeless biological activity for these compounds has been presumed. This presumption is no longer. The inexorable acquisition of resistance mechanisms by bacteria is retransforming medical practice. Credible answers to this dilemma are far better recognized than they are being implemented. In this perspective we examine (and in key respects, reiterate) the chemical and biological strategies being used to address the challenge of bacterial resistance. PMID:27746889

  13. Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of the Gram-Negative Bacteria Based on Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Ruf, Claude; Crussard, Steve; Franceschi, Christine; Orenga, Sylvain; Ouattara, Jasmine; Ramjeet, Mahendrasingh; Surre, Jérémy; Matic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly treating infections with adequate antibiotics is of major importance. This requires a fast and accurate determination of the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial pathogens. The most frequently used methods are slow because they are based on the measurement of growth inhibition. Faster methods, such as PCR-based detection of determinants of antibiotic resistance, do not always provide relevant information on susceptibility, particularly that which is not genetically based. Consequently, new methods, such as the detection of changes in bacterial physiology caused by antibiotics using flow cytometry and fluorescent viability markers, are being explored. In this study, we assessed whether Alexa Fluor® 633 Hydrazide (AFH), which targets carbonyl groups, can be used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Carbonylation of cellular macromolecules, which increases in antibiotic-treated cells, is a particularly appropriate to assess for this purpose because it is irreversible. We tested the susceptibility of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to antibiotics from the three classes: β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones. In addition to AFH, we used TO-PRO®-3, which enters cells with damaged membranes and binds to DNA, and DiBAC4 (3), which enters cells with depolarized membranes. We also monitored antibiotic-induced morphological alterations of bacterial cells by analyzing light scattering signals. Although all tested dyes and light scattering signals allowed for the detection of antibiotic-sensitive cells, AFH proved to be the most suitable for the fast and reliable detection of antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:27507962

  14. Natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics in Actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenqing; Qi, Jianzhao; Wu, Pan; Wan, Dan; Liu, Jin; Feng, Xuan; Deng, Zixin

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside antibiotics constitute an important family of microbial natural products bearing diverse bioactivities and unusual structural features. Their biosynthetic logics are unique with involvement of complex multi-enzymatic reactions leading to the intricate molecules from simple building blocks. Understanding how nature builds this family of antibiotics in post-genomic era sets the stage for rational enhancement of their production, and also paves the way for targeted persuasion of the cell factories to make artificial designer nucleoside drugs and leads via synthetic biology approaches. In this review, we discuss the recent progress and perspectives on the natural and engineered biosynthesis of nucleoside antibiotics.

  15. [Antibiotics: drug and food interactions].

    PubMed

    Hodel, M; Genné, D

    2009-10-07

    Antibiotics are widely prescribed in medical practice. Many of them induce or are subject to interactions that may diminish their anti-infectious efficiency or elicit toxic effects. Food intake can influence the effectiveness of an antibiotic. Certain antibiotics can lower the effectiveness of oral contraception. Oral anticoagulation can be influenced to a great extent by antibiotics and controls are necessary. Interactions are also possible via enzymatic induction or inhibition of cytochromes. The use of an interaction list with substrates of cytochromes enables to anticipate. Every new prescription should consider a possible drug or food interaction.

  16. Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS): beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics stimulate virulent phage growth.

    PubMed

    Comeau, André M; Tétart, Françoise; Trojet, Sabrina N; Prère, Marie-Françoise; Krisch, H M

    2007-08-29

    Although the multiplication of bacteriophages (phages) has a substantial impact on the biosphere, comparatively little is known about how the external environment affects phage production. Here we report that sub-lethal concentrations of certain antibiotics can substantially stimulate the host bacterial cell's production of some virulent phage. For example, a low dosage of cefotaxime, a cephalosporin, increased an uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain's production of the phage PhiMFP by more than 7-fold. We name this phenomenon Phage-Antibiotic Synergy (PAS). A related effect was observed in diverse host-phage systems, including the T4-like phages, with beta-lactam and quinolone antibiotics, as well as mitomycin C. A common characteristic of these antibiotics is that they inhibit bacterial cell division and trigger the SOS system. We therefore examined the PAS effect within the context of the bacterial SOS and filamentation responses. We found that the PAS effect appears SOS-independent and is primarily a consequence of cellular filamentation; it is mimicked by cells that constitutively filament. The fact that completely unrelated phages manifest this phenomenon suggests that it confers an important and general advantage to the phages.

  17. Probing minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianxun; Zheng, Yan; Yan, Ya; Yang, Lingling; Yao, Yihui; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Chen, Yuqing; Xing, Jinchun; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-06-15

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has become a major threat to public health. Advanced tools are urgently needed to quickly diagnose antibiotic-resistant infections to initiate appropriate treatment. Here we report the development of a highly sensitive flow cytometric method to probe minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria via single cell detection. Monoclonal antibody against TEM-1 β-lactamase and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated secondary antibody were used to selectively label resistant bacteria green, and nucleic acid dye SYTO 62 was used to stain all the bacteria red. A laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was applied to simultaneously detect the side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria. By using E. coli JM109/pUC19 and E. coli JM109 as the model systems for antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-susceptible bacteria, respectively, as low as 0.1% of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were accurately quantified. By monitoring the dynamic population change of a bacterial culture with the administration of antibiotics, we confirmed that under the antimicrobial pressure, the original low population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria outcompeted susceptible strains and became the dominant population after 5hours of growth. Detection of antibiotic-resistant infection in clinical urine samples was achieved without cultivation, and the bacterial load of susceptible and resistant strains can be faithfully quantified. Overall, the HSFCM-based quantitative method provides a powerful tool for the fundamental studies of antibiotic resistance and holds the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies.

  18. Cryptic antifungal compounds active by synergism with polyene antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Mariko; Ihara, Fumio; Nihira, Takuya

    2016-04-01

    The majority of antifungal compounds reported so far target the cell wall or cell membrane of fungi, suggesting that other types of antibiotics cannot exert their activity because they cannot penetrate into the cells. Therefore, if the permeability of the cell membrane could be enhanced, many antibiotics might be found to have antifungal activity. We here used the polyene antibiotic nystatin, which binds to ergosterol and forms pores at the cell membrane, to enhance the cellular permeability. In the presence of nystatin, many culture extracts from entomopathogenic fungi displayed antifungal activity. Among all the active extracts, two active components were purified and identified as helvolic acid and terramide A. Because the minimum inhibitory concentration of either compound was reduced four-fold in the presence of nystatin, it can be concluded that this screening method is useful for detecting novel antifungal activity.

  19. Electrochemically monitoring the antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Webster, Thaddaeus A; Sismaet, Hunter J; Chan, I-ping J; Goluch, Edgar D

    2015-11-07

    The condition of cells in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms was monitored via the electrochemical detection of the electro-active virulence factor pyocyanin in a fabricated microfluidic growth chamber coupled with a disposable three electrode cell. Cells were exposed to 4, 16, and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate after overnight growth. At the end of testing, the measured maximum peak current (and therefore pyocyanin concentration) was reduced by approximately 68% and 82% in P. aeruginosa exposed to 16 and 100 mg L(-1) colistin sulfate, respectively. Samples were removed from the microfluidic chamber, analyzed for viability using staining, and streaked onto culture plates to confirm that the P. aeruginosa cells were affected by the antibiotics. The correlation between electrical signal drop and the viability of P. aeruginosa cells after antibiotic exposure highlights the usefulness of this approach for future low cost antibiotic screening applications.

  20. Antibiotic drug advertising in medical journals.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Jacob; Moran, Lia; Schlaeffer, Francisc; Borer, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Advertising is a leading strategy for drug promotion. We analysed 779 advertisements in 24 medical journals, 25% of which featured antibiotics. Antibiotic advertisements showed differences compared to those of other drugs. None addressed the issue of antibiotic resistance. Efforts to prevent antibiotic resistance should take antibiotic advertising into consideration.

  1. Uptake of antibiotics by human polymorphonuclear leukocyte cytoplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, W.L.; King-Thompson, N.L. , Decatur, GA )

    1990-06-01

    Enucleated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN cytoplasts), which have no nuclei and only a few granules, retain many of the functions of intact neutrophils. To better define the mechanisms and intracellular sites of antimicrobial agent accumulation in human neutrophils, we studied the antibiotic uptake process in PMN cytoplasts. Entry of eight radiolabeled antibiotics into PMN cytoplasts was determined by means of a velocity gradient centrifugation technique. Uptakes of these antibiotics by cytoplasts were compared with our findings in intact PMN. Penicillin entered both intact PMN and cytoplasts poorly. Metronidazole achieved a concentration in cytoplasts (and PMN) equal to or somewhat less than the extracellular concentration. Chloramphenicol, a lipid-soluble drug, and trimethoprim were concentrated three- to fourfold by cytoplasts. An unusual finding was that trimethroprim, unlike other tested antibiotics, was accumulated by cytoplasts more readily at 25 degrees C than at 37 degrees C. After an initial rapid association with cytoplasts, cell-associated imipenem declined progressively with time. Clindamycin and two macrolide antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin) were concentrated 7- to 14-fold by cytoplasts. This indicates that cytoplasmic granules are not essential for accumulation of these drugs. Adenosine inhibited cytoplast uptake of clindamycin, which enters intact phagocytic cells by the membrane nucleoside transport system. Roxithromycin uptake by cytoplasts was inhibited by phagocytosis, which may reduce the number of cell membrane sites available for the transport of macrolides. These studies have added to our understanding of uptake mechanisms for antibiotics which are highly concentrated in phagocytes.

  2. The Antibiotic Resistance Problem Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The term "antibiotic" was first proposed by Vuillemin in 1889 but was first used in the current sense by Walksman in 1941. An antibiotic is defined as a "derivative produced by the metabolism of microorganisms that possess antibacterial activity at low concentrations and is not toxic to the host." In this article, the author describes how…

  3. Antibiotic use in livestock production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic usage is a useful and commonly implemented practice in livestock and production agriculture that has progressively gained attention in recent years from consumers of animal products due to concerns about human and environmental health. Sub-therapeutic usage of antibiotics has led to a con...

  4. New approaches to antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Kealey, C; Creaven, C A; Murphy, C D; Brady, C B

    2017-03-08

    New antibiotics are urgently required by human medicine as pathogens emerge with developed resistance to almost all antibiotic classes. Pioneering approaches, methodologies and technologies have facilitated a new era in antimicrobial discovery. Innovative culturing techniques such as iChip and co-culturing methods which use 'helper' strains to produce bioactive molecules have had notable success. Exploiting antibiotic resistance to identify antibacterial producers performed in tandem with diagnostic PCR based identification approaches has identified novel candidates. Employing powerful metagenomic mining and metabolomic tools has identified the antibiotic'ome, highlighting new antibiotics from underexplored environments and silent gene clusters enabling researchers to mine for scaffolds with both a novel mechanism of action and also few clinically established resistance determinants. Modern biotechnological approaches are delivering but will require support from government initiatives together with changes in regulation to pave the way for valuable, efficacious, highly targeted, pathogen specific antimicrobial therapies.

  5. [Antibiotic resistance: A global crisis].

    PubMed

    Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-12-01

    The introduction of antibiotics into clinical practice represented one of the most important interventions for the control of infectious diseases. Antibiotics have saved millions of lives and have also brought a revolution in medicine. However, an increasing threat has deteriorated the effectiveness of these drugs, that of bacterial resistance to antibiotics, which is defined here as the ability of bacteria to survive in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit/kill others of the same species. In this review some recent and important examples of resistance in pathogens of concern for mankind are mentioned. It is explained, according to present knowledge, the process that led to the current situation in a short time, evolutionarily speaking. It begins with the resistance genes, continues with clones and genetic elements involved in the maintenance and dissemination, and ends with other factors that contribute to its spread. Possible responses to the problem are also reviewed, with special reference to the development of new antibiotics.

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Obeso, Sergio; Rodrigo, Juan P; Sánchez, Rafael; López, Fernando; Díaz, Juan P; Suárez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 80s, numerous clinical trials have shown a significant reduction in the incidence of infections in clean-contaminated upper respiratory tract surgery, due to perioperative use of antibiotics; however, there is no consensus about the best antibiotic protocol. Moreover, there are no universally accepted guidelines about flap reconstructive procedures. In otological and rhinological surgery, tonsillectomy, cochlear implant and laryngo-pharyngeal laser surgery, the use of antibiotics frequently depends on institutional or personal preferences rather than the evidence available. We reviewed clinical trials on different otorhinolaryngological procedures, assessing choice of antibiotic, length of treatment and administration route. There are no clinical trials for laryngo-pharyngeal laser surgery. Nor are there clinical trials on implant cochlear surgery or neurosurgical clean-contaminated procedures, but in these circumstances, antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended.

  7. Antibiotics and immunity: effects of antibiotics on mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes and interleukin-2 production.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M S; Maged, Z A; Haron, A; Khalil, R Y; Attallah, A M

    1988-12-01

    The immunomodulating properties of antimicrobial drugs may have important implications in prescriptive practice. This is particularly so for patients whose immune system has been compromised. In this study, tetracycline, cephalothin, rifampicin, polymyxin B and nitrofurantoin reduced mitogen responsiveness of both B and T lymphocytes of mouse spleen cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. Ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, streptomycin and erythromycin had no effect. In the in vivo study none of the antibiotics affected mouse spleen cell transformation in response to mitogen. The addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) did not prevent the effect of the antibiotics tested on human lymphocytes in vitro. Cephalothin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin decreased IL-2 production by mouse spleen cells in vitro.

  8. Mildiomycin: a nucleoside antibiotic that inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Cosín, M; Carrasco, L

    1985-03-01

    Mildiomycin, a new nucleoside antibiotic, selectively inhibits protein synthesis in HeLa cells, and is less active in the inhibition of RNA or DNA synthesis. An increased inhibition of translation by mildiomycin is observed in cultured HeLa cells when they are permeabilized by encephalomyocarditis virus. This observation suggests that this antibiotic does not easily pass through the cell membrane, as occurs with other nucleoside and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The inhibition of translation is also observed in cell-free systems, such as endogenous protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate or the synthesis of polyphenylalanine directed by poly (U). Finally the mode of action of mildiomycin was investigated and the results suggest that the compound blocks the peptidyl-transferase center.

  9. Biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

    PubMed

    Olsen, I

    2015-05-01

    Biofilms are heterogeneous structures composed of bacterial cells surrounded by a matrix and attached to solid surfaces. The bacteria here are 100 to 1,000 times more tolerant to antimicrobials than corresponding planktonic cells. Biofilms can be difficult to eradicate when they cause biofilm-related diseases, e.g., implant infections, cystic fibrosis, urinary tract infections, and periodontal diseases. A number of phenotypic features of the biofilm can be involved in biofilm-specific tolerance and resistance. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved. The current review deals with both phenotypic and molecular mechanisms of biofilm-specific antibiotic tolerance and resistance.

  10. Antibiotic proteins of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gabay, J E; Scott, R W; Campanelli, D; Griffith, J; Wilde, C; Marra, M N; Seeger, M; Nathan, C F

    1989-01-01

    Nine polypeptide peaks with antibiotic activity were resolved from human polymorphonuclear leukocyte azurophil granule membranes. All but 1 of the 12 constituent polypeptides were identified by N-terminal sequence analysis. Near quantitative recovery of protein and activity permitted an assessment of the contribution of each species to the overall respiratory-burst-independent antimicrobial capacity of the cell. Three uncharacterized polypeptides were discovered, including two broad-spectrum antibiotics. One of these, a defensin that we have designated human neutrophil antimicrobial peptide 4, was more potent than previously described defensins but represented less than 1% of the total protein. The other, named azurocidin, was abundant and comparable to bactericidal permeability-increasing factor in its contribution to the killing of Escherichia coli. Images PMID:2501794

  11. Comet assay with gill cells of Mytilus galloprovincialis end point tools for biomonitoring of water antibiotic contamination: Biological treatment is a reliable process for detoxification.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Zouiten, Amina; Dridi, Dorra; Tahrani, Leyla; Zouiten, Dorra; Mosrati, Ridha; Cherif, Ameur; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2016-04-01

    This article investigates the ability of Pseudomonas peli to treat industrial pharmaceuticals wastewater (PW). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis revealed the presence, in this PW, of a variety of antibiotics such as sulfathiazole, sulfamoxole, norfloxacine, cloxacilline, doxycycline, and cefquinome.P. peli was very effective to be grown in PW and inducts a remarkable increase in chemical oxygen demand and biochemical oxygen demand (140.31 and 148.51%, respectively). On the other hand, genotoxicity of the studied effluent, before and after 24 h of shaking incubation with P. peli, was evaluated in vivo in the Mediterranean wild mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis using comet assay for quantification of DNA fragmentation. Results show that PW exhibited a statistically significant (p< 0.001) genotoxic effect in a dose-dependent manner; indeed, the percentage of genotoxicity was 122.6 and 49.5% after exposure to 0.66 ml/kg body weight (b.w.); 0.33 ml/kg b.w. of PW, respectively. However, genotoxicity decreased strongly when tested with the PW obtained after incubation with P. peli We can conclude that using comet assay genotoxicity end points are useful tools to biomonitor the physicochemical and biological quality of water. Also, it could be concluded that P. peli can treat and detoxify the studied PW.

  12. Curing bacteria of antibiotic resistance: reverse antibiotics, a novel class of antibiotics in nature.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Igarashi, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yuh; Baba, Tadashi; Umekita, Maya; Akamatsu, Yuzuru

    2012-06-01

    By screening cultures of soil bacteria, we re-discovered an old antibiotic (nybomycin) as an antibiotic with a novel feature. Nybomycin is active against quinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with mutated gyrA genes but not against those with intact gyrA genes against which quinolone antibiotics are effective. Nybomycin-resistant mutant strains were generated from a quinolone-resistant, nybomycin-susceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strain Mu 50. The mutants, occurring at an extremely low rate (<1 × 10(-11)/generation), were found to have their gyrA genes back-mutated and to have lost quinolone resistance. Here we describe nybomycin as the first member of a novel class of antibiotics designated 'reverse antibiotics'.

  13. Different classes of antibiotics differentially influence shiga toxin production.

    PubMed

    McGannon, Colleen Marie; Fuller, Cynthia Ann; Weiss, Alison Ann

    2010-09-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) in Escherichia coli O157:H7 is encoded as a late gene product by temperate bacteriophage integrated into the chromosome. Phage late genes, including stx, are silent in the lysogenic state. However, stress signals, including some induced by antibiotics, trigger the phage to enter the lytic cycle, and phage replication and Stx production occur concurrently. In addition to the Stx produced by O157:H7, phage produced by O157:H7 can infect harmless intestinal E. coli and recruit them to produce Shiga toxin. To understand how antibiotics influence Stx production, Stx lysogens were treated with different classes of antibiotics in the presence or absence of phage-sensitive E. coli, and Stx-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis was monitored using luciferase-expressing Vero cells. Growth-inhibitory levels of antibiotics suppressed Stx production. Subinhibitory levels of antibiotics that target DNA synthesis, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, increased Stx production, while antibiotics that target the cell wall, transcription, or translation did not. More Stx was produced when E. coli O157:H7 was incubated in the presence of phage-sensitive E. coli than when grown as a pure culture. Remarkably, very high levels of Stx were detected even when growth of O157:H7 was completely suppressed by CIP. In contrast, azithromycin significantly reduced Stx levels even when O157:H7 viability remained high.

  14. A new antibiotic kills pathogens without detectable resistance.

    PubMed

    Ling, Losee L; Schneider, Tanja; Peoples, Aaron J; Spoering, Amy L; Engels, Ina; Conlon, Brian P; Mueller, Anna; Schäberle, Till F; Hughes, Dallas E; Epstein, Slava; Jones, Michael; Lazarides, Linos; Steadman, Victoria A; Cohen, Douglas R; Felix, Cintia R; Fetterman, K Ashley; Millett, William P; Nitti, Anthony G; Zullo, Ashley M; Chen, Chao; Lewis, Kim

    2015-01-22

    Antibiotic resistance is spreading faster than the introduction of new compounds into clinical practice, causing a public health crisis. Most antibiotics were produced by screening soil microorganisms, but this limited resource of cultivable bacteria was overmined by the 1960s. Synthetic approaches to produce antibiotics have been unable to replace this platform. Uncultured bacteria make up approximately 99% of all species in external environments, and are an untapped source of new antibiotics. We developed several methods to grow uncultured organisms by cultivation in situ or by using specific growth factors. Here we report a new antibiotic that we term teixobactin, discovered in a screen of uncultured bacteria. Teixobactin inhibits cell wall synthesis by binding to a highly conserved motif of lipid II (precursor of peptidoglycan) and lipid III (precursor of cell wall teichoic acid). We did not obtain any mutants of Staphylococcus aureus or Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to teixobactin. The properties of this compound suggest a path towards developing antibiotics that are likely to avoid development of resistance.

  15. Antibiotic Bactericidal Activity Is Countered by Maintaining pH Homeostasis in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, I. L.; Reichlen, M. J.; Honaker, R. W.; Leistikow, R. L.; Clambey, E. T.; Scobey, M. S.; Hinds, A. B.; Born, S. E.; Covey, C. R.; Schurr, M. J.; Lenaerts, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotics target specific biosynthetic processes essential for bacterial growth. It is intriguing that several commonalities connect the bactericidal activity of seemingly disparate antibiotics, such as the numerous conditions that confer broad-spectrum antibiotic tolerance. Whether antibiotics kill in a manner unique to their specific targets or by a universal mechanism is a critical and contested subject. Herein, we demonstrate that the bactericidal activity of diverse antibiotics against Mycobacterium smegmatis and four evolutionarily divergent bacterial pathogens was blocked by conditions that worked to maintain intracellular pH homeostasis. Single-cell pH analysis demonstrated that antibiotics increased the cytosolic pH of M. smegmatis, while conditions that promoted proton entry into the cytosol prevented intracellular alkalization and antibiotic killing. These findings led to a hypothesis that posits antibiotic lethality occurs when antibiotics obstruct ATP-consuming biosynthetic processes while metabolically driven proton efflux is sustained despite the loss of proton influx via ATP synthase. Consequently, without a concomitant reduction in respiratory proton efflux, cell death occurs due to intracellular alkalization. Our findings indicate the effects of antibiotics on pH homeostasis should be considered a potential mechanism contributing to antibiotic lethality. IMPORTANCE Since the discovery of antibiotics, mortality due to bacterial infection has decreased dramatically. However, infections from difficult to treat bacteria such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant pathogens have been on the rise. An understanding of the cascade of events that leads to cell death downstream of specific drug-target interactions is not well understood. We have discovered that killing by several classes of antibiotics was stopped by maintaining pH balance within the bacterial cell, consistent with a shared mechanism of antibiotic killing. Our

  16. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  17. Antibiotics that target protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Lisa S; Xie, Yun; Tor, Yitzhak

    2011-01-01

    The key role of the bacterial ribosome makes it an important target for antibacterial agents. Indeed, a large number of clinically useful antibiotics target this complex translational ribonucleoprotein machinery. The majority of these compounds, mostly of natural origin, bind to one of the three key ribosomal sites: the decoding (or A-site) on the 30S, the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) on the 50S, and the peptide exit tunnel on the 50S. Antibiotics that bind the A-site, such as the aminoglycosides, interfere with codon recognition and translocation. Peptide bond formation is inhibited when small molecules like oxazolidinones bind at the PTC. Finally, macrolides tend to block the growth of the amino acid chain at the peptide exit tunnel. In this article, the major classes of antibiotics that target the bacterial ribosome are discussed and classified according to their respective target. Notably, most antibiotics solely interact with the RNA components of the bacterial ribosome. The surge seen in the appearance of resistant bacteria has not been met by a parallel development of effective and broad-spectrum new antibiotics, as evident by the introduction of only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and lipopeptides, in the past decades. Nevertheless, this significant health threat has revitalized the search for new antibacterial agents and novel targets. High resolution structural data of many ribosome-bound antibiotics provide unprecedented insight into their molecular contacts and mode of action and inspire the design and synthesis of new candidate drugs that target this fascinating molecular machine.

  18. Quinolones: from antibiotics to autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, Stephan; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Diggle, Stephen P; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Since quinine was first isolated, animals, plants and microorganisms producing a wide variety of quinolone compounds have been discovered, several of which possess medicinally interesting properties ranging from antiallergenic and anticancer to antimicrobial activities. Over the years, these have served in the development of many synthetic drugs, including the successful fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and related bacteria produce a number of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones, some of which exhibit antimicrobial activity. However, quinolones such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline act as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. Here, we review selectively this extensive family of bicyclic compounds, from natural and synthetic antimicrobials to signalling molecules, with a special emphasis on the biology of P. aeruginosa. In particular, we review their nomenclature and biochemistry, their multiple properties as membrane-interacting compounds, inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex and iron chelators, as well as the regulation of their biosynthesis and their integration into the intricate quorum-sensing regulatory networks governing virulence and secondary metabolite gene expression. PMID:20738404

  19. Quinolones: from antibiotics to autoinducers.

    PubMed

    Heeb, Stephan; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Diggle, Stephen P; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    Since quinine was first isolated, animals, plants and microorganisms producing a wide variety of quinolone compounds have been discovered, several of which possess medicinally interesting properties ranging from antiallergenic and anticancer to antimicrobial activities. Over the years, these have served in the development of many synthetic drugs, including the successful fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and related bacteria produce a number of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones, some of which exhibit antimicrobial activity. However, quinolones such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline act as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. Here, we review selectively this extensive family of bicyclic compounds, from natural and synthetic antimicrobials to signalling molecules, with a special emphasis on the biology of P. aeruginosa. In particular, we review their nomenclature and biochemistry, their multiple properties as membrane-interacting compounds, inhibitors of the cytochrome bc(1) complex and iron chelators, as well as the regulation of their biosynthesis and their integration into the intricate quorum-sensing regulatory networks governing virulence and secondary metabolite gene expression.

  20. Putrescine reduces antibiotic-induced oxidative stress as a mechanism of modulation of antibiotic resistance in Burkholderia cenocepacia.

    PubMed

    El-Halfawy, Omar M; Valvano, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Communication of antibiotic resistance among bacteria via small molecules is implicated in transient reduction of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics, which could lead to therapeutic failures aggravating the problem of antibiotic resistance. Released putrescine from the extremely antibiotic-resistant bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia protects less-resistant cells from different species against the antimicrobial peptide polymyxin B (PmB). Exposure of B. cenocepacia to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and expression of the oxidative stress response regulator OxyR. We evaluated whether putrescine alleviates antibiotic-induced oxidative stress. The accumulation of intracellular ROS, such as superoxide ion and hydrogen peroxide, was assessed fluorometrically with dichlorofluorescein diacetate, while the expression of OxyR and putrescine synthesis enzymes was determined in luciferase assays using chromosomal promoter-lux reporter system fusions. We evaluated wild-type and isogenic deletion mutant strains with defects in putrescine biosynthesis after exposure to sublethal concentrations of PmB and other bactericidal antibiotics. Exogenous putrescine protected against oxidative stress induced by PmB and other antibiotics, whereas reduced putrescine synthesis resulted in increased ROS generation and a parallel increased sensitivity to PmB. Of the 3 B. cenocepacia putrescine-synthesizing enzymes, PmB induced only BCAL2641, an ornithine decarboxylase. This study reveals BCAL2641 as a critical component of the putrescine-mediated communication of antibiotic resistance and as a plausible target for designing inhibitors that would block the communication of such resistance among different bacteria, ultimately reducing the window of therapeutic failure in treating bacterial infections.

  1. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  2. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  3. [Strategies to avoid antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Kees, M G

    2013-03-01

    Antibiotics are used very frequently in critically ill patients as a causal and often life-saving treatment; however, the high density of use of broad spectrum antibiotics contributes to a further deterioration in resistance trends, which makes a rational prescription behavior mandatory. This particularly includes measures which lead to the reduction of antibiotic use, i.e. rigorous indications, targeted de-escalation and limited duration. For optimal efficacy of a necessary treatment the integration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles can be helpful.

  4. Effects of residual antibiotics in groundwater on Salmonella typhimurium: changes in antibiotic resistance, in vivo and in vitro pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Haznedaroglu, Berat Z; Yates, Marylynn V; Maduro, Morris F; Walker, Sharon L

    2012-01-01

    An outbreak-causing strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was exposed to groundwater with residual antibiotics for up to four weeks. Representative concentrations (0.05, 1, and 100 μg L(-1)) of amoxicillin, tetracycline, and a mixture of several other antibiotics (1 μg L(-1) each) were spiked into artificially prepared groundwater (AGW). Antibiotic susceptibility analysis and the virulence response of stressed Salmonella were determined on a weekly basis by using human epithelial cells (HEp2) and soil nematodes (C. elegans). Results have shown that Salmonella typhimurium remains viable for long periods of exposure to antibiotic-supplemented groundwater; however, they failed to cultivate as an indication of a viable but nonculturable state. Prolonged antibiotics exposure did not induce any changes in the antibiotic susceptibility profile of the S. typhimurium strain used in this study. S. typhimurium exposed to 0.05 and 1 μg L(-1) amoxicillin, and 1 μg L(-1) tetracycline showed hyper-virulent profiles in both in vitro and in vivo virulence assays with the HEp2 cells and C. elegans respectively, most evident following 2nd and 3rd weeks of exposure.

  5. Inhibition of intracellular growth of Listeria monocytogenes by antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, C; Avril, J L; Cartier, F; Berche, P

    1994-01-01

    We studied the activities of 15 antibiotics on the intracellular growth of Listeria monocytogenes in a HeLa cell line. After 24 h of contact with the infected cells, the antibiotics most effective against the intracellular growth of the 10 strains tested were amoxicillin, temafloxacin, and sparfloxacin, which nevertheless failed to totally eliminate the intracellular bacteria. Rifampin and co-trimoxazole had variable effects, depending on the isolates studied. The most active combinations were amoxicillin-sparfloxacin, co-trimoxazole-gentamicin, and sparfloxacin-co-trimoxazole. The results suggest the value of using a cell culture technique to study the activities of antibiotics against certain bacteria with intracellular sites of multiplication. PMID:8203836

  6. Mode of Action of Antibiotic U-24,544

    PubMed Central

    Reusser, Fritz

    1967-01-01

    Antibiotic U-24,544, a new antibacterial agent, was found to be an effective uncoupler of phosphorylation associated with the oxidation of glutamate and succinate in rat liver mitochondria. Respiration was inhibited during glutamate oxidation but not during succinate oxidation. In a medium deficient in inorganic phosphate, the agent showed slight stimulation of mitochondrial glutamate oxidation. Mitochondrial swelling induced by inorganic phosphate was suppressed. The antibiotic inhibited protein, nucleic acid, and cell wall synthesis in Mycobacterium avium cells nearly equally without a predominant inhibition of any one of these macromolecular biosynthetic processes. Nucleic acid and polypeptide synthesis remained unaffected, but respiration was inhibited in cell-free bacterial systems. It was thus concluded that the antibiotic interfered primarily with the cellular energy-generating processes. PMID:6069281

  7. Toxin Release of Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa after Exposure to Typical Tetracycline Antibiotic Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jing; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lumei; Qian, Jingru; Chen, Jiejing; Wu, Qingwen; Hu, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    The global usage of veterinary antibiotics is significant. Antibiotics can be released into aquatic environments and elicit toxic effects on non-target organisms. In this study, the growth characteristics and toxin release of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa) were examined to investigate the physiological effects of tetracycline antibiotics on aquatic life. Results showed that the degree of toxicities of the following target antibiotics was TC (tetracycline hydrochloride) > CTC (chlortetracycline hydrochloride) > OTC (oxytetracycline hydrochloride) in terms of growth parameters, EC10 (0.63, 1.86, and 3.02 mg/L, respectively), and EC20 (1.58, 4.09, and 4.86 mg/L, respectively) values. These antibiotics inhibited the production of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) to varying degrees. CTC interfered M. aeruginosa cells and decreased their ability to release MC-LR, but this antibiotic stimulated the ability of these cells to synthesize MC-LR at 2 and 5 mg/L. OTC elicited a relatively weaker toxicity than CTC did and reduced MC-LR release. TC was the most toxic among the three antibiotics, and this antibiotic simultaneously reduced intracellular and extracellular MC-LR equivalents. Our results helped elucidate the effects of tetracycline antibiotics on M. aeruginosa, which is essential for environmental evaluation and protection. Our results are also helpful for guiding the application of veterinary antibiotics in agricultural settings. PMID:28230795

  8. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    PubMed

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic.

  9. Synthetic biology era: Improving antibiotic's world.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Trampe, Silvia; Ceapa, Corina D; Manzo-Ruiz, Monserrat; Sánchez, Sergio

    2017-01-31

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogen microorganisms is problematic in the context of the current spectrum of available medication. The poor specificity and the high toxicity of some available molecules have made imperative the search for new strategies to improve the specificity and to pursue the discovery of novel compounds with increased bioactivity. Using living cells as platforms, synthetic biology has counteracted this problem by offering novel pathways to create synthetic systems with improved and desired functions. Among many other biotechnological approaches, the advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to design and construct novel biological systems in order to look for new drugs with increased bioactivity. Advancements have also been made in the redesigning of RNA and DNA molecules in order to engineer antibiotic clusters for antibiotic overexpression. As for the production of these antibacterial compounds, yeasts and filamentous fungi as well as gene therapy are utilized to enhance protein solubility. Specific delivery is achieved by creating chimeras using plant genes into bacterial hosts. Some of these synthetic systems are currently in clinical trials, proving the proficiency of synthetic biology in terms of both pharmacological activities as well as an increase in the biosafety of treatments. It is possible that we may just be seeing the tip of the iceberg, and synthetic biology applications will overpass expectations beyond our present knowledge.

  10. Mass spectrometry methods for predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Charretier, Yannick; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Developing elaborate techniques for clinical applications can be a complicated process. Whole-cell MALDI-TOF MS revolutionized reliable microorganism identification in clinical microbiology laboratories and is now replacing phenotypic microbial identification. This technique is a generic, accurate, rapid, and cost-effective growth-based method. Antibiotic resistance keeps emerging in environmental and clinical microorganisms, leading to clinical therapeutic challenges, especially for Gram-negative bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is used to reliably predict antimicrobial success in treating infection, but it is inherently limited by the need to isolate and grow cultures, delaying the application of appropriate therapies. Antibiotic resistance prediction by growth-independent methods is expected to reduce the turnaround time. Recently, the potential of next-generation sequencing and microarrays in predicting microbial resistance has been demonstrated, and this review evaluates the potential of MS in this field. First, technological advances are described, and the possibility of predicting antibiotic resistance by MS is then illustrated for three prototypical human pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Clearly, MS methods can identify antimicrobial resistance mediated by horizontal gene transfers or by mutations that affect the quantity of a gene product, whereas antimicrobial resistance mediated by target mutations remains difficult to detect.

  11. [Regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomycetes].

    PubMed

    Matseliukh, B P

    2006-01-01

    The review of literature presents the modern data about cascade regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in Streptomycetes including basal and global levels. The first regulatory level is presented by related proteins of SARP family playing the role of positive transcription factors of pathway-specific genes of clusters of antibiotic biosynthesis. In their turn these regulatory genes are under the control of higher regulatory level represented by bldA- and A-factor-dependent cascade regulation and two-component signal transduction system (AfsK-AfsR, AbsAl-AbsA2, AfsQ1-AfsQ2 and others), consisting of sensor protein kinase and response regulator protein.Streptomycetes, in contrast to other microorganisms, have dozens of protein kinases and related regulator proteins that testifies to the great importance of protein phosphorylation in regulation of secondary metabolism and morphogenesis in cell response to internal and external signals. The role of camp, ppGpp and other proteins in regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis was also considered in this review.

  12. Mechanisms of bacterial resistance to macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yoshinori

    1999-06-01

    Macrolides have been used in the treatment of infectious diseases since the late 1950s. Since that time, a finding of antagonistic action between erythromycin and spiramycin in clinical isolates1 led to evidence of the biochemical mechanism and to the current understanding of inducible or constitutive resistance to macrolides mediated by erm genes containing, respectively, the functional regulation mechanism or constitutively mutated regulatory region. These resistant mechanisms to macrolides are recognized in clinically isolated bacteria. (1) A methylase encoded by the erm gene can transform an adenine residue at 2058 (Escherichia coli equivalent) position of 23S rRNA into an 6N, 6N-dimethyladenine. Position 2058 is known to reside either in peptidyltransferase or in the vicinity of the enzyme region of domain V. Dimethylation renders the ribosome resistant to macrolides (MLS). Moreover, another finding adduced as evidence is that a mutation in the domain plays an important role in MLS resistance: one of several mutations (transition and transversion) such as A2058G, A2058C or U, and A2059G, is usually associated with MLS resistance in a few genera of bacteria. (2) M (macrolide antibiotics)- and MS (macrolide and streptogramin type B antibiotics)- or PMS (partial macrolide and streptogramin type B antibiotics)-phenotype resistant bacteria cause decreased accumulation of macrolides, occasionally including streptogramin type B antibiotics. The decreased accumulation, probably via enhanced efflux, is usually inferred from two findings: (i) the extent of the accumulated drug in a resistant cell increases as much as that in a susceptible cell in the presence of an uncoupling agent such as carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), and arsenate; (ii) transporter proteins, in M-type resistants, have mutual similarity to the 12-transmembrane domain present in efflux protein driven by proton-motive force, and in MS- or PMS-type resistants

  13. The Double Life of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response. “The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily under-dose himself and by exposing his microbes to nonlethal quantities of the drug make them resistant.”~Alexander Fleming PMID:24003650

  14. Antibiotic resistance: An ethical challenge.

    PubMed

    Littmann, Jasper; Buyx, Alena; Cars, Otto

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we argue that antibiotic resistance (ABR) raises a number of ethical problems that have not yet been sufficiently addressed. We outline four areas in which ethical issues that arise in relation to ABR are particularly pressing. First, the emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant infections exacerbates traditional ethical challenges of infectious disease control, such as the restriction of individual liberty for the protection of the public's health. Second, ABR raises issues of global distributive justice, both with regard to the overuse and lack of access to antibiotics. Third, the use of antibiotics in veterinary medicine raises serious concerns for animal welfare and sustainable farming practices. Finally, the diminishing effectiveness of antibiotics leads to questions about intergenerational justice and our responsibility for the wellbeing of future generations. We suggest that current policy discussions should take ethical conflicts into account and engage openly with the challenges that we outline in this paper.

  15. Multiscale Models of Antibiotic Probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics is one of the most important advances in the history of humankind. For eighty years human life expectancy and standards of living improved greatly thanks to antibiotics. But bacteria have been fighting back, developing resistance to our most potent molecules. New, alternative strategies must be explored as antibiotic therapies become obsolete because of bacterial resistance. Mathematical models and simulations guide the development of complex technologies, such as aircrafts, bridges, communication systems and transportation systems. Herein, models are discussed that guide the development of new antibiotic technologies. These models span multiple molecular and cellular scales, and facilitate the development of a technology that addresses a significant societal challenge. We argue that simulations can be a creative source of knowledge. PMID:25313349

  16. β-Lactam Antibiotics Renaissance

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wenling; Panunzio, Mauro; Biondi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s β-lactam antibiotics have been used to treat bacterial infections. However, emergence and dissemination of β-lactam resistance has reached the point where many marketed β-lactams no longer are clinically effective. The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and the progressive withdrawal of pharmaceutical companies from antibiotic research have evoked a strong reaction from health authorities, who have implemented initiatives to encourage the discovery of new antibacterials. Despite this gloomy scenario, several novel β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors have recently progressed into clinical trials, and many more such compounds are being investigated. Here we seek to provide highlights of recent developments relating to the discovery of novel β-lactam antibiotics and β-lactamase inhibitors. PMID:27025744

  17. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Optimization of lag time underlies antibiotic tolerance in evolved bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Ofer; Goldberg, Amir; Ronin, Irine; Shoresh, Noam; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2014-09-18

    The great therapeutic achievements of antibiotics have been dramatically undercut by the evolution of bacterial strategies that overcome antibiotic stress. These strategies fall into two classes. 'Resistance' makes it possible for a microorganism to grow in the constant presence of the antibiotic, provided that the concentration of the antibiotic is not too high. 'Tolerance' allows a microorganism to survive antibiotic treatment, even at high antibiotic concentrations, as long as the duration of the treatment is limited. Although both resistance and tolerance are important reasons for the failure of antibiotic treatments, the evolution of resistance is much better understood than that of tolerance. Here we followed the evolution of bacterial populations under intermittent exposure to the high concentrations of antibiotics used in the clinic and characterized the evolved strains in terms of both resistance and tolerance. We found that all strains adapted by specific genetic mutations, which became fixed in the evolved populations. By monitoring the phenotypic changes at the population and single-cell levels, we found that the first adaptive change to antibiotic stress was the development of tolerance through a major adjustment in the single-cell lag-time distribution, without a change in resistance. Strikingly, we found that the lag time of bacteria before regrowth was optimized to match the duration of the antibiotic-exposure interval. Whole genome sequencing of the evolved strains and restoration of the wild-type alleles allowed us to identify target genes involved in this antibiotic-driven phenotype: 'tolerance by lag' (tbl). Better understanding of lag-time evolution as a key determinant of the survival of bacterial populations under high antibiotic concentrations could lead to new approaches to impeding the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  19. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL

    PubMed Central

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:25649856

  20. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL.

    PubMed

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-07-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  1. High Concentration of Red Clay as an Alternative for Antibiotics in Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jee, Seung Cheol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in aquaculture raises environmental and food safety concerns because chronic exposure of an aquatic ecosystem to antibiotics can result in the spread of antibiotic resistance, bioaccumulation of antibiotics in the organisms, and transfer of antibiotics to humans. In an attempt to overcome these problems, high-concentration red clay was applied as an alternative antibiotic against the following common fish pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio alginolyticus, and Streptococcus equinus. The growth of A. salmonicida and V. alginolyticus was retarded by red clay, whereas that of S. equinus was promoted. Phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed the attachment of red clay on cell surfaces, resulting in rapid gravitational removal and cell surface damage in both A. salmonicida and V. alginolyticus, but not in S. equinus. Different cell wall properties of grampositive species may explain the unharmed cell surface of S. equinus. Significant levels of oxidative stress were generated in only the former two species, whereas significant changes in membrane permeability were found only in S. equinus, probably because of its physiological adaptation. The bacterial communities in water samples from Oncorhynchus mykiss aquacultures supplemented with red clay showed similar structure and diversity as those from oxytetracycline-treated water. Taken together, the antibiotic effects of high concentrations of red clay in aquaculture can be attributed to gravitational removal, cell surface damage, and oxidative stress production, and suggest that red clay may be used as an alternative for antibiotics in aquaculture.

  2. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals. PMID:21694883

  3. Cellular pharmacokinetics of telavancin, a novel lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, and analysis of lysosomal changes in cultured eukaryotic cells (J774 mouse macrophages and rat embryonic fibroblasts)

    PubMed Central

    Barcia-Macay, Maritza; Mouaden, Fatima; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Tulkens, Paul M.; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Background Telavancin is a lipoglycopeptide with multiple mechanisms of action that include membrane-destabilizing effects towards bacterial cells. It shows bactericidal activity against forms of Staphylococcus aureus (phagolysosomal infection) with different resistance phenotypes [methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus or vancomycin-resistant S. aureus]. We examine here the uptake, efflux and intracellular distribution of telavancin in eukaryotic cells as well as its potential to induce lysosomal changes (in comparison with vancomycin and oritavancin). Methods J774 macrophages and rat embryo fibroblasts were exposed for up to 24 and 72 h to telavancin (5–90 mg/L). The following studies were performed: measurement of 14C-labelled telavancin cellular uptake and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation), determination of pericellular membrane integrity (lactate dehydrogenase release), electron microscopy with morphometric analysis of changes in lysosome size and determination of total phospholipid and cholesterol content. Results The uptake of telavancin proceeded linearly as a function of time and concentration in both cell types (clearance rate of ∼10 mL/g of protein/h). Efflux (macrophages) was ∼5.7-fold slower. Telavancin subcellular distribution was superimposable on that of a lysosomal marker (N-acetyl-β-hexosaminidase). It did not cause an increase in the release of lactate dehydrogenase and did not induce significant increases in total phospholipid or cholesterol content. It caused only mild morphological lysosomal alterations (similar to vancomycin and much less than oritavancin by morphometric analysis). Conclusions Telavancin is taken up by eukaryotic cells and localizes in lysosomes, causing mild morphological alterations without evidence of lipid metabolism alterations. These data support our observations that telavancin is active against intracellular S. aureus. PMID:18375379

  4. Beta-lactam Antibiotics: From Antibiosis to Resistance and Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Kok-Fai; Schneper, Lisa; Mathee, Kalai

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY This review focuses on the era of antibiosis that led to a better understanding of bacterial morphology, in particlar the cell wall component peptidoglycan. This is an effort to take readers on a tour de force from the concept of antibiosis, to the serepidity of antibiotics, evolution of beta-lactam development, and the molecular biology of antibiotic resistance. These areas of research have culminated in a deeper understanding of microbiology, particularly in the area of bacterial cell wall synthesis and recycling. In spite of this knowledge, which has enabled design of new even more effective therapeutics to combat bacterial infection and has provided new research tools, antibiotic resistance remains a worldwide health care problem. PMID:20041868

  5. WAAR (World Alliance against Antibiotic Resistance): Safeguarding antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the five next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practicionners, and veterinarians. PMID:22958542

  6. Multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria and their role in antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Blair, Jessica M A; Richmond, Grace E; Piddock, Laura J V

    2014-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria express a plethora of efflux pumps that are capable of transporting structurally varied molecules, including antibiotics, out of the bacterial cell. This efflux lowers the intracellular antibiotic concentration, allowing bacteria to survive at higher antibiotic concentrations. Overexpression of some efflux pumps can cause clinically relevant levels of antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative pathogens. This review discusses the role of efflux in resistance of clinical isolates of Gram-negative bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms that control efflux pump expression, the recent advances in our understanding of efflux pump structure and how inhibition of efflux is a promising future strategy for tackling multidrug resistance in Gram-negative pathogens.

  7. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  8. Management Options For Reducing The Release Of Antibiotics And Antibiotic Resistance Genes To The Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: There is growing concern worldwide about the role of polluted soil and water - 77 environments in the development and dissemination of antibiotic resistance. 78 Objective: To identify management options for reducing the spread of antibiotics and 79 antibiotic resist...

  9. The general mode of translation inhibition by macrolide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Krishna; Kanabar, Pinal; Schryer, David; Florin, Tanja; Oh, Eugene; Bahroos, Neil; Tenson, Tanel; Weissman, Jonathan S; Mankin, Alexander S

    2014-11-11

    Macrolides are clinically important antibiotics thought to inhibit bacterial growth by impeding the passage of newly synthesized polypeptides through the nascent peptide exit tunnel of the bacterial ribosome. Recent data challenged this view by showing that macrolide antibiotics can differentially affect synthesis of individual proteins. To understand the general mechanism of macrolide action, we used genome-wide ribosome profiling and analyzed the redistribution of ribosomes translating highly expressed genes in bacterial cells treated with high concentrations of macrolide antibiotics. The metagene analysis indicated that inhibition of early rounds of translation, which would be characteristic of the conventional view of macrolide action, occurs only at a limited number of genes. Translation of most genes proceeds past the 5'-proximal codons and can be arrested at more distal codons when the ribosome encounters specific short sequence motifs. The problematic sequence motifs are confined to the nascent peptide residues in the peptidyl transferase center but not to the peptide segment that contacts the antibiotic molecule in the exit tunnel. Therefore, it appears that the general mode of macrolide action involves selective inhibition of peptide bond formation between specific combinations of donor and acceptor substrates. Additional factors operating in the living cell but not functioning during in vitro protein synthesis may modulate site-specific action of macrolide antibiotics.

  10. [New antibiotics - standstill or progress].

    PubMed

    Rademacher, J; Welte, T

    2017-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics has been ignored for a long time. But nowadays, increasing resistance is an important topic. For a decade no new antibiotics had been developed and it is not possible to quickly close this gap of new resistance and no new drugs. This work presents six new antibiotics (ceftaroline, ceftobiprole, solithromycin, tedizolid, ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam). In part, only expert opinions are given due to lack of study results.The two 5th generation cephalosporins ceftaroline and ceftobiprole have beside their equivalent efficacy to ceftriaxone (ceftaroline) and cefipim (ceftobiprole) high activity against MRSA. The fluoroketolide solithromycin should help against macrolide-resistant pathogens and has been shown to be noninferior to the fluorochinolones. The oxazolidinone tedizolid is effective against linezolid-resistant MRSA. The two cephalosporins ceftolozane/tazobactam and ceftazidime/avibactam are not only effective against gram-negative pathogens, but they have a very broad spectrum. Due to the efficacy against extended-spectrum β‑lactamases, they can relieve the selection pressure of the carbapenems. We benefit from all new antibiotics which can take the selection pressure from other often used antibiotics. The increasing number of resistant gram-negative pathogens worldwide is alarming. Thus, focusing on the development of new drugs is extremely important.

  11. Nucleotide Selectivity of Antibiotic Kinases▿

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3′)-IIIa, APH(2″)-Ib, and MPH(2′)-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3′)-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2′)-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2″)-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance. PMID:20231391

  12. Nucleotide selectivity of antibiotic kinases.

    PubMed

    Shakya, Tushar; Wright, Gerard D

    2010-05-01

    Antibiotic kinases, which include aminoglycoside and macrolide phosphotransferases (APHs and MPHs), pose a serious threat to currently used antimicrobial therapies. These enzymes show structural and functional homology with Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases, which is suggestive of a common ancestor. Surprisingly, recent in vitro studies using purified antibiotic kinase enzymes have revealed that a number are able to utilize GTP as the antibiotic phospho donor, either preferentially or exclusively compared to ATP, the canonical phosphate donor in most biochemical reactions. To further explore this phenomenon, we examined three enzymes, APH(3')-IIIa, APH(2'')-Ib, and MPH(2')-I, using a competitive assay that mimics in vivo nucleotide triphosphate (NTP) concentrations and usage by each enzyme. Downstream analysis of reaction products by high-performance liquid chromatography enabled the determination of partitioning of phosphate flux from NTP donors to antibiotics. Using this ratio along with support from kinetic analysis and inhibitor studies, we find that under physiologic concentrations of NTPs, APH(3')-IIIa exclusively uses ATP, MPH(2')-I exclusively uses GTP, and APH(2'')-Ib is able to use both species with a preference for GTP. These differences reveal likely different pathways in antibiotic resistance enzyme evolution and can be exploited in selective inhibitor design to counteract resistance.

  13. A new approach for the discovery of antibiotics by targeting non-multiplying bacteria: a novel topical antibiotic for staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanmin; Shamaei-Tousi, Alireza; Liu, Yingjun; Coates, Anthony

    2010-07-27

    In a clinical infection, multiplying and non-multiplying bacteria co-exist. Antibiotics kill multiplying bacteria, but they are very inefficient at killing non-multipliers which leads to slow or partial death of the total target population of microbes in an infected tissue. This prolongs the duration of therapy, increases the emergence of resistance and so contributes to the short life span of antibiotics after they reach the market. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria from the onset of an antibiotic development program is a new concept. This paper describes the proof of principle for this concept, which has resulted in the development of the first antibiotic using this approach. The antibiotic, called HT61, is a small quinolone-derived compound with a molecular mass of about 400 Daltons, and is active against non-multiplying bacteria, including methicillin sensitive and resistant, as well as Panton-Valentine leukocidin-carrying Staphylococcus aureus. It also kills mupirocin resistant MRSA. The mechanism of action of the drug is depolarisation of the cell membrane and destruction of the cell wall. The speed of kill is within two hours. In comparison to the conventional antibiotics, HT61 kills non-multiplying cells more effectively, 6 logs versus less than one log for major marketed antibiotics. HT61 kills methicillin sensitive and resistant S. aureus in the murine skin bacterial colonization and infection models. No resistant phenotype was produced during 50 serial cultures over a one year period. The antibiotic caused no adverse affects after application to the skin of minipigs. Targeting non-multiplying bacteria using this method should be able to yield many new classes of antibiotic. These antibiotics may be able to reduce the rate of emergence of resistance, shorten the duration of therapy, and reduce relapse rates.

  14. Bedaquiline, an FDA-approved antibiotic, inhibits mitochondrial function and potently blocks the proliferative expansion of stem-like cancer cells (CSCs).

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Marco; Lamb, Rebecca; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2016-08-01

    Bedaquiline (a.k.a., Sirturo) is an anti-microbial agent, which is approved by the FDA for the treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diaryl-quinoline compound, that mechanistically inhibits the bacterial ATP-synthase, and shows potent activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB. Interestingly, eukaryotic mitochondria originally evolved from engulfed aerobic bacteria. Thus, we hypothesized that, in mammalian cells, bedaquiline might also target the mitochondrial ATP-synthase, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion. Here, we show that bedaquiline has anti-cancer activity, directed against Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs). More specifically, we demonstrate that bedaquiline treatment of MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibits mitochondrial oxygen-consumption, as well as glycolysis, but induces oxidative stress. Importantly, bedaquiline significantly blocks the propagation and expansion of MCF7-derived CSCs, with an IC-50 of approx. 1-μM, as determined using the mammosphere assay. Similarly, bedaquiline also reduces both the CD44+/CD24low/- CSC and ALDH+ CSC populations, under anchorage-independent growth conditions. In striking contrast, bedaquiline significantly increases oxygen consumption in normal human fibroblasts, consistent with the fact that it is well-tolerated in patients treated for TB infections. As such, future pre-clinical studies and human clinical trials in cancer patients may be warranted. Interestingly, we also highlight that bedaquiline shares certain structural similarities with trans-piceatannol and trans-resveratrol, which are known natural flavonoid inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase (complex V) and show anti-aging properties.

  15. Bedaquiline, an FDA-approved antibiotic, inhibits mitochondrial function and potently blocks the proliferative expansion of stem-like cancer cells (CSCs)

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Marco; Lamb, Rebecca; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Bedaquiline (a.k.a., Sirturo) is an anti-microbial agent, which is approved by the FDA for the treatment of multi-drug resistant pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Bedaquiline is a first-in-class diaryl-quinoline compound, that mechanistically inhibits the bacterial ATP-synthase, and shows potent activity against both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant TB. Interestingly, eukaryotic mitochondria originally evolved from engulfed aerobic bacteria. Thus, we hypothesized that, in mammalian cells, bedaquiline might also target the mitochondrial ATP-synthase, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP depletion. Here, we show that bedaquiline has anti-cancer activity, directed against Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs). More specifically, we demonstrate that bedaquiline treatment of MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibits mitochondrial oxygen-consumption, as well as glycolysis, but induces oxidative stress. Importantly, bedaquiline significantly blocks the propagation and expansion of MCF7-derived CSCs, with an IC-50 of approx. 1-μM, as determined using the mammosphere assay. Similarly, bedaquiline also reduces both the CD44+/CD24low/− CSC and ALDH+ CSC populations, under anchorage-independent growth conditions. In striking contrast, bedaquiline significantly increases oxygen consumption in normal human fibroblasts, consistent with the fact that it is well-tolerated in patients treated for TB infections. As such, future pre-clinical studies and human clinical trials in cancer patients may be warranted. Interestingly, we also highlight that bedaquiline shares certain structural similarities with trans-piceatannol and trans-resveratrol, which are known natural flavonoid inhibitors of the mitochondrial ATP-synthase (complex V) and show anti-aging properties. PMID:27344270

  16. [Alliance against MDRO: safeguarding antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Carlet, J; Rambaud, C; Pulcini, C

    2012-09-01

    Resistance to antibiotics has increased recently to a dramatic extend, and the pipeline of new antibiotics is almost dry for the 5 next years. Failures happen already for trivial community acquired infections, like pyelonephritis, or peritonitis, and this is likely to increase. Difficult surgical procedures, transplants, and other immunosuppressive therapies will become far more risky. Resistance is mainly due to an excessive usage of antibiotics, in all sectors, including the animal one. Action is urgently needed. Therefore, an alliance against MDRO has been recently created, which includes health care professionals, consumers, health managers, and politicians. The document highlights the different proposed measures, and represents a strong consensus between the different professionals, including general practitioners, and veterinarians.

  17. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  18. Cairomycin B, a New Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, Ibrahim R.; Abedallah, Nadia; Fathy, Shadia

    1977-01-01

    Cairomycin B is a new cyclic peptide antibiotic that was isolated from Streptomyces As-C-19 obtained from the soil of Cairo. The antibiotic had the following empirical formula: C10H15N3O3; on acid hydrolysis, it yielded aspartic acid and lysine. Spectral analysis and its chemical characteristics indicated that it was a cyclic peptide. The antibiotic melted at 120 to 121°C and was freely soluble in chloroform, ethyl acetate, and acetone, slightly soluble in alcohols, and rather insoluble in water and petroleum ether. Cairomycin B was mainly active against gram-positive bacteria, with high toxicity to experimental animals and weak serum-binding properties. PMID:855995

  19. Supercomputer Simulations Help Develop New Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    ScienceCinema

    Zgurskaya, Helen; Smith, Jeremy

    2016-11-23

    ORNL leveraged powerful supercomputing to support research led by University of Oklahoma scientists to identify chemicals that seek out and disrupt bacterial proteins called efflux pumps, known to be a major cause of antibiotic resistance. By running simulations on Titan, the team selected molecules most likely to target and potentially disable the assembly of efflux pumps found in E. coli bacteria cells.

  20. Supercomputer Simulations Help Develop New Approach to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Zgurskaya, Helen; Smith, Jeremy

    2016-11-17

    ORNL leveraged powerful supercomputing to support research led by University of Oklahoma scientists to identify chemicals that seek out and disrupt bacterial proteins called efflux pumps, known to be a major cause of antibiotic resistance. By running simulations on Titan, the team selected molecules most likely to target and potentially disable the assembly of efflux pumps found in E. coli bacteria cells.

  1. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  2. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Symptom Relief

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  3. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  4. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - What You Can Do

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  5. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - What Everyone Should Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  6. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  7. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  8. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Bronchitis (Chest Cold)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  9. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sinus Infection (Sinusitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  10. Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work - Sore Throat

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  11. Influence of Dissolved Organic Matter on Tetracycline Bioavailability to an Antibiotic-Resistant Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zeyou; Zhang, Yingjie; Gao, Yanzheng; Boyd, Stephen A; Zhu, Dongqiang; Li, Hui

    2015-09-15

    Complexation of tetracycline with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aqueous solution could alter the bioavailability of tetracycline to bacteria, thereby alleviating selective pressure for development of antibiotic resistance. In this study, an Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporter construct with antibiotic resistance genes coupled to green fluorescence protein was exposed to tetracycline in the presence of DOM derived from humic acids. Complexation between tetracycline and DOM diminished tetracycline bioavailability to E. coli, as indicated by reduced expression of antibiotic resistance genes. Increasing DOM concentration resulted in decreasing bioavailability of tetracycline to the bioreporter. Freely dissolved tetracycline (not complexed with DOM) was identified as the major fraction responsible for the rate and magnitude of antibiotic resistance genes expressed. Furthermore, adsorption of DOM on bacterial cell surfaces inhibited tetracycline diffusion into the bioreporter cells. The magnitude of the inhibition was related to the amount of DOM adsorbed and tetracycline affinity for the DOM. These findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which the bioavailability of tetracycline antibiotics to bacteria is reduced by DOM present in water. Agricultural lands receiving livestock manures commonly have elevated levels of both DOM and antibiotics; the DOM could suppress the bioavailability of antibiotics, hence reducing selective pressure on bacteria for development of antibiotic resistance.

  12. Antibiotic treatment selects for cooperative virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-09-08

    Antibiotics are powerful therapeutics but are not equally effective against all cells in bacterial populations. Bacteria that express an antibiotic-tolerant phenotype ("persisters") can evade treatment [1]. Persisters can cause relapses of the infection after the end of the therapy [2]. It is still poorly understood whether persistence affects the evolution of bacterial virulence. During infections, persisters have been found preferentially at particular sites within the host [3, 4]. If bacterial virulence factors are required to reach such sites, treatment with antibiotics could impose selection on the expression of virulence genes, in addition to their well-established effects on bacterial resistance. Here, we report that treatment with antibiotics selects for virulence and fosters transmissibility of Salmonella Typhimurium. In a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea, treatment with the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin reverses the outcome of competition between wild-type bacteria and avirulent mutants that can spontaneously arise during within-host evolution [5]. While avirulent mutants take over the gut lumen and abolish disease transmission in untreated mice, ciprofloxacin tilts the balance in favor of virulent, wild-type bacteria. This is explained by the need for virulence factors to invade gut tissues and form a persistent reservoir. Avirulent mutants remain in the gut lumen and are eradicated. Upon cessation of antibiotic treatment, tissue-lodged wild-type pathogens reseed the gut lumen and thereby facilitate disease transmissibility to new hosts. Our results suggest a general principle by which antibiotic treatment can promote cooperative virulence during within-host evolution, increase duration of transmissibility, and thereby enhance the spread of an infectious disease.

  13. New Technologies for Rapid Bacterial Identification and Antibiotic Resistance Profiling.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Shana O

    2017-04-01

    Conventional approaches to bacterial identification and drug susceptibility testing typically rely on culture-based approaches that take 2 to 7 days to return results. The long turnaround times contribute to the spread of infectious disease, negative patient outcomes, and the misuse of antibiotics that can contribute to antibiotic resistance. To provide new solutions enabling faster bacterial analysis, a variety of approaches are under development that leverage single-cell analysis, microfluidic concentration and detection strategies, and ultrasensitive readout mechanisms. This review discusses recent advances in this area and the potential of new technologies to enable more effective management of infectious disease.

  14. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus mutans: Comparison of Serotype Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Little, Wayne A.; Thomson, Lynn A.; Bowen, William H.

    1979-01-01

    A total of 82 strains of Streptococcus mutans representing serotypes a through g were tested for susceptibility to erythromycin, penicillin, methicillin, lincomycin, tetracycline, vancomycin, gentamicin, streptomycin, neomycin, kanamycin, bacitracin, and polymyxin B. Strains included stock cultures and isolates from human and animal dental plaque. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were determined by a broth-microdilution procedure. The major differences in antibiotic susceptibility observed among the serotypes resulted with antibiotics which act on the cell surface. Bacitracin was most active against serotype a strains and polymyxin B against serotype b strains. Serotypes a, d, and g were less susceptible than the other serotypes to methicillin. PMID:464571

  15. Probiotic approach to prevent antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Arthur C; Forssten, Sofia; Hibberd, Ashley A; Lyra, Anna; Stahl, Buffy

    2016-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms, mainly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although also strain of other species are commercialized, that have a beneficial effect on the host. From the perspective of antibiotic use, probiotics have been observed to reduce the risk of certain infectious disease such as certain types of diarrhea and respiratory tract infection. This may be accompanied with a reduced need of antibiotics for secondary infections. Antibiotics tend to be effective against most common diseases, but increasingly resistance is being observed among pathogens. Probiotics are specifically selected to not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and not carry transferable antibiotic resistance. Concomitant use of probiotics with antibiotics has been observed to reduce the incidence, duration and/or severity of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. This contributes to better adherence to the antibiotic prescription and thereby reduces the evolution of resistance. To what extent probiotics directly reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance is still much under investigation; but maintaining a balanced microbiota during antibiotic use may certainly provide opportunities for reducing the spread of resistances. Key messages Probiotics may reduce the risk for certain infectious diseases and thereby reduce the need for antibiotics. Probiotics may reduce the risk for antibiotic-associated diarrhea Probiotics do not contribute to the spread of antibiotic resistance and may even reduce it.

  16. Synergistic Photothermal and Antibiotic Killing of Biofilm-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Using Targeted Antibiotic-Loaded Gold Nanoconstructs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to conventional antibiotics is a growing public health concern that is quickly outpacing the development of new antibiotics. This has led the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to designate Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species as “ESKAPE pathogens” on the basis of the rapidly decreasing availability of useful antibiotics. This emphasizes the urgent need for alternative therapeutic strategies to combat infections caused by these and other bacterial pathogens. In this study, we used Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) as a proof-of-principle ESKAPE pathogen to demonstrate that an appropriate antibiotic (daptomycin) can be incorporated into polydopamine-coated gold nanocages (AuNC@PDA) and that daptomycin-loaded AuNC@PDA can be conjugated to antibodies targeting a species-specific surface protein (staphylococcal protein A; Spa) as a means of achieving selective delivery of the nanoconstructs directly to the bacterial cell surface. Targeting specificity was confirmed by demonstrating a lack of binding to mammalian cells, reduced photothermal and antibiotic killing of the Spa-negative species Staphylococcus epidermidis, and reduced killing of S. aureus in the presence of unconjugated anti-Spa antibodies. We demonstrate that laser irradiation at levels within the current safety standard for use in humans can be used to achieve both a lethal photothermal effect and controlled release of the antibiotic, thus resulting in a degree of therapeutic synergy capable of eradicating viable S. aureus cells. The system was validated using planktonic bacterial cultures of both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains and subsequently shown to be effective in the context of an established biofilm, thus indicating that this approach could be used to facilitate the effective treatment of intrinsically resistant biofilm infections. PMID

  17. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the antibiotic discharge outer membrane lipoprotein OprM of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an exceptionally long unit cell and complex lattice structure

    SciTech Connect

    Akama, Hiroyuki; Kanemaki, Misa; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nakae, Taiji

    2005-01-01

    The OprM subunit of the MexAB-OprM efflux pump in P. aeruginosa is an outer membrane-anchored lipoprotein. OprM crystals have been grown at 293 K in the presence of 2-methyl-2,4-propanediol and a combination of surfactants and diffracted to 2.56 Å resolution. Crystals of the drug-discharge outer membrane protein OprM (MW = 50.9 kDa) of the MexAB-OprM multidrug transporter of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been grown at 293 K in the presence of 2-methyl-2,4-propanediol and a combination of surfactants. The crystal belonged to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 1044.3 Å. Diffraction data for OprM were obtained using the undulator synchrotron-radiation beamline at SPring-8 (BL44XU, Osaka University), which allowed an extra-long specimen-to-detector distance with a wide detector area. The crystal diffracted to 2.56 Å resolution using 0.9 Å X-rays from the synchrotron-radiation source. A heavy-atom derivative for isomorphous replacement phasing was obtained using iridium chloride.

  18. Host-dependent Induction of Transient Antibiotic Resistance: A Prelude to Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Ersoy, Selvi C.; Shimp, William R.; House, John K.; Marth, Jamey D.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Mahan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Current antibiotic testing does not include the potential influence of host cell environment on microbial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance, hindering appropriate therapeutic intervention. We devised a strategy to identify the presence of host–pathogen interactions that alter antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings revealed a bacterial mechanism that promotes antibiotic resistance in vivo at concentrations of drug that far exceed dosages determined by standardized antimicrobial testing. This mechanism has escaped prior detection because it is reversible and operates within a subset of host tissues and cells. Bacterial pathogens are thereby protected while their survival promotes the emergence of permanent drug resistance. This host-dependent mechanism of transient antibiotic resistance is applicable to multiple pathogens and has implications for the development of more effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:26501114

  19. Host-dependent Induction of Transient Antibiotic Resistance: A Prelude to Treatment Failure.

    PubMed

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z; Heithoff, Douglas M; Ersoy, Selvi C; Shimp, William R; House, John K; Marth, Jamey D; Smith, Jeffrey W; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Current antibiotic testing does not include the potential influence of host cell environment on microbial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance, hindering appropriate therapeutic intervention. We devised a strategy to identify the presence of host-pathogen interactions that alter antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings revealed a bacterial mechanism that promotes antibiotic resistance in vivo at concentrations of drug that far exceed dosages determined by standardized antimicrobial testing. This mechanism has escaped prior detection because it is reversible and operates within a subset of host tissues and cells. Bacterial pathogens are thereby protected while their survival promotes the emergence of permanent drug resistance. This host-dependent mechanism of transient antibiotic resistance is applicable to multiple pathogens and has implications for the development of more effective antimicrobial therapies.

  20. Spatial mapping of antibiotic resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serious concern for modern animal production is the fear that feed antimicrobials, such as monensin, increase the potential for high levels of antibiotic resistant (AR) gene prevalence in the manure, which may subsequently be shared with soil communities and eventually be taken up by human pathoge...

  1. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work.

  2. Antibiotic resistance: a geopolitical issue.

    PubMed

    Carlet, J; Pulcini, C; Piddock, L J V

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), associated with a lack of new antibiotics, is a major threat. Some countries have been able to contain resistance, but in most countries the numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to increase, along with antibiotic consumption by humans and animals. AMR is a global issue, and concerns all decision-makers worldwide. Some initiatives have been undertaken in the last 15 years, in particular by the WHO, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, and the CDC, but those initiatives were partial and poorly implemented, without coordination. Very recently, some important initiatives have been implemented by the WHO. Since 2009, a US and European joint task force, the Trans-Atlantic Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance, has been working on common recommendations. At a national level, some important initiatives have been implemented, in particular in European countries and in the USA. The Chennai declaration, in India, is also a good example of a multidisciplinary and national initiative that was highly political. Finally, several non-governmental non-profit organizations are also very active, and have helped to raise awareness about the problem of AMR. In the future, this global issue will need political involvement and strong cooperation between countries and between international agencies.

  3. Antibiotic Therapy of Staphylococcal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hawks, Gordon H.

    1965-01-01

    The antibiotic treatment of staphylococcal infections remains a problem. Isolation of the organism and sensitivity testing are necessary in the choice of antibiotic. Penicillin G is the most effective penicillin against non-penicillinase-producing staphy-lococci; for the penicillinase producers there is very little to choose between the semisynthetic penicillins, methicillin, cloxacillin, nafcillin and oxacillin. For patients who are hypersensitive to penicillin, the bacteriostatic drugs (erythromycin, novobiocin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, oleandomycin) are useful for mild infections, while for more severe illness the bactericidal drugs (vancomycin, ristocetin, kanamycin, bacitracin, neomycin) have been used successfully. Acute staphylococcal enterocolitis is probably best treated by a semisynthetic penicillin. Other antibiotics which have been found useful, with clinical trials, for staphylococcal infections are cephalosporin, fucidin, cephaloridine and lincomycin. The latter drug has been reported of value in the treatment of osteomyelitis. There is little justification for the prophylactic use of antibiotics to prevent staphylococcal infection. Surgical drainage is still an important adjunct in the treatment of many staphylococcal infections. PMID:5318575

  4. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja; G. de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue. PMID:23882264

  5. Global surveillance of antibiotic sensitivity of Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, F.; Lewis, M. J.; Pearson, N. J.

    1976-01-01

    Strains of Vibrio cholerae—1156 from various parts of the world—were examined by standardized antibiotic sensitivity tests in one centre, to determine the global incidence of antibiotic resistance in this organism and to assess the extent to which differences in methods of sensitivity testing might be responsible for discrepancies in the reported incidence of resistant strains. Of the strains examined, 1127 were fully sensitive to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, furazolidone, and three different sulphonamides, 27 showed stable and reproducible resistance to one or more of these agents, and 2 proved to contain a minority of cells with unstable, presumably plasmid-borne, resistance to chloram-phenicol. Unstable resistance to antibiotics may be common in V. cholerae but rarely recognized, and may account for some of the discrepancies in the reported incidence of resistant strains. PMID:1088100

  6. A common mechanism of cellular death induced by bactericidal antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kohanski, Michael A; Dwyer, Daniel J; Hayete, Boris; Lawrence, Carolyn A; Collins, James J

    2007-09-07

    Antibiotic mode-of-action classification is based upon drug-target interaction and whether the resultant inhibition of cellular function is lethal to bacteria. Here we show that the three major classes of bactericidal antibiotics, regardless of drug-target interaction, stimulate the production of highly deleterious hydroxyl radicals in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, which ultimately contribute to cell death. We also show, in contrast, that bacteriostatic drugs do not produce hydroxyl radicals. We demonstrate that the mechanism of hydroxyl radical formation induced by bactericidal antibiotics is the end product of an oxidative damage cellular death pathway involving the tricarboxylic acid cycle, a transient depletion of NADH, destabilization of iron-sulfur clusters, and stimulation of the Fenton reaction. Our results suggest that all three major classes of bactericidal drugs can be potentiated by targeting bacterial systems that remediate hydroxyl radical damage, including proteins involved in triggering the DNA damage response, e.g., RecA.

  7. Differential effects of thiopeptide and orthosomycin antibiotics on translational GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Liu, Hanqing; Chen, Yuanwei; Starosta, Agata L.; Márquez, Viter; Ivanova, Marina; Cooperman, Barry S.; Wilson, Daniel N.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The ribosome is a major target in the bacterial cell for antibiotics. Here we dissect the effects that the thiopeptide antibiotics thiostrepton (ThS) and micrococcin (MiC) as well as the orthosomycin antibiotic evernimicin (Evn) have on translational GTPases. We demonstrate that, like ThS, MiC is a translocation inhibitor, and that the activation by MiC of the ribosome-dependent GTPase activity of EF-G is dependent on the presence of the ribosomal proteins L7/L12 as well as the G′ subdomain of EF-G. In contrast, Evn does not inhibit translocation, but is a potent inhibitor of back-translocation as well as IF2-dependent 70S initiation complex formation. Collectively, these results shed insights not only into fundamental aspects of translation, but also into the unappreciated specificities of these classes of translational inhibitors. PMID:21609840

  8. Influence of the Charge State on the Structures and Interactions of Vancomycin Antibiotics with Cell-Wall Analogue Peptides: Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhibo; Vorpagel, Erich R.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-02-16

    In this study we examined the effect of the charge state on the energetics and dynamics of dissociation of the non-covalent complex between the vancomycin and the cell wall peptide analogue Nα,Nε-diacetyl-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala (V-Ac2KDADA). The binding energies between the vancomycin and the peptide were obtained from the RRKM modeling of the time- and energy resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) experiments. Our results demonstrate that the stability of the complex toward fragmentation increases in the order: [V+Ac2KDADA+H]+2 < [V+Ac2KDADA+H]+ < [V+Ac2KDADA-H]-. Dissociation of the singly protonated and singly deprotonated complex is characterized by very large entropy effects indicating substantial increase in the conformational flexibility of the resulting products. The experimental threshold energies of 1.75 eV and 1.34 eV obtained for the [V+Ac2KDADA-H]- and [V+Ac2KDADA+H]+ , respectively, are in excellent agreement with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The increased stability of the deprotonated complex observed experimentally is attributed to the presence of three charged sites in the deprotonated complex as compared to only one charged site in the singly protonated complex. The low binding energy of 0.93 eV obtained for the doubly protonated complex suggests that this ion is destabilized by Coulomb repulsion between the singly protonated vancomycin and the singly protonated peptide comprising the complex.

  9. Simultaneous breakdown of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaneti, Galoz; Sarig, Hadar; Marjieh, Ibrahim; Fadia, Zaknoon; Mor, Amram

    2013-12-01

    In previous studies, the oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) C12(ω7)K-β12 added to cultures of gram-positive bacteria exerted a bacteriostatic activity that was associated with membrane depolarization, even at high concentrations. Here, we report that multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, unlike other gram-positive species, have reverted to the sensitive phenotype when exposed to subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of the OAK, thereby increasing antibiotics potency by up to 3 orders of magnitude. Such chemosensitization was achieved using either cytoplasm or cell-wall targeting antibiotics. Moreover, eventual emergence of resistance to antibiotics was significantly delayed. Using the mouse peritonitis-sepsis model, we show that on single-dose administration of oxacillin and OAK combinations, death induced by a lethal staphylococcal infection was prevented in a synergistic manner, thereby supporting the likelihood for synergism to persist under in vivo conditions. Toward illuminating the molecular basis for these observations, we present data arguing that sub-MIC OAK interactions with the plasma membrane can inhibit proton-dependent signal transduction responsible for expression and export of resistance factors, as demonstrated for β-lactamase and PBP2a. Collectively, the data reveal a potentially useful approach for overcoming antibiotic resistance and for preventing resistance from emerging as readily as when bacteria are exposed to an antibiotic alone.

  10. What Can Be Done about Antibiotic Resistance?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us General Background: What can be done about Antibiotic Resistance? What can I do? Are antibacterial agents, such as antibacterial soaps, a solution? Are antibiotics regulated? Is there any international action on the ...

  11. Alliance for the Prudent Use of Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Competencies Current Projects Completed Projects The Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance ... visit our partner lab at the Center for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance . Antibiotic Resistance in the ...

  12. When and How to Take Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... complete dose, and they will not work to kill all your disease causing bacteria. Taking partial doses ... dose of the appropriate antibiotic is needed to kill all the harmful bacteria. How safe are antibiotics? ...

  13. Origins and evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-09-01

    Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory.

  14. Antibiotic stewardship programmes and the surgeon's role.

    PubMed

    Çakmakçi, M

    2015-04-01

    Inappropriate antibiotic use is a frequent occurrence, especially in surgical units. Among the unnecessary costs of such usage are unfavourable outcomes for patients and the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. Antibiotic stewardship programmes aim to limit the spread of antibiotic resistance by promoting thoughtful prescribing of antibiotics. Such programmes usually try to control inappropriate use of antibiotics; to optimize the choice of drug, dosing, route, and duration of therapy; to maximize clinical cure or prevention of infection; and to limit unwanted effects and excess cost. In this paper, I discuss the impact of improper use of antibiotics and outline why I believe that antibiotic stewardship is likely to be the best way of dealing with it. Engagement of surgeons in antibiotic stewardship programmes is crucial to their success.

  15. Evolving medicinal chemistry strategies in antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Andrew C; Johnson, Jarrod W; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-12-01

    Chemical modification of synthetic or natural product antibiotic scaffolds to expand potency and spectrum and to bypass mechanisms of resistance has dominated antibiotic drug discovery and proven immensely successful. However, the inexorable evolution of drug resistance coupled with a drought in innovation in antibiotic discovery contribute to a dearth of new drugs entering to market. Better understanding of the physicochemical properties of antibiotic chemical space is required to inform new antibiotic discovery. Innovations such as the development of antibiotic adjuvants to preserve efficacy of existing drugs together with expanding antibiotic chemical diversity through synthetic biology or new techniques to mine antibiotic producing organisms, are required to bridge the growing gap between the need for new drugs and their discovery.

  16. Origins and Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Julian; Davies, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and every means of horizontal gene transmission to develop multiple mechanisms of resistance for each and every antibiotic introduced into practice clinically, agriculturally, or otherwise. This review presents the salient aspects of antibiotic resistance development over the past half-century, with the oft-restated conclusion that it is time to act. To achieve complete restitution of therapeutic applications of antibiotics, there is a need for more information on the role of environmental microbiomes in the rise of antibiotic resistance. In particular, creative approaches to the discovery of novel antibiotics and their expedited and controlled introduction to therapy are obligatory. PMID:20805405

  17. Sequence-Specific Targeting of Bacterial Resistance Genes Increases Antibiotic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Michael; Daly, Seth M.; Greenberg, David E.; Toprak, Erdal

    2016-01-01

    The lack of effective and well-tolerated therapies against antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a global public health problem leading to prolonged treatment and increased mortality. To improve the efficacy of existing antibiotic compounds, we introduce a new method for strategically inducing antibiotic hypersensitivity in pathogenic bacteria. Following the systematic verification that the AcrAB-TolC efflux system is one of the major determinants of the intrinsic antibiotic resistance levels in Escherichia coli, we have developed a short antisense oligomer designed to inhibit the expression of acrA and increase antibiotic susceptibility in E. coli. By employing this strategy, we can inhibit E. coli growth using 2- to 40-fold lower antibiotic doses, depending on the antibiotic compound utilized. The sensitizing effect of the antisense oligomer is highly specific to the targeted gene’s sequence, which is conserved in several bacterial genera, and the oligomer does not have any detectable toxicity against human cells. Finally, we demonstrate that antisense oligomers improve the efficacy of antibiotic combinations, allowing the combined use of even antagonistic antibiotic pairs that are typically not favored due to their reduced activities. PMID:27631336

  18. The In vitro Antibiotic Tolerant Persister Population in Burkholderia pseudomallei is Altered by Environmental Factors.

    PubMed

    Nierman, William C; Yu, Yan; Losada, Liliana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persistence due to antibiotic tolerance is a critical aspect of antibiotic treatment failure, disease latency, and chronic or reemergent infections. The levels of persisters is especially notable for the opportunistic Gram-negative pathogens from the Burkholderia and Pseudomonas genera. We examined the rate of drug tolerant persisters in Burkholderia pseudomallei, Burkholderia thailandensis, Burkholderia cepacia complex organisms, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at mid-log growth in LB broth culture. We found that a fraction of the antibiotic-sensitive cells from every species were tolerant to a 24 h high-dose antibiotic challenge. All tested Burkholderia strains demonstrated a drug tolerant persister population at a rate that was at least 100-500 times higher than P. aeruginosa. When challenged with at least a 10X minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 24 h exposure to three different antibiotics with different modes of action we found that in B. pseudomallei Bp82 each of the tree antibiotics revealed different persister fractions at each of two different growth states. This observation suggests that our assay is detecting heterogeneous persister subpopulations. Persistence in B. pseudomallei Bp82 was highly dependent on growth stage, with a surprisingly high persister fraction of >64% of the late stationary phase cells being antibiotic tolerant to 100XMIC cefotaxime. Adaptation of B. pseudomallei to distilled water storage resulted in a population of drug tolerant cells up to 100% of the non-drug-challenged viable cell count in the same cefotaxime assay. Cultivation of B. pseudomallei with a sub-inhibitory concentration of several antibiotics resulted in altered persister fractions within the population relative to cultures lacking the antibiotic. Our study provides insight into the sensitivity of the persister fraction within the population of B. pseudomallei due to environmental variables and suggests diversity within the persister population revealed by

  19. Tympanoplasty surgery and prophylactic antibiotics: surgical results.

    PubMed

    John, D G; Carlin, W V; Lesser, T H; Carrick, D G; Fielder, C

    1988-06-01

    This paper reports a multicentre, controlled, blind, prospective, randomized study into the use of prophylactic systemic antibiotics in myringoplasty surgery. A total of 130 individuals were randomly allocated to either an antibiotic or a non-antibiotic group. Each individual was clinically and audiometrically assessed preoperatively, and 8 weeks postoperatively. It was found that systemic prophylactic antibiotics did not influence either the success rate of myringoplasty surgery or the audiometric result.

  20. New business models for antibiotic innovation.

    PubMed

    So, Anthony D; Shah, Tejen A

    2014-05-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistance and the dearth of novel antibiotics have become a growing concern among policy-makers. A combination of financial, scientific, and regulatory challenges poses barriers to antibiotic innovation. However, each of these three challenges provides an opportunity to develop pathways for new business models to bring novel antibiotics to market. Pull-incentives that pay for the outputs of research and development (R&D) and push-incentives that pay for the inputs of R&D can be used to increase innovation for antibiotics. Financial incentives might be structured to promote delinkage of a company's return on investment from revenues of antibiotics. This delinkage strategy might not only increase innovation, but also reinforce rational use of antibiotics. Regulatory approval, however, should not and need not compromise safety and efficacy standards to bring antibiotics with novel mechanisms of action to market. Instead regulatory agencies could encourage development of companion diagnostics, test antibiotic combinations in parallel, and pool and make transparent clinical trial data to lower R&D costs. A tax on non-human use of antibiotics might also create a disincentive for non-therapeutic use of these drugs. Finally, the new business model for antibiotic innovation should apply the 3Rs strategy for encouraging collaborative approaches to R&D in innovating novel antibiotics: sharing resources, risks, and rewards.

  1. Overcoming the current deadlock in antibiotic research.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Hack, Ingrid M

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are on the rise, making it harder to treat bacterial infections. The situation is aggravated by the shrinking of the antibiotic development pipeline. To finance urgently needed incentives for antibiotic research, creative financing solutions are needed. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are a successful model for moving forward.

  2. Pipeline of Known Chemical Classes of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    d’Urso de Souza Mendes, Cristina; de Souza Antunes, Adelaide Maria

    2013-01-01

    Many approaches are used to discover new antibiotic compounds, one of the most widespread being the chemical modification of known antibiotics. This type of discovery has been so important in the development of new antibiotics that most antibiotics used today belong to the same chemical classes as antibiotics discovered in the 1950s and 1960s. Even though the discovery of new classes of antibiotics is urgently needed, the chemical modification of antibiotics in known classes is still widely used to discover new antibiotics, resulting in a great number of compounds in the discovery and clinical pipeline that belong to existing classes. In this scenario, the present article presents an overview of the R&D pipeline of new antibiotics in known classes of antibiotics, from discovery to clinical trial, in order to map out the technological trends in this type of antibiotic R&D, aiming to identify the chemical classes attracting most interest, their spectrum of activity, and the new subclasses under development. The result of the study shows that the new antibiotics in the pipeline belong to the following chemical classes: quinolones, aminoglycosides, macrolides, oxazolidinones, tetracyclines, pleuromutilins, beta-lactams, lipoglycopeptides, polymyxins and cyclic lipopeptides. PMID:27029317

  3. Do topical antibiotics help corneal epithelial trauma?

    PubMed Central

    King, J. W.; Brison, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Topical antibiotics are routinely used in emergency rooms to treat corneal trauma, although no published evidence supports this treatment. In a noncomparative clinical trial, 351 patients with corneal epithelial injuries were treated without antibiotics. The infection rate was 0.7%, suggesting that such injuries can be safely and effectively managed without antibiotics. A comparative clinical trial is neither warranted nor feasible. PMID:8268742

  4. A mathematical model for expected time to extinction of pathogenic bacteria through antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M. K.; Nandi, S.; Roy, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Application of antibiotics in human system to prevent bacterial diseases like Gastritis, Ulcers, Meningitis, Pneumonia and Gonorrhea are indispensable. Antibiotics saved innumerable lives and continue to be a strong support for therapeutic application against pathogenic bacteria. In human system, bacterial diseases occur when pathogenic bacteria gets into the body and begin to reproduce and crowd out healthy bacteria. In this process, immature bacteria releases enzyme which is essential for bacterial cell-wall biosynthesis. After complete formation of cell wall, immature bacteria are converted to mature or virulent bacteria which are harmful to us during bacterial infections. Use of antibiotics as drug inhibits the bacterial cell wall formation. After application of antibiotics within body, the released bacterial enzyme binds with antibiotic molecule instead of its functional site during the cell wall synthesis in a competitive inhibition approach. As a consequence, the bacterial cell-wall formation as well as maturation process of pathogenic bacteria is halted and the disease is cured with lysis of bacterial cells. With this idea, a mathematical model has been developed in the present research investigation to review the inhibition of biosynthesis of bacterial cell wall by the application of antibiotics as drug in the light of enzyme kinetics. This approach helps to estimate the expected time to extinction of the pathogenic bacteria. Our mathematical approach based on the enzyme kinetic model for finding out expected time to extinction contributes favorable results for understanding of disease dynamics. Analytical and numerical results based on simulated findings validate our mathematical model.

  5. Development of antibiotic activity profile screening for the classification and discovery of natural product antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Weng Ruh; Oliver, Allen G; Linington, Roger G

    2012-11-21

    Despite recognition of the looming antibiotic crisis by healthcare professionals, the number of new antibiotics reaching the clinic continues to decline sharply. This study aimed to establish an antibiotic profiling strategy using a panel of clinically relevant bacterial strains to create unique biological fingerprints for all major classes of antibiotics. Antibiotic mode of action profile (BioMAP) screening has been shown to effectively cluster antibiotics by structural class based on these fingerprints. Using this approach, we have accurately predicted the presence of known antibiotics in natural product extracts and have discovered a naphthoquinone-based antibiotic from our marine natural product library that possesses a unique carbon skeleton. We have demonstrated that bioactivity fingerprinting is a successful strategy for profiling antibiotic lead compounds and that BioMAP can be applied to the discovery of new natural product antibiotics leads.

  6. Antibiotic resistance breakers: can repurposed drugs fill the antibiotic discovery void?

    PubMed

    Brown, David

    2015-12-01

    Concern over antibiotic resistance is growing, and new classes of antibiotics, particularly against Gram-negative bacteria, are needed. However, even if the scientific hurdles can be overcome, it could take decades for sufficient numbers of such antibiotics to become available. As an interim solution, antibiotic resistance could be 'broken' by co-administering appropriate non-antibiotic drugs with failing antibiotics. Several marketed drugs that do not currently have antibacterial indications can either directly kill bacteria, reduce the antibiotic minimum inhibitory concentration when used in combination with existing antibiotics and/or modulate host defence through effects on host innate immunity, in particular by altering inflammation and autophagy. This article discusses how such 'antibiotic resistance breakers' could contribute to reducing the antibiotic resistance problem, and analyses a priority list of candidates for further investigation.

  7. Collateral Damage: Detrimental Effect of Antibiotics on the Development of Protective Immune Memory

    PubMed Central

    Benoun, Joseph M.; Labuda, Jasmine C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antibiotic intervention is an effective treatment strategy for many bacterial infections and liberates bacterial antigens and stimulatory products that can induce an inflammatory response. Despite the opportunity for bacterial killing to enhance the development of adaptive immunity, patients treated successfully with antibiotics can suffer from reinfection. Studies in mouse models of Salmonella and Chlamydia infection also demonstrate that early antibiotic intervention reduces host protective immunity to subsequent infection. This heightened susceptibility to reinfection correlates with poor development of Th1 and antibody responses in antibiotic-treated mice but can be overcome by delayed antibiotic intervention, thus suggesting a requirement for sustained T cell stimulation for protection. Although the contribution of memory T cell subsets is imperfectly understood in both of these infection models, a protective role for noncirculating memory cells is suggested by recent studies. Together, these data propose a model where antibiotic treatment specifically interrupts tissue-resident memory T cell formation. Greater understanding of the mechanistic basis of this phenomenon might suggest therapeutic interventions to restore a protective memory response in antibiotic-treated patients, thus reducing the incidence of reinfection. PMID:27999159

  8. Surface modeling of soil antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-jiao; Yue, Tian-xiang; Du, Zheng-ping; Wang, Zong; Li, Xue-wen

    2016-02-01

    Large numbers of livestock and poultry feces are continuously applied into soils in intensive vegetable cultivation areas, and then some veterinary antibiotics are persistent existed in soils and cause health risk. For the spatial heterogeneity of antibiotic residues, developing a suitable technique to interpolate soil antibiotic residues is still a challenge. In this study, we developed an effective interpolator, high accuracy surface modeling (HASM) combined vegetable types, to predict the spatial patterns of soil antibiotics, using 100 surface soil samples collected from an intensive vegetable cultivation area located in east of China, and the fluoroquinolones (FQs), including ciprofloxacin (CFX), enrofloxacin (EFX) and norfloxacin (NFX), were analyzed as the target antibiotics. The results show that vegetable type is an effective factor to be combined to improve the interpolator performance. HASM achieves less mean absolute errors (MAEs) and root mean square errors (RMSEs) for total FQs (NFX+CFX+EFX), NFX, CFX and EFX than kriging with external drift (KED), stratified kriging (StK), ordinary kriging (OK) and inverse distance weighting (IDW). The MAE of HASM for FQs is 55.1 μg/kg, and the MAEs of KED, StK, OK and IDW are 99.0 μg/kg, 102.8 μg/kg, 106.3 μg/kg and 108.7 μg/kg, respectively. Further, RMSE simulated by HASM for FQs (CFX, EFX and NFX) are 106.2 μg/kg (88.6 μg/kg, 20.4 μg/kg and 39.2 μg/kg), and less 30% (27%, 22% and 36%), 33% (27%, 27% and 43%), 38% (34%, 23% and 41%) and 42% (32%, 35% and 51%) than the ones by KED, StK, OK and IDW, respectively. HASM also provides better maps with more details and more consistent maximum and minimum values of soil antibiotics compared with the measured data. The better performance can be concluded that HASM takes the vegetable type information as global approximate information, and takes local sampling data as its optimum control constraints.

  9. Quorum-Sensing Mechanisms and Bacterial Response to Antibiotics in P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2016-11-01

    Emergence and worldwide spreading of resistant bacteria to antibiotic have raised the importance for finding therapeutic alternative to compensate antibiotic drawbacks. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication involved in the development of various common bacterial behaviors including virulence factors expression, and targeting QS seems to be relevant to the struggle against bacterial infection. In this report, relevant literature on intrication of QS system and antimicrobial sensitivity mechanisms in P. aeruginosa PAO1 are reviewed.

  10. Antibiotic Tolerance Induced by Lactoferrin in Clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, María T.; Viejo-Diaz, Mónica; Pérez, Francisco; Fierro, José F.

    2005-01-01

    Lactoferrin-induced cell depolarization and a delayed tobramycin-killing effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were correlated. This antibiotic tolerance effect (ATE) reflects the ability of a defense protein to modify the activity of an antibiotic as a result of its modulatory effect on bacterial physiology. P. aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients showed higher ATE values (≤6-fold) than other clinical strains. PMID:15793153

  11. Antibiotic control in a municipal hospital.

    PubMed

    Recco, R A; Gladstone, J L; Friedman, S A; Gerken, E H

    1979-05-25

    The choice of an antibiotic for a patient is often a difficult decision. The clinician must contend with a bewildering variety of bacteria and use a number of expensive and toxic antimicrobial agents judiciously. To deal with the problems of excessive and inappropriate use, the medical staff of Coney Island Hospital established compulsory, prospective antibiotic control. Two years after initiation of this program, we analyzed changes in sensitivity patterns of hospital flora, physicians' prescribing habits and antibiotic use. A trend toward increasing resistance on the part of some Gram-negative isolates to certain beta-lactam antibiotics was noted. Antibiotic costs decreased an average of 38%, while prescribing skills improved.

  12. Antibiotics from microbes: converging to kill.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products.

  13. Fumarate-Mediated Persistence of Escherichia coli against Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Heo, Paul; Jung, Suk-Chae; Park, Myungseo; Oh, Eun-Joong; Sung, Jaeyun; Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Suk-Chan; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Dongwoo; Jin, Yong-Su; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial persisters are a small fraction of quiescent cells that survive in the presence of lethal concentrations of antibiotics. They can regrow to give rise to a new population that has the same vulnerability to the antibiotics as did the parental population. Although formation of bacterial persisters in the presence of various antibiotics has been documented, the molecular mechanisms by which these persisters tolerate the antibiotics are still controversial. We found that amplification of the fumarate reductase operon (FRD) inEscherichia coliled to a higher frequency of persister formation. The persister frequency ofE. coliwas increased when the cells contained elevated levels of intracellular fumarate. Genetic perturbations of the electron transport chain (ETC), a metabolite supplementation assay, and even the toxin-antitoxin-relatedhipA7mutation indicated that surplus fumarate markedly elevated theE. colipersister frequency. AnE. colistrain lacking succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), thereby showing a lower intracellular fumarate concentration, was killed ∼1,000-fold more effectively than the wild-type strain in the stationary phase. It appears thatSDHandFRDrepresent a paired system that gives rise to and maintainsE. colipersisters by producing and utilizing fumarate, respectively.

  14. Collective Resistance in Microbial Communities by Intracellular Antibiotic Deactivation

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Robin A.; Lin, Leo; van Doorn, G. Sander; Sorg, Moritz; Olson, Joshua; Nizet, Victor; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    The structure and composition of bacterial communities can compromise antibiotic efficacy. For example, the secretion of β-lactamase by individual bacteria provides passive resistance for all residents within a polymicrobial environment. Here, we uncover that collective resistance can also develop via intracellular antibiotic deactivation. Real-time luminescence measurements and single-cell analysis demonstrate that the opportunistic human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae grows in medium supplemented with chloramphenicol (Cm) when resistant bacteria expressing Cm acetyltransferase (CAT) are present. We show that CAT processes Cm intracellularly but not extracellularly. In a mouse pneumonia model, more susceptible pneumococci survive Cm treatment when coinfected with a CAT-expressing strain. Mathematical modeling predicts that stable coexistence is only possible when antibiotic resistance comes at a fitness cost. Strikingly, CAT-expressing pneumococci in mouse lungs were outcompeted by susceptible cells even during Cm treatment. Our results highlight the importance of the microbial context during infectious disease as a potential complicating factor to antibiotic therapy. PMID:28027306

  15. Fumarate-Mediated Persistence of Escherichia coli against Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Seob; Cho, Da-Hyeong; Heo, Paul; Jung, Suk-Chae; Park, Myungseo; Oh, Eun-Joong; Sung, Jaeyun; Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Suk-Chan; Lee, Dae-Hee; Lee, Sarah; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Dongwoo

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are a small fraction of quiescent cells that survive in the presence of lethal concentrations of antibiotics. They can regrow to give rise to a new population that has the same vulnerability to the antibiotics as did the parental population. Although formation of bacterial persisters in the presence of various antibiotics has been documented, the molecular mechanisms by which these persisters tolerate the antibiotics are still controversial. We found that amplification of the fumarate reductase operon (FRD) in Escherichia coli led to a higher frequency of persister formation. The persister frequency of E. coli was increased when the cells contained elevated levels of intracellular fumarate. Genetic perturbations of the electron transport chain (ETC), a metabolite supplementation assay, and even the toxin-antitoxin-related hipA7 mutation indicated that surplus fumarate markedly elevated the E. coli persister frequency. An E. coli strain lacking succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), thereby showing a lower intracellular fumarate concentration, was killed ∼1,000-fold more effectively than the wild-type strain in the stationary phase. It appears that SDH and FRD represent a paired system that gives rise to and maintains E. coli persisters by producing and utilizing fumarate, respectively. PMID:26810657

  16. 5-Alkyloxytryptamines are membrane-targeting, broad-spectrum antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Katherine C; Hurley, Katherine A; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-11-15

    Antibiotic adjuvant therapy represents an exciting opportunity to enhance the activity of clinical antibiotics by co-dosing with a secondary small molecule. Successful adjuvants decrease the concentration of antibiotics used to defeat bacteria, increase activity (in some cases introducing activity against organisms that are drug resistant), and reduce the frequency at which drug-resistant bacteria emerge. We report that 5-alkyloxytryptamines are a new class of broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with exciting activity as antibiotic adjuvants. We synthesized 5-alkyloxytryptamine analogs and found that an alkyl chain length of 6-12 carbons and a primary ammonium group are necessary for the antibacterial activity of the compounds, and an alkyl chain length of 6-10 carbons increased the membrane permeability of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Although several of the most potent analogs also have activity against the membranes of human embryonic kidney cells, we demonstrate that below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)-where mammalian cell toxicity is low-these compounds may be successfully used as adjuvants for chloramphenicol, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, and rifampicin against clinical strains of Salmonella typhimurium, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus, reducing MIC values by as much as several logs.

  17. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  18. Use of antibiotics in plant agriculture.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, V O; Duffy, B

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotics are essential for control of bacterial diseases of plants, especially fire blight of pear and apple and bacterial spot of peach. Streptomycin is used in several countries; the use of oxytetracycline, oxolinic acid and gentamicin is limited to only a few countries. Springtime antibiotic sprays suppress pathogen growth on flowers and leaf surfaces before infection; after infection, antibiotics are ineffective. Antibiotics are applied when disease risk is high, and consequently the majority of orchards are not treated annually. In 2009 in the United States, 16,465 kg (active ingredient) was applied to orchards, which is 0.12% of the total antibiotics used in animal agriculture. Antibiotics are active on plants for less than a week, and significant residues have not been found on harvested fruit. Antibiotics have been indispensable for crop protection in the United States for more than 50 years without reports of adverse effects on human health or persistent impacts on the environment.

  19. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla Saeed; Abu-Hammad, Osama Abdalla; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud Khaled; Khraisat, Ameen Sameh; Shehabi, Asem Ata

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. PMID:20668712

  20. Local antibiotic delivery with demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine S; Supronowicz, Peter R; Zhukauskas, Rasa M; Gill, Elise; Cobb, Ronald R

    2012-03-01

    A method of care for these infected nonunions is prolonged intravenous systemic antibiotic treatment and implantation of methyl methacrylate antibiotic carrier beads to delivery high local doses of antibiotics. This method requires a second surgery to remove the beads once the infection has cleared. Recent studies have investigated the use of biodegradable materials that have been impregnated with antibiotics as tools to treat bone infections. In the present study, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was investigated for its ability to be loaded with an antibiotic. The data presented herein demonstrates that this osteoinductive and biodegradable material can be loaded with gentamicin and release clinically relevant levels of the drug for at least 13 days in vitro. This study also demonstrates that the antibiotic loaded onto the graft has no adverse effects on the osteoinductive nature of the DBM as measured in vitro and in vivo. This bone void filler may represent a promising option for local antibiotic delivery in orthopedic applications.

  1. In vivo Host Environment Alters Pseudomonas aeruginosa Susceptibility to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Dong, Yuanyuan; Fan, Zheng; Liu, Chang; Xia, Bin; Shi, Jing; Bai, Fang; Jin, Yongxin; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2017-01-01

    During host infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinately regulates the expression of numerous genes to adapt to the host environment while counteracting host clearance mechanisms. As infected patients take antibiotics, the invading bacteria encounter antibiotics in the host milieu. P. aeruginosa is highly resistant to antibiotics due to multiple chromosomally encoded resistant determinants. And numerous in vitro studies have demonstrated the regulatory mechanisms of antibiotic resistance related genes in response to antibiotics. However, it is not well-known how host environment affects bacterial response to antibiotics. In this study, we found that P. aeruginosa cells directly isolated from mice lungs displayed higher susceptibility to tobramycin than in vitro cultured bacteria. In vitro experiments demonstrated that incubation with A549 and differentiated HL60 (dHL60) cells sensitized P. aeruginosa to tobramycin. Further studies revealed that reactive oxygen species produced by the host cells contributed to the increased bacterial susceptibility. At the same concentration of tobramycin, presence of A549 and dHL60 cells resulted in higher expression of heat shock proteins, which are known inducible by tobramycin. Further analyses revealed decreased membrane potential upon incubation with the host cells and modification of lipopolysaccharide, which contributed to the increased susceptibility to tobramycin. Therefore, our results demonstrate that contact with host cells increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin. PMID:28352614

  2. Designing Safer and Greener Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Gathergood, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Since the production of the first pharmaceutically active molecules at the beginning of the 1900s, drug molecules and their metabolites have been observed in the environment in significant concentrations. In this review, the persistence of antibiotics in the environment and their associated effects on ecosystems, bacterial resistance and health effects will be examined. Solutions to these problems will also be discussed, including the pharmaceutical industries input, green chemistry, computer modeling and representative ionic liquid research. PMID:27029311

  3. Antibiotics and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sheetal R; Collins, James J; Relman, David A

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics have been a cornerstone of innovation in the fields of public health, agriculture, and medicine. However, recent studies have shed new light on the collateral damage they impart on the indigenous host-associated communities. These drugs have been found to alter the taxonomic, genomic, and functional capacity of the human gut microbiota, with effects that are rapid and sometimes persistent. Broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce bacterial diversity while expanding and collapsing membership of specific indigenous taxa. Furthermore, antibiotic treatment selects for resistant bacteria, increases opportunities for horizontal gene transfer, and enables intrusion of pathogenic organisms through depletion of occupied natural niches, with profound implications for the emergence of resistance. Because these pervasive alterations can be viewed as an uncoupling of mutualistic host-microbe relationships, it is valuable to reconsider antimicrobial therapies in the context of an ecological framework. Understanding the biology of competitive exclusion, interspecies protection, and gene flow of adaptive functions in the gut environment may inform the design of new strategies that treat infections while preserving the ecology of our beneficial constituents.

  4. Desensitization to antibiotics in children.

    PubMed

    Cernadas, Josefina R

    2013-02-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur to almost all drugs and antibiotics are among the most common cause for this kind of reactions. Drug hypersensitivity may affect any organ or system, and manifestations range widely in clinical severity from mild pruritus to anaphylaxis. In most cases, the suspected drug is avoided in the future. In case of infection, there is usually a safe antibiotic alternative. Nonetheless, in some cases, no alternative treatment exists for optimal therapy. Under these circumstances, desensitization may be performed. Drug desensitization is defined as the induction of a temporary state of tolerance to a drug which can only be maintained by continuous administration of the medication responsible for the hypersensitivity reaction. Desensitization is mainly performed in IgE-mediated reactions. Increasing doses of the implicated drug are administered over a short period of time, until the therapeutic dose is achieved and tolerated. Very few studies confined to children are found in literature. Most of them are case reports. In general, the proposed desensitization schemes are similar to those used in adults differing only in the final dose administered. The purpose of this study is to review desensitization to antibiotics in children presenting and discussing three clinical practical cases of desensitization in this age group.

  5. Selectively guanidinylated aminoglycosides as antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Fair, Richard J; Hensler, Mary E; Thienphrapa, Wdee; Dam, Quang N; Nizet, Victor; Tor, Yitzhak

    2012-07-01

    The emergence of virulent, drug-resistant bacterial strains coupled with a minimal output of new pharmaceutical agents to combat them makes this a critical time for antibacterial research. Aminoglycosides are a well-studied, highly potent class of naturally occurring antibiotics with scaffolds amenable to modification, and therefore, they provide an excellent starting point for the development of semisynthetic, next-generation compounds. To explore the potential of this approach, we synthesized a small library of aminoglycoside derivatives selectively and minimally modified at one or two positions with a guanidine group replacing the corresponding amine or hydroxy functionality. Most guanidino-aminoglycosides showed increased affinity for the ribosomal decoding rRNA site, the cognate biological target of the natural products, when compared with their parent antibiotics, as measured by an in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) A-site binding assay. Additionally, certain analogues showed improved minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values against resistant bacterial strains, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An amikacin derivative holds particular promise with activity greater than or equal to the parent antibiotic in the majority of bacterial strains tested.

  6. Sources of antibiotics: Hot springs.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Girish B; Balachandran, Lakshmi

    2016-11-24

    The discovery of antibiotics heralded an era of improved health care. However, the over-prescription and misuse of antibiotics resulted in the development of resistant strains of various pathogens. Since then, there has been an incessant search for discovering novel compounds from bacteria at various locations with extreme conditions. The soil is one of the most explored locations for bioprospecting. In recent times, hypersaline environments and symbiotic associations have been investigated for novel antimicrobial compounds. Among the extreme environments, hot springs are comparatively less explored. Many researchers have reported the presence of microbial life and secretion of antimicrobial compounds by microorganisms in hot springs. A pioneering research in the corresponding author's laboratory resulted in the identification of the antibiotic Fusaricidin B isolated from a hot spring derived eubacteria, Paenibacillus polymyxa, which has been assigned a new application for its anti-tubercular properties. The corresponding author has also reported anti-MRSA and anti-VRE activity of 73 bacterial isolates from hot springs in India.

  7. Metabolic engineering of an industrial polyoxin producer for the targeted overproduction of designer nucleoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianzhao; Liu, Jin; Wan, Dan; Cai, You-Sheng; Wang, Yinghu; Li, Shunying; Wu, Pan; Feng, Xuan; Qiu, Guofu; Yang, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Wenqing; Deng, Zixin

    2015-09-01

    Polyoxin and nikkomycin are naturally occurring peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics with potent antifungal bioactivity. Both exhibit similar structural features, having a nucleoside skeleton and one or two peptidyl moieties. Combining the refactoring of the polyoxin producer Streptomyces aureochromogenes with import of the hydroxypyridylhomothreonine pathway of nikkomycin allows the targeted production of three designer nucleoside antibiotics designated as nikkoxin E, F, and G. These structures were determined by NMR and/or high resolution mass spectrometry. Remarkably, the introduction of an extra copy of the nikS gene encoding an ATP-dependent ligase significantly enhanced the production of the designer antibiotics. Moreover, all three nikkoxins displayed improved bioactivity against several pathogenic fungi as compared with the naturally-occurring antibiotics. These data provide a feasible model for high efficiency generation of nucleoside antibiotics related to polyoxins and nikkomycins in a polyoxin cell factory via synthetic biology strategy.

  8. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Ochi, Kozo

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s).

  9. Induction of human plasmablasts during infection with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Band, Victor I.; Ibegbu, Chris; Kaur, Surinder Pal; Cagle, Stephanie M.; Trible, Ronald; Jones, Crystal L.; Wang, Yun F.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Ray, Susan M.; Wrammert, Jens; Weiss, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Nosocomial pathogens such as Acinetobacter baumannii are a growing public health threat, due in part to their increasing resistance to antibiotics. Since some strains are resistant to all available antibiotics, novel therapies are urgently needed. Plasmablasts are short-lived B cells found in the blood that can be collected and harnessed to produce therapeutic antibodies. We set out to determine whether plasmablasts are induced during infection with A. baumannii and other nosocomial pathogens. Methods We obtained blood samples from patients infected with antibiotic-resistant nosocomial pathogens, and analysed their plasmablast response by flow cytometry. Results We observed a strong induction of plasmablasts in patients with antibiotic-resistant A. baumannii infection. Furthermore, plasmablasts were also induced in response to other drug-resistant nosocomial pathogens. Conclusions These data suggest that plasmablasts may be broadly harnessed to develop therapeutic antibodies to combat otherwise untreatable antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:24583361

  10. A Chemical-Genomic Screen of Neglected Antibiotics Reveals Illicit Transport of Kasugamycin and Blasticidin S

    PubMed Central

    Shiver, Anthony L.; Kritikos, George; Li, Bo; Krogan, Nevan; Typas, Athanasios

    2016-01-01

    Fighting antibiotic resistance requires a deeper understanding of the genetic factors that determine the antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria. Here we describe a chemical-genomic screen in Escherichia coli K-12 that was designed to discover new aspects of antibiotic resistance by focusing on a set of 26 antibiotics and other stresses with poorly characterized mode-of-action and determinants of resistance. We show that the screen identifies new resistance determinants for these antibiotics including a common signature from two antimicrobials, kasugamycin and blasticidin S, used to treat crop diseases like rice blast and fire blight. Following this signature, we further investigated the mechanistic basis for susceptibility to kasugamycin and blasticidin S in E. coli using both genetic and biochemical approaches. We provide evidence that these compounds hijack an overlapping set of peptide ABC-importers to enter the bacterial cell. Loss of uptake may be an underappreciated mechanism for the development of kasugamycin resistance in bacterial plant pathogens. PMID:27355376

  11. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s). PMID:26369962

  12. Association between clinical antibiotic resistance and susceptibility of Pseudomonas in the cystic fibrosis lung

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Gunther; Mahrt, Niels; Tueffers, Leif; Barbosa, Camilo; Harjes, Malte; Adolph, Gernot; Friedrichs, Anette; Krenz-Weinreich, Annegret; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cystic fibrosis patients suffer from chronic lung infections that require long-term antibiotic therapy. Pseudomonas readily evolve resistance, rendering antibiotics ineffective. In vitro experiments suggest that resistant bacteria may be treated by exploiting their collateral sensitivity to other antibiotics. Here, we investigate correlations of sensitivity and resistance profiles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa that naturally adapted to antibiotics in the cystic fibrosis lung. Methodology: Resistance profiles for 13 antibiotics were obtained using broth dilution, E-test and VITEK mass spectroscopy. Genetic variants were determined from whole-genome sequences and interrelationships among isolates were analyzed using 13 MLST loci. Result: Our study focused on 45 isolates from 13 patients under documented treatment with antibiotics. Forty percent of these were clinically resistant and 15% multi-drug resistant. Colistin resistance was found once, despite continuous colistin treatment and even though colistin resistance can readily evolve experimentally in the laboratory. Patients typically harbored multiple genetically and phenotypically distinct clones. However, genetically similar clones often had dissimilar resistance profiles. Isolates showed mutations in genes encoding cell wall synthesis, alginate production, efflux pumps and antibiotic modifying enzymes. Cross-resistance was commonly observed within antibiotic classes and between aminoglycosides and β-lactam antibiotics. No evidence was found for consistent phenotypic resistance to one antibiotic and sensitivity to another within one genotype. Conclusions and implications: Evidence supporting potential collateral sensitivity in clinical P. aeruginosa isolates remains equivocal. However, cross-resistance within antibiotic classes is common. Colistin therapy is promising since resistance to it was rare despite its intensive use in the studied patients. PMID:27193199

  13. Benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis in children with chronic sinusitis: assessment of outcome predictors.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, A; Brodsky, L; Ballow, M

    1993-01-01

    Eighty-six children with chronic sinusitis, documented by x-ray with symptoms and signs for more than 12 weeks, were evaluated for atopy and B-cell immune abnormalities. Twenty-nine percent (25/86) of the patients had some B-cell abnormality of immunoglobulin isotype, IgG subclass, and/or hyporesponsiveness to pneumococcal polysaccharide (PPS) vaccine (Pneumovax). Eleven of 17 patients who were hyporesponsive to PPS vaccine had normal immunoglobulin isotypes and IgG subclasses. Twenty-six of these 86 children were followed prospectively for > or = 1 year on prophylactic antibiotics. The 12-month period before the use of prophylactic antibiotics was taken as the control period for each child for comparison. Nineteen of 26 (74%) children had a good outcome (greater than a 50% reduction in the number of exacerbations of sinusitis during a 12-month period compared with the previous year) on prophylactic antibiotics with a reduction in exacerbations of sinusitis from 9.8 per year to 2.7 episodes per year. In contrast, 7/26 had a poor outcome (p < .0001) on prophylactic antibiotics (from 12.6 per year to 8.7 per year on prophylactic antibiotics). There were no significant differences in age, gender, atopy, or presence of a B-cell immune abnormality in the good versus the poor outcome groups to prophylactic antibiotic therapy. Treatment outcome correlated inversely with the number of sinus infections before prophylactic antibiotics, p = .036. Underlying B-cell immune abnormalities could not be correlated with intervention outcome on prophylactic antibiotics. The use of prophylactic antibiotics was an effective treatment modality in children with chronic sinusitis, even in patients with selective immune abnormalities.

  14. Global transcriptome and physiological responses of Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 exposed to distinct classes of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Heo, Aram; Jang, Hyun-Jin; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of antibiotics on environment-originated nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species have been poorly explored. To understand the antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that function in nonpathogenic Acinetobacter species, we used an RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) technique to perform global gene-expression profiling of soil-borne Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 after exposing the bacteria to 4 classes of antibiotics (ampicillin, Amp; kanamycin, Km; tetracycline, Tc; norfloxacin, Nor). Interestingly, the well-known two global regulators, the soxR and the rpoE genes are present among 41 commonly upregulated genes under all 4 antibiotic-treatment conditions. We speculate that these common genes are essential for antibiotic resistance in DR1. Treatment with the 4 antibiotics produced diverse physiological and phenotypic changes. Km treatment induced the most dramatic phenotypic changes. Examination of mutation frequency and DNA-repair capability demonstrated the induction of the SOS response in Acinetobacter especially under Nor treatment. Based on the RNA-seq analysis, the glyoxylate-bypass genes of the citrate cycle were specifically upregulated under Amp treatment. We also identified newly recognized non-coding small RNAs of the DR1 strain, which were also confirmed by Northern blot analysis. These results reveal that treatment with antibiotics of distinct classes differentially affected the gene expression and physiology of DR1 cells. This study expands our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic-stress response of environment-originated bacteria and provides a basis for future investigations.

  15. Antibiotic policies in Central Eastern Europe.

    PubMed

    Cizman, Milan; Beovic, Bojana; Krcmery, Vladimir; Barsic, Bruno; Tamm, Eda; Ludwig, Endre; Pelemis, Mojimir; Karovski, Kliment; Grzesiowski, Pavel; Gardovska, Dace; Volokha, Alla; Keuleyan, Emma; Stratchounski, Leonid; Dumitru, Carstina; Titov, Leonid P; Usonis, Vytantas; Dvorák, Peter

    2004-09-01

    To assess the antibiotic policies in Central Eastern European (CEE) countries, a questionnaire on the prevalence of resistance, antibiotic consumption data for ambulatory and hospital care and antibiotic policies, was mailed to national representatives. Data on antibiotic resistance and consumption of antibiotics at national levels are limited and vary considerably among countries. The importance of surveillance data in altering perceptions of the prevalence of resistance is shown by the comparison of surveillance data and interview data. Interview data without surveillance data produced the widest range of estimates of the prevalence of resistance in streptococcus pneumonia -5% in Lithuania and 82% in Belarus. The average consumption of antibiotics in ambulatory care in eight CEE countries in 2001 was 19.35 defined daily doses (DDD)/1000 inhabitants per day, (range 13.1 - 24.8 DDD) and in hospitals in six CEE countries was 2.2 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day (range 1.3-4.5). Over the counter sales of antibiotics are available in some countries. Antibiotic policy interventions do not exist or only apply to specific problems or interventions. Better implementation of antibiotic interventions and education on antibiotic use should be a high priority in this region. An effective strategy requires close co-operation, consultations and partnership at national and international level in particular, via existing international organisations.

  16. National campaigns to improve antibiotic use.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Herman; Guillemot, Didier; Ferech, Matus; Schlemmer, Benoit; Costers, Michiel; van Breda, Marije; Baker, Lee J; Cars, Otto; Davey, Peter G

    2006-05-01

    High levels of antibiotic consumption are driving levels of bacterial resistance that threaten public health. Nonetheless, antibiotics still provide highly effective treatments for common diseases with important implications for human health. The challenge for public education is to achieve a meaningful reduction in unnecessary antibiotic use without adversely affecting the management of bacterial infections. This paper focuses on the lessons learned from national campaigns in countries (Belgium and France) with high antibiotic use. Evaluation of these national campaigns showed the importance of television advertising as a powerful medium to change attitudes and perhaps also behaviour with regard to antibiotics. Moreover, in both countries, strong evidence suggested reduced antibiotic prescribing. However, adverse effects associated with a reduction in antibiotic prescribing were not monitored. We conclude that carefully designed mass education campaigns could improve antibiotic use nationally and should be considered in countries with high antibiotic use. However, these campaigns should employ techniques of social marketing and use appropriate outcome measures. The benefits and risks of such campaigns have been less well established in countries where antibiotic use is already low or declining.

  17. Antibiotic Modification of Native Grafts: Improving upon nature's scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketonis, Constantinos

    -like cells with no increased toxicity. Furthermore, the antibiotic-modified allograft incorporated well into tibial defects in the rat. Finally, this construct was efficacious in decreasing the severity of infection and host reaction when impacted in an in vivo model of allograft-associated infection. Thus, our proposed modification in surface design serves as a starting point for the development of a new generation of bone grafts that are biologically active at sites of physiological importance.

  18. Development of antibiotics and the future of marine microorganisms to stem the tide of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kasanah, Noer; Hamann, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics remain essential tools in the control of infectious diseases. With the emergence of new diseases, resistant forms of diseases such as tuberculosis and malaria, as well as the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria, it has become essential to develop novel antibiotics. Development of the existing antibiotics involved three strategies, including discovery of new target sites, modification of existing antibiotic structures, and the identification of new resources for novel antibiotics. Marine microorganisms have clearly become an essential new resource in the discovery of new antibiotic leads. PMID:15600239

  19. Sickle Cell Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the pain, and immunizations and daily doses of penicillin (an antibiotic) can help prevent infection. Infection used ... children with sickle cell disease. But thanks to penicillin (or a similar antibiotic, amoxicillin) and appropriate immunizations , ...

  20. Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhalt, John P.

    A 28-year-old man was transferred to our hospital and underwent surgery for resection of an aortic graft infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrobial therapy consisted of amikacin, cefazolin, chloramphenicol, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim. A request for amikacin and sulfamethoxazole assays was received by the laboratory along with information that the patient had received tobramycin until 24 h before the serum was obtained.

  1. Laser based enhancement of susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznick, Yana; Banin, Ehud; Lipovsky, Anat; Lubart, Rachel; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2012-03-01

    Our objective is to test the effect of pulsed (Q-switched) and continuous wave (CW) laser light at wavelength of 532nm on the viability of free-living stationary phase bacteria with and without gentamicin (an antibiotic) treatment. Free living stationary phase gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1) was immersed in Luria Broth (LB) solution and exposed to Q-switched and CW lasers with and without the addition of the antibiotic gentamicin. Cell viability was determined at different time points. Laser treatment alone did not reduce cell viability compared to untreated control and the gentamicin treatment alone only resulted in a 0.5 log reduction in the viable count for P. aeruginosa. The combined laser and gentamicin treatment, however, resulted in a synergistic effect and viability was reduced by 8 log's for P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  2. Mechanisms of Resistance to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics: Overview and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycoside (AG) antibiotics are used to treat many Gram-negative and some Gram-positive infections and, importantly, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Among various bacterial species, resistance to AGs arises through a variety of intrinsic and acquired mechanisms. The bacterial cell wall serves as a natural barrier for small molecules such as AGs and may be further fortified via acquired mutations. Efflux pumps work to expel AGs from bacterial cells, and modifications here too may cause further resistance to AGs. Mutations in the ribosomal target of AGs, while rare, also contribute to resistance. Of growing clinical prominence is resistance caused by ribosome methyltransferases. By far the most widespread mechanism of resistance to AGs is the inactivation of these antibiotics by AG-modifying enzymes. We provide here an overview of these mechanisms by which bacteria become resistant to AGs and discuss their prevalence and potential for clinical relevance. PMID:26877861

  3. Bacteria-mediated effects of antibiotics on Daphnia nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gorokhova, Elena; Rivetti, Claudia; Furuhagen, Sara; Edlund, Anna; Ek, Karin; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2015-05-05

    In polluted environments, contaminant effects may be manifested via both direct toxicity to the host and changes in its microbiota, affecting bacteria-host interactions. In this context, particularly relevant is exposure to antibiotics released into environment. We examined effects of the antibiotic trimethoprim on microbiota of Daphnia magna and concomitant changes in the host feeding. In daphnids exposed to 0.25 mg L(-1) trimethoprim for 24 h, the microbiota was strongly affected, with (1) up to 21-fold decrease in 16S rRNA gene abundance and (2) a shift from balanced communities dominated by Curvibacter, Aquabacterium, and Limnohabitans in controls to significantly lower diversity under dominance of Pelomonas in the exposed animals. Moreover, decreased feeding and digestion was observed in the animals exposed to 0.25-2 mg L(-1) trimethoprim for 48 h and then fed 14C-labeled algae. Whereas the proportion of intact algal cells in the guts increased with increased trimethoprim concentration, ingestion and incorporation rates as well as digestion and incorporation efficiencies decreased significantly. Thus, antibiotics may impact nontarget species via changes in their microbiota leading to compromised nutrition and, ultimately, growth. These bacteria-mediated effects in nontarget organisms may not be unique for antibiotics, but also relevant for environmental pollutants of various nature.

  4. Perturbation of iron homeostasis promotes the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Méhi, Orsolya; Bogos, Balázs; Csörgő, Bálint; Pál, Ferenc; Nyerges, Akos; Papp, Balázs; Pál, Csaba

    2014-10-01

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in microbes is frequently achieved by acquisition of spontaneous mutations during antimicrobial therapy. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of a central transcriptional regulator of iron homeostasis (Fur) facilitates laboratory evolution of ciprofloxacin resistance in Escherichia coli. To decipher the underlying molecular mechanisms, we first performed a global transcriptome analysis and demonstrated that the set of genes regulated by Fur changes substantially in response to antibiotic treatment. We hypothesized that the impact of Fur on evolvability under antibiotic pressure is due to the elevated intracellular concentration of free iron and the consequent enhancement of oxidative damage-induced mutagenesis. In agreement with expectations, overexpression of iron storage proteins, inhibition of iron transport, or anaerobic conditions drastically suppressed the evolution of resistance, whereas inhibition of the SOS response-mediated mutagenesis had only a minor effect. Finally, we provide evidence that a cell permeable iron chelator inhibits the evolution of resistance. In sum, our work revealed the central role of iron metabolism in the de novo evolution of antibiotic resistance, a pattern that could influence the development of novel antimicrobial strategies.

  5. Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bleich, Rachel; Watrous, Jeramie D; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Bowers, Albert A; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2015-03-10

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to produce a wide range of structurally complex natural products historically called "secondary" metabolites. Although some of these compounds have been identified as bacterial communication cues, more frequently natural products are scrutinized for antibiotic activities that are relevant to human health. However, there has been little regard for how these compounds might otherwise impact the physiology of neighboring microbes present in complex communities. Bacillus cereus secretes molecules that activate expression of biofilm genes in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to identify the thiocillins, a group of thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, as biofilm matrix-inducing compounds produced by B. cereus. We found that thiocillin increased the population of matrix-producing B. subtilis cells and that this activity could be abolished by multiple structural alterations. Importantly, a mutation that eliminated thiocillin's antibiotic activity did not affect its ability to induce biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. We go on to show that biofilm induction appears to be a general phenomenon of multiple structurally diverse thiazolyl peptides and use this activity to confirm the presence of thiazolyl peptide gene clusters in other bacterial species. Our results indicate that the roles of secondary metabolites initially identified as antibiotics may have more complex effects--acting not only as killing agents, but also as specific modulators of microbial cellular phenotypes.

  6. Thiopeptide antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Bleich, Rachel; Watrous, Jeramie D.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Bowers, Albert A.; Shank, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved the ability to produce a wide range of structurally complex natural products historically called “secondary” metabolites. Although some of these compounds have been identified as bacterial communication cues, more frequently natural products are scrutinized for antibiotic activities that are relevant to human health. However, there has been little regard for how these compounds might otherwise impact the physiology of neighboring microbes present in complex communities. Bacillus cereus secretes molecules that activate expression of biofilm genes in Bacillus subtilis. Here, we use imaging mass spectrometry to identify the thiocillins, a group of thiazolyl peptide antibiotics, as biofilm matrix-inducing compounds produced by B. cereus. We found that thiocillin increased the population of matrix-producing B. subtilis cells and that this activity could be abolished by multiple structural alterations. Importantly, a mutation that eliminated thiocillin’s antibiotic activity did not affect its ability to induce biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. We go on to show that biofilm induction appears to be a general phenomenon of multiple structurally diverse thiazolyl peptides and use this activity to confirm the presence of thiazolyl peptide gene clusters in other bacterial species. Our results indicate that the roles of secondary metabolites initially identified as antibiotics may have more complex effects—acting not only as killing agents, but also as specific modulators of microbial cellular phenotypes. PMID:25713360

  7. Genetic Regulation of Virulence and Antibiotic Resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Carsten; Kary, Stefani C.; Schauer, Kristina; Cameron, Andrew D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant microorganisms are forecast to become the single biggest challenge to medical care in the 21st century. Over the last decades, members of the genus Acinetobacter have emerged as bacterial opportunistic pathogens, in particular as challenging nosocomial pathogens because of the rapid evolution of antimicrobial resistances. Although we lack fundamental biological insight into virulence mechanisms, an increasing number of researchers are working to identify virulence factors and to study antibiotic resistance. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the regulation of virulence genes and antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii. A survey of the two-component systems AdeRS, BaeSR, GacSA and PmrAB explains how each contributes to antibiotic resistance and virulence gene expression, while BfmRS regulates cell envelope structures important for pathogen persistence. A. baumannii uses the transcription factors Fur and Zur to sense iron or zinc depletion and upregulate genes for metal scavenging as a critical survival tool in an animal host. Quorum sensing, nucleoid-associated proteins, and non-classical transcription factors such as AtfA and small regulatory RNAs are discussed in the context of virulence and antibiotic resistance. PMID:28036056

  8. Microbiological effects of sublethal levels of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2014-07-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics results in the generation of antibiotic concentration gradients in humans, livestock and the environment. Thus, bacteria are frequently exposed to non-lethal (that is, subinhibitory) concentrations of drugs, and recent evidence suggests that this is likely to have an important role in the evolution of antibiotic resistance. In this Review, we discuss the ecology of antibiotics and the ability of subinhibitory concentrations to select for bacterial resistance. We also consider the effects of low-level drug exposure on bacterial physiology, including the generation of genetic and phenotypic variability, as well as the ability of antibiotics to function as signalling molecules. Together, these effects accelerate the emergence and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among humans and animals.

  9. Counteracting selection for antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yosef, Ido; Manor, Miriam; Qimron, Udi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens is on the rise because antibiotics exert selection pressure that kills only the antibiotic-sensitive pathogens. Sanitation and cleansing of hospital surfaces and the skin of medical personnel do not counteract this selective pressure, but rather indiscriminately reduce total pathogens on treated surfaces. Here, we discuss two recently introduced genetic strategies, based on temperate bacteriophages as DNA-delivery vehicles, that aim to sensitize bacteria to antibiotics and selectively kill the antibiotic-resistant ones. Outlooks for rendering one such approach more efficient and applicable are proposed. We believe that using an end product designed according to the provided principles on hospital surfaces and in hand-sanitizers will facilitate substitution of antibiotic-resistant pathogens with sensitive ones. PMID:27144084

  10. New antibiotic therapies for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rana Majd; Gordon, Rachel A; Wilson, Janice M; Silapunt, Sirunya

    2012-01-01

    Acne and rosacea compromise a substantial portion of the dermatology clinical practice. Over the past century, many treatment modalities have been introduced with antibiotics playing a major role. Today, both oral and topical antibiotics are used in the management of acne and rosacea, with several novel formulations and/or combination regimens recently introduced. The latest studies suggest anti-inflammatory actions to be the most likely mechanism of antibiotics in acne and rosacea, shifting the focus to subantimicrobial-dose oral antibiotics and/or topical antibiotic regimens as the preferred first-line agents. Here we will discuss the most recent oral and topical antibiotic therapies available for treatment of acne and rosacea, with special focus on efficacy data, indication, dosing, and mechanism of action.

  11. Insights into antibiotic resistance through metagenomic approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Robert; Edwards, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The consequences of bacterial infections have been curtailed by the introduction of a wide range of antibiotics. However, infections continue to be a leading cause of mortality, in part due to the evolution and acquisition of antibiotic-resistance genes. Antibiotic misuse and overprescription have created a driving force influencing the selection of resistance. Despite the problem of antibiotic resistance in infectious bacteria, little is known about the diversity, distribution and origins of resistance genes, especially for the unculturable majority of environmental bacteria. Functional and sequence-based metagenomics have been used for the discovery of novel resistance determinants and the improved understanding of antibiotic-resistance mechanisms in clinical and natural environments. This review discusses recent findings and future challenges in the study of antibiotic resistance through metagenomic approaches.

  12. Antibiotic stewardship: a focus on ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Gangat, M Azhar; Hsu, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the major health threats facing modern medicine. While there are many tactics to address this issue, antibiotic stewardship has been shown effective in reducing antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug effects, mortality and health care cost. Most antibiotic stewardship programs have evolved within acute care settings where the bulk of resistant infections are identified. Unfortunately, hospitals are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of overall antibiotic use. The vast majority of the antibiotic prescriptions are dispensed in ambulatory care settings, making this a critical target for stewardship programs. This article discusses the global need for antibiotic stewardship, highlights the importance of outpatient stewardship, and discusses strategies and challenges for implementation of stewardship in community settings.

  13. Antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations improve the quorum sensing behavior of Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanjun; Wang, Weishan; Zhu, Ying; Gong, Qianhong; Yu, Wengong; Lu, Xinzhi

    2013-04-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that antibiotics function as intermicrobial signaling molecules instead of killing weapons. However, mechanisms and key factors that are involved in such functions remain poorly understood. Earlier findings have associated antibiotic signaling with quorum sensing (QS); however, results varied among experiments, antibiotics, and bacterial strains. In this study, we found that antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations improved the violacein-producing ability of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction of QS-associated gene transcripts and bioassay of violacein production in a QS mutant strain demonstrated that antibiotics enhanced the production of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs; QS signaling molecules) and increased AHL-inducing QS-mediated virulence, including chitinase production and biofilm formation. Moreover, a positive flagellar activity and an increased bacterial clustering ability were found, which are related to the antibiotic-induced biofilm formation. Our findings suggested that antibiotic-mediated interspecific signaling also occurs in C. violaceum, thereby expanding the knowledge and language of cell-to-cell communication.

  14. A new macromolecular antitumor antibiotic, C-1027. I. Discovery, taxonomy of producing organism, fermentation and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, J L; Xue, Y C; Xie, M Y; Zhang, R; Otani, T; Minami, Y; Yamada, Y; Marunaka, T

    1988-11-01

    Strain C-1027, an actinomycete isolated from a soil sample collected in China, was found to produce the new antibiotic, C-1027. From taxonomical studies on its morphological, cultural and physiological characteristics, this antibiotic-producing strain was identified as Streptomyces globisporus C-1027. Antibiotic C-1027 has antimicrobial activity against most Gram-positive bacteria but not against Mycobacterium sp. or Gram-negative bacteria. This antibiotic shows remarkable activity in spermatogonial assay and potent cytotoxicity against KB carcinoma cells in vitro, and exhibits inhibition on transplantable tumors in mice.

  15. New sesquicillins, insecticidal antibiotics produced by Albophoma sp. FKI-1778.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Ryuji; Imasato, Rie; Yamaguchi, Yuichi; Masuma, Rokuro; Shiomi, Kazuro; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Omura, Satoshi

    2005-06-01

    Four new antibiotics, sesquicillins B to E were isolated from the culture broth of Albophoma sp. FKI-1778 together with known sesquicillin (sesquicillin A in this paper). The structures of sesquicillins were elucidated by spectroscopic studies including various NMR experiments. All sesquicillins have a common pyrano-diterpene skeleton. Sesquicillins showed moderate inhibitory activity against the growth of Artemia salina (brine shrimps) and Jurkat cells.

  16. Simple Strategy for Taming Membrane-Disrupting Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy has been devised for increasing the cellular selectivity of membrane-disrupting antibiotics based on the attachment of a facially amphiphilic sterol. Using Amphotericin B (AmB) as a prototype, covalent attachment of cholic acid bound to a series of α,ω-diamines has led to a dramatic reduction in hemolytic activity, a significant reduction in toxicity toward HEK293T cells, and significant retention of antifungal activity. PMID:27801580

  17. The spatial profiles and metabolic capabilities of microbial populations impact the growth of antibiotic-resistant mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Karishma S.; Ratnayeke, Nalin; Katira, Parag; Gordon, Vernita D.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance adversely affects clinical and public health on a global scale. Using the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we show that increasing the number density of bacteria, on agar containing aminoglycoside antibiotics, can non-monotonically impact the survival of antibiotic-resistant mutants. Notably, at high cell densities, mutant survival is inhibited. A wide range of bacterial species can inhibit antibiotic-resistant mutants. Inhibition results from the metabolic breakdown of amino acids, which results in alkaline by-products. The consequent increase in pH acts in conjunction with aminoglycosides to mediate inhibition. Our work raises the possibility that the manipulation of microbial population structure and nutrient environment in conjunction with existing antibiotics could provide therapeutic approaches to combat antibiotic resistance. PMID:25972434

  18. Blast from the Past: Reassessing Forgotten Translation Inhibitors, Antibiotic Selectivity, and Resistance Mechanisms to Aid Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-07

    Protein synthesis is a major target within the bacterial cell for antibiotics. Investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics have provided much needed functional and structural insight into their mechanism of action. However, the increasing prevalence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria has limited the utility of our current arsenal of clinically relevant antibiotics, highlighting the need for the development of new classes. Recent structural studies have characterized a number of antibiotics discovered decades ago that have unique chemical scaffolds and/or utilize novel modes of action to interact with the ribosome and inhibit translation. Additionally, structures of eukaryotic cytoplasmic and mitochondrial ribosomes have provided further structural insight into the basis for specificity and toxicity of antibiotics. Together with our increased understanding of bacterial resistance mechanisms, revisiting our treasure trove of "forgotten" antibiotics could pave the way for the next generation of antimicrobial agents.

  19. Antibiotrophs: The complexity of antibiotic-subsisting and antibiotic-resistant microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Woappi, Yvon; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Arya; Singh, Om V

    2016-01-01

    Widespread overuse of antibiotics has led to the emergence of numerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria; among these are antibiotic-subsisting strains capable of surviving in environments with antibiotics as the sole carbon source. This unparalleled expansion of antibiotic resistance reveals the potent and diversified resistance abilities of certain bacterial strains. Moreover, these strains often possess hypermutator phenotypes and virulence transmissibility competent for genomic and proteomic propagation and pathogenicity. Pragmatic and prospicient approaches will be necessary to develop efficient therapeutic methods against such bacteria and to understand the extent of their genomic adaptability. This review aims to reveal the niches of these antibiotic-catabolizing microbes and assesses the underlying factors linking natural microbial antibiotic production, multidrug resistance, and antibiotic-subsistence.

  20. Antibiotic research and development: business as usual?

    PubMed

    Harbarth, S; Theuretzbacher, U; Hackett, J

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of antibiotic resistance is tremendous and, without new anti-infective strategies, will continue to increase in the coming decades. Despite the growing need for new antibiotics, few pharmaceutical companies today retain active antibacterial drug discovery programmes. One reason is that it is scientifically challenging to discover new antibiotics that are active against the antibiotic-resistant bacteria of current clinical concern. However, the main hurdle is diminishing economic incentives. Increased global calls to minimize the overuse of antibiotics, the cost of meeting regulatory requirements and the low prices of currently marketed antibiotics are strong deterrents to antibacterial drug development programmes. New economic models that create incentives for the discovery of new antibiotics and yet reconcile these incentives with responsible antibiotic use are long overdue. DRIVE-AB is a €9.4 million public-private consortium, funded by the EU Innovative Medicines Initiative, that aims to define a standard for the responsible use of antibiotics and to develop, test and recommend new economic models to incentivize investment in producing new anti-infective agents.

  1. [The different intake modalities of oral antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Maesschalck, J

    2012-09-01

    This article attempts to provide a guideline for the different modalities of taking oral antibiotics. On the one hand, it focuses on the time interval between two administrations, and on the other hand on the time of optimal absorption. Antibiotics can be classified into 2 groups--either time dependent or concentration dependent--based on their antibacterial mechanism of action. By understanding the underlying reason for the different administration schedules (for example, why antibiotic A is taken three times daily with a meal and antibiotic B only once and sober), pharmacists and technicians are far better prepared for their task to inform the patient who is dispensed a first prescription.

  2. New anticancer antibiotic acts through diradical rearrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, S. )

    1990-05-28

    This paper reports that chemists have found and characterized an anticancer antibiotic, dynemicin A, that may be the fouth of a series of antibiotics that act by metabolic rearrangement to a diradical. If true, diradical precursors may represent an antibiotic strategy that evolved widely in nature. And, there may be many more anticancer antibiotics awaiting discovery. Also, the unique internal trigger that seems to set off the dynemicin rearrangement gives chemists a new understanding of how these compounds work. If, indeed, the anthraquinone nucleus in dynemicin A binds by intercalation between strands of DNA as is now thought, chemists will learn more about how to deliver drugs to specific sites.

  3. Broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holen, Øyunn; Alberg, Torunn; Blix, Hege Salvesen; Smith, Ingrid; Neteland, Marion Iren; Eriksen, Hanne Merete

    2017-03-01

    BACKGROUND One of the objectives in the action plan to reduce antimicrobial resistance in the health services in Norway is to reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals. This study describes the use of certain broad-spectrum antibiotics mentioned in the action plan in Norwegian hospitals, and assesses prescribing practices in relation to the Norwegian guidelines for antibiotic use in hospitals.MATERIAL AND METHOD Data were analysed from a nationwide non-identifiable point prevalence survey in May 2016 where all systemic use of antibiotics was recorded.RESULTS Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for 33 % of all antibiotics prescribed. Altogether 84 % of all broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed as treatment, 8 % were for prophylactic use, and 8 % were classified as other/unknown. Lower respiratory tract infections were the most frequent indication for treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, involving 30 % of all broad-spectrum treatment.INTERPRETATION This point prevalence survey in Norwegian hospitals in spring 2016 indicates a possibility for reducing the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections and for prophylactic use. Reduction of healthcare-associated infections may also contribute.

  4. Tackling antibiotic resistance: the environmental framework.

    PubMed

    Berendonk, Thomas U; Manaia, Célia M; Merlin, Christophe; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Cytryn, Eddie; Walsh, Fiona; Bürgmann, Helmut; Sørum, Henning; Norström, Madelaine; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Huovinen, Pentti; Stefani, Stefania; Schwartz, Thomas; Kisand, Veljo; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a threat to human and animal health worldwide, and key measures are required to reduce the risks posed by antibiotic resistance genes that occur in the environment. These measures include the identification of critical points of control, the development of reliable surveillance and risk assessment procedures, and the implementation of technological solutions that can prevent environmental contamination with antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes. In this Opinion article, we discuss the main knowledge gaps, the future research needs and the policy and management options that should be prioritized to tackle antibiotic resistance in the environment.

  5. A site-specific recombinase-based method to produce antibiotic selectable marker free transgenic cattle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuan; Wang, Yongsheng; Tong, Qi; Liu, Xu; Su, Feng; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic selectable marker genes have been widely used to generate transgenic animals. Once transgenic animals have been obtained, the selectable marker is no longer necessary but raises public concerns regarding biological safety. The aim of this study was to prepare competent antibiotic selectable marker free transgenic cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). PhiC31 intergrase was used to insert a transgene cassette into a "safe harbor" in the bovine genome. Then, Cre recombinase was employed to excise the selectable marker under the monitoring of a fluorescent double reporter. By visually tracking the phenotypic switch from red to green fluorescence, antibiotic selectable marker free cells were easily detected and sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. For safety, we used phiC31 mRNA and cell-permeant Cre protein in this study. When used as donor nuclei for SCNT, these safe harbor integrated marker-free transgenic cells supported a similar developmental competence of SCNT embryos compared with that of non-transgenic cells. After embryo transfer, antibiotic selectable marker free transgenic cattle were generated and anti-bacterial recombinant human β-defensin-3 in milk was detected during their lactation period. Thus, this approach offers a rapid and safe alternative to produce antibiotic selectable marker free transgenic farm animals, thereby making it a valuable tool to promote the healthy development and welfare of transgenic farm animals.

  6. An In Vitro Combined Antibiotic-Antibody Treatment Eliminates Toxicity from Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Craig; Zhang, Guodong; Patfield, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Treating Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) gastrointestinal infections is difficult. The utility of antibiotics for STEC treatment is controversial, since antibiotic resistance among STEC isolates is widespread and certain antibiotics dramatically increase the expression of Shiga toxins (Stxs), which are some of the most important virulence factors in STEC. Stxs contribute to life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which develops in considerable proportions of patients with STEC infections. Understanding the antibiotic resistance profiles of STEC isolates and the Stx induction potential of promising antibiotics is essential for evaluating any antibiotic treatment of STEC. In this study, 42 O157:H7 or non-O157 STEC isolates (including the “big six” serotypes) were evaluated for their resistance against 22 antibiotics by using an antibiotic array. Tigecycline inhibited the growth of all of the tested STEC isolates and also inhibited the production of Stxs (Stx2 in particular). In combination with neutralizing antibodies to Stx1 and Stx2, the tigecycline-antibody treatment fully protected Vero cells from Stx toxicity, even when the STEC bacteria and the Vero cells were cultured together. The combination of an antibiotic such as tigecycline with neutralizing antibodies presents a promising strategy for future STEC treatments. PMID:26100707

  7. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of antibiotics in biofilm infections of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hengzhuang, Wang; Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Although progress on biofilm research has been obtained during the past decades, the treatment of biofilm infections with antibiotics remains a riddle. The pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) profiles of an antimicrobial agent provide important information helping to establish an efficient dosing regimen and to minimize the development of antimicrobial tolerance and resistance in biofilm infections. Unfortunately, most previous PK/PD studies of antibiotics have been done on planktonic cells, and extrapolation of the results on biofilms is problematic as bacterial biofilms differ from planktonic grown cells in the growth rate, gene expression, and metabolism. Here, we set up several protocols for the studies of PK/PD of antibiotics in biofilm infections of P. aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo. It should be underlined that none of the protocols in biofilms have yet been certificated for clinical use or proved useful for guidance of antibiotic therapy.

  8. Pathophysiology of chronic bacterial osteomyelitis. Why do antibiotics fail so often?

    PubMed Central

    Ciampolini, J; Harding, K

    2000-01-01

    In this review the pathophysiology of chronic bacterial osteomyelitis is summarised, focusing on how bacteria succeed so often in overcoming both host defence mechanisms and antibiotic agents. Bacteria adhere to bone matrix and orthopaedic implants via receptors to fibronectin and to other structural proteins. They subsequently elude host defences and antibiotics by "hiding" intracellularly, by developing a slimy coat, or by acquiring a very slow metabolic rate. The presence of an orthopaedic implant also causes a local polymorphonuclear cell defect, with decreased ability to kill phagocytosed bacteria. Osteolysis is determined locally by the interaction of bacterial surface components with immune system cells and subsequent cytokine production. The increasing development of antibiotic resistance by Staphylococcus aureus and S epidermidis will probably make conservative treatment even less successful than it is now. A close interaction between orthopaedic surgeons and physicians, with combined medical and operative treatment, is to be commended.


Keywords: osteomyelitis; joint replacement infection; antibiotics; osteolysis PMID:10908375

  9. Design of dual action antibiotics as an approach to search for new promising drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevyashova, A. N.; Olsufyeva, E. N.; Preobrazhenskaya, M. N.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to the latest achievements in the design of dual action antibiotics — heterodimeric (chimeric) structures based on antibacterial agents of different classes (fluoroquinolones, anthracyclines, oxazolidines, macrolides and so on). Covalent binding can make the pharmacokinetic characteristics of these molecules more predictable and improve the penetration of each component into the cell. Consequently, not only does the drug efficacy increase owing to inhibition of two targets but also the resistance to one or both antibiotics can be overcome. The theoretical grounds of elaboration, design principles and methods for the synthesis of dual action antibiotics are considered. The structures are classified according to the type of covalent spacer (cleavable or not) connecting the moieties of two agents. Dual action antibiotics with a spacer that can be cleaved in a living cell are considered as dual action prodrugs. Data on the biological action of heterodimeric compounds are presented and structure-activity relationships are analyzed. The bibliography includes 225 references.

  10. How type 1 fimbriae help Escherichia coli to evade extracellular antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Avalos Vizcarra, Ima; Hosseini, Vahid; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Meier, Stefanie; Weber, Stefan S.; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    To survive antibiotics, bacteria use two different strategies: counteracting antibiotic effects by expression of resistance genes or evading their effects e.g. by persisting inside host cells. Since bacterial adhesins provide access to the shielded, intracellular niche and the adhesin type 1 fimbriae increases bacterial survival chances inside macrophages, we asked if fimbriae also influenced survival by antibiotic evasion. Combined gentamicin survival assays, flow cytometry, single cell microscopy and kinetic modeling of dose response curves showed that type 1 fimbriae increased the adhesion and internalization by macrophages. This was caused by strongly decreased off-rates and affected the number of intracellular bacteria but not the macrophage viability and morphology. Fimbriae thus promote antibiotic evasion which is particularly relevant in the context of chronic infections. PMID:26728082

  11. Antagonism between Bacteriostatic and Bactericidal Antibiotics Is Prevalent

    PubMed Central

    Lázár, Viktória; Papp, Balázs; Arnoldini, Markus; Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Busa-Fekete, Róbert; Fekete, Gergely; Pál, Csaba; Ackermann, Martin; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Combination therapy is rarely used to counter the evolution of resistance in bacterial infections. Expansion of the use of combination therapy requires knowledge of how drugs interact at inhibitory concentrations. More than 50 years ago, it was noted that, if bactericidal drugs are most potent with actively dividing cells, then the inhibition of growth induced by a bacteriostatic drug should result in an overall reduction of efficacy when the drug is used in combination with a bactericidal drug. Our goal here was to investigate this hypothesis systematically. We first constructed time-kill curves using five different antibiotics at clinically relevant concentrations, and we observed antagonism between bactericidal and bacteriostatic drugs. We extended our investigation by performing a screen of pairwise combinations of 21 different antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations, and we found that strong antagonistic interactions were enriched significantly among combinations of bacteriostatic and bactericidal drugs. Finally, since our hypothesis relies on phenotypic effects produced by different drug classes, we recreated these experiments in a microfluidic device and performed time-lapse microscopy to directly observe and quantify the growth and division of individual cells with controlled antibiotic concentrations. While our single-cell observations supported the antagonism between bacteriostatic and bactericidal drugs, they revealed an unexpected variety of cellular responses to antagonistic drug combinations, suggesting that multiple mechanisms underlie the interactions. PMID:24867991

  12. Where antibiotic resistance mutations meet quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Krašovec, Rok; Belavkin, Roman V.; Aston, John A.; Channon, Alastair; Aston, Elizabeth; Rash, Bharat M.; Kadirvel, Manikandan; Forbes, Sarah; Knight, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We do not need to rehearse the grim story of the global rise of antibiotic resistant microbes. But what if it were possible to control the rate with which antibiotic resistance evolves by de novo mutation? It seems that some bacteria may already do exactly that: they modify the rate at which they mutate to antibiotic resistance dependent on their biological environment. In our recent study [Krašovec, et al. Nat. Commun. (2014), 5, 3742] we find that this modification depends on the density of the bacterial population and cell-cell interactions (rather than, for instance, the level of stress). Specifically, the wild-type strains of Escherichia coli we used will, in minimal glucose media, modify their rate of mutation to rifampicin resistance according to the density of wild-type cells. Intriguingly, the higher the density, the lower the mutation rate (Figure 1). Why this novel density-dependent ‘mutation rate plasticity’ (DD-MRP) occurs is a question at several levels. Answers are currently fragmentary, but involve the quorum-sensing gene luxS and its role in the activated methyl cycle.

  13. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in colorectal surgery].

    PubMed

    Dellamonica, P; Bernard, E

    1994-01-01

    In elective colorectal surgery, the benefit of preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is well established, with a reduction in wound infection rate to less than 10%. The antimicrobial agent used has to be active against aerobic and anaerobic pathogens such as Escheria coli and Bacteriodes fragilis. The efficacy of three schemes of administration: oral and/or parenteral prophylaxis associated with a mechanical preparation, has been demonstrated. Oral antibiotic administration is current practice in USA; the most widely used oral regimen is the combination of erythromycin and neomycin given the day before surgery. Parenteral prophylaxis with a cephalosporin active against Bacteriodes fragilis such as cefoxitin and cefotetan, is preferred in Europe. The issue of whether a systemic prophylaxis should be added to the oral regimen or not has not yet been resolved. However it seems that the association should be proposed in various situations: patients with a high risk factors score (rectal resection and operations lasting more than three hours), patients with incomplete mechanical preparation, delay of the onset of surgery after the last oral dose.

  14. Antibiotics from Pseudomonas reptilivora I. Taxonomic Classification and Optimal Conditions of Fermentation for Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Luis A. Del; Olivares, J.; Blesa, M. C.; Mayor, F.

    1972-01-01

    A bacterium able to produce wide-spectrum antibiotic substances was isolated from a plant extract. The antibiotic-producing bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas reptilivora after suitable morphological and biochemical assays. Optimal yield conditions for antibiotic production in liquid medium have been established. PMID:4790557

  15. A review of newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics reserved for resistant infections: Implications for emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Mazer-Amirshahi, Maryann; Pourmand, Ali; May, Larissa

    2016-10-17

    Millions of patients are evaluated every year in the emergency department (ED) for bacterial infections. Emergency physicians often diagnose and prescribe initial antibiotic therapy for a variety of bacterial infections, ranging from simple urinary tract infections to severe sepsis. In life-threatening infections, inappropriate choice of initial antibiotic has been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. As such, initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy on the part of the emergency physician is critical. Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance, drug allergies, and antibiotic shortages further complicates the choice of antibiotics. Patients may have a history of prior resistant infections or culture data indicating that common first-line antibiotics used in the ED may be ineffective. In recent years, there have been several new antibiotic approvals as well as renewed interest in second and third line antibiotics because of the aforementioned concerns. In addition, several newly approved antibiotics have the advantage of being administered once weekly or even as a single infusion, which has the potential to decrease hospitalizations and healthcare costs. This article reviews newly approved antibiotics and antibiotics used to treat resistant infections with a focus on implications for emergency medicine.

  16. Effects of temperature and antibiotics on persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of low, residual concentrations of antibiotics in manure and other environmental matrices is not well understood. It has been hypothesized that antibiotic concentrations below clinical MIC (minimal inhibitory concentrations) are still capable of selecting for resistance. The objective of ...

  17. Naphthalecin, a novel antibiotic produced by the anaerobic bacterium, Sporotalea colonica sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Masami; Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Takase, Shigehiro; Hashimoto, Michizane; Nagai, Koji

    2008-04-01

    A novel antibiotic naphthalecin was purified and isolated from the cells of an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a soil sample. This antibiotic contained a naphthalene moiety, so named as naphthalecin, and showed antibacterial activity against gram positive species. The producing strain, an obligate anaerobe, was identified as a new species of the genus Sporotalea. Identification of the bacterium, cultivation, purification, structure determination, and antibacterial activity are shown.

  18. Antibiotic stewardship: a call for action by the urologic community.

    PubMed

    Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Bartoletti, Ricardo; Cek, Mete; Grabe, Magnus; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Pickard, Robert; Bjerklund-Johansen, Truls E

    2013-09-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and lack of new antibiotics in the near future calls for a variety of coordinated strategies called "Antibiotic stewardship", to improve antibiotic use with the goal of enhancing patient health outcomes and reducing emergence of resistance to antibiotics.

  19. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii serum-associated antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn; Dunman, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca(2+) channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections.

  20. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  1. Interleukin-1 production by antibiotic-treated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Y; Fay, M; Gougerot-Pocidalo, M A

    1988-05-01

    The effects of penicillin, macrolides (spiramycin and erythromycin), cephalosporins (cefaclor and cefadroxil), tetracycline (doxycycline) and quinolones (pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin) on extracellular and cell-associated interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity from human adherent mononuclear leucocyte cells were investigated in vitro. When cells were treated with an antibiotic concentration of 10 mg/l, no apparent effect could be detected for penicillin, erythromycin, cephalosporins or quinolones, while a slight increase of extracellular IL-1 activity associated with a decrease of intracellular IL-1 activity was observed with spiramycin and doxycycline. When high antibiotic concentration were used, extracellular IL-1 activity was increased by macrolides and tetracycline, while both cell-associated and class II human monocyte antigen expression were decreased. A toxic effect may have been exerted by these antimicrobial agents, since cell viability was altered when they were used at high concentrations. In contrast, extracellular IL-1 activity was found to be decreased by quinolones and cephalosporins. Intracellular IL-1 activity was also decreased by cephalosporins, while quinolones did not modify either cell-associated IL-1 activity or class II human monocyte antigen expression. The effect induced by quinolones and cephalosporins occurred without modification of cell viability. IL-1 activity was shown to be affected by antibiotics over the same range of concentrations which are known to inhibit mononuclear leucocyte proliferation. Our data may help in defining the mechanism by which the mitogen-induced mononuclear proliferative response is suppressed by antimicrobial agents since this appears to involve the inhibition of IL-1 production or of its release.

  2. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed.

  3. Interpretation of Epithelial Lining Fluid Concentrations of Antibiotics against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kiem, Sungmin; Schentag, Jerome J

    2014-12-01

    Although antibiotics whose epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations are reported high tend to be preferred in treatment of pneumonia, measurement of ELF concentrations of antibiotics could be misled by contamination from lysis of ELF cells and technical errors of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). In this review, ELF concentrations of anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) antibiotics were interpreted considering above confounding factors. An equation used to explain antibiotic diffusion into CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) was adopted: ELF/free serum concentration ratio = 0.96 + 0.091 × ln (partition coefficient / molecular weight(1/2)). Seven anti-MRSA antibiotics with reported ELF concentrations were fitted to this equation to see if their ELF concentrations were explainable by the penetration capacity only. Then, outliers were modeled under the assumption of varying contamination from lysed ELF cells (test range 0-10% of ELF volume). ELF concentrations of oritavancin, telavancin, tigecycline, and vancomycin were well described by the diffusion equation, with or without additional impact from cell lysis. For modestly high ELF/free serum concentration ratio of linezolid, technical errors of BAL should be excluded. Although teicoplanin and iclaprim showed high ELF/free serum ratios also, their protein binding levels need to be cleared for proper interpretation. At the moment, it appears very premature to use ELF concentrations of anti-MRSA antibiotics as a relevant guide for treatment of lung infections by MRSA.

  4. An efficient system for intracellular delivery of beta-lactam antibiotics to overcome bacterial resistance

    PubMed Central

    Abed, Nadia; Saïd-Hassane, Fatouma; Zouhiri, Fatima; Mougin, Julie; Nicolas, Valérie; Desmaële, Didier; Gref, Ruxandra; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The “Golden era” of antibiotics is definitely an old story and this is especially true for intracellular bacterial infections. The poor intracellular bioavailability of antibiotics reduces the efficency of many treatments and thereby promotes resistances. Therefore, the development of nanodevices coupled with antibiotics that are capable of targeting and releasing the drug into the infected-cells appears to be a promising solution to circumvent these complications. Here, we took advantage of two natural terpenes (farnesyl and geranyl) to design nanodevices for an efficient intracellular delivery of penicillin G. The covalent linkage between the terpene moieties and the antibiotic leads to formation of prodrugs that self-assemble to form nanoparticles with a high drug payload between 55–63%. Futhermore, the addition of an environmentally-sensitive bond between the antibiotic and the terpene led to an efficient antibacterial activity against the intracellular pathogen Staphylococcus aureus with reduced intracellular replication of about 99.9% compared to untreated infected cells. Using HPLC analysis, we demonstrated and quantified the intracellular release of PenG when this sensitive-bond (SB) was present on the prodrug, showing the success of this technology to deliver antibiotics directly into cells. PMID:26311631

  5. A computational tool integrating host immunity with antibiotic dynamics to study tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Elsje; Cilfone, Nicholas A; Lin, Philana Ling; Dartois, Véronique; Mattila, Joshua T; Butler, J Russell; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-02-21

    While active tuberculosis (TB) is a treatable disease, many complex factors prevent its global elimination. Part of the difficulty in developing optimal therapies is the large design space of antibiotic doses, regimens and combinations. Computational models that capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotics at the site of infection can aid in reducing the design space of costly and time-consuming animal pre-clinical and human clinical trials. The site of infection in TB is the granuloma, a collection of immune cells and bacteria that form in the lung, and new data suggest that penetration of drugs throughout granulomas is problematic. Here we integrate our computational model of granuloma formation and function with models for plasma pharmacokinetics, lung tissue pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for two first line anti-TB antibiotics. The integrated model is calibrated to animal data. We make four predictions. First, antibiotics are frequently below effective concentrations inside granulomas, leading to bacterial growth between doses and contributing to the long treatment periods required for TB. Second, antibiotic concentration gradients form within granulomas, with lower concentrations toward their centers. Third, during antibiotic treatment, bacterial subpopulations are similar for INH and RIF treatment: mostly intracellular with extracellular bacteria located in areas non-permissive for replication (hypoxic areas), presenting a slowly increasing target population over time. Finally, we find that on an individual granuloma basis, pre-treatment infection severity (including bacterial burden, host cell activation and host cell death) is predictive of treatment outcome.

  6. A computational tool integrating host immunity with antibiotic dynamics to study tuberculosis treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pienaar, Elsje; Cilfone, Nicholas A.; Lin, Philana Ling; Dartois, Veronique; Mattila, Joshua T.; Butler, J. Russell; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2014-12-08

    While active tuberculosis (TB) is a treatable disease, many complex factors prevent its global elimination. Part of the difficulty in developing optimal therapies is the large design space of antibiotic doses, regimens and combinations. Computational models that capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotics at the site of infection can aid in reducing the design space of costly and time-consuming animal pre-clinical and human clinical trials. The site of infection in TB is the granuloma, a collection of immune cells and bacteria that form in the lung, and new data suggest that penetration of drugs throughout granulomas is problematic. In this paper, we integrate our computational model of granuloma formation and function with models for plasma pharmacokinetics, lung tissue pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for two first line anti-TB antibiotics. The integrated model is calibrated to animal data. We make four predictions. First, antibiotics are frequently below effective concentrations inside granulomas, leading to bacterial growth between doses and contributing to the long treatment periods required for TB. Second, antibiotic concentration gradients form within granulomas, with lower concentrations toward their centers. Third, during antibiotic treatment, bacterial subpopulations are similar for INH and RIF treatment: mostly intracellular with extracellular bacteria located in areas non-permissive for replication (hypoxic areas), presenting a slowly increasing target population over time. In conclusion, we find that on an individual granuloma basis, pre-treatment infection severity (including bacterial burden, host cell activation and host cell death) is predictive of treatment outcome.

  7. Overcoming Drug Resistance with Alginate Oligosaccharides Able To Potentiate the Action of Selected Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saira; Tøndervik, Anne; Sletta, Håvard; Klinkenberg, Geir; Emanuel, Charlotte; Onsøyen, Edvar; Myrvold, Rolf; Howe, Robin A.; Walsh, Timothy R.; Thomas, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The uncontrolled, often inappropriate use of antibiotics has resulted in the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, with major cost implications for both United States and European health care systems. We describe the utilization of a low-molecular-weight oligosaccharide nanomedicine (OligoG), based on the biopolymer alginate, which is able to perturb multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria by modulating biofilm formation and persistence and reducing resistance to antibiotic treatment, as evident using conventional and robotic MIC screening and microscopic analyses of biofilm structure. OligoG increased (up to 512-fold) the efficacy of conventional antibiotics against important MDR pathogens, including Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, and Burkholderia spp., appearing to be effective with several classes of antibiotic (i.e., macrolides, β-lactams, and tetracyclines). Using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), increasing concentrations (2%, 6%, and 10%) of alginate oligomer were shown to have a direct effect on the quality of the biofilms produced and on the health of the cells within that biofilm. Biofilm growth was visibly weakened in the presence of 10% OligoG, as seen by decreased biomass and increased intercellular spaces, with the bacterial cells themselves becoming distorted and uneven due to apparently damaged cell membranes. This report demonstrates the feasibility of reducing the tolerance of wound biofilms to antibiotics with the use of specific alginate preparations. PMID:22825116

  8. Status Report from the Scientific Panel on Antibiotic Use in Dermatology of the American Acne and Rosacea Society: Part 1: Antibiotic Prescribing Patterns, Sources of Antibiotic Exposure, Antibiotic Consumption and Emergence of Antibiotic Resistance, Impact of Alterations in Antibiotic Prescribing, and Clinical Sequelae of Antibiotic Use.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Webster, Guy F; Rosen, Ted; Thiboutot, Diane; Leyden, James J; Gallo, Richard; Walker, Clay; Zhanel, George; Eichenfield, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Oral and topical antibiotics are commonly prescribed in dermatologie practice, often for noninfectious disorders, such as acne vulgaris and rosacea. Concerns related to antibiotic exposure from both medical and nonmedical sources require that clinicians consider in each case why and how antibiotics are being used and to make appropriate adjustments to limit antibiotic exposure whenever possible. This first article of a three-part series discusses prescribing patterns in dermatology, provides an overview of sources of antibiotic exposure, reviews the relative correlations between the magnitude of antibiotic consumption and emergence of antibiotic resistance patterns, evaluates the impact of alterations in antibiotic prescribing, and discusses the potential relevance and clinical sequelae of antibiotic use, with emphasis on how antibiotics are used in dermatology.

  9. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  10. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance.

  11. Earlier Debridement and Antibiotic Administration Decrease Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    closure (No Antibiotics) or treatment with tobramycin or vancomycin-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads (Antibiotics) and closed. Each time... polymethylmethacrylate beads and hip spacers in vivo. Acta Orthop. 80(2):193– 197, 2009. 10. Gustilo, R. B., Anderson, J. T. Prevention of infection

  12. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist’s view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-08-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research.

  13. Antibiotic resistance: a physicist’s view

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rosalind; Waclaw, Bartłomiej

    2016-01-01

    The problem of antibiotic resistance poses challenges across many disciplines. One such challenge is to understand the fundamental science of how antibiotics work, and how resistance to them can emerge. This is an area where physicists can make important contributions. Here, we highlight cases where this is already happening, and suggest directions for further physics involvement in antimicrobial research. PMID:27510596

  14. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance. PMID:27892497

  15. Analysis of antibiotic consumption in burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanzadeh-Moghadam, Somayeh; Azimi, Leila; Amani, Laleh; Rastegar Lari, Aida; Alinejad, Faranak; Rastegar Lari, Abdolaziz

    2015-01-01

    Infection control is very important in burn care units, because burn wound infection is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among burn patients. Thus, the appropriate prescription of antibiotics can be helpful, but unreasonable prescription can have detrimental consequences, including greater expenses to patients and community alike. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of antibiotic therapy on the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. 525 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from 335 hospitalized burn patients. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed after identification the strains. The records of patients were audited to find the antibiotic used. The results indicated that P. aeruginosa is the most prevalent Gram-negative bacteria. Further, it showed a relation between abuse of antibiotics and emergence of antibiotic resistance. Control of resistance to antibiotics by appropriate prescription practices not only facilitates prevention of infection caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, but it can also decrease the cost of treatment. PMID:26124986

  16. Repairing the broken market for antibiotic innovation.

    PubMed

    Outterson, Kevin; Powers, John H; Daniel, Gregory W; McClellan, Mark B

    2015-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant bacterial diseases pose serious and growing threats to human health. While innovation is important to all areas of health research, it is uniquely important in antibiotics. Resistance destroys the fruit of prior research, making it necessary to constantly innovate to avoid falling back into a pre-antibiotic era. But investment is declining in antibiotics, driven by competition from older antibiotics, the cost and uncertainty of the development process, and limited reimbursement incentives. Good public health practices curb inappropriate antibiotic use, making return on investment challenging in payment systems based on sales volume. We assess the impact of recent initiatives to improve antibiotic innovation, reflecting experience with all sixty-seven new molecular entity antibiotics approved by the Food and Drug Administration since 1980. Our analysis incorporates data and insights derived from several multistakeholder initiatives under way involving governments and the private sector on both sides of the Atlantic. We propose three specific reforms that could revitalize innovations that protect public health, while promoting long-term sustainability: increased incentives for antibiotic research and development, surveillance, and stewardship; greater targeting of incentives to high-priority public health needs, including reimbursement that is delinked from volume of drug use; and enhanced global collaboration, including a global treaty.

  17. Mining metagenomic datasets for antibiotic resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are medicines that are used to kill, slow down, or prevent the growth of susceptible bacteria. They became widely used in the mid 20th century for controlling disease in humans, animals, and plants, and for a variety of industrial purposes. Antibiotic resistance is a broad term. There ...

  18. [Bedside consultation by a multidisciplinary antibiotics team: an Antibiotic Stewardship Programme at UMCG].

    PubMed

    Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; Sinha, Bhanu; Wilting, Kasper R; Veenstra-Kyuchukova, Yanka; Panday, Prashant N; Hendrix, Ron

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) published a vision document to counteract the rise in antibiotic use and resistance. An Antibiotic Stewardship Programme (ASP) will be implemented by a multidisciplinary antibiotics team (A-team). In 2012 University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG) in the Netherlands started an Antibiotic Stewardship Programme (ASP) pilot project at the trauma surgery ward. The focus is on providing bedside consultation for patients based on the day 2 bundle. Implementation of the ASP on the basis of a day 2 bundle resulted in an intervention percentage of 75%. The pilot project was a success and will be extended to other wards.

  19. Transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone: The case of antibiotic resistance genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. G.

    2015-12-01

    In addition to material and energy flows, the dynamics and functions of the Earth's critical zone are intensively mediated by biological actions performed by diverse organisms. These biological actions are modulated by the expression of functional genes and their translation into enzymes that catalyze geochemical reactions, such as nutrient turnover and pollutant biodegradation. Although geobiology, as an interdisciplinary research area, is playing and vital role in linking biological and geochemical processes at different temporal and spatial scales, the distribution and transport of functional genes have rarely been investigated from the Earth's critical zone perspectives. To illustrate the framework of studies on the transport and transformation of genetic information in the critical zone, antibiotic resistance is taken as an example. Antibiotic resistance genes are considered as a group of emerging contaminants, and their emergence and spread within the critical zone on one hand are induced by anthropogenic activities, and on other hand are threatening human health worldwide. The transport and transformation of antibiotic resistance genes are controlled by both horizontal gene transfer between bacterial cells and the movement of bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes. In this paper, the fate and behavior of antibiotic resistance genes will be discussed in the following aspects: 1) general overview of environmental antibiotic resistance; 2) high through quantification of the resistome in various environmental media; 3) pathways of resistance gene flow within the critical zone; and 4) potential strategies in mitigating antibiotic resistance, particularly from the critical zone perspectives.

  20. A competitive trade-off limits the selective advantage of increased antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Gerardin, Ylaine; Springer, Michael; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-01

    In structured environments, antibiotic producing microorganisms can gain a selective advantage by inhibiting nearby competing species1. However, despite their genetic potential2,3, natural isolates often make only small amounts of antibiotics, and laboratory evolution can lead to loss rather than enhancement of antibiotic production4. Here we show that, due to competition with antibiotic resistant cheater cells, increased levels of antibiotic production can actually decrease the selective advantage to producers. Competing fluorescently-labeled Escherichia coli colicin producers with non-producing resistant and sensitive strains on solid media, we found that while producer colonies can greatly benefit from the inhibition of nearby sensitive colonies, this benefit is shared with resistant colonies growing in their vicinity. A simple model, which accounts for such local competitive and inhibitory interactions, suggests that the advantage of producers varies non-monotonically with the amount of production. Indeed, experimentally varying the amount of production shows a peak in selection for producers, reflecting a trade-off between benefit gained by inhibiting sensitive competitors and loss due to an increased contribution to resistant cheater colonies. These results help explain the low level of antibiotic production observed for natural species, and can help direct laboratory evolution experiments selecting for increased or novel production of antibiotics. PMID:27668360

  1. A role for the bacterial GATC methylome in antibiotic stress survival

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nadia R.; Ross, Christian A.; Jain, Saloni; Shapiro, Rebecca S.; Gutierrez, Arnaud; Belenky, Peter; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is an increasingly serious public health threat1. Understanding pathways allowing bacteria to survive antibiotic stress may unveil new therapeutic targets2–8. We explore the role of the bacterial epigenome in antibiotic stress survival using classical genetic tools and single-molecule real-time sequencing to characterize genomic methylation kinetics. We find that Escherichia coli survival under antibiotic pressure is severely compromised without adenine methylation at GATC sites. While the adenine methylome remains stable during drug stress, without GATC methylation, methyl-dependent mismatch repair (MMR) is deleterious, and fueled by the drug-induced error-prone polymerase PolIV, overwhelms cells with toxic DNA breaks. In multiple E. coli strains, including pathogenic and drug-resistant clinical isolates, DNA adenine methyltransferase deficiency potentiates antibiotics from the β-lactam and quinolone classes. This work indicates that the GATC methylome provides structural support for bacterial survival during antibiotics stress and suggests targeting bacterial DNA methylation as a viable approach to enhancing antibiotic activity. PMID:26998690

  2. A competitive trade-off limits the selective advantage of increased antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Gerardin, Ylaine; Springer, Michael; Kishony, Roy

    2016-09-26

    In structured environments, antibiotic-producing microorganisms can gain a selective advantage by inhibiting nearby competing species(1). However, despite their genetic potential(2,3), natural isolates often make only small amounts of antibiotics, and laboratory evolution can lead to loss rather than enhancement of antibiotic production(4). Here, we show that, due to competition with antibiotic-resistant cheater cells, increased levels of antibiotic production can actually decrease the selective advantage to producers. Competing fluorescently labelled Escherichia coli colicin producers with non-producing resistant and sensitive strains on solid media, we found that although producer colonies can greatly benefit from the inhibition of nearby sensitive colonies, this benefit is shared with resistant colonies growing in their vicinity. A simple model, which accounts for such local competitive and inhibitory interactions, suggests that the advantage of producers varies non-monotonically with the amount of production. Indeed, experimentally varying the amount of production shows a peak in selection for producers, reflecting a trade-off between benefit gained by inhibiting sensitive competitors and loss due to an increased contribution to resistant cheater colonies. These results help explain the low level of antibiotic production observed for natural species and can help direct laboratory evolution experiments selecting for increased or novel production of antibiotics.

  3. Silver nanoparticles strongly enhance and restore bactericidal activity of inactive antibiotics against multiresistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Panáček, Aleš; Smékalová, Monika; Večeřová, Renata; Bogdanová, Kateřina; Röderová, Magdaléna; Kolář, Milan; Kilianová, Martina; Hradilová, Šárka; Froning, Jens P; Havrdová, Markéta; Prucek, Robert; Zbořil, Radek; Kvítek, Libor

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics is currently one of the most important healthcare issues, and has serious negative impacts on medical practice. This study presents a potential solution to this problem, using the strong synergistic effects of antibiotics combined with silver nanoparticles (NPs). Silver NPs inhibit bacterial growth via a multilevel mode of antibacterial action at concentrations ranging from a few ppm to tens of ppm. Silver NPs strongly enhanced antibacterial activity against multiresistant, β-lactamase and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae when combined with the following antibiotics: cefotaxime, ceftazidime, meropenem, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. All the antibiotics, when combined with silver NPs, showed enhanced antibacterial activity at concentrations far below the minimum inhibitory concentrations (tenths to hundredths of one ppm) of individual antibiotics and silver NPs. The enhanced activity of antibiotics combined with silver NPs, especially meropenem, was weaker against non-resistant bacteria than against resistant bacteria. The double disk synergy test showed that bacteria produced no β-lactamase when treated with antibiotics combined with silver NPs. Low silver concentrations were required for effective enhancement of antibacterial activity against multiresistant bacteria. These low silver concentrations showed no cytotoxic effect towards mammalian cells, an important feature for potential medical applications.

  4. Advances in pneumococcal antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-Hoon

    2013-10-01

    Antimicrobial resistance and serotypes in Streptococcus pneumoniae have been evolving with the widespread use of antibiotics and the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV). Particularly, among various types of antimicrobial resistance, macrolide resistance has most remarkably increased in many parts of the world, which has been reported to be >70% among clinical isolates from Asian countries. Penicillin resistance has dramatically decreased among nonmeningeal isolates due to the changes in resistance breakpoints, although resistance to other β-lactams such as cefuroxime has increased. Multidrug resistance became a serious concern in the treatment of invasive pneumococcal diseases, especially in Asian countries. After PCV7 vaccination, serotype 19A has emerged as an important cause of invasive pneumococcal diseases which was also associated with increasing prevalence of multidrug resistance in pneumococci. Widespread use of PCV13, which covers additional serotypes 3, 6A and 19A, may contribute to reduce the clonal spread of drug-resistant 19A pneumococci.

  5. Antibiotic consideration in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Jack D

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a syndrome characterized by the loss of indigenous vaginal lactobacilli and massive polymicrobial anaerobic vaginal overgrowth of elusive etiology. Although progress has occurred in defining the composition of the vaginal microbiome using DNA amplifications, rapidly accumulating data have not resulted in therapeutic advantage. Treatment options remain limited and outcome often unsatisfactory, particularly regarding the frequent recurrence of symptomatic disease, leading to enormous frustration among patients and practitioners. This review does not address the important issues of transmission, diagnosis, and complications of BV, but focuses on antimicrobial activity of current drugs and their limitations in vitro and in vivo. Recognizing these limitations should allow for either development of new antibiotics or for innovative use of currently available drugs in new study protocols.

  6. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  7. Pneumonia in immunocompetent patients: combination antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Salva, S; Borgatta, B; Rello, J

    2014-04-01

    Pneumonia's burden is still important worldwide not only because of its high incidence and mortality, but also for the elevated costs related to it. Despite the concerted efforts to reduce the incidence of sepsis-related complications, they continue to represent a major human and economic burden. The cornerstone of sepsis management is early appropriate empiric broad spectrum antibiotics, resuscitation, and source control. The association between inappropriate use of antibiotics and increased mortality is the rationale for the use of empiric antibiotic combination therapy in critically ill patients. The aim of this manuscript was to discuss recent literature regarding the management of severe pneumonia, both community-acquired and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated, in critically ill patients. Use of combination therapy is warranted in severe infections with shock; considerations should be made on the importance of optimal antibiotic administration and adverse reactions, thus providing guidance for a rational use of antibiotics.

  8. Antibiotics From Microbes: Converging To Kill

    PubMed Central

    Fischbach, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As genetically encoded small molecules, antibiotics are phenotypes that have resulted from mutation and natural selection. Advances in genetics, biochemistry, and bioinformatics have connected hundreds of antibiotics to the gene clusters that encode them, allowing these molecules to be analyzed using the tools of evolutionary biology. This review surveys examples of convergent evolution from microbially produced antibiotics, including the convergence of distinct gene clusters on similar phenotypes and the merger of distinct gene clusters into a single functional unit. Examining antibiotics through an evolutionary lens highlights the versatility of biosynthetic pathways, reveals lessons for combating antibiotic resistance, and provides an entry point for studying the natural roles of these natural products. PMID:19695947

  9. Innovation of novel antibiotics: an economic perspective.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Michael R; Fendrick, A Mark

    2014-10-15

    Despite the public attention to antibiotic overuse and the specter of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens, current infections necessitate the use of antibiotics. Yet, patients and providers may not fully consider the societal cost associated with inappropriate antimicrobial use and subsequent resistance. Policies intended to limit use to minimize resistance must be balanced with the competing concern of underutilization. It is difficult to determine whether research and development incentives or reducing the costs of bringing new antibiotics through expedited review will be sufficient. Likely, the most effective method would be allowing higher prices for use deemed to be clinically appropriate. The ultimate policy goal is to ensure that antibiotics are used appropriately, with the right patients receiving the right medication at the right time, and that the world has a steady stream of future antibiotics to effectively treat the resistant organisms that will inevitably emerge.

  10. [Duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Pereira, P Ricardo; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    The duration of antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis is a controversial issue. Antibiotic regimens have changed over time along with the criteria used to determine the ideal antibiotic therapy duration. The authors aim to make an historical overview on this matter and simultaneously add the evidence of recent studies, pointing out some issues in results interpretation, namely, their design and the associated demographic and epidemiological questions. Clinical assays on this subject, with statistically significant results, are quite recent. Most of the scientific knowledge has been acquired empirically through the times. The actual investigation paradigm, in what concerns to antibiotic therapy in bacterial meningitis, lays on the dichotomy: "short versus long duration regimens". Nevertheless, so far, the existing studies have not completely cleared this doubt. Thus, despite some evidence suggests that short duration antibiotic regimens are effective for some patients, in patients with severe disease presentations or with other morbidities its use may be questioned.

  11. Update on the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    PubMed

    Rossolini, Gian Maria; Arena, Fabio; Pecile, Patrizia; Pollini, Simona

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotics tend to lose their efficacy over time due to the emergence and dissemination of resistance among bacterial pathogens. Strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes have emerged among major Gram-positive and Gram-negative species including Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter spp. Enterobacteriaceae, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. With some Gram-negatives, resistance may involve most or even all the available antimicrobial options, resulting in extremely drug-resistant or totally drug-resistant phenotypes. This so-called 'antibiotic resistance crisis' has been compounded by the lagging in antibiotic discovery and development programs occurred in recent years, and is jeopardizing the essential role played by antibiotics in current medical practices.

  12. Penetration barrier contributes to bacterial biofilm-associated resistance against only select antibiotics, and exhibits genus-, strain- and antibiotic-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rachna; Sahore, Simmi; Kaur, Preetinder; Rani, Alka; Ray, Pallab

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are implicated in a wide range of implant-based and chronic infections. These infections are often associated with adverse therapeutic outcomes, owing to the decreased antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms compared with their planktonic counterparts. This altered biofilm susceptibility has been attributed to multiple factors, including a reduced antibiotic penetration. Although several studies have addressed the role of penetration barrier in biofilm-associated drug resistance, it remains inconclusive. This study was done to elucidate antibiotic penetration through biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an agar disk diffusion assay. Penetration capacity of six antimicrobial drugs from different classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, fluoroquinolones and glycopeptides) through biofilms formed by standard strains and clinical isolates from catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) was elucidated by measuring their growth-inhibition zones in lawn cultures on Mueller-Hinton agar, following diffusion of an antibiotic from an overlying disk through their biofilm to the agar medium. Penetration of only select antimicrobials (vancomycin and chloramphenicol) was hindered through biofilms. There was considerable variation in biofilm-permeating capacity depending upon the genus, strain/CRBSI isolate and antibiotic tested. Furthermore, antibiotics failed to kill the biofilm cells independent of penetration, indicating that other factors contributed substantially to biofilm resistance.

  13. A novel antibiotic-delivery system by using ovotransferrin as targeting molecule.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hisham R; Tatsumoto, Sayuri; Ono, Hajime; Van Immerseel, Filip; Raspoet, Ruth; Miyata, Takeshi

    2015-01-23

    Synthetic antibiotics and antimicrobial agents, such as sulfonamide and triclosan (TCS), have provided new avenues in the treatment of bacterial infections, as they target lethal intracellular pathways. Sulfonamide antibiotics block synthesis of folic acid by inhibiting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) while TCS block fatty acid synthesis through inhibition of enoyl-ACP reductase (FabI). They are water-insoluble agents and high doses are toxic, limiting their therapeutic efficiency. In this study, an antibiotic drug-targeting strategy based on utilizing ovotransferrin (OTf) as a carrier to allow specific targeting of the drug to microbial or mammalian cells via the transferrin receptor (TfR) is explored, with potential to alleviate insolubility and toxicity problems. Complexation, through non-covalent interaction, with OTf turned sulfa antibiotics or TCS into completely soluble in aqueous solution. OTf complexes showed superior bactericidal activity against several bacterial strains compared to the activity of free agents. Strikingly, a multi-drug resistant Salmonella strain become susceptible to antibiotics-OTf complexes while a tolC-knockout mutant strain become susceptible to OTf and more sensitive to the complexes. The antibiotic bound to OTf was, thus exported through the multi-drug efflux pump TolC in Salmonella wild-type strain. Further, antibiotics-OTf complexes were able to efficiently kill intracellular pathogens after infecting human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116). The results demonstrate, for the first time, that the TfR mediated endocytosis of OTf can be utilized to specifically target drugs directly to pathogens or intracellularly infected cells and highlights the potency of the antibiotic-OTf complex for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  14. Antibiotics: When They Can and Can't Help

    MedlinePlus

    ... and most coughs and sore throats.What is "antibiotic resistance?""Antibiotic resistance" and "bacterial resistance" are two ways of describing ... was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: antibiotic ... resistance, bacterial resistance, improper prescribing, overuse, patient ...

  15. Short Course of Antibiotics Not Best for Kids' Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... significant concerns regarding overuse of antibiotics and increased antibiotic resistance, we conducted this trial to see if reducing ... treatment would be equally effective along with decreased antibiotic resistance and fewer adverse reactions," Dr. Alejandro Hoberman said ...

  16. Antibiotic-non-antibiotic combinations for combating extremely drug-resistant Gram-negative 'superbugs'.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Elena K; Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian

    2017-02-28

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance of Gram-negative pathogens has become a worldwide crisis. The status quo for combating resistance is to employ synergistic combinations of antibiotics. Faced with this fast-approaching post-antibiotic era, it is critical that we devise strategies to prolong and maximize the clinical efficacy of existing antibiotics. Unfortunately, reports of extremely drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative pathogens have become more common. Combining antibiotics such as polymyxin B or the broad-spectrum tetracycline and minocycline with various FDA-approved non-antibiotic drugs have emerged as a novel combination strategy against otherwise untreatable XDR pathogens. This review surveys the available literature on the potential benefits of employing antibiotic-non-antibiotic drug combination therapy. The apex of this review highlights the clinical utility of this novel therapeutic strategy for combating infections caused by 'superbugs'.

  17. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development.

  18. Membrane depolarization-triggered responsive diversification leads to antibiotic tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Natalie; Knapen, Wouter J.; Fauvart, Maarten; Michiels, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations are known to harbor a small fraction of so-called persister cells that have the remarkable ability to survive treatment with very high doses of antibiotics. Recent studies underscore the importance of persistence in chronic infections, yet the nature of persisters remains poorly understood. We recently showed that the universally conserved GTPase Obg modulates persistence via a (p)ppGpp-dependent mechanism that proceeds through expression of hokB. HokB is a membrane-bound toxin that causes the membrane potential to collapse. The resulting drop in cellular energy levels triggers a switch to the persistent state, yielding protection from antibiotic attack. Obg-mediated persistence is conserved in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, making Obg a promising target for therapies directed against bacterial persistence.

  19. Multi-bacteria multi-antibiotic testing using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for urinary tract infection (UTI) diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Kastanos, Evdokia; Pitris, Costas

    2013-06-01

    The inappropriate use of antibiotics leads to antibiotic resistance, which is a major health care problem. The current method for determination of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics requires overnight cultures. However most of the infections cannot wait for the results to receive treatment, so physicians administer general spectrum antibiotics. This results in ineffective treatments and aggravates the rising problem of antibiotic resistance. In this work, a rapid method for diagnosis and antibiogram for a bacterial infection was developed using Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) with silver nanoparticles. The advantages of this novel method include its rapidness and efficiency which will potentially allow doctors to prescribe the most appropriate antibiotic for an infection. SERS spectra of three species of gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, Proteus spp., and Klebsiella spp. were obtained after 0 and 4 hour exposure to the seven different antibiotics. Bacterial strains were diluted in order to reach the concentration of (2x105 cfu/ml), cells/ml which is equivalent to the minimum concentration found in urine samples from UTIs. Even though the concentration of bacteria was low, species classification was achieved with 94% accuracy using spectra obtained at 0 hours. Sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics was predicted with 81%-100% accuracy from spectra obtained after 4 hours of exposure to the different antibiotics. This technique can be applied directly to urine samples, and with the enhancement provided by SERS, this method has the potential to be developed into a rapid method for same day UTI diagnosis and antibiogram.

  20. Rampant Parasexuality Evolves in a Hospital Pathogen during Antibiotic Selection.

    PubMed

    Beabout, Kathryn; Hammerstrom, Troy G; Wang, Tim T; Bhatty, Minny; Christie, Peter J; Saxer, Gerda; Shamoo, Yousif

    2015-10-01

    Horizontal gene transfer threatens the therapeutic success of antibiotics by facilitating the rapid dissemination of resistance alleles among bacterial species. The conjugative mobile element Tn916 provides an excellent context for examining the role of adaptive parasexuality as it carries the tetracycline-resistance allele tetM and has been identified in a wide range of pathogens. We have used a combination of experimental evolution and allelic frequency measurements to gain insights into the adaptive trajectories leading to tigecycline resistance in a hospital strain of Enterococcus faecalis and predict what mechanisms of resistance are most likely to appear in the clinical setting. Here, we show that antibiotic selection led to the near fixation of adaptive alleles that simultaneously altered TetM expression and produced remarkably increased levels of Tn916 horizontal gene transfer. In the absence of drug, approximately 1 in 120,000 of the nonadapted E. faecalis S613 cells had an excised copy of Tn916, whereas nearly 1 in 50 cells had an excised copy of Tn916 upon selection for resistance resulting in a more than 1,000-fold increase in conjugation rates. We also show that tigecycline, a translation inhibitor, selected for a mutation in the ribosomal S10 protein. Our results show the first example of mutations that concurrently confer resistance to an antibiotic and lead to constitutive conjugal-transfer of the resistance allele. Selection created a highly parasexual phenotype and high frequency of Tn916 jumping demonstrating how the use of antibiotics can lead directly to the proliferation of resistance in, and potentially among, pathogens.

  1. Phenotypic and gene expression responses of E. coli to antibiotics during spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zea, Luis

    Bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics has been shown in vitro to be reduced during spaceflight; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this outcome are not fully understood. In particular, it is not yet clear whether this observed response is due to increased drug resistance (a microbial defense response) or decreased drug efficacy (a microgravity biophysical mass transport effect). To gain insight into the differentiation between these two potential causes, an investigation was undertaken onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2014 termed Antibiotic Effectiveness in Space-1 (AES-1). For this purpose, E. coli was challenged with two antibiotics, Gentamicin Sulfate and Colistin Sulfate, at concentrations higher than those needed to inhibit growth on Earth. Phenotypic parameters (cell size, cell envelope thickness, population density and lag phase duration) and gene expression were compared between the spaceflight samples and ground controls cultured in varying levels of drug concentration. It was observed that flight samples proliferated in antibiotic concentrations that were inhibitory on Earth, growing on average to a 13-fold greater concentration than matched 1g controls. Furthermore, at the highest drug concentrations in space, E. coli cells were observed to aggregate into visible clusters. In spaceflight, cell size was significantly reduced, translating to a decrease in cell surface area to about one half of the ground controls. Smaller cell surface area can in turn proportionally reduce the rate of antibiotic molecules reaching the cell. Additionally, it was observed that genes --- in some cases more than 2000 --- were overexpressed in space with respect to ground controls. Up-regulated genes include poxB, which helps catabolize glucose into organic acids that alter acidity around and inside the cell, and the gadABC family genes, which confer resistance to extreme acid conditions. The next step is to characterize the mechanisms behind

  2. Engineering of an industrial polyoxin producer for the rational production of hybrid peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lipeng; Lin, Shuangjun; Qu, Dongjing; Hong, Xuechuan; Bai, Linquan; Chen, Wenqing; Deng, Zixin

    2012-07-01

    Polyoxins and nikkomycins are potent antifungal peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics, which inhibit fungal cell wall biosynthesis. They consist of a nucleoside core and one or two independent peptidyl moieties attached to the core at different sites. Making mutations and introducing heterologous genes into an industrial Streptomyces aureochromogenes polyoxin producer, resulted in the production of four polyoxin-nikkomycin hybrid antibiotics designated as polyoxin N and nikkoxin B-D, whose structures were confirmed using high resolution MS and NMR. Two of the hybrid antibiotics, polyoxin N and nikkoxin D, were significantly more potent against some human or plant fungal pathogens than their parents. The data provides an example for rational generation of novel peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics in an industrial producer.

  3. A novel microbead-based microfluidic device for rapid bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    He, J; Mu, X; Guo, Z; Hao, H; Zhang, C; Zhao, Z; Wang, Q

    2014-12-01

    Effective treatment of infectious diseases depends on the ability to rapidly identify the infecting bacteria and the use of sensitive antibiotics. The currently used identification assays usually take more than 72 h to perform and have a low sensitivity. Herein, we present a microbead-based microfluidic platform that is highly sensitive and rapid for bacterial detection and antibiotic sensitivity testing. The platform includes four units, one of which is used for bacterial identification and the other three are used for susceptibility testing. Our results showed that Escherichia coli O157 at a cell density range of 10(1)-10(5) CFU/μL could be detected within 30 min. Additionally, the effects of three antibiotics on E. coli O157 were evaluated within 4-8 h. Overall, this integrated microbead-based microdevice provides a sensitive, rapid, reliable, and highly effective platform for the identification of bacteria, as well as antibiotic sensitivity testing.

  4. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sean D.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (ΔMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that ΔMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which ΔMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels. PMID:19015512

  5. Bactericidal Antibiotics Induce Toxic Metabolic Perturbations that Lead to Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Peter; Ye, Jonathan D; Porter, Caroline B M; Cohen, Nadia R; Lobritz, Michael A; Ferrante, Thomas; Jain, Saloni; Korry, Benjamin J; Schwarz, Eric G; Walker, Graham C; Collins, James J

    2015-11-03

    Understanding how antibiotics impact bacterial metabolism may provide insight into their mechanisms of action and could lead to enhanced therapeutic methodologies. Here, we profiled the metabolome of Escherichia coli after treatment with three different classes of bactericidal antibiotics (?-lactams, aminoglycosides, quinolones). These treatments induced a similar set of metabolic changes after 30 min that then diverged into more distinct profiles at later time points. The most striking changes corresponded to elevated concentrations of central carbon metabolites, active breakdown of the nucleotide pool, reduced lipid levels, and evidence of an elevated redox state. We examined potential end-target consequences of these metabolic perturbations and found that antibiotic-treated cells exhibited cytotoxic changes indicative of oxidative stress, including higher levels of protein carbonylation, malondialdehyde adducts, nucleotide oxidation, and double-strand DNA breaks. This work shows that bactericidal antibiotics induce a complex set of metabolic changes that are correlated with the buildup of toxic metabolic by-products.

  6. Evolution of resistance to a last-resort antibiotic in Staphyloccocus aureus via bacterial competition

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Gudrun; Yepes, Ana; Förstner, Konrad U.; Wermser, Charlotte; Stengel, Stephanie T.; Modamio, Jennifer; Ohlsen, Knut; Foster, Kevin R.; Lopez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Antibiotic resistance is a key medical concern, with antibiotic use likely being an important cause. However, here we describe an alternative route to clinically-relevant antibiotic resistance that occurs solely due to competitive interactions between bacterial cells. We consistently observe that isolates of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus diversify spontaneously into two distinct, sequentially arising strains. The first evolved strain outgrows the parent strain via secretion of surfactants and a toxic bacteriocin. The second is resistant to the bacteriocin. Importantly, this second strain is also resistant to intermediate levels of vancomycin. This so-called VISA (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus) phenotype is seen in many hard-to-treat clinical isolates. This strain diversification also occurs during in vivo infection in a mouse model, consistent with the fact that both coevolved phenotypes resemble strains commonly found in clinic. Our study shows how competition between coevolving bacterial strains can generate antibiotic resistance and recapitulate key clinical phenotypes. PMID:25171407

  7. Antimicrobial metallopolymers and their bioconjugates with conventional antibiotics against multidrug-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiuyang; Chen, Yung Pin; Miller, Kristen P; Ganewatta, Mitra S; Bam, Marpe; Yan, Yi; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Decho, Alan W; Tang, Chuanbing

    2014-04-02

    Bacteria are now becoming more resistant to most conventional antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a complex of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial strains, has proven especially problematic in both hospital and community settings by deactivating conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems, through various mechanisms, resulting in increased mortality rates and hospitalization costs. Here we introduce a class of charged metallopolymers that exhibit synergistic effects against MRSA by efficiently inhibiting activity of β-lactamase and effectively lysing bacterial cells. Various conventional β-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin-G, amoxicillin, ampicillin, and cefazolin, are protected from β-lactamase hydrolysis via the formation of unique ion-pairs between their carboxylate anions and cationic cobaltocenium moieties. These discoveries could provide a new pathway for designing macromolecular scaffolds to regenerate vitality of conventional antibiotics to kill multidrug-resistant bacteria and superbugs.

  8. Revisiting the mechanism of macrolide-antibiotic resistance mediated by ribosomal protein L22.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sean D; Sauer, Robert T

    2008-11-25

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance can occur by many mechanisms. An intriguing class of mutants is resistant to macrolide antibiotics even though these drugs still bind to their targets. For example, a 3-residue deletion (DeltaMKR) in ribosomal protein L22 distorts a loop that forms a constriction in the ribosome exit tunnel, apparently allowing nascent-chain egress and translation in the presence of bound macrolides. Here, however, we demonstrate that DeltaMKR and wild-type ribosomes show comparable macrolide sensitivity in vitro. In Escherichia coli, we find that this mutation reduces antibiotic occupancy of the target site on ribosomes in a manner largely dependent on the AcrAB-TolC efflux system. We propose a model for antibiotic resistance in which DeltaMKR ribosomes alter the translation of specific proteins, possibly via changes in programmed stalling, and modify the cell envelope in a manner that lowers steady-state macrolide levels.

  9. Effect of Antibiotic Class on Stroke Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zierath, Dannielle; Kunze, Allison; Fecteau, Leia; Becker, Kyra

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Infections are common following stroke and associated with worse outcome. Clinical trials evaluating the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics have produced mixed results. This study explores the possibility that antibiotics of different classes may differentially affect stroke outcome. Methods Lewis rats were subjected to transient cerebral ischemia (2 hrs) and survived for 1 month. The day after stroke they were randomized to therapy with ceftiofur (a β-lactam antibiotic), enrofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) or vehicle (as controls) and underwent the equivalent of 7 days of treatment. Behavioral tests were performed weekly until sacrifice. In a subset of animals, histology was done. Results There were no differences in outcomes at 24 hours or 1 week after stroke among the different groups. At 1 month after stroke, however, performance on the rotarod was worse in enrofloxacin treated animals when compared to control animals. Conclusions Independent of infection, the antibiotic enrofloxacin was associated with worse stroke outcome. These data echo the clinical observations to date and suggest that the secondary effects of antibiotics on stroke outcome should be considered when treating infection in subjects with stroke. The mechanism by which this antibiotic affects outcome needs to be elucidated. PMID:26138122

  10. Persistence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Dan I; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2011-09-01

    Unfortunately for mankind, it is very likely that the antibiotic resistance problem we have generated during the last 60 years due to the extensive use and misuse of antibiotics is here to stay for the foreseeable future. This view is based on theoretical arguments, mathematical modeling, experiments and clinical interventions, suggesting that even if we could reduce antibiotic use, resistant clones would remain persistent and only slowly (if at all) be outcompeted by their susceptible relatives. In this review, we discuss the multitude of mechanisms and processes that are involved in causing the persistence of chromosomal and plasmid-borne resistance determinants and how we might use them to our advantage to increase the likelihood of reversing the problem. Of particular interest is the recent demonstration that a very low antibiotic concentration can be enriching for resistant bacteria and the implication that antibiotic release into the environment could contribute to the selection for resistance. Several mechanisms are contributing to the stability of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations and even if antibiotic use is reduced it is likely that most resistance mechanisms will persist for considerable times.

  11. Gut microbiota disturbance during antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Manuel; Martins dos Santos, Vitor AP; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    It is known that the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiota responds to different antibiotics in different ways and that while some antibiotics do not induce disturbances of the community, others drastically influence the richness, diversity, and prevalence of bacterial taxa. However, the metabolic consequences thereof, independent of the degree of the community shifts, are not clearly understood. In a recent article, we used an integrative OMICS approach to provide new insights into the metabolic shifts caused by antibiotic disturbance. The study presented here further suggests that specific bacterial lineage blooms occurring at defined stages of antibiotic intervention are mostly associated with organisms that possess improved survival and colonization mechanisms, such as those of the Enterococcus, Blautia, Faecalibacterium, and Akkermansia genera. The study also provides an overview of the most variable metabolic functions affected as a consequence of a β-lactam antibiotic intervention. Thus, we observed that anabolic sugar metabolism, the production of acetyl donors and the synthesis and degradation of intestinal/colonic epithelium components were among the most variable functions during the intervention. We are aware that these results have been established with a single patient and will require further confirmation with a larger group of individuals and with other antibiotics. Future directions for exploration of the effects of antibiotic interventions are discussed. PMID:24418972

  12. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  13. Antibiotic resistance: Italian awareness survey 2016.

    PubMed

    Prigitano, Anna; Romanò, Luisa; Auxilia, Francesco; Castaldi, Silvana; Tortorano, Anna M

    2017-03-09

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a public health priority worldwide. The WHO conducted a survey concerning the personal use of antibiotics, knowledge of appropriate use and awareness of the issue of resistance. A similar survey was conducted in Italy involving 666 young university students and 131 seniors attending courses of the University of the third age. Antibiotics seem to be taken with moderate frequency and appropriately: 30% of respondents took them in the past six months and 94% took these drugs only prescribed by a doctor, in the correct dose and for the proper duration. Notable confusion concerning the conditions treatable with antibiotics was detected (only 30% indicated gonorrhea, and 30-40% believed that antibiotics should be employed for fever, cold, and flu), while 94% of participants seemed aware of the problem of antibiotic resistance. Most of the respondents identified the behaviors that can reduce the phenomenon of resistance (regular handwashing and use of antibiotics only when prescribed and needed). The results of our survey, that involved people of high level of instruction and living in urban areas of northern regions, cannot be extended to all the Italian population. However, they provide valid elements to promote initiatives aimed to a more aware use of antibiotics.

  14. Molecular regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Chater, Keith F; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2013-03-01

    Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes.

  15. Plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance is due to enzymatic modification of the antibiotic.

    PubMed Central

    Llaneza, J; Villar, C J; Salas, J A; Suarez, J E; Mendoza, M C; Hardisson, C

    1985-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of plasmid-mediated resistance to fosfomycin is described. The antibiotic was inactivated intracellularly and remained inside the cells. Modification was also obtained from cell extracts and was not energy dependent. The modifying enzyme seems to have sulfhydryl groups in its active center. PMID:3899003

  16. Review of Cellular Changes in the Cochlea Due to Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Dalian; Salvi, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Over the past two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Aminoglycoside damage progresses from cochlear base to apex and from outer to inner hair cells. Aminoglycoside antibiotics enter hair cells at the apical pole and are taken up into lysosomes and mitochondria.…

  17. Lysozyme as an alternative to growth promoting antibiotics in swine production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a naturally occurring enzyme found in bodily secretions such as tears, saliva, and milk. It functions as an antimicrobial agent by cleaving the peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell walls, which leads to cell death. Antibiotics are also antimicrobials and have been fed at subtherape...

  18. Environmental dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and correlation to anthropogenic contamination with antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem which threatens modern healthcare globally. Resistance has traditionally been viewed as a clinical problem, but recently non-clinical environments have been highlighted as an important factor in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events are likely to be common in aquatic environments; integrons in particular are well suited for mediating environmental dissemination of ARGs. A growing body of evidence suggests that ARGs are ubiquitous in natural environments. Particularly, elevated levels of ARGs and integrons in aquatic environments are correlated to proximity to anthropogenic activities. The source of this increase is likely to be routine discharge of antibiotics and resistance genes, for example, via wastewater or run-off from livestock facilities and agriculture. While very high levels of antibiotic contamination are likely to select for resistant bacteria directly, the role of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics in environmental antibiotic resistance dissemination remains unclear. In vitro studies have shown that low levels of antibiotics can select for resistant mutants and also facilitate HGT, indicating the need for caution. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that the environment plays an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance; further studies are needed to elucidate key aspects of this process. Importantly, the levels of environmental antibiotic contamination at which resistant bacteria are selected for and HGT is facilitated at should be determined. This would enable better risk analyses and facilitate measures for preventing dissemination and development of antibiotic resistance in the environment. PMID:26356096

  19. Fungal treatment for the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in veterinary hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lucas, D; Badia-Fabregat, M; Vicent, T; Caminal, G; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Balcázar, J L; Barceló, D

    2016-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance represents one of the most important public health concerns and has been linked to the widespread use of antibiotics in ve