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Sample records for cell-independent antiviral antibody

  1. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  2. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against Phytolacca americana antiviral protein PAP I.

    PubMed

    Kaloyanova, D; Kyurkchiev, S; Xu, J; Abouhaidar, M; Ivanov, I

    1999-08-01

    Four hybridoma lines are constructed producing monoclonal antibodies against the pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) antiviral protein PAP I. Two of the antibodies, 4E8 and 5D3, are characterized in more detail. They recognize amino acid sequences rather than conformational changes and their epitopes are 65% distinct. One of these antibodies (5D3) is used to study localization of recombinant PAP I in Escherichia coli cells by immuno-gold electron microscopy.

  3. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  4. Control of Toll-like receptor-mediated T cell-independent type 1 antibody responses by the inducible nuclear protein IκB-ζ.

    PubMed

    Hanihara-Tatsuzawa, Fumito; Miura, Hanae; Kobayashi, Shuhei; Isagawa, Takayuki; Okuma, Atsushi; Manabe, Ichiro; MaruYama, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Antibody responses have been classified as being either T cell-dependent or T cell-independent (TI). TI antibody responses are further classified as being either type 1 (TI-1) or type 2 (TI-2), depending on their requirement for B cell-mediated antigen receptor signaling. Although the mechanistic basis of antibody responses has been studied extensively, it remains unclear whether different antibody responses share similarities in their transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that mice deficient in IκB-ζ, specifically in their B cells, have impaired TI-1 antibody responses but normal T cell-dependent and TI-2 antibody responses. The absence of IκB-ζ in B cells also impaired proliferation triggered by Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, plasma cell differentiation, and class switch recombination (CSR). Mechanistically, IκB-ζ-deficient B cells could not induce TLR-mediated induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a class-switch DNA recombinase. Retroviral transduction of AID in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells restored CSR activity. Furthermore, acetylation of histone H3 in the vicinity of the transcription start site of the gene that encodes AID was reduced in IκB-ζ-deficient B cells relative to IκB-ζ-expressing B cells. These results indicate that IκB-ζ regulates TLR-mediated CSR by inducing AID. Moreover, IκB-ζ defines differences in the transcriptional regulation of different antibody responses.

  5. Antibody response to a T-cell-independent antigen is preserved after splenic artery embolization for trauma.

    PubMed

    Olthof, D C; Lammers, A J J; van Leeuwen, E M M; Hoekstra, J B L; ten Berge, I J M; Goslings, J C

    2014-11-01

    Splenic artery embolization (SAE) is increasingly being used as a nonoperative management strategy for patients with blunt splenic injury following trauma. The aim of this study was to assess the splenic function of patients who were embolized. A clinical study was performed, with splenic function assessed by examining the antibody response to polysaccharide antigens (pneumococcal 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine), B-cell subsets, and the presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB). The data were compared to those obtained from splenectomized patients and healthy controls (HC) who had been included in a previously conducted study. A total of 30 patients were studied: 5 who had proximal SAE, 7 who had distal SAE, 8 who had a splenectomy, and 10 HC. The median vaccine-specific antibody response of the SAE patients (fold increase, 3.97) did not differ significantly from that of the HC (5.29; P = 0.90); however, the median response of the splenectomized patients (2.30) did differ (P = 0.003). In 2 of the proximally embolized patients and none of the distally embolized patients, the ratio of the IgG antibody level postvaccination compared to that prevaccination was <2. There were no significant differences in the absolute numbers of lymphocytes or B-cell subsets between the SAE patients and the HC. HJB were not observed in the SAE patients. The splenic immune function of embolized patients was preserved, and therefore routine vaccination appears not to be indicated. Although the median antibody responses did not differ between the patients who underwent proximal SAE and those who underwent distal SAE, 2 of the 5 proximally embolized patients had insufficient responses to vaccination, whereas none of the distally embolized patients exhibited an insufficient response. Further research should be done to confirm this finding.

  6. Function and glycosylation of plant-derived antiviral monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kisung; Tekoah, Yoram; Rudd, Pauline M.; Harvey, David J.; Dwek, Raymond A.; Spitsin, Sergei; Hanlon, Cathleen A.; Rupprecht, Charles; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Golovkin, Maxim; Koprowski, Hilary

    2003-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering led to the production of plant-derived mAb (mAbP), which provides a safe and economically feasible alternative to the current methods of antibody production in animal systems. In this study, the heavy and light chains of human anti-rabies mAb were expressed and assembled in planta under the control of two strong constitutive promoters. An alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated leader sequence and Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) endoplasmic reticulum retention signal were linked at the N and C terminus of the heavy chain, respectively. mAbP was as effective at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus as the mammalian-derived antibody (mAbM) or human rabies Ig (HRIG). The mAbP contained mainly oligomannose type N-glycans (90%) and had no potentially antigenic α(1,3)-linked fucose residues. mAbP had a shorter half-life than mAbM. The mAbP was as efficient as HRIG for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies virus in hamsters, indicating that differences in N-glycosylation do not affect the efficacy of the antibody in this model. PMID:12799460

  7. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  8. Impact of thiamine deficiency on T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antibody production in lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.

    2012-01-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush on thiamine-replete and thiamine-depleted diets were evaluated for the effects of thiamine status on in vivo responses to the T-dependent antigen trinitophenol (TNP)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNP-KLH), the T-independent antigen trinitrophenol-lipolysaccaharide (TNP-LPS), or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS; negative control fish). Plasma antibody concentrations were evaluated for possible differences in total anti-TNP activity as well as differences in response kinetics. Associations between anti-TNP activity and muscle and liver thiamine concentrations as well as ratios of muscle-to-liver thiamine to anti-TNP activity were also examined. Thiamine-depleted lake trout that were injected with TNP-LPS exhibited significantly more anti-TNP activity than thiamine-replete fish. The depleted fish injected with TNP-LPS also exhibited significantly different response kinetics relative to thiamine-replete lake trout. No differences in activity or kinetics were observed between the thiamine-replete and -depleted fish injected with TNP-KLH or in the DPBS negative controls. Anti-TNP activity in thiamine-depleted lake trout injected with TNP-KLH was positively associated with muscle thiamine pyrophosphate (thiamine diphosphate; TPP) concentration. A negative association was observed between the ratio of muscle-to-liver TPP and T-independent responses. No significant associations between anti-TNP activity and tissue thiamine concentration were observed in the thiamine-replete fish. We demonstrated that thiamine deficiency leads to alterations in both T-dependent and T-independent immune responses in lake trout.

  9. Novel microarrays for simultaneous serodiagnosis of multiple antiviral antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Ponnurengam Malliappan; Moritsugu, Nozomi; Obuse, Sei; Isoshima, Takashi; Tashiro, Hideo; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We developed an automated diagnostic system for the detection of virus-specific immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) that was based on a microarray platform. We compared efficacies of our automated system with conventional enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). Viruses were immobilized to microarrays using a radical cross-linking reaction that was induced by photo-irradiation. A new photoreactive polymer containing perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate was prepared and coated on plates. Inactivated measles, rubella, mumps, Varicella-Zoster and recombinant Epstein-Barr viruse antigen were added to coated plates, and irradiated with ultraviolet light to facilitate immobilization. Virus-specific IgGs in healthy human sera were assayed using these prepared microarrays and the results obtained compared with those from conventional EIAs. We observed high correlation (0.79-0.96) in the results between the automated microarray technique and EIAs. The microarray-based assay was more rapid, involved less reagents and sample, and was easier to conduct compared with conventional EIA techniques. The automated microarray system was further improved by introducing reagent storage reservoirs inside the chamber, thereby conserving the use of expensive reagents and antibodies. We considered the microarray format to be suitable for rapid and multiple serological diagnoses of viral diseases that could be developed further for clinical applications. PMID:24367491

  10. Additive Effect of Neutralizing Antibody and Antiviral Drug Treatment in Preventing Virus Escape and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Peter; Senn, Beatrice M.; Klenerman, Paul; Kalinke, Ulrich; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    2000-01-01

    Poorly cytopathic or noncytopathic viruses can escape immune surveillance and establish a chronic infection. Here we exploited the strategy of combining antiviral drug treatment with the induction of a neutralizing antibody response to avoid the appearance of neutralization-resistant virus variants. Despite the fact that H25 immunoglobulin transgenic mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus mounted an early neutralizing antibody response, the virus escaped from neutralization and persisted. After ribavirin treatment of H25 transgenic mice, the appearance of neutralization-resistant virus was prevented and virus was cleared. Thus, the combination of virus-neutralizing antibodies and chemotherapy efficiently controlled the infection, whereas each defense line alone did not. Similar additive effects may be unexpectedly efficient and beneficial in humans after infections with persistent viruses such as hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus and possibly human immunodeficiency virus. PMID:10846070

  11. Crystal Structure of HIV-1 Primary Receptor CD4 i Complex with a Potent Antiviral Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.M.; Hong, X.; Seaman, M.S.; Rits-Vollock, S.p Kao, C.Y.; Ho, D.D.; Chen, B.

    2010-06-18

    Ibalizumab is a humanized, anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. It potently blocks HIV-1 infection and targets an epitope in the second domain of CD4 without interfering with immune functions mediated by interaction of CD4 with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. We report here the crystal structure of ibalizumab Fab fragment in complex with the first two domains (D1-D2) of CD4 at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. Ibalizumab grips CD4 primarily by the BC-loop (residues 121125) of D2, sitting on the opposite side of gp120 and MHC-II binding sites. No major conformational change in CD4 accompanies binding to ibalizumab. Both monovalent and bivalent forms of ibalizumab effectively block viral infection, suggesting that it does not need to crosslink CD4 to exert antiviral activity. While gp120-induced structural rearrangements in CD4 are probably minimal, CD4 structural rigidity is dispensable for ibalizumab inhibition. These results could guide CD4-based immunogen design and lead to a better understanding of HIV-1 entry.

  12. Antibody Complementarity-Determining Regions (CDRs) Can Display Differential Antimicrobial, Antiviral and Antitumor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Polonelli, Luciano; Pontón, José; Elguezabal, Natalia; Moragues, María Dolores; Casoli, Claudio; Pilotti, Elisabetta; Ronzi, Paola; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Juliano, Maria A.; Maffei, Domenico Leonardo; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) are immunoglobulin (Ig) hypervariable domains that determine specific antibody (Ab) binding. We have shown that synthetic CDR-related peptides and many decapeptides spanning the variable region of a recombinant yeast killer toxin-like antiidiotypic Ab are candidacidal in vitro. An alanine-substituted decapeptide from the variable region of this Ab displayed increased cytotoxicity in vitro and/or therapeutic effects in vivo against various bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The possibility that isolated CDRs, represented by short synthetic peptides, may display antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor activities irrespective of Ab specificity for a given antigen is addressed here. Methodology/Principal Findings CDR-based synthetic peptides of murine and human monoclonal Abs directed to: a) a protein epitope of Candida albicans cell wall stress mannoprotein; b) a synthetic peptide containing well-characterized B-cell and T-cell epitopes; c) a carbohydrate blood group A substance, showed differential inhibitory activities in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo against C. albicans, HIV-1 and B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells, conceivably involving different mechanisms of action. Antitumor activities involved peptide-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Engineered peptides, obtained by alanine substitution of Ig CDR sequences, and used as surrogates of natural point mutations, showed further differential increased/unaltered/decreased antimicrobial, antiviral and/or antitumor activities. The inhibitory effects observed were largely independent of the specificity of the native Ab and involved chiefly germline encoded CDR1 and CDR2 of light and heavy chains. Conclusions/Significance The high frequency of bioactive peptides based on CDRs suggests that Ig molecules are sources of an unlimited number of sequences potentially active against infectious agents and tumor cells. The easy production and low cost of small sized synthetic

  13. Anti-Her-2/neu antibody induces apoptosis in Her-2/neu overexpressing breast cancer cells independently from p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Brodowicz, T; Kandioler, D; Tomek, S; Ludwig, C; Rudas, M; Kunstfeld, R; Koestler, W; Hejna, M; Budinsky, A; Wiltschke, C; Zielinski, C C

    2001-01-01

    Anti-Her-2/neu antibody is known to induce apoptosis in HER-2/neu overexpressing breast cancer cells. However, exact regulatory mechanisms mediating and controlling this phenomenon are still unknown. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of anti-Her-2/neu antibody on apoptosis of HER-2/neu overexpressing human breast cancer cell lines SK-BR-3, HTB-24, HTB-25, HTB-27, HTB-128, HTB-130 and HTB-131 in relation to p53 genotype and bcl-2 status. SK-BR-3, HTB-24, HTB-128 and HTB-130 cells exhibited mutant p53, whereas wild type p53 was found in HTB-25, HTB-27 and HTB-131 cells. All seven cell lines weakly expressed bcl-2 protein (10–20%). Anti-Her-2/neu antibody, irrespective of p53 and bcl-2 status, induced apoptosis in all 7 cell lines dose- and time-dependently and correlated with Her-2/neu overexpression. In addition, incubation of cell lines with anti-Her-2/neu antibody did not alter p53 or bcl-2 expression. Anti-HER-2/neu antibody did not induce apoptosis in HER-2/neu negative HBL-100 and HTB-132 cell lines. Our results indicate that within the panel of tested breast cancer cell lines, anti-Her-2/neu antibody-induced apoptosis was independent from the presence of intact p53. © 2001 Cancer Research Compaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11742500

  14. Plaque/focus immunoassay: a simple method for detecting antiviral monoclonal or other antibodies and viral antigens in cells.

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Gregersen, J P; Ludwig, H

    1984-11-30

    A new, simple enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is described which is performed directly on infected and fixed cell cultures in microtitre plates. It permits large scale screening of antiviral monoclonal antibodies and differentiation of specific antibodies from those usually responsible for high background reactions in other ELISA techniques. Time consuming purification of antigens is thus avoided. The plaque/focus immunoassay is also applicable to titration of antibodies in patients' sera and antigens in lytically or non-lytically virus-infected cells. It may also be used to localize antigens in different cell compartments. This immunoassay requires no special equipment and results may be evaluated either with the naked eye or using a light microscope.

  15. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  16. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A; Hoornweg, Tabitha E; van de Pol, Denise P I; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts' antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  17. Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Dengue Virus Infection in Primary Human Macrophages; Balancing Higher Fusion against Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Flipse, Jacky; Diosa-Toro, Mayra A.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; van de Pol, Denise P. I.; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    The dogma is that the human immune system protects us against pathogens. Yet, several viruses, like dengue virus, antagonize the hosts’ antibodies to enhance their viral load and disease severity; a phenomenon called antibody-dependent enhancement of infection. This study offers novel insights in the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated enhancement (ADE) of dengue virus infection in primary human macrophages. No differences were observed in the number of bound and internalized DENV particles following infection in the absence and presence of enhancing concentrations of antibodies. Yet, we did find an increase in membrane fusion activity during ADE of DENV infection. The higher fusion activity is coupled to a low antiviral response early in infection and subsequently a higher infection efficiency. Apparently, subtle enhancements early in the viral life cycle cascades into strong effects on infection, virus production and immune response. Importantly, and in contrast to other studies, the antibody-opsonized virus particles do not trigger immune suppression and remain sensitive to interferon. Additionally, this study gives insight in how human macrophages interact and respond to viral infections and the tight regulation thereof under various conditions of infection. PMID:27380892

  18. Antiviral Antibodies and T Cells Are Present in the Foreskin of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Rothaeusler, Kristina; Ma, Zhong-Min; Qureshi, Huma; Carroll, Timothy D.; Rourke, Tracy; McChesney, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    No information exists regarding immune responses to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the foreskin or glans of the human penis, although this is a key tissue for HIV transmission. To address this gap, we characterized antiviral immune responses in foreskin of male rhesus macaques (RMs) inoculated with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strain SIVmac251 by penile foreskin exposure. We found a complete population of immune cells in the foreskin and glans of normal RMs, although B cells were less common than CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. IgG-secreting cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay in cell suspensions made from the foreskin. In the foreskin and glans of SIV-infected RMs, although B cells were less common than CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, SIV-specific IgG antibody was present in foreskin secretions. In addition, cytokine-secreting SIV-specific CD8+ T cells were readily found in cell suspensions made from the foreskin. Although potential HIV target cells were found in and under the epithelium covering all penile surfaces, the presence of antiviral effector B and T cells in the foreskin suggests that vaccines may be able to elicit immunity in this critical site to protect men from acquiring HIV. PMID:22532691

  19. Cellular impedance measurement as a new tool for poxvirus titration, antibody neutralization testing and evaluation of antiviral substances

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, Peter T.; Schuenadel, Livia; Wiethaus, Julia; Bourquain, Daniel R.; Kurth, Andreas; Nitsche, Andreas

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Real-time data acquisition by RT-CES requires low operative effort. {yields} Time to result is reduced by using RT-CES instead of conventional methods. {yields} RT-CES enables quantification of virus titers in unknown samples. {yields} RT-CES is a useful tool for high-throughput characterization of antiviral agents. {yields} An RT-CES-based virus neutralization test was established. -- Abstract: Impedance-based biosensing known as real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) belongs to an emerging technology for analyzing the status of cells in vitro. In the present study protocols were developed for an RT-CES-based system (xCELLigence{sup TM}, Roche Applied Science, ACEA Biosciences Inc.) to supplement conventional techniques in pox virology. First, proliferation of cells susceptible to orthopoxviruses was monitored. For virus titration cells were infected with vaccinia virus and cell status, represented by the dimensionless impedance-based cell index (CI), was monitored. A virus-dose dependent decrease in electrical impedance could be shown. Calculation of calibration curves at a suitable CI covering a dynamic range of 4 log enabled the quantification of virus titers in unknown samples. Similarly, antiviral effects could be determined as shown for anti-poxviral agents ST-246 and Cidofovir. Published values for the in vitro concentration that inhibited virus replication by 50% (IC{sub 50}) could be confirmed while cytotoxicity in effective concentrations was excluded in long-term incubation experiments. Finally, an RT-CES-based virus neutralization test was established. Various poxvirus-specific antibodies were examined for their neutralizing activity and a calculation mode for the neutralizing antibody titer was introduced. In summary, the presented RT-CES-based methods outmatch end-point assays by observing the cell population throughout the entire experiment while workload and time to result are reduced.

  20. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread. PMID:27225131

  1. Access of protective antiviral antibody to neuronal tissues requires CD4 T-cell help.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Norifumi; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-05-26

    Circulating antibodies can access most tissues to mediate surveillance and elimination of invading pathogens. Immunoprivileged tissues such as the brain and the peripheral nervous system are shielded from plasma proteins by the blood-brain barrier and blood-nerve barrier, respectively. Yet, circulating antibodies must somehow gain access to these tissues to mediate their antimicrobial functions. Here we examine the mechanism by which antibodies gain access to neuronal tissues to control infection. Using a mouse model of genital herpes infection, we demonstrate that both antibodies and CD4 T cells are required to protect the host after immunization at a distal site. We show that memory CD4 T cells migrate to the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in response to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. Once inside these neuronal tissues, CD4 T cells secrete interferon-γ and mediate local increase in vascular permeability, enabling antibody access for viral control. A similar requirement for CD4 T cells for antibody access to the brain is observed after intranasal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus. Our results reveal a previously unappreciated role of CD4 T cells in mobilizing antibodies to the peripheral sites of infection where they help to limit viral spread.

  2. Preserved antiviral adaptive immunity following polyclonal antibody immunotherapy for severe murine influenza infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Natalie E.; Hatjopolous, Antoinette; Fraser, Cara K.; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy may have particular benefits for the treatment of severe influenza infection in at-risk populations, however little is known of the impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation of memory responses to the virus. Ideally, passive immunotherapy should attenuate the severity of infection while still allowing the formation of adaptive responses to confer protection from future exposure. In this study, we sought to determine if administration of influenza-specific ovine polyclonal antibodies could inhibit adaptive immune responses in a murine model of lethal influenza infection. Ovine polyclonal antibodies generated against recombinant PR8 (H1N1) hemagglutinin exhibited potent prophylactic capacity and reduced lethality in an established influenza infection, particularly when administered intranasally. Surviving mice were also protected against reinfection and generated normal antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses to the virus. The longevity of ovine polyclonal antibodies was explored with a half-life of over two weeks following a single antibody administration. These findings support the development of an ovine passive polyclonal antibody therapy for treatment of severe influenza infection which does not affect the formation of subsequent acquired immunity to the virus. PMID:27380890

  3. Cellular impedance measurement as a new tool for poxvirus titration, antibody neutralization testing and evaluation of antiviral substances.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Peter T; Schuenadel, Livia; Wiethaus, Julia; Bourquain, Daniel R; Kurth, Andreas; Nitsche, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    Impedance-based biosensing known as real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) belongs to an emerging technology for analyzing the status of cells in vitro. In the present study protocols were developed for an RT-CES-based system (xCELLigence™, Roche Applied Science, ACEA Biosciences Inc.) to supplement conventional techniques in pox virology. First, proliferation of cells susceptible to orthopoxviruses was monitored. For virus titration cells were infected with vaccinia virus and cell status, represented by the dimensionless impedance-based cell index (CI), was monitored. A virus-dose dependent decrease in electrical impedance could be shown. Calculation of calibration curves at a suitable CI covering a dynamic range of 4 log enabled the quantification of virus titers in unknown samples. Similarly, antiviral effects could be determined as shown for anti-poxviral agents ST-246 and Cidofovir. Published values for the in vitro concentration that inhibited virus replication by 50% (IC₅₀) could be confirmed while cytotoxicity in effective concentrations was excluded in long-term incubation experiments. Finally, an RT-CES-based virus neutralization test was established. Various poxvirus-specific antibodies were examined for their neutralizing activity and a calculation mode for the neutralizing antibody titer was introduced. In summary, the presented RT-CES-based methods outmatch end-point assays by observing the cell population throughout the entire experiment while workload and time to result are reduced.

  4. Analysis of the quantity of antiviral antibodies from mink infected with different Aleutian disease virus strains.

    PubMed

    Aasted, B; Tierney, G S; Bloom, M E

    1984-05-01

    Mink persistently infected with Aleutian disease virus (ADV) develop hypergammaglobulinaemia and immune complex disease. Radiolabelled antibodies from mink infected with ADV-G, DK, Pullman , and Utah I strains of ADV were reacted against all four ADV strains in radioimmunoassay (RIA). The amount of anti-ADV antibody in two equally hypergammaglobulinaemic serum pools varied from 13% (anti- Pullman ) to 57% (anti-Utah I). Serum pools from two other sources (anti-DK and anti-ADV-G), although less hypergammaglobulinaemic , had 5% and 13%, respectively, indicating that 43-95% of the Ig in the sera of mink with AD was not specific antibody to ADV structural antigens. The possibility of a general polyclonal activation of the humoral immune system is being discussed. Comparison of plateau RIA binding levels for the four serum pools against the four viral antigens suggested three patterns of reactivity: DK and Utah I reacted similarly, but Pullman and ADV-G reacted serologically different.

  5. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile.

  6. Lack of antiviral antibody response in koalas infected with koala retroviruses (KoRV).

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Uwe; Keller, Martina; Möller, Annekatrin; Timms, Peter; Denner, Joachim

    2015-02-16

    Many wild koalas are infected with the koala retrovirus, KoRV, some of which suffer from lymphoma and chlamydial disease. Three subgroups, KoRV-A, KoRV-B and KoRV-J, have so far been described. It is well known that other closely related gammaretroviruses can induce tumours and severe immunodeficiencies in their respective hosts and a possible role for KoRV infection in lymphoma and chlamydial disease in koalas has been suggested. In many wild koalas, KoRV-A has become endogenised, i.e., it is integrated in the germ-line and is passed on with normal cellular genes. In this study, sera from koalas in European zoos and from wild animals in Australia were screened for antibodies against KoRV-A. These naturally infected animals all carry endogenous KoRV-A and two zoo animals are also infected with KoRV-B. The antibody response is generally an important diagnostic tool for detecting retrovirus infections. However, when Western blot analyses were performed using purified virus or recombinant proteins corresponding to KoRV-A, none of the koalas tested positive for specific antibodies, suggesting a state of tolerance. These results have implications for koala vaccination, as they suggest that therapeutic immunisation of animals carrying and expressing endogenous KoRV-A will not be successful. However, it remains unclear whether these animals can be immunised against KoRV-B and immunisation of uninfected koalas could still be worthwhile. PMID:25596496

  7. Intracellular Reprogramming of Expression, Glycosylation, and Function of a Plant-Derived Antiviral Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young-Kwan; So, Yang-Kang; Ryu, Jae-Sung; Oh, Seung-Han; Han, Yeon-Soo; Ko, Kinarm; Choo, Young-Kug; Park, Sung-Joo; Brodzik, Robert; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Hwang, Kyung-A; Koprowski, Hilary; Lee, Yong Seong; Ko, Kisung

    2013-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering, which has led to the production of plant-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbPs), provides a safe and economically effective alternative to conventional antibody expression methods. In this study, the expression levels and biological properties of the anti-rabies virus mAbP SO57 with or without an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retention peptide signal (Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu; KDEL) in transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum) were analyzed. The expression levels of mAbP SO57 with KDEL (mAbPK) were significantly higher than those of mAbP SO57 without KDEL (mAbP) regardless of the transcription level. The Fc domains of both purified mAbP and mAbPK and hybridoma-derived mAb (mAbH) had similar levels of binding activity to the FcγRI receptor (CD64). The mAbPK had glycan profiles of both oligomannose (OM) type (91.7%) and Golgi type (8.3%), whereas the mAbP had mainly Golgi type glycans (96.8%) similar to those seen with mAbH. Confocal analysis showed that the mAbPK was co-localized to ER-tracker signal and cellular areas surrounding the nucleus indicating accumulation of the mAbP with KDEL in the ER. Both mAbP and mAbPK disappeared with similar trends to mAbH in BALB/c mice. In addition, mAbPK was as effective as mAbH at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus CVS-11. These results suggest that the ER localization of the recombinant mAbP by KDEL reprograms OM glycosylation and enhances the production of the functional antivirus therapeutic antibody in the plant. PMID:23967055

  8. Llama-Derived Single Domain Antibodies to Build Multivalent, Superpotent and Broadened Neutralizing Anti-Viral Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hultberg, Anna; Temperton, Nigel J.; Rosseels, Valérie; Koenders, Mireille; Gonzalez-Pajuelo, Maria; Schepens, Bert; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Schillemans, Joris; Saunders, Michael; Weiss, Robin A.; Saelens, Xavier; Melero, José A.; Verrips, C. Theo; Van Gucht, Steven; de Haard, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    For efficient prevention of viral infections and cross protection, simultaneous targeting of multiple viral epitopes is a powerful strategy. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHH) against the trimeric envelope proteins of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Fusion protein), Rabies virus (Glycoprotein) and H5N1 Influenza (Hemagglutinin 5) were selected from llama derived immune libraries by phage display. Neutralizing VHH recognizing different epitopes in the receptor binding sites on the spikes with affinities in the low nanomolar range were identified for all the three viruses by viral neutralization assays. By fusion of VHH with variable linker lengths, multimeric constructs were made that improved neutralization potencies up to 4,000-fold for RSV, 1,500-fold for Rabies virus and 75-fold for Influenza H5N1. The potencies of the VHH constructs were similar or better than best performing monoclonal antibodies. The cross protection capacity against different viral strains was also improved for all three viruses, both by multivalent (two or three identical VHH) and biparatopic (two different VHH) constructs. By combining a VHH neutralizing RSV subtype A, but not subtype B with a poorly neutralizing VHH with high affinity for subtype B, a biparatopic construct was made with low nanomolar neutralizing potency against both subtypes. Trivalent anti-H5N1 VHH neutralized both Influenza H5N1 clade1 and 2 in a pseudotype assay and was very potent in neutralizing the NIBRG-14 Influenza H5N1 strain with IC50 of 9 picomolar. Bivalent and biparatopic constructs against Rabies virus cross neutralized both 10 different Genotype 1 strains and Genotype 5. The results show that multimerization of VHH fragments targeting multiple epitopes on a viral trimeric spike protein is a powerful tool for anti-viral therapy to achieve “best-in-class” and broader neutralization capacity. PMID:21483777

  9. Long-lasting protective antiviral immunity induced by passive immunotherapies requires both neutralizing and effector functions of the administered monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Roudaina; Pelegrin, Mireia; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Plays, Marc; Piechaczyk, Marc; Gros, Laurent

    2010-10-01

    Using FrCas(E) retrovirus-infected newborn mice as a model system, we have shown recently that a long-lasting antiviral immune response essential for healthy survival emerges after a short treatment with a neutralizing (667) IgG2a isotype monoclonal antibody (MAb). This suggested that the mobilization of adaptive immunity by administered MAbs is key for the success in the long term for the MAb-based passive immunotherapy of chronic viral infections. We have addressed here whether the anti-FrCas(E) protective endogenous immunity is the mere consequence of viral propagation blunting, which would simply give time to the immune system to react, and/or to actual immunomodulation by the MAb during the treatment. To this aim, we have compared viral replication, disease progression, and antiviral immune responses between different groups of infected mice: (i) mice treated with either the 667 MAb, its F(ab')(2) fragment, or an IgM (672) with epitopic specificity similar to that of 667 but displaying different effector functions, and (ii) mice receiving no treatment but infected with a low viral inoculum reproducing the initial viral expansion observed in their infected/667 MAb-treated counterparts. Our data show that the reduction of FrCas(E) propagation is insufficient on its own to induce protective immunity and support a direct immunomodulatory action of the 667 MAb. Interestingly, they also point to sequential actions of the administered MAb. In a first step, viral propagation is exclusively controlled by 667 neutralizing activity, and in a second one, this action is complemented by FcgammaR-binding-dependent mechanisms, which most likely combine infected cell cytolysis and the modulation of the antiviral endogenous immune response. Such complementary effects of administered MAbs must be taken into consideration for the improvement of future antiviral MAb-based immunotherapies.

  10. Subversion of early innate antiviral responses during antibody-dependent enhancement of Dengue virus infection induces severe disease in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Vivian V; Fagundes, Caio T; Valadão, Deborah F; Ávila, Thiago V; Cisalpino, Daniel; Rocha, Rebeca F; Ribeiro, Lucas S; Ascenção, Fernando R; Kangussu, Lucas M; Celso, M Q; Astigarraga, Ruiz G; Gouveia, Frederico L; Silva, Tarcília A; Bonaventura, Daniela; Sampaio, Divaldo de Almeida; Leite, Ana Cristina L; Teixeira, Mauro M; Souza, Danielle G

    2014-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease caused by one of four serotypes of Dengue virus (DENV-1-4). Epidemiologic and observational studies demonstrate that the majority of severe dengue cases, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), occurs predominantly in either individuals with cross-reactive immunity following a secondary heterologous infection or in infants with primary DENV infections born from dengue-immune mothers, suggesting that B-cell-mediated and antibody responses impact on disease evolution. We demonstrate here that B cells play a pivotal role in host responses against primary DENV infection in mice. After infection, μMT(-/-) mice showed increased viral loads followed by severe disease manifestation characterized by intense thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, cytokine production and massive liver damage that culminated in death. In addition, we show that poly and monoclonal anti-DENV-specific antibodies can sufficiently increase viral replication through a suppression of early innate antiviral responses and enhance disease manifestation, so that a mostly non-lethal illness becomes a fatal disease resembling human DHF/DSS. Finally, treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin containing anti-DENV antibodies confirmed the potential enhancing capacity of subneutralizing antibodies to mediate virus infection and replication and induce severe disease manifestation of DENV-infected mice. Thus, our results show that humoral responses unleashed during DENV infections can exert protective or pathological outcomes and provide insight into the pathogenesis of this important human pathogen. PMID:24723052

  11. Determination of inhibitory concentrations of antiviral agents in cell culture by use of an enzyme immunoassay with virus-specific, peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel, F H; Boere, W A; Harmsen, T; Kraaijeveld, C A; Snippe, H

    1985-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) to determine 50% inhibitory concentrations of drugs which suppress Semliki Forest virus replication is described. Inhibition of virus replication was measured in L-cells, seeded as monolayers in 96-well plates by use of horseradish peroxidase-labeled monoclonal antibodies directed against the E1 glycoprotein of Semliki Forest virus. The antiviral agents tested were cycloheximide, tunicamycin, NH4Cl, and disodium cromoglycate. The 50% inhibitory concentration of these antiviral agents was arbitrarily defined as the concentration of drug, in culture medium, associated with 50% reduction of the control absorbance value measured on Semliki Forest virus-infected cells without drug in the culture fluid. Twenty-two hours after infection the 50% inhibitory concentrations of the drugs were 0.2 microgram/ml for cycloheximide, 0.8 microgram/ml for tunicamycin, 0.3 mg/ml for NH4Cl, and 4.9 mg/ml for disodium cromoglycate. These values are similar to those determined by others with conventional methods of virus quantification. This test is sensitive and easy to perform and therefore is suited for large-scale experiments. PMID:3925876

  12. A T cell-independent antitumor response in mice with bone marrow cells retrovirally transduced with an antibody/Fc-gamma chain chimeric receptor gene recognizing a human ovarian cancer antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Chopra, R K; Royal, R E; Yang, J C; Rosenberg, S A; Hwu, P

    1998-02-01

    In order to treat common cancers with immunotherapy, chimeric receptors have been developed that combine the tumor specificity of antibodies with T-cell effector functions. Previously, we demonstrated that T cells transduced with a chimeric receptor gene against human ovarian cancer were able to recognize ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We now report that recipients of bone marrow cells transduced with these genes exhibited significant antitumor activity in vivo. Moreover, in vivo depletion of T cells in reconstituted mice did not affect antitumor activity, suggesting that other immune cells expressing the chimeric receptor gene may play an important role in tumor rejection.

  13. Detection of Aleutian mink disease virus DNA and antiviral antibodies in American mink (Neovison vison) 10 days postinoculation.

    PubMed

    Farid, A Hossain; Hussain, Irshad; Arju, Irin

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of infection by the Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV; Carnivore amdoparvovirus 1) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) has important ramifications in virus eradication programs. A spleen homogenate containing a local isolate of AMDV was injected intraperitoneally into black (n = 44) and sapphire (n = 12) American mink (Neovison vison). Animals were euthanized 10 days postinoculation and anti-AMDV antibodies and AMDV DNA were tested in plasma and 7 organs by CIEP and PCR, respectively. Viral DNA was detected in the plasma, spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow, and lung samples of all inoculated mink, but was not detected in some small intestine, kidney, and liver samples. In contrast, antibodies were detected in the plasma of 3 sapphire (25.0%) and 19 black (43.2%) mink but not in any of the organs. The sensitivity of the CIEP test on plasma samples was 39.3%, implying that low levels of antibodies during the early stages of virus exposure resulted in failure to detect infection by the CIEP test. We concluded that CIEP is not a reliable test for early detection of AMDV infection in mink and that there were considerable differences among mink of each color type for production of detectable levels of antibodies. PCR tests on samples of saliva, rectal swabs, and feces did not produce consistent and reliable results. PMID:25862712

  14. Antiviral Activity of a Single-Domain Antibody Immunotoxin Binding to Glycoprotein D of Herpes Simplex Virus 2

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, Eileen M.; Zhang, Hong; Desai, Prashant J.; Biragyn, Arya

    2014-01-01

    Despite years of research dedicated to preventing the sexual transmission of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), there is still no protective vaccine or microbicide against one of the most common sexually transmitted infections in the world. Using a phage display library constructed from a llama immunized with recombinant HSV-2 glycoprotein D, we identified a single-domain antibody VHH, R33, which binds to the viral surface glycoprotein D. Although R33 does not demonstrate any HSV-2 neutralization activity in vitro, when expressed with the cytotoxic domain of exotoxin A, the resulting immunotoxin (R33ExoA) specifically and potently kills HSV-2-infected cells, with a 50% neutralizing dilution (IC50) of 6.7 nM. We propose that R33ExoA could be used clinically to prevent transmission of HSV-2 through killing of virus-producing epithelial cells during virus reactivation. R33 could also potentially be used to deliver other cytotoxic effectors to HSV-2-infected cells. PMID:25385102

  15. Amino acid interaction networks provide a new lens for therapeutic antibody discovery and anti-viral drug optimization.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Karthik; Shriver, Zachary; Babcock, Gregory J

    2015-04-01

    Identification of epitopes on viral proteins for the design/identification of broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnAbs) or specific immunogens for vaccine development is hampered by target amino acid diversity. Recently, bnAbs have been isolated for variable viruses by screening B cells from infected individuals for neutralization breadth. Epitope mapping and structural analysis of bnAbs revealed, while some of these bnAbs target glycan moieties, most target protein regions that are conserved in sequence and/or structure. However, almost universally viruses develop mutations that allow escape from neutralization suggesting protein function may not be dependent on the observed conservation. An alternative method for identification of conserved amino acid sequences utilizes an amino acid network-based approach. Calculation of a significant interaction network (SIN) score allows for selection of amino acids that are conserved and constrained within the protein system. Amino acids with high SIN scores are predicted to mutate at lower frequency due to the impact mutation has on the structure/function of a protein. By ascertaining regions of high SIN score, therapeutics can be appropriately designed to target these regions of low mutability. Further, the use of atomic interaction networks to examine protein structure and protein-protein interfaces can complement existing structure-based computational approaches for therapeutic engineering. PMID:25913816

  16. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    Fullen, Daniel J.; Noulin, Nicolas; Catchpole, Andrew; Fathi, Hosnieh; Murray, Edward J.; Mann, Alex; Eze, Kingsley; Balaratnam, Ganesh; Borley, Daryl W.; Gilbert, Anthony; Lambkin-Williams, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014–2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model. Methods and Strain Selection We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model. Human Challenge and Conclusions We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2) challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055 PMID:26761707

  17. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Individual or Combinations of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Antiviral Reagents against Cell-Free and Cell-to-Cell HIV-1 Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Kolodkin-Gal, Dror; Eslamizar, Leila; Owuor, Joshua O.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Gonzalez, Ana M.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Gelman, Rebecca S.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Schmitz, Joern E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To date, most therapeutic and vaccine candidates for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are evaluated preclinically for efficacy against cell-free viral challenges. However, cell-associated HIV-1 is suggested to be a major contributor to sexual transmission by mucosal routes. To determine if neutralizing antibodies or inhibitors block cell-free and cell-associated virus transmission of diverse HIV-1 strains with different efficiencies, we tested 12 different antibodies and five inhibitors against four green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled HIV-1 envelope (Env) variants from transmitted/founder (T/F) or chronic infection isolates. We evaluated antibody/inhibitor-mediated virus neutralization using either TZM-bl target cells, in which infectivity was determined by virus-driven luciferase expression, or A3R5 lymphoblastoid target cells, in which infectivity was evaluated by GFP expression. In both the TZM-bl and A3R5 assays, cell-free virus or infected CD4+ lymphocytes were used as targets for neutralization. We further hypothesized that the combined use of specific neutralizing antibodies targeting HIV-1 Env would more effectively prevent cell-associated virus transmission than the use of individual antibodies. The tested antibody combinations included two gp120-directed antibodies, VRC01 and PG9, or VRC01 with the gp41-directed antibody 10E8. Our results demonstrated that cell-associated virus was less sensitive to neutralizing antibodies and inhibitors, particularly using the A3R5 neutralization assay, and the potencies of these neutralizing agents differed among Env variants. A combination of different neutralizing antibodies that target specific sites on gp120 led to a significant reduction in cell-associated virus transmission. These assays will help identify ideal combinations of broadly neutralizing antibodies to use for passive preventive antibody administration and further characterize targets for the most effective neutralizing antibodies

  19. West Nile virus-specific CD4 T cells exhibit direct anti-viral cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity and are sufficient for antiviral protection

    PubMed Central

    Brien, James D.; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2012-01-01

    CD4 T cells have been shown to be necessary for the prevention of encephalitis during West Nile virus infection. However, the mechanisms used by antigen-specific CD4 T cells to protect mice from West Nile virus encephalitis remain incompletely understood. Contrary to the belief that CD4 T cells are protective because they merely maintain the CD8 T cell response and improve antibody production, we here provide evidence for the direct anti-viral activity of CD4 T cells which functions to protect the host from WNV encephalitis. In adoptive transfers, naïve CD4 T cells protected a significant number of lethally infected RAG−/− mice, demonstrating the protective effect of CD4 T cells independent of B cells and CD8 T cells. To shed light on the mechanism of this protection, we defined the peptide specificities of the CD4 T cells responding to West Nile virus infection in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice, and used these peptides to characterize the in vivo function of antiviral CD4 T cells. WNV-specific CD4 T cells produced IFN-γ and IL-2, but also showed potential for in vivo and ex vivo cytotoxicity. Furthermore, peptide vaccination using CD4 epitopes conferred protection against lethal West Nile virus infection in immunocompetent mice. These results demonstrate the role of direct effector function of antigen-specific CD4 T cell in preventing severe West Nile virus disease. PMID:19050276

  20. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  1. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  2. Antiviral targets of human noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bv Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Muhaxhiri, Zana; Deng, Lisheng; Choi, Jae-Mun; Estes, Mary K; Song, Yongcheng; Palzkill, Timothy; Atmar, Robert L

    2016-06-01

    Human noroviruses are major causative agents of sporadic and epidemic gastroenteritis both in children and adults. Currently there are no licensed therapeutic intervention measures either in terms of vaccines or drugs available for these highly contagious human pathogens. Genetic and antigenic diversity of these viruses, rapid emergence of new strains, and their ability to infect a broad population by using polymorphic histo-blood group antigens for cell attachment, pose significant challenges for the development of effective antiviral agents. Despite these impediments, there is progress in the design and development of therapeutic agents. These include capsid-based candidate vaccines, and potential antivirals either in the form of glycomimetics or designer antibodies that block HBGA binding, as well as those that target essential non-structural proteins such as the viral protease and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In addition to these classical approaches, recent studies suggest the possibility of interferons and targeting host cell factors as viable approaches to counter norovirus infection. This review provides a brief overview of this progress. PMID:27318434

  3. [Ribonucleases as antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Il'inskaia, O N; Shakh Makhmud, R

    2014-01-01

    Many ribonucleases (RNases) are able to inhibit the reproduction of viruses in infected cell cultures and laboratory animals, but molecular mechanisms of their antiviral activity remain unclear. The review observes the most known RNases which possess established antiviral effects, actually intracellular RNases (RNase L, MCPIPI protein, eosinophylic RNases) as well as exogenously applied ones (RNase A, BS-RNase, onconase, binase, synthetic RNases). Attention is given on two important but not always obligatory aspects in molecule of RNases, which have antiviral properties: catalytic activity and ability to the dimerization. The hypothetic scheme of virus elimination by exogenous RNases, that reflects possible types of interaction of viruses and RNases with a cell, is proposed. The evidence for RNases as classical components of immune defense which are perspective agents for development of new antiviral therapeutics is produced.

  4. Antiviral therapy: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shahidi Bonjar, Amir Hashem

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses extracorporeal removal of viral particles and their antigens from the blood as an auxiliary therapy. This hypothesis has not been reported before. In some chronic blood-borne viral infections, the virus remains systemic and persistent for extended periods of time, with adverse effects that weaken the immune system. Blood titers of virus and its toxins are proportional to the severity of the disease, and their reduction can alleviate symptoms, leading to improved health. Several blood-borne viral infections can be overcome by the young, but are life-threatening in the elderly. It is known that some older people have extreme difficulty tolerating viral infections such as influenza and the common cold. Further, several types of viral infection persist throughout the life of the individual and cannot be eliminated by conventional treatments. Well-known infections of this type include HIV and hepatitis B. In the case of Ebola virus, patients remain infectious as long as their blood contains the virus. According to the present hypothesis, an extracorporeal viral antibody column (EVAC) is proposed for elimination or reduction of the blood viral titer when treating blood-borne viral infection. EVAC would selectively trap viral antigens and toxins in the blood into an extracorporeal circuit, while returning detoxified blood back to the patient’s body. It is anticipated that EVAC would reduce mortality caused by blood-borne viral infections in the elderly since reduction of blood virus titers would improve health, leading to improved overall patient performance. Such enhancement would also make conventional therapies even more effective. EVAC could have a lifesaving role in treatment of viral illness, especially those involving lethal viruses such as Ebola, where the patient’s recovery to a large extent depends on their general health status. EVAC would be for single use and appropriately disposed of after each detoxification procedure. When

  5. Advances in Antiviral vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Barney S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Antiviral vaccines have been the most successful biomedical intervention for preventing epidemic viral disease. Vaccination for smallpox in humans and rinderpest in cattle was the basis for disease eradication, and recent progress in polio eradication is promising. While early vaccines were developed empirically by passage in live animals or eggs, more recent vaccines have been developed because of the advent of new technologies, particularly cell culture and molecular biology. Recent technological advances in gene delivery and expression, nanoparticles, protein manufacturing, and adjuvants have created the potential for new vaccine platforms that may provide solutions for vaccines against viral pathogens for which no interventions currently exist. In addition, the technological convergence of human monoclonal antibody isolation, structural biology, and high throughput sequencing is providing new opportunities for atomic-level immunogen design. Selection of human monoclonal antibodies can identify immunodominant antigenic sites associated with neutralization and provide reagents for stabilizing and solving the structure of viral surface proteins. Understanding the structural basis for neutralization can guide selection of vaccine targets. Deep sequencing of the antibody repertoire and defining the ontogeny of the desired antibody responses can reveal the junctional recombination and somatic mutation requirements for B-cell recognition and affinity maturation. Collectively, this information will provide new strategic approaches for selecting vaccine antigens, formulations, and regimens. Moreover, it creates the potential for rational vaccine design and establishing a catalogue of vaccine technology platforms that would be effective against any given family or class of viral pathogens and improve our readiness to address new emerging viral threats. PMID:23947359

  6. Hemolysin-producing Listeria monocytogenes affects the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hage-Chahine, C M; Del Giudice, G; Lambert, P H; Pechere, J C

    1992-01-01

    A murine experimental infection with a hemolysin-producing (Hly+) strain of Listeria monocytogenes and a non-hemolysin-producing (Hly-) mutant was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the role of hemolysin production in the immune response. No antilisterial antibodies were detectable following sublethal infection with Hly+ bacteria, but consistent antilisterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody production was observed following sublethal infection with the Hly- mutant. Hly+ but not Hly- L. monocytogenes induced transient inhibition of antibody response to Hly- bacteria and to unrelated T-cell-dependent (tetanus toxoid) and T-cell-independent (pneumococcal polysaccharide 3) antigens. Transient inhibition of the activation of an antigen-specific T-cell clone was also observed following Hly+ infection of antigen-presenting cells but not following Hly- infection. These results suggest that hemolysin production by L. monocytogenes is an important factor in modulating the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens in infected individuals. Images PMID:1548067

  7. Reaction of germinal centers in the T-cell-independent response to the bacterial polysaccharide alpha(1-->6)dextran.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, D; Wells, S M; Stall, A M; Kabat, E A

    1994-01-01

    Primary immunization of BALB/c mice with alpha(1-->6)dextran (DEX), a native bacterial polysaccharide, induces an unexpected pattern of splenic B-cell responses. After a peak of antibody-secreting B-cell response at day 4, deposition of dextran-anti-dextran immune complexes, as revealed by staining with both dextran and antibodies to dextran, occurs and persists in splenic follicles until at least the fourth week after immunization. Antigen-specific B cells appear and proliferate in such follicles, leading by day 11 to development of DEX-specific germinal centers as characterized by the presence of distinct regions of DEX+ peanut agglutinin-positive (PNA+) cells. At this time, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis also reveals the appearance of a distinct population of DEX+ PNA+ splenic B cells. In contrast, DEX+ PNA- cells, characterized by intense cytoplasmic staining, are present outside of splenic follicles, peak at day 4 to day 5, and persist until at least day 28. The frequency of these cells correlates with DEX-specific antibody-secreting cells, as detected by the ELISA-spot assay. Thus, in addition to the expected plasma cellular response, the typical T-cell-independent type II antigen, DEX, surprisingly also elicits the formation of antigen-specific germinal centers. These observations raise fundamental questions about the roles of germinal centers in T-cell-independent immune responses. Images PMID:7511812

  8. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  9. Antiviral Roles of Plant ARGONAUTES

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Alberto; Carrington, James C.

    2015-01-01

    ARGONAUTES (AGOs) are the effector proteins functioning in eukaryotic RNA silencing pathways. AGOs associate with small RNAs and are programmed to target complementary RNA or DNA. Plant viruses induce a potent and specific antiviral RNA silencing host response in which AGOs play a central role. Antiviral AGOs associate with virus-derived small RNAs to repress complementary viral RNAs or DNAs, or with endogenous small RNAs to regulate host gene expression and promote antiviral defense. Here, we review recent progress towards understanding the roles of plant AGOs in antiviral defense. We also discuss the strategies that viruses have evolved to modulate, attenuate or suppress AGO antiviral functions. PMID:26190744

  10. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization.

  11. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization. PMID:26297577

  12. Existing antiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Creed, Rosella; Mendoza, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    The innovation of vaccines has allowed for one of the greatest advancements in the history of public health. The first of the vaccines have been the antiviral vaccines, in particular the smallpox vaccine that was first developed by Edward Jenner in 1796. This article will review vaccination for the following viral diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, influenza, rotavirus, rabies, monkeypox, smallpox, Japanese encephalitis, and yellow fever. PMID:19335723

  13. Release of nitric oxide during the T cell-independent pathway of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, K.P.; Rogers, H.W.; Corbett, J.A.; Schreiber, R.D.; McDaniel, M.L.; Unanue, E.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Immunodeficient mice are remarkably resistant to Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. The authors examined the role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in the CB-17/lcr SCID (SCID) response to LM. SCID spleen cells produced large quantities of NO (as measured by nitrite formation) when incubated in the presence of heat-killed LM. NO produced large quantities of nitrite in response to LM, but only in the presence of IFN-[gamma]. The production of NO induced by LM was not affected by neutralizing antibodies to TNF or IL-1. The production of NO was inhibited by addition of either of two inhibitors of NO synthase, N[sup G]-monomethyl arginine, or aminoguanidine. In a different situation, NK cells that were stimulated by TNF and Listeria products to release IFN-[gamma] did not produce NO. Macrophages cultured with IFN-[gamma] killed live LM. This increased killing of LM was significantly inhibited by amino-guanidine. In vivo, administration of aminoguanidine resulted in a marked increase in the mortality and spleen bacterial loads of LM-infected SCID or immunocompetent control mice. It is concluded that NO is a critical effector molecule of T cell-independent natural resistence of LM as studied in the SCID mouse, and that the NO-mediated response is essential for both SCID and immunocompetent host to survive after LM infection. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Antiviral effect of interferon covalently bound to sepharose.

    PubMed

    Ankel, H; Chany, C; Galliot, B; Chevalier, M J; Robert, M

    1973-08-01

    Interferon, covalently bound to Sepharose 4B activated by cyanogen bromide, induces the antiviral state in sensitive cells. The antiviral effect is neutralized by antiserum specific to interferon and is recovered thereafter when the antibody is detached from the interferon by treatment at low pH. Binding interferon to Sepharose increases the stability of the molecule. It is likely that the interferon molecule acts on the cell receptor without being detached from the beads. However, the data do not exclude the possibility of a small loss of interferon, or fragments of it, after contact with the cell.

  15. Broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun-Da; Meng, Wen; Wang, Xiao-Jia; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2015-01-01

    Development of highly effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the major objective shared by the fields of virology and pharmaceutics. Antiviral drug development has focused on targeting viral entry and replication, as well as modulating cellular defense system. High throughput screening of molecules, genetic engineering of peptides, and functional screening of agents have identified promising candidates for development of optimal broad-spectrum antiviral agents to intervene in viral infection and control viral epidemics. This review discusses current knowledge, prospective applications, opportunities, and challenges in the development of broad-spectrum antiviral agents. PMID:26052325

  16. Antiviral options for biodefense.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Chelsea M; Grosenbach, Douglas W; Hruby, Dennis E

    2013-10-01

    A key to biodefense strategies is an assessment of current therapies available as well as the expedited development of new antiviral therapeutic options. Viruses make up the majority of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Category A Priority Pathogens, agents that are considered to pose the greatest risk to public health and national security, and yet there are currently no approved treatments for most of these viral biodefense threats. A review of the Category A viral biothreat agents and strategies for the development of new therapeutics are presented here. PMID:23773331

  17. In vivo CD40 ligation can induce T-cell-independent antitumor effects that involve macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lum, Hillary D; Buhtoiarov, Ilia N; Schmidt, Brian E; Berke, Gideon; Paulnock, Donna M; Sondel, Paul M; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L

    2006-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated T cell-independent antitumor and antimetastatic effects of CD40 ligation that involved natural killer (NK) cells. As CD40 molecules are expressed on the surface of macrophages (Mphi), we hypothesized that Mphi may also serve as antitumor effector cells when activated by CD40 ligation. Progression of subcutaneous NXS2 murine neuroblastomas was delayed significantly by agonistic CD40 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD40 mAb) therapy in immunocompetent A/J mice, as well as in T and B cell-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Although NK cells can be activated by anti-CD40 mAb, anti-CD40 mAb treatment also induced a significant antitumor effect in SCID/beige mice in the absence of T and NK effector cells, even when noncytolytic NK cells and polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) were depleted. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with anti-CD40 mAb resulted in enhanced expression of cytokines and cell surface activation markers, as well as Mphi-mediated tumor inhibition in A/J mice, C57BL/6 mice, and SCID/beige mice, as measured in vitro. A role for Mphi was shown by reduction in the antitumor effect of anti-CD40 mAb when Mphi functions were inhibited in vivo by silica. In addition, activation of peritoneal Mphi by anti-CD40 mAb resulted in survival benefits in mice bearing intraperitoneal tumors. Taken together, our results show that anti-CD40 mAb immunotherapy of mice can inhibit tumor growth in the absence of T cells, NK cells, and PMN through the involvement of activated Mphi.

  18. B-cell agonists up-regulate AID and APOBEC3G deaminases, which induce IgA and IgG class antibodies and anti-viral function.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Thomas; Whittall, Trevor; Babaahmady, Kaboutar; Lehner, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    B cells express two critical deaminases in the development of adaptive and innate immunity. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) functions in class switch recombination, somatic hypermutation and may result in affinity maturation of antibodies. Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G; A3G) is an innate anti-retroviral factor that inhibits HIV replication. We have studied a number of B-cell agonists with the aim of identifying the most effective agents that will up-regulate both deaminases and thereby enhance adaptive and innate immunity. CD40 ligand (CD40L) with interleukin-4 or HLA-class II antibodies significantly up-regulated both AID and A3G in isolated human CD19(+) B cells. The functions of these deaminases were demonstrated by enhancement of B-cell surface expression of IgA and IgG and inducing significantly higher IgA and IgG4 antibodies. An enhanced A3G function was then demonstrated by inhibition of HIV-1 replication in co-culture of CD4(+) T cells with autologous B cells, treated with CD40L and CD4 or HLA antibodies, compared with unstimulated human B cells. The dual B-cell-induced deaminase functions may be critical in IgA and IgG antibodies inhibiting pre-entry and A3G that of post-entry HIV-1 transmission and suggests a novel strategy of immunization, especially relevant to mucosal infections.

  19. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  20. Antiviral Immunity in Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission. PMID:22163335

  1. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Li, Guangdi

    2016-07-01

    Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide.

  2. Approved Antiviral Drugs over the Past 50 Years.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik; Li, Guangdi

    2016-07-01

    Since the first antiviral drug, idoxuridine, was approved in 1963, 90 antiviral drugs categorized into 13 functional groups have been formally approved for the treatment of the following 9 human infectious diseases: (i) HIV infections (protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, entry inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (ii) hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections (lamivudine, interferons, nucleoside analogues, and acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues), (iii) hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections (ribavirin, interferons, NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B polymerase inhibitors), (iv) herpesvirus infections (5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, entry inhibitors, nucleoside analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and acyclic guanosine analogues), (v) influenza virus infections (ribavirin, matrix 2 protein inhibitors, RNA polymerase inhibitors, and neuraminidase inhibitors), (vi) human cytomegalovirus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, acyclic nucleoside phosphonate analogues, pyrophosphate analogues, and oligonucleotides), (vii) varicella-zoster virus infections (acyclic guanosine analogues, nucleoside analogues, 5-substituted 2'-deoxyuridine analogues, and antibodies), (viii) respiratory syncytial virus infections (ribavirin and antibodies), and (ix) external anogenital warts caused by human papillomavirus infections (imiquimod, sinecatechins, and podofilox). Here, we present for the first time a comprehensive overview of antiviral drugs approved over the past 50 years, shedding light on the development of effective antiviral treatments against current and emerging infectious diseases worldwide. PMID:27281742

  3. Baculovirus Stimulates Antiviral Effects in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gronowski, Ann M.; Hilbert, David M.; Sheehan, Kathleen C. F.; Garotta, Gianni; Schreiber, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    Herein, we report that Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus, a member of the Baculoviridae family, is capable of stimulating antiviral activity in mammalian cells. Baculoviruses are not pathogenic to mammalian cells. Nevertheless, live baculovirus is shown here to induce interferons (IFN) from murine and human cell lines and induces in vivo protection of mice from encephalomyocarditis virus infection. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the baculovirus envelope gp67 neutralize baculovirus-dependent IFN production. Moreover, UV treatment of baculovirus eliminates both infectivity and IFN-inducing activity. In contrast, the IFN-inducing activity of the baculovirus was unaffected by DNase or RNase treatment. These data demonstrate that IFN production can be induced in mammalian cells by baculovirus even though the cells fail to serve as a natural host for an active viral infection. Baculoviruses, therefore, provide a novel model in which to study at least one alternative mechanism for IFN induction in mammalian cells. PMID:10559307

  4. Emerging antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2008-09-01

    Foremost among the newly described antiviral agents that may be developed into drugs are, for the treatment of human papilloma virus (HPV) infections, cPrPMEDAP; for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, BAY 57-1293; for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections, FV-100 (prodrug of Cf 1743); for the treatment of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections, maribavir; for the treatment of poxvirus infections, ST-246; for the treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) (which in the meantime has already been approved in the EU); for the treatment of various DNA virus infections, the hexadecyloxypropyl (HDP) and octadecyloxyethyl (ODE) prodrugs of cidofovir; for the treatment of orthomyxovirus infections (i.e., influenza), peramivir; for the treatment of hepacivirus infections (i.e., hepatitis C), the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir, the nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NRRIs) PSI-6130 and R1479, and various non-nucleoside RNA replicase inhibitors (NNRRIs); for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections, integrase inhibitors (INIs) such as elvitegravir, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as apricitabine, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) such as rilpivirine and dapivirine; and for the treatment of both HCV and HIV infections, cyclosporin A derivatives such as the non-immunosuppressive Debio-025.

  5. Hibernation is associated with depression of T-cell independent humoral immune responses in the 13-lined ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Bouma, Hjalmar R; Henning, Robert H; Kroese, Frans G M; Carey, Hannah V

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian hibernation consists of periods of low metabolism and body temperature (torpor), interspersed by euthermic arousal periods. The function of both the innate and adaptive immune system is suppressed during hibernation. In this study, we analyzed the humoral adaptive immune response to a T-cell independent (TI-2) and a T-cell dependent (TD) antigen. Thirteen-lined ground squirrels were immunized in summer or during hibernation with either a TI-2 or TD antigen on day 0 and day 14. Blood was drawn on day 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Both types of antigens induced a significant rise in antibody titer in summer animals. Much to our surprise, however, only immunization with the TD antigen, and not with the TI-2 antigen induced a humoral response in hibernators. Flow cytometric analysis of CD4 (helper T-lymphocytes), CD8 (cytotoxic T-lymphocytes) and CD45RA (B-lymphocytes) in blood, spleen and lymph nodes ruled out massive apoptosis as explanation of the absent TI humoral response during hibernation. Rather, reduced TI-2 stimulation of B-lymphocytes, possibly due to lowered serum complement during torpor, may explain the reduced antibody production in response to a TI-2 antigen. These results demonstrate that hibernation diminishes the capacity to induce a TI-2 humoral immune response, while the capacity to induce a humoral response to a TD antigen is maintained.

  6. Aleutian disease of mink: the antibody response of sapphire and pastel mink to Aleutian disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bloom, M E; Race, R E; Hadlow, W J; Chesebro, B

    1975-10-01

    The specific antiviral antibody response of sapphire and pastel mink to Pullman strain of ADV has been examined. Sapphire mink inoculated with from 300,000-3 LD50 developed high levels of specific antibody and AD. Pastel mink inoculated with parallel doses of ADV also produced antibody but did not develop AD. The low incidence of AD in pastel mink inoculated with Pullman strain of ADV is probably related to factors other than antiviral antibody.

  7. Towards antivirals against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Abdelnabi, Rana; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen

    2015-09-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has re-emerged in recent decades, causing major outbreaks of chikungunya fever in many parts of Africa and Asia, and since the end of 2013 also in Central and South America. Infections are usually associated with a low mortality rate, but can proceed into a painful chronic stage, during which patients may suffer from polyarthralgia and joint stiffness for weeks and even several years. There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs available for the prevention or treatment of CHIKV infections. Current therapy therefore consists solely of the administration of analgesics, antipyretics and anti-inflammatory agents to relieve symptoms. We here review molecules that have been reported to inhibit CHIKV replication, either as direct-acting antivirals, host-targeting drugs or those that act via a yet unknown mechanism. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Chikungunya discovers the New World."

  8. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  9. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  10. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Luis P.

    2011-01-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features. PMID:22069523

  11. Highlights in antiviral drug research: antivirals at the horizon.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2013-11-01

    This review highlights ten "hot topics" in current antiviral research: (i) new nucleoside derivatives (i.e., PSI-352938) showing high potential as a direct antiviral against hepatitis C virus (HCV); (ii) cyclopropavir, which should be further pursued for treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections; (iii) North-methanocarbathymidine (N-MCT), with a N-locked conformation, showing promising activity against both α- and γ-herpesviruses; (iv) CMX001, an orally bioavailable prodrug of cidofovir with broad-spectrum activity against DNA viruses, including polyoma, adeno, herpes, and pox; (v) favipiravir, which is primarily pursued for the treatment of influenza virus infections, but also inhibits the replication of other RNA viruses, particularly (-)RNA viruses such as arena, bunya, and hanta; (vi) newly emerging antiarenaviral compounds which should be more effective (and less toxic) than the ubiquitously used ribavirin; (vii) antipicornavirus agents in clinical development (pleconaril, BTA-798, and V-073); (viii) natural products receiving increased attention as potential antiviral drugs; (ix) antivirals such as U0126 targeted at specific cellular kinase pathways [i.e., mitogen extracellular kinase (MEK)], showing activity against influenza and other viruses; and (x) two structurally unrelated compounds (i.e., LJ-001 and dUY11) with broad-spectrum activity against virtually all enveloped RNA and DNA viruses.

  12. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  13. Novel antiviral activity of chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Takashi; Shirane, Jumi; Hieshima, Kunio; Shibano, Michiko; Watanabe, Masayasu; Jin, Zhe; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Saito, Takuya; Shimomura, Yoshikazu; Yoshie, Osamu . E-mail: o.yoshie@med.kindai.ac.jp

    2006-07-05

    Antimicrobial peptides are a diverse family of small, mostly cationic polypeptides that kill bacteria, fungi and even some enveloped viruses, while chemokines are a group of mostly cationic small proteins that induce directed migration of leukocytes through interactions with a group of seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors. Recent studies have shown that antimicrobial peptides and chemokines have substantially overlapping functions. Thus, while some antimicrobial peptides are chemotactic for leukocytes, some chemokines can kill a wide range of bacteria and fungi. Here, we examined a possible direct antiviral activity of chemokines against an enveloped virus HSV-1. Among 22 human chemokines examined, chemokines such as MIP-1{alpha}/CCL3, MIP-1{beta}/CCL4 and RANTES/CCL5 showed a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1. It is intriguing that these chemokines are mostly known to be highly expressed by effector CD8{sup +} T cells. The chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity commonly bound to HSV-1 virions via envelope glycoprotein gB. Electron microscopy revealed that the chemokines with a significant anti-HSV-1 activity were commonly capable of generating pores in the envelope of HSV-1. Thus, some chemokines have a significant direct antiviral activity against HSV-1 in vitro and may have a potential role in host defense against HSV-1 as a direct antiviral agent.

  14. Antiviral Strategies Against Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Abdelnabi, Rana; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has evolved from a geographically isolated pathogen to a virus that is widespread in many parts of Africa, Asia and recently also in Central- and South-America. Although CHIKV infections are rarely fatal, the disease can evolve into a chronic stage, which is characterized by persisting polyarthralgia and joint stiffness. This chronic CHIKV infection can severely incapacitate patients for weeks up to several years after the initial infection. Despite the burden of CHIKV infections, no vaccine or antivirals are available yet. The current therapy is therefore only symptomatic and consists of the administration of analgesics, antipyretics, and anti-inflammatory agents. Recently several molecules with various viral or host targets have been identified as CHIKV inhibitors. In this chapter, we summarize the current status of the development of antiviral strategies against CHIKV infections.

  15. Antiviral Strategies Against Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Abdelnabi, Rana; Neyts, Johan; Delang, Leen

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades the Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has evolved from a geographically isolated pathogen to a virus that is widespread in many parts of Africa, Asia and recently also in Central- and South-America. Although CHIKV infections are rarely fatal, the disease can evolve into a chronic stage, which is characterized by persisting polyarthralgia and joint stiffness. This chronic CHIKV infection can severely incapacitate patients for weeks up to several years after the initial infection. Despite the burden of CHIKV infections, no vaccine or antivirals are available yet. The current therapy is therefore only symptomatic and consists of the administration of analgesics, antipyretics, and anti-inflammatory agents. Recently several molecules with various viral or host targets have been identified as CHIKV inhibitors. In this chapter, we summarize the current status of the development of antiviral strategies against CHIKV infections. PMID:27233277

  16. New in vitro method for evaluating antiviral activity of acyclic nucleoside phosphonates against plant viruses.

    PubMed

    Spak, J; Holý, A; Pavingerová, D; Votruba, I; Spaková, V; Petrzik, K

    2010-12-01

    A new method was developed for testing antiviral compounds against plant viruses based on rapidly growing brassicas in vitro on liquid medium. This method enables exchange of media containing tested chemicals in various concentrations and simultaneous evaluation of their phytotoxicity and antiviral activity. While using ribavirin as a standard for comparison, phytotoxicity and ability of the acyclic nucleotide analogues (R)-PMPA, PMEA, PMEDAP, and (S)-HPMPC to eliminate ssRNA Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) were evaluated by this method. Double antibody sandwich ELISA and real-time PCR were used for relative quantification of viral protein and nucleic acid in plants. Ribavirin had the most powerful antiviral effect against TYMV. On the other hand, (R)-PMPA and PMEA had no antiviral effect and almost no phytotoxicity compared to the control. (S)-HPMPC and PMEDAP showed moderate antiviral effect, accompanied by higher phytotoxicity. The tested compounds can be screened within 6-9 weeks in contrast to the 6 months for traditionally used explants on solid medium. The method enables large-scale screening of potential antivirals for in vitro elimination of viruses from vegetatively propagated crops and ornamentals.

  17. Antiviral immunity following smallpox virus infection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Matthew W; Hanifin, Jon M; Mori, Motomi; Koudelka, Caroline W; Slifka, Mark K

    2010-12-01

    Outbreaks of smallpox (i.e., caused by variola virus) resulted in up to 30% mortality, but those who survived smallpox infection were regarded as immune for life. Early studies described the levels of neutralizing antibodies induced after infection, but smallpox was eradicated before contemporary methods for quantifying T-cell memory were developed. To better understand the levels and duration of immunity after smallpox infection, we performed a case-control study comparing antiviral CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and neutralizing antibody levels of 24 smallpox survivors with the antiviral immunity observed in 60 smallpox-vaccinated (i.e., vaccinia virus-immune) control subjects. We found that the duration of immunity following smallpox infection was remarkably similar to that observed after smallpox vaccination, with antiviral T-cell responses that declined slowly over time and antiviral antibody responses that remained stable for decades after recovery from infection. These results indicate that severe, potentially life-threatening disease is not required for the development of sustainable long-term immunity. This study shows that the levels of immunity induced following smallpox vaccination are comparable in magnitude to that achieved through natural variola virus infection, and this may explain the notable success of vaccination in eradicating smallpox, one of the world's most lethal diseases.

  18. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  19. Analysis of antiviral resistance in the intestinal tracts of nude mice infected with a mouse adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Umehara, K; Tazume, S; Hashimoto, K

    1987-05-01

    Upon intestinal infection of heterozygous (nu/+) mice with mouse adenovirus, antiviral resistance can be seen in the form of negative-recovery of virus from feces 2-3 wks post infection. On the other hand, in similar infections in BALB/c nude (nu/nu) mice, the antiviral resistance is manifested as negative-recovery of virus from feces at a later stage, i.e., at around 6 wks post infection. This resistance was not accompanied by rises in interferon titer, rises in natural killer (NK) cell activity, nor was the resistance affected by the introduction of anti-asialo GM1 antibody. No distinct loss of resistance was observed upon administration of carrageenan, but the resistance in the group given carrageenan immediately before and after viral challenge seemed to be slightly reduced. In all infected nu/nu mice, neither neutralizing antibody (NT-Ab) nor complement-dependent NT-Ab could be detected by the usual tube method. On the other hand, a complete abolishment of the antiviral resistance was seen following cyclophosphamide administration. For clarification of the antiviral resistance factor in nu/nu mice, the analysis of antibody other than NT-Ab and complement-dependent NT-Ab, and the problem of resolution of antibody titration remain. Furthermore, it has been noted that the serum IgG titer is high in nu/nu mice and that this level is depressed by cyclophosphamide administration. It is believed that this may be in some way involved with the loss of antiviral resistance observed.

  20. What You Should Know about Flu Antiviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... to prevent seasonal influenza . Antiviral drugs are a second line of defense to treat the flu (including seasonal flu and variant flu viruses ) if you get sick. What are the benefits of antiviral drugs? When used for treatment, antiviral ...

  1. Antiviral therapy for human rabies.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila M; Jackson, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Human rabies is virtually always fatal despite numerous attempts at aggressive therapy. Most survivors received one or more doses of rabies vaccine prior to the onset of the disease. The Milwaukee Protocol has proved to be ineffective for rabies and should no longer be used. New approaches are needed and an improved understanding of basic mechanisms responsible for the clinical disease in rabies may prove to be useful for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Antiviral therapy is thought to be an important component of combination therapy for the management of human rabies, and immunotherapy and neuroprotective therapy should also be strongly considered. There are many important issues for consideration regarding drug delivery to the central nervous system in rabies, which are in part related to the presence of the blood-brain barrier and also the blood-spinal cord barrier. Ribavirin and interferon-α have proved to be disappointing agents for the therapy of rabies. There is insufficient evidence to support the continued use of ketamine or amantadine for the therapy of rabies. Minocycline or corticosteroids should not be used because of concerns about aggravating the disease. A variety of new antiviral agents are under development and evaluation, including favipiravir, RNA interference (for example, small interfering [si]RNAs) and novel targeted approaches, including interference with viral capsid assembly and viral egress.

  2. Antiviral effects of Glycyrrhiza species.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Cristina; Eisenhut, Michael; Krausse, Rea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Pellati, Donatella; Armanini, Decio; Bielenberg, Jens

    2008-02-01

    Historical sources for the use of Glycyrrhiza species include ancient manuscripts from China, India and Greece. They all mention its use for symptoms of viral respiratory tract infections and hepatitis. Randomized controlled trials confirmed that the Glycyrrhiza glabra derived compound glycyrrhizin and its derivatives reduced hepatocellular damage in chronic hepatitis B and C. In hepatitis C virus-induced cirrhosis the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma was reduced. Animal studies demonstrated a reduction of mortality and viral activity in herpes simplex virus encephalitis and influenza A virus pneumonia. In vitro studies revealed antiviral activity against HIV-1, SARS related coronavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, arboviruses, vaccinia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus. Mechanisms for antiviral activity of Glycyrrhiza spp. include reduced transport to the membrane and sialylation of hepatitis B virus surface antigen, reduction of membrane fluidity leading to inhibition of fusion of the viral membrane of HIV-1 with the cell, induction of interferon gamma in T-cells, inhibition of phosphorylating enzymes in vesicular stomatitis virus infection and reduction of viral latency. Future research needs to explore the potency of compounds derived from licorice in prevention and treatment of influenza A virus pneumonia and as an adjuvant treatment in patients infected with HIV resistant to antiretroviral drugs. PMID:17886224

  3. Recent Progress toward Engineering HIV-1-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming; Li, Yue; Zheng, Huiwen; Shao, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the limitation of antiviral activities, multiple antibody-engineering technologies have been explored to generate “the better” neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 since bNAbs attack viral entry by various mechanisms. Thus, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit rational antibody combination or engineered antibodies (eAbs) as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. It has been reported that inclusion of fusion-neutralizing antibodies in a set of bNAbs could improve their overall activities and neutralizing spectrum. Here, we review several routes for engineering bNAbs, such as design and generation of bispecific antibodies, specific glycosylation of antibodies to enhance antiviral activity, and variable region-specific modification guided by structure and computer, as well as reviewing antibody-delivery technologies by non-viral vector, viral vector, and human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells transduced with a lentiviral construct. We also discuss the optimized antiviral activities and benefits of these strategy and potential mechanisms. PMID:27746780

  4. Secondary Rearrangements and Hypermutation Generate Sufficient B Cell Diversity to Mount Protective Antiviral Immunoglobulin Responses

    PubMed Central

    López-Macías, Constantino; Kalinke, Ulrich; Cascalho, Marilia; Wabl, Matthias; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Lamarre, Alain

    1999-01-01

    Variable (V) region gene replacement was recently implicated in B cell repertoire diversification, but the contribution of this mechanism to antibody responses is still unknown. To investigate the role of V gene replacements in the generation of antigen-specific antibodies, we analyzed antiviral immunoglobulin responses of “quasimonoclonal” (QM) mice. The B cells of QM mice are genetically committed to exclusively express the anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl) acetyl specificity. However, ∼20% of the peripheral B cells of QM mice undergo secondary rearrangements and thereby potentially acquire new specificities. QM mice infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, or poliovirus mounted virus-specific neutralizing antibody responses. In general, kinetics of the antiviral immunoglobulin responses were delayed in QM mice; however, titers similar to control animals were eventually produced that were sufficient to protect against VSV-induced lethal disease. VSV neutralizing single-chain Fv fragments isolated from phage display libraries constructed from QM mice showed VH gene replacements and extensive hypermutation. Thus, our data demonstrate that secondary rearrangements and hypermutation can generate sufficient B cell diversity in QM mice to mount protective antiviral antibody responses, suggesting that these mechanisms might also contribute to the diversification of the B cell repertoire of normal mice. PMID:10359583

  5. Broad-spectrum antivirals against viral fusion

    PubMed Central

    Vigant, Frederic; Santos, Nuno C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    Effective antivirals have been developed against specific viruses, such as HIV, Hepatitis C virus and influenza virus. This ‘one bug–one drug’ approach to antiviral drug development can be successful, but it may be inadequate for responding to an increasing diversity of viruses that cause significant diseases in humans. The majority of viral pathogens that cause emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases are membrane-enveloped viruses, which require the fusion of viral and cell membranes for virus entry. Therefore, antivirals that target the membrane fusion process represent new paradigms for broad-spectrum antiviral discovery. In this Review, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the fusion between virus and cell membranes and explore how broad-spectrum antivirals target this process to prevent virus entry. PMID:26075364

  6. Interferons lambda, new cytokines with antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Lopušná, K; Režuchová, I; Betáková, T; Skovranová, L; Tomašková, J; Lukáčiková, L; Kabát, P

    2013-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key cytokines in the establishment of a multifaceted antiviral response. Three distinct types of IFNs are now recognized (type I, type II, and type III) based on their receptor usage, structural features and biological activities. Although all IFNs are important mediators of antiviral protection, their roles in antiviral defence vary. Interferon lambda (IFN-λ) is a recently discovered group of small helical cytokines capable of inducing an antiviral response both in vitro as well as in vivo. They were discovered independently in 2003 by the groups of Sheppard and Kotenko. This family consists of three structurally related IFN-λ subtypes called IFN-λ1 (IL-29), IFN-λ2 (IL-28A), and IFN-λ3 (IL-28B). In this study we investigate the antiviral activities of IFN-λ1, λ2, and λ3 on some medically important viruses, influenza viruses, herpes viruses and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. PMID:23600875

  7. Antiviral strategies: the present and beyond.

    PubMed

    Burke, J D; Fish, E N

    2009-01-01

    Historically, vaccine strategies have proven to be most effective at eradicating the targeted virus infections. With the advent of new or re-emerging altered viruses, some of which jump species to infect humans, the threat of viral pandemics exists. The protracted time to develop a vaccine during a pandemic necessitates using antiviral drugs in the intervening months prior to vaccine availability. Antiviral drugs that are pathogen specific, for example Amantidine, Tamiflu and Relenza, targeted against influenza viruses, are associated with the emergence of virus strains that are drug resistant. The use of ribavirin, a more broad spectrum antiviral, in combination therapies directed against influenza and hepatitis C virus, has proven effective, albeit to a modest extent. Attention is focused on the potential use of interferons (IFN)-alpha/beta as broad spectrum antivirals in acute infections, to invoke both direct antiviral effects against viruses and activation of specific immune effector cells. PMID:20021443

  8. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  9. Antiviral perspectives for chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Deepti; Cherian, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that has a major health impact in humans and causes acute febrile illness in humans accompanied by joint pains and, in many cases, persistent arthralgia lasting for weeks to years. CHIKV reemerged in 2005-2006 in several parts of the Indian Ocean islands and India after a gap of 32 years, causing millions of cases. The re-emergence of CHIKV has also resulted in numerous outbreaks in several countries in the eastern hemisphere, with a threat to further expand in the near future. However, there is no vaccine against CHIKV infection licensed for human use, and therapy for CHIKV infection is still mainly limited to supportive care as antiviral agents are yet in different stages of testing or development. In this review we explore the different perspectives for chikungunya treatment and the effectiveness of these treatment regimens and discuss the scope for future directions.

  10. Virus assembly, allostery, and antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnick, Adam; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana

    2010-01-01

    Assembly of virus capsids and surface proteins must be regulated to ensure that the resulting complex is an infectious virion. Here we examine assembly of virus capsids, focusing on hepatitis B virus and bacteriophage MS2, and formation of glycoproteins in the alphaviruses. These systems are structurally and biochemically well-characterized and are simplest-case paradigms of self-assembly. Published data suggest that capsid and glycoprotein assembly is subject to allosteric regulation, that is, regulation at the level of conformational change. The hypothesis that allostery is a common theme in viruses suggests that deregulation of capsid and glycoprotein assembly by small molecule effectors will be an attractive antiviral strategy, as has been demonstrated with hepatitis B virus. PMID:21163649

  11. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  12. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-11-09

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells--including germline stem cells--become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions--GLP-1/Notch signaling--becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance.

  13. Cancer Exosomes Perform Cell-Independent MicroRNA Biogenesis and Promote Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Sonia A.; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O’Connell, Joyce T.; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T.; Melo, Carlos A.; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate non-tumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  14. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    PubMed Central

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  15. Antiviral Natural Products and Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang-Tzung; Hsu, Wen-Chan; Lin, Chun-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections play an important role in human diseases, and recent outbreaks in the advent of globalization and ease of travel have underscored their prevention as a critical issue in safeguarding public health. Despite the progress made in immunization and drug development, many viruses lack preventive vaccines and efficient antiviral therapies, which are often beset by the generation of viral escape mutants. Thus, identifying novel antiviral drugs is of critical importance and natural products are an excellent source for such discoveries. In this mini-review, we summarize the antiviral effects reported for several natural products and herbal medicines. PMID:24872930

  16. Reduced Number of Transitional and Naive B Cells in Addition to Decreased BAFF Levels in Response to the T Cell Independent Immunogen Pneumovax®23.

    PubMed

    Roth, Alena; Glaesener, Stephanie; Schütz, Katharina; Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunity against T cell independent (TI) antigens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae is characterized by antibody production of B cells induced by the combined activation of T cell independent type 1 and type 2 antigens in the absence of direct T cell help. In mice, the main players in TI immune responses have been well defined as marginal zone (MZ) B cells and B-1 cells. However, the existence of human equivalents to these B cell subsets and the nature of the human B cell compartment involved in the immune reaction remain elusive. We therefore analyzed the effect of a TI antigen on the B cell compartment through immunization of healthy individuals with the pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnPS)-based vaccine Pneumovax®23, and subsequent characterization of B cell subpopulations. Our data demonstrates a transient decrease of transitional and naïve B cells, with a concomitant increase of IgA+ but not IgM+ or IgG+ memory B cells and a predominant generation of PnPS-specific IgA+ producing plasma cells. No alterations could be detected in T cells, or proposed human B-1 and MZ B cell equivalents. Consistent with the idea of a TI immune response, antigen-specific memory responses could not be observed. Finally, BAFF, which is supposed to drive class switching to IgA, was unexpectedly found to be decreased in serum in response to Pneumovax®23. Our results demonstrate that a characteristic TI response induced by Pneumovax®23 is associated with distinct phenotypical and functional changes within the B cell compartment. Those modulations occur in the absence of any modulations of T cells and without the development of a specific memory response.

  17. Reduced Number of Transitional and Naive B Cells in Addition to Decreased BAFF Levels in Response to the T Cell Independent Immunogen Pneumovax®23

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Alena; Glaesener, Stephanie; Schütz, Katharina; Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunity against T cell independent (TI) antigens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae is characterized by antibody production of B cells induced by the combined activation of T cell independent type 1 and type 2 antigens in the absence of direct T cell help. In mice, the main players in TI immune responses have been well defined as marginal zone (MZ) B cells and B-1 cells. However, the existence of human equivalents to these B cell subsets and the nature of the human B cell compartment involved in the immune reaction remain elusive. We therefore analyzed the effect of a TI antigen on the B cell compartment through immunization of healthy individuals with the pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnPS)-based vaccine Pneumovax®23, and subsequent characterization of B cell subpopulations. Our data demonstrates a transient decrease of transitional and naïve B cells, with a concomitant increase of IgA+ but not IgM+ or IgG+ memory B cells and a predominant generation of PnPS-specific IgA+ producing plasma cells. No alterations could be detected in T cells, or proposed human B-1 and MZ B cell equivalents. Consistent with the idea of a TI immune response, antigen-specific memory responses could not be observed. Finally, BAFF, which is supposed to drive class switching to IgA, was unexpectedly found to be decreased in serum in response to Pneumovax®23. Our results demonstrate that a characteristic TI response induced by Pneumovax®23 is associated with distinct phenotypical and functional changes within the B cell compartment. Those modulations occur in the absence of any modulations of T cells and without the development of a specific memory response. PMID:27031098

  18. Modulation by gamma interferon of antiviral cell-mediated immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Utermöhlen, O; Dangel, A; Tárnok, A; Lehmann-Grube, F

    1996-01-01

    Mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and injected once 24 h later with a monoclonal antibody directed against gamma interferon. In comparison with controls, the increase of numbers of CD8+ T cells and the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in spleens and virus clearance from organs were diminished, as was the ability of spleen cells to transmit adoptive immunity to infected recipients. The same treatment slightly but consistently lessened rather than augmented the virus titers early in infection, which was also observed in thymusless nu/nu mice. Injection into infected mice of the lymphokine itself in quantities probably higher than are produced endogenously resulted in lower virus titers in spleens but higher titers in livers. The adoptive immunity in infected mice achieved by infusion of immune spleen cells was not altered by treating the recipients with gamma interferon monoclonal antibody. Such treatment did not measurably affect the production of antiviral serum antibodies. We conclude that in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected mice, gamma interferon is needed for the generation of antivirally active CD8+ T lymphocytes, and furthermore that in this experimental model, direct antiviral effects of the lymphokine elude detection. PMID:8627670

  19. Emerging antiviral strategies to interfere with influenza virus entry.

    PubMed

    Vanderlinden, Evelien; Naesens, Lieve

    2014-03-01

    Influenza A and B viruses are highly contagious respiratory pathogens with a considerable medical and socioeconomical burden and known pandemic potential. Current influenza vaccines require annual updating and provide only partial protection in some risk groups. Due to the global spread of viruses with resistance to the M2 proton channel inhibitor amantadine or the neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir, novel antiviral agents with an original mode of action are urgently needed. We here focus on emerging options to interfere with the influenza virus entry process, which consists of the following steps: attachment of the viral hemagglutinin to the sialylated host cell receptors, endocytosis, M2-mediated uncoating, low pH-induced membrane fusion, and, finally, import of the viral ribonucleoprotein into the nucleus. We review the current functional and structural insights in the viral and cellular components of this entry process, and the diverse antiviral strategies that are being explored. This encompasses small molecule inhibitors as well as macromolecules such as therapeutic antibodies. There is optimism that at least some of these innovative concepts to block influenza virus entry will proceed from the proof of concept to a more advanced stage. Special attention is therefore given to the challenging issues of influenza virus (sub)type-dependent activity or potential drug resistance. PMID:23801557

  20. Antiviral treatment of influenza in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choe, Young June; Lee, Hyunju; Lee, Hoan Jong; Choi, Eun Hwa

    2015-06-01

    Antiviral therapy has an important role in the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza. At present, two classes of antiviral agents, adamantanes and neuraminidase inhibitors, are available for the treatment and chemoprophylaxis of influenza in Korea. Because of the widespread resistance against adamantanes, neuraminidase inhibitors are mainly used. Because each country has a unique epidemiology of influenza, the proper use of antiviral agents should be determined based on local data. Decisions on the clinical practice in the treatment of influenza in South Korea are guided by the local surveillance data, practice guidelines, health insurance system and the resistance patterns of the circulating influenza viruses. This review highlights the role of antiviral agents in the treatment and outcome of influenza in Korea by providing comprehensive information of their clinical usage in Korea.

  1. Antiviral Drug Research Proposal Activity †

    PubMed Central

    Injaian, Lisa; Smith, Ann C.; Shipley, Jennifer German; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Fredericksen, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The development of antiviral drugs provides an excellent example of how basic and clinical research must be used together in order to achieve the final goal of treating disease. A Research Oriented Learning Activity was designed to help students to better understand how basic and clinical research can be combined toward a common goal. Through this project students gained a better understanding of the process of scientific research and increased their information literacy in the field of virology. The students worked as teams to research the many aspects involved in the antiviral drug design process, with each student becoming an “expert” in one aspect of the project. The Antiviral Drug Research Proposal (ADRP) culminated with students presenting their proposals to their peers and local virologists in a poster session. Assessment data showed increased student awareness and knowledge of the research process and the steps involved in the development of antiviral drugs as a result of this activity. PMID:23653735

  2. Viruses and Antiviral Immunity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Viral pathogens present many challenges to organisms, driving the evolution of a myriad of antiviral strategies to combat infections. A wide variety of viruses infect invertebrates, including both natural pathogens that are insect-restricted, and viruses that are transmitted to vertebrates. Studies using the powerful tools available in the model organism Drosophila have expanded our understanding of antiviral defenses against diverse viruses. In this review, we will cover three major areas. First, we will describe the tools used to study viruses in Drosophila. Second, we will survey the major viruses that have been studied in Drosophila. And lastly, we will discuss the well-characterized mechanisms that are active against these diverse pathogens, focusing on non-RNAi mediated antiviral mechanisms. Antiviral RNAi is discussed in another paper in this issue. PMID:23680639

  3. Antiviral Effect of Agaricomycetes Mushrooms (Review).

    PubMed

    Teplyakova, Tamara V; Kosogova, Tatiana A

    2016-01-01

    This review presents data on the studied antiviral activities of Agaricomycetes mushrooms against the herpes, West Nile, influenza, human immunodeficiency, and hepatitis viruses, as well as orthopoxviruses, including the variola virus. Polysaccharides and other compounds (e.g., proteins, glycoproteins, terpenoids, melanins, nucleosides) exhibit antiviral activity against many viruses that are pathogenic in humans. Effective strains isolated from wild mushrooms in culture represent promising objects for the development of biotechnological drugs, including ones possessing antiviral activity. The data on antitumor and antiviral activities of compounds from the same mushroom species indicate the correlation of these properties. With regard to this connection, preparations of Basidiomycetes may have prophylactic value in preventing cancers with a viral etiology. PMID:27649599

  4. Therapeutic Potential of Spirooxindoles as Antiviral Agents.

    PubMed

    Ye, Na; Chen, Haiying; Wold, Eric A; Shi, Pei-Yong; Zhou, Jia

    2016-06-10

    Antiviral therapeutics with profiles of high potency, low resistance, panserotype, and low toxicity remain challenging, and obtaining such agents continues to be an active area of therapeutic development. Due to their unique three-dimensional structural features, spirooxindoles have been identified as privileged chemotypes for antiviral drug development. Among them, spiro-pyrazolopyridone oxindoles have been recently reported as potent inhibitors of dengue virus NS4B, leading to the discovery of an orally bioavailable preclinical candidate (R)-44 with excellent in vivo efficacy in a dengue viremia mouse model. This review highlights recent advances in the development of biologically active spirooxindoles for their antiviral potential, primarily focusing on the structure-activity relationships (SARs) and modes of action, as well as future directions to achieve more potent analogues toward a viable antiviral therapy. PMID:27627626

  5. Antiviral activity of silymarin against chikungunya virus.

    PubMed

    Lani, Rafidah; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Chiam, Chun Wei; Moghaddam, Ehsan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann; Rausalu, Kai; Merits, Andres; Higgs, Stephen; Vanlandingham, Dana; Abu Bakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-06-16

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes chikungunya fever, with clinical presentations such as severe back and small joint pain, and debilitating arthritis associated with crippling pains that persist for weeks and even years. Although there are several studies to evaluate the efficacy of drugs against CHIKV, the treatment for chikungunya fever is mainly symptom-based and no effective licensed vaccine or antiviral are available. Here, we investigated the antiviral activity of three types of flavonoids against CHIKV in vitro replication. Three compounds: silymarin, quercetin and kaempferol were evaluated for their in vitro antiviral activities against CHIKV using a CHIKV replicon cell line and clinical isolate of CHIKV of Central/East African genotype. A cytopathic effect inhibition assay was used to determine their activities on CHIKV viral replication and quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to calculate virus yield. Antiviral activity of effective compound was further investigated by evaluation of CHIKV protein expression using western blotting for CHIKV nsP1, nsP3, and E2E1 proteins. Briefly, silymarin exhibited significant antiviral activity against CHIKV, reducing both CHIKV replication efficiency and down-regulating production of viral proteins involved in replication. This study may have important consequence for broaden the chance of getting the effective antiviral for CHIKV infection.

  6. [Interferon : antiviral mechanisms and viral escape].

    PubMed

    Espert, Lucile; Gongora, Céline; Mechti, Nadir

    2003-02-01

    15 % of human cancers have virus origin, meaning that viruses are the second cause of cancers after tabagism. The knowledge of antiviral mechanisms is essential for treatment and prevention of infection evolution towards cancers. Interferons (IFNs) are a large family of multifunctional cytokines. They are involved in regulation of cell growth and modulation of immune response. But, all these functions seem to converge toward the most important of them : the antiviral activity. IFN secretion is the first event induced by viral infection, and will act on specific receptors on neighbour cells and prevent their infection by inducing numbers of antiviral genes. Although few of them are well known like the PKR, the 2-5OAS/RNase L pathway and the Mx proteins, many others need extensive studies to understand the wide range of IFN effect. Viruses have evolved to circumvent the IFN antiviral activity, and are able not only to divert the cellular machinery but also to lure the antiviral mechanisms of the host cell. The purpose of this review is to describe the many antiviral pathways and proteins induced by IFNs and to summarize the strategies of viral escape. PMID:12660132

  7. Antiviral therapy in seasonal influenza and 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza: Korean experiences and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Song, Joon Young; Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of substantial morbidity and mortality in humans every year. Vaccination is the main strategy to prevent influenza infection, but antiviral agents also play an important role in the control of both seasonal and pandemic influenza. During the influenza A/H1N1 pandemic in 2009, early prompt antiviral therapy may have reduced the severity of the influenza outcomes including pneumonia, hospitalization and mortality in the Republic of Korea. Since the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, there have been increasing usages of antiviral agents for the treatment of patients with seasonal influenza. Although currently rare, antiviral resistance among influenza viruses may emerge and increase with increased use of neuraminidase inhibitors. New agents with different modes of action are under investigation, including favipiravir, DAS181, nitazoxanide and broad-spectrum neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Data are limited with respect to high-dose and combination antiviral therapies. So, clinical trials are warranted to evaluate diverse antiviral combinations that may be synergistic and less likely to induce breakthrough resistance.

  8. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  9. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells—including germline stem cells—become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions—GLP-1/Notch signaling—becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10832.001 PMID:26551561

  10. Containing pandemic influenza with antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Longini, Ira M; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Nizam, Azhar; Yang, Yang

    2004-04-01

    For the first wave of pandemic influenza or a bioterrorist influenza attack, antiviral agents would be one of the few options to contain the epidemic in the United States until adequate supplies of vaccine were available. The authors use stochastic epidemic simulations to investigate the effectiveness of targeted antiviral prophylaxis to contain influenza. In this strategy, close contacts of suspected index influenza cases take antiviral agents prophylactically. The authors compare targeted antiviral prophylaxis with vaccination strategies. They model an influenza pandemic or bioterrorist attack for an agent similar to influenza A virus (H2N2) that caused the Asian influenza pandemic of 1957-1958. In the absence of intervention, the model predicts an influenza illness attack rate of 33% of the population (95% confidence interval (CI): 30, 37) and an influenza death rate of 0.58 deaths/1,000 persons (95% Cl: 0.4, 0.8). With the use of targeted antiviral prophylaxis, if 80% of the exposed persons maintained prophylaxis for up to 8 weeks, the epidemic would be contained, and the model predicts a reduction to an illness attack rate of 2% (95% Cl: 0.2, 16) and a death rate of 0.04 deaths/1,000 persons (95% CI: 0.0003, 0.25). Such antiviral prophylaxis is nearly as effective as vaccinating 80% of the population. Vaccinating 80% of the children aged less than 19 years is almost as effective as vaccinating 80% of the population. Targeted antiviral prophylaxis has potential as an effective measure for containing influenza until adequate quantities of vaccine are available.

  11. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  13. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  14. Antiviral activities of heated dolomite powder.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Koichi; Hirano, Shozo; Yamana, Hideaki; Onda, Tetsuhiko; Maeda, Takayoshi; Ito, Toshihiro; Hayakawa, Motozo

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the heating conditions of dolomite powder on its antiviral activity was studied against the H5N3 avian influenza virus. Calcium oxide (CaO) and magnesium oxide (MgO), obtained by the thermal decomposition of dolomite above 800 degrees C, were shown to have strong antiviral activity, but the effect was lessened when the heating temperature exceeded 1400 degrees C. Simultaneous measurement of the crystallite size suggested that the weakening of the activity was due to the considerable grain growth of the oxides. It was found that the presence of Mg in dolomite contributed to the deterrence of grain growth of the oxides during the heating process. Although both CaO and MgO exhibited strong antiviral activity, CaO had the stronger activity but quickly hydrated in the presence of water. On the other hand, the hydration of MgO took place gradually under the same conditions. Separate measurements using MgO and Mg(OH)2 revealed that MgO had a higher antiviral effect than Mg(OH)2. From the overall experiments, it was suggested that the strong antiviral activity of dolomite was related to the hydration reaction of CaO. PMID:19127652

  15. 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, William M

    2005-08-01

    The 18th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held at the Princess Sofia Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, from 11th-14th April, 2005. This is a yearly international meeting sponsored by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR). The current president of ISAR is John A Secrest 3rd of the Southern Research Institute. The scientific programme committee was chaired by John C Drach from the University of Michigan. ISAR was founded in 1987 to exchange prepublication basic, applied and clinical information on the development of antiviral, chemical and biological agents as well as to promote collaborative research. The ISAR has had a major role in the significant advances of the past decade in the reduction of the societal burdens of viral diseases by the focus of ICAR on the discovery and clinical application of antiviral agents. The 18th ICAR was organised as a series of focus presentations on specific viral groups consisting of oral and poster presentations of original research findings. In addition, the conference included plenary speakers, award presentations, a minisymposium on bioterrorism, and a satellite symposium on clinical antiviral drug developments. The size of the conference (> 50 oral and 250 poster presentations) necessitates limitation to the most noteworthy in the judgment of this reviewer. The current membership of the ISAR is approximately 700 with approximately 50% the membership in attendance. PMID:16086663

  16. A novel Ebola virus expressing luciferase allows for rapid and quantitative testing of antivirals.

    PubMed

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Callison, Julie; Takada, Ayato; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-09-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever with case fatality rates of up to 90%, for which no antiviral therapies are available. Antiviral screening is hampered by the fact that development of cytopathic effect, the easiest means to detect infection with wild-type EBOV, is relatively slow. To overcome this problem we generated a recombinant EBOV carrying a luciferase reporter. Using this virus we show that EBOV entry is rapid, with viral protein expression detectable within 2 h after infection. Further, luminescence-based assays were developed to allow highly sensitive titer determination within 48 h. As a proof-of-concept for its utility in antiviral screening we used this virus to assess neutralizing antibodies and siRNAs, with significantly faster screening times than currently available wild-type or recombinant viruses. The availability of this recombinant virus will allow for more rapid and quantitative evaluation of antivirals against EBOV, as well as the study of details of the EBOV life cycle.

  17. Alpha-particle emitting 213Bi-anti-EGFR immunoconjugates eradicate tumor cells independent of oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Wulbrand, Christian; Seidl, Christof; Gaertner, Florian C; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET α-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound α-particle emitting (213)Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with (213)Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1α. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing (213)Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml-1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5-12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by (213)Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that α-particle emitting (213)Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, (213)Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors.

  18. Alpha-Particle Emitting 213Bi-Anti-EGFR Immunoconjugates Eradicate Tumor Cells Independent of Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Florian C.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET α-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound α-particle emitting 213Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1α. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml–1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5–12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that α-particle emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:23724085

  19. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  20. Current Landscape of Antiviral Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Wade; Cox, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Continued discovery and development of new antiviral medications are paramount for global human health, particularly as new pathogens emerge and old ones evolve to evade current therapeutic agents. Great success has been achieved in developing effective therapies to suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV); however, the therapies are not curative and therefore current efforts in HIV and HBV drug discovery are directed toward longer-acting therapies and/or developing new mechanisms of action that could potentially lead to cure, or eradication, of the virus. Recently, exciting early clinical data have been reported for novel antivirals targeting respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza (flu). Preclinical data suggest that these new approaches may be effective in treating high-risk patients afflicted with serious RSV or flu infections. In this review, we highlight new directions in antiviral approaches for HIV, HBV, and acute respiratory virus infections. PMID:26962437

  1. Antiviral Defense Mechanisms in Honey Bees

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Daughenbaugh, Katie F.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees are significant pollinators of agricultural crops and other important plant species. High annual losses of honey bee colonies in North America and in some parts of Europe have profound ecological and economic implications. Colony losses have been attributed to multiple factors including RNA viruses, thus understanding bee antiviral defense mechanisms may result in the development of strategies that mitigate colony losses. Honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms include RNA-interference, pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered signal transduction cascades, and reactive oxygen species generation. However, the relative importance of these and other pathways is largely uncharacterized. Herein we review the current understanding of honey bee antiviral defense mechanisms and suggest important avenues for future investigation. PMID:26273564

  2. Combined Treatment with Antiviral Therapy and Rituximab in Patients with Mixed Cryoglobulinemia: Review of the Literature and Report of a Case Using Direct Antiviral Agents-Based Antihepatitis C Virus Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Urraro, Teresa; Gragnani, Laura; Piluso, Alessia; Fabbrizzi, Alessio; Monti, Monica; Boldrini, Barbara; Ranieri, Jessica; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2015-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is an autoimmune/B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder associated with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection, manifesting as a systemic vasculitis. In the last decade, antiviral treatment (AT) with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) was considered the first therapeutic option for HCV-MC. In MC patients ineligible or not responsive to antivirals, the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (RTX) is effective. A combined AT plus RTX was also suggested. Since the introduction of direct acting antivirals (DAAs), few data were published about MC and no data about a combined schedule. Here, we report a complete remission of MC after a sustained virological response following a combined RTX/Peg-IFN+RBV+DAA (boceprevir) treatment and review the literature about the combined RTX/AT. PMID:25815218

  3. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses

    PubMed Central

    McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T.; Dennison, S. Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  4. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  5. Intestinal bacteria trigger T cell-independent immunoglobulin A(2) class switching by inducing epithelial-cell secretion of the cytokine APRIL.

    PubMed

    He, Bing; Xu, Weifeng; Santini, Paul A; Polydorides, Alexandros D; Chiu, April; Estrella, Jeannelyn; Shan, Meimei; Chadburn, Amy; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Plebani, Alessandro; Knowles, Daniel M; Rescigno, Maria; Cerutti, Andrea

    2007-06-01

    Bacteria colonize the intestine shortly after birth and thereafter exert several beneficial functions, including induction of protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies. The distal intestine contains IgA(2), which is more resistant to bacterial proteases than is IgA(1). The mechanism by which B cells switch from IgM to IgA(2) remains unknown. We found that human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) triggered IgA(2) class switching in B cells, including IgA(1)-expressing B cells arriving from mucosal follicles, through a CD4(+) T cell-independent pathway involving a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL). IECs released APRIL after sensing bacteria through Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and further increased APRIL production by activating dendritic cells via thymic stromal lymphopoietin. Our data indicate that bacteria elicit IgA(2) class switching by linking lamina propria B cells with IECs through a TLR-inducible signaling program requiring APRIL. Thus, mucosal vaccines should activate IECs to induce more effective IgA(2) responses.

  6. Antiviral Drug Resistance: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Sunwen

    2010-01-01

    Summary Antiviral drug resistance is an increasing concern in immunocompromised patient populations, where ongoing viral replication and prolonged drug exposure lead to the selection of resistant strains. Rapid diagnosis of resistance can be made by associating characteristic viral mutations with resistance to various drugs as determined by phenotypic assays. Management of drug resistance includes optimization of host factors and drug delivery, selection of alternative therapies based on knowledge of mechanisms of resistance, and the development of new antivirals. This article discusses drug resistance in herpesviruses and hepatitis B. PMID:20466277

  7. Directed evolution of mutator adenoviruses resistant to antibody neutralization.

    PubMed

    Myers, Nicolle D; Skorohodova, Ksenia V; Gounder, Anshu P; Smith, Jason G

    2013-05-01

    We incorporated a previously identified mutation that reduces the fidelity of the DNA polymerase into a human adenovirus vector. Using this mutator vector, we demonstrate rapid selection of resistance to a neutralizing anti-hexon monoclonal antibody due to a G434D mutation in hexon that precludes antibody binding. Since mutator adenoviruses can accumulate compound mutations that are unattainable using traditional random mutagenesis techniques, this approach will be valuable to the study of antivirals and host factor interactions.

  8. Bell's Palsy: Treatment with Steroids and Antiviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... PATIENTS and their FAMILIES BELL’S PALSY: TREATMENT WITH STEROIDS AND ANTIVIRAL DRUGS This information sheet is provided to help you understand the role of steroids and antiviral drugs for treating Bell’s palsy. Neurologists ...

  9. Fc receptors in antibody-dependent enhancement of viral infections.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Adam; Foo, Suan-Sin; Bruzzone, Roberto; Dinh, Luan Vu; King, Nicholas J C; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2015-11-01

    Sensitization of the humoral immune response to invading viruses and production of antiviral antibodies forms part of the host antiviral repertoire. Paradoxically, for a number of viral pathogens, under certain conditions, antibodies provide an attractive means of enhanced virus entry and replication in a number of cell types. Known as antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection, the phenomenon occurs when virus-antibody immunocomplexes interact with cells bearing complement or Fc receptors, promoting internalization of the virus and increasing infection. Frequently associated with exacerbation of viral disease, ADE of infection presents a major obstacle to the prevention of viral disease by vaccination and is thought to be partly responsible for the adverse effects of novel antiviral therapeutics such as intravenous immunoglobulins. There is a growing body of work examining the intracellular signaling pathways and epitopes responsible for mediating ADE, with a view to aiding rational design of antiviral strategies. With in vitro studies also confirming ADE as a feature of infection for a growing number of viruses, challenges remain in understanding the multilayered molecular mechanisms of ADE and its effect on viral pathogenesis. PMID:26497532

  10. Antiviral drug ganciclovir is a potent inhibitor of microglial proliferation and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaoqing; Mathur, Vidhu; Ho, Peggy P; James, Michelle L; Lucin, Kurt M; Hoehne, Aileen; Alabsi, Haitham; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Steinman, Lawrence; Luo, Jian; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2014-02-10

    Aberrant microglial responses contribute to neuroinflammation in many neurodegenerative diseases, but no current therapies target pathogenic microglia. We discovered unexpectedly that the antiviral drug ganciclovir (GCV) inhibits the proliferation of microglia in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model for multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as in kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity. In EAE, GCV largely prevented infiltration of T lymphocytes into the central nervous system (CNS) and drastically reduced disease incidence and severity when delivered before the onset of disease. In contrast, GCV treatment had minimal effects on peripheral leukocyte distribution in EAE and did not inhibit generation of antibodies after immunization with ovalbumin. Additionally, a radiolabeled analogue of penciclovir, [(18)F]FHBG, which is similar in structure to GCV, was retained in areas of CNS inflammation in EAE, but not in naive control mice, consistent with the observed therapeutic effects. Our experiments suggest GCV may have beneficial effects in the CNS beyond its antiviral properties. PMID:24493798

  11. Synthesis and antiviral activity of substituted quercetins.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Mahendra; Kim, Yunjeong; Desper, John; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Hua, Duy H

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses are important pathogens that cause respiratory infections in humans and animals. In addition to vaccination, antiviral drugs against influenza virus play a significant role in controlling viral infections by reducing disease progression and virus transmission. Plant derived polyphenols are associated with antioxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, and cardio- and neuro-protective actions. Some polyphenols, such as resveratrol and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), showed significant anti-influenza activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Recently we showed that quercetin and isoquercetin (quercetin-3-β-d-glucoside), a glucoside form of quercetin, significantly reduced the replication of influenza viruses in vitro and in vivo (isoquercetin). The antiviral effects of isoquercetin were greater than that of quercetin with lower IC(50) values and higher in vitro therapeutic index. Thus, we investigated the synthesis and antiviral activities of various quercetin derivatives with substitution of C3, C3', and C5 hydroxyl functions with various phenolic ester, alkoxy, and aminoalkoxy moieties. Among newly synthesized compounds, quercetin-3-gallate which is structurally related to EGCG showed comparable antiviral activity against influenza virus (porcine H1N1 strain) to that of EGCG with improved in vitro therapeutic index.

  12. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  13. New hypoxanthine nucleosides with RNA antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Nair, V; Ussery, M A

    1992-08-01

    A series of novel C-2 functionalized hypoxanthine and purine ribonucleosides have been synthesized and evaluated against exotic RNA viruses of the family or genus alpha, arena, flavi, and rhabdo. Both specific and broad-spectrum antiviral activities were discovered but only with hypoxanthine nucleosides. PMID:1444325

  14. The antiviral spectrum of Listerine antiseptic.

    PubMed

    Dennison, D K; Meredith, G M; Shillitoe, E J; Caffesse, R G

    1995-04-01

    The mechanism of activity and the antiviral spectrum of Listerine antiseptic have not been examined thoroughly. We therefore tested its effect on laboratory strains of herpes simplex type 1 and type 2 (enveloped DNA viruses), influenza A virus (enveloped RNA virus), rotavirus (nonenveloped RNA virus), and adenovirus type 5 (nonenveloped DNA virus). Each virus was mixed with an equal volume of Listerine for 30 seconds to 5 minutes, and the residual infectivity of the virus was assessed. An antiviral effect was defined as greater than 95% reduction of infectivity. Exposure to Listerine for 30 seconds had an antiviral effect against herpes simplex type-1 and type-2 (96.3% and 100% reduction in infectious virus, respectively) and influenza A (100% reduction). In contrast, rotavirus-induced plaque formation was reduced by 12.2% after 30 seconds of exposure to Listerine, whereas 5 minutes of exposure to Listerine resulted in a 21.5% increase in plaque formation. Exposure of adenovirus to Listerine had a minimal effect on the cytopathocity of the virus, with a 33.4% reduction in virus levels after 5 minutes. The antiviral activity of Listerine is thus not related to the viral genome but is probably directed to the viral envelope. PMID:7614202

  15. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Ly-Chatain, Mai H.; Moussaoui, Saliha; Vera, Annabelle; Rigobello, Véronique; Demarigny, Yann

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds – cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), chitosan, nisin, and lysozyme – was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail) infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA) infecting E. coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7 – 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 to 1.5 log(pfu)/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min). These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds. PMID:23487495

  16. Social stress in male mice impairs long-term antiviral immunity selectively in wounded subjects.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Johanna; Boersma, Wim J A; Scholten, Jan Willem; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2002-03-01

    An important property of the antiviral immune response is its time-dependent character. Beginning with a few antigen-specific cells upon infection, it evolves to a stage where there is an abundance of antigen-specific cells and antibodies that are needed to clear the pathogen, and ends with circulating antibodies and a population of virus-specific memory cells to protect the animal from reinfection. Short-term effects of stress on the immune system have been investigated extensively, showing that stress acutely changes many aspects of immunity. However, relatively little is known about the consequences of stress for the quality and quantity of long-term immunological memory. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of social stress, applied in mice at Days 1, 2 and 3 after inoculation with a herpes virus, on long-term antibody and memory cytokine responses to the virus. Male mice were subjected to three 5-min confrontations with an aggressive conspecific. Approximately half of the mice was wounded by bites of the aggressor during this stress procedure, and these mice were analyzed separately from nonwounded mice. It appeared that wounded mice showed suppressed protective antibody responses and impaired memory for virus-specific IL-4 and IL-10 production, whereas mice that were not wounded showed intact long-term immune responses and memory. It is concluded that the combination of wounds and the social stress of repeated confrontations is associated with impaired protective immunity as a consequence of suppressed antibody levels and impairment of some aspects of antiviral immunological memory. PMID:11897253

  17. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Li, Timothy C. M.; Chan, Martin C. W.; Lee, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:26389935

  18. Clinical Implications of Antiviral Resistance in Influenza.

    PubMed

    Li, Timothy C M; Chan, Martin C W; Lee, Nelson

    2015-09-01

    Influenza is a major cause of severe respiratory infections leading to excessive hospitalizations and deaths globally; annual epidemics, pandemics, and sporadic/endemic avian virus infections occur as a result of rapid, continuous evolution of influenza viruses. Emergence of antiviral resistance is of great clinical and public health concern. Currently available antiviral treatments include four neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir, zanamivir, peramivir, laninamivir), M2-inibitors (amantadine, rimantadine), and a polymerase inhibitor (favipiravir). In this review, we focus on resistance issues related to the use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). Data on primary resistance, as well as secondary resistance related to NAI exposure will be presented. Their clinical implications, detection, and novel therapeutic options undergoing clinical trials are discussed.

  19. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides. PMID:15308605

  20. Glycodendritic structures: promising new antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2004-09-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed by dendritic cells, is able to recognize high mannosylated glycoproteins at the surface of a broad range of pathogens including viruses, bacteria, fungi and parasites. For at least some of these agents this interaction appears to be an important part of the infection process. Therefore, this lectin might be considered in the design of new antiviral drugs. In this manner, multivalent carbohydrate systems based on dendrimers and dendritic polymers are promising candidates as antiviral drugs. Boltorn hyperbranched dendritic polymers functionalized with mannose have been used to inhibit DC-SIGN-mediated infection in an Ebola-pseudotyped viral model. Their physiological solubility, lack of toxicity and especially their low price suggest the application of these glycodendritic polymers for possible formulation as microbicides.

  1. Synthesis and antiviral activity of 5'-deoxypyrazofurin.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Schneller, S W; Ikeda, S; Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1993-11-12

    In searching for derivatives of pyrazofurin that could display antiviral properties by means that do not require C-5' phosphorylation, 5'-deoxypyrazofurin (3) has been synthesized in six steps from methyl5-deoxy-2,3-O-isopropylidene-beta-D-ribofuranoside (4). Compound 3 was evaluated for antiviral activity against a large number of viruses including herpes-, pox-, myxo-, toga-, arena-, rhabdo-, picorna-,reo-, and retroviruses. Compound 3 proved active against respiratory syncytial virus (in HeLa cells), vaccinia virus (in embryonic skin-muscle fibroblast cells), vesicular stomatitis virus (in HeLa cells), and influenza A virus (in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells) at concentrations (ranging from 4 to 20 micrograms/mL) that were nontoxic to the confluent host cell cultures. PMID:8246242

  2. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings.

  3. Antiviral Strategies for Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Maria; Larson, Jeffrey L.; Fang, Fang

    2010-01-01

    While vaccines are the primary public health response to seasonal and pandemic flu, short of a universal vaccine there are inherent limitations to this approach. Antiviral drugs provide valuable alternative options for treatment and prophylaxis of influenza. Here, we will review drugs and drug candidates against influenza with an emphasis on the recent progress of a host-targeting entry-blocker drug candidate, DAS181, a sialidase fusion protein. PMID:21994706

  4. Defining the Recognition Elements of Lewis Y-Reactive Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Siegel, Eric R.; Murali, Ramachandran; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Antibody response to carbohydrate antigens is often independent of T cells and the process of affinity/specificity improvement is considered strictly dependent on the germinal centers. Antibodies induced during a T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) response are less variable and less functionally versatile than those induced with T cell help. The antigen specificity consequences of accumulation of somatic mutations in antibodies during TI-2 responses of Marginal Zone (MZ) B cells is a fact that still needs explanation. Germline genes that define carbohydrate-reactive antibodies are known to sculpt antibody-combining sites containing innate, key side-chain contacts that define the antigen recognition step. However, substitutions associated with MZ B cell derived antibodies might affect the mobility and polyspecificity of the antibody. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed antibodies reactive with the neolactoseries antigen Lewis Y (LeY) to define the residue subset required for the reactive repertoire for the LeY antigen. Our molecular simulation studies of crystallographically determined and modeled antibody-LeY complexes suggests that the heavy-chain germline gene VH7183.a13.20 and the light-chain Vκ cr1 germline gene are sufficient to account for the recognition of the trisaccharide-H determinant Types 1–4, while the specificity for LeY is driven by the CDR3 backbone conformation of the heavy chain and not the side chain interactions. These results confirm that these monoclonals use germline-encoded amino acids to recognize simple carbohydrate determinants like trisaccharide-H but relies on somatic mutations in the periphery of the combining site to modify affinity for LeY through electrostatic interactions that leads to their optimized binding. These observations bring further attention to the role of mutations in T-cell independent antibodies to distinguish self from non-self carbohydrate antigens. PMID:25117628

  5. Antiviral activities of atractylon from Atractylodis Rhizoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yang; Mai, Jing-Yin; Hou, Tian-Lu; Ping, Jian; Chen, Jian-Jie

    2016-10-01

    Atractylodis Rhizoma is a traditional medicinal herb, which has antibacterial, antiviral, anti‑inflammatory and anti‑allergic, anticancer, gastroprotective and neuroprotective activities. It is widely used for treating fever, cold, phlegm, edema and arthralgia syndrome in South‑East Asian nations. In this study, 6 chemical compositions of Atractylodis Rhizoma were characterized by spectral analysis and their antiviral activities were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Among them, atractylon showed most significant antiviral activities. Atractylon treatment at doses of 10‑40 mg/kg for 5 days attenuated influenza A virus (IAV)‑induced pulmonary injury and decreased the serum levels of interleukin (IL)‑6, tumor necrosis factor‑α and IL‑1β, but increased interferon‑β (IFN‑β) levels. Atractylon treatment upregulated the expression of Τoll‑like receptor 7 (TLR7), MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor‑associated factor 6 and IFN‑β mRNA but downregulated nuclear factor‑κB p65 protein expression in the lung tissues of IAV‑infected mice. These results demonstrated that atractylon significantly alleviated IAV‑induced lung injury via regulating the TLR7 signaling pathway, and may warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for IAV treatment. PMID:27600871

  6. Antiviral activities of atractylon from Atractylodis Rhizoma

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Mai, Jing-Yin; Hou, Tian-Lu; Ping, Jian; Chen, Jian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodis Rhizoma is a traditional medicinal herb, which has antibacterial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic, anticancer, gastroprotective and neuroprotective activities. It is widely used for treating fever, cold, phlegm, edema and arthralgia syndrome in South-East Asian nations. In this study, 6 chemical compositions of Atractylodis Rhizoma were characterized by spectral analysis and their antiviral activities were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Among them, atractylon showed most significant antiviral activities. Atractylon treatment at doses of 10–40 mg/kg for 5 days attenuated influenza A virus (IAV)-induced pulmonary injury and decreased the serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β, but increased interferon-β (IFN-β) levels. Atractylon treatment upregulated the expression of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), MyD88, tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 and IFN-β mRNA but downregulated nuclear factor-κB p65 protein expression in the lung tissues of IAV-infected mice. These results demonstrated that atractylon significantly alleviated IAV-induced lung injury via regulating the TLR7 signaling pathway, and may warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for IAV treatment. PMID:27600871

  7. The development of therapeutic antibodies against dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Fibriansah, Guntur; Lok, Shee-Mei

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus, a positive-sense RNA virus, is one of the major human pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes. However, no fully effective licensed dengue vaccines or therapeutics are currently available. Several potent neutralizing antibodies against DENV have been isolated from mice and humans, and the characterization of their properties by biochemical and biophysical methods have revealed important insights for development of therapeutic antibodies. In this review, we summarize recently reported antibody-antigen complex structures, their likely neutralization mechanisms and enhancement propensities, as well as their prophylactic and therapeutic capabilities in mouse models. This article forms part of a symposium on flavivirus drug discovery in the journal Antiviral Research.

  8. Antibody-based concepts for multipurpose prevention technologies

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Kevin J; Zeitlin, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Because of the versatility and specificity of monoclonal antibodies, they are candidates for multipurpose prevention technologies when formulated as topical (gels, films, rings) or injectable drugs and as vaccines. This review focuses on antibody-based proof of concept studies for the human immunodeficiency virus, herpes simplex virus and sperm. Opportunities and challenges in antibody evasion/resistance, manufacturing, regulatory, and pharmacoeconomics are discussed. This article is based on a presentation at the “Product Development Workshop 2013: HIV and Multipurpose Prevention Technologies,” held in Arlington, Virginia on February 21-22, 2013. It forms part of a special supplement to Antiviral Research. PMID:24188703

  9. Antiviral and immune stimulant activities of glycyrrhizin against duck hepatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Soufy, Hamdy; Yassein, Safaa; Ahmed, Alaa R; Khodier, Mohamed H; Kutkat, Mohamed A; Nasr, Soad M; Okda, Faten A

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effect of glycyrrhizin as an immune stimulant against duck hepatitis virus (DHV). In vitro study was carried out to determine cytotoxic and antiviral effects of glycyrrhizin in VERO cells. In vivo study was performed on 40 one-day-old White Pekin ducklings. -and the birds weres divided into 4 groups: control, glycyrrhizin treated, vaccinated with live attenuated DHV vaccine and glycyrrhizin treated and vaccinated; to investigate the changes in immunity and challenge test. Blood samples were collected from each duckling for evaluation of cellular and humeral immunity. The in vitro results revealed that glycyrrhizin had antiviral and no toxic effects till 10⁶ dilutions. Higher antibody titer was observed from the 5th week till the end of experiment in glycyrrhizin and vaccinated group. Treatment with glycyrrhizin alone or with DHV vaccine demonstrated a pronounced lymphocytic proliferation response after 4 days post-inoculation till the end of experiment, while vaccinated group revealed a pronounced proliferation response after 24 days post-inoculation. Treatment with glycyrrhizin alone or combination with DHV vaccine revealed good immune stimulant and antiviral effect against DHV. PMID:23983372

  10. Antiviral effects of liposome-encapsulated PolyICLC against Dengue virus in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxin; Hu, Yanxin; Sun, Lunquan; Wong, Jonathan; Wang, Ming

    2016-09-16

    This study presents the first investigation of the antiviral effects of the liposome-encapsulated PolyICLC (LE-PolyICLC) on Dengue virus (DENV) in a mouse model. In vivo efficacy studies showed that LE-PolyICLC acted to increase antiviral mechanisms mainly through promoting cytokine expression associated with innate immunity, such as IFN-γ. In addition, the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was also increased, while IL-6 level was decreased in serum. The titers of total antibodies against DENV2 in mice were also elevated. Administration of LE-PolyICLC not only alleviated the loss of body weight, degree of morbidity, and pathological damage in brains, but also reduced the viral titers and expression of viral E protein in the brain. Notably, the effectiveness of LE-PolyICLC was better than PolyICLC on the basis of the data presented in this study. These results, therefore, set a foundation for further development of LE-PolyICLC as an attractive candidate of antiviral agents to be used in both prophylactic and therapeutic settings in DENV diseases. PMID:27524246

  11. HIV/HCV Antiviral Drug Interactions in the Era of Direct-acting Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Donald P.; Faragon, John J.; Banks, Sarah; Chirch, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Therapy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and chronic hepatitis C has evolved over the past decade, resulting in better control of infection and clinical outcomes; however, drug-drug interactions remain a significant hazard. Joint recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Diseases Society of America regarding drug-drug interactions between HIV antiretroviral agents and direct-acting antiviral agents for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are reviewed here. This review is oriented to facilitate appropriate selection of an antiviral therapy regimen for HCV infection based on the choice of antiretroviral therapy being administered and, if necessary, switching antiretroviral regimens. PMID:27777891

  12. The TACI receptor regulates T-cell-independent marginal zone B cell responses through innate activation-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Figgett, William A; Fairfax, Kirsten; Vincent, Fabien B; Le Page, Mélanie A; Katik, Indzi; Deliyanti, Devy; Quah, Pin Shie; Verma, Pali; Grumont, Raelene; Gerondakis, Steve; Hertzog, Paul; O'Reilly, Lorraine A; Strasser, Andreas; Mackay, Fabienne

    2013-09-19

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD) plays a critical role in immune homeostasis and tolerance. In T-cell-dependent humoral responses, AICD of B cells is initiated by Fas ligand (FasL) on T cells, stimulating the Fas receptor on B cells. In contrast, T-cell-independent B cell responses involve innate-type B lymphocytes, such as marginal zone (MZ) B cells, and little is known about the mechanisms that control AICD during innate B cell responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation. Here, we show that MZ B cells undergo AICD in response to TLR4 activation in vivo. The transmembrane activator, calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) receptor and TLR4 cooperate to upregulate expression of both FasL and Fas on MZ B cells and also to repress inhibitors of Fas-induced apoptosis signaling. These findings demonstrate an unappreciated role for TACI and its ligands in the regulation of AICD during T-cell-independent B cell responses.

  13. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: a novel mechanism for improving bone material properties.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Maxime A; Brown, Drew M; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C; Almer, Jonathan D; Stock, Stuart R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B

    2014-04-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle X-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength.

  14. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: A novel mechanism for improving bone material properties

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Maxime A.; Brown, Drew M.; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M.; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Stock, Stuart R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (−OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle x-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength. PMID:24468719

  15. Innate immunity to dengue virus infection and subversion of antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Green, Angela M; Beatty, P Robert; Hadjilaou, Alexandros; Harris, Eva

    2014-03-20

    Dengue is a major public health issue in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV1-DENV4) are spread primarily by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, whose geographic range continues to expand. Humans are the only host for epidemic strains of DENV, and the virus has developed sophisticated mechanisms to evade human innate immune responses. The host cell's first line of defense begins with an intracellular signaling cascade resulting in production of interferon α/β (IFN-α/β), which promotes intracellular antiviral responses and helps initiates the adaptive response during the course of DENV infection. In response, DENV has developed numerous ways to subvert these intracellular antiviral responses and directly inhibit cellular signaling cascades. Specifically, DENV manipulates the unfolded protein response and autophagy to counter cellular stress and delay apoptosis. The DENV non-structural protein NS4B and subgenomic flavivirus RNA interfere with the RNA interference pathway by inhibiting the RNase Dicer. During heterotypic secondary DENV infection, subneutralizing antibodies can enable viral uptake through Fcγ receptors and down-regulate signaling cascades initiated via the pattern recognition receptors TLR-3 and MDA5/RIG-I, thus reducing the antiviral state of the cell. The DENV NS2B/3 protein cleaves human STING/MITA, interfering with induction of IFN-α/β. Finally, DENV NS2A, NS4A, and NS4B complex together to block STAT1 phosphorylation, while NS5 binds and promotes degradation of human STAT2, thus preventing formation of the STAT1/STAT2 heterodimer and its transcriptional induction of interferon stimulating genes. Here, we discuss the host innate immune response to DENV and the mechanisms of immune evasion that DENV has developed to manipulate cellular antiviral responses. PMID:24316047

  16. Determining Mechanism of Action of Antivirals for Respiratory Illness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Irma; Dobrovolny, Hana

    2015-03-01

    Viral infections in the respiratory tract are common in humans and can cause serious illness and death. Drug treatment is the principal line of protection against many of these illnesses and many compounds are tested as antivirals. Often the efficacy of these antivirals are determined before a mechanism of action is understood. We use mathematical models to represent the evolution of these diseases and establish which experiments can help determine the mechanism of action of antivirals.

  17. Systems biology: A tool for charting the antiviral landscape.

    PubMed

    Bowen, James R; Ferris, Martin T; Suthar, Mehul S

    2016-06-15

    The host antiviral programs that are initiated following viral infection form a dynamic and complex web of responses that we have collectively termed as "the antiviral landscape". Conventional approaches to studying antiviral responses have primarily used reductionist systems to assess the function of a single or a limited subset of molecules. Systems biology is a holistic approach that considers the entire system as a whole, rather than individual components or molecules. Systems biology based approaches facilitate an unbiased and comprehensive analysis of the antiviral landscape, while allowing for the discovery of emergent properties that are missed by conventional approaches. The antiviral landscape can be viewed as a hierarchy of complexity, beginning at the whole organism level and progressing downward to isolated tissues, populations of cells, and single cells. In this review, we will discuss how systems biology has been applied to better understand the antiviral landscape at each of these layers. At the organismal level, the Collaborative Cross is an invaluable genetic resource for assessing how genetic diversity influences the antiviral response. Whole tissue and isolated bulk cell transcriptomics serves as a critical tool for the comprehensive analysis of antiviral responses at both the tissue and cellular levels of complexity. Finally, new techniques in single cell analysis are emerging tools that will revolutionize our understanding of how individual cells within a bulk infected cell population contribute to the overall antiviral landscape.

  18. Hydrogen bonds and antiviral activity of benzaldehyde derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Belkov, M. V.; Shadyro, O. I.; Brinkevich, S. D.; Samovich, S. N.

    2012-09-01

    We have obtained the Fourier transform IR spectra of solutions of benzaldehyde derivatives having different antiviral activities against a herpes virus. We observe a correlation between the presence of hydrogen bonds in the benzaldehyde molecules and the appearance of antiviral properties in the compounds. For compounds having antiviral activity, we have obtained spectral data suggesting the existence of hydrogen bonds of the type C=OṡṡṡH-O and O-HṡṡṡO in the molecules. When the hydrogen atom in the hydroxyl groups are replaced by a methyl group, no intramolecular hydrogen bonds are formed and the compounds lose their antiviral activity.

  19. Pharmacokinetic characteristics, pharmacodynamic effect and in vivo antiviral efficacy of liver-targeted interferon alpha.

    PubMed

    Rycroft, Daniel; Sosabowski, Jane; Coulstock, Edward; Davies, Marie; Morrey, John; Friel, Sarah; Kelly, Fiona; Hamatake, Robert; Ovečka, Milan; Prince, Rob; Goodall, Laura; Sepp, Armin; Walker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNα) is used for the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection, and whilst efficacious, it is associated with multiple adverse events caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting IFN directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. Furthermore we investigated whether directing IFN to the reservoir of infection in the liver may improve antiviral efficacy by increasing local concentration in target organs and tissues. Our previous results show that the mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific liver targeting antibody, DOM26h-196-61, results in a fusion protein which retains the activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. In vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-DOM26h-196-61, hereafter referred to as targeted mIFNα2, was observed in microSPECT imaging studies in mice. In this study we show by pharmacokinetic analysis that antibody mediated liver-targeting results in increased uptake and exposure of targeted mIFNα2 in target tissues, and correspondingly reduced uptake and exposure in systemic circulation, clearance organs and non-target tissues. We also show that cytokine activity and antiviral activity of liver-targeted IFN is observed in vivo, but that, contrary to expectations, liver-targeting of mIFNα2 using ASGPR specific dAbs actually leads to a reduced pharmacodynamic effect in target organs and lower antiviral activity in vivo when compared to non-targeted mIFNα2-dAb fusions.

  20. Pharmacokinetic Characteristics, Pharmacodynamic Effect and In Vivo Antiviral Efficacy of Liver-Targeted Interferon Alpha

    PubMed Central

    Rycroft, Daniel; Sosabowski, Jane; Coulstock, Edward; Davies, Marie; Morrey, John; Friel, Sarah; Kelly, Fiona; Hamatake, Robert; Ovečka, Milan; Prince, Rob; Goodall, Laura; Sepp, Armin; Walker, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Interferon alpha (IFNα) is used for the treatment of hepatitis B virus infection, and whilst efficacious, it is associated with multiple adverse events caused by systemic exposure to interferon. We therefore hypothesise that targeting IFN directly to the intended site of action in the liver would reduce exposure in blood and peripheral tissue and hence improve the safety and tolerability of IFNα therapy. Furthermore we investigated whether directing IFN to the reservoir of infection in the liver may improve antiviral efficacy by increasing local concentration in target organs and tissues. Our previous results show that the mIFNα2 fused to an ASGPR specific liver targeting antibody, DOM26h-196-61, results in a fusion protein which retains the activity of both fusion partners when measured in vitro. In vivo targeting of the liver by mIFNα2-DOM26h-196-61, hereafter referred to as targeted mIFNα2, was observed in microSPECT imaging studies in mice. In this study we show by pharmacokinetic analysis that antibody mediated liver-targeting results in increased uptake and exposure of targeted mIFNα2 in target tissues, and correspondingly reduced uptake and exposure in systemic circulation, clearance organs and non-target tissues. We also show that cytokine activity and antiviral activity of liver-targeted IFN is observed in vivo, but that, contrary to expectations, liver-targeting of mIFNα2 using ASGPR specific dAbs actually leads to a reduced pharmacodynamic effect in target organs and lower antiviral activity in vivo when compared to non-targeted mIFNα2-dAb fusions. PMID:25689509

  1. Update on dengue: epidemiology, virus evolution, antiviral drugs, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Gubler, Duane J

    2010-05-01

    Dengue virus is the most widespread geographically of the arboviruses and a major public health threat in the tropics and subtropics. Scientific advances in recent years have provided new insights about the pathogenesis of more severe disease and novel approaches into the development of antiviral compounds and dengue vaccines. Phylogenetic studies show an association between specific subtypes (within serotypes) and severity of dengue. The lack of association between maternal antibodies and development of severe dengue in infants in a recent study has called for the rethinking or refinement of the current antibody-dependent enhancement theory of dengue hemorrhagic syndrome in infancy. Such studies should stimulate new directions of research into mechanisms responsible for the development of severe dengue. The life cycle of dengue virus readily shows that virus entry and replication can be targeted by small molecules. Advances in a mouse model (AG 129 mice) have made it easier to test such antiviral compounds. The efforts to find specific dengue inhibitors are intensifying and the tools to evaluate the efficacy of new drugs are now in place for rapid translation into trials in humans. Furthermore, several dengue vaccine candidates are in development, of which the chimeric dengue/yellow fever vaccine has now entered phase 3 trials. Until the availability of a licensed vaccine, disease surveillance and vector population control remain the mainstay of dengue prevention. PMID:21308524

  2. Update on dengue: epidemiology, virus evolution, antiviral drugs, and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Wilder-Smith, Annelies; Ooi, Eng-Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Gubler, Duane J

    2010-05-01

    Dengue virus is the most widespread geographically of the arboviruses and a major public health threat in the tropics and subtropics. Scientific advances in recent years have provided new insights about the pathogenesis of more severe disease and novel approaches into the development of antiviral compounds and dengue vaccines. Phylogenetic studies show an association between specific subtypes (within serotypes) and severity of dengue. The lack of association between maternal antibodies and development of severe dengue in infants in a recent study has called for the rethinking or refinement of the current antibody-dependent enhancement theory of dengue hemorrhagic syndrome in infancy. Such studies should stimulate new directions of research into mechanisms responsible for the development of severe dengue. The life cycle of dengue virus readily shows that virus entry and replication can be targeted by small molecules. Advances in a mouse model (AG 129 mice) have made it easier to test such antiviral compounds. The efforts to find specific dengue inhibitors are intensifying and the tools to evaluate the efficacy of new drugs are now in place for rapid translation into trials in humans. Furthermore, several dengue vaccine candidates are in development, of which the chimeric dengue/yellow fever vaccine has now entered phase 3 trials. Until the availability of a licensed vaccine, disease surveillance and vector population control remain the mainstay of dengue prevention.

  3. Phenotypic lentivirus screens to identify functional single domain antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian I; Hanke, Leo; Morin, Benjamin; Brewer, Rebeccah; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P J; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of proteins is key in assessing their in vivo function. Although genetic ablation is straightforward, reversible and specific perturbation of protein function remains a challenge. Single domain antibody fragments, such as camelid-derived VHHs, can serve as inhibitors or activators of intracellular protein function, but functional testing of identified VHHs is laborious. To address this challenge, we have developed a lentiviral screening approach to identify VHHs that elicit a phenotype when expressed intracellularly. We identified 19 antiviral VHHs that protect human A549 cells from lethal infection with influenza A virus (IAV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), respectively. Both negative-sense RNA viruses are vulnerable to VHHs uniquely specific for their respective nucleoproteins. Antiviral VHHs prevented nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins or mRNA transcription, respectively, and may provide clues for novel antiviral reagents. In principle, the screening approach described here should be applicable to identify inhibitors of any pathogen or biological pathway. PMID:27573105

  4. Natural Killer cell-dependent and non-dependent anti-viral activity of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Asmal, Mohammed; Letvin, Norman L.; Geiben-Lynn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    2-cys peroxiredoxins (Prx), a group of anti-oxidative enzyme proteins, act directly on virally-infected cells to inhibit HIV-1 replication, and indirectly through destruction of HIV infected cells by stimulation of Natural Killer (NK) cell-mediated immune responses. We assayed for antibody-dependent NK cell mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI) using plasma from SIV-infected rhesus macaques. We found that Prx-1 strongly increased ADCVI in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting augmentation of NK cell killing. We also investigated the effect of Prx-1 on NK cell-independent HIV-1 and HIV-2 inhibition. We found that primary HIV isolates were potently inhibited at nM concentrations, regardless of viral clade, receptor usage or anti-retroviral drug resistance. During NK cell independent inhibition, we found that Prx-1 reversed the HIV-1 induced gene expression of Heat shock protein 90 kDa alpha (cystolic), class A member 2, (HSP90), a protein of the stress pathway. Prx-1 highly activated Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B), a gene of the TGF-β pathway, and Baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 2 (Birc-2), an anti-apoptotic gene of the NF-κB pathway. We identified gene-expression networks highly dependent on the NFκB and ERK1/2 pathways. Our findings demonstrate that Prx-1 inhibits HIV replication through NK cell-dependent and NK cell-independent mechanisms. PMID:24244928

  5. Neuropsychiatric Effects of HIV Antiviral Medications.

    PubMed

    Treisman, Glenn J; Soudry, Olivia

    2016-10-01

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has dramatically increased the lifespan of HIV patients but treatment is complicated by numerous adverse effects and toxicities. ART complications include neuropsychiatric, metabolic, gastrointestinal, cardiac, and numerous other toxicities, and clinicians often have to choose one toxicity over another to offer the best medication regimen for a patient. Some antiviral drugs cause significant neuropsychiatric complications, including depression, cognitive impairment, and sleep disturbance. Even in careful studies, it may be difficult to determine which effects are related to the virus, the immune system, or the treatment. Of the six currently marketed classes of antiviral drugs, the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors have been most commonly associated with neuropsychiatric complications. Within these classes, certain drugs are more likely to cause difficulty than others. We review the contention regarding the central nervous system (CNS) complications of efavirenz, as well as debate about the role of CNS penetration in drug effectiveness and toxicity. A thorough working knowledge of the neuropsychiatric consequences of ART allows clinicians to tailor treatment more successfully to individual patients as well as to identify ART more quickly as the source of a problem or symptom. PMID:27534750

  6. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Elizabeth J; Kirkegaard, Karla A; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus's inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles-the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations-both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  7. Exploiting Genetic Interference for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kirkegaard, Karla A.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly evolving viruses are a major threat to human health. Such viruses are often highly pathogenic (e.g., influenza virus, HIV, Ebola virus) and routinely circumvent therapeutic intervention through mutational escape. Error-prone genome replication generates heterogeneous viral populations that rapidly adapt to new selection pressures, leading to resistance that emerges with treatment. However, population heterogeneity bears a cost: when multiple viral variants replicate within a cell, they can potentially interfere with each other, lowering viral fitness. This genetic interference can be exploited for antiviral strategies, either by taking advantage of a virus’s inherent genetic diversity or through generating de novo interference by engineering a competing genome. Here, we discuss two such antiviral strategies, dominant drug targeting and therapeutic interfering particles. Both strategies harness the power of genetic interference to surmount two particularly vexing obstacles—the evolution of drug resistance and targeting therapy to high-risk populations—both of which impede treatment in resource-poor settings. PMID:27149616

  8. Defensins Potentiate a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Enteric Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Gounder, Anshu P; Myers, Nicolle D; Treuting, Piper M; Bromme, Beth A; Wilson, Sarah S; Wiens, Mayim E; Lu, Wuyuan; Ouellette, André J; Spindler, Katherine R; Parks, William C; Smith, Jason G

    2016-03-01

    α-defensins are abundant antimicrobial peptides with broad, potent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities in vitro. Although their contribution to host defense against bacteria in vivo has been demonstrated, comparable studies of their antiviral activity in vivo are lacking. Using a mouse model deficient in activated α-defensins in the small intestine, we show that Paneth cell α-defensins protect mice from oral infection by a pathogenic virus, mouse adenovirus 1 (MAdV-1). Survival differences between mouse genotypes are lost upon parenteral MAdV-1 infection, strongly implicating a role for intestinal defenses in attenuating pathogenesis. Although differences in α-defensin expression impact the composition of the ileal commensal bacterial population, depletion studies using broad-spectrum antibiotics revealed no effect of the microbiota on α-defensin-dependent viral pathogenesis. Moreover, despite the sensitivity of MAdV-1 infection to α-defensin neutralization in cell culture, we observed no barrier effect due to Paneth cell α-defensin activation on the kinetics and magnitude of MAdV-1 dissemination to the brain. Rather, a protective neutralizing antibody response was delayed in the absence of α-defensins. This effect was specific to oral viral infection, because antibody responses to parenteral or mucosal ovalbumin exposure were not affected by α-defensin deficiency. Thus, α-defensins play an important role as adjuvants in antiviral immunity in vivo that is distinct from their direct antiviral activity observed in cell culture. PMID:26933888

  9. Defensins Potentiate a Neutralizing Antibody Response to Enteric Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Treuting, Piper M.; Bromme, Beth A.; Wilson, Sarah S.; Wiens, Mayim E.; Lu, Wuyuan; Ouellette, André J.; Spindler, Katherine R.; Parks, William C.; Smith, Jason G.

    2016-01-01

    α-defensins are abundant antimicrobial peptides with broad, potent antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activities in vitro. Although their contribution to host defense against bacteria in vivo has been demonstrated, comparable studies of their antiviral activity in vivo are lacking. Using a mouse model deficient in activated α-defensins in the small intestine, we show that Paneth cell α-defensins protect mice from oral infection by a pathogenic virus, mouse adenovirus 1 (MAdV-1). Survival differences between mouse genotypes are lost upon parenteral MAdV-1 infection, strongly implicating a role for intestinal defenses in attenuating pathogenesis. Although differences in α-defensin expression impact the composition of the ileal commensal bacterial population, depletion studies using broad-spectrum antibiotics revealed no effect of the microbiota on α-defensin-dependent viral pathogenesis. Moreover, despite the sensitivity of MAdV-1 infection to α-defensin neutralization in cell culture, we observed no barrier effect due to Paneth cell α-defensin activation on the kinetics and magnitude of MAdV-1 dissemination to the brain. Rather, a protective neutralizing antibody response was delayed in the absence of α-defensins. This effect was specific to oral viral infection, because antibody responses to parenteral or mucosal ovalbumin exposure were not affected by α-defensin deficiency. Thus, α-defensins play an important role as adjuvants in antiviral immunity in vivo that is distinct from their direct antiviral activity observed in cell culture. PMID:26933888

  10. What Lies Beneath: Antibody Dependent Natural Killer Cell Activation by Antibodies to Internal Influenza Virus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vanderven, Hillary A; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Chen, Weisan; Wines, Bruce; Hogarth, P Mark; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C; Parsons, Matthew S; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The conserved internal influenza proteins nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1) are well characterised for T cell immunity, but whether they also elicit functional antibodies capable of activating natural killer (NK) cells has not been explored. We studied NP and M1-specific ADCC activity using biochemical, NK cell activation and killing assays with plasma from healthy and influenza-infected subjects. Healthy adults had antibodies to M1 and NP capable of binding dimeric FcγRIIIa and activating NK cells. Natural symptomatic and experimental influenza infections resulted in a rise in antibody dependent NK cell activation post-infection to the hemagglutinin of the infecting strain, but changes in NK cell activation to M1 and NP were variable. Although antibody dependent killing of target cells infected with vaccinia viruses expressing internal influenza proteins was not detected, opsonising antibodies to NP and M1 likely contribute to an antiviral microenvironment by stimulating innate immune cells to secrete cytokines early in infection. We conclude that effector cell activating antibodies to conserved internal influenza proteins are common in healthy and influenza-infected adults. Given the significance of such antibodies in animal models of heterologous influenza infection, the definition of their importance and mechanism of action in human immunity to influenza is essential. PMID:27428437

  11. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases. PMID:24810855

  12. Antiviral Treatment among Pregnant Women with Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin; Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Schillie, Sarah F.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the antiviral treatment patterns for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) among pregnant and nonpregnant women. Methods. Using 2011 MarketScan claims, we calculated the rates of antiviral treatment among women (aged 10–50 years) with CHB. We described the pattern of antiviral treatment during pregnancy and ≥1 month after delivery. Results. We identified 6274 women with CHB during 2011. Among these, 64 of 507 (12.6%) pregnant women and 1151 of 5767 (20.0%) nonpregnant women received antiviral treatment (P < 0.01). Pregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (73.4%) and lamivudine (21.9%); nonpregnant women were most commonly prescribed tenofovir (50.2%) and entecavir (41.3%) (P < 0.01). Among 48 treated pregnant women with an identifiable delivery date, 16 (33.3%) were prescribed an antiviral before pregnancy and continued treatment for at least one month after delivery; 14 (29.2%) started treatment during the third trimester and continued at least one month after delivery. Conclusion. Among this insured population, pregnant women with CHB received an antiviral significantly less often than nonpregnant women. The most common antiviral prescribed for pregnant women was tenofovir. These data provide a baseline for assessing changes in treatment patterns with anticipated increased use of antivirals to prevent breakthrough perinatal hepatitis B virus infection. PMID:25548510

  13. Potential applications for antiviral therapy and prophylaxis in bovine medicine.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Benjamin W; Walz, Paul H; Givens, M Daniel

    2014-06-01

    Viral disease is one of the major causes of financial loss and animal suffering in today's cattle industry. Increases in global commerce and average herd size, urbanization, vertical integration within the industry and alterations in global climate patterns have allowed the spread of pathogenic viruses, or the introduction of new viral species, into regions previously free of such pathogens, creating the potential for widespread morbidity and mortality in naïve cattle populations. Despite this, no antiviral products are currently commercially licensed for use in bovine medicine, although significant progress has been made in the development of antivirals for use against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) and bovine herpesvirus (BHV). BVDV is extensively studied as a model virus for human antiviral studies. Consequently, many compounds with efficacy have been identified and a few have been successfully used to prevent infection in vivo although commercial development is still lacking. FMDV is also the subject of extensive antiviral testing due to the importance of outbreak containment for maintenance of export markets. Thirdly, BHV presents an attractive target for antiviral development due to its worldwide presence. Antiviral studies for other bovine viral pathogens are largely limited to preliminary studies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of antiviral compounds against several key bovine pathogens and the potential for commercial antiviral applications in the prevention and control of several selected bovine diseases.

  14. Innate Antiviral Defenses Independent of Inducible IFNα/β Production.

    PubMed

    Paludan, Søren R

    2016-09-01

    The type I interferons (IFNs) (IFNα and IFNβ) not only have potent antiviral activities, but also have pathological functions if produced at high levels or over a long time. Recent articles have described antiviral immune mechanisms that are activated in response to virus infection at epithelial surfaces independently of IFNα and IFNβ. This may allow the host to exert rapid local antiviral activity and only induce a full-blown, and potentially pathological, type I IFN response in situations where stronger protective immunity is needed. Here, I describe the emerging understanding of early antiviral defenses, which are independent of type I IFN responses, and also discuss how this enables tissues to exert rapid antiviral activities and to limit type I IFN production. PMID:27345728

  15. The Antiviral Activities and Mechanisms of Marine Polysaccharides: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Shi-Xin; Guan, Hua-Shi

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the studies on the antiviral activities of marine natural products, especially marine polysaccharides, are attracting more and more attention all over the world. Marine-derived polysaccharides and their lower molecular weight oligosaccharide derivatives have been shown to possess a variety of antiviral activities. This paper will review the recent progress in research on the antiviral activities and the mechanisms of these polysaccharides obtained from marine organisms. In particular, it will provide an update on the antiviral actions of the sulfated polysaccharides derived from marine algae including carrageenans, alginates, and fucans, relating to their structure features and the structure–activity relationships. In addition, the recent findings on the different mechanisms of antiviral actions of marine polysaccharides and their potential for therapeutic application will also be summarized in detail. PMID:23235364

  16. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  17. The chemical bases of the various AIDS epidemics: recreational drugs, anti-viral chemotherapy and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Duesberg, Peter; Koehnlein, Claus; Rasnick, David

    2003-06-01

    In 1981 a new epidemic of about two-dozen heterogeneous diseases began to strike non-randomly growing numbers of male homosexuals and mostly male intravenous drug users in the US and Europe. Assuming immunodeficiency as the common denominator the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) termed the epidemic, AIDS, for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. From 1981-1984 leading researchers including those from the CDC proposed that recreational drug use was the cause of AIDS, because of exact correlations and of drug-specific diseases. However, in 1984 US government researchers proposed that a virus, now termed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is the cause of the non-random epidemics of the US and Europe but also of a new, sexually random epidemic in Africa. The virus-AIDS hypothesis was instantly accepted, but it is burdened with numerous paradoxes, none of which could be resolved by 2003: Why is there no HIV in most AIDS patients, only antibodies against it? Why would HIV take 10 years from infection to AIDS? Why is AIDS not self-limiting via antiviral immunity? Why is there no vaccine against AIDS? Why is AIDS in the US and Europe not random like other viral epidemics? Why did AIDS not rise and then decline exponentially owing to antiviral immunity like all other viral epidemics? Why is AIDS not contagious? Why would only HIV carriers get AIDS who use either recreational or anti-HIV drugs or are subject to malnutrition? Why is the mortality of HIV-antibody-positives treated with anti-HIV drugs 7-9%, but that of all (mostly untreated) HIV-positives globally is only 1.4%? Here we propose that AIDS is a collection of chemical epidemics, caused by recreational drugs, anti-HIV drugs, and malnutrition. According to this hypothesis AIDS is not contagious, not immunogenic, not treatable by vaccines or antiviral drugs, and HIV is just a passenger virus. The hypothesis explains why AIDS epidemics strike non-randomly if caused by drugs and randomly if caused by malnutrition

  18. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  19. Novel concept on antiviral strategies to dengue.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chih; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence has revealed that asymptomatic and/or persistent dengue virus (DENV) infections play a role in the cycling pattern of dengue outbreaks. These findings add a new dimension to the continually evolving search for effective prevention strategies in dengue. Disappointing outcomes of clinical trials in anti-dengue modalities have become commonplace. These failures may result from confounding variables and/or unresolved scientific issues that surround dengue, including the replication cycle of DENV in a natural setting, the target cells and reservoir for viral replication in vivo, and the effect of asymptomatic/persistent carriers in the dissemination of dengue. This article sets forth to address these issues using the most updated information available in the literature and to propose a novel antiviral strategy for the prevention and control of dengue. PMID:27284691

  20. Contribution of autophagy to antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Rey-Jurado, Emma; Riedel, Claudia A; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-11-14

    Although identified in the 1960's, interest in autophagy has significantly increased in the past decade with notable research efforts oriented at understanding as to how this multi-protein complex operates and is regulated. Autophagy is commonly defined as a "self-eating" process evolved by eukaryotic cells to recycle senescent organelles and expired proteins, which is significantly increased during cellular stress responses. In addition, autophagy can also play important roles during human diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative and autoimmune disorders. Furthermore, novel findings suggest that autophagy contributes to the host defense against microbial infections. In this article, we review the role of macroautophagy in antiviral immune responses and discuss molecular mechanisms evolved by viral pathogens to evade this process. A role for autophagy as an effector mechanism used both, by innate and adaptive immunity is also discussed.

  1. Antiviral Terpenoid Constituents of Ganoderma pfeifferi.

    PubMed

    Niedermeyer, Timo H J; Lindequist, Ulrike; Mentel, Renate; Gördes, Dirk; Schmidt, Enrico; Thurow, Kerstin; Lalk, Michael

    2005-12-01

    Four sterols and 10 triterpenes were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma pfeifferi, including the three new triterpenes 3,7,11-trioxo-5alpha-lanosta-8,24-diene-26-al (lucialdehyde D, 1), 5alpha-lanosta-8,24-diene-26-hydroxy-3,7-dione (ganoderone A, 2), and 5alpha-lanosta-8-ene-24,25-epoxy-26-hydroxy-3,7-dione (ganoderone C, 3). The structures of 1-3 were determined on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. Antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity were studied for some of the isolated compounds. Ganoderone A (2), lucialdehyde B (4), and ergosta-7,22-dien-3beta-ol (7) were found to exhibit potent inhibitory activity against herpes simplex virus.

  2. Ubiquitination in the Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Meredith E.; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has long been known to regulate fundamental cellular processes through the induction of proteasomal degradation of target proteins. More recently, ‘atypical’ nondegradative types of polyubiquitin chains have been appreciated as important regulatory moieties by modulating the activity or subcellular localization of key signaling proteins. Intriguingly, many of these non-degradative types of ubiquitination regulate the innate sensing pathways initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), ultimately coordinating an effective antiviral immune response. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the functional roles of degradative and atypical types of ubiquitination in innate immunity to viral infections, with a specific focus on the signaling pathways triggered by RIG-I-like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and the intracellular viral DNA sensor cGAS. PMID:25753787

  3. Antiviral activity of alcohol for surface disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moorer, W R

    2003-08-01

    Bacteria and viruses from the patient's mouth travel with dental splatter and spills. A surface disinfectant should possess antiviral activity as well as antibacterial action. Because of frequent and 'open' application in the dental office, such a disinfectant should be non-toxic, non-allergenic and safe for the hygienist. It now appears that high-concentration alcohol mixtures (i.e. 80% ethanol + 5% isopropanol) are not only excellent antibacterials, but quickly inactivate HIV as well as hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Compared to alternative surface disinfectants, use of high-concentration alcohol for the spray-wipe-spray method of surface disinfection in dentistry appears safe and efficient. However, dried matter should be wiped and hydrated first.

  4. Development of novel antivirals against flaviviruses.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Chinmay G; Kuhn, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    Dengue virus is responsible for a significant amount of human disease in predominantly tropical areas of the world. Much effort has focused on the development of vaccines against the four serotypes of dengue, and within the next few years a vaccine is anticipated. Less progress has been made at developing antivirals that might reduce disease severity. Recent advances in the structural biology of dengue virus and other flaviviruses have opened new possibilities for the rational design of small molecule inhibitors of virus replication. This chapter describes the structural attributes of the dengue virion and how knowledge of its structure, assembly, and entry mechanisms are guiding new strategies toward the development of compounds that will interfere with the viral replication process. PMID:17319153

  5. Immunomodulating and antiviral therapy in herpes zoster.

    PubMed

    Topciu, V; Mihăilescu, R

    1996-01-01

    Two groups of patients with herpes zoster were followed up. The first group was subjected, beside a symptomatic therapy, to an immunological and antiviral treatment. The control group was treated only symptomatically. The immunological preparations used were: the immunostimulant SRE (Corynebacterium parvum), which stimulated the lymphocytes and macrophages, Moroxidin (Virustat-Paris) and Antiherpin (interferon inductor), which acted by blocking the virus replication. The preparations were indigenous and atoxic. A significant difference between the courses of disease in the two groups was observed, namely, the severity and duration of subjective and objective symptoms were more than double and followed by persistent neurological sequelae in the control group in comparison with the patients of the experimental group. PMID:9495784

  6. Intracellular Neutralization of Virus by Immunoglobulin A Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazanec, Mary B.; Kaetzel, Charlotte S.; Lamm, Michael E.; Fletcher, David; Nedrud, John G.

    1992-08-01

    IgA is thought to neutralize viruses at the epithelial surface of mucous membranes by preventing their attachment. Since IgA, a polymeric immunoglobulin, is transported through the lining of epithelial cells by the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor and since viruses are obligate intracellular parasites, we hypothesized that IgA antibodies may also interfere with viral replication by binding to newly synthesized viral proteins within infected cells. Polarized monolayers of Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells expressing the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor were infected on the apical surface with Sendai virus. Anti-Sendai virus IgA monoclonal antibody delivered from the basolateral surface colocalized with viral protein within the cell, as documented by immunofluorescence. More importantly, anti-viral IgA reduced virus titers >1000-fold (P < 0.0001) in apical supernatants and >10-fold (P < 0.0001) in cell lysates from monolayers treated with anti-viral IgA compared with those treated with either anti-viral IgG or an irrelevant IgA monoclonal antibody. We believe that the differences in viral titers between cell layers treated with specific IgA, which enters the epithelial cell by binding to the polymeric-immunoglobulin receptor, and those treated with specific IgG, which does not enter the cells, or irrelevant IgA indicate that specific intracellular IgA antibodies can inhibit viral replication. Thus, in addition to the classical role of humoral antibodies in extracellular defense, IgA antibody may be able to neutralize microbial pathogens intracellularly, giving IgA a role in host defense that has traditionally been reserved for cell-mediated immunity.

  7. Litsea Species as Potential Antiviral Plant Sources.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yifu; Wang, Dongying; Tan, Ghee T; Van Hung, Nguyen; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Pezzuto, John M; Fong, Harry H S; Soejarto, Djaja Doel; Zhang, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Litsea verticillata Hance (Lauraceae), a Chinese medicine used to treat swelling caused by injury or by snake bites, was the first plant identified by our National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded International Cooperative Biodiversity Group (ICBG) project to exhibit anti-HIV activities. From this plant, we discovered a class of 8 novel litseane compounds, prototypic sesquiterpenes, all of which demonstrated anti-HIV activities. In subsequent studies, 26 additional compounds of different structural types were identified. During our continuing investigation of this plant species, we identified two new litseanes, litseaverticillols L and M, and a new sesquiterpene butenolide, litseasesquibutenolide. Litseaverticillols L and M were found to inhibit HIV-1 replication, with an IC[Formula: see text] value of 49.6[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M. To further determine the antiviral properties of this plant, several relatively abundant isolates, including a litseane compound, two eudesmane sesquiterpenes and three lignans, were evaluated against an additional 21 viral targets. Lignans 8 and 9 were shown to be active against the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), with EC[Formula: see text] values of 22.0[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M ([Formula: see text]) and 16.2[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]M ([Formula: see text]), respectively. Since many antiviral compounds have been discovered in L. verticillata, we further prepared 38 plant extracts made from the different plant parts of 9 additional Litsea species. These extracts were evaluated for their anti-HIV and cytotoxic activities, and four of the extracts, which ranged across three different species, displayed 97-100% inhibitory effects against HIV replication without showing cytotoxicity to a panel of human cell lines at a concentration of 20 μg/mL. PMID:27080941

  8. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks. PMID:27708647

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Experimental Model Systems and Antiviral drug Research*

    PubMed Central

    Uprichard, Susan L.

    2010-01-01

    An estimated 130 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) making it a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. Because the currently available therapy of pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin is only effective in a subset of patients, the development of new HCV antivirals is a healthcare imperative. This review discusses the experimental models available for HCV antiviral drug research, recent advances in HCV antiviral drug development, as well as active research being pursued to facilitate development of new HCV-specific therapeutics. PMID:20960298

  11. Antivirals for Respiratory Viral Infections: Problems and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Zhou, Yuan-Hong; Ye, Feng; Yang, Zhan-Qiu

    2016-08-01

    In the past two decades, several newly emerging and reemerging viral respiratory pathogens including several influenza viruses (avian influenza and pandemic influenza), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), have continued to challenge medical and public health systems. Thereafter, the development of cost-effective, broad-spectrum antiviral agents is the urgent mission of both virologists and pharmacologists. Current antiviral developments have focused targets on viral entry, replication, release, and intercellular pathways essential for viral life cycle. Here, we review the current literature on challenges and prospects in the development of these antivirals. PMID:27486742

  12. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.   PMID:26982805

  13. The antiviral response to gamma interferon.

    PubMed

    Costa-Pereira, Ana P; Williams, Timothy M; Strobl, Birgit; Watling, Diane; Briscoe, James; Kerr, Ian M

    2002-09-01

    A role for alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) in the IFN-gamma antiviral response has long been suggested. Accordingly, possible roles for autocrine or double-stranded-RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-alpha/beta in the IFN-gamma response were investigated. Use was made of wild-type and a variety of mutant human fibrosarcoma cell lines, including mutant U5A cells, which lack a functional IFN-alpha/beta receptor and hence an IFN-alpha/beta response. IFN-gamma did not induce detectable levels of IFN-alpha/beta in any of the cell lines, nor was the IFN-gamma response per se dependent on autocrine IFN-alpha/beta. On the other hand, a number of responses to dsRNA [poly(I). poly(C)] and encephalomyocarditis virus were greatly enhanced by IFN-gamma pretreatment (priming) of wild-type cells or of mutant cells lacking an IFN-alpha/beta response; these include the primary induction of dsRNA-inducible mRNAs, including IFN-beta mRNA, and, to a lesser extent, the dsRNA-mediated activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase(s). IFN-gamma priming of mRNA induction by dsRNA is dependent on JAK1 and shows biphasic kinetics, with an initial rapid (<30-min) response being followed by a more substantial effect on overnight incubation. The IFN-gamma-primed dsRNA responses appear to be subject to modulation through the p38, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and ERK1/ERK2 MAP kinase pathways. It can be concluded that despite efficient priming of IFN-beta production, the IFN-alpha/beta pathways play no significant role in the primary IFN-gamma antiviral response in these cell-virus systems. The observed IFN-gamma priming of dsRNA responses, on the other hand, will likely play a significant role in combating virus infection in vivo.

  14. Anti-tumor and anti-viral activities of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2013-04-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)-related lectin family, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding specific lectins widespread among monocotyledonous plants, is well-known to possess a broad range of biological functions such as anti-tumor, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities. Herein, we mainly focused on exploring the precise molecular mechanisms by which GNA-related lectins induce cancer cell apoptotic and autophagic death targeting mitochondria-mediated ROS-p38-p53 apoptotic or autophagic pathway, Ras-Raf and PI3K-Akt anti-apoptotic or anti-autophagic pathways. In addition, we further discussed the molecular mechanisms of GNA-related lectins exerting anti-viral activities by blocking the entry of the virus into its target cells, preventing transmission of the virus as well as forcing virus to delete glycan in its envelope protein and triggering neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, these findings may provide a new perspective of GNA-related lectins as potential drugs for cancer and virus therapeutics in the future.

  15. Polyribonucleotide-anthraquinone interactions: in vitro antiviral activity studies.

    PubMed

    Jamison, J M; Krabill, K; Flowers, D G; Tsai, C C

    1990-03-01

    Twelve anthraquinones (AQ) were evaluated for their ability to potentiate the antiviral activity of poly r(A-U) using a human foreskin fibroblast-vesicular stomatitis virus bioassay in which the AQ was combined with 0.2 mM poly r(A-U) to produce an AQ/ribonucleotide ratio of 1/4. Poly r(A-U) and the AQ alone were not effective antiviral agents. Five of the twelve AQs tested, mitoxantrone, adriamycin, ametantrone, carminic acid and daunomycin, enhanced the antiviral activity of poly r(A-U) 9- to 13-fold. The interferon-inducing activity of the five active AQ/poly r(A-U) combinations was equal to the sum of the interferon-inducing activities of their constituents. These five AQs appear to potentiate the antiviral activity of poly r(A-U) without superinduction of interferon. PMID:1693102

  16. HIV resistance to antiviral drugs: public health implications.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Cameron, D W

    1998-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of HIV strains resistant to antiviral drugs has given rise to a number of important concerns distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure. A major issue is the extent to which drug-resistant viruses may be transmitted in primary infection via sexual or intravenous routes and how this relates to the relative fitness of such strains. It is also important to understand the potential role of effective antiviral therapy in the decrease of viral burden in both blood and sexual secretions, and the extent to which this may be compromised in individuals harboring resistant viruses. A related subject is the important role of patient adherence to antiviral therapy in achieving sustained reduction in viral load and preventing the emergence of drug resistance. These linked topics are tied to the central role of antiviral agents in the selection of mutant forms that can attain a replication advantage in the presence of drug.

  17. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-22

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity.

  18. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Nikzad, Sonia; Abdul Kadir, Habsah; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  19. Potential Antiviral Agents from Marine Fungi: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Moghadamtousi, Soheil Zorofchian; Nikzad, Sonia; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-07-01

    Biodiversity of the marine world is only partially subjected to detailed scientific scrutiny in comparison to terrestrial life. Life in the marine world depends heavily on marine fungi scavenging the oceans of lifeless plants and animals and entering them into the nutrient cycle by. Approximately 150 to 200 new compounds, including alkaloids, sesquiterpenes, polyketides, and aromatic compounds, are identified from marine fungi annually. In recent years, numerous investigations demonstrated the tremendous potential of marine fungi as a promising source to develop new antivirals against different important viruses, including herpes simplex viruses, the human immunodeficiency virus, and the influenza virus. Various genera of marine fungi such as Aspergillus, Penicillium, Cladosporium, and Fusarium were subjected to compound isolation and antiviral studies, which led to an illustration of the strong antiviral activity of a variety of marine fungi-derived compounds. The present review strives to summarize all available knowledge on active compounds isolated from marine fungi with antiviral activity. PMID:26204947

  20. Dengue Virus Entry as Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Marijke M. F.; Schols, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections are expanding worldwide and, because of the lack of a vaccine, the search for antiviral products is imperative. Four serotypes of DENV are described and they all cause a similar disease outcome. It would be interesting to develop an antiviral product that can interact with all four serotypes, prevent host cell infection and subsequent immune activation. DENV entry is thus an interesting target for antiviral therapy. DENV enters the host cell through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Several cellular receptors have been proposed, and DC-SIGN, present on dendritic cells, is considered as the most important DENV receptor until now. Because DENV entry is a target for antiviral therapy, various classes of compounds have been investigated to inhibit this process. In this paper, an overview is given of all the putative DENV receptors, and the most promising DENV entry inhibitors are discussed. PMID:22529868

  1. Antiviral agents against equid alphaherpesviruses: Current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Vissani, María A; Thiry, Etienne; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana; Barrandeguy, María

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus infections cause respiratory, neurological and reproductive syndromes. Despite preventive and control measures and the availability of vaccines and immunostimulants, herpesvirus infections still constitute a major threat to equine health and for the equine industry worldwide. Antiviral drugs, particularly nucleoside analogues and foscarnet, are successfully used for the treatment of human alphaherpesvirus infections. In equine medicine, the use of antiviral medications in alphaherpesvirus infections would decrease the excretion of virus and diminish the risk of contagion and the convalescent time in affected horses, and would also improve the clinical outcome of equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy. The combined use of antiviral compounds, along with vaccines, immune modulators, and effective preventive and control measures, might be beneficial in diminishing the negative impact of alphaherpesvirus infections in horses. The purpose of this review is to analyse the available information regarding the use of antiviral agents against alphaherpesviruses, with particular emphasis on equine alphaherpesvirus infections.

  2. Phosphocholine-Specific Antibodies Improve T-Dependent Antibody Responses against OVA Encapsulated into Phosphatidylcholine-Containing Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Leal, Yoelys; López-Requena, Alejandro; Lopetegui-González, Isbel; Machado, Yoan; Alvarez, Carlos; Pérez, Rolando; Lanio, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine have been widely used as adjuvants. Recently, we demonstrated that B-1 cells produce dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-specific IgM upon immunization of BALB/c mice with DPPC-liposomes encapsulating ovalbumin (OVA). Although this preparation enhanced the OVA-specific humoral response, the contribution of anti-DPPC antibodies to this effect was unclear. Here, we demonstrate that these antibodies are secreted by B-1 cells independently of the presence of OVA in the formulation. We also confirm that these antibodies are specific for phosphocholine. The anti-OVA humoral response was partially restored in B-1 cells-deficient BALB/xid mice by immunization with the liposomes opsonized with the serum total immunoglobulin (Ig) fraction containing anti-phosphocholine antibodies, generated in wild-type animals. This result could be related to the increased phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages of the particles opsonized with the serum total Ig or IgM fractions, both containing anti-phosphocholine antibodies. In conclusion, in the present work, it has been demonstrated that phosphocholine-specific antibodies improve T-dependent antibody responses against OVA carried by DPPC-liposomes. PMID:27713745

  3. The Role of Cytokine PF4 in the Antiviral Immune Response of Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulei; Cao, Jiao; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    During viral infection in vertebrates, cytokines play important roles in the host defense against the virus. However, the function of cytokines in invertebrates has not been well characterized. In this study, shrimp cytokines involved in viral infection were screened using a cytokine antibody microarray. The results showed that three cytokines, the Fas receptor (Fas), platelet factor 4 (PF4) and interleukin-22 (IL-22), were significantly upregulated in the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-challenged shrimp, suggesting that these cytokines played positive regulatory roles in the immune response of shrimp against the virus. Further experiments revealed that PF4 had positive effects on the antiviral immunity of shrimp by enhancing the shrimp phagocytic activity and inhibiting the apoptotic activity of virus-infected hemocytes. Therefore, our study presented a novel mechanism of cytokines in the innate immunity of invertebrates. PMID:27631372

  4. The Role of Cytokine PF4 in the Antiviral Immune Response of Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulei; Cao, Jiao; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    During viral infection in vertebrates, cytokines play important roles in the host defense against the virus. However, the function of cytokines in invertebrates has not been well characterized. In this study, shrimp cytokines involved in viral infection were screened using a cytokine antibody microarray. The results showed that three cytokines, the Fas receptor (Fas), platelet factor 4 (PF4) and interleukin-22 (IL-22), were significantly upregulated in the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-challenged shrimp, suggesting that these cytokines played positive regulatory roles in the immune response of shrimp against the virus. Further experiments revealed that PF4 had positive effects on the antiviral immunity of shrimp by enhancing the shrimp phagocytic activity and inhibiting the apoptotic activity of virus-infected hemocytes. Therefore, our study presented a novel mechanism of cytokines in the innate immunity of invertebrates. PMID:27631372

  5. Immune and antibody responses to an isolated capsid protein of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, H L; Moore, D M; McKercher, P D; Polatnick, J

    1975-12-01

    The purified capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 of foot-and-mouth disease virus type A12 strain 119 emulsified with incomplete Freund's adjuvant were studied in swine and guinea pigs. Swine inoculated on days 0, 28, and 60 with 100-mug doses of VP3 were protected by day 82 against exposure to infected swine. Serums from animals inoculated with VP3 contained viral precipitating and neutralizing antibodies, but such serums recognized fewer viral antigenic determinants than did antiviral serums. Capsid proteins VP1 and VP2 did not produce detectable antiviral antibody in guinea pigs, and antiviral antibody responses in swine to a mixture of VP1, VP2, and VP3 were lower than the responses to VP3 alone. However, when swine were inoculated with VP1, VP2, and VP3 separately at different body sites, no interference with the response to VP3 was observed. Vaccine containing VP3 isolated from acetylethylenimine-treated virus appeared less protective for swine than vaccine containing VP3 from nontreated virus. Trypsinized virus, which contains the cleaved peptides VP3a and VP3b rather than intact VP3, produced approximately the same levels of antiviral antibody responses in guinea pigs as did virus. Conversely, an isolated mixture of VP3a and VP3b did not produce detectable antiviral antibody responses in guinea pigs. The VP3a-VP3b mixture did, however, sensitize guinea pigs to elicit such responses following reinoculation with a marginally effective dose of trypsinized virus. PMID:171309

  6. Interferons: Success in anti-viral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan-ching; Young, Howard A

    2014-08-01

    The interferons (IFNs) are glycoproteins with strong antiviral activities that represent one of the first lines of host defense against invading pathogens. These proteins are classified into three groups, Type I, II and III IFNs, based on the structure of their receptors on the cell surface. Due to their ability to modulate immune responses, they have become attractive therapeutic options to control chronic virus infections. In combination with other drugs, Type I IFNs are considered as "standard of care" in suppressing Hepatitis C (HCV) and Hepatitis B (HBV) infections, while Type III IFN has generated encouraging results as a treatment for HCV infection in phase III clinical trials. However, though effective, using IFNs as a treatment is not without the need for caution. IFNs are such powerful cytokines that affect a wide array of cell types; as a result, patients usually experience unpleasant symptoms, with a percentage of patients suffering system wide effects. Thus, constant monitoring is required for patients treated with IFN in order to reach the treatment goals of suppressing virus infection and maintaining quality of life.

  7. Probiotics as Antiviral Agents in Shrimp Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Sai Gopal, D. V. R.

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases. PMID:23738078

  8. The antiviral activities of ISG15

    PubMed Central

    Morales, David J.; Lenschow, Deborah J.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modification is an important strategy for the regulation of the cell proteome independent of the need for new gene expression. Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers mediate the regulation of protein levels, signaling pathways, vesicular trafficking, and many other cellular processes through their covalent conjugation to proteins. Interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) is a type I interferon induced ubiquitin-like modifier. In addition to conjugating to potentially hundreds of target proteins, ISG15 can be found in an unconjugated form both inside of the cell and released from interferon stimulated cells into the extracellular environment. Due to its robust expression after type I interferon stimulation and the broad panel of proteins that it targets, ISG15 has drawn much attention as a potential regulator of the immune response and has been shown to mediate protection in a number of different viral infection models. Here we will review the current state of the field of ISG15, the viruses against which ISG15 mediates protection, and the mechanisms by which ISG15 exerts antiviral activity. PMID:24095857

  9. Optimizing distribution of pandemic influenza antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bismark; Huang, Hsin-Chan; Morton, David P; Johnson, Gregory P; Gutfraind, Alexander; Galvani, Alison P; Clements, Bruce; Meyers, Lauren A

    2015-02-01

    We provide a data-driven method for optimizing pharmacy-based distribution of antiviral drugs during an influenza pandemic in terms of overall access for a target population and apply it to the state of Texas, USA. We found that during the 2009 influenza pandemic, the Texas Department of State Health Services achieved an estimated statewide access of 88% (proportion of population willing to travel to the nearest dispensing point). However, access reached only 34.5% of US postal code (ZIP code) areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. Optimized distribution networks increased expected access to 91% overall and 60% in hard-to-reach regions, and 2 or 3 major pharmacy chains achieved near maximal coverage in well-populated areas. Independent pharmacies were essential for reaching ZIP code areas containing <1,000 underinsured persons. This model was developed during a collaboration between academic researchers and public health officials and is available as a decision support tool for Texas Department of State Health Services at a Web-based interface. PMID:25625858

  10. Probiotics as antiviral agents in shrimp aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Bestha; Viswanath, Buddolla; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-01-01

    Shrimp farming is an aquaculture business for the cultivation of marine shrimps or prawns for human consumption and is now considered as a major economic and food production sector as it is an increasingly important source of protein available for human consumption. Intensification of shrimp farming had led to the development of a number of diseases, which resulted in the excessive use of antimicrobial agents, which is finally responsible for many adverse effects. Currently, probiotics are chosen as the best alternatives to these antimicrobial agents and they act as natural immune enhancers, which provoke the disease resistance in shrimp farm. Viral diseases stand as the major constraint causing an enormous loss in the production in shrimp farms. Probiotics besides being beneficial bacteria also possess antiviral activity. Exploitation of these probiotics in treatment and prevention of viral diseases in shrimp aquaculture is a novel and efficient method. This review discusses the benefits of probiotics and their criteria for selection in shrimp aquaculture and their role in immune power enhancement towards viral diseases.

  11. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20(th) century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  12. Perspective of Use of Antiviral Peptides against Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Heger, Zbynek; Krejcova, Ludmila; Pekarik, Vladimir; Bastl, Karel; Janda, Jozef; Kostolansky, Frantisek; Vareckova, Eva; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The threat of a worldwide influenza pandemic has greatly increased over the past decade with the emergence of highly virulent avian influenza strains. The increased frequency of drug-resistant influenza strains against currently available antiviral drugs requires urgent development of new strategies for antiviral therapy, too. The research in the field of therapeutic peptides began to develop extensively in the second half of the 20th century. Since then, the mechanisms of action for several peptides and their antiviral prospect received large attention due to the global threat posed by viruses. Here, we discussed the therapeutic properties of peptides used in influenza treatment. Peptides with antiviral activity against influenza can be divided into three main groups. First, entry blocker peptides such as a Flupep that interact with influenza hemagglutinin, block its binding to host cells and prevent viral fusion. Second, several peptides display virucidal activity, disrupting viral envelopes, e.g., Melittin. Finally, a third set of peptides interacts with the viral polymerase complex and act as viral replication inhibitors such as PB1 derived peptides. Here, we present a review of the current literature describing the antiviral activity, mechanism and future therapeutic potential of these influenza antiviral peptides. PMID:26492266

  13. Current and new cytomegalovirus antivirals and novel animal model strategies.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alistair

    2010-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant health problem among immunosuppressed individuals. In particular, transplant and AIDS patients and the developing fetus in utero are highly susceptible to CMV. In these vulnerable populations, infection leads to life threatening end organ viral disease or in surviving newborn babies to deafness or to mental retardation. Currently, the most effective way to control CMV infection, given the lack of an effective vaccine, is by antiviral therapy. However, available antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged use, such as drug toxicity as well as the emergence of resistant strains of virus. Additionally, since CMV has multiple complex immune evasion strategies, to avoid innate and adaptive immune responses, there is a need for new antiviral development. Any antiviral should be tested in a controlled animal model but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Consequently, animal CMV in their respective animal host are used to study intervention strategies. In this review, both current and new antiviral strategies are discussed as are the various animal models and strategies to improve existing antiviral animal models by humanizing animal CMV.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  15. Isolation of reovirus T3D mutants capable of infecting human tumor cells independent of junction adhesion molecule-A.

    PubMed

    van den Wollenberg, Diana J M; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; van den Hengel, Sanne K; Cramer, Steve J; de Groot, Raoul J; Hoeben, Rob C

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with a distinctive preference to replicate in and lyse transformed cells. On that account, Reovirus type 3 Dearing (T3D) is clinically evaluated as oncolytic agent. The therapeutic efficacy of this approach depends in part on the accessibility of the reovirus receptor Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) on the target cells. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of reovirus T3D mutants that can infect human tumor cells independent of JAM-A. The JAM-A-independent (jin) mutants were isolated on human U118MG glioblastoma cells, which do not express JAM-A. All jin mutants harbour mutations in the S1 segments close to the region that encodes the sialic acid-binding pocket in the shaft of the spike protein. In addition, two of the jin mutants encode spike proteins with a Q336R substitution in their head domain. The jin mutants can productively infect a wide range of cell lines that resist wt reovirus T3D infection, including chicken LMH cells, hamster CHO cells, murine endothelioma cells, human U2OS and STA-ET2.1 cells, but not primary human fibroblasts. The jin-mutants rely on the presence of sialic-acid residues on the cell surface for productive infection, as is evident from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) inhibition experiments, and from the jin-reovirus resistance of CHO-Lec2 cells, which have a deficiency of sialic-acids on their glycoproteins. The jin mutants may be useful as oncolytic agents for use in tumors in which JAM-A is absent or inaccessible.

  16. Kupffer cell-independent acute hepatocellular oxidative stress and decreased bile formation in post-cold-ischemic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Y; Suematsu, M; Shimazu, M; Kato, Y; Sano, T; Makino, N; Hirano, K I; Naito, M; Wakabayashi, G; Ishimura, Y; Kitajima, M

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine distribution and time history of oxidative stress during the hyperacute period of reperfusion in the liver grafts undergoing cold ischemia and to investigate roles of Kupffer cells as a potential oxidant source. Rat livers were harvested at 4 degrees C in University of Wisconsin solution and followed by reperfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer under monitoring bile excretion. To investigate oxidative changes, laser-confocal microfluorography was performed in reperfused livers preloaded with dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester, a fluorescence precursor sensing intracellular hydroperoxide generation. Livers undergoing the 16-hour cold storage displayed an impaired recovery of bile acid-dependent bile output concurrent with a marked increase in hydroperoxide generation in hepatocytes, which occurred as early as 5 minutes after the onset of reperfusion, whereas the status of lobular perfusion was well maintained. Pretreatment with liposome-encapsulated dichloromethylene diphosphonate, a Kupffer cell-depleting reagent, did neither alter the reperfusion-induced periportal oxidative changes nor improve the recovery of bile output in the graft. On the other hand, EPCK, a hepatotropic antioxidant composed of vitamin E phosphate ester bound to vitamin C, not only diminished the oxidative changes but also improved the reduction of bile acid-dependent bile output. Furthermore, the reagent was capable of inhibiting H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress in cultured hepatocytes. These results suggest that hepatocytes constitute a major site of the oxidative insult triggered through Kupffer cell-independent mechanisms and serve as an important cellular component to be protected by antioxidant therapeutics.

  17. Natural isolates of Brome mosaic virus with the ability to move from cell to cell independently of coat protein.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Atsushi; Nakamura, Wakako; Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Goto, Kaku; Kaido, Masanori; Okuno, Tetsuro; Mise, Kazuyuki

    2005-04-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) requires encapsidation-competent coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement and the 3a movement protein (MP) is involved in determining the CP requirement for BMV movement. However, these conclusions have been drawn by using BMV strain M1 (BMV-M1) and a related strain. Here, the ability of the MPs of five other natural BMV strains to mediate the movement of BMV-M1 in the absence of CP was tested. The MP of BMV M2 strain (BMV-M2) efficiently mediated the movement of CP-deficient BMV-M1 and the MPs of two other strains functioned similarly to some extent. Furthermore, BMV-M2 itself moved between cells independently of CP, demonstrating that BMV-M1 and -M2 use different movement modes. Reassortment between CP-deficient BMV-M1 and -M2 showed the involvement of RNA3 in determining the CP requirement for cell-to-cell movement and the involvement of RNAs 1 and 2 in movement efficiency and symptom induction in the absence of CP. Spontaneous BMV MP mutants generated in planta that exhibited CP-independent movement were also isolated and analysed. Comparison of the nucleotide differences of the MP genes of BMV-M1, the natural strains and mutants capable of CP-independent movement, together with further mutational analysis of BMV-M1 MP, revealed that single amino acid differences at the C terminus of MP are sufficient to alter the requirement for CP in the movement of BMV-M1. Based on these findings, a possible virus strategy in which a movement mode is selected in plant viruses to optimize viral infectivity in plants is discussed.

  18. Isolation of Reovirus T3D Mutants Capable of Infecting Human Tumor Cells Independent of Junction Adhesion Molecule-A

    PubMed Central

    van den Hengel, Sanne K.; Cramer, Steve J.; de Groot, Raoul J.; Hoeben, Rob C.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with a distinctive preference to replicate in and lyse transformed cells. On that account, Reovirus type 3 Dearing (T3D) is clinically evaluated as oncolytic agent. The therapeutic efficacy of this approach depends in part on the accessibility of the reovirus receptor Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) on the target cells. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of reovirus T3D mutants that can infect human tumor cells independent of JAM-A. The JAM-A-independent (jin) mutants were isolated on human U118MG glioblastoma cells, which do not express JAM-A. All jin mutants harbour mutations in the S1 segments close to the region that encodes the sialic acid-binding pocket in the shaft of the spike protein. In addition, two of the jin mutants encode spike proteins with a Q336R substitution in their head domain. The jin mutants can productively infect a wide range of cell lines that resist wt reovirus T3D infection, including chicken LMH cells, hamster CHO cells, murine endothelioma cells, human U2OS and STA-ET2.1 cells, but not primary human fibroblasts. The jin-mutants rely on the presence of sialic-acid residues on the cell surface for productive infection, as is evident from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) inhibition experiments, and from the jin-reovirus resistance of CHO-Lec2 cells, which have a deficiency of sialic-acids on their glycoproteins. The jin mutants may be useful as oncolytic agents for use in tumors in which JAM-A is absent or inaccessible. PMID:23110175

  19. Selective utilization of Toll-like receptor and MyD88 signaling in B cells for enhancement of the anti-viral germinal center response

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Baidong; Saudan, Philippe; Ott, Gary; Wheeler, Matthew L.; Ji, Ming; Kuzmich, Lili; Lee, Linda M.; Coffman, Robert L.; Bachmann, Martin F.; DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The contribution of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling to T cell-dependent (TD) antibody responses was assessed by using mice lacking the TLR signaling adaptor MyD88 in individual cell types. When a soluble TLR9 ligand was used as adjuvant for a protein antigen, MyD88 was required in dendritic cells but not in B cells to enhance the TD antibody response, regardless of the inherent immunogenicity of the antigen. In contrast, a TLR9 ligand contained within a virus-like particle substantially augmented the TD germinal center IgG antibody response, and this augmentation required B cell MyD88. The ability of B cells to discriminate between antigens based the physical form of a TLR ligand likely reflects an adaptation to facilitate strong anti-viral antibody responses. PMID:21353603

  20. A murine model of coxsackievirus A16 infection for anti-viral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingwei; Shi, Jinping; Huang, Xulin; Liu, Fei; Cai, Yicun; Lan, Ke; Huang, Zhong

    2014-05-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) is one of the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which is a common infectious disease in children. CA16 infection may lead to severe nervous system damage and even death in humans. However, study of the pathogenesis of CA16 infection and development of vaccines and anti-viral agents are hindered partly by the lack of an appropriate small animal model. In the present study, we developed and characterized a murine model of CA16 infection. We show that neonatal mice are susceptible to CA16 infection via intraperitoneal inoculation. One-day-old mice infected with 2×10(6)TCID50 of CA16/SZ05 strain consistently exhibited clinical signs, including reduced mobility, and limb weakness and paralysis. About 57% of the mice died within 14days after infection. Significant damage in the brainstem, limb muscles and intestines of the infected mice in the moribund state was observed by histological examination, and the presence of CA16 in neurons of the brainstem was demonstrated by immunohistochemical staining with a CA16-specific polyclonal antibody, strongly suggesting the involvement of the central nervous system in CA16 infection. Analysis of virus titers in various organs/tissues collected at 3, 6 and 9days post-infection, showed that skeletal muscle was the major site of virus replication at the early stage of infection, while the virus mainly accumulated in the brain at the late stage. In addition, susceptibility of mice to CA16 infection was found to be age dependent. Moreover, different CA16 strains could exhibit varied virulence in vivo. Importantly, we demonstrated that post-exposure treatment with an anti-CA16 monoclonal antibody fully protected mice against lethal CA16 infection. Collectively, these results indicate the successful development of a CA16 infection mouse model for anti-viral evaluation. PMID:24583030

  1. High antiviral effects of hibiscus tea extract on the H5 subtypes of low and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    BAATARTSOGT, Tugsbaatar; BUI, Vuong N.; TRINH, Dai Q.; YAMAGUCHI, Emi; GRONSANG, Dulyatad; THAMPAISARN, Rapeewan; OGAWA, Haruko; IMAI, Kunitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Viral neuraminidase inhibitors are widely used as synthetic anti-influenza drugs for the prevention and treatment of influenza. However, drug-resistant influenza A virus variants, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs), have been reported. Therefore, the discovery of novel and effective antiviral agents is warranted. We screened the antiviral effects of 11 herbal tea extracts (hibiscus, black tea, tencha, rosehip tea, burdock tea, green tea, jasmine tea, ginger tea, lavender tea, rose tea and oak tea) against the H5N1 HPAIV in vitro. Among the tested extracts, only the hibiscus extract and its fractionated extract (frHibis) highly and rapidly reduced the titers of all H5 HPAIVs and low pathogenic AIVs (LPAIVs) used in the pre-treatment tests of Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells that were inoculated with a mixture of the virus and the extract. Immunogold electron microscopy showed that anti-H5 monoclonal antibodies could not bind to the deformed H5 virus particles pretreated with frHibis. In post-treatment tests of MDCK cells cultured in the presence of frHibis after infection with H5N1 HPAIV, the frHibis inhibited viral replication and the expression of viral antigens and genes. Among the plants tested, hibiscus showed the most prominent antiviral effects against both H5 HPAIV and LPAIV. PMID:27193820

  2. Generation of a recombinant classical swine fever virus stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene for quantitative antiviral assay.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liang; Li, Yongfeng; Chen, Jianing; Li, Chao; Huang, Junhua; Luo, Yuzi; Sun, Yuan; Li, Su; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2014-09-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF), caused by classical swine fever virus (CSFV), is a highly contagious swine disease leading to significant economic losses worldwide. Vaccines are widely used to control the disease, and no CSFV-specific antivirals are currently available. To facilitate anti-CSFV molecule discovery, we developed a reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc stably expressing the firefly luciferase (Fluc) gene in the N(pro) gene. The reporter virus enabled more sensitive and convenient detection of the N(pro) protein expression and the viral replication by luciferase reporter assay than by traditional methods. The CSFV N(pro) protein was detectable as early as 4.5h post-infection. As a proof-of-concept for its utility in rapid antiviral screening, this reporter virus was used to quantify anti-CSFV neutralizing antibodies of 50 swine sera and to assess 12 small interfering RNAs targeting different regions of the CSFV genome. The results were comparable to those obtained by traditional methods. Taken together, the reporter virus CSFV-N(pro)Fluc represents a useful tool for rapid and quantitative screening and evaluation of antivirals against CSFV.

  3. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-01-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E. helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  4. Influenza antiviral susceptibility monitoring activities in relation to national antiviral stockpiles in Europe during the winter 2006/2007 season.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A; Lackenby, A; Hay, A; Zambon, M

    2007-04-01

    Due to the influenza pandemic threat, many countries are stockpiling antivirals in the hope of limiting the impact of a future pandemic virus. Since resistance to antiviral drugs would probably significantly alter the effectiveness of antivirals, surveillance programmes to monitor the emergence of resistance are of considerable importance. During the 2006/2007 influenza season, an inventory was conducted by the European Surveillance Network for Vigilance against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) in collaboration with the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) to evaluate antiviral susceptibility testing by the National Influenza Reference Laboratories (NIRL) in relation to the national antiviral stockpile in 30 European countries that are members of EISS. All countries except Ukraine had a stockpile of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) oseltamivir. Additionally, four countries had a stockpile of the NAI zanamivir and three of the M2 ion channel inhibitor rimantadine. Of 29 countries with a NAI stockpile, six countries' NIRLs could determine virus susceptibility by 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) and in 13 countries it could be done by sequencing. Only in one of the three countries with a rimantadine stockpile could the NIRL determine virus susceptibility, by sequencing only. However, including the 18 countries that had plans to introduce or extend antiviral susceptibility testing, the NIRLs of 21 of the 29 countries with a stockpile would be capable of susceptibility testing appropriate to the stockpiled drug by the end of the 2007/2008 influenza season. Although most European countries in this study have stockpiles of influenza antivirals, susceptibility surveillance capability by the NIRLs appropriate to the stockpiled antivirals is limited. PMID:17991386

  5. The SARS-coronavirus papain-like protease: structure, function and inhibition by designed antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Báez-Santos, Yahira M; St John, Sarah E; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2015-03-01

    Over 10 years have passed since the deadly human coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV) emerged from the Guangdong Province of China. Despite the fact that the SARS-CoV pandemic infected over 8500 individuals, claimed over 800 lives and cost billions of dollars in economic loss worldwide, there still are no clinically approved antiviral drugs, vaccines or monoclonal antibody therapies to treat SARS-CoV infections. The recent emergence of the deadly human coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS-CoV) is a sobering reminder that new and deadly coronaviruses can emerge at any time with the potential to become pandemics. Therefore, the continued development of therapeutic and prophylactic countermeasures to potentially deadly coronaviruses is warranted. The coronaviral proteases, papain-like protease (PLpro) and 3C-like protease (3CLpro), are attractive antiviral drug targets because they are essential for coronaviral replication. Although the primary function of PLpro and 3CLpro are to process the viral polyprotein in a coordinated manner, PLpro has the additional function of stripping ubiquitin and ISG15 from host-cell proteins to aid coronaviruses in their evasion of the host innate immune responses. Therefore, targeting PLpro with antiviral drugs may have an advantage in not only inhibiting viral replication but also inhibiting the dysregulation of signaling cascades in infected cells that may lead to cell death in surrounding, uninfected cells. This review provides an up-to-date discussion on the SARS-CoV papain-like protease including a brief overview of the SARS-CoV genome and replication followed by a more in-depth discussion on the structure and catalytic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLpro, the multiple cellular functions of SARS-CoV PLpro, the inhibition of SARS-CoV PLpro by small molecule inhibitors, and the prospect of inhibiting papain-like protease from other coronaviruses. This paper forms part of a series of

  6. Alteration of Antiviral Signalling by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of Mitochondrial Antiviral Signalling Protein (MAVS)

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fei; Matsumiya, Tomoh; Hayakari, Ryo; Yoshida, Hidemi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Takahashi, Ippei; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variation is associated with diseases. As a type of genetic variation occurring with certain regularity and frequency, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is attracting more and more attention because of its great value for research and real-life application. Mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS) acts as a common adaptor molecule for retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), which can recognize foreign RNA, including viral RNA, leading to the induction of type I interferons (IFNs). Therefore, MAVS is thought to be a crucial molecule in antiviral innate immunity. We speculated that genetic variation of MAVS may result in susceptibility to infectious diseases. To assess the risk of viral infection based on MAVS variation, we tested the effects of twelve non-synonymous MAVS coding-region SNPs from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database that result in amino acid substitutions. We found that five of these SNPs exhibited functional alterations. Additionally, four resulted in an inhibitory immune response, and one had the opposite effect. In total, 1,032 human genomic samples obtained from a mass examination were genotyped at these five SNPs. However, no homozygous or heterozygous variation was detected. We hypothesized that these five SNPs are not present in the Japanese population and that such MAVS variations may result in serious immune diseases. PMID:26954674

  7. Maternal IgG and IgA Antibodies Dampen Mucosal T Helper Cell Responses in Early Life.

    PubMed

    Koch, Meghan A; Reiner, Gabrielle L; Lugo, Kyler A; Kreuk, Lieselotte S M; Stanbery, Alison G; Ansaldo, Eduard; Seher, Thaddeus D; Ludington, William B; Barton, Gregory M

    2016-05-01

    To maintain a symbiotic relationship between the host and its resident intestinal microbiota, appropriate mucosal T cell responses to commensal antigens must be established. Mice acquire both IgG and IgA maternally; the former has primarily been implicated in passive immunity to pathogens while the latter mediates host-commensal mutualism. Here, we report the surprising observation that mice generate T cell-independent and largely Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent IgG2b and IgG3 antibody responses against their gut microbiota. We demonstrate that maternal acquisition of these antibodies dampens mucosal T follicular helper responses and subsequent germinal center B cell responses following birth. This work reveals a feedback loop whereby T cell-independent, TLR-dependent antibodies limit mucosal adaptive immune responses to newly acquired commensal antigens and uncovers a broader function for maternal IgG. PMID:27153495

  8. Impaired antibody response after immunization of HIV-infected individuals with the polysaccharide vaccine against Salmonella typhi (Typhim-Vi).

    PubMed

    Kroon, F P; van Dissel, J T; Ravensbergen, E; Nibbering, P H; van Furth, R

    1999-08-01

    Infections with Salmonella species, including Salmonella typhi, are more frequently observed in HIV-infected individuals than in healthy individuals. HIV-infected individuals were vaccinated with polysaccharide vaccine against Salmonella typhi (Typhim-Vi) which is assumed to be a T-cell-independent antigen. We found that the antibody response in patients with < 200 x 10(6)/l CD4+ T lymphocytes was significantly lower compared with patients with > or = 200 x 10(6)/l CD4+ T lymphocytes and healthy controls. The antibody response after vaccination with the polysaccharide salmonella Vi-antigen was correlated with the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes and therefore Typhim-Vi can be considered to be a T-cell-independent type 2 antigen. The results of this study indicate that after vaccination the proportion of HIV-infected individuals with protective antibody concentrations against Salmonella typhi will be lower than in healthy controls.

  9. Antiviral macrophage responses in flavivirus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ashhurst, Thomas Myles; Vreden, Caryn van; Munoz-Erazo, Luis; Niewold, Paula; Watabe, Kanami; Terry, Rachael L; Deffrasnes, Celine; Getts, Daniel R; Cole King, Nicholas Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Mosquito-borne flaviviruses are a major current and emerging threat, affecting millions of people worldwide. Global climate change, combined with increasing proximity of humans to animals and mosquito vectors by expansion into natural habitats, coupled with the increase in international travel, have resulted in significant spread and concomitant increase in the incidence of infection and severe disease. Although neuroinvasive disease has been well described for some viral infections such as Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV) and West Nile virus (WNV), others such as dengue virus (DENV) have recently displayed an emerging pattern of neuroinvasive disease, distinct from the previously observed, systemically-induced encephalomyelopathy. In this setting, the immune response is a crucial component of host defence, in preventing viral dissemination and invasion of the central nervous system (CNS). However, subversion of the anti-viral activities of macrophages by flaviviruses can facilitate viral replication and spread, enhancing the intensity of immune responses, leading to severe immune-mediated disease which may be further exacerbated during the subsequent infection with some flaviviruses. Furthermore, in the CNS myeloid cells may be responsible for inducing specific inflammatory changes, which can lead to significant pathological damage during encephalitis. The interaction of virus and cells of the myeloid lineage is complex, and this interaction is likely responsible at least in part, for crucial differences between viral clearance and pathology. Recent studies on the role of myeloid cells in innate immunity and viral control, and the mechanisms of evasion and subversion used by flaviviruses are rapidly advancing our understanding of the immunopathological mechanisms involved in flavivirus encephalitis and will lead to the development of therapeutic strategies previously not considered. PMID:24434318

  10. Antiviral effect of ranpirnase against Ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Thomas; Draper, Ken; Brasel, Trevor; Freiberg, Alexander; Squiquera, Luis; Sidransky, David; Sulley, Jamie; Taxman, Debra J

    2016-08-01

    The recent epidemic of Ebola has intensified the need for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics that prolong and improve survival against deadly viral diseases. We sought to determine whether ranpirnase, an endoribonuclease from Rana pipiens with a demonstrated human safety profile in phase III oncology trials, can reduce titers of Ebola virus (EBOV) in infected cells, protect mice against mouse-adapted EBOV challenge, and reduce virus levels in infected mice. Our results demonstrate that 0.50 μg/ml ranpirnase is potently effective at reducing EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection in cultured Vero E6 cells (Selectivity Index 47.8-70.2). In a prophylactic study, a single intravenous dose of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase protected 70% of mice from progressive infection. Additionally, in a post-exposure prophylactic study, 100% of female mice survived infection after intraperitoneal administration of 0.1 mg/kg ranpirnase for ten days beginning 1 h post challenge. Most of the male counterparts were sacrificed due to weight loss by Study Day 8 or 9; however, the Clinical Activity/Behavior scores of these mice remained low and no significant microscopic pathologies could be detected in the kidneys, livers or spleens. Furthermore, live virus could not be detected in the sera of ranpirnase-treated mice by Study Day 8 or in the kidneys, livers or spleens by Study Day 12, and viral RNA levels declined exponentially by Study Day 12. Because ranpirnase is exceptionally stable and has a long track record of safe intravenous administration to humans, this drug provides a promising new candidate for clinical consideration in the treatment of Ebola virus disease alone or in combination with other therapeutics. PMID:27350309

  11. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  12. Cyclin D1 is dispensable for G1 control in retinoblastoma gene-deficient cells independently of cdk4 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, J; Bartkova, J; Rohde, M; Strauss, M; Bartek, J

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the regulator-versus-target relationship in the cyclin D1/cdk4/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway, we examined fibroblasts from RB-1 gene-deficient and RB-1 wild-type littermate mouse embryos (ME) and in human tumor cell lines that differed in the status of the RB-1 gene. The RB+/+ and RB-/- ME fibroblasts expressed similar protein levels of D-type cyclins, cdk4, and cdk6, showed analogous spectra and abundance of cellular proteins complexed with cdk4 and/or cyclins D1 and D2, and exhibited comparable associated kinase activities. Of the two human cell lines established from the same sarcoma biopsy, the RB-positive SKUT1B cells contained cdk4 that was mainly associated with D-type cyclins, contrary to a predominant cdk4-p16INK4 complex in the RB-deficient SKUT1A cells. Antibody-mediated neutralization of cyclin D1 arrested the RB-positive ME and SKUT1B cells in G1, whereas this cyclin appeared dispensable in the RB-deficient ME and SKUT1A cells. Lack of requirement for cyclin D1 therefore correlated with absence of functional pRB, regardless of whether active cyclin D1/cdk4 holoenzyme was present in the cells under study. Consistent with a potential role of cyclin D/cdk4 in phosphorylation of pRB, monoclonal anti-cyclin D1 antibodies supporting the associated kinase activity failed to significantly affect proliferation of RB-positive cells, whereas the antibody DCS-6, unable to coprecipitate cdk4, efficiently inhibited G1 progression and prevented pRB phosphorylation in vivo. These data provide evidence for an upstream control function of cyclin D1/cdk4, and a downstream role for pRB, in the order of events regulating transition through late G1 phase of the mammalian cell division cycle. PMID:7739541

  13. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: Nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-01-01

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~69%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (p<0.05~0.005) of A-LCP NPs, suggests excellent in vivo efficacy. Whereas, two free drugs (ACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug. PMID:23791977

  14. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-09-28

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~70%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (p<0.05-0.005) of A-LCP NPs, suggests excellent in vivo efficacy. Whereas, two free drugs (ACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug.

  15. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  16. Pharmacological and biological antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Pinkert, Sandra; Geisler, Anja; Poller, Wolfgang; Kurreck, Jens

    2011-10-11

    Subtype B coxsackieviruses (CVB) represent the most commonly identified infectious agents associated with acute and chronic myocarditis, with CVB3 being the most common variant. Damage to the heart is induced both directly by virally mediated cell destruction and indirectly due to the immune and autoimmune processes reacting to virus infection. This review addresses antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections discovered over the last 25 years. One group represents pharmacologically active low molecular weight substances that inhibit virus uptake by binding to the virus capsid (e.g., pleconaril) or inactivate viral proteins (e.g., NO-metoprolol and ribavirin) or inhibit cellular proteins which are essential for viral replication (e.g., ubiquitination inhibitors). A second important group of substances are interferons. They have antiviral but also immunomodulating activities. The third and most recently discovered group includes biological and cellular therapeutics. Soluble receptor analogues (e.g., sCAR-Fc) bind to the virus capsid and block virus uptake. Small interfering RNAs, short hairpin RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides bind to and led to degradation of the viral RNA genome or cellular RNAs, thereby preventing their translation and viral replication. Most recently mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to possess antiviral activity in CVB3 infections. Taken together, a number of antiviral therapeutics has been developed for the treatment of myocardial CVB infection in recent years. In addition to low molecular weight inhibitors, biological therapeutics have become promising anti-viral agents.

  17. Cytomegalovirus Antivirals and Development of Improved Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Alistair; Choi, K. Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes a life long asymptomatic infection in healthy individuals. Infection of immunesuppressed individuals causes serious illness. Transplant and AIDS patients are highly susceptible to CMV leading to life threatening end organ disease. Another vulnerable population is the developing fetus in utero, where congenital infection can result in surviving newborns with long term developmental problems. There is no vaccine licensed for CMV and current antivirals suffer from complications associated with prolonged treatment. These include drug toxicity and emergence of resistant strains. There is an obvious need for new antivirals. Candidate intervention strategies are tested in controlled pre-clinical animal models but species specificity of HCMV precludes the direct study of the virus in an animal model. Areas covered This review explores the current status of CMV antivirals and development of new drugs. This includes the use of animal models and the development of new improved models such as humanized animal CMV and bioluminescent imaging of virus in animals in real time. Expert Opinion Various new CMV antivirals are in development, some with greater spectrum of activity against other viruses. Although the greatest need is in the setting of transplant patients there remains an unmet need for a safe antiviral strategy against congenital CMV. This is especially important since an effective CMV vaccine remains an elusive goal. In this capacity greater emphasis should be placed on suitable pre-clinical animal models and greater collaboration between industry and academia. PMID:21883024

  18. Antiviral responses of arthropod vectors: an update on recent advances.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fazakerley, John K; Fragkoudis, Rennos

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, biting midges and sand flies, transmit many viruses that can cause outbreaks of disease in humans and animals around the world. Arthropod vector species are invading new areas due to globalisation and environmental changes, and contact between exotic animal species, humans and arthropod vectors is increasing, bringing with it the regular emergence of new arboviruses. For future strategies to control arbovirus transmission, it is important to improve our understanding of virus-vector interactions. In the last decade knowledge of arthropod antiviral immunity has increased rapidly. RNAi has been proposed as the most important antiviral response in mosquitoes and it is likely to be the most important antiviral response in all arthropods. However, other newly-discovered antiviral strategies such as melanisation and the link between RNAi and the JAK/STAT pathway via the cytokine Vago have been characterised in the last few years. This review aims to summarise the most important and most recent advances made in arthropod antiviral immunity. PMID:25674592

  19. Antiviral responses of arthropod vectors: an update on recent advances.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Claudia; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Fazakerley, John K; Fragkoudis, Rennos

    2014-01-01

    Arthropod vectors, such as mosquitoes, ticks, biting midges and sand flies, transmit many viruses that can cause outbreaks of disease in humans and animals around the world. Arthropod vector species are invading new areas due to globalisation and environmental changes, and contact between exotic animal species, humans and arthropod vectors is increasing, bringing with it the regular emergence of new arboviruses. For future strategies to control arbovirus transmission, it is important to improve our understanding of virus-vector interactions. In the last decade knowledge of arthropod antiviral immunity has increased rapidly. RNAi has been proposed as the most important antiviral response in mosquitoes and it is likely to be the most important antiviral response in all arthropods. However, other newly-discovered antiviral strategies such as melanisation and the link between RNAi and the JAK/STAT pathway via the cytokine Vago have been characterised in the last few years. This review aims to summarise the most important and most recent advances made in arthropod antiviral immunity.

  20. Pharmacological and biological antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections.

    PubMed

    Fechner, Henry; Pinkert, Sandra; Geisler, Anja; Poller, Wolfgang; Kurreck, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Subtype B coxsackieviruses (CVB) represent the most commonly identified infectious agents associated with acute and chronic myocarditis, with CVB3 being the most common variant. Damage to the heart is induced both directly by virally mediated cell destruction and indirectly due to the immune and autoimmune processes reacting to virus infection. This review addresses antiviral therapeutics for cardiac coxsackievirus infections discovered over the last 25 years. One group represents pharmacologically active low molecular weight substances that inhibit virus uptake by binding to the virus capsid (e.g., pleconaril) or inactivate viral proteins (e.g., NO-metoprolol and ribavirin) or inhibit cellular proteins which are essential for viral replication (e.g., ubiquitination inhibitors). A second important group of substances are interferons. They have antiviral but also immunomodulating activities. The third and most recently discovered group includes biological and cellular therapeutics. Soluble receptor analogues (e.g., sCAR-Fc) bind to the virus capsid and block virus uptake. Small interfering RNAs, short hairpin RNAs and antisense oligonucleotides bind to and led to degradation of the viral RNA genome or cellular RNAs, thereby preventing their translation and viral replication. Most recently mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to possess antiviral activity in CVB3 infections. Taken together, a number of antiviral therapeutics has been developed for the treatment of myocardial CVB infection in recent years. In addition to low molecular weight inhibitors, biological therapeutics have become promising anti-viral agents. PMID:21989310

  1. Modelling Virus and Antibody Dynamics during Dengue Virus Infection Suggests a Role for Antibody in Virus Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Clapham, Hannah E; Dorigatti, Ilaria; Simmons, Cameron P; Ferguson, Neil M

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is an infection of increasing global importance, yet uncertainty remains regarding critical aspects of its virology, immunology and epidemiology. One unanswered question is how infection is controlled and cleared during a dengue infection. Antibody is thought to play a role, but little past work has examined the kinetics of both virus and antibody during natural infections. We present data on multiple virus and antibody titres measurements recorded sequentially during infection from 53 Vietnamese dengue patients. We fit mechanistic mathematical models of the dynamics of viral replication and the host immune response to these data. These models fit the data well. The model with antibody removing virus fits the data best, but with a role suggested for ADCC or other infected cell clearance mechanisms. Our analysis therefore shows that the observed viral and antibody kinetics are consistent with antibody playing a key role in controlling viral replication. This work gives quantitative insight into the relationship between antibody levels and the efficiency of viral clearance. It will inform the future development of mechanistic models of how vaccines and antivirals might modify the course of natural dengue infection. PMID:27213681

  2. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L.; Kwilas, Steve A.; Josleyn, Matthew D.; Hammerbeck, Christopher D.; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W.; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  3. Antiviral Biologic Produced in DNA Vaccine/Goose Platform Protects Hamsters Against Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome When Administered Post-exposure.

    PubMed

    Haese, Nicole; Brocato, Rebecca L; Henderson, Thomas; Nilles, Matthew L; Kwilas, Steve A; Josleyn, Matthew D; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Schiltz, James; Royals, Michael; Ballantyne, John; Hooper, Jay W; Bradley, David S

    2015-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) and ANDV-like viruses are responsible for most hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) cases in South America. Recent studies in Chile indicate that passive transfer of convalescent human plasma shows promise as a possible treatment for HPS. Unfortunately, availability of convalescent plasma from survivors of this lethal disease is very limited. We are interested in exploring the concept of using DNA vaccine technology to produce antiviral biologics, including polyclonal neutralizing antibodies for use in humans. Geese produce IgY and an alternatively spliced form, IgYΔFc, that can be purified at high concentrations from egg yolks. IgY lacks the properties of mammalian Fc that make antibodies produced in horses, sheep, and rabbits reactogenic in humans. Geese were vaccinated with an ANDV DNA vaccine encoding the virus envelope glycoproteins. All geese developed high-titer neutralizing antibodies after the second vaccination, and maintained high-levels of neutralizing antibodies as measured by a pseudovirion neutralization assay (PsVNA) for over 1 year. A booster vaccination resulted in extraordinarily high levels of neutralizing antibodies (i.e., PsVNA80 titers >100,000). Analysis of IgY and IgYΔFc by epitope mapping show these antibodies to be highly reactive to specific amino acid sequences of ANDV envelope glycoproteins. We examined the protective efficacy of the goose-derived antibody in the hamster model of lethal HPS. α-ANDV immune sera, or IgY/IgYΔFc purified from eggs, were passively transferred to hamsters subcutaneously starting 5 days after an IM challenge with ANDV (25 LD50). Both immune sera, and egg-derived purified IgY/IgYΔFc, protected 8 of 8 and 7 of 8 hamsters, respectively. In contrast, all hamsters receiving IgY/IgYΔFc purified from normal geese (n=8), or no-treatment (n=8), developed lethal HPS. These findings demonstrate that the DNA vaccine/goose platform can be used to produce a candidate antiviral biological product

  4. Current and novel antiviral strategies for influenza infection.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hui-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A and B viruses are major causes for respiratory infections in children and adults. Viral and host factors determine clinical manifestations which range from self-resolving uncomplicated infections, severe viral or bacterial secondary pneumonia, to death. Emergence of transmissible resistant variants and time-dependent effectiveness are the major challenges for the currently approved antivirals, M2 ion channel blockers and neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors. Favipiravir that inhibits the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of multiple RNA viruses is approved in Japan against influenza strains resistant to available antivirals. With expanded knowledge on viral nucleoprotein (NP) and polymerase structures, novel small molecule inhibitors targeting NP oligomer formation, PA endonuclease domain, and the PB2 cap-binding domain are being developed. Combination therapy with different antiviral compounds or with host immune response modulators may further benefit clinical outcomes.

  5. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses.

  6. Antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis B in China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Wang, Junzhong; Yang, Dongliang

    2015-02-01

    The vaccination program against hepatitis B virus (HBV) has greatly reduced the incidence of HBV infection. However, almost one-fourth of the HBV infected patients worldwide are still located in China. The healthcare burden from chronic HBV infection is a big challenge for the Chinese government and clinicians. Antiviral therapy plays a central role in controlling chronic HBV infection and preventing the disease progression. However, due to the specific economic and medical system issues, the first-line antiviral agents recommended by the AASLD and EASL have not been widely used for Chinese patients. In this review, we will discuss some key issues in the area of antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B in China. PMID:25540038

  7. Antiviral selection in the management of acute retinal necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Patrick MK; Hooper, Claire Y; Lightman, Susan

    2010-01-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal antiviral regimen in the management of acute retinal necrosis, a disease caused by herpetic viruses with devastating consequences for the eye. The current gold standard is based on retrospective case series. Because the incidence of disease is low, few well-designed, randomized trials have evaluated treatment dosage and duration. Newer oral antiviral agents are emerging as alternatives to high-dose intravenous acyclovir, avoiding the need for inpatient intravenous treatment. Drug resistance is uncommon but may also be difficult to identify. Antiviral drugs have few side effects, but special attention needs to be paid to patients who have underlying renal disease, are pregnant or are immunocompromised. PMID:20169044

  8. Antiviral defense in shrimp: from innate immunity to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pei-Hui; Huang, Tianzhi; Zhang, Xiaobo; He, Jian-Guo

    2014-08-01

    The culture of penaeid shrimp is rapidly developing as a major business endeavor worldwide. However, viral diseases have caused huge economic loss in penaeid shrimp culture industries. Knowledge of shrimp innate immunity and antiviral responses has made important progress in recent years, allowing the design of better strategies for the prevention and control of shrimp diseases. In this study, we have updated information on shrimp antiviral immunity and interactions between shrimp hosts and viral pathogens. Current knowledge and recent progress in immune signaling pathways (e.g., Toll/IMD-NF-κB and JAK-STAT signaling pathways), RNAi, phagocytosis, and apoptosis in shrimp antiviral immunity are discussed. The mechanism of viral infection in shrimp hosts and the interactions between viruses and shrimp innate immune systems are also analyzed.

  9. An innate antiviral pathway acting before interferons at epithelial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Marie B; Reinert, Line S; Thomsen, Martin K; Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nandakumar, Ramya; Cheshenko, Natalia; Prabakaran, Thaneas; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Krzyzowska, Malgosha; Kratholm, Sine K; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Petersen, Steen V; Goriely, Stanislas; Bibby, Bo Martin; Eriksson, Kristina; Ruland, Jürgen; Thomsen, Allan R; Herold, Betsy C; Wandall, Hans H; Frische, Sebastian; Holm, Christian K; Paludan, Søren R

    2016-02-01

    Mucosal surfaces are exposed to environmental substances and represent a major portal of entry for microorganisms. The innate immune system is responsible for early defense against infections and it is believed that the interferons (IFNs) constitute the first line of defense against viruses. Here we identify an innate antiviral pathway that works at epithelial surfaces before the IFNs. The pathway is activated independently of known innate sensors of viral infections through a mechanism dependent on viral O-linked glycans, which induce CXCR3 chemokines and stimulate antiviral activity in a manner dependent on neutrophils. This study therefore identifies a previously unknown layer of antiviral defense that exerts its action on epithelial surfaces before the classical IFN response is operative.

  10. Commensal bacteria calibrate the activation threshold of innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; Osborne, Lisa C; Monticelli, Laurel A; Doering, Travis A; Alenghat, Theresa; Sonnenberg, Gregory F; Paley, Michael A; Antenus, Marcelo; Williams, Katie L; Erikson, Jan; Wherry, E John; Artis, David

    2012-07-27

    Signals from commensal bacteria can influence immune cell development and susceptibility to infectious or inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which commensal bacteria regulate protective immunity after exposure to systemic pathogens remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibiotic-treated (ABX) mice exhibit impaired innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses and substantially delayed viral clearance after exposure to systemic LCMV or mucosal influenza virus. Furthermore, ABX mice exhibited severe bronchiole epithelial degeneration and increased host mortality after influenza virus infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of macrophages isolated from ABX mice revealed decreased expression of genes associated with antiviral immunity. Moreover, macrophages from ABX mice exhibited defective responses to type I and type II IFNs and impaired capacity to limit viral replication. Collectively, these data indicate that commensal-derived signals provide tonic immune stimulation that establishes the activation threshold of the innate immune system required for optimal antiviral immunity.

  11. Ubiquitin in the activation and attenuation of innate antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection activates danger signals that are transmitted via the retinoic acid–inducible gene 1–like receptor (RLR), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) protein signaling cascades. This places host cells in an antiviral posture by up-regulating antiviral cytokines including type-I interferon (IFN-I). Ubiquitin modifications and cross-talk between proteins within these signaling cascades potentiate IFN-I expression, and inversely, a growing number of viruses are found to weaponize the ubiquitin modification system to suppress IFN-I. Here we review how host- and virus-directed ubiquitin modification of proteins in the RLR, NLR, and TLR antiviral signaling cascades modulate IFN-I expression. PMID:26712804

  12. The Antiviral Effect of Baicalin on Enterovirus 71 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Tingting; Jin, Yue; Cheng, Jianpin; Wan, Changbiao; Qian, Weihe; Xing, Fei; Shi, Weifeng

    2015-01-01

    Baicalin is a flavonoid compound extracted from Scutellaria roots that has been reported to possess antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral activities. However, the antiviral effect of baicalin on enterovirus 71 (EV71) is still unknown. In this study, we found that baicalin showed inhibitory activity on EV71 infection and was independent of direct virucidal or prophylactic effect and inhibitory viral absorption. The expressions of EV71/3D mRNA and polymerase were significantly blocked by baicalin treatment at early stages of EV71 infection. In addition, baicalin could decrease the expressions of FasL and caspase-3, as well as inhibit the apoptosis of EV71-infected human embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells. Altogether, these results indicate that baicalin exhibits potent antiviral effect on EV71 infection, probably through inhibiting EV71/3D polymerase expression and Fas/FasL signaling pathways. PMID:26295407

  13. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Linero, Florencia N.; Sepúlveda, Claudia S.; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C.; Scolaro, Luis A.; Damonte, Elsa B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection. PMID:23170173

  14. [Chitosan antiviral activity: dependence on structure and depolymerization method].

    PubMed

    Davydova, V N; Nagorskaia, V P; Gorbach, V I; Kalitnik, A A; Reunov, A V; Solov'eva, T F; Ermak, I M

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic (the action of lysozyme) and chemical (hydrogen peroxide) hydrolysis of chitosans with various degree ofacetylation (DA)--25, 17, and 1.5%--was performed. Purification and fractioning of the hydrolysis products were performed using dialysis, ultrafiltration, and gel-penetrating chromatography Low-molecular (LM) derivatives of the polysaccharide with molecular masses from 17 to 2 kDa were obtained. The study of their antiviral activity against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) showed that these samples inhibited the formation of local necroses induced by the virus for 50-90%. The antiviral activity of the LM chitosans significantly increased with the lowering of their polymerization degree. Furthermore, the products of the enzymatic hydrolysis possessed higher activity than the chitosan samples obtained as a result of chemical hydrolysis. It was revealed that the exhibition of the antiviral activity weakly depended on the degree of acetylation of the samples.

  15. Origins and Evolution of tetherin, an Orphan Antiviral Gene.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Venkatesh, Siddarth; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-10

    Tetherin encodes an interferon-inducible antiviral protein that traps a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses at infected cell surfaces. Despite the absence of any clearly related gene or activity, we describe possible scenarios by which tetherin arose that exemplify how protein modularity, evolvability, and robustness can create and preserve new functions. We find that tetherin genes in various organisms exhibit no sequence similarity and share only a common architecture and location in modern genomes. Moreover, tetherin is part of a cluster of three potential sister genes encoding proteins of similar architecture, some variants of which exhibit antiviral activity while others can be endowed with antiviral activity by a simple modification. Only in slowly evolving species (e.g., coelacanths) does tetherin exhibit sequence similarity to one potential sister gene. Neofunctionalization, drift, and genetic conflict appear to have driven a near complete loss of sequence similarity among modern tetherin genes and their sister genes. PMID:27427209

  16. Phytochemistry, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of Eleusine indica (sambau)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iberahim, Rashidah; Yaacob, Wan Ahmad; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    Goose grass also known as Eleusine indica (EI) is a local medicinal plant that displays antioxidant, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. The present study is to determine the phytochemical constituents, cytotoxicity and antiviral activities for both crude extract and fraction obtained from the plant. The crude extract contained more secondary metabolites compared to the hexane fraction as gauged using standard phytochemical tests. Cytotoxicity screening against Vero cells using MTT assay showed that the CC50 values for crude extract and hexane fraction were 2.07 and 5.62 mg/ml respectively. The antiviral activity towards Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) was determined using plaque reduction assay. The selective indices (SI = CC50 / EC50) for both methanol extract and hexane fraction were 12.2 and 6.2 respectively. These results demonstrate that the extract prepared from E. indica possesses phytochemical compound that was non cytotoxic to the cell with potential antiviral activity.

  17. Antiviral Drugs for Viruses Other Than Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Razonable, Raymund R.

    2011-01-01

    Most viral diseases, with the exception of those caused by human immunodeficiency virus, are self-limited illnesses that do not require specific antiviral therapy. The currently available antiviral drugs target 3 main groups of viruses: herpes, hepatitis, and influenza viruses. With the exception of the antisense molecule fomivirsen, all antiherpes drugs inhibit viral replication by serving as competitive substrates for viral DNA polymerase. Drugs for the treatment of influenza inhibit the ion channel M2 protein or the enzyme neuraminidase. Combination therapy with Interferon-α and ribavirin remains the backbone treatment for chronic hepatitis C; the addition of serine protease inhibitors improves the treatment outcome of patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Chronic hepatitis B can be treated with interferon or a combination of nucleos(t)ide analogues. Notably, almost all the nucleos(t) ide analogues for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B possess anti–human immunodeficiency virus properties, and they inhibit replication of hepatitis B virus by serving as competitive substrates for its DNA polymerase. Some antiviral drugs possess multiple potential clinical applications, such as ribavirin for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C and respiratory syncytial virus and cidofovir for the treatment of cytomegalovirus and other DNA viruses. Drug resistance is an emerging threat to the clinical utility of antiviral drugs. The major mechanisms for drug resistance are mutations in the viral DNA polymerase gene or in genes that encode for the viral kinases required for the activation of certain drugs such as acyclovir and ganciclovir. Widespread antiviral resistance has limited the clinical utility of M2 inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza infections. This article provides an overview of clinically available antiviral drugs for the primary care physician, with a special focus on pharmacology, clinical uses, and adverse effects. PMID

  18. RNA interference-mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity in invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Arabinda; Tassetto, Michel; Kunitomi, Mark; Andino, Raul

    2013-01-01

    In invertebrates such as insects and nematodes, RNA interference (RNAi) provides RNA-based protection against viruses. This form of immunity restricts viral replication and dissemination from infected cells and viruses, in turn, have evolved evasion mechanisms or RNAi suppressors to counteract host defenses. Recent advances indicate that, in addition to RNAi, other related small RNA pathways contribute to antiviral functions in invertebrates. This has led to a deeper understanding of fundamental aspects of small RNA-based antiviral immunity in invertebrates and its contribution to viral spread and pathogenesis.

  19. Antiviral, antifungal and antiprotozoal agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Jose Elias; García-Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2007-03-01

    Among the antimicrobial agents, antibacterials are the most frequently mentioned in cinematographic plots. Nevertheless, it is not uncommon to come across other antiviral agents, especially antiretrovirals and antiprotozoals. We analyzed the presence of antiviral and antifungal agents in different commercial films, both when they were merely mentioned in passing and when they played a major role in the film. This review essentially aims to address the historical portrayal of these agents in film and to list their appearances. The fictional treatments that appear in some films are not addressed.

  20. Interactions between natural killer cells and antibody Fc result in enhanced antibody neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Forthal, Donald N; Landucci, Gary; Phan, Tran B; Becerra, Juan

    2005-02-01

    Antibodies can prevent lentivirus infections in animals and may play a role in controlling viral burden in established infection. In preventing and particularly in controlling infection, antibodies likely function in the presence of large quantities of virus. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize large inocula of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on different target cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from HIV-infected patients was tested for neutralizing activity against primary R5 strains of HIV-1 at inocula ranging from 100 to 20,000 50% tissue culture infective doses. At all virus inocula, inhibition by antibody was enhanced when target cells for virus growth were monocyte-depleted, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) rather than CD4(+) lymphocytes. However, enhanced inhibition on PBMCs was greatest with larger amounts of virus. Depleting PBMCs of natural killer (NK) cells, which express Fc receptors for IgG (FcgammaRs), abrogated the enhanced antibody inhibition, whereas adding NK cells to CD4(+) lymphocytes restored inhibition. There was no enhanced inhibition on PBMCs when F(ab')(2) was used. Further experiments demonstrated that the release of beta-chemokines, most likely through FcgammaR triggering of NK cells, contributed modestly to the antiviral activity of antibody on PBMCs and that antibody-coated virus adsorbed to uninfected cells provided a target for NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1. These results indicate that Fc-FcgammaR interactions enhance the ability of antibody to neutralize HIV-1. Since FcgammaR-bearing cells are always present in vivo, FcgammaR-mediated antibody function may play a role in the ability of antibody to control lentivirus infection.

  1. Interactions between Natural Killer Cells and Antibody Fc Result in Enhanced Antibody Neutralization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Phan, Tran B.; Becerra, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies can prevent lentivirus infections in animals and may play a role in controlling viral burden in established infection. In preventing and particularly in controlling infection, antibodies likely function in the presence of large quantities of virus. In this study, we explored the mechanisms by which antibodies neutralize large inocula of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on different target cells. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from HIV-infected patients was tested for neutralizing activity against primary R5 strains of HIV-1 at inocula ranging from 100 to 20,000 50% tissue culture infective doses. At all virus inocula, inhibition by antibody was enhanced when target cells for virus growth were monocyte-depleted, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) rather than CD4+ lymphocytes. However, enhanced inhibition on PBMCs was greatest with larger amounts of virus. Depleting PBMCs of natural killer (NK) cells, which express Fc receptors for IgG (FcγRs), abrogated the enhanced antibody inhibition, whereas adding NK cells to CD4+ lymphocytes restored inhibition. There was no enhanced inhibition on PBMCs when F(ab′)2 was used. Further experiments demonstrated that the release of β-chemokines, most likely through FcγR triggering of NK cells, contributed modestly to the antiviral activity of antibody on PBMCs and that antibody-coated virus adsorbed to uninfected cells provided a target for NK cell-mediated inhibition of HIV-1. These results indicate that Fc-FcγR interactions enhance the ability of antibody to neutralize HIV-1. Since FcγR-bearing cells are always present in vivo, FcγR-mediated antibody function may play a role in the ability of antibody to control lentivirus infection. PMID:15681406

  2. Pharmacokinetics of antiviral polyoxometalates in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, L; Boudinot, F D; Boudinot, S G; Henson, G W; Bossard, G E; Martellucci, S A; Ash, P W; Fricker, S P; Darkes, M C; Theobald, B R

    1994-01-01

    Polyoxometalates are soluble mineral compounds formed principally of oxide anions and early transition metal cations. The polyoxometalates K12H2[P2W12O48].24H2O (JM 1591), K10[P2W18Zn4(H2O)2O68].20H2O (JM 1596), and [(CH3)3NH]8[Si2W18Nb6O77] (JM 2820) demonstrate potent antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus in vitro. The preclinical pharmacokinetics of these three compounds were characterized after single-dose intravenous administration of 50 mg/kg to rats. Plasma, urine, and feces were collected for 168 h, and polyoxometalate concentrations were determined by atomic emission. Serum protein binding was measured by equilibrium dialysis. All three compounds were highly bound to serum proteins in a concentration-dependent manner. Total and unbound concentrations of the three compounds in plasma declined in a triexponential manner with terminal half-lives of 246.0 +/- 127.0, 438.4 +/- 129.4, and 32.2 +/- 5.37 h (mean +/- standard deviation) for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Systemic clearances based on total concentrations in plasma were low, averaging 0.016 +/- 0.002, 0.015 +/- 0.002, and 0.018 +/- 0.003 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. The clearances of unbound compounds from plasma averaged 0.966 +/- 0.136, 0.050 +/- 0.005, and 0.901 +/- 0.165 liter/h/kg for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. For JM 1596, the clearance of unbound compound from the kidneys was lower than the glomerular filtration rate (0.086 liter/h/kg), suggesting this polyoxometalate underwent renal tubular reabsorption. However, JM 1591 and JM 2820 appeared to undergo tubular secretion. The fraction of the dose recovered in urine was 11.5, 46.8, and 10.6% for JM 1591, JM 1596, and JM 2820, respectively. Approximately 5% of the dose of each polyoxometalate was recovered in feces. The steady-state volume of distribution based on total concentrations averaged 1.44 liters

  3. New Study Shows Clinicians Under-Prescribing Flu Antiviral Drugs and Possibly Overprescribing Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should Know About Flu Antiviral Drugs Antiviral Drug Supply Mixing Tamiflu Capsules Drug Resistance Information for Health ... The Flu Season Seasonal Influenza, More Information Vaccine Supply for 2015-2016 Season Seasonal Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations ...

  4. Identification of Alpha Interferon-Induced Genes Associated with Antiviral Activity in Daudi Cells and Characterization of IFIT3 as a Novel Antiviral Gene ▿

    PubMed Central

    Schmeisser, H.; Mejido, J.; Balinsky, C. A.; Morrow, A. N.; Clark, C. R.; Zhao, T.; Zoon, K. C.

    2010-01-01

    A novel assay was developed for Daudi cells in which the antiviral (AV) and antiproliferative (AP) activities of interferon (IFN) can be measured simultaneously. Using this novel assay, conditions allowing IFN AV protection but no growth inhibition were identified and selected. Daudi cells were treated under these conditions, and gene expression microarray analyses were performed. The results of the analysis identified 25 genes associated with IFN-α AV activity. Upregulation of 23 IFN-induced genes was confirmed by using reverse transcription-PCR. Of 25 gene products, 17 were detected by Western blotting at 24 h. Of the 25 genes, 10 have not been previously linked to AV activity of IFN-α. The most upregulated gene was IFIT3 (for IFN-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 3). The results from antibody neutralizing experiments suggested an association of the identified genes with IFN-α AV activity. This association was strengthened by results from IFIT3-small interfering RNA transfection experiments showing decreased expression of IFIT3 and a reduction in the AV activity induced by IFN-α. Overexpression of IFIT3 resulted in a decrease of virus titer. Transcription of AV genes after the treatment of cells with higher concentrations of IFN having an AP effect on Daudi cells suggested pleiotropic functions of identified gene products. PMID:20686046

  5. SIGNIFICANCE OF BIVALENCE OF ANTIBODY IN VIRAL NEUTRALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Robert W.; Nisonoff, Alfred; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1971-01-01

    The role of bivalence of antibody in its capacity to neutralize virus was studied with rabbit antibodies to the bacteriophage, φX174. Univalent Fab or Fab' fragments of IgG isolated from antiviral antisera obtained early in the immunization schedule had virtually no activity compared to that of the intact IgG. When the antibodies were isolated from antisera of the same rabbits several months later, the univalent fragments and IgG were essentially equal in activity. The results are interpreted on the basis that an IgG molecule, because of its bivalence, has a higher effective combining affinity (avidity) than a univalent fragment. After prolonged immunization, however, the affinity of univalent antibody becomes sufficiently high that it exceeds a threshold value, above which further increase in affinity, through bivalence, is no longer significant. The results could explain the variability in relative effectiveness of univalent antibodies observed in previous studies. These data, and the fact that F(ab')2 fragments from either "early" or "late" antisera were as effective as IgG, indicate that fragment Fc is not a significant factor in neutralization. No differences in dissociation from the virus of univalent antibody from early and late antisera could be demonstrated by dilution at temperatures up to 47°C. The attachment at sites of neutralization on the virus appears to be functionally almost irreversible in this system. PMID:5166611

  6. Potential therapeutic use of antibodies directed towards HuIFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Billiau, A

    1997-01-01

    IFN-gamma is an important regulator of immune responses and inflammation. Studies in animal models of inflammation, autoimmunity, cancer, transplant rejection and delayed-type hypersensitivity have indicated that administration of antibodies against IFN-gamma can prevent the occurrence of diseases or alleviate disease manifestations. Therefore, it is speculated that such antibodies may have therapeutical efficacy in human diseases. Since animal-derived antibodies are immunogenic in patients several strategies are being developed in order to reduce or abolish this human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. In our laboratory, we have constructed a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) derived from a mouse antibody with neutralizing potential for human IFN-gamma. A scFv consists of only variable domains tethered together by a flexible linker. The scFv was demonstrated to neutralize the antiviral activity of HuIFN-gamma in vitro and therefore might be considered as a candidate for human therapy.

  7. Natural selection drives extremely rapid evolution in antiviral RNAi genes.

    PubMed

    Obbard, Darren J; Jiggins, Francis M; Halligan, Daniel L; Little, Tom J

    2006-03-21

    RNA interference (RNAi) is perhaps best known as a laboratory tool. However, RNAi-related pathways represent an antiviral component of innate immunity in both plants and animals. Since viruses can protect themselves by suppressing RNAi, interaction between RNA viruses and host RNAi may represent an ancient coevolutionary "arms race." This could lead to strong directional selection on RNAi genes, but to date their evolution has not been studied. By comparing DNA sequences from different species of Drosophila, we show that the rate of amino acid evolution is substantially elevated in genes related to antiviral RNAi function (Dcr2, R2D2, and Ago2). They are among the fastest evolving 3% of all Drosophila genes; they evolve significantly faster than other components of innate immunity and faster than paralogous genes that mediate "housekeeping" functions. Based on DNA polymorphism data from three species of Drosophila, McDonald-Kreitman tests showed that this rapid evolution is due to strong positive selection. Furthermore, Dcr2 and Ago2 display reduced genetic diversity, indicative of a recent selective sweep in both genes. Together, these data show rapid adaptive evolution of the antiviral RNAi pathway in Drosophila. This is a signature of host-pathogen arms races and implies that the ancient battle between RNA viruses and host antiviral RNAi genes is active and significant in shaping RNAi function.

  8. Synergistic antiviral activity of gemcitabine and ribavirin against enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunju; Kim, Chonsaeng; Kim, Dong-eun; Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Miri; Choi, Kwangman; Kang, Mingu; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Hae Soo; Shin, Jin Soo; Kim, Janghwan; Han, Sang-Bae; Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Su Ui; Lee, Chong-Kyo; Kim, Meehyein; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Cho, Sungchan

    2015-12-01

    Enteroviruses are major causative agents of various human diseases, and some of them are currently considered to be an enormous threat to public health. However, no effective therapy is currently available for the treatment of these infections. We identified gemcitabine, a nucleoside-analog drug used for cancer treatment, from a screen of bioactive chemicals as a novel inhibitor of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and enterovirus 71 (EV71). Gemcitabine potently inhibited the proliferation of CVB3 and EV71, as well as the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons, in cells with a low micromolar IC50 (1-5 μM). Its strong inhibitory effect was also observed in cells infected with human rhinoviruses, demonstrating broad-spectrum antiviral effects on enteroviruses. Mechanistically, an extensive analysis excluded the involvement of 2C, 3A, IRES-dependent translation, and also that of polyprotein processing in the antiviral effects of gemcitabine. Importantly, gemcitabine in combination with ribavirin, an antiviral drug currently being used against a few RNA viruses, exhibited a synergistic antiviral effect on the replication of CVB3 and EV71 replicons. Consequently, our results clearly demonstrate a new indication for gemcitabine as an effective broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses and strongly suggest a new therapeutic strategy using gemcitabine alone or in combination with ribavirin for the treatment of various diseases associated with enterovirus infection.

  9. Novel drug delivery approaches on antiviral and antiretroviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pooja; Chawla, Anuj; Arora, Sandeep; Pawar, Pravin

    2012-01-01

    Viruses have the property to replicate very fast in host cell. It can attack any part of host cell. Therefore, the clinical efficacy of antiviral drugs and its bioavailability is more important concern taken into account to treat viral infections. The oral and parenteral routes of drug administration have several shortcomings, however, which could lead to the search for formulating better delivery systems. Now, a day's novel drug delivery systems (NDDS) proved to be a better approach to enhance the effectiveness of the antivirals and improve the patient compliance and decrease the adverse effect. The NDDS have reduced the dosing frequency and shorten the duration of treatment, thus, which could lead the treatment more cost-effective. The development of NDDS for antiviral and antiretroviral therapy aims to deliver the drug devoid of toxicity, with high compatibility and biodegradability, targeting the drug to specific sites for viral infection and in some instances it also avoid the first pass metabolism effect. This article aims to discuss the usefulness of novel delivery approaches of antiviral agents such as niosomes, microspheres, microemulsions, nanoparticles that are used in the treatment of various Herpes viruses and in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. PMID:23057001

  10. Evaluation of antiseptic antiviral activity of chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Geller, Chloé; Finance, Chantal; Duval, Raphaël Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    Antiviral antisepsis and disinfection are crucial for preventing the environmental spread of viral infections. Emerging viruses and associated diseases, as well as nosocomial viral infections, have become a real issue in medical fields, and there are very few efficient and specific treatments available to fight most of these infections. Another issue is the potential environmental resistance and spread of viral particles. Therefore, it is essential to properly evaluate the efficacy of antiseptics-disinfectants (ATS-D) on viruses. ATS-D antiviral activity is evaluated by (1) combining viruses and test product for an appropriately defined and precise contact time, (2) neutralizing product activity, and (3) estimating the loss of viral infectivity. A germicide can be considered to have an efficient ATS-D antiviral activity if it induces a >3 or >4 log(10) reduction (American and European regulatory agency requirements, respectively) in viral titers in a defined contact time. This unit describes a global methodology for evaluating chemical ATS-D antiviral activity.

  11. 75 FR 16151 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  12. Novel antiviral activity of baicalein against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dengue is a serious arboviral disease currently with no effective antiviral therapy or approved vaccine available. Therefore, finding the effective compound against dengue virus (DENV) replication is very important. Among the natural compounds, bioflavonoids derived mainly from plants are of interest because of their biological and medicinal benefits. Methods In the present study, antiviral activity of a bioflavonoid, baicalein, was evaluated against different stages of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) replication in Vero cells using focus forming unit reduction assay and quantitative RT-PCR. Results Baicalein inhibited DENV-2 replication in Vero cells with IC50= 6.46 μg/mL and SI= 17.8 when added after adsorption to the cells. The IC50 against DENV-2 was 5.39 μg/mL and SI= 21.3 when cells were treated 5 hours before virus infection and continuously up to 4 days post infection. Baicalein exhibited direct virucidal effect against DENV-2 with IC 50= 1.55 μg/mL and showed anti-adsorption effect with IC50 = 7.14 μg/mL. Conclusions Findings presented here suggest that baicalein exerts potent antiviral activity against DENV. Baicalein possesses direct virucidal activity against DENV besides its effects against dengue virus adsorption and intracellular replication of DENV-2. Baicalein, hence, should be considered for in vivo evaluation in the development of an effective antiviral compound against DENV. PMID:23140177

  13. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  14. HIV resistance to antiviral drugs: public health implications.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Cameron, D W

    1998-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of HIV strains resistant to antiviral drugs has given rise to a number of important concerns distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure. A major issue is the extent to which drug-resistant viruses may be transmitted in primary infection via sexual or intravenous routes and how this relates to the relative fitness of such strains. It is also important to understand the potential role of effective antiviral therapy in the decrease of viral burden in both blood and sexual secretions, and the extent to which this may be compromised in individuals harboring resistant viruses. A related subject is the important role of patient adherence to antiviral therapy in achieving sustained reduction in viral load and preventing the emergence of drug resistance. These linked topics are tied to the central role of antiviral agents in the selection of mutant forms that can attain a replication advantage in the presence of drug. PMID:16904396

  15. 76 FR 14027 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  16. 76 FR 14026 - Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to...

  17. Chromatographic methods for the bioanalysis of antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Riley, C M; Ault, J M; Klutman, N E

    1990-10-12

    The present review has concentrated on chromatographic techniques for the quantitative determination of antiviral drugs in biological samples. Special attention has been paid to the elements of chromatographic assays that are essential to ensure selectivity, sensitivity, accuracy and precision of the various methods. Wherever possible, attempts have been made to determine the suitability of the methods for application to investigations in pharmacokinetics in man and experimental animals, biopharmaceutics, therapeutic drug monitoring, metabolism and pharmacology. Because of the serious consequences of infection from material contaminated with viruses, special consideration has been given to the handling of contaminated samples. It was convenient to divide the antiviral drugs for the purpose of this review into two groups, the nucleoside and the non-nucleoside antiviral drugs. The nucleosides discussed are vidarabine, cytarabine, ribavirin, riboxamide, acyclovir, ganciclovir, desciclovir, carbovir, 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine, 2',3'-dideoxycytidine, zidovudine, 2',3'-dideoxyinosine, 2',3'-didehydro-3'-deoxythymidine, idoxuridine, 5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine, 2'-fluoro-5-iodoaracytidine and 5-iodo-2'-deoxycytidine. The non-nucleoside antiviral drugs discussed are arildone, amantidine, rimantidine, moroxydine, enviroxime, foscarnet and ampligen. PMID:2258420

  18. Adenovirus infection reverses the antiviral state induced by human interferon.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1987-04-01

    HeLa cells treated with human lymphoblastoid interferon do not synthesize poliovirus proteins. The antiviral state against poliovirus is reversed if cells are previously infected with adenovirus type 5. A late gene product seems to be involved in this reversion, since no effect is observed at early stages of infection or in the presence of aphidicolin.

  19. Liposomal Systems as Nanocarriers for the Antiviral Agent Ivermectin

    PubMed Central

    Croci, Romina; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Chan, Kitti Wing Ki; Watanabe, Satoru; Pezzullo, Margherita; Mastrangelo, Eloise; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    RNA virus infections can lead to the onset of severe diseases such as fever with haemorrhage, multiorgan failure, and mortality. The emergence and reemergence of RNA viruses continue to pose a significant public health threat worldwide with particular attention to the increasing incidence of flaviviruses, among others Dengue, West Nile Virus, and Yellow Fever viruses. Development of new and potent antivirals is thus urgently needed. Ivermectin, an already known antihelminthic drug, has shown potent effects in vitro on Flavivirus helicase, with EC50 values in the subnanomolar range for Yellow Fever and submicromolar EC50 for Dengue Fever, Japanese encephalitis, and tick-borne encephalitis viruses. However ivermectin is hampered in its application by pharmacokinetic problems (little solubility and high cytotoxicity). To overcome such problems we engineered different compositions of liposomes as ivermectin carriers characterizing and testing them on several cell lines for cytotoxicity. The engineered liposomes were less cytotoxic than ivermectin alone and they showed a significant increase of the antiviral activity in all the Dengue stains tested (1, 2, and S221). In the current study ivermectin is confirmed to be an effective potential antiviral and liposomes, as drug carriers, are shown to modulate the drug activity. All together the results represent a promising starting point for future improvement of ivermectin as antiviral and its delivery. PMID:27242902

  20. Antiviral medication in sexually transmitted diseases. Part I: HSV, HPV.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczyk-Bonikowska, Beata; Majewska, Anna; Malejczyk, Magdalena; Mlynarczyk, Grazyna; Majewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are one of the most prevalent infectious diseases in the world and important cause of morbidity and mortality. Especially STDs of viral etiology are difficult to cure. In many cases the antiviral therapy can relieve the symptoms but not eliminate the virus. During the past decades, considerable progress has been made in the development of antiviral drugs. One of the oldest antiviral medications is acyclovir (ACV). It is approved to treat initial and recurrent genital herpes and as a suppressive therapy in severe recurrent genital infections as well. Drug resistance to ACV and related drugs is seen among immunocompromised hosts, including human immunodeficiency virus HIV-infected patients. Resistant infections can be managed by second-line drugs - foscarnet or cidofovir- but they are more toxic than ACV. In case of HPV there is not known specific target for the medication and that is why the substances used in human papilloma virus HPV infection therapy are either antimitotics or immunomodulators. The Part I review focuses on mechanisms of actions and mechanisms of resistance to antiviral agents used in a treatment of the genital herpes and genital HPV infection. In Part II we will show the therapeutic options in other sexually transmitted infections: hepatitis B, C and HIV. PMID:24032509

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  2. AVPpred: collection and prediction of highly effective antiviral peptides.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Nishant; Qureshi, Abid; Kumar, Manoj

    2012-07-01

    In the battle against viruses, antiviral peptides (AVPs) had demonstrated the immense potential. Presently, more than 15 peptide-based drugs are in various stages of clinical trials. Emerging and re-emerging viruses further emphasize the efforts to accelerate antiviral drug discovery efforts. Despite, huge importance of the field, no dedicated AVP resource is available. In the present study, we have collected 1245 peptides which were experimentally checked for antiviral activity targeting important human viruses like influenza, HIV, HCV and SARS, etc. After removing redundant peptides, 1056 peptides were divided into 951 training and 105 validation data sets. We have exploited various peptides sequence features, i.e. motifs and alignment followed by amino acid composition and physicochemical properties during 5-fold cross validation using Support Vector Machine. Physiochemical properties-based model achieved maximum 85% accuracy and 0.70 Matthew's Correlation Coefficient (MCC). Performance of this model on the experimental validation data set showed 86% accuracy and 0.71 MCC which is far better than the general antimicrobial peptides prediction methods. Therefore, AVPpred-the first web server for predicting the highly effective AVPs would certainly be helpful to researchers working on peptide-based antiviral development. The web server is freely available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/avppred. PMID:22638580

  3. Cytotoxicity and antiviral activity of methanol extract from Polygonum minus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Noor Zarina Abd; Bunawan, Hamidun; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2015-09-01

    A study was carried out to test the cytotoxicity and antiviral effects of methanolic extracts from the leaves and stem of Polygonum minus or kesum. Cytotoxicity tests were performed on Vero cells indicates the LC50 value for leaf extract towards the Vero cells was 875 mg/L and the LC50 value for stem extract was 95 mg/L. The LC50 values indidcate the non-cytotoxic effect of the extracts and worth for further testing. Antiviral test were carried out towards herpes simplex virus infected Vero cells using three concentration of extract which were equivalent to 1.0 LC50, 0.1 LC50 and 0.01 LC50. Three different treatments to detect antiviral activity were used. Mild antiviral activity of the stem extract was detected when cells were treated for 24 hours with plant extract before viral infection. This demonstrates the capability of the test compound to protect the cells from viral attachment and of the possible prophylactic effect of the P. minus stem methanol extract.

  4. Gutsy Microbes Fly High in the Antiviral War.

    PubMed

    Robalino, Javier; Wu, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    The importance of microbiomes in health and disease is now well appreciated. New work from Sansone and colleagues adds to this understanding by showing that gut microbes are key for the local induction of an ERK-dependent antiviral response in flies. PMID:26690611

  5. Synthesis and antiviral evaluation of bisnoradamantane sulfites and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Torres, Eva; Guardiola, Salvador; Naesens, Lieve; Vázquez, Santiago

    2011-03-01

    The reaction of a series of 1,2-diols with thionyl chloride led to bisnoradamantane sulfites in very good yields. The reaction has also been applied to related polycyclic scaffolds. The compounds have been tested for antiviral activity but none of them showed to be active. Several attempts to generate and trap SO from these polycyclic sulfites have been unsuccessful.

  6. [Coincidence of a chronic Hepatitis C and an autoimmune Hepatitis Type 3 - successful therapy with the new direct-acting antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Dikopoulos, N; Zizer, E

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection may be associated with several features of autoimmunity (i. e., detection of different kinds of autoantibodies in the serum). Hepatitis C is also associated with different autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, lichen ruber planus, and membranous glomerulonephritis being the most relevant. There are very few cases of a coincidence of chronic hepatitis C with an autoimmune hepatitis, that is usually diagnosed by detection of specific autoantibodies and typical histological features. During the time of interferon-based antiviral therapies, we often faced a therapeutic dilemma as interferon could lead to an exacerbation of the coincident autoimmune disease. So, in these cases, a prophylactic immunosuppression had to be started before initiation of interferon therapy. Meanwhile, in the new era of direct antiviral agents against hepatitis C, highly specific and effective therapeutic options are available. The case report presented here describes the very rare coincidence of a chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1 with an autoimmune hepatitis type 3 diagnosed by the presence of anti-SLA-antibodies. In the past, the patient had several unsuccessful interferon-based therapies without achieving a sustained virological response in parallel with an immunosuppressive treatment with azathioprine. During the further course of the disease, the patient generated a liver cirrhosis CHILD A after only a few years. After the approval of the direct antiviral agents sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in 2014, we conducted an antiviral therapy, including ribavirin, for 24 weeks and fortunately achieved a sustained virological response. Due to the persistent disease activity caused by the autoimmune hepatitis after the end of antiviral therapy, we treated the patient with prednisolone and azathioprine and could induce a stable and persistent remission of the autoimmune disease. PMID:27529527

  7. [Coincidence of a chronic Hepatitis C and an autoimmune Hepatitis Type 3 - successful therapy with the new direct-acting antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Dikopoulos, N; Zizer, E

    2016-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis C infection may be associated with several features of autoimmunity (i. e., detection of different kinds of autoantibodies in the serum). Hepatitis C is also associated with different autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune thyroiditis, lichen ruber planus, and membranous glomerulonephritis being the most relevant. There are very few cases of a coincidence of chronic hepatitis C with an autoimmune hepatitis, that is usually diagnosed by detection of specific autoantibodies and typical histological features. During the time of interferon-based antiviral therapies, we often faced a therapeutic dilemma as interferon could lead to an exacerbation of the coincident autoimmune disease. So, in these cases, a prophylactic immunosuppression had to be started before initiation of interferon therapy. Meanwhile, in the new era of direct antiviral agents against hepatitis C, highly specific and effective therapeutic options are available. The case report presented here describes the very rare coincidence of a chronic hepatitis C, genotype 1 with an autoimmune hepatitis type 3 diagnosed by the presence of anti-SLA-antibodies. In the past, the patient had several unsuccessful interferon-based therapies without achieving a sustained virological response in parallel with an immunosuppressive treatment with azathioprine. During the further course of the disease, the patient generated a liver cirrhosis CHILD A after only a few years. After the approval of the direct antiviral agents sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in 2014, we conducted an antiviral therapy, including ribavirin, for 24 weeks and fortunately achieved a sustained virological response. Due to the persistent disease activity caused by the autoimmune hepatitis after the end of antiviral therapy, we treated the patient with prednisolone and azathioprine and could induce a stable and persistent remission of the autoimmune disease.

  8. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  9. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  10. Antiviral Effect of Methylated Flavonol Isorhamnetin against Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3′, and 4′ positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3′-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70–80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids. PMID:25806943

  11. Antiviral effect of methylated flavonol isorhamnetin against influenza.

    PubMed

    Abdal Dayem, Ahmed; Choi, Hye Yeon; Kim, Young Bong; Cho, Ssang-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is an infectious respiratory disease with frequent seasonal epidemics that causes a high rate of mortality and morbidity in humans, poultry, and animals. Influenza is a serious economic concern due to the costly countermeasures it necessitates. In this study, we compared the antiviral activities of several flavonols and other flavonoids with similar, but distinct, hydroxyl or methyl substitution patterns at the 3, 3', and 4' positions of the 15-carbon flavonoid skeleton, and found that the strongest antiviral effect was induced by isorhamnetin. Similar to quercetin and kaempferol, isorhamnetin possesses a hydroxyl group on the C ring, but it has a 3'-methyl group on the B ring that is absent in quercetin and kaempferol. Co-treatment and pre-treatment with isorhamnetin produced a strong antiviral effect against the influenza virus A/PR/08/34(H1N1). However, isorhamnetin showed the most potent antiviral potency when administered after viral exposure (post-treatment method) in vitro. Isorhamnetin treatment reduced virus-induced ROS generation and blocked cytoplasmic lysosome acidification and the lipidation of microtubule associated protein1 light chain 3-B (LC3B). Oral administration of isorhamnetin in mice infected with the influenza A virus significantly decreased lung virus titer by 2 folds, increased the survival rate which ranged from 70-80%, and decreased body weight loss by 25%. In addition, isorhamnetin decreased the virus titer in ovo using embryonated chicken eggs. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) of isorhamnetin could explain its strong anti-influenza virus potency; the methyl group located on the B ring of isorhamnetin may contribute to its strong antiviral potency against influenza virus in comparison with other flavonoids.

  12. Discovery of Potent Broad Spectrum Antivirals Derived from Marine Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Raveh, Avi; Delekta, Phillip C.; Dobry, Craig J.; Peng, Weiping; Schultz, Pamela J.; Blakely, Pennelope K.; Tai, Andrew W.; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Irani, David N.; Sherman, David H.; Miller, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural products provide a vast array of chemical structures to explore in the discovery of new medicines. Although secondary metabolites produced by microbes have been developed to treat a variety of diseases, including bacterial and fungal infections, to date there has been limited investigation of natural products with antiviral activity. In this report, we used a phenotypic cell-based replicon assay coupled with an iterative biochemical fractionation process to identify, purify, and characterize antiviral compounds produced by marine microbes. We isolated a compound from Streptomyces kaviengensis, a novel actinomycetes isolated from marine sediments obtained off the coast of New Ireland, Papua New Guinea, which we identified as antimycin A1a. This compound displays potent activity against western equine encephalitis virus in cultured cells with half-maximal inhibitory concentrations of less than 4 nM and a selectivity index of greater than 550. Our efforts also revealed that several antimycin A analogues display antiviral activity, and mechanism of action studies confirmed that these Streptomyces-derived secondary metabolites function by inhibiting the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain, thereby suppressing de novo pyrimidine synthesis. Furthermore, we found that antimycin A functions as a broad spectrum agent with activity against a wide range of RNA viruses in cultured cells, including members of the Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Picornaviridae, and Paramyxoviridae families. Finally, we demonstrate that antimycin A reduces central nervous system viral titers, improves clinical disease severity, and enhances survival in mice given a lethal challenge with western equine encephalitis virus. Our results provide conclusive validation for using natural product resources derived from marine microbes as source material for antiviral drug discovery, and they indicate that host mitochondrial electron transport is a viable target for the

  13. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  14. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  15. Monoclonal Antibody Shows Promise as Potential Therapeutic for MERS | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A monoclonal antibody has proven effective in preventing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in lab animals, suggesting further development as a potential intervention for the deadly disease in humans, according to new research. MERS is a newly emerged coronavirus first detected in humans in 2012. Most cases have occurred in the Middle East, but the disease has appeared elsewhere. In all, MERS has infected more than 1,700 individuals and killed more than 600, according to the World Health Organization. No vaccines or antiviral therapies currently exist. Several candidate vaccines are being developed, and some have been tested in animal models, a prerequisite to human clinical trials.

  16. Converting monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapies from passive to active: bringing immune complexes into play

    PubMed Central

    Lambour, Jennifer; Naranjo-Gomez, Mar; Piechaczyk, Marc; Pelegrin, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which currently constitute the main class of biotherapeutics, are now recognized as major medical tools that are increasingly being considered to fight severe viral infections. Indeed, the number of antiviral mAbs developed in recent years has grown exponentially. Although their direct effects on viral blunting have been studied in detail, their potential immunomodulatory actions have been overlooked until recently. The ability of antiviral mAbs to modulate antiviral immune responses in infected organisms has recently been revealed. More specifically, upon recognition of their cognate antigens, mAbs form immune complexes (ICs) that can be recognized by the Fc receptors expressed on different immune cells of infected individuals. This binding may be followed by the modulation of the host immune responses. Harnessing this immunomodulatory property may facilitate improvements in the therapeutic potential of antiviral mAbs. This review focuses on the role of ICs formed with different viral determinants and mAbs in the induction of antiviral immune responses in the context of both passive immunotherapies and vaccination strategies. Potential deleterious effects of ICs on the host immune response are also discussed. PMID:27530750

  17. Epimedium koreanum Nakai displays broad spectrum of antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo by inducing cellular antiviral state.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-20

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant's known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakai markedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans.

  18. Epimedium koreanum Nakai Displays Broad Spectrum of Antiviral Activity in Vitro and in Vivo by Inducing Cellular Antiviral State

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won-Kyung; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Lee, Byeong-Hoon; Park, Jun-Seol; Kim, Chul-Joong; Ma, Jin Yeul; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Epimedium koreanum Nakai has been extensively used in traditional Korean and Chinese medicine to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the plant’s known immune modulatory potential and chemical make-up, scientific information on its antiviral properties and mode of action have not been completely investigated. In this study, the broad antiviral spectrum and mode of action of an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai was evaluated in vitro, and moreover, the protective effect against divergent influenza A subtypes was determined in BALB/c mice. An effective dose of Epimedium koreanum Nakaimarkedly reduced the replication of Influenza A Virus (PR8), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) in RAW264.7 and HEK293T cells. Mechanically, we found that an aqueous extract from Epimedium koreanum Nakai induced the secretion of type I IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the subsequent stimulation of the antiviral state in cells. Among various components present in the extract, quercetin was confirmed to have striking antiviral properties. The oral administration of Epimedium koreanum Nakai exhibited preventive effects on BALB/c mice against lethal doses of highly pathogenic influenza A subtypes (H1N1, H5N2, H7N3 and H9N2). Therefore, an extract of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and its components play roles as immunomodulators in the innate immune response, and may be potential candidates for prophylactic or therapeutic treatments against diverse viruses in animal and humans. PMID:25609307

  19. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  20. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  1. Insights into antiviral innate immunity revealed by studying hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies on the interactions of the positive strand RNA virus hepatitis C virus (HCV) with the host have contributed to several discoveries in the field of antiviral innate immunity. These include revealing the antiviral sensing pathways that lead to the induction of type I interferon (IFN) during HCV infection and also the importance of type III IFNs in the antiviral immune response to HCV. These studies on HCV/host interactions have contributed to our overall understanding of viral sensing and viral evasion of the antiviral intracellular innate immune response. In this review, I will highlight how these studies of HCV/host interactions have led to new insights into antiviral innate immunity. Overall, I hope to emphasize that studying antiviral immunity in the context of virus infection is necessary to fully understand antiviral immunity and how it controls the outcome of viral infection. PMID:25819428

  2. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  3. Advances in Antibody Design.

    PubMed

    Tiller, Kathryn E; Tessier, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies as therapeutics requires optimizing several of their key attributes. These include binding affinity and specificity, folding stability, solubility, pharmacokinetics, effector functions, and compatibility with the attachment of additional antibody domains (bispecific antibodies) and cytotoxic drugs (antibody-drug conjugates). Addressing these and other challenges requires the use of systematic design methods that complement powerful immunization and in vitro screening methods. We review advances in designing the binding loops, scaffolds, domain interfaces, constant regions, post-translational and chemical modifications, and bispecific architectures of antibodies and fragments thereof to improve their bioactivity. We also highlight unmet challenges in antibody design that must be overcome to generate potent antibody therapeutics. PMID:26274600

  4. HCV RNA Activates APCs via TLR7/TLR8 While Virus Selectively Stimulates Macrophages Without Inducing Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; El-Far, Mohamed; Dupuy, Franck P.; Abdel-Hakeem, Mohamed S.; He, Zhong; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Shi, Yu; Haddad, Elias K.; Ancuta, Petronela; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Said, Elias A.

    2016-01-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems fail to control HCV infection in the majority of infected individuals. HCV is an ssRNA virus, which suggests a role for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 in initiating the anti-viral response. Here we demonstrate that HCV genomic RNA harbours specific sequences that initiate an anti-HCV immune response through TLR7 and TLR8 in various antigen presenting cells. Conversely, HCV particles are detected by macrophages, but not by monocytes and DCs, through a TLR7/8 dependent mechanism; this leads to chloroquine sensitive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β, while the antiviral type I Interferon response is not triggered in these cells. Antibodies to DC-SIGN, a c-type lectin selectively expressed by macrophages but not pDCs or mDCs, block the production of cytokines. Novel anti-HCV vaccination strategies should target the induction of TLR7/8 stimulation in APCs in order to establish potent immune responses against HCV. PMID:27385120

  5. Development of a FACS-based assay for evaluating antiviral potency of compound in dengue infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yilong; Chen, Yen-Liang; Herve, Maxime; Gu, Feng; Shi, Pei-Yong; Blasco, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Dengue fever is the most important arthropod-transmitted viral disease affecting humans. It is a blood-borne disease characterized by persistent fever and joint pain. In the blood, primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), in particular monocytes, are the main target of the dengue virus (DENV). These cells are poorly permissive for in vitro dengue virus infection and their infectivity varies from donor to donor. To overcome this barrier, an anti-dengue antibody was used to improve the infectivity of DENV-2 clinical isolates to PBMCs, the monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1 and the granulocyte cell line, KU812. A higher throughput 96-well-format assay based on a fluorescent-activated cell sorter could potentially be developed to evaluate the antiviral potency of compounds in DENV-infected PBMCs in vitro. The results correlate well with data obtained by a standard plaque assay. Altogether, an assay has been developed that enables evaluation of the antiviral activity of test compounds in a physiologically-relevant cell system (PBMCs). These screening processes are urgently needed for dengue drug discovery.

  6. Novel drugs targeting Toll-like receptors for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mira C; Shirey, Kari Ann; Pletneva, Lioubov M; Boukhvalova, Marina S; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Vogel, Stefanie N; Blanco, Jorge CG

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are sentinel receptors of the host innate immune system that recognize conserved ‘pathogen-associated molecular patterns’ of invading microbes, including viruses. The activation of TLRs establishes antiviral innate immune responses and coordinates the development of long-lasting adaptive immunity in order to control viral pathogenesis. However, microbe-induced damage to host tissues may release ‘danger-associated molecular patterns’ that also activate TLRs, leading to an overexuberant inflammatory response and, ultimately, to tissue damage. Thus, TLRs have proven to be promising targets as therapeutics for the treatment of viral infections that result in inflammatory damage or as adjuvants in order to enhance the efficacy of vaccines. Here, we explore recent advances in TLR biology with a focus on novel drugs that target TLRs (agonists and antagonists) for antiviral therapy. PMID:25620999

  7. Microbiota-Dependent Priming of Antiviral Intestinal Immunity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Christine L; Cohen, Jonathan; Yasunaga, Ari; Xu, Jie; Osborn, Greg; Subramanian, Harry; Gold, Beth; Buchon, Nicolas; Cherry, Sara

    2015-11-11

    Enteric pathogens must overcome intestinal defenses to establish infection. In Drosophila, the ERK signaling pathway inhibits enteric virus infection. The intestinal microflora also impacts immunity but its role in enteric viral infection is unknown. Here we show that two signals are required to activate antiviral ERK signaling in the intestinal epithelium. One signal depends on recognition of peptidoglycan from the microbiota, particularly from the commensal Acetobacter pomorum, which primes the NF-kB-dependent induction of a secreted factor, Pvf2. However, the microbiota is not sufficient to induce this pathway; a second virus-initiated signaling event involving release of transcriptional paused genes mediated by the kinase Cdk9 is also required for Pvf2 production. Pvf2 stimulates antiviral immunity by binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase PVR, which is necessary and sufficient for intestinal ERK responses. These findings demonstrate that sensing of specific commensals primes inflammatory signaling required for epithelial responses that restrict enteric viral infections.

  8. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  9. The diversity of insect antiviral immunity: insights from viruses.

    PubMed

    Marques, João T; Imler, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Insects represent over 70% of all animal species. Recent virome analyses reveal unprecedented genetic diversity of insect viruses, which appears to match that of their hosts. Thus, insect-virus interactions may provide information on a vast repertoire of antiviral immune mechanisms. Tapping into this diversity is challenging because of several constraints imposed by the uniqueness of each insect model. Nevertheless, it is clear that many conserved and divergent pathways participate in the control of viral infection in insects. Co-evolution between hosts and viruses favors the development of immune evasion mechanisms by the pathogen. Viral suppressors can offer unique perspective on host pathways and emphasize the importance of RNA interference, apoptosis, but also NF-κB pathways and translation control in insect antiviral immunity. PMID:27232381

  10. Antiviral Activity of Resveratrol against Human and Animal Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Yusuf; Hassim, Hasliza; Hamzah, Hazilawati; Noordin, Mohamed Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a potent polyphenolic compound that is being extensively studied in the amelioration of viral infections both in vitro and in vivo. Its antioxidant effect is mainly elicited through inhibition of important gene pathways like the NF-κβ pathway, while its antiviral effects are associated with inhibitions of viral replication, protein synthesis, gene expression, and nucleic acid synthesis. Although the beneficial roles of resveratrol in several viral diseases have been well documented, a few adverse effects have been reported as well. This review highlights the antiviral mechanisms of resveratrol in human and animal viral infections and how some of these effects are associated with the antioxidant properties of the compound. PMID:26693226

  11. Direct Acting Antivirals for the Treatment of Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Karayiannis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The development and evaluation of antiviral agents through carefully designed clinical trials over the last 25 years have heralded a new dawn in the treatment of patients chronically infected with the hepatitis B and C viruses, but not so for the D virus (HBV, HCV, and HDV). The introduction of direct acting antivirals (DDAs) for the treatment of HBV carriers has permitted the long-term use of these compounds for the continuous suppression of viral replication, whilst in the case of HCV in combination with the standard of care [SOC, pegylated interferon (PegIFN), and ribavirin] sustained virological responses (SVRs) have been achieved with increasing frequency. Progress in the case of HDV has been slow and lacking in significant breakthroughs.This paper aims to summarise the current state of play in treatment approaches for chonic viral hepatitis patients and future perspectives. PMID:24278700

  12. Emerging antivirals for the treatment of hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Yan; Chen, Hong-Song

    2014-06-28

    Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) constitutes a major global public health threat, causing substantial disease burdens such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, thus representing high unmet medical needs. Currently available therapies are safe, well tolerated, and highly effective in decreasing viremia and improving measured clinical outcomes with low rates of antiviral resistance. However, long-term management remains a clinical challenge, mainly due to the slow kinetics of HBV surface antigen clearance. In this article, we review emerging antivirals directed at novel targets derived from mechanisms of viral cellular entry, viral replication, viral assembly, and the host immune response, leading to preclinical and clinical trials for possible future therapeutic intervention. The recent therapeutic advances in the development of all categories of HBV inhibitors may pave the way for regimens of finite duration that result in long-lasting control of chronic hepatitis B infection. PMID:24976708

  13. An epimer of 5'-noraristeromycin and its antiviral properties.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, S M; Chen, X; Schneller, S W; Ikeda, S; Snoeck, R; Andrei, G; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1994-04-29

    A derivative of 5'-noraristeromycin epimeric at the 5'-nor center ((-)-3) has been prepared enantiospecifically in three steps from (+)-((1R,4S)-4-hydroxy-2-cyclopenten- 1-yl acetate. Compound (-)-3 was evaluated for antiviral activity against a large number of viruses and found to display marked activity against varicella-zoster virus, vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, parainfluenza virus, reovirus, and cytomegalovirus. A similar antiviral activity spectrum was shown by the S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors neplanocin A and carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine. While equally potent as neplanocin A against most of the viruses tested, compound (-)-3 was significantly less cytotoxic. The results of this study suggest that (-)-3 should be pursued for the treatment of those virus infections [that is, pox (VV), rhabdo (VSV), paramyxo (parainfluenza), and reo] that appear to be exquisitively sensitive to the compound. PMID:8176716

  14. Current and emerging antiviral treatments for hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Joseph S; Aspinall, Esther; Liew, Danny; Thompson, Alexander J; Hellard, Margaret E

    2013-01-01

    Newly licensed direct acting antivirals for hepatitis C virus HCV are able to cure up to 75% of patients chronically infected with genotype-1 infection, which is the predominant HCV strain in Europe and North America. Emerging antiviral therapies promise further increases in virological response, as well as improved tolerability, reduced duration of therapy, and will potentially eliminate the need for interferon use. This review highlights the main therapeutic agents used in current standard of care, including telaprevir and boceprevir. It goes on to evaluate the mechanisms of emerging drugs, their stage of development and response rates seen in research to date. Finally, it projects into the not too distant future to consider treatment strategies involving combinations of agents and interferon-free therapies, and in which patients they might prove most successful. PMID:22882367

  15. Functionalization, cyclization and antiviral activity of A-secotriterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Grishko, Victoria V; Galaiko, Natalia V; Tolmacheva, Irina A; Kucherov, Igor I; Eremin, Vladimir F; Boreko, Eugene I; Savinova, Olga V; Slepukhin, Pavel A

    2014-08-18

    Triterpene derivatives with an α,β-alkenenitrile moiety in the five-membered ring A have been synthesized by nitrile anion cyclizations of 1-cyano-2,3-secotriterpenoids. Oxime-containing precursors, 2,3-secointermediates and five-membered ring A products of cyclizations were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against enveloped viruses - influenza A virus and human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1). Lupane ketoxime and the 2,3-secolupane C-3 aldoxime which possess antiviral activities against both influenza A virus (EC50 12.9-18.2 μM) and HIV-1 (EC50 0.06 μM) were the most promising compounds. PMID:24997292

  16. Mechanisms of antiviral action of plant antimicrobials against murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gilling, Damian H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤ 35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses.

  17. Norovirus: targets and tools in antiviral drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Joana; Neyts, Johan; Jochmans, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    The development of antiviral strategies to treat or prevent norovirus infections is a pressing matter. Noroviruses are the number 1 cause of acute gastroenteritis, of foodborne illness, of sporadic gastroenteritis in all age groups and of severe acute gastroenteritis in children less than 5 years old seeking medical assistance [USA/CDC]. In developing countries, noroviruses are linked to significant mortality (~200,000 children <5 years old). Noroviruses are a major culprit for the closure of hospital wards, and associated with increased hospitalization and mortality among the elderly. Transplant patients have significant risk of acquiring persistent norovirus gastroenteritis. Control and prevention strategies are limited to the use of disinfectants and hand sanitizers, whose efficacy is frequently insufficient. Hence, there is an ample need for antiviral treatment and prophylaxis of norovirus infections. The fact that only a handful of inhibitors of norovirus replication have been reported can largely be attributable to the hampering inability to cultivate human noroviruses in cell culture. The Norwalk replicon-bearing cells and the murine norovirus-infected cell lines are the available models to assess in vitro antiviral activity of compounds. Human noroviruses have been shown to replicate (to some extent) in mice, calves, gnotobiotic pigs, and chimpanzees. Infection of interferon-deficient mice with the murine norovirus results in virus-induced diarrhea. Here we review recent developments in understanding which norovirus proteins or host cell factors may serve as targets for inhibition of viral replication. Given the recent advances, significant progress in the search for antiviral strategies against norovirus infections is expected in the upcoming years. PMID:24893351

  18. Structural insight on processivity, human disease and antiviral drug toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerase gamma (Pol γ) is a nuclear encoded, mitochondrially located replicase that conducts all DNA synthesis in the organelle. Structurally, human Pol γ closely resembles bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase. Perhaps due to this prokaryotic-like feature, Pol γ is highly susceptible to inhibition by drugs designed against HIV reverse transcriptase and HCV RNA polymerase. In this review, I summarize recent structural and biochemical studies towards understanding Pol γ-mediated antiviral drug toxicity. PMID:21185718

  19. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  20. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  1. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on feline calicivirus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Liu, Jiasen; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2015-12-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a highly contagious pathogen that causes oral and upper respiratory tract disease in cats. Despite widespread vaccination, the prevalence of FCV remains high. Furthermore, a high gene mutation rate has led to the emergence of variants, and some infections are lethal. To date, there is no effective antiviral drug available for treating FCV infection. Here, we show that lithium chloride (LiCl) effectively suppresses the replication of FCV strain F9 in Crandell-Reese feline kidney (CRFK) cells. The antiviral activity of LiCl occurred primarily during the early stage of infection and in a dose-dependent manner. LiCl treatment also inhibited the cytopathic effect. LiCl treatment exhibited a strong inhibitory effect against a panel of other two reference strains and two recent FCV isolates from China. These results demonstrate that LiCl might be an effective anti-FCV drug for controlling FCV disease. Further studies are required to explore the antiviral activity of LiCl against FCV replication in vivo. PMID:26239340

  2. In vitro antiviral effect of germacrone on feline calicivirus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxia; Liu, Yongxiang; Zu, Shaopo; Sun, Xue; Liu, Chunguo; Liu, Dafei; Zhang, Xiaozhan; Tian, Jin; Qu, Liandong

    2016-06-01

    Feline calicivirus (FCV) often causes respiratory tract and oral disease in cats and is a highly contagious virus. Widespread vaccination does not prevent the spread of FCV. Furthermore, the low fidelity of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of FCV leads to the emergence of new variants, some of which show increased virulence. Currently, few effective anti-FCV drugs are available. Here, we found that germacrone, one of the main constituents of volatile oil from rhizoma curcuma, was able to effectively reduce the growth of FCV strain F9 in vitro. This compound exhibited a strong anti-FCV effect mainly in the early phase of the viral life cycle. The antiviral effect depended on the concentration of the drug. In addition, germacrone treatment had a significant inhibitory effect against two other reference strains, 2280 and Bolin, and resulted in a significant reduction in the replication of strains WZ-1 and HRB-SS, which were recently isolated in China. This is the first report of antiviral effects of germacrone against a calicivirus, and extensive in vivo research is needed to evaluate this drug as an antiviral therapeutic agent for FCV. PMID:26997613

  3. Antiviral drug discovery against SARS-CoV.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Hsu, John T-A; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2006-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV. In the 2003 outbreak, it infected more than 8,000 people worldwide and claimed the lives of more than 900 victims. The high mortality rate resulted, at least in part, from the absence of definitive treatment protocols or therapeutic agents. Although the virus spreading has been contained, due preparedness and planning, including the successful development of antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV, is necessary for possible reappearance of SARS. In this review, we have discussed currently available strategies for antiviral drug discovery and how these technologies have been utilized to identify potential antiviral agents for the inhibition of SARS-CoV replication. Moreover, progress in the drug development based on different molecular targets is also summarized, including 1) Compounds that block the S protein-ACE2-mediated viral entry; 2) Compounds targeting SARS-CoV M(pro); 3) Compounds targeting papain-like protease 2 (PLP2); 4) Compounds targeting SARS-CoV RdRp; 5) Compounds targeting SARS-CoV helicase; 6) Active compounds with unspecified targets; and 7) Research on siRNA. This review aims to provide a comprehensive account of drug discovery on SARS. The experiences with the SARS outbreak and drug discovery would certainly be an important lesson for the drug development for any new viral outbreaks that may emerge in the future.

  4. Immunoenhancing properties and antiviral activity of 7-deazaguanosine in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Smee, D F; Alaghamandan, H A; Gilbert, J; Burger, R A; Jin, A; Sharma, B S; Ramasamy, K; Revankar, G R; Cottam, H B; Jolley, W B

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide analog 7-deazaguanosine has not previously been reported to possess biological (antiviral or antitumor) properties in cell culture or in vivo. Up to 10(5) U of interferon per ml was detected in mouse sera 1 to 4 h following oral (200-mg/kg of body weight) and intraperitoneal (50-mg/kg) doses of the compound. 7-Deazaguanosine also caused significant activation of natural killer and phagocytic cells but did not augment T- and B-cell blastogenesis. Intraperitoneal treatments of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg/day administered 24 and 18 h before virus inoculation were highly protective in mice inoculated with lethal doses of Semliki Forest or San Angelo viruses. Less but still significant survivor increases were evident in treated mice infected with banzi or encephalomyocarditis viruses. In most cases, the degree of antiviral activity was similar to that exhibited by the biological response modifier 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine. 7-Thia-8-oxoguanosine was more potent than 7-deazaguanosine against encephalomyocarditis virus in mice, however. Oral efficacy was achieved with 7-deazaguanosine treatments of greater than or equal to 100 mg/kg against all virus infections, whereas 7-thia-8-oxoguanosine is reported to be devoid of oral activity in rodents. Thus, 7-deazaguanosine represents the first reported orally active nucleoside biological response modifier exhibiting broad-spectrum antiviral activity against particular types of RNA viruses. PMID:1707603

  5. Design of translactam HCMV protease inhibitors as potent antivirals.

    PubMed

    Borthwick, Alan D

    2005-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important pathogen for which there is a significant unmet medical need. New HCMV antivirals, active against novel molecular targets, are undoubtedly needed as the currently available drugs ganciclovir, cidofovir, and foscarnet, which are all viral DNA inhibitors, suffer from limited effectiveness, mainly due to the development of drug resistance, poor bioavailability, and toxicity. One of the newer molecular targets that has been exploited in the search for better drug candidates is HCMV protease. Our deltaAla HCMV protease (wild type variant with the internal cleavage site deleted) was cloned and expressed in E. coli. This viral enzyme was used to develop HCMV protease assays to evaluate potential inhibitors. The chirally pure (SRS)-alpha-methyl pyrrolidine-5,5-trans-lactam template was synthesized, which together with the natural substrate requirements of HCMV protease and detailed SAR, was used to design potent and selective mechanism based inhibitors of HCMV protease. The mechanism of action of these inhibitors of HCMV protease was investigated by ESI/MS, and the X-ray crystal structure of the HCMV protease was used to refine our selective viral enzyme inhibitors to obtain plasma stable antivirals. A novel ELISA antiviral assay was developed which, together with a cytotoxicity assay, enabled us to discover anti-HCMV drug candidates equivalent in potency to ganciclovir that had good pharmacokinetics in the dog and good brain and ocular penetration in the guinea pig.

  6. Antiviral Effect of Interferon Lambda Against Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Lukacikova, Lubomira; Oveckova, Ingrid; Betakova, Tatiana; Laposova, Katarina; Polcicova, Katarina; Pastorekova, Silvia; Pastorek, Jaromir; Tomaskova, Jana

    2015-07-01

    Lambda interferons inhibit replication of many viruses, but their role in the inhibition of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection remains unclear. In this study, we examined the antiviral effects of interferon (IFN)-λ2 and IFN-λ3 against LCMV in A549 cells. We found that IFN-λ2 is a more potent inhibitor of LCMV strain MX compared with IFN-λ3, whereas both cytokines have similar antiviral effects against an immunosuppressive variant of LCMV, clone-13. We also demonstrated that the antiviral activity of IFN-λ2 is more effective if it is delivered early rather than after establishment of a long-term infection, suggesting that virus replication is only partially responsive to the cytokine. In agreement with this observation, we showed that LCMV infection significantly reduces IFNLR1 mRNA expression in infected cells. In addition, LCMV infection, to some extent, compromises the signal transduction pathway of IFN-λ2. This implies that IFN receptors as well as their downstream signaling components could be selectively targeted either directly by LCMV proteins or indirectly by cellular factor(s) that are induced or activated by LCMV infection.

  7. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    PubMed Central

    Saumet, Anne; Lecellier, Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(mi)RNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (si)RNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses. PMID:16409629

  8. Favipiravir elicits antiviral mutagenesis during virus replication in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis has emerged as a novel potential therapeutic approach to treat viral infections. Several studies have demonstrated that increases in the high mutation rates inherent to RNA viruses lead to viral extinction in cell culture, but evidence during infections in vivo is limited. In this study, we show that the broad-range antiviral nucleoside favipiravir reduces viral load in vivo by exerting antiviral mutagenesis in a mouse model for norovirus infection. Increased mutation frequencies were observed in samples from treated mice and were accompanied with lower or in some cases undetectable levels of infectious virus in faeces and tissues. Viral RNA isolated from treated animals showed reduced infectivity, a feature of populations approaching extinction during antiviral mutagenesis. These results suggest that favipiravir can induce norovirus mutagenesis in vivo, which in some cases leads to virus extinction, providing a proof-of-principle for the use of favipiravir derivatives or mutagenic nucleosides in the clinical treatment of noroviruses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03679.001 PMID:25333492

  9. Antiviral activity of some South American medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Abad, M J; Bermejo, P; Sanchez Palomino, S; Chiriboga, X; Carrasco, L

    1999-03-01

    Folk medicinal plants are potential sources of useful therapeutic compounds including some with antiviral activities. Extracts prepared from 10 South American medicinal plants (Baccharis trinervis, Baccharis teindalensis, Eupatorium articulatum, Eupatorium glutinosum, Tagetes pusilla, Neurolaena lobata, Conyza floribunda, Phytolacca bogotensis, Phytolacca rivinoides and Heisteria acuminata) were screened for in vitro antiviral activity against herpes simplex type I (HSV-1), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and poliovirus type 1. The most potent inhibition was observed with an aqueous extract of B. trinervis, which inhibited HSV-1 replication by 100% at 50-200 micrograms/mL, without showing cytotoxic effects. Good activities were also found with the ethanol extract of H. acuminata and the aqueous extract of E. articulatum, which exhibited antiviral effects against both DNA and RNA viruses (HSV-1 and VSV, respectively) at 125-250 micrograms/mL. The aqueous extracts of T. pusilla (100-250 micrograms/mL), B. teindalensis (50-125 micrograms/mL) and E. glutinosum (50-125 micrograms/mL) also inhibited the replication of VSV, but none of the extracts tested had any effect on poliovirus replication. PMID:10190189

  10. Antiviral and antimicrobial assessment of some selected flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ozçelik, Berrin; Orhan, Ilkay; Toker, Gülnur

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, the results of antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity tests of four flavonoid derivatives, scandenone (1), tiliroside (2), quercetin-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (3), and kaempferol-3,7-O-alpha-L-dirhamnoside (4), are presented. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of these compounds were tested against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the fungus Candida albicans by a micro-dilution method. On the other hand, both DNA virus Herpes simplex (HSV) and RNA virus Parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) were employed for antiviral assessment of the compounds using Madin-Darby bovine kidney and Vero cell lines. According to our data, all of the compounds tested were found to be quite active against S. aureus and E. faecalis with MIC values of 0.5 microg/ml, followed by E. coli (2 microg/ml), K. pneumoniae (4 microg/ml), A. baumannii (8 micro/g/ml), and B. subtilis (8 microg/ml), while they inhibited C. albicans at 1 microg/ml as potent as ketoconazole. However, only compound 3 displayed an antiviral effect towards PI-3 in the range of 8-32 microg/ml of inhibitory concentration for cytopathogenic effect (CPE).

  11. Antioxidants: potential antiviral agents for Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zehua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Zongtao; Tian, Yanping

    2014-07-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is prevalent throughout eastern and southern Asia and the Pacific Rim. It is caused by the JE virus (JEV), which belongs to the family Flaviviridae. Despite the importance of JE, little is known about its pathogenesis. The role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of viral infections has led to increased interest in its role in JEV infections. This review focuses mainly on the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of JEV infection and the antiviral effect of antioxidant agents in inhibiting JEV production. First, this review summarizes the pathogenesis of JE. The pathological changes include neuronal death, astrocyte activation, and microglial proliferation. Second, the relationship between oxidative stress and JEV infection is explored. JEV infection induces the generation of oxidants and exhausts the supply of antioxidants, which activates specific signaling pathways. Finally, the therapeutic efficacy of a variety of antioxidants as antiviral agents, including minocycline, arctigenin, fenofibrate, and curcumin, was studied. In conclusion, antioxidants are likely to be developed into antiviral agents for the treatment of JE. PMID:24780919

  12. Antiviral agents and HIV prevention: controversies, conflicts, and consensus

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Myron S.; Muessig, Kathryn E.; Smith, M. Kumi; Powers, Kimberly A.; Kashuba, Angela D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Antiviral agents can be used to prevent HIV transmission before exposure as preexpo-sure prophylaxis (PrEP), after exposure as postexposure prophylaxis, and as treatment of infected people for secondary prevention. Considerable research has shed new light on antiviral agents for PrEP and for prevention of secondary HIV transmission. While promising results have emerged from several PrEP trials, the challenges of poor adherence among HIV-negative clients and possible increase in sexual risk behaviors remain a concern. In addition, a broader pipeline of antiviral agents for PrEP that focuses on genital tract pharmacology and safety and resistance issues must be developed. Antiretroviral drugs have also been used to prevent HIV transmission from HIV-infected patients to their HIV-discordant sexual partners. The HIV Prevention Trials Network 052 trial demonstrated nearly complete prevention of HIV transmission by early treatment of infection, but the generalizability of the results to other risk groups – including intravenous drug users and MSM – has not been determined. Most importantly, the best strategy for use of antiretroviral agents to reduce the spread of HIV at either the individual level or the population level has not been developed, and remains the ultimate goal of this area of investigation. PMID:22507927

  13. Optimal antiviral treatment strategies and the effects of resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Elsa; Day, Troy

    2011-04-01

    Recent pandemic planning has highlighted the importance of understanding the effect that widespread antiviral use will have on the emergence and spread of resistance. A number of recent studies have determined that if resistance to antiviral medication can evolve, then deploying treatment at a less than maximum rate often minimizes the outbreak size. This finding, however, involves the assumption that treatment levels remain constant during the entire outbreak. Using optimal control theory, we address the question of optimal antiviral use by considering a large class of time-varying treatment strategies. We prove that, contrary to previous results, it is always optimal to treat at the maximum rate provided that this treatment occurs at the right time. In general the optimal strategy is to wait some fixed amount of time and then to deploy treatment at the maximum rate for the remainder of the outbreak. We derive analytical conditions that characterize this optimal amount of delay. Our results show that it is optimal to start treatment immediately when one of the following conditions holds: (i) immediate treatment can prevent an outbreak, (ii) the initial pool of susceptibles is small, or (iii) when the maximum possible rate of treatment is low, such that there is little de novo emergence of resistant strains. Finally, we use numerical simulations to verify that the results also hold under more general conditions.

  14. Polar profile of antiviral peptides from AVPpred Database.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Diseases of viral origin in humans are among the most serious threats to health and the global economy. As recent history has shown the virus has a high pandemic potential, among other reasons, due to its ability to spread by air, hence the identification, investigation, containment, and treatment of viral diseases should be considered of paramount importance. In this sense, the bioinformatics research has focused on finding fast and efficient algorithms that can identify highly toxic antiviral peptides and to serve as a first filter, so that trials in the laboratory are substantially reduced. The work presented here contributes to this effort through the use of an algorithm already published by this team, called polarity index method, which identifies with high efficiency antiviral peptides from the exhaustive analysis of the polar profile, using the linear sequence of the peptide. The test carried out included all peptides in APD2 Database and 60 antiviral peptides identified by Kumar and co-workers (Nucleic Acids Res 40:W199-204, 2012), to build its AVPpred algorithm. The validity of the method was focused on its discriminating capacity so we included the 15 sub-classifications of both Databases. PMID:24993579

  15. Antiviral activity of lanatoside C against dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Yan Yi; Chen, Karen Caiyun; Chen, Huixin; Seng, Eng Khuan; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-11-01

    Dengue infection poses a serious threat globally due to its recent rapid spread and rise in incidence. Currently, there is no approved vaccine or effective antiviral drug for dengue virus infection. In response to the urgent need for the development of an effective antiviral for dengue virus, the US Drug Collection library was screened in this study to identify compounds with anti-dengue activities. Lanatoside C, an FDA approved cardiac glycoside was identified as a candidate anti-dengue compound. Our data revealed that lanatoside C has an IC50 of 0.19μM for dengue virus infection in HuH-7 cells. Dose-dependent reduction in dengue viral RNA and viral proteins synthesis were also observed upon treatment with increasing concentrations of lanatoside C. Time of addition study indicated that lanatoside C inhibits the early processes of the dengue virus replication cycle. Furthermore, lanatoside C can effectively inhibit all four serotypes of dengue virus, flavivirus Kunjin, alphavirus Chikungunya and Sindbis virus as well as the human enterovirus 71. These findings suggest that lanatoside C possesses broad spectrum antiviral activity against several groups of positive-sense RNA viruses.

  16. Interferon lambda induces antiviral response to herpes simplex virus 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lopušná, K; Režuchová, I; Kabát, P; Kúdelová, M

    2014-01-01

    Lambda interferons (IFN-λ) are known to induce potent antiviral response in a wide variety of target cells. They activate the same intracellular signalling pathways and have similar biological activities as IFN-α/β, including antiviral activity, but signal via distinct receptor complex, which is expressed in a cell- and species-specific manner. IFN-λ was reported to induce in vitro marked antiviral activity against various RNA viruses, but corresponding data on DNA viruses are sparse. Therefore we examined the IFN-λ1 induced antiviral activity against two strains of herpes simplex virus 1, a highly pathogenic ANGpath and moderately pathogenic KOS. The antiviral response was determined in vitro in Vero cells, known as deficient in production of type I IFNs and in Vero E6 cells, responding to viral infection with abundant IFN-λ production, although deficient in production of type I IFNs. The results showed that IFN-λ1 induced in Vero cells higher antiviral activity against ANGpath strain than against KOS strain. In Vero E6 cells endogenous IFN-λ induced higher antiviral activity against ANGpath strain than against KOS strain, but because of the virus induction of IFN-λ expression the antiviral activity was detected later. The observed differences between the IFN-λ1-induced antiviral activities against viral strains of various pathogenicity suggest that virus attributes may play role in the antiviral state of cells induced by IFN-λ. PMID:25518713

  17. Antiviral activity of crude extracts from Commiphora swynnertonii against Newcastle disease virus in ovo.

    PubMed

    Bakari, Gaymary George; Max, Robert A; Mdegela, Robinson H; Phiri, Elliot C J; Mtambo, Mkumbukwa M A

    2012-10-01

    Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of crude extracts from resin, leaves, stem barks and root barks of Commiphora swynnertonii against Newcastle disease virus (NDV) using an in ovo assay. Nine-day-old embryonated chicken eggs were divided into seven groups (n = 6) and received various treatments. Six groups were inoculated with velogenic NDV strain; five groups out of these were treated with different concentrations of the four extracts or a diluent, dimethylsulphoxide. The uninoculated and inoculated groups were left as negative and positive controls, respectively. Embryo survival was observed daily and embryo weights were measured day 5 post-inoculation; a few eggs from selected groups were left to hatch. Allantoic fluid from treated eggs and serum from hatched chicks were collected for hemagglutination and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) tests to detect NDV in the eggs and antibodies against NDV in the hatched chicks respectively. Results showed that embryo survival and mean embryo weight were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in those groups which were treated with the crude extracts from C. swynnertonii than the positive control group. Also the extracts significantly (p < 0.001) reduced virus titres, whereas no viruses were detected in the allantoic fluids of the resin-treated group at the highest concentration of 500 μg/mL. Furthermore, the HI test results showed very low levels of antibodies against NDV in chicks hatched from resin and root bark extract-treated eggs suggesting that these plant materials were capable of destroying the NDV before stimulating the developing chick's immunity. The current findings have clearly demonstrated that crude extracts especially that of resin from C. swynnertonii have strong antiviral activity against NDV in ovo. In vivo trials are needed to validate the use of resin from the tree in controlling Newcastle disease in chickens. PMID:22302704

  18. Factors associated with the response to interferon-based antiviral therapies for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Hirayuki; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health concern worldwide. Interferon-α (IFN-α) therapy has been the main antiviral treatment for more than 20 years. Because of its established antitumor effects, IFN-based treatments for chronic HCV infection still have a clinical impact, particularly for patients with high risk conditions of developing hepatocellular carcinoma, such as older age and advanced liver fibrosis. As a result of exhaustive research, several viral factors, including NS5A amino acid mutations such as the IFN sensitivity-determining region and the IFN/ribavirin resistance-determining region, and mutations of amino acids in the core protein region (core 70 and 91) were shown to be associated with the response to IFN-α treatment. In addition, among the host factors related to the response to IFN-α treatment, polymorphisms of the interleukin-28B gene were identified to be the most important factor. In this article, we review the factors associated with the efficacy of IFN-α treatment for chronic HCV infection. In addition, our recent findings regarding the possible involvement of anti-IFN-α neutralizing antibodies in a non-response to pegylated-IFN-α treatment are also described. PMID:26609345

  19. Anti-Viral Agents in Neurodegenerative Disorders: New Paradigm for Targeting Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Faldu, Khushboo G; Shah, Jigna S; Patel, Snehal S

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting geriatric populations for which several causes have been proposed. These include a relationship with known pathogens although the exact nature of such a relationship remains uncertain. Herpes simplex virus-1 has been proposed as potential cause of AD because of its ability to form ß amyloid(Aß) and neurofibrillary tangles due to tau hyperphosphorylation and action of beta & gamma secretase on amyloid precursor protein(APP) together with genetic association with apolipoprotein-E4(ApoE-Ɛ4), which points out to latent Herpes Simplex virus-1 as an agent causing AD. There are numerous studies that linked HSV-1 with AD like anti-HSV-1 IgM antibodies, nectin-2, heme oxygenase-1, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor-2A, caspase-8 and nucleus-specific alteration of raphe neurons. Various possible mechanisms by which HSV-1 might lead to development of AD such as ApoE, ß-amyloid, tau phosphorylation, inflammation and oxidative stress are also discussed. Thus, this review discusses patent information and a strong relationship between latent HSV-1 and AD and also proposes antiviral therapy for AD. PMID:25963683

  20. Antiviral activity of tenofovir against Cauliflower mosaic virus and its metabolism in Brassica pekinensis plants.

    PubMed

    Spak, Josef; Votruba, Ivan; Pavingerová, Daniela; Holý, Antonín; Spaková, Vlastimila; Petrzik, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The antiviral effect of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate tenofovir (R)-PMPA on double-stranded DNA Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in Brassica pekinensis plants grown in vitro on liquid medium was evaluated. Double antibody sandwich ELISA and PCR were used for relative quantification of viral protein and detecting nucleic acid in plants. (R)-PMPA at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/l significantly reduced CaMV titers in plants within 6-9 weeks to levels detectable neither by ELISA nor by PCR. Virus-free plants were obtained after 3-month cultivation of meristem tips on semisolid medium containing 50 mg/l (R)-PMPA and their regeneration to whole plants in the greenhouse. Studying the metabolism of (R)-PMPA in B. pekinensis revealed that mono- and diphosphate, structural analogs of NDP and/or NTP, are the only metabolites formed. The data indicate very low substrate activity of the enzymes toward (R)-PMPA as substrate. The extent of phosphorylation in the plant's leaves represents only 4.5% of applied labeled (R)-PMPA. In roots, we detected no radioactive peaks of phosphorylated metabolites of (R)-PMPAp or (R)-PMPApp. PMID:21889541

  1. Antibodies to prothrombin.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, M L

    2012-06-01

    Research on antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and the thrombotic manifestations associated with these antibodies has grown since the description of anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) by Harris and colleagues in the early 1980s. Antiprothrombin (aPT) antibodies are commonly detected by ELISA, using irradiated plates (aPT) or prothrombin in complex with phosphatidylserine (aPS/PT). Although aPT and/or aPS/PT are associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) -related clinical features and these antibodies correlate with each other, aPT and aPS/PT belong to different populations of autoantibodies even though they can both be present in the same patient. Early studies suggested that these antibodies might be the antigenic target of lupus anticoagulant (LA) and their correlation and clinical significance is being investigated. PMID:22635215

  2. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  3. Antibodies in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs from one individual to another can incite the production of antibodies specific for foreign antigens, especially major histocompatibility antigens, in the graft. Antibodies specific for a graft provide an index of immunity and a potential trigger for injury and rejection. However, the index of immunity can sometimes miss antibody-mediated rejection and besides causing injury the antibodies against a graft can also protect a graft from injury by blocking immune recognition, called enhancement, regulating activation of complement, and inducing changes in the graft that resist damage. Reviewed here are potential limitations in the use of antibodies as an index of immunity and the ways antibodies cause and/or prevent injury. PMID:20807473

  4. The Synthetic Antiviral Drug Arbidol Inhibits Globally Prevalent Pathogenic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Halfmann, Peter; Morrey, John D.; Smee, Donald F.; Prichard, Mark; Mire, Chad E.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Geisbert, Thomas W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arbidol (ARB) is a synthetic antiviral originally developed to combat influenza viruses. ARB is currently used clinically in several countries but not in North America. We have previously shown that ARB inhibits in vitro hepatitis C virus (HCV) by blocking HCV entry and replication. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are inhibited by ARB and demonstrate that ARB suppresses in vitro infection of mammalian cells with Ebola virus (EBOV), Tacaribe arenavirus, and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). We also confirm suppression of hepatitis B virus and poliovirus by ARB. ARB inhibited EBOV Zaire Kikwit infection when added before or at the same time as virus infection and was less effective when added 24 h after EBOV infection. Experiments with recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing the EBOV Zaire glycoprotein showed that infection was inhibited by ARB at early stages, most likely at the level of viral entry into host cells. ARB inhibited HHV-8 replication to a similar degree as cidofovir. Our data broaden the spectrum of antiviral efficacy of ARB to include globally prevalent viruses that cause significant morbidity and mortality. IMPORTANCE There are many globally prevalent viruses for which there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral medicines. Some of these viruses, such as Ebola virus or members of the arenavirus family, rapidly cause severe hemorrhagic diseases that can be fatal. Other viruses, such as hepatitis B virus or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), establish persistent infections that cause chronic illnesses, including cancer. Thus, finding an affordable, effective, and safe drug that blocks many viruses remains an unmet medical need. The antiviral drug arbidol (ARB), already in clinical use in several countries as an anti-influenza treatment, has been previously shown to suppress the growth of many viruses. In this report, we expand the list of viruses that are blocked by ARB in a laboratory setting to include Ebola virus

  5. Clearance of persistent hepatitis C virus infection using a claudin-1-targeting monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Mailly, Laurent; Wilson, Garrick K.; Aubert, Philippe; Duong, François H. T.; Calabrese, Diego; Leboeuf, Céline; Fofana, Isabel; Thumann, Christine; Bandiera, Simonetta; Lütgehetmann, Marc; Volz, Tassilo; Davis, Christopher; Harris, Helen J.; Mee, Christopher J.; Girardi, Erika; Chane-Woon-Ming, Béatrice; Ericsson, Maria; Fletcher, Nicola; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Pessaux, Patrick; Vercauteren, Koen; Meuleman, Philip; Villa, Pascal; Kaderali, Lars; Pfeffer, Sébastien; Heim, Markus H.; Neunlist, Michel; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Dandri, Maura; McKeating, Jane A.; Robinet, Eric; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer1. Cell entry of HCV2 and other pathogens3-5 is mediated by tight junction (TJ) proteins, but successful therapeutic targeting of TJ proteins has not been reported yet. Using a human liver-chimeric mouse model6 we show that a monoclonal antibody specific for TJ protein claudin-17 eliminates chronic HCV infection without detectable toxicity. This antibody inhibits HCV entry, cell-cell transmission and virus-induced signaling events. Antibody treatment reduces the number of HCV-infected hepatocytes in vivo, highlighting the need for de novo infection via host entry factors to maintain chronic infection. In summary, we demonstrate that an antibody targeting a virus receptor can cure chronic viral infection and uncover TJ proteins as targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:25798937

  6. Prevention and Treatment of Influenza with Hyperimmune Bovine Colostrum Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Wong, Victor; Muller, Brian; Rawlin, Grant; Brown, Lorena E.

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of specific vaccines and antiviral drugs, influenza continues to impose a heavy toll on human health worldwide. Passive transfer of specific antibody (Ab) may provide a useful means of preventing or treating disease in unvaccinated individuals or those failing to adequately seroconvert, especially now that resistance to antiviral drugs is on the rise. However, preparation of appropriate Ab in large scale, quickly and on a yearly basis is viewed as a significant logistical hurdle for this approach to control seasonal influenza. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, bovine colostrum, which contains approximately 500 g of IgG per milking per animal, has been investigated as a source of polyclonal antibody for delivery to the respiratory tract. IgG and F(ab')2 were purified from the hyperimmune colostrum of cows vaccinated with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) vaccine and were shown to have high hemagglutination-inhibitory and virus-neutralizing titers. In BALB/c mice, a single administration of either IgG or F(ab')2 could prevent the establishment of infection with a sublethal dose of PR8 virus when given as early as 7 days prior to exposure to virus. Pre-treated mice also survived an otherwise lethal dose of virus, the IgG- but not the F(ab')2-treated mice showing no weight loss. Successful reduction of established infection with this highly virulent virus was also observed with a single treatment 24 hr after virus exposure. Conclusions/Significance These data suggest that a novel and commercially-scalable technique for preparing Ab from hyperimmune bovine colostrum could allow production of a valuable substitute for antiviral drugs to control influenza with the advantage of eliminating the need for daily administration. PMID:21049034

  7. Antibodies to cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, G M; Gentry, M K; Amende, L M; Blanchette-Mackie, E J; Alving, C R

    1988-01-01

    Cholesterol-dependent complement activation has been proposed as a factor that might influence the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Although antibodies to cholesterol conjugates have been reported, cholesterol is widely regarded as a poorly immunogenic substance. Monoclonal IgM complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol were obtained in the present study after immunizing mice with liposomes containing high amounts of cholesterol (71 mol % relative to phosphatidylcholine) and lipid A as an adjuvant. Clones were selected for the ability of secreted antibodies to react with liposomes containing 71% cholesterol but not with liposomes containing 43% cholesterol. The antibodies also reacted with crystalline cholesterol in a solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding of monoclonal antibodies to the surface of crystalline cholesterol was demonstrated by electron microscopy by utilizing a second antibody (anti-IgM) labeled with colloidal gold. The immunization period required to induce monoclonal antibodies was very short (3 days) and a high fraction of the hybrid cells (at least 70%) were secreting detectable antibodies to cholesterol. The results demonstrate that cholesterol can be a highly immunogenic molecule and that complement-fixing antibodies to cholesterol can be readily obtained. Images PMID:3162316

  8. Bone marrow is a major site of long-term antibody production after acute viral infection.

    PubMed Central

    Slifka, M K; Matloubian, M; Ahmed, R

    1995-01-01

    Antiviral antibody production is often sustained for long periods after resolution of an acute viral infection. Despite extensive documentation of this phenomenon, the mechanisms involved in maintaining long-term antibody production remain poorly defined. As a first step towards understanding the nature of long-term humoral immunity, we examined the anatomical location of antibody-producing cells during acute viral infection. Using the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model, we found that after resolution of the acute infection, when antiviral plasma cells in the spleen decline, a population of virus-specific plasma cells appears in the bone marrow and constitutes the major source of long-term antibody production. Following infection of adult mice, LCMV-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) peaked in the spleen at 8 days postinfection but were undetectable in the bone marrow at that time. The infection was essentially cleared by 15 days, and the ASC numbers in the spleen rapidly declined while an increasing population of LCMV-specific ASC began to appear in the bone marrow. Compared with the peak response at 8 days postinfection, time points from 30 days to more than 1 year later demonstrated greater-than-10-fold reductions in splenic ASC. In contrast, LCMV-specific plasma cell numbers in the bone marrow remained high and correlated with the high levels of antiviral serum antibody. The presence of LCMV-specific plasma cells in the bone marrow was not due to persistent infection at this site, since the virus was cleared from both the spleen and bone marrow with similar kinetics as determined by infectivity and PCR assays. The immunoglobulin G subclass profile of antibody-secreting cells derived from bone marrow and the spleen correlated with the immunoglobulin G subclass distribution of LCMV-specific antibody in the serum. Upon rechallenge with LCMV, the spleen exhibited a substantial increase in virus-specific plasma cell numbers during the early phase

  9. Evaluation of antiviral activity of plant extracts against foot and mouth disease virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Younus, Ishrat; Siddiq, Afshan; Ishaq, Humera; Anwer, Laila; Badar, Sehrish; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate antiviral activity of chloroformic leaves extracts of three plants: Azadirachta indica, Moringa oleifera and Morus alba against Foot and Mouth disease virus using MTT assay (3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). Antiviral and cytotoxic activity of each extract was evaluated as cell survival percentage and results were expressed as Means ± S.D. The concentrations which resulted in cell survival percentages of greater than 50% are considered to be effective antiviral concentrations. From the tested plant extracts, Moringa oleifera showed potent antiviral activity (p<0.05) while Azadirachta indica showed significant antiviral activity in the range of 1-50μ/ml & 12-100μ/ml respectively. In contrast no antiviral activity was observed by Morus alba as all the tested concentration resulted in significant reduction (p<0.05) in cell survival percentage. PMID:27393440

  10. Cell-based antiviral screening against coronaviruses: Developing virus-specific and broad-spectrum inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kilianski, Andy; Baker, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    To combat the public health threat from emerging coronaviruses (CoV), the development of antiviral therapies with either virus-specific or pan-CoV activities is necessary. An important step in antiviral drug development is the screening of potential inhibitors in cell-based systems. The recent emergence of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV necessitates adapting methods that have been used to identify antivirals against the severe, acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV and developing new approaches to more efficiently screen antiviral drugs. In this article we review cell-based assays using infectious virus (BSL-3) and surrogate assays (BSL-2) that can be implemented to accelerate antiviral development against MERS-CoV and future emergent coronaviruses. This paper forms part of a series of invited articles in Antiviral Research on “From SARS to MERS: 10 years of research on highly pathogenic human coronaviruses.” PMID:24269477

  11. Depletion of complement has distinct effects on the primary and secondary antibody responses to a conjugate of pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide and a T-cell-dependent protein carrier.

    PubMed

    Test, Samuel T; Mitsuyoshi, Joyce K; Hu, Yong

    2005-01-01

    Complement activation plays a critical role in the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens. However, the effect of conjugation of T-cell-dependent protein carriers to T-cell-independent type 2 antigens on the requirement for complement in the humoral immune response to such antigens remains unknown. We studied the role of complement activation on the antibody response of BALB/c mice immunized with the T-cell-independent type 2 antigen serotype 14 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS14), either in unmodified form or conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA). In mice immunized with either PPS14 or PPS14-OVA, depletion of endogenous complement at the time of primary immunization by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF) diminished serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after primary immunization but enhanced antibody responses after secondary immunization. The secondary immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-PPS14 antibody response after immunization with PPS14-OVA was especially enhanced by complement depletion, was observed at doses as low as 0.2 mug of antigen, and was maximal when CVF was administered within 2 days of immunization. The avidity and opsonophagocytic functions of IgG anti-PPS14 antibodies were comparable in mice immunized with PPS14-OVA with or without complement depletion. Serum anti-PPS14 antibody concentrations were near normal, and the enhancing effects of CVF treatment on the secondary anti-PPS14 antibody response were also apparent in splenectomized mice immunized with PPS14-OVA. These results demonstrate that complement activation can have distinct effects on the primary and secondary antibody responses to a T-cell-independent type 2 antigen, either unmodified or conjugated to a T-cell-dependent protein carrier. These differences should be taken into consideration when using complement to modulate the immune response to vaccines. PMID:15618164

  12. Depletion of complement has distinct effects on the primary and secondary antibody responses to a conjugate of pneumococcal serotype 14 capsular polysaccharide and a T-cell-dependent protein carrier.

    PubMed

    Test, Samuel T; Mitsuyoshi, Joyce K; Hu, Yong

    2005-01-01

    Complement activation plays a critical role in the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens. However, the effect of conjugation of T-cell-dependent protein carriers to T-cell-independent type 2 antigens on the requirement for complement in the humoral immune response to such antigens remains unknown. We studied the role of complement activation on the antibody response of BALB/c mice immunized with the T-cell-independent type 2 antigen serotype 14 pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS14), either in unmodified form or conjugated to ovalbumin (OVA). In mice immunized with either PPS14 or PPS14-OVA, depletion of endogenous complement at the time of primary immunization by treatment with cobra venom factor (CVF) diminished serum anti-PPS14 concentrations after primary immunization but enhanced antibody responses after secondary immunization. The secondary immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-PPS14 antibody response after immunization with PPS14-OVA was especially enhanced by complement depletion, was observed at doses as low as 0.2 mug of antigen, and was maximal when CVF was administered within 2 days of immunization. The avidity and opsonophagocytic functions of IgG anti-PPS14 antibodies were comparable in mice immunized with PPS14-OVA with or without complement depletion. Serum anti-PPS14 antibody concentrations were near normal, and the enhancing effects of CVF treatment on the secondary anti-PPS14 antibody response were also apparent in splenectomized mice immunized with PPS14-OVA. These results demonstrate that complement activation can have distinct effects on the primary and secondary antibody responses to a T-cell-independent type 2 antigen, either unmodified or conjugated to a T-cell-dependent protein carrier. These differences should be taken into consideration when using complement to modulate the immune response to vaccines.

  13. Titration of IgG antibodies against varicella zoster virus before bone marrow transplantation is not predictive of future zoster.

    PubMed

    Webster, A; Grint, P; Brenner, M K; Prentice, H G; Griffiths, P D

    1989-02-01

    Serum antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) were measured in 77 patients about to undergo allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and in 65 of their donors. Ten patients developed zoster within the first 6 months following transplant. There was no significant difference in the mean pretransplant antibody titre between those patients who did or did not subsequently develop zoster. Likewise, the level of antibody to VZV amongst donors had no effect on the subsequent development of zoster. We conclude that the pretransplant level of antibody to VZV is not predictive of subsequent zoster infection, and would not be helpful in identifying patients for trials of antiviral prophylaxis. These results contrast with those previously found for another herpesvirus, herpes simplex (HSV), where antibody level pretransplant is predictive of future HSV recurrence.

  14. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  15. Antibodies as natural adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies in complex with specific antigen can dramatically change the antibody response to this antigen. Depending on antibody class and type of antigen, >99 % suppression or >100-fold enhancement of the response can take place. IgM and IgG3 are efficient enhancers and operate via the complement system. In contrast, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b enhance antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to protein antigens via activating Fcγ-receptors. IgE also enhances antibody and CD4(+) T cell responses to small proteins but uses the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23. Most likely, IgM and IgG3 work by increasing the effective concentration of antigen on follicular dendritic cells in splenic follicles. IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgE probably enhance antibody responses by increasing antigen presentation by dendritic cells to T helper cells. IgG antibodies of all subclasses have a dual effect, and suppress antibody responses to particulate antigens such as erythrocytes. This capacity is used in the clinic to prevent immunization of Rhesus-negative women to Rhesus-positive fetal erythrocytes acquired via transplacental hemorrage. IgG-mediated suppression in mouse models can take place in the absence of Fcγ-receptors and complement and to date no knock-out mouse strain has been found where suppression is abrogated.

  16. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  17. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  18. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  19. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  20. A novel reporter system for neutralizing and enhancing antibody assay against dengue virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) still poses a global public health threat, and no vaccine or antiviral therapy is currently available. Antibody plays distinct roles in controlling DENV infections. Neutralizing antibody is protective against DENV infection, whereas sub-neutralizing concentration of antibody can increase DENV infection, termed antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). Plaque-based assay represents the most widely accepted method measuring neutralizing or enhancing antibodies. Results In this study, a novel reporter virus-based system was developed for measuring neutralization and ADE activity. A stable Renilla luciferase reporter DENV (Luc-DENV) that can produce robust luciferase signals in BHK-21 and K562 cells were used to establish the assay and validated against traditional plaque-based assay. Luciferase value analysis using various known DENV-specific monoclonal antibodies showed good repeatability and a well linear correlation with conventional plaque-based assays. The newly developed assay was finally validated with clinical samples from infected animals and individuals. Conclusions This reporter virus-based assay for neutralizing and enhancing antibody evaluation is rapid, lower cost, and high throughput, and will be helpful for laboratory detection and epidemiological investigation for DENV antibodies. PMID:24548533

  1. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  2. Accumulation of VH Replacement Products in IgH Genes Derived from Autoimmune Diseases and Anti-Viral Responses in Human.

    PubMed

    Lange, Miles D; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Li, Song; Liao, Hongyan; Zemlin, Michael; Su, Kaihong; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement refers to RAG-mediated secondary recombination of the IgH genes, which renews almost the entire VH gene coding region but retains a short stretch of nucleotides as a VH replacement footprint at the newly generated VH-DH junction. To explore the biological significance of VH replacement to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based VH replacement footprint analyzer program and analyzed the distribution of VH replacement products in 61,851 human IgH gene sequences downloaded from the NCBI database. The initial assignment of the VH, DH, and JH gene segments provided a comprehensive view of the human IgH repertoire. To our interest, the overall frequency of VH replacement products is 12.1%; the frequencies of VH replacement products in IgH genes using different VH germline genes vary significantly. Importantly, the frequencies of VH replacement products are significantly elevated in IgH genes derived from different autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and allergic rhinitis, and in IgH genes encoding various autoantibodies or anti-viral antibodies. The identified VH replacement footprints preferentially encoded charged amino acids to elongate IgH CDR3 regions, which may contribute to their autoreactivities or anti-viral functions. Analyses of the mutation status of the identified VH replacement products suggested that they had been actively involved in immune responses. These results provide a global view of the distribution of VH replacement products in human IgH genes, especially in IgH genes derived from autoimmune diseases and anti-viral immune responses.

  3. Independent evolution of an antiviral TRIMCyp in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sam J; Webb, Benjamin L J; Ylinen, Laura M J; Verschoor, Ernst; Heeney, Jonathan L; Towers, Greg J

    2008-03-01

    The antiretroviral restriction factor TRIM5 has recently emerged as an important mediator of innate immunity and species-specific inhibition of retroviral replication in mammals. Selection pressure from pathogenic infection has driven rapid evolution of TRIM5 genes, leading to the antiviral specificities we see today. Remarkably, the New World owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) encodes a TRIM5 protein in which the antiviral determinants in the B30.2 domain have been replaced by cyclophilin A (CypA) encoded by a retrotransposed cDNA. The owl monkey TRIMCyp protein restricts infection by a subset of lentiviruses that recruit CypA to their capsids, including HIV-1 and feline immunodeficiency virus. Here, we show that the Old World monkey, rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), also encodes a TRIMCyp protein that has arisen independently from that in owl monkeys. The rhesus TRIMCyp is encoded by a single, but common, allele (Mamu7) of the rhesus TRIM5 gene, among at least six further alleles that encode full-length TRIM5 proteins with no homology to CypA. The antiviral specificity of the rhesus TRIMCyp is distinct, restricting infection of HIV-2 and feline immunodeficiency virus but not HIV-1. Restriction by rhesus TRIMCyp is before reverse transcription and inhibited by blocking CypA binding, with cyclosporine A, or by mutation of the capsid CypA binding site. These observations suggest a mechanism of restriction that is conserved between TRIMCyp proteins. The lack of activity against HIV-1 suggests that Mamu7 homozygous animals will be null for TRIM5-mediated restriction of HIV-1 and could contribute to improved animal models for HIV/AIDS. PMID:18287035

  4. In Vitro Efficacy of Antiviral Compounds against Enterovirus D68

    PubMed Central

    Rhoden, Eric; Zhang, Mingyu; Nix, W. Allan

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the United States experienced a large outbreak of severe respiratory illness associated with enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). We used a homogeneous, cell-based assay to assess the antiviral activity of compounds developed for EV/rhinovirus infection or other indications. Three of 15 compounds were highly active against all four strains tested (the prototype and three 2014 strains), with 50% effective concentrations of 0.0012 to 0.027 μM. Additional studies are needed to assess their in vivo efficacy against EV-D68. PMID:26149998

  5. Development of Small-Molecule Antivirals for Ebola.

    PubMed

    Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-11-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus species. Although a significant progress has recently been made in understanding of Ebola virus biology and pathogenesis, development of effective anti-Ebola treatments has not been very productive, compared to other areas of antiviral research (e.g., HIV and HCV infections). No approved vaccine or medicine is available for Ebola but several are currently under development. This review summarises attempts in identification, evaluation, and development of small-molecule candidates for treatment of Ebola viral disease, including the most promising experimental drugs brincidofovir (CMX001), BCX4430, and favipiravir (T-705).

  6. Antiviral therapy effects upon hepatitis C cholestatic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vere, C C; Gofiţă, Eliza; Forţofoiu, C; Streba, Letiţia Adela Maria; Genunche, Amelia

    2007-01-01

    Cholestasis includes, as a syndrome, all clinical and biological manifestations caused by the deficient or simply absent biliar secretion or caused by the obstruction of the biliary ducts. The hepatic cholestasis from the chronic hepatitis C (HC VHC) is a result of the altered interlobular biliary canalicules, caused by the modified cellular transport mechanisms and it is associated with a medium to severe degree of fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of antiviral therapy in HC VHC patients. The study included a number of 37 HC VHC patients admitted at the Medical Department no. 1 of the Emergency County Hospital of Craiova; they were treated with Pegasys, 180 microg/week and Copegus, 1000 or 1200 mg/day, taking in consideration their weight, for 48 weeks and they were monitored for 24 weeks after the treatment. The following parameters were analyzed: direct bilirubine, total cholesterol, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamiltranspeptidase and leucin-aminopeptidase. Under treatment, the clinical status caused by the cholestasis (pruritus, icteric syndrome, hemoragipary syndrome) was improved in six of the given cases (16.22%). Before therapy, the hepatic cholestasis was present in 20 patients (54.05%), and after treatment in 14 patients (37.83%). During therapy, the average values for all the monitored parameters decreased: direct bilirubine (0.38 +/- 0.18 mg/dl vs. 0.34 +/- 0.24 mg/dl, p = 0.0867), total cholesterol (198.53 md/dl vs. 183.16 mg/dl, p = 0.0808), alkaline phosphatase (236.99 +/- 79.09 iu/l vs. 227.82 +/- 87.59 iu/l, p = 0.0845), gamma-glutamiltranspeptidase (47 +/- 32.89 iu/l vs. 43.91 +/- 29.66 iu/l, p = 0.1509), and leucin-aminopeptidase (32.33 +/- 13.22 iu/l vs. 28.95 +/- 14.22 iu/l, p = 0.0038). Under antiviral treatment there was noticed an improvement of the cholestasis clinical status in a small number of cases. Antiviral therapy favorably influenced the liver cholestasis associated in patients with chronic hepatitis

  7. A bispecific antibody effectively neutralizes all four serotypes of dengue virus by simultaneous blocking virus attachment and fusion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xin; Deng, Yongqiang; Wang, Huajing; Ji, Guanghui; Tan, Wenlong; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Hui; Xia, Tian; Meng, Yanchun; Wang, Chao; Yu, Xiaojie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bohua; Qin, E-De; Dai, Jianxin; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Guo, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    Although dengue virus (DENV) infection severely threatens the health of humans, no specific antiviral drugs are currently approved for clinical use against DENV infection. Attachment and fusion are 2 critical steps for the flavivirus infection, and the corresponding functional epitopes are located at E protein domain III (E-DIII) and domain II (E-DII), respectively. Here, we constructed a bispecific antibody (DVD-1A1D-2A10) based on the 2 well-characterized anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies 1A1D-2 (1A1D) and 2A10G6 (2A10). The 1A1D antibody binds E-DIII and can block the virus attaching to the cell surface, while the 2A10 antibody binds E-DII and is able to prevent the virus from fusing with the endosomal membrane. Our data showed that DVD-1A1D-2A10 retained the antigen-binding activity of both parental antibodies. Importantly, it was demonstrated to be significantly more effective at neutralizing DENV than its parental antibodies both in vitro and in vivo, even better than the combination of them. To eliminate the potential antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) effect, this bispecific antibody was successfully engineered to prevent Fc-γ-R interaction. Overall, we generated a bispecific anti-DENV antibody targeting both attachment and fusion stages, and this bispecific antibody broadly neutralized all 4 serotypes of DENV without risk of ADE, suggesting that it has great potential as a novel antiviral strategy against DENV. PMID:26905804

  8. Human antibodies reveal a protective epitope that is highly conserved among human and nonhuman influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Grandea, Andres G.; Olsen, Ole A.; Cox, Thomas C.; Renshaw, Mark; Hammond, Philip W.; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying; Mitcham, Jennifer L.; Cieplak, Witold; Stewart, Shaun M.; Grantham, Michael L.; Pekosz, Andrew; Kiso, Maki; Shinya, Kyoko; Hatta, Masato; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Moyle, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Influenza remains a serious public health threat throughout the world. Vaccines and antivirals are available that can provide protection from infection. However, new viral strains emerge continuously because of the plasticity of the influenza genome, which necessitates annual reformulation of vaccine antigens, and resistance to antivirals can appear rapidly and become entrenched in circulating virus populations. In addition, the spread of new pandemic strains is difficult to contain because of the time required to engineer and manufacture effective vaccines. Monoclonal antibodies that target highly conserved viral epitopes might offer an alternative protection paradigm. Herein we describe the isolation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies derived from the IgG+ memory B cells of healthy, human subjects that recognize a previously unknown conformational epitope within the ectodomain of the influenza matrix 2 protein, M2e. This antibody binding region is highly conserved in influenza A viruses, being present in nearly all strains detected to date, including highly pathogenic viruses that infect primarily birds and swine, and the current 2009 swine-origin H1N1 pandemic strain (S-OIV). Furthermore, these human anti-M2e monoclonal antibodies protect mice from lethal challenges with either H5N1 or H1N1 influenza viruses. These results suggest that viral M2e can elicit broadly cross-reactive and protective antibodies in humans. Accordingly, recombinant forms of these human antibodies may provide useful therapeutic agents to protect against infection from a broad spectrum of influenza A strains. PMID:20615945

  9. Identification of Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus Capsid Sequences Mediating Antibody-Dependent Enhancement of Infection, Virus Neutralization, and Immune Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Marshall E.; Best, Sonja M.; Hayes, Stanley F.; Wells, Richard D.; Wolfinbarger, James B.; McKenna, Robert; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2001-01-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV) causes a persistent infection associated with circulating immune complexes, immune complex disease, hypergammaglobulinemia, and high levels of antiviral antibody. Although antibody can neutralize ADV infectivity in Crandell feline kidney cells in vitro, virus is not cleared in vivo, and capsid-based vaccines have proven uniformly ineffective. Antiviral antibody also enables ADV to infect macrophages, the target cells for persistent infection, by Fc-receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The antibodies involved in these unique aspects of ADV pathogenesis may have specific targets on the ADV capsid. Prominent differences exist between the structure of ADV and other, more-typical parvoviruses, which can be accounted for by short peptide sequences in the flexible loop regions of the capsid proteins. In order to determine whether these short sequences are targets for antibodies involved in ADV pathogenesis, we studied heterologous antibodies against several peptides present in the major capsid protein, VP2. Of these antibodies, a polyclonal rabbit antibody to peptide VP2:428-446 was the most interesting. The anti-VP2:428-446 antibody aggregated virus particles into immune complexes, mediated ADE, and neutralized virus infectivity in vitro. Thus, antibody against this short peptide can be implicated in key facets of ADV pathogenesis. Structural modeling suggested that surface-exposed residues of VP2:428-446 are readily accessible for antibody binding. The observation that antibodies against a single target peptide in the ADV capsid can mediate both neutralization and ADE may explain the failure of capsid-based vaccines. PMID:11602751

  10. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  11. Antibody-dependent enhancement of dengue virus infection is inhibited by SA-17, a doxorubicin derivative.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Nuñez, Nilda V; Jarupathirun, Patsaporn; Kaptein, Suzanne J F; Neyts, Johan; Smit, Jolanda M

    2013-10-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is thought to play a critical role in the exacerbation of dengue virus (DENV)-induced disease during a heterologous re-infection. Despite ADE's clinical impact, only a few antiviral compounds have been assessed for their anti-ADE activity. We reported earlier that SA-17, a doxorubicin derivative, efficiently inhibits the in vitro infection of DENV and yellow fever virus. Here we explored SA-17's mechanism of inhibition and investigated if the compound is active against ADE of DENV infection. Since enhanced infectivity stimulated by antibodies has been observed with standard and immature DENV, both types of virions were included in the study. We observed that SA-17 (i) inhibits DENV infection by preventing binding/entry to the cell and (ii) interferes with antibody-mediated infection of both standard and immature DENV2. SA-17 markedly reduced the infectivity of DENV2 in ADE conditions, with IC50s ranging from 0.26 to 2.89μM. The compound exerted its activity when added before, during, and after antibody-opsonization of standard and immature virus. Thus, molecules with the characteristics of SA-17 may be attractive antiviral agents since they can be used both to block DENV2 entry during primary and secondary infection and to inhibit ADE of standard and immature virus. PMID:23994499

  12. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Brutscher, Laura M; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  13. Genistein as antiviral drug against HIV ion channel.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Daniel; Schwarz, Silvia; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Ronghua; Sun, Bing; Schwarz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Various drugs found in Chinese herbs are well known for their antiviral potency. We have tested several flavonoids with respect to their potency to block the viral protein U of the human immunodeficiency type 1 virus, which is believed to form a cation-permeable ion channel in the infected cell. We used Xenopus oocytes with heterologously expressed viral protein U as model system to test the efficacy of the drugs in voltage-clamp experiments. This method had been demonstrated in the past as a useful tool to screen drugs for their potency in inhibition of ion channel activity. The viral protein U-mediated current could be inhibited by Ba(2+) with a K1/2 value of 1.6 mM. Therefore, we determined viral protein U-mediated current as current component blocked by 10 mM Ba(2+). We screened several flavonoids with respect to their effects on this current. The flavonols quercetin and kaempferol, and the flavanols (-)epigallochatechin and (-)epichatechin were ineffective. The flavanone naringenin showed at 20 µM slight (about 10%) inhibition. The most potent drug was the isoflavon genistein which exhibited at 20 µM significant inhibition of about 40% with a K1/2 value of 81 ± 4 µM. We suggest that viral ion channels, in general, may be a good target for development of antiviral agents, and that, in particular, isoflavons may be candidates for development of drugs targeting viral protein U.

  14. Danger, diversity and priming in innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Collins, Susan E; Mossman, Karen L

    2014-10-01

    The prototypic response to viral infection involves the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to the activation of transcription factors such as IRF3 and NFkB and production of type 1 IFN. While this response can lead to the induction of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) and recruitment and activation of immune cells, such a comprehensive response is likely inappropriate for routine low level virus exposure. Moreover, viruses have evolved a plethora of immune evasion strategies to subvert antiviral signalling. There is emerging evidence that cells have developed very sensitive methods of detecting not only specific viral PAMPS, but also more general danger or stress signals associated with viral entry and replication. Such stress-induced cellular responses likely serve to prime cells to respond to further PAMP stimulation or allow for a rapid and localized intracellular response independent of IFN production and its potential immune sequelae. This review discusses diversity in innate antiviral players and pathways, the role of "danger" sensing, and how alternative pathways, such as the IFN-independent pathway, may serve to prime cells for further pathogen attack.

  15. Human IFNAR2 deficiency: Lessons for antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Mohamad, Siti M B; Young, Dan F; Skelton, Andrew J; Leahy, T Ronan; Munday, Diane C; Butler, Karina M; Morfopoulou, Sofia; Brown, Julianne R; Hubank, Mike; Connell, Jeff; Gavin, Patrick J; McMahon, Cathy; Dempsey, Eugene; Lynch, Niamh E; Jacques, Thomas S; Valappil, Manoj; Cant, Andrew J; Breuer, Judith; Engelhardt, Karin R; Randall, Richard E; Hambleton, Sophie

    2015-09-30

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) is a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism. Mouse models have been pivotal to understanding the role of IFN-α/β in immunity, although validation of these findings in humans has been limited. We investigated a previously healthy child with fatal encephalitis after inoculation of the live attenuated measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. By targeted resequencing, we identified a homozygous mutation in the high-affinity IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR2) in the proband, as well as a newborn sibling, that rendered cells unresponsive to IFN-α/β. Reconstitution of the proband's cells with wild-type IFNAR2 restored IFN-α/β responsiveness and control of IFN-attenuated viruses. Despite the severe outcome of systemic live vaccine challenge, the proband had previously shown no evidence of heightened susceptibility to respiratory viral pathogens. The phenotype of IFNAR2 deficiency, together with similar findings in STAT2-deficient patients, supports an essential but narrow role for IFN-α/β in human antiviral immunity.

  16. Human IFNAR2 deficiency: lessons for antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, C.J.A.; Mohamad, S.M.B; Young, D.F.; Skelton, A.J.; Leahy, T.R.; Munday, D.C.; Butler, K.M.; Morfopoulou, S.; Brown, J.R.; Hubank, M.; Connell, J.; Gavin, P.J.; McMahon, C.; Dempsey, E.; Lynch, N.E.; Jacques, T.S.; Valappil, M.; Cant, A.J.; Breuer, J.; Engelhardt, K.R.; Randall, R.E.; Hambleton, S.

    2016-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) is a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism. Mouse models have been pivotal to understanding the role of IFN-α/β in immunity, although validation of these findings in humans has been limited. We investigated a previously healthy child with fatal encephalitis following inoculation of the live-attenuated measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. By targeted resequencing we identified a homozygous mutation in the high-affinity interferon-α/β receptor (IFNAR2) in the proband, as well as a newborn sibling, that rendered cells unresponsive to IFN-α/β. Reconstitution of the proband’s cells with wild-type IFNAR2 restored IFN-α/β responsiveness and control of IFN-attenuated viruses. Despite the severe outcome of systemic live-vaccine challenge, the proband had previously shown no evidence of heightened susceptibility to respiratory viral pathogens. The phenotype of IFNAR2 deficiency, together with similar findings in STAT2 deficient patients, supports an essential but narrow role for IFN-α/β in human antiviral immunity. Summary Human IFNAR2 deficiency causes fatal susceptibility to live viral vaccines, revealing a vital but narrow nonredundant role for IFN-α/β in viral immunity. PMID:26424569

  17. Engineering a Therapeutic Lectin by Uncoupling Mitogenicity from Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Michael D.; Boudreaux, Daniel M.; Salmon, Loïc; Chugh, Jeetender; Winter, Harry C.; Meagher, Jennifer L.; André, Sabine; Murphy, Paul V.; Oscarson, Stefan; Roy, René; King, Steven; Kaplan, Mark H.; Goldstein, Irwin J.; Tarbet, E. Bart; Hurst, Brett L.; Smee, Donald F.; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Hoffmann, Hans-Heinrich; Xue, Yi; Rice, Charles M.; Schols, Dominique; Garcia, J. Victor; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Markovitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A key effector route of the Sugar Code involves lectins that exert crucial regulatory controls by targeting distinct cellular glycans. We demonstrate that a single amino acid substitution in a banana lectin, replacing histidine 84 with a threonine, significantly reduces its mitogenicity while preserving its broad-spectrum antiviral potency. X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and glycocluster assays reveal that loss of mitogenicity is strongly correlated with loss of pi-pi stacking between aromatic amino acids H84 and Y83, which removes a wall separating two carbohydrate binding sites, thus diminishing multivalent interactions. On the other hand, monovalent interactions and antiviral activity are preserved by retaining other wild-type conformational features and possibly through unique contacts involving the T84 side chain. Through such fine-tuning, target selection and downstream effects of a lectin can be modulated so as to knock down one activity while preserving another, thus providing tools for therapeutics and for understanding the Sugar Code. PMID:26496612

  18. Meeting report: 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research.

    PubMed

    Vere Hodge, R Anthony

    2013-10-01

    The 26th International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR) was held in San Francisco, California from May 11 to 15, 2013. This article summarizes the principal invited lectures at the meeting. The opening symposium on the legacy of the late Antonín Holý included presentations on his pioneering work with nucleotide analogs, which led to the development of several antiviral drugs including tenofovir. This drug has transformed the treatment of HIV infection and has recently become the first-line therapy for chronic hepatitis B. The Gertrude Elion Award lecturer described the anti-HIV activities of the CCR5 inhibitor cenicriviroc and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor festinavir®, and also reviewed the evaluation of biodegradable nanoparticles with adjuvant activity. The William Prusoff Award winner reported on the creation of NAOMI, a computer model with 21 enzymes to predict the activity of nucleoside analogs against hepatitis C virus (HCV). Other invited lecturers discussed the development of countermeasures against severe dengue and the potential of RNA virus capping and repair enzymes as drug targets. Topics in the clinical symposium included the current status of the anti-HCV compounds sovaprevir, ACH-3102, miravirsen and ALS-2200; the evaluation of single-tablet regimens for HIV infection; and the investigation of cytomegalovirus resistance to CMX001. Two chemistry minisymposia examined strategies and tactics in drug design and the use of in drug discovery. PMID:23973733

  19. Flexibility as a Strategy in Nucleoside Antiviral Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Peters, H L; Ku, T C; Seley-Radtke, K L

    2015-01-01

    As far back as Melville Wolfrom's acyclic sugar synthesis in the 1960's, synthesis of flexible nucleoside analogues have been an area of interest. This concept, however, went against years of enzyme-substrate binding theory. Hence, acyclic methodology in antiviral drug design did not take off until the discovery and subsequent FDA approval of such analogues as Acyclovir and Tenofovir. More recently, the observation that flexible nucleosides could overcome drug resistance spawned a renewed interest in the field of nucleoside drug design. The next generation of flexible nucleosides shifted the focus from the sugar moiety to the nucleobase. With analogues such as Seley-Radtke "fleximers", and Herdewijn's C5 substituted 2'-deoxyuridines, the area of base flexibility has seen great expansion. More recently, the marriage of these methodologies with acyclic sugars has resulted in a series of acyclic flex-base nucleosides with a wide range of antiviral properties, including some of the first to exhibit anti-coronavirus activity. Various flexible nucleosides and their corresponding nucleobases will be compared in this review. PMID:26282942

  20. Human IFNAR2 deficiency: Lessons for antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christopher J A; Mohamad, Siti M B; Young, Dan F; Skelton, Andrew J; Leahy, T Ronan; Munday, Diane C; Butler, Karina M; Morfopoulou, Sofia; Brown, Julianne R; Hubank, Mike; Connell, Jeff; Gavin, Patrick J; McMahon, Cathy; Dempsey, Eugene; Lynch, Niamh E; Jacques, Thomas S; Valappil, Manoj; Cant, Andrew J; Breuer, Judith; Engelhardt, Karin R; Randall, Richard E; Hambleton, Sophie

    2015-09-30

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) is a fundamental antiviral defense mechanism. Mouse models have been pivotal to understanding the role of IFN-α/β in immunity, although validation of these findings in humans has been limited. We investigated a previously healthy child with fatal encephalitis after inoculation of the live attenuated measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine. By targeted resequencing, we identified a homozygous mutation in the high-affinity IFN-α/β receptor (IFNAR2) in the proband, as well as a newborn sibling, that rendered cells unresponsive to IFN-α/β. Reconstitution of the proband's cells with wild-type IFNAR2 restored IFN-α/β responsiveness and control of IFN-attenuated viruses. Despite the severe outcome of systemic live vaccine challenge, the proband had previously shown no evidence of heightened susceptibility to respiratory viral pathogens. The phenotype of IFNAR2 deficiency, together with similar findings in STAT2-deficient patients, supports an essential but narrow role for IFN-α/β in human antiviral immunity. PMID:26424569

  1. Antiviral Prevention of Sepsis Induced Cytomegalovirus Reactivation in Immunocompetent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Meghan R.; Trgovcich, Joanne; Zimmerman, Peter; Chang, Alexander; Miller, Cortland; Klenerman, Paul; Cook, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Immunocompetent patients can reactivate latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) during critical illness and reactivation is associated with significantly worse outcomes. Prior to clinical trials in humans to prove causality, we sought to determine an optimal antiviral treatment strategy. Methods Mice latently infected with murine CMV (MCMV) received a septic reactivation trigger and were randomized to receive one of four ganciclovir regimens or saline. Lungs were evaluated for viral transcriptional reactivation and fibrosis after each regimen. Influences of ganciclovir on early sepsis induced pulmonary inflammation and T-cell activation were studied after sepsis induction. Results All ganciclovir regimens reduced measurable MCMV transcriptional reactivation, and 10mg/day for 7 or 21 days was most effective. Lower dose (5mg/kg/day) or delayed therapy were associated with significant breakthrough reactivation. Higher doses of ganciclovir given early were associated with the lowest incidence of pulmonary fibrosis, and delay of therapy for 1 week was associated with significantly worse pulmonary fibrosis. Although bacterial sepsis induced activation of MCMV-specific pulmonary T-cells, this activation was not influenced by ganciclovir. Conclusion These results suggest that antiviral treatment trials in humans should use 10mg/kg/day ganciclovir administered as early as possible in at-risk patients to minimize reactivation events and associated pulmonary injury PMID:20004216

  2. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee.

    PubMed

    Brutscher, Laura M; Flenniken, Michelle L

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans.

  3. Negative Regulation of Cytoplasmic RNA-Mediated Antiviral Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Komuro, Akihiko; Bamming, Darja

    2008-01-01

    The recent, rapid progress in our understanding of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral innate immune signaling was initiated by the discovery of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) as a sensor of viral RNA [1]. It is now widely recognized that RIG-I and related RNA helicases, melanoma differentiated-associated gene-5 (MDA5) and laboratory of genetics and physiology-2 (LGP2), can initiate and/or regulate RNA and virus -mediated type I IFN production and antiviral responses. As with other cytokine systems, production of type I IFN is a transient process, and can be hazardous to the host if unregulated, resulting in chronic cellular toxicity or inflammatory and autoimmune diseases [2-9]. In addition, the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) system is a fundamental target for virus-encoded immune suppression, with many indirect and direct examples of interference described. In this article, we review the current understanding of endogenous negative regulation in RLR signaling and explore direct inhibition of RLR signaling by viruses as a host immune evasion strategy. PMID:18703349

  4. Herpes simplex virus: isolation, cytopathological characterization and antiviral sensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Carlos; Hattori, Lilian Yumi; Galhardi, Ligia Carla Faccin; Lopes, Nayara; Bomfim, Wesley Andrade; de Cândido, Ligyana Korki; de Azevedo, Elbens Marcos Minoreli; Gon, Airton dos Santos; Linhares, Rosa Elisa Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is an endemic disease and it is estimated that 6095% of the adult population are infected with symptoms that are usually self-limiting, though they can be serious, extensive and prolonged in immunocompromised individuals, highlighted by the emergence of drug-resistant strains. The study of the wild-type HSV strains based on the cytopathogenic features and its antiviral sensitivity are important in the establishment of an antivirogram for controlling the infection. OBJECTIVE This study sought to isolate and examine the cytopathological characteristics of circulating strains of the Herpes simplex virus, from clinical specimens and their sensitivity to commercially available antiherpesvirus drugs, acyclovir, phosphonophormic acid and trifluridine. METHODS Herpes simplex virus isolation, cytopathological features and antiviral sensitivity assays were performed in cell culture by tissue culture infectious dose or plaque forming unit assay. RESULTS From twenty-two clinical specimens, we isolated and adapted nine strains. Overall, the cytopathic effect was detected 24 h post-infection (p.i.) and the presence of syncytia was remarkable 48 h p.i., observed after cell staining. Out of eight isolates, four developed plaques of varying sizes. All the isolates were sensitive to acyclovir, phosphonophormic and trifluridine, with the percentage of virus inhibition (%VI) ranging from 49.7-100%. CONCLUSIONS The methodology for HSV isolation and characterization is a straightforward approach, but the drug sensitivity test, regarded as being of great practical importance, needs to be better understood. PMID:24937819

  5. RNAi and Antiviral Defense in the Honey Bee

    PubMed Central

    Brutscher, Laura M.; Flenniken, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees play an important agricultural and ecological role as pollinators of numerous agricultural crops and other plant species. Therefore, investigating the factors associated with high annual losses of honey bee colonies in the US is an important and active area of research. Pathogen incidence and abundance correlate with Colony Collapse Disorder- (CCD-) affected colonies in the US and colony losses in the US and in some European countries. Honey bees are readily infected by single-stranded positive sense RNA viruses. Largely dependent on the host immune response, virus infections can either remain asymptomatic or result in deformities, paralysis, or death of adults or larvae. RNA interference (RNAi) is an important antiviral defense mechanism in insects, including honey bees. Herein, we review the role of RNAi in honey bee antiviral defense and highlight some parallels between insect and mammalian immune systems. A more thorough understanding of the role of pathogens on honey bee health and the immune mechanisms bees utilize to combat infectious agents may lead to the development of strategies that enhance honey bee health and result in the discovery of additional mechanisms of immunity in metazoans. PMID:26798663

  6. [Plasmacytoid dendritic cells: the novel Eldorado for antiviral therapy?].

    PubMed

    Smith, Nikaïa; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) represent the first line of host defense against viruses and are an essential link between innate and adaptive immunity. The antiviral factor IFN-α is massively produced by pDCs in response to HIV infection and induces the expression of cellular genes that interfere with viral replication (ISG). Indeed, type I IFN produced by pDCs has a direct anti-viral activity against HIV and has important adjuvant function on other immune cell-types, such as T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the role of type I IFN in HIV disease is complex and may depend on the stage of the disease. The immunologic hallmark of HIV infection is a status of chronic and progressive immune activation, which drives the immune system to exhaustion and leads to severe immunodeficiency. There is now strong evidence that chronic activation of pDCs may promote HIV pathogenesis and have an impact on adaptive T-cell response. Thus, targeting pDCs and type I IFN may open new therapeutic strategies for chronically activated HIV patients. PMID:26514383

  7. Systematic identification of type I and type II interferon-induced antiviral factors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Yang; Sanchez, David Jesse; Aliyari, Roghiyh; Lu, Sun; Cheng, Genhong

    2012-03-13

    Type I and type II interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that establish the cellular antiviral state through the induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). We sought to understand the basis of the antiviral activity induced by type I and II IFNs in relation to the functions of their ISGs. Based on gene expression studies, we systematically identified antiviral ISGs by performing blinded, functional screens on 288 type I and type II ISGs. We assessed and validated the antiviral activity of these ISGs against an RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), and a DNA virus, murine gammaherpes virus (MHV-68). Overall, we identified 34 ISGs that elicited an antiviral effect on the replication of either one or both viruses. Fourteen ISGs have uncharacterized antiviral functions. We further defined ISGs that affect critical life-cycle processes in expression of VSV protein and MHV-68 immediate-early genes. Two previously undescribed antiviral ISGs, TAP1 and BMP2, were further validated. TAP1-deficient fibroblasts were more susceptible to VSV infection but less so to MHV-68 infection. On the other hand, exogenous BMP2 inhibits MHV-68 lytic growth but did not affect VSV growth. These results delineate common and distinct sets of type I and type II IFN-induced genes as well as identify unique ISGs that have either broad or specific antiviral effects on these viruses. PMID:22371602

  8. Antiviral effect of diammonium glycyrrhizinate on cell infection by porcine parvovirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) can cause reproductive failure in swine resulting in economic losses to the industry. Antiviral effects of diammonium glycyrrhizinate (DG) have been reported on several animal viruses; however, to date it has yet to be tested on PPV. In this study, the antiviral activity of ...

  9. Chemical Space Mapping and Structure-Activity Analysis of the ChEMBL Antiviral Compound Set.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Kyrylo; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2016-08-22

    Curation, standardization and data fusion of the antiviral information present in the ChEMBL public database led to the definition of a robust data set, providing an association of antiviral compounds to seven broadly defined antiviral activity classes. Generative topographic mapping (GTM) subjected to evolutionary tuning was then used to produce maps of the antiviral chemical space, providing an optimal separation of compound families associated with the different antiviral classes. The ability to pinpoint the specific spots occupied (responsibility patterns) on a map by various classes of antiviral compounds opened the way for a GTM-supported search for privileged structural motifs, typical for each antiviral class. The privileged locations of antiviral classes were analyzed in order to highlight underlying privileged common structural motifs. Unlike in classical medicinal chemistry, where privileged structures are, almost always, predefined scaffolds, privileged structural motif detection based on GTM responsibility patterns has the decisive advantage of being able to automatically capture the nature ("resolution detail"-scaffold, detailed substructure, pharmacophore pattern, etc.) of the relevant structural motifs. Responsibility patterns were found to represent underlying structural motifs of various natures-from very fuzzy (groups of various "interchangeable" similar scaffolds), to the classical scenario in medicinal chemistry (underlying motif actually being the scaffold), to very precisely defined motifs (specifically substituted scaffolds). PMID:27410486

  10. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antibody Mediated Neurologic Relapse Post Herpes Simplex Encephalitis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Sarah; Walsh, Aoibhinn; King, Mary D; Lynch, Bryan; Webb, David; Twomey, Eilish; Ronan Leahy, T; Butler, Karina; Gavin, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advent of antiviral therapy, herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) remains a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Neurologic relapse after initial improvement is generally attributed to herpes simplex virus reactivation. In 2013, inflammation caused by anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies was reported in association with cases of neurologic relapse after herpes simplex encephalitis. We present 3 such cases and discuss diagnostic and management dilemmas.

  11. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  12. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  13. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-01-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change. Images Fig. 1 PMID:389957

  14. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  15. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  16. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  17. Engineering antibodies for therapy.

    PubMed

    Adair, J R

    1992-12-01

    Success in the generation of an antibody-based therapeutic requires careful consideration of the binding site, to achieve specificity and high affinity; of the effector, to produce the desired therapeutic effect; of the means of attachment of the effector to the binding site; production of the end product; and the response made by the patient to the administered compound. Each of these areas is receiving attention by antibody-engineering techniques. The number of potentially useful monoclonal antibodies developed over the last 10 years, and currently in clinical trials or preregistration, is now being increased by these engineered newcomers. It will be interesting to see over the next few years how many of these antibodies, and of which kind, emerge as products.

  18. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  19. Therapeutic antibodies and infectious diseases, Tours, France, November 20-22, 2012.

    PubMed

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The Therapeutic Antibodies and Infectious Diseases international congress was held in Tours, France on November 20-22, 2012. The first session was devoted to the development of antibodies directed against bacterial toxins or viruses that could be used in a potential bioterrorist threat situation. The second session dealt with the effector functions of anti-microbial antibodies, while the third was oriented toward anti-viral antibodies, with a special emphasis on antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C viruses. After a lecture by a speaker from the US Food and Drug Administration on antibody cocktails, the second day ended with a special session dedicated to discussions regarding the involvement of French biotechnology industries in the field. On the last day, the congress concluded with talks about current antibody treatments for infectious diseases, with a particular focus on their adverse events. Participants enjoyed this very stimulating and convivial meeting, which gathered scientists from various countries who had different scientific research interests.

  20. Therapeutic antibodies and infectious diseases, Tours, France, November 20−22, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Desoubeaux, Guillaume; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    The Therapeutic Antibodies and Infectious Diseases international congress was held in Tours, France on November 20−22, 2012. The first session was devoted to the development of antibodies directed against bacterial toxins or viruses that could be used in a potential bioterrorist threat situation. The second session dealt with the effector functions of anti-microbial antibodies, while the third was oriented toward anti-viral antibodies, with a special emphasis on antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency and hepatitis C viruses. After a lecture by a speaker from the US Food and Drug Administration on antibody cocktails, the second day ended with a special session dedicated to discussions regarding the involvement of French biotechnology industries in the field. On the last day, the congress concluded with talks about current antibody treatments for infectious diseases, with a particular focus on their adverse events. Participants enjoyed this very stimulating and convivial meeting, which gathered scientists from various countries who had different scientific research interests. PMID:23883703

  1. Antioxidative and antiviral properties of flowering cherry fruits (Prunus serrulata L. var. spontanea).

    PubMed

    Yook, Hong-Sun; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Park, Jung-Eun; Shin, Hyun-Jin

    2010-01-01

    The phenolic compounds of many fruits have been known to be efficient cellular protective antioxidants. In this study, antioxidative and antiviral properties of flowering cherry cultivars (Prunus yedoensis, Prunus sargentii, Prunus lannesiana, and Prunus cerasus) in Korea were investigated. The antioxidant property was assayed for specific activities including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) hydroxy radical scavenging activity, reducing power capacity, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) like activity. In addition, antiviral activity was determined by inhibition studies on the infection cycle of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), measured as minimum concentration of cherry extracts that inhibited 50% of cytopathic effect (CPE) on PEDV. Our results show that the four varieties of cherries contain substantially high antioxidants and antiviral activities. In particular, P. cerasus contains higher antioxidants and antiviral activities as well as polyphenolic content than other varieties. Our data indicate that Korean native cherry cultivars could be beneficial supplements of dietary antioxidants and natural antiviral agents. PMID:20821824

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  3. Antiviral activity of glycoprotein GP-1 isolated from Streptomyces kanasensis ZX01.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Feng, Juntao; Han, Lirong; Zhang, Xing

    2016-07-01

    Plant virus diseases have seriously damaged global food security. However, current antiviral agents are not efficient enough for the requirement of agriculture production. So, developing new efficient and nontoxic antiviral agents is imperative. GP-1, from Streptomyces kanasensis ZX01, is a new antiviral glycoprotein, of which the antiviral activity and the mode of action against Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were investigated in this study. The results showed that GP-1 could fracture TMV particles, and the infection and accumulation of TMV in host plants were inhibited. Moreover, GP-1 could induce systematic resistance against TMV in the host, according to the results of activities of defensive enzymes increasing, MDA decreasing and overexpression of pathogenesis-related proteins. Furthermore, GP-1 could promote growth of the host plant. In conclusion, GP-1 showed the ability to be developed as an efficient antiviral agent and a fertilizer for agriculture. PMID:27091231

  4. Viral evasion mechanisms of early antiviral responses involving regulation of ubiquitin pathways.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-08-01

    Early innate and cell-intrinsic responses are essential to protect host cells against pathogens. In turn, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to establish productive infections by counteracting host innate immune responses. Increasing evidence indicates that these antiviral factors may have a dual role by directly inhibiting viral replication as well as by sensing and transmitting signals to induce antiviral cytokines. Recent studies have pointed at new, unappreciated mechanisms of viral evasion of host innate protective responses including manipulating the host ubiquitin (Ub) system. Virus-mediated inhibition of antiviral factors by Ub-dependent degradation is emerging as a crucial mechanism for evading the antiviral response. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new mechanisms by which virus-encoded proteins inhibit Ub and Ub-like (Ubl) modification of host proteins involved in innate immune signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent findings and novel strategies that viruses have developed to counteract these early innate antiviral defenses.

  5. Engineered mammalian RNAi can elicit antiviral protection that negates the requirement for the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Bouhaddou, Mehdi; Sachs, David; tenOever, Benjamin Robert

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY While the intrinsic antiviral cell defenses of many kingdoms utilize pathogen-specific small RNAs, the antiviral response of chordates is primarily protein-based and not uniquely tailored to the incoming microbe. In an effort to explain this evolutionary bifurcation, we determined whether antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) was sufficient to replace the protein-based type I interferon (IFN-I) system of mammals. To this end, we recreated an RNAi-like response in mammals and determined its effectiveness to combat influenza A virus in vivo in the presence and absence of the canonical IFN-I system. Mammalian antiviral RNAi, elicited by either host- or virus-derived small RNAs, effectively attenuated virus and prevented disease independently of the innate immune response. These data find that chordates could have utilized RNAi as their primary antiviral cell defense and suggest that the IFN-I system emerged as a result of natural selection imposed by ancient pathogens. PMID:26549455

  6. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  7. Murine cytomegalovirus resistant to antivirals has genetic correlates with human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Scott, G M; Ng, H-L; Morton, C J; Parker, M W; Rawlinson, W D

    2005-08-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) resistance to antivirals is a significant clinical problem. Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection of mice is a well-described animal model for in vivo studies of CMV pathogenesis, although the mechanisms of MCMV antiviral susceptibility need elucidation. Mutants resistant to nucleoside analogues aciclovir, adefovir, cidofovir, ganciclovir, penciclovir and valaciclovir, and the pyrophosphate analogue foscarnet were generated by in vitro passage of MCMV (Smith) in increasing concentrations of antiviral. All MCMV antiviral resistant mutants contained DNA polymerase mutations identical or similar to HCMV DNA polymerase mutations known to confer antiviral resistance. Mapping of the mutations onto an MCMV DNA polymerase three-dimensional model generated using the Thermococcus gorgonarius Tgo polymerase crystal structure showed that the DNA polymerase mutations potentially confer resistance through changes in regions surrounding a catalytic aspartate triad. The ganciclovir-, penciclovir- and valaciclovir-resistant isolates also contained mutations within MCMV M97 identical or similar to recognized GCV-resistant mutations of HCMV UL97 protein kinase, and demonstrated cross-resistance to antivirals of the same class. This strongly suggests that MCMV M97 has a similar role to HCMV UL97 in the phosphorylation of nucleoside analogue antivirals. All MCMV mutants demonstrated replication-impaired phenotypes, with the lowest titre and plaque size observed for isolates containing mutations in both DNA polymerase and M97. These findings indicate DNA polymerase and protein kinase regions of potential importance for antiviral susceptibility and replication. The similarities between MCMV and HCMV mutations that arise under antiviral selective pressure increase the utility of MCMV as a model for in vivo studies of CMV antiviral resistance. PMID:16033961

  8. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  9. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for detection of antibodies to recombinant human interferon-alpha A

    SciTech Connect

    Palleroni, A.V.; Trown, P.W.

    1986-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the detection of antibodies to recombinant human leukocyte interferon A (rHuIFN-alpha A) in human serum has been developed and validated against the standard antiviral neutralization bioassay (ANB). The assay measures the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled rHuIFN-alpha A to immunoglobulins in serum. Aliquots of patients' sera are incubated with /sup 125/I-rHuIFN-alpha A and the complexes formed between antibodies in the sera and the /sup 125/I-rHuIFN-alpha A are precipitated with goat anti-human IgG serum. The radioactivity in the immune precipitate is a measure of the quantity of antibody (if present) in the serum. The sensitivity of this RIA is 5 ng of IgG/ml of serum.

  10. Treatment of Lassa virus infection in outbred guinea pigs with first-in-class human monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Cross, Robert W; Mire, Chad E; Branco, Luis M; Geisbert, Joan B; Rowland, Megan M; Heinrich, Megan L; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Grant, Donald S; Fullah, Mohamed; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Robinson, James E; Geisbert, Thomas W; Garry, Robert F

    2016-09-01

    Lassa fever is a significant health threat to West African human populations with hundreds of thousands of annual cases. There are no approved medical countermeasures currently available. Compassionate use of the antiviral drug ribavirin or transfusion of convalescent serum has resulted in mixed success depending on when administered or the donor source, respectively. We previously identified several recombinant human monoclonal antibodies targeting the glycoprotein of Lassa virus with strong neutralization profiles in vitro. Here, we demonstrate remarkable therapeutic efficacy using first-in-class human antibodies in a guinea pig model of Lassa infection thereby presenting a promising treatment alternative. PMID:27531367

  11. β-Thymosins participate in antiviral immunity of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Shi, Li-Jie; Zhao, Yan-Ran; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-08-01

    β-Thymosins participate in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation and differentiation, wound healing, and anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. Many studies have investigated vertebrate β-thymosins, whereas few reports have focused on invertebrate β-thymosins. In this study, nine isoforms of β-thymosins (PcThy-1 to PcThy-8) were identified from the red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The isoforms contained different numbers of the thymosin β actin-binding motif. PcThy-1 contained one thymosin β actin-binding motif, whereas PcThy-8 contained eight motifs. Western blot analysis with anti-PcThy-4 antibody showed that three to six isoforms were present in one tissue, and PcThy-4, PcThy-5, PcThy-6, and PcThy-7 were the main isoforms in several tissues. Time course expression analysis of PcThys at the protein level showed that PcThy-4 was upregulated in hemocytes and gills after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. PcThy-4, which contained four thymosin β actin-binding motifs, was selected for further research. Tissue distribution analysis by quantitative real-time PCR showed that PcThy-4 was present in tissues of the hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine at the transcriptional level. Transcriptional expression profiles showed that PcThy-4 was upregulated after WSSV challenge. In vivo RNAi and protein injection assay results showed that PcThy-4 inhibited the replication of WSSV in crayfish and enhanced the survival rate after WSSV infection. Furthermore, PcThy-4 promoted hemocyte phagocytosis of WSSV. Overall, results suggested that PcThys protected crayfish from WSSV infection and played an important role in antiviral immune response. PMID:25892020

  12. The use of trypan blue for counterstaining in the Sepharose bead immunofluorescence test. The application of the test for the demonstration of primate retrovirus-specific antibodies and antigens.

    PubMed

    Micheel, B

    1978-01-01

    The Sepharose bead immunoflurorescence test was performed by counterstaining the beads with trypan blue. This results in a red staining of negative beads which allows an easy distinction from positive green-fluorescent beads. Sepharose beads conjugated with viral proteins or antiviral antibodies were used to demonstrate Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMW)- and simian sarcoma virus (SSV) - specific antigens or antibodies. The test shows a high sensitivity and specificity and needs a small amount of material.

  13. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G.; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M.; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Garcia, Jordan A.; Mandl, Judith N.; Grodick, Rachael A.; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B.; Lenardo, Timothy E.; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cornall, Richard J.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  14. RNA interference-mediated antiviral defense in insects

    PubMed Central

    Gammon, Don B.; Mello, Craig C.

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) pathways are critical for the detection and inhibition of RNA virus replication in insects. Recent work has also implicated RNAi pathways in the establishment of persistent virus infections and in the control of DNA virus replication. Accumulating evidence suggests that diverse double-stranded RNAs produced by RNA and DNA viruses can trigger RNAi responses yet many viruses have evolved mechanisms to inhibit RNAi defenses. Therefore, an evolutionary arms race exists between host RNAi pathways and invading viral pathogens. Here we review recent advances in our knowledge of how insect RNAi pathways are elicited upon infection, the strategies used by viruses to counter these defenses, and discuss recent evidence implicating Piwi-interacting RNAs in antiviral defense. PMID:26034705

  15. Antiviral activity of squalamine: Role of electrostatic membrane binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Bernard; Qu, Wei; Mishra, Abhijit; Zasloff, Michael; Wong, Gerard; Luijten, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Recent workootnotetextM. Zasloff et al., Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. (USA) 108, 15978 (2011). has demonstrated that squalamine, a molecule found in the liver of sharks, exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral properties. It has been proposed that this activity results from the charge-density matching of squalamine and phospholipid membranes, causing squalamine to bind to membranes and displace proteins such as Rac1 that are crucial for the viral replication cycle. Here we investigate this hypothesis by numerical simulation of a coarse-grained model for the competition between Rac1 and squalamine in binding affinity to a flat lipid bilayer. We perform free-energy calculations to test the ability of squalamine to condense stacked bilayer systems and thereby displace bulkier Rac1 molecules. We directly compare our findings to small-angle x-ray scattering results for the same setup.

  16. Mucin biopolymers as broad-spectrum antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Lieleg, Oliver; Lieleg, Corinna; Bloom, Jesse; Buck, Christopher B.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Mucus is a porous biopolymer matrix that coats all wet epithelia in the human body and serves as the first line of defense against many pathogenic bacteria and viruses. However, under certain conditions viruses are able to penetrate this infection barrier, which compromises the protective function of native mucus. Here, we find that isolated porcine gastric mucin polymers, key structural components of native mucus, can protect an underlying cell layer from infection by small viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), or a strain of influenza A virus. Single particle analysis of virus mobility inside the mucin barrier reveals that this shielding effect is in part based on a retardation of virus diffusion inside the biopolymer matrix. Our findings suggest that purified mucins may be used as a broad-range antiviral supplement to personal hygiene products, baby formula or lubricants to support our immune system. PMID:22475261

  17. Quasispecies and the development of new antiviral strategies.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Esteban

    2003-01-01

    RNA virus populations consist of complex and dynamic mutant distributions, rather than defined genomic sequences. This feature confers great adaptability on viruses and is partly responsible for current difficulties of viral disease prevention and control. Mutant distributions, also termed mutant swarms or mutant clouds, were first proposed in a theory of molecular evolution termed quasispecies theory. The theoretical formulation of quasispecies and its links to present day RNA viruses are discussed. The need to accommodate antiviral strategies to the dynamic nature of viral populations is emphasized. In particular, recent results on viral extinction associated with enhanced mutagenesis (virus entry into error catastrophe) are reviewed and presented as an example of how the understanding of viruses as quasispecies could lead to a potential practical application in medicine.

  18. Recent Advances in Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Kawada, Norifumi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major worldwide health problem. Chronic infection induces continuous inflammation in the liver, progression of hepatic fibrosis, eventual cirrhosis, and possible hepatocellular carcinoma. Eradication of the virus is one of the most important treatment aims. A number of promising new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been developed over the past 10 years. Due to their increased efficacy, safety, and tolerability, interferon-free oral therapies with DAAs have been approved for patients with HCV, including those with cirrhosis. This review introduces the characteristics and results of recent clinical trials of several DAAs: NS3/4A protease inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors, and NS5B inhibitors. DAA treatment failure and prognosis after DAA therapy are also discussed. PMID:27022210

  19. Regulation of antiviral T cell responses by type I interferons.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Josh; Kalinke, Ulrich; Oxenius, Annette

    2015-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that are rapidly induced in different cell types during viral infections. The consequences of type I IFN signalling include direct antiviral activity, innate immune cell activation and regulation of adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we discuss recent conceptual advances in our understanding of indirect and direct regulation of T cell immunity by type I IFNs, which can either promote or inhibit T cell activation, proliferation, differentiation and survival. This regulation depends, to a large extent, on the timing of type I IFN exposure relative to T cell receptor signalling. Type I IFNs also provide activated T cells with resistance to natural killer cell-mediated elimination. PMID:25790790

  20. DOCK8 regulates lymphocyte shape integrity for skin antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Dove, Christopher G; Hor, Jyh Liang; Murdock, Heardley M; Strauss-Albee, Dara M; Garcia, Jordan A; Mandl, Judith N; Grodick, Rachael A; Jing, Huie; Chandler-Brown, Devon B; Lenardo, Timothy E; Crawford, Greg; Matthews, Helen F; Freeman, Alexandra F; Cornall, Richard J; Germain, Ronald N; Mueller, Scott N; Su, Helen C

    2014-12-15

    DOCK8 mutations result in an inherited combined immunodeficiency characterized by increased susceptibility to skin and other infections. We show that when DOCK8-deficient T and NK cells migrate through confined spaces, they develop cell shape and nuclear deformation abnormalities that do not impair chemotaxis but contribute to a distinct form of catastrophic cell death we term cytothripsis. Such defects arise during lymphocyte migration in collagen-dense tissues when DOCK8, through CDC42 and p21-activated kinase (PAK), is unavailable to coordinate cytoskeletal structures. Cytothripsis of DOCK8-deficient cells prevents the generation of long-lived skin-resident memory CD8 T cells, which in turn impairs control of herpesvirus skin infections. Our results establish that DOCK8-regulated shape integrity of lymphocytes prevents cytothripsis and promotes antiviral immunity in the skin. PMID:25422492

  1. Total Synthesis of the Antiviral Natural Product Houttuynoid B.

    PubMed

    Kerl, Thomas; Berger, Florian; Schmalz, Hans-Günther

    2016-02-24

    The first total synthesis of houttuynoid B, a powerful antiviral flavonoid glycoside from the Chinese plant Houttuynia cordata, is described. In a key step, a Baker-Venkataraman rearrangement employing an already glycosylated substrate was used to efficiently set up the fully functionalized carbon skeleton. The required benzofuran building block was prepared through a domino Sonogashira coupling/5-endo-dig cyclization and converted into a stable 1-hydroxybenzotriazole-derived active ester prior to linking with a galactosylated hydroxyacetophenone unit. The elaborated synthesis requires only nine steps (11 % overall yield) along the longest linear sequence and paves the way for the preparation of structurally related compounds for further biological evaluation. PMID:26748612

  2. Resistance to Rhabdoviridae Infection and Subversion of Antiviral Responses.

    PubMed

    Blondel, Danielle; Maarifi, Ghizlane; Nisole, Sébastien; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2015-07-07

    Interferon (IFN) treatment induces the expression of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). However, only a selection of their products have been demonstrated to be responsible for the inhibition of rhabdovirus replication in cultured cells; and only a few have been shown to play a role in mediating the antiviral response in vivo using gene knockout mouse models. IFNs inhibit rhabdovirus replication at different stages via the induction of a variety of ISGs. This review will discuss how individual ISG products confer resistance to rhabdoviruses by blocking viral entry, degrading single stranded viral RNA, inhibiting viral translation or preventing release of virions from the cell. Furthermore, this review will highlight how these viruses counteract the host IFN system.

  3. Resistance to Rhabdoviridae Infection and Subversion of Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Danielle; Maarifi, Ghizlane; Nisole, Sébastien; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.

    2015-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) treatment induces the expression of hundreds of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). However, only a selection of their products have been demonstrated to be responsible for the inhibition of rhabdovirus replication in cultured cells; and only a few have been shown to play a role in mediating the antiviral response in vivo using gene knockout mouse models. IFNs inhibit rhabdovirus  replication at different stages via the induction of a variety of ISGs. This review will discuss how individual ISG products confer resistance to rhabdoviruses by blocking viral entry, degrading single stranded viral RNA, inhibiting viral translation or preventing release of virions from the cell. Furthermore, this review will highlight how these viruses counteract the host IFN system. PMID:26198243

  4. Type I Interferons in Newborns—Neurotoxicity versus Antiviral Defense

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In most children and adults, primary infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is asymptomatic. However, very rarely (incidence of 1 in 1,000,000), it can cause herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). HSE also occurs in infants but with a much starker incidence of one in three. This age difference in susceptibility to HSV-1-caused HSE is not well understood. In a recent article in mBio, authors have identified the choroid plexus as the anatomical site of robust HSV-1 replication in the brain. They point to low levels of type I interferon (IFN) receptor as causal of the lack of HSV-1 replication control in neonates, in contrast to adults. Here, I discuss these findings in the context of human genetic evidence. I point to the balancing act of type I IFN acting as a neurotoxin and an antiviral agent, an evolutionary choice of a lesser evil. PMID:27190218

  5. Investment in antiviral drugs: a real options approach.

    PubMed

    Attema, Arthur E; Lugnér, Anna K; Feenstra, Talitha L

    2010-10-01

    Real options analysis is a promising approach to model investment under uncertainty. We employ this approach to value stockpiling of antiviral drugs as a precautionary measure against a possible influenza pandemic. Modifications of the real options approach to include risk attitude and deviations from expected utility are presented. We show that risk aversion counteracts the tendency to delay investment for this case of precautionary investment, which is in contrast to earlier applications of risk aversion to real options analysis. Moreover, we provide a numerical example using real world data and discuss the implications of real options analysis for health policy. Suggestions for further extensions of the model and a comparison with the expected value of information analysis are put forward.

  6. Griffithsin: An Antiviral Lectin with Outstanding Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT), an algae-derived lectin, is one of the most potent viral entry inhibitors discovered to date. It is currently being developed as a microbicide with broad-spectrum activity against several enveloped viruses. GRFT can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection at picomolar concentrations, surpassing the ability of most anti-HIV agents. The potential to inhibit other viruses as well as parasites has also been demonstrated. Griffithsin’s antiviral activity stems from its ability to bind terminal mannoses present in high-mannose oligosaccharides and crosslink these glycans on the surface of the viral envelope glycoproteins. Here, we review structural and biochemical studies that established mode of action and facilitated construction of GRFT analogs, mechanisms that may lead to resistance, and in vitro and pre-clinical results that support the therapeutic potential of this lectin. PMID:27783038

  7. [Eenie, Meenie, Miney, Moe, who is responsible for the antibody-dependent enhancement of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus infection?].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Wei; Xing, Xiu-Mei; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-07-01

    Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (AMDV) causes a persistent infection associated with immune complex disease, hypergammaglobulinemia, and high levels of antiviral antibodies. Despite the presence of an antibody, the virus is not cleared in vivo. Pre-existing antibodies may enhance viral infections, by Fc-receptor-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), but the mechanism that underlies ADE has not been fully defined. Three models have been proposed, including: (1) interactions between antibody and FcR, complement C3 fragment and CR, or between C1q and C1qR, which promotes viral attachment to cells; (2) suppression of IFN-gamma-mediated host-cell antiviral gene expression by the upregulation of negative regulators of pathogen pattern recognition; and (3) the promotion of early IL-10 secretion. In addition, the role of cytokine IL-6 in ADE mediated disease development is discussed, to facilitate a better understanding of the pathogenesis of AMDV infection, as well as give insights into rational vaccine design approaches. PMID:25272602

  8. Formation of antiviral cytoplasmic granules during orthopoxvirus infection.

    PubMed

    Simpson-Holley, M; Kedersha, N; Dower, K; Rubins, K H; Anderson, P; Hensley, L E; Connor, J H

    2011-02-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) mutants lacking the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-binding E3L protein (ΔE3L mutant VV) show restricted replication in most cell types, as dsRNA produced by VV activates protein kinase R (PKR), leading to eIF2α phosphorylation and impaired translation initiation. Here we show that cells infected with ΔE3L mutant VV assemble cytoplasmic granular structures which surround the VV replication factories at an early stage of the nonproductive infection. These structures contain the stress granule-associated proteins G3BP, TIA-1, and USP10, as well as poly(A)-containing RNA. These structures lack large ribosomal subunit proteins, suggesting that they are translationally inactive. Formation of these punctate structures correlates with restricted replication, as they occur in >80% of cells infected with ΔE3L mutant VV but in only 10% of cells infected with wild-type VV. We therefore refer to these structures as antiviral granules (AVGs). Formation of AVGs requires PKR and phosphorylated eIF2α, as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking PKR displayed reduced granule formation and MEFs lacking phosphorylatable eIF2α showed no granule formation. In both cases, these decreased levels of AVG formation correlated with increased ΔE3L mutant VV replication. Surprisingly, MEFs lacking the AVG component protein TIA-1 supported increased replication of ΔE3L mutant VV, despite increased eIF2α phosphorylation and the assembly of AVGs that lacked TIA-1. These data indicate that the effective PKR-mediated restriction of ΔE3L mutant VV replication requires AVG formation subsequent to eIF2α phosphorylation. This is a novel finding that supports the hypothesis that the formation of subcellular protein aggregates is an important component of the successful cellular antiviral response.

  9. Curious discoveries in antiviral drug development: the role of serendipity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2015-07-01

    Antiviral drug development has often followed a curious meandrous route, guided by serendipity rather than rationality. This will be illustrated by ten examples. The polyanionic compounds (i) polyethylene alanine (PEA) and (ii) suramin were designed as an antiviral agent (PEA) or known as an antitrypanosomal agent (suramin), before they emerged as, respectively, a depilatory agent, or reverse transcriptase inhibitor. The 2',3'-dideoxynucleosides (ddNs analogues) (iii) have been (and are still) used in the "Sanger" DNA sequencing technique, although they are now commercialized as nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) in the treatment of HIV infections. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (iv) was discovered as a selective anti-herpes simplex virus compound and is now primarily used for the treatment of varicella-zoster virus infections. The prototype of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (ANPs), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine [(S)-HPMPA], (v) was never commercialized, although it gave rise to several marketed products (cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir). 1-[2-(Hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (vi) and TIBO (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4-benzodiazepin-2(1H)]-one and -thione) (vii) paved the way to a number of compounds (i.e., nevirapine, delavirdine, etravirine, and rilpivirine), which are now collectively called non-NRTIs. The bicyclam AMD3100 (viii) was originally described as an anti-HIV agent before it became later marketed as a stem cell mobilizer. The S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitors (ix), while active against a broad range of (-)RNA viruses and poxviruses may be particularly effective against Ebola virus, and for (x) the O-ANP derivatives, the potential application range encompasses virtually all DNA viruses. PMID:25726922

  10. Management of direct-acting antiviral agent failures.

    PubMed

    Buti, Maria; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Esteban, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Failure to respond to the approved combinations of multiple direct-acting antiviral agents is relatively low in hepatitis C virus treatment registration studies, with rates of 1% to 7%, depending on the patients' baseline characteristics. In real life, failure is slightly higher, likely because of lower compliance. Treatment failures are usually related to relapse and less often to on-treatment viral breakthrough. Hepatitis C drug-resistant variants are detected in most patients who do not achieve viral eradication. The risk of developing these variants depends on host- and virus-related factors, the properties of the drugs used, and the treatment strategies applied. Patients who carry resistance-associated variants may not obtain benefits from treatment and are at risk of disease progression and transmission of the variants. Whether hepatitis C resistance-associated variants persist depends on their type: NS3-4A variants often disappear gradually after therapy is stopped, whereas NS5A variants tend to persist for more than 2 years. The best way to prevent emergence of resistant variants is to eliminate the virus at the first treatment using highly potent antivirals with genetic barriers to resistance. In patients failing first-generation protease inhibitors, combination therapies with sofosbuvir and NS5 inhibitors have proven effective. Some salvage regimens can be shortened to 12 weeks by addition of ribavirin. The optimal treatment for patients who fail an NS5A inhibitor and those with multidrug-resistant variants remains to be defined, and research efforts should continue to focus on treatment for these patients.

  11. Evidence of the Innate Antiviral and Neuroprotective Properties of Progranulin

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Hyeon-Sook; Lo, Yungtai; Choi, Namjong; Letendre, Scott; Lee, Sunhee C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Compelling data exist that show that normal levels of progranulin (PGRN) are required for successful CNS aging. PGRN production is also modulated by inflammation and infection, but no data are available on the production and role of PGRN during CNS HIV infection. Methods To determine the relationships between PGRN and HIV disease, neurocognition, and inflammation, we analyzed 107 matched CSF and plasma samples from CHARTER, a well-characterized HIV cohort. Levels of PGRN were determined by ELISA and compared to levels of several inflammatory mediators (IFNγ, IL-6, IL-10, IP-10, MCP-1, TNFα, IL-1β, IL-4 and IL-13), as well as clinical, virologic and demographic parameters. The relationship between HIV infection and PGRN was also examined in HIV-infected primary human microglial cultures. Results In plasma, PGRN levels correlated with the viral load (VL, p<0.001). In the CSF of subjects with undetectable VL, lower PGRN was associated with neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.046). CSF PGRN correlated with CSF IP-10, TNFα and IL-10, and plasma PGRN correlated with plasma IP-10. In vitro, microglial HIV infection increased PGRN production and PGRN knockdown increased HIV replication, demonstrating that PGRN is an innate antiviral protein. Conclusions We propose that PGRN plays dual roles in people living with HIV disease. With active HIV replication, PGRN is induced in infected macrophages and microglia and functions as an antiviral protein. In individuals without active viral replication, decreased PGRN production contributes to neurocognitive dysfunction, probably through a diminution of its neurotrophic functions. Our results have implications for the pathogenesis, biomarker studies and therapy for HIV diseases including HIV-associated neurocognitive dysfunction (HAND). PMID:24878635

  12. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus.

  13. Dysbiosis-induced IL-33 contributes to impaired antiviral immunity in the genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Meehyang; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Inhwa; Yu, Je-Wook; Nakae, Susumu; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Commensal microbiota are well known to play an important role in antiviral immunity by providing immune inductive signals; however, the consequence of dysbiosis on antiviral immunity remains unclear. We demonstrate that dysbiosis caused by oral antibiotic treatment directly impairs antiviral immunity following viral infection of the vaginal mucosa. Antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to mucosal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection more rapidly than water-fed mice, and also showed delayed viral clearance at the site of infection. However, innate immune responses, including type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine production at infection sites, as well as induction of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in draining lymph nodes, were not impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. By screening the factors controlling antiviral immunity, we found that IL-33, an alarmin released in response to tissue damage, was secreted from vaginal epithelium after the depletion of commensal microbiota. This cytokine suppresses local antiviral immunity by blocking the migration of effector T cells to the vaginal tissue, thereby inhibiting the production of IFN-γ, a critical cytokine for antiviral defense, at local infection sites. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of homeostasis maintained by commensal bacteria, and reveal a deleterious consequence of dysbiosis in antiviral immune defense. PMID:26811463

  14. Antiviral activity of ginsenosides against coxsackievirus B3, enterovirus 71, and human rhinovirus 3

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jae-Hyoung; Choi, Hwa-Jung; Song, Hyuk-Hwan; Hong, Eun-Hye; Lee, Bo-Ra; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Choi, Kwangman; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Lee, Yong-Pyo; Cho, Sungchan; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Background Ginsenosides are the major components responsible for the biochemical and pharmacological actions of ginseng, and have been shown to have various biological activities. In this study, we investigated the antiviral activities of seven ginsenosides [protopanaxatriol (PT) type: Re, Rf, and Rg2; protopanaxadiol (PD) type: Rb1, Rb2, Rc, and Rd)] against coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), enterovirus 71 (EV71), and human rhinovirus 3 (HRV3). Methods Assays of antiviral activity and cytotoxicity were evaluated by the sulforhodamine B method using the cytopathic effect (CPE) reduction assay. Results The antiviral assays demonstrated that, of the seven ginsenosides, the PT-type ginsenosides (Re, Rf, and Rg2) possess significant antiviral activities against CVB3 and HRV3 at a concentration of 100 μg/mL. Among the PT-type ginsenosides, only ginsenoside Rg2 showed significant anti-EV71 activity with no cytotoxicity to cells at 100 μg/mL. The PD-type ginsenosides (Rb1, Rb2, Rc, and Rd), by contrast, did not show any significant antiviral activity against CVB3, EV71, and HRV3, and exhibited cytotoxic effects to virus-infected cells. Notably, the antiviral efficacies of PT-type ginsenosides were comparable to those of ribavirin, a commonly used antiviral drug. Conclusion Collectively, our findings suggest that the ginsenosides Re, Rf, and Rg2 have the potential to be effective in the treatment of CVB3, EV71, and HRV3 infection. PMID:25378991

  15. Antiviral activity of silver nanoparticle/chitosan composites against H1N1 influenza A virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yasutaka; Ono, Takeshi; Miyahira, Yasushi; Nguyen, Vinh Quang; Matsui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki

    2013-02-01

    Silver nanoparticle (Ag NP)/chitosan (Ch) composites with antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus were prepared. The Ag NP/Ch composites were obtained as yellow or brown floc-like powders following reaction at room temperature in aqueous medium. Ag NPs (3.5, 6.5, and 12.9 nm average diameters) were embedded into the chitosan matrix without aggregation or size alternation. The antiviral activity of the Ag NP/Ch composites was evaluated by comparing the TCID50 ratio of viral suspensions treated with the composites to untreated suspensions. For all sizes of Ag NPs tested, antiviral activity against H1N1 influenza A virus increased as the concentration of Ag NPs increased; chitosan alone exhibited no antiviral activity. Size dependence of the Ag NPs on antiviral activity was also observed: antiviral activity was generally stronger with smaller Ag NPs in the composites. These results indicate that Ag NP/Ch composites interacting with viruses exhibit antiviral activity.

  16. Dysbiosis-induced IL-33 contributes to impaired antiviral immunity in the genital mucosa.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Eun; Kim, Byoung-Chan; Chang, Dong-Ho; Kwon, Meehyang; Lee, Sun Young; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Inhwa; Yu, Je-Wook; Nakae, Susumu; Lee, Heung Kyu

    2016-02-01

    Commensal microbiota are well known to play an important role in antiviral immunity by providing immune inductive signals; however, the consequence of dysbiosis on antiviral immunity remains unclear. We demonstrate that dysbiosis caused by oral antibiotic treatment directly impairs antiviral immunity following viral infection of the vaginal mucosa. Antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to mucosal herpes simplex virus type 2 infection more rapidly than water-fed mice, and also showed delayed viral clearance at the site of infection. However, innate immune responses, including type I IFN and proinflammatory cytokine production at infection sites, as well as induction of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses in draining lymph nodes, were not impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. By screening the factors controlling antiviral immunity, we found that IL-33, an alarmin released in response to tissue damage, was secreted from vaginal epithelium after the depletion of commensal microbiota. This cytokine suppresses local antiviral immunity by blocking the migration of effector T cells to the vaginal tissue, thereby inhibiting the production of IFN-γ, a critical cytokine for antiviral defense, at local infection sites. These findings provide insight into the mechanisms of homeostasis maintained by commensal bacteria, and reveal a deleterious consequence of dysbiosis in antiviral immune defense.

  17. Induction and suppression of tick cell antiviral RNAi responses by tick-borne flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Schnettler, Esther; Tykalová, Hana; Watson, Mick; Sharma, Mayuri; Sterken, Mark G.; Obbard, Darren J.; Lewis, Samuel H.; McFarlane, Melanie; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; Barry, Gerald; Weisheit, Sabine; Best, Sonja M.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.; Chase-Topping, Margo E.; Gould, Ernest A.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Fazakerley, John K.; Kohl, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted by distantly related arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes (class Insecta) and ticks (class Arachnida). RNA interference (RNAi) is the major antiviral mechanism in arthropods against arboviruses. Unlike in mosquitoes, tick antiviral RNAi is not understood, although this information is important to compare arbovirus/host interactions in different classes of arbovirus vectos. Using an Ixodes scapularis-derived cell line, key Argonaute proteins involved in RNAi and the response against tick-borne Langat virus (Flaviviridae) replication were identified and phylogenetic relationships characterized. Analysis of small RNAs in infected cells showed the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs), which are key molecules of the antiviral RNAi response. Importantly, viRNAs were longer (22 nucleotides) than those from other arbovirus vectors and mapped at highest frequency to the termini of the viral genome, as opposed to mosquito-borne flaviviruses. Moreover, tick-borne flaviviruses expressed subgenomic flavivirus RNAs that interfere with tick RNAi. Our results characterize the antiviral RNAi response in tick cells including phylogenetic analysis of genes encoding antiviral proteins, and viral interference with this pathway. This shows important differences in antiviral RNAi between the two major classes of arbovirus vectors, and our data broadens our understanding of arthropod antiviral RNAi. PMID:25053841

  18. Nitric oxide attenuates matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meschiari, Cesar A; Izidoro-Toledo, Tatiane; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases involve critical mechanisms including impaired nitric oxide (NO) levels and abnormal matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. While NO downregulates MMP expression in some cell types, no previous study has examined whether NO downregulates MMP levels in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that NO donors could attenuate MMP-9 production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a result of less NFκB activation or cyclic GMP (cGMP)-mediated mechanisms. We studied the effects of DetaNONOate (10-400 μM) or SNAP (50-400 μM) on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 10 nM)-induced increases in MMP-9 activity (by gel zymography) or concentrations (by ELISA) as well as on a tissue inhibitor of MMPs' (TIMP)-1 concentrations (by ELISA) in the conditioned medium of HUVECs incubated for 24 h with these drugs. We also examined whether the irreversible inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ modified the effects of SNAP or whether 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable analog of cGMP) influenced PMA-induced effects on MMP-9 expression. Total and phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations were measured in HUVEC lysates to assess NFκB activation. Both NO donors attenuated PMA-induced increases in MMP-9 activity and concentrations without significantly affecting TIMP-1 concentrations. This effect was not modified by ODQ, and 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect MMP-9 concentrations. While PMA increased phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations, SNAP had no influence on this effect. In conclusion, this study shows that NO donors may attenuate imbalanced MMP expression and activity in endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms. Our results may offer an important pharmacological strategy to approach cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Nitric oxide attenuates matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meschiari, Cesar A; Izidoro-Toledo, Tatiane; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases involve critical mechanisms including impaired nitric oxide (NO) levels and abnormal matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. While NO downregulates MMP expression in some cell types, no previous study has examined whether NO downregulates MMP levels in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that NO donors could attenuate MMP-9 production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a result of less NFκB activation or cyclic GMP (cGMP)-mediated mechanisms. We studied the effects of DetaNONOate (10-400 μM) or SNAP (50-400 μM) on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 10 nM)-induced increases in MMP-9 activity (by gel zymography) or concentrations (by ELISA) as well as on a tissue inhibitor of MMPs' (TIMP)-1 concentrations (by ELISA) in the conditioned medium of HUVECs incubated for 24 h with these drugs. We also examined whether the irreversible inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ modified the effects of SNAP or whether 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable analog of cGMP) influenced PMA-induced effects on MMP-9 expression. Total and phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations were measured in HUVEC lysates to assess NFκB activation. Both NO donors attenuated PMA-induced increases in MMP-9 activity and concentrations without significantly affecting TIMP-1 concentrations. This effect was not modified by ODQ, and 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect MMP-9 concentrations. While PMA increased phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations, SNAP had no influence on this effect. In conclusion, this study shows that NO donors may attenuate imbalanced MMP expression and activity in endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms. Our results may offer an important pharmacological strategy to approach cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23456480

  20. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-07-15

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells.

  1. Antibody Avidity in Humoral Immune Responses in Bangladeshi Children and Adults following Administration of an Oral Killed Cholera Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Mohammad Murshid; Leung, Daniel T.; Akhtar, Marjahan; Nazim, Mohammad; Akter, Sarmin; Uddin, Taher; Khanam, Farhana; Mahbuba, Deena Al; Ahmad, Shaikh Meshbahuddin; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur Rahman; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Ryan, Edward T.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody avidity for antigens following disease or vaccination increases with affinity maturation and somatic hypermutation. In this study, we followed children and adults in Bangladesh for 1 year following oral cholera vaccination and measured the avidity of antibodies to the T cell-dependent antigen cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) and the T cell-independent antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in comparison with responses in other immunological measurements. Children produced CTB-specific IgG and IgA antibodies of high avidity following vaccination, which persisted for several months; the magnitudes of responses were comparable to those seen in adult vaccinees. The avidity of LPS-specific IgG and IgA antibodies in vaccinees increased significantly shortly after the second dose of vaccine but waned rapidly to baseline levels thereafter. CTB-specific memory B cells were present for only a short time following vaccination, and we did not find significant memory B cell responses to LPS in any age group. For older children, there was a significant correlation between CTB-specific memory T cell responses after the second dose of vaccine and CTB-specific IgG antibody avidity indices over the subsequent year. These findings suggest that vaccination induces a longer-lasting increase in the avidity of antibodies to a T cell-dependent antigen than is measured by a memory B cell response to that antigen and that early memory T cell responses correlate well with the subsequent development of higher-avidity antibodies. PMID:23925888

  2. ANTIBODY FORMATION IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, M.

    1961-01-01

    Neutralizing activity against T2 bacteriophage appeared in cultures of lymph node cells from normal rats in response to their in vitro stimulation with a cell-free filtrate derived from homogenized rat macrophages which had been incubated with T2 bacteriophage. This activity was specifically directed against T2 bacteriophage. It resided in a fraction of the culture fluid which had the salting-out properties of serum globulin. Phage neutralization was inhibited by antibody specific for rat serum gamma globulin. Antibody production against T2 bacteriophage in cultures of lymph node cells from normal animals failed to occur if (a) T2 bacteriophage alone was added, (b) if the incubation period of macrophages and T2 phage was unduly shortened, (c) if the cell-free filtrate was heated at 80–100°C for 15 minutes, (d) if more than an optimal amount of T2 bacteriophage was added to the macrophages. Additional factors which prevented the formation of antibody were the heat inactivation of the lymph node cells or the addition to the culture medium of either streptomycin or ribonuclease. Finally, it was found that macrophages and lymph node cells had to be obtained from animals of one and the same species. All essential findings on the production of antibody to T2 bacteriophage in vitro could be confirmed by substitution of the chick embryo for the tissue culture medium. The results are discussed in terms of a possible mechanism of antibody production in which an RNAse-sensitive substance resulting from the interaction of macrophages and antigen is capable of stimulating antibody synthesis in lymphocytic cells. PMID:13893304

  3. Surfactant-Modified Nanoclay Exhibits an Antiviral Activity with High Potency and Broad Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian-Jong; Wei, Jiun-Chiou; Lee, Yi-Ling; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nanomaterials have the characteristics associated with high surface-to-volume ratios and have been explored for their antiviral activity. Despite some success, cytotoxicity has been an issue in nanomaterial-based antiviral strategies. We previously developed a novel method to fully exfoliate montmorillonite clay to generate the most fundamental units of nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP). We further modified NSP by capping with various surfactants and found that the surfactant-modified NSP (NSQ) was less cytotoxic. In this study, we tested the antiviral potentials of a series of natural-clay-derived nanomaterials. Among the derivatives, NSP modified with anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (NSQc), but not the pristine clay, unmodified NSP, a silver nanoparticle-NSP hybrid, NSP modified with cationic n-octadecanylamine hydrochloride salt, or NSP modified with nonionic Triton X-100, significantly suppressed the plaque-forming ability of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) at noncytotoxic concentrations. NSQc also blocked infection with dengue virus (DEN) and influenza A virus. Regarding the antiviral mechanism, NSQc interfered with viral binding through electrostatic interaction, since its antiviral activity can be neutralized by Polybrene, a cationic polymer. Furthermore, NSQc reduced the lethality of JEV and DEN infection in mouse challenge models. Thus, the surfactant-modified exfoliated nanoclay NSQc may be a novel nanomaterial with broad and potent antiviral activity. IMPORTANCE Nanomaterials have being investigated as antimicrobial agents, yet their antiviral potential is overshadowed by their cytotoxicity. By using a novel method, we fully exfoliated montmorillonite clay to generate the most fundamental units of nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP). Here, we show that the surfactant-modified NSP (NSQ) is less cytotoxic and that NSQc (NSP modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate) could potently block infection by dengue virus (DEN), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV

  4. [Effectiveness and safety of antiviral therapy of military personnel suffering from chronic hepatitis C].

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, K V; Gusev, D A; Kozlov, K V; Shishkin, M K; Sukachev, V S; Shakhmanov, D M; Zhabrov, S S

    2015-04-01

    In order to evaluate effectiveness and safety of antiviral therapy schemes examined and treated 191 patients with chronic bepatitis C were assigned standard interferon and ribavirin, pegslated interferon and ribavirin, the total duration of the course coput 24-48 weeks. Based on clinical and laboratory parameters evaluated the safety of antiviral therapy. Formation of sustainable viral response, depending on the genotype observed, was given at 58,9-70%.of patients. In case of insufficient. antiviral therapy was prescribed a second course that will improve the effectiveness of treatment to 90-95%. Correction of adverse events was held lower dosages of interferon and/or ribavirin.

  5. Autoreactivity of primary human immunoglobulins ancestral to hypermutated human antibodies that neutralize HCMV.

    PubMed

    McLean, Gary R; Cho, Chin-wen; Schrader, John W

    2006-05-01

    The human antibody response to the AD-2S1 epitope of glycoprotein B (gB) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is dominated by a family of closely related somatically mutated antibodies. These antibodies neutralize viral infectivity and the genes encoding them are derived from two commonly used germ-line variable (V) region genes, IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Recombination of these V genes with the appropriate junctional diversity generates genes that encode primary immunoglobulins that bind to AD-2S1. To further understand the initial primary immunoglobulin response to AD-2S1 we synthesized the germ-line-based ancestor of one such family of antibodies and showed that it bound gB at the AD-2S1 epitope. Here we show that the germ-line ancestor of a second family of antibodies likewise binds to gB. We further show that one of the ancestral primary immunoglobulins, but not the other, also recognized autoantigens. In contrast, the hypermutated derivatives did not demonstrate autoreactivity and minor structural changes in the primary immunoglobulin were sufficient to generate or abolish autoreactivity or to change specificity. Thus, our demonstration that the ancestor of a highly mutated, non-autoreactive antiviral IgG antibody binds nuclear and cell-surface autoantigens indicates for the first time that self-reactivity is not necessarily a barrier to development into a follicular B lymphocyte that undergoes antigen-initiated affinity maturation.

  6. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  7. Therapeutic Efficacy of Antibodies Lacking FcγR against Lethal Dengue Virus Infection Is Due to Neutralizing Potency and Blocking of Enhancing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Katherine L.; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Beltramello, Martina; Johnson, Syd; Sallusto, Federica; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Diamond, Michael S.; Harris, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) are life-threatening complications following infection with one of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV). At present, no vaccine or antiviral therapies are available against dengue. Here, we characterized a panel of eight human or mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and their modified variants lacking effector function and dissected the mechanism by which some protect against antibody-enhanced lethal DENV infection. We found that neutralizing modified MAbs that recognize the fusion loop or the A strand epitopes on domains II and III of the envelope protein, respectively, act therapeutically by competing with and/or displacing enhancing antibodies. By analyzing these relationships, we developed a novel in vitro suppression-of-enhancement assay that predicts the ability of modified MAbs to act therapeutically against antibody-enhanced disease in vivo. These studies provide new insight into the biology of DENV pathogenesis and the requirements for antibodies to treat lethal DENV disease. PMID:23459315

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of antibodies lacking Fcγ receptor binding against lethal dengue virus infection is due to neutralizing potency and blocking of enhancing antibodies [corrected].

    PubMed

    Williams, Katherine L; Sukupolvi-Petty, Soila; Beltramello, Martina; Johnson, Syd; Sallusto, Federica; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Diamond, Michael S; Harris, Eva

    2013-02-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) are life-threatening complications following infection with one of the four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV). At present, no vaccine or antiviral therapies are available against dengue. Here, we characterized a panel of eight human or mouse-human chimeric monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and their modified variants lacking effector function and dissected the mechanism by which some protect against antibody-enhanced lethal DENV infection. We found that neutralizing modified MAbs that recognize the fusion loop or the A strand epitopes on domains II and III of the envelope protein, respectively, act therapeutically by competing with and/or displacing enhancing antibodies. By analyzing these relationships, we developed a novel in vitro suppression-of-enhancement assay that predicts the ability of modified MAbs to act therapeutically against antibody-enhanced disease in vivo. These studies provide new insight into the biology of DENV pathogenesis and the requirements for antibodies to treat lethal DENV disease.

  9. Separation methods for acyclovir and related antiviral compounds.

    PubMed

    Loregian, A; Gatti, R; Palù, G; De Palo, E F

    2001-11-25

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug, which selectively inhibits replication of members of the herpes group of DNA viruses with low cell toxicity. Valaciclovir (VACV), a prodrug of ACV is usually preferred in the oral treatment of viral infections, mainly herpes simplex virus (HSV). Also other analogues such as ganciclovir and penciclovir are discussed here. The former acts against cytomegalovirus (CMV) in general and the latter against CMV retinitis. The action mechanism of these antiviral drugs is presented briefly here, mainly via phosphorylation and inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. The therapeutic use and the pharmacokinetics are also outlined. The measurement of the concentration of acyclovir and related compounds in biological samples poses a particularly significant challenge because these drugs tend to be structurally similar to endogenous substances. The analysis requires the use of highly selective analytical techniques and chromatography methods are a first choice to determine drug content in pharmaceuticals and to measure them in body fluids. Chromatography can be considered the procedure of choice for the bio-analysis of this class of antiviral compounds, as this methodology is characterised by good specificity and accuracy and it is particularly useful when metabolites need to be monitored. Among chromatographic techniques, the reversed-phase (RP) HPLC is widely used for the analysis. C18 Silica columns from 7.5 to 30 cm in length are used, the separation is carried out mainly at room temperature and less than 10 min is sufficient for the analysis at 1.0-1.5 ml/min of flow-rate. The separation methods require an isocratic system, and various authors have proposed a variety of mobile phases. The detection requires absorbance or fluorescence measurements carried out at 250-254 nm and at lambdaex=260-285 nm, lambdaem=375-380 nm, respectively. The detection limit is about 0.3-10 ng/ml but the most important aspect is related to the sample treatment

  10. Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance

    PubMed Central

    McKimm‐Breschkin, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McKimm‐Breschkin (2012) Influenza neuraminidase inhibitors: Antiviral action and mechanisms of resistance. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(Suppl. 1), 25–36. There are two major classes of antivirals available for the treatment and prevention of influenza, the M2 inhibitors and the neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs). The M2 inhibitors are cheap, but they are only effective against influenza A viruses, and resistance arises rapidly. The current influenza A H3N2 and pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses are already resistant to the M2 inhibitors as are many H5N1 viruses. There are four NAIs licensed in some parts of the world, zanamivir, oseltamivir, peramivir, and a long‐acting NAI, laninamivir. This review focuses on resistance to the NAIs. Because of differences in their chemistry and subtle differences in NA structures, resistance can be both NAI‐ and subtype specific. This results in different drug resistance profiles, for example, the H274Y mutation confers resistance to oseltamivir and peramivir, but not to zanamivir, and only in N1 NAs. Mutations at E119, D198, I222, R292, and N294 can also reduce NAI sensitivity. In the winter of 2007–2008, an oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A(H1N1) strain with an H274Y mutation emerged in the northern hemisphere and spread rapidly around the world. In contrast to earlier evidence of such resistant viruses being unfit, this mutant virus remained fully transmissible and pathogenic and became the major seasonal A(H1N1) virus globally within a year. This resistant A(H1N1) virus was displaced by the sensitive A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Approximately 0·5–1·0% of community A(H1N1)pdm09 isolates are currently resistant to oseltamivir. It is now apparent that variation in non‐active site amino acids can affect the fitness of the enzyme and compensate for mutations that confer high‐level oseltamivir resistance resulting in minimal impact on enzyme function. PMID:23279894

  11. Identification of Antiviral Agents Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Promoter from Extracts of Indonesian Marine Organisms by a Novel Cell-Based Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Atsuya; Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Tamaki, Mayumi; Setiawan, Andi; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Toyama, Masaaki; Baba, Masanori; de Voogd, Nicole J.; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    The current treatments of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) face a limited choice of vaccine, antibody and antiviral agents. The development of additional antiviral agents is still needed for improvement of CHB therapy. In this study, we established a screening system in order to identify compounds inhibiting the core promoter activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV). We prepared 80 extracts of marine organisms from the coral reefs of Indonesia and screened them by using this system. Eventually, two extracts showed high inhibitory activity (>95%) and low cytotoxicity (66% to 77%). Solvent fractionation, column chromatography and NMR analysis revealed that 3,5-dibromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 1) and 3,4,5-tribromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 2), which are classified as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were identified as anti-HBV agents in the extracts. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HBV core promoter activity as well as HBV production from HepG2.2.15.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.23 and 0.80 µM, respectively, while selectivity indexes of compound 1 and 2 were 18.2 and 12.8, respectively. These results suggest that our cell-based HBV core promoter assay system is useful to determine anti-HBV compounds, and that two PBDE compounds are expected to be candidates of lead compounds for the development of anti-HBV drugs. PMID:26561821

  12. Identification of Antiviral Agents Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Promoter from Extracts of Indonesian Marine Organisms by a Novel Cell-Based Screening Assay.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsuya; Fujimoto, Yuusuke; Tamaki, Mayumi; Setiawan, Andi; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Okuyama-Dobashi, Kaori; Kasai, Hirotake; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji; Toyama, Masaaki; Baba, Masanori; de Voogd, Nicole J; Maekawa, Shinya; Enomoto, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Junichi; Moriishi, Kohji

    2015-11-01

    The current treatments of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) face a limited choice of vaccine, antibody and antiviral agents. The development of additional antiviral agents is still needed for improvement of CHB therapy. In this study, we established a screening system in order to identify compounds inhibiting the core promoter activity of hepatitis B virus (HBV). We prepared 80 extracts of marine organisms from the coral reefs of Indonesia and screened them by using this system. Eventually, two extracts showed high inhibitory activity (>95%) and low cytotoxicity (66% to 77%). Solvent fractionation, column chromatography and NMR analysis revealed that 3,5-dibromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 1) and 3,4,5-tribromo-2-(2,4-dibromophenoxy)-phenol (compound 2), which are classified as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), were identified as anti-HBV agents in the extracts. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited HBV core promoter activity as well as HBV production from HepG2.2.15.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The EC50 values of compounds 1 and 2 were 0.23 and 0.80 µM, respectively, while selectivity indexes of compound 1 and 2 were 18.2 and 12.8, respectively. These results suggest that our cell-based HBV core promoter assay system is useful to determine anti-HBV compounds, and that two PBDE compounds are expected to be candidates of lead compounds for the development of anti-HBV drugs. PMID:26561821

  13. Therapeutic antibodies in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Magdelaine-Beuzelin, Charlotte; Pinault, Coralie; Paintaud, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    More than a century after the first successful use of serotherapy, antibody-based therapy has been renewed by the availability of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. As in the past, current clinical experience has prompted new pharmacological questions and induced much debate among practitioners, notably in the field of ophthalmology. An examination of the history of antibodies as treatments for ocular disorders reveals interesting parallels to the modern era. The fact that a treatment administered by a systemic route could be efficacious in a local disease was not widely accepted and the “chemical” nature of antibodies was not clearly understood in the late 19th century. Clinical studies by Henry Coppez, a Belgian ophthalmologist, established in 1894 that antidiphtheric antitoxins could be used to treat conjunctival diphtheria. Nearly 20 years later, Coppez and Danis described age-related macular degeneration, a disorder which today benefits from ranibizumab therapy. The product, a locally-administered recombinant monoclonal Fab fragment, is directed against vascular endothelial growth factor A. Interestingly, its full-size counterpart, bevacizumab, which is approved for the treatment of solid tumors, has also demonstrated efficacy in age-related macular degeneration when administered either intravenously or locally, which raises new questions about antibody pharmacology and biodistribution. In order to shed some light on this debate, we recount the early history of serotherapy applied to ophthalmology, review the exact molecular differences between ranibizumab and bevacizumab, and discuss what is known about IgG and the blood-retina barrier and the possible role of FcRn, an IgG transporter. PMID:21358858

  14. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fcγ type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement

  15. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  16. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  17. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  18. RITA (Reactivating p53 and Inducing Tumor Apoptosis) is efficient against TP53abnormal myeloma cells independently of the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the p53-reactivating drugs RITA and nutlin3a in killing myeloma cells. Methods A large cohort of myeloma cell lines (n = 32) and primary cells (n = 21) was used for this study. This cohort contained cell lines with various TP53 statuses and primary cells with various incidences of deletion of chromosome 17. Apoptosis was evaluated using flow cytometry with Apo2.7 staining of the cell lines or via the loss of the myeloma-specific marker CD138 in primary cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed by the appearance of a subG1 peak and the activation of caspases 3 and 9. Activation of the p53 pathway was monitored using immunoblotting via the expression of the p53 target genes p21, Noxa, Bax and DR5. The involvement of p53 was further studied in 4 different p53-silenced cell lines. Results Both drugs induced the apoptosis of myeloma cells. The apoptosis that was induced by RITA was not related to the TP53 status of the cell lines or the del17p status of the primary samples (p = 0.52 and p = 0.80, respectively), and RITA did not commonly increase the expression level of p53 or p53 targets (Noxa, p21, Bax or DR5) in sensitive cells. Moreover, silencing of p53 in two TP53mutated cell lines failed to inhibit apoptosis that was induced by RITA, which confirmed that RITA-induced apoptosis in myeloma cells was p53 independent. In contrast, apoptosis induced by nutlin3a was directly linked to the TP53 status of the cell lines and primary samples (p < 0.001 and p = 0.034, respectively) and nutlin3a increased the level of p53 and p53 targets in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, we showed that a nutlin3a-induced DR5 increase (≥1.2-fold increase) was a specific and sensitive marker (p < 0.001) for a weak incidence of 17p deletion within the samples (≤19%). Conclusion These data show that RITA, in contrast to nutlin3a, effectively induced apoptosis in a subset of MM cells independently of p53. The findings and could be

  19. [ANTIVIRAL ACTIVITY OF THE DIHYDROQUERCETIN DURING THE COXSACKIEVIRUS B4 REPLICATION IN VITRO].

    PubMed

    Galochkina, A V; Zarubaev, V V; Kiselev, O I; Babkin, V A; Ostroukhova, L A

    2016-01-01

    A study of the antiviral activity of antioxidants against viral infections is believed to be essential for creating complex antiviral agents. Dihydroquercetin is considered as the most active antioxidant extracted from Larix gmelinii. In this work, we present results of experiments of the antiviral properties of dihydroquercetin against a member of the family Picarnaviridae--Coxsackievirus B4 in vitro. We have estimated that dihydroquercetin reduces viral titers at 100 µg/ml concentration as compared with control of virus. We have shown using the plaque assay that CPE of virusis reduced in the presence of dihydroquercetin at 100 µg/ml. Study of the phase of viral lifecycle, in which dihydroquercetin acted, demonstrated that the highest efficacy of the antiviral therapy was reached at early stages of virus reproduction (1-3 hours post infection). These results show that dihydroquercetin has antiviralproperty against Coxsackievirus B4. This drug and other antioxidants can be tested as inhibitors of viral replication.

  20. A human genome-wide loss-of-function screen identifies effective chikungunya antiviral drugs

    PubMed Central

    Karlas, Alexander; Berre, Stefano; Couderc, Thérèse; Varjak, Margus; Braun, Peter; Meyer, Michael; Gangneux, Nicolas; Karo-Astover, Liis; Weege, Friderike; Raftery, Martin; Schönrich, Günther; Klemm, Uwe; Wurzlbauer, Anne; Bracher, Franz; Merits, Andres; Meyer, Thomas F.; Lecuit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a globally spreading alphavirus against which there is no commercially available vaccine or therapy. Here we use a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify 156 proviral and 41 antiviral host factors affecting CHIKV replication. We analyse the cellular pathways in which human proviral genes are involved and identify druggable targets. Twenty-one small-molecule inhibitors, some of which are FDA approved, targeting six proviral factors or pathways, have high antiviral activity in vitro, with low toxicity. Three identified inhibitors have prophylactic antiviral effects in mouse models of chikungunya infection. Two of them, the calmodulin inhibitor pimozide and the fatty acid synthesis inhibitor TOFA, have a therapeutic effect in vivo when combined. These results demonstrate the value of loss-of-function screening and pathway analysis for the rational identification of small molecules with therapeutic potential and pave the way for the development of new, host-directed, antiviral agents. PMID:27177310

  1. African swine fever virus: current state and future perspectives in vaccine and antiviral research.

    PubMed

    Zakaryan, Hovakim; Revilla, Yolanda

    2016-03-15

    African swine fever (ASF) is among the most significant of swine diseases for which no effective vaccines and antivirals are available. The disease, which is endemic in Africa, was introduced to Trans-Caucasian countries and the Russian Federation in 2007, where it remains prevalent today among domestic pigs and wild boars. Although some measures were implemented, ASF continues to pose a global risk for all countries, and thereby highlighting the importance of vaccine and antiviral research. In this review, an overview of research efforts toward the development of effective vaccines during the past decades is presented. As an alternative to vaccine development, the current state in antiviral research against ASFV is also presented. Finally, future perspectives in vaccine and antiviral research giving emphasis on some strategies that may allow researchers to develop effective countermeasures against ASF are discussed.

  2. Antiviral effect of lithium chloride on infection of cells by canine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pei; Fu, Xinliang; Yan, Zhongshan; Fang, Bo; Huang, San; Fu, Cheng; Hong, Malin; Li, Shoujun

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 causes significant viral disease in dogs, with high morbidity, high infectivity, and high mortality. Lithium chloride is a potential antiviral drug for viruses. We determined the antiviral effect of Lithium Chloride on canine parvovirus type 2 in feline kidney cells. The viral DNA and proteins of canine parvovirus were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. Further investigation verified that viral entry into cells was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by lithium chloride. These results indicated that lithium chloride could be a potential antiviral drug for curing dogs with canine parvovirus infection. The specific steps of canine parvovirus entry into cells that are affected by lithium chloride and its antiviral effect in vivo should be explored in future studies.

  3. [Comparative study of the antiviral properties of histones of animal and plant origin].

    PubMed

    Ladygina, M E; Sokolovskaia, I V; Rubin, B A; Grot, A V

    1978-01-01

    The antiviral properties of histones of animal (thymus) and plant (French beans) origin were studied in plants and with a plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Histones of the thymus and French beans were shown to be able to inhibit TMV reproduction. The antiviral properties of histones were found to depend on their concentration, pH, and to be determined by the modes of their introduction into leaves. The manifestation of the antiviral properties of histones seems to require not only their direct contact with virus but also a certain exposure on the leaf. The similarities of antiviral protective mechanisms of plants and animals determined by substances of the protein nature are discussed.

  4. Antiviral Potential of Algae Polysaccharides Isolated from Marine Sources: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Azin; Zorofchian Moghadamtousi, Soheil; Abubakar, Sazaly; Zandi, Keivan

    2015-01-01

    From food to fertilizer, algal derived products are largely employed in assorted industries, including agricultural, biomedical, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Among different chemical compositions isolated from algae, polysaccharides are the most well-established compounds, which were subjected to a variety of studies due to extensive bioactivities. Over the past few decades, the promising results for antiviral potential of algae-derived polysaccharides have advocated them as inordinate candidates for pharmaceutical research. Numerous studies have isolated various algal polysaccharides possessing antiviral activities, including carrageenan, alginate, fucan, laminaran, and naviculan. In addition, different mechanisms of action have been reported for these polysaccharides, such as inhibiting the binding or internalization of virus into the host cells or suppressing DNA replication and protein synthesis. This review strives for compiling previous antiviral studies of algae-derived polysaccharides and their mechanism of action towards their development as natural antiviral agents for future investigations. PMID:26484353

  5. Photo-distributed lichenoid eruption secondary to direct anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cory L; McCausland, Drew; Chu, Emily Y

    2015-10-01

    Novel direct anti-viral agents are emerging as effective treatments for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and provide an alternative to the year-long standard therapy with interferon and ribavirin. However, cutaneous side effects from these new medications, including rash, pruritus and photosensitivity, are among the most commonly reported adverse events and have resulted in therapy discontinuation in some cases. Here, we report two cases of a photo-distributed lichenoid eruption that occurred within 1  month of starting anti-viral therapy with simeprevir and sofosbuvir without interferon or ribavirin. This report provides the first histologic description of the cutaneous eruption associated with direct anti-viral therapy for HCV and highlights the importance of recognizing and treating the often intolerable dermatologic side effects of these novel medications, the incidence of which is likely to increase as direct anti-viral agents may become the standard of care for HCV. PMID:25974215

  6. 75 FR 20437 - Amended Authorization of Emergency Use of the Antiviral Product Peramivir Accompanied by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Amended Authorization of Emergency Use of the Antiviral Product Peramivir Accompanied by Emergency Use Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an...

  7. Synthesis and screening of bicyclic carbohydrate-based compounds: a novel type of antivirals.

    PubMed

    Van Hoof, Steven; Ruttens, Bart; Hubrecht, Idzi; Smans, Gert; Blom, Petra; Sas, Benedikt; Van hemel, Johan; Vandenkerckhove, Jan; Van der Eycken, Johan

    2006-03-15

    A small library of bicyclic carbohydrate derivatives was synthesized and screened. A strong and selective activity against cytomegalovirus was found. Structure-activity relationship for this new type of antivirals is discussed.

  8. Preventive Activity against Influenza (H1N1) Virus by Intranasally Delivered RNA-Hydrolyzing Antibody in Respiratory Epithelial Cells of Mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seungchan; Youn, Ha-Na; Hoang, Phuong Mai; Cho, Sungrae; Kim, Kee-Eun; Kil, Eui-Joon; Lee, Gunsup; Cho, Mun-Ju; Hong, Juhyun; Byun, Sung-June; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-09-21

    The antiviral effect of a catalytic RNA-hydrolyzing antibody, 3D8 scFv, for intranasal administration against avian influenza virus (H1N1) was described. The recombinant 3D8 scFv protein prevented BALB/c mice against H1N1 influenza virus infection by degradation of the viral RNA genome through its intrinsic RNA-hydrolyzing activity. Intranasal administration of 3D8 scFv (50 μg/day) for five days prior to infection demonstrated an antiviral activity (70% survival) against H1N1 infection. The antiviral ability of 3D8 scFv to penetrate into epithelial cells from bronchial cavity via the respiratory mucosal layer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and histopathological examination. The antiviral activity of 3D8 scFv against H1N1 virus infection was not due to host immune cytokines or chemokines, but rather to direct antiviral RNA-hydrolyzing activity of 3D8 scFv against the viral RNA genome. Taken together, our results suggest that the RNase activity of 3D8 scFv, coupled with its ability to penetrate epithelial cells through the respiratory mucosal layer, directly prevents H1N1 virus infection in a mouse model system.

  9. Natural antibodies in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Veres, J

    1975-01-01

    The serum of 100 adults living in Budapest was examined for isohaemagglutinin titre with haemaglutination, for staphylococcal-antitoxin titre with haemolysis inhibition and for bacterial antibody titre against 17 different groups of bacteria with passive haemagglutination. Antibody levels in males, except for certain bacterial antibodies, were somewhat lower than in females. The antibody titres, especially in men, decreased gradually from 20 to 50 years of age and were usually lower in Rh negative than in Rh positive persons.

  10. Antiviral activity of ancient system of ayurvedic medicinal plant Cissus quadrangularis L. (Vitaceae).

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, P; Jayalakshmi, K; Vidhya, N; Prasad, R; Sheriff, A Khaleefathullah; Kathiravan, G; Rajagopal, K; Sureban, Sripathi M

    2009-12-01

    Partially purified methanolic extract of Cissus quadrangularis (belonging to Vitaceae member, South Indian medicinal plant) have been explored for antiviral activity and their phytochemical characterisation. In vitro antiviral activity against HSV type1 and 2, and Vero cells at non-cytotoxic concentration were determined. HSV1 and HSV2 showed more sensitivity against the partially purified compound. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of the Steroids and Terpenoids. PMID:25206252

  11. New era for management of chronic hepatitis C virus using direct antiviral agents: A review

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Tamer; El-Kassas, Mohamed; Esmat, Gamal

    2014-01-01

    The pegylated interferon regimen has long been the lone effective management of chronic hepatitis C with modest response. The first appearance of protease inhibitors included boceprevir and telaprevir. However, their efficacy was limited to genotype 1. Recently, direct antiviral agents opened the gate for a real effective management of HCV, certainly after FDA approval of some compounds that further paved the way for the appearance of enormous potent direct antiviral agents that may achieve successful eradication of HCV. PMID:26257927

  12. Human influenza is more effective than avian influenza at antiviral suppression in airway cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Alan Chen-Yu; Barr, Ian; Hansbro, Philip M; Wark, Peter A

    2011-06-01

    Airway epithelial cells are the initial site of infection with influenza viruses. The innate immune responses of airway epithelial cells to infection are important in limiting virus replication and spread. However, relatively little is known about the importance of this innate antiviral response to infection. Avian influenza viruses are a potential source of future pandemics; therefore, it is critical to examine the effectiveness of the host antiviral system to different influenza viruses. We used a human influenza (H3N2) and a low-pathogenic avian influenza (H11N9) to assess and compare the antiviral responses of Calu-3 cells. After infection, H3N2 replicated more effectively than the H11N9 in Calu-3 cells. This was not due to differential expression of sialic acid residues on Calu-3 cells, but was attributed to the interference of host antiviral responses by H3N2. H3N2 induced a delayed antiviral signaling and impaired type I and type III IFN induction compared with the H11N9. The gene encoding for nonstructural (NS) 1 protein was transfected into the bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), and the H3N2 NS1 induced a greater inhibition of antiviral responses compared with the H11N9 NS1. Although the low-pathogenic avian influenza virus was capable of infecting BECs, the human influenza virus replicated more effectively than avian influenza virus in BECs, and this was due to a differential ability of the two NS1 proteins to inhibit antiviral responses. This suggests that the subversion of human antiviral responses may be an important requirement for influenza viruses to adapt to the human host and cause disease.

  13. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  14. Phenylboronic-acid-modified nanoparticles: potential antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Manakamana; Vausselin, Thibaut; Barras, Alexandre; Bande, Omprakash; Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Benazza, Mohammed; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Teodorescu, Cristian Mihail; Boukherroub, Rabah; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Dubuisson, Jean; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-12-11

    Phenylboronic-acid-modified nanoparticles (NPs) are attracting considerable attention for biological and biomedical applications. We describe here a convenient and general protocol for attaching multiple copies of para-substituted phenylboronic acid moieties onto either iron-oxide-, silica- or diamond-derived NPs. The boronic acid functionalized NPs are all fabricated by first modifying the surface of each particle type with 4-azidobenzoic ester functions. These azide-terminated nanostructures were then reacted with 4-[1-oxo-4-pentyn-1-yl) amino]phenylboronic acid units via a Cu(I) catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition to furnish, conveniently, the corresponding boronic-acid modified NPs (or "borono-lectins") targeted in this work. The potential of these novel "borono-lectins" as antiviral inhibitors was investigated against the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) exploiting a bioassay that measures the potential of drugs to interfere with the ability of cell-culture-derived JFH1 virus particles to infect healthy hepatocytes. As far as we are aware, this is the first report that describes NP-derived viral entry inhibitors and thus serves as a "proof-of-concept" study. The novel viral entry activity demonstrated, and the fact that the described boronic-acid-functionalized NPs all display much reduced cellular toxicities compared with alternate NPs, sets the stage for their further investigation. The data supports that NP-derived borono-lectins should be pursued as a potential therapeutic strategy for blocking viral entry of HCV.

  15. Antiviral therapies: focus on Hepatitis B reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Kirby, Karen A.; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yoo, Wangdon; Hong, Sun Pyo; Kim, Soo-Ok; Folk, William R.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the etiologic agent of mankind’s most serious liver disease. While the availability of a vaccine has reduced the number of new HBV infections, the vaccine does not benefit the approximately 350 million people already chronically infected by the virus. Most of the drugs approved by the FDA for the treatment of hepatitis B target the reverse transcriptase (RT or P gene product) and are nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) that suppress viral replication. However, prolonged monotherapies directed against a single target result in the emergence of viral resistance. HBV genotypic differences affect NRTI resistance, and because the reading frames of the S (surface antigen) and P genes partially overlap, genomic differences that affect the surface of the virus may also alter the viral polymerase sequence, function and drug susceptibility. The scope of this review is to assess the effects of HBV genotypic variation on the development of drug resistance to NRTIs. Some RT residues that vary among different genotypes are in the vicinity of residues that mutate and give rise to NRTI resistance. Interactions between these amino acids can help explain the effect of HBV genotype on the development of NRTI resistance during antiviral therapies, and might help in the design of improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:22531713

  16. Antiviral therapies: focus on hepatitis B reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Michailidis, Eleftherios; Kirby, Karen A; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yoo, Wangdon; Hong, Sun Pyo; Kim, Soo-Ok; Folk, William R; Sarafianos, Stefan G

    2012-07-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the etiologic agent of mankind's most serious liver disease. While the availability of a vaccine has reduced the number of new HBV infections, the vaccine does not benefit the approximately 350 million people already chronically infected by the virus. Most of the drugs approved by the FDA for the treatment of hepatitis B target the reverse transcriptase (RT or P gene product) and are nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs) that suppress viral replication. However, prolonged monotherapies directed against a single target result in the emergence of viral resistance. HBV genotypic differences affect NRTI resistance, and because the reading frames of the S (surface antigen) and P genes partially overlap, genomic differences that affect the surface of the virus may also alter the viral polymerase sequence, function and drug susceptibility. The scope of this review is to assess the effects of HBV genotypic variation on the development of drug resistance to NRTIs. Some RT residues that vary among different genotypes are in the vicinity of residues that mutate and give rise to NRTI resistance. Interactions between these amino acids can help explain the effect of HBV genotype on the development of NRTI resistance during antiviral therapies, and might help in the design of improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:22531713

  17. Resistance to antivirals in human cytomegalovirus: mechanisms and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Pérez, J L

    1997-09-01

    Long term therapies needed for managing human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections in immunosupressed patients provided the background for the emergence of the resistance to antivirals active against HCMV. In addition, laboratory selected mutants have also been readily achieved. Both clinical and laboratory resistant strains share the same determinants of resistance. Ganciclovir resistance may be due to a few mutations in the HCMV UL97 gene and/or viral DNA pol gene, the former being responsible for about 70% of clinical resistant isolates. Among them, V464, V594, S595 and F595 are the most frequent mutations. Because of their less extensive clinical use, much less is known about resistance to foscarnet and cidofovir (formerly, HPMPC) but in both cases, it has been associated to mutations in the DNA pol. Ganciclovir resistant strains showing DNA pol mutations are cross-resistant to cidofovir and their corresponding IC50 are normally higher than those from strains harboring only mutations at the UL97 gene. To date, foscarnet resistance seems to be independent of both ganciclovir and cidofovir resistance.

  18. Regulation of the Host Antiviral State by Intercellular Communications

    PubMed Central

    Assil, Sonia; Webster, Brian; Dreux, Marlène

    2015-01-01

    Viruses usually induce a profound remodeling of host cells, including the usurpation of host machinery to support their replication and production of virions to invade new cells. Nonetheless, recognition of viruses by the host often triggers innate immune signaling, preventing viral spread and modulating the function of immune cells. It conventionally occurs through production of antiviral factors and cytokines by infected cells. Virtually all viruses have evolved mechanisms to blunt such responses. Importantly, it is becoming increasingly recognized that infected cells also transmit signals to regulate innate immunity in uninfected neighboring cells. These alternative pathways are notably mediated by vesicular secretion of various virus- and host-derived products (miRNAs, RNAs, and proteins) and non-infectious viral particles. In this review, we focus on these newly-described modes of cell-to-cell communications and their impact on neighboring cell functions. The reception of these signals can have anti- and pro-viral impacts, as well as more complex effects in the host such as oncogenesis and inflammation. Therefore, these “broadcasting” functions, which might be tuned by an arms race involving selective evolution driven by either the host or the virus, constitute novel and original regulations of viral infection, either highly localized or systemic. PMID:26295405

  19. Expression of pokeweed antiviral proteins in creeping bentgrass.

    PubMed

    Dai, W D; Bonos, S; Guo, Z; Meyer, W A; Day, P R; Belanger, F C

    2003-01-01

    Fungal diseases of creeping bentgrass, an important amenity grass used extensively on golf courses, are a serious problem in golf course management. Transgenic approaches to improving disease resistance to fungal diseases are being explored in many species, and in some cases ribosome-inactivating proteins have been found to be effective. We have generated transgenic creeping bentgrass plants expressing three forms of ribosome-inactivating proteins from pokeweed, which are termed pokeweed antiviral proteins (PAP). PAP-Y and PAP-C are nontoxic mutants of PAP; PAPII is the native form of another ribosome-inactivating protein from pokeweed. In creeping bentgrass, PAP-C transformants did not accumulate the protein, suggesting that it is unstable, and in a field test these plants were not protected from infection by the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia homoeocarpa, the causal agent of dollar spot disease. PAPII transformants could accumulate stable levels of the protein but had symptoms of toxicity; one low-expressing line exhibited good disease resistance. PAP-Y transformants accumulated stable levels of protein, and under greenhouse conditions they appeared to be phenotypically normal.

  20. A small RNA targets pokeweed antiviral protein transcript.

    PubMed

    Klenov, Alexander; Neller, Kira C M; Burns, Lydia A; Krivdova, Gabriela; Hudak, Katalin A

    2016-03-01

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) are a class of plant defense proteins with N-glycosidase activity (EC 3.2.2.22). Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) is a Type I RIP isolated from the pokeweed plant, Phytolacca americana, thought to confer broad-spectrum virus resistance in this plant. Through a combination of standard molecular techniques and RNA sequencing analysis, we report here that a small RNA binds and cleaves the open reading frame of PAP mRNA. Additionally, sRNA targeting of PAP is dependent on jasmonic acid (JA), a plant hormone important for defense against pathogen infection and herbivory. Levels of small RNA increased with JA treatment, as did levels of PAP mRNA and protein, suggesting that the small RNA functions to moderate the expression of PAP in response to this hormone. The association between JA and PAP expression, mediated by sRNA299, situates PAP within a signaling pathway initiated by biotic stress. The consensus sequence of sRNA299 was obtained through bioinformatic analysis of pokeweed small RNA sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first account of a sRNA targeting a RIP gene.

  1. Novel antiviral strategies to combat human Arenavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Stefan; de la Torre, Juan C

    2005-12-01

    Arenaviruses merit significant attention both as tractable model systems to study acute and persistent viral infections, and as clinically important human pathogens. Evidence indicates that LCMV remains present in the USA and Europe and capable of causing significant morbidity in infected individuals, likely being a neglected human pathogen. Moreover, new arenaviruses are being discovered in the Americas on the average of one every three years, with some of them causing severe hemorrhagic fever. In addition, weaponized forms of these viruses pose a real threat as agents of bioterrorism. Therefore, it is important to develop effective vaccines and better antiviral drugs to combat the dual threats of naturally occurring and intentionally introduced Arenavirus infections. The development of arenavirus reverse genetic systems is allowing investigators to conduct a detailed molecular characterization of the viral cis-acting signals and trans-acting factors that control each of the steps of the Arenavirus life cycle, including RNA synthesis, packaging and budding. We will discuss how this new knowledge is facilitating the establishment of novel assays to identify and characterize compounds capable of interfering with specific steps of the virus life cycle. Likewise, the ability to generate predetermined specific mutations within the arenavirus genome, and analyze their phenotypic expression, would significantly contribute to the elucidation of arenavirus-host interactions, including the bases of their ability to persist, as well as to cause severe HF (hemorrhagic fever) disease in humans. These approaches could also lead to the development of novel potent and safe Arenavirus vaccines. PMID:16375709

  2. Psychiatric treatment considerations with direct acting antivirals in hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite recent advances in hepatitis C (HCV) treatment, specifically the addition of direct acting antivirals (DAAs), pegylated interferon-alpha remains the backbone of HCV therapy. Therefore, the impact of DAAs on the management of co-morbid psychiatric illness and neuropsychiatric sequalae remains an ongoing concern during HCV therapy. This paper provides a review of the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of DAAs and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between DAAs and psychiatric medications. Methods We conducted a Pubmed search using relevant search terms and hand searched reference lists of related review articles. In addition, we searched abstracts for major hepatology conferences and contacted respective pharmaceutical companies for additional studies. Results Limited data is available on the neuropsychiatric adverse effects of DAAs; however, data from major clinical trials suggest that DAAs have minimal neuropsychiatric risk. DAAs can potentially interact with a variety of psychotropic agents via cytochrome P450 and p-glycoprotein interactions. Triazolam, oral midazolam, St. John’s Wort, carbamazepine and pimozide, are contraindicated with DAAs. DDIs between DAAs and antidepressants, anxiolytics, hypnotics, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics and treatments for opioid dependence are summarized. Conclusions Although DAAs do not add significant neuropsychiatric risk, the potential for DDIs is high. Consideration of DDIs is paramount to improving medication adherence and mitigating adverse effects during HCV therapy. PMID:23672254

  3. Chemical diversity and antiviral potential in the pantropical Diospyros genus.

    PubMed

    Peyrat, Laure-Anne; Eparvier, Véronique; Eydoux, Cécilia; Guillemot, Jean-Claude; Stien, Didier; Litaudon, Marc

    2016-07-01

    A screening using a dengue replicon virus-cell-based assay was performed on 3563 ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extracts from different parts of 1500 plants. The screening led to the selection of species from the genus Diospyros (Ebenaceae), among which 25 species distributed in tropical areas showed significant inhibitory activity on dengue virus replication. A metabolic analysis was conducted from the UPLC-HRMS profiles of 33 biologically active and inactive plant extracts, and their metabolic proximity is presented in the form of a dendrogram. The results of the study showed that chemical similarity is not related to plant species or organ. Overall, metabolomic profiling allowed us to define large groups of extracts, comprising both active and inactive ones. Closely related profiles from active extracts might indicate that the common major components of these extracts were responsible for the antiviral activity, while the comparison of chemically similar active and inactive extracts, will permit to find compounds of interest. Eventually, the phytochemical investigation of Diospyros glans bark EtOAc extract afforded usnic acid and 7 known ursane- and lupane-type triterpenoids, among which 5 were found significantly active against dengue virus replication. The inhibitory potency of these compounds was also evaluated on a DENV-NS5 RNA-dependant RNA polymerase assay. PMID:27126897

  4. Novel antiviral activity of bromocriptine against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumihiro; Ishida, Yuki; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka; Watanabe, Satoru; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Youichi; Ichiyama, Koji; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yoshii, Kentaro; Takashima, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infectious disease is a major public health problem worldwide; however, licensed vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against this infection are not available. To identify novel anti-DENV compounds, we screened 1280 pharmacologically active compounds using focus reduction assay. Bromocriptine (BRC) was found to have potent anti-DENV activity and low cytotoxicity (half maximal effective concentration [EC50], 0.8-1.6 μM; and half maximal cytotoxicity concentration [CC50], 53.6 μM). Time-of-drug-addition and time-of-drug-elimination assays suggested that BRC inhibits translation and/or replication steps in the DENV life cycle. A subgenomic replicon system was used to verify that BRC restricts RNA replication step. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution (N374H) was detected in the NS3 protein that conferred resistance to BRC. In summary, BRC was found to be a novel DENV inhibitor and a potential candidate for the treatment of DENV infectious disease.

  5. New Class of Orthopoxvirus Antiviral Drugs That Block Viral Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Chelsea M.; Bolken, Tove' C.; Mjalli, Adnan M.; Arimilli, Murty N.; Andrews, Robert C.; Rothlein, Robert; Andrea, Tariq; Rao, Mohan; Owens, Katrina L.; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2004-01-01

    By using a homology-based bioinformatics approach, a structural model of the vaccinia virus (VV) I7L proteinase was developed. A unique chemical library of ∼51,000 compounds was computationally queried to identify potential active site inhibitors. The resulting biased subset of compounds was assayed for both toxicity and the ability to inhibit the growth of VV in tissue culture cells. A family of chemotypically related compounds was found which exhibits selective activity against orthopoxviruses, inhibiting VV with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 3 to 12 μM. These compounds exhibited no significant cytotoxicity in the four cell lines tested and did not inhibit the growth of other organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, adenovirus, or encephalomyocarditis virus. Phenotypic analyses of virus-infected cells were conducted in the presence of active compounds to verify that the correct biochemical step (I7L-mediated core protein processing) was being inhibited. Electron microscopy of compound-treated VV-infected cells indicated a block in morphogenesis. Compound-resistant viruses were generated and resistance was mapped to the I7L open reading frame. Transient expression with the mutant I7L gene rescued the ability of wild-type virus to replicate in the presence of compound, indicating that this is the only gene necessary for resistance. This novel class of inhibitors has potential for development as an efficient antiviral drug against pathogenic orthopoxviruses, including smallpox. PMID:15507601

  6. Antiviral mechanism of polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers against HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Vacas-Córdoba, Enrique; Maly, Marek; De la Mata, Francisco J; Gómez, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology-derived platforms, such as dendrimers, are very attractive in several biological applications. In the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, polyanionic carbosilane dendrimers have shown great potential as antiviral agents in the development of novel microbicides to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV-1. In this work, we studied the mechanism of two sulfated and naphthylsulfonated functionalized carbosilane dendrimers, G3-S16 and G2-NF16. They are able to inhibit viral infection at fusion and thus at the entry step. Both compounds impede the binding of viral particles to target cell surface and membrane fusion through the blockage of gp120–CD4 interaction. In addition, and for the first time, we demonstrate that dendrimers can inhibit cell-to-cell HIV transmission and difficult infectious synapse formation. Thus, carbosilane dendrimers’ mode of action is a multifactorial process targeting several proteins from viral envelope and from host cells that could block HIV infection at different stages during the first step of infection. PMID:27103798

  7. Antiviral Therapy in Elderly Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rheem, Justin; Sundaram, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of direct-acting antiviral (DAA) agents has revolutionized the treatment schema for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. From cure rates to tolerability, DAA agents have shown outstanding profiles compared with the prior therapy of pegylated interferon with ribavirin. However, the efficacy and safety profiles of DAA therapy in older patients, particularly the elderly, have been unclear, and patients in the 1945 to 1965 birth cohort constitute the largest proportion of the HCV population in the United States. Treating elderly patients with pegylated interferon and ribavirin has been challenging due to the frequent presence of multiple comorbidities in the elderly and high discontinuation rates caused by adverse events. Now, as more DAA agents have become widely studied and approved, subgroup analyses for the elderly population are being elucidated. Analysis of the current literature shows that these agents have been effective, well tolerated, and safe in the elderly population. This article highlights the efficacy and safety differences in interferon-based therapy and interferon-free regimens for elderly patients with HCV infection. PMID:27482173

  8. A Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline antigen induces polyclonal B-cell activation of normal murine spleen cells by T-cell-independent, BCR-directed stimulation.

    PubMed

    Montes, C L; Zuñiga, E; Minoprio, P; Vottero-Cima, E; Gruppi, A

    1999-08-01

    We have previously reported that a cytosolic alkaline fraction (FI) obtained from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi promotes the activation, proliferation and differentiation of normal murine B cells into antibody-secreting plasmocytes. Neither the mechanism nor the cells involved in the FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation were established. In this work we report that accessory cells are required for FI-induced polyclonal B-cell activation as no proliferative responses were obtained following treatment of normal spleen mononuclear cells (NSMC) with L-leucine methyl ester. Furthermore, FI did not induce the expression of CD25 on T cells and it promoted the proliferation of a T-cell-depleted population, indicating that it acts in a T-independent manner. We observed that NSMC were stimulated in vitro by FI-released cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 and IL-10, which are involved in B-cell proliferation and differentiation. Interestingly, while significant amounts of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) were found in culture supernatants we did not observe detectable levels of IL-2. Additionally, we found that B-cell receptor (BCR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens were involved in the proliferative response induced by FI because antibodies directed against cell-surface immunoglobulin M (IgM), CD45 and MHC class II molecules inhibited the FI-induced B-cell proliferation. CD40 ligand (CD40L) did not participate in such a phenomenon.

  9. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ding Y.; Hurt, Aeron C.

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titer of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness. PMID:26870031

  10. Antiviral Activity of Graphene–Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  11. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-07-19

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host-virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects. PMID:27357659

  12. Antiviral Activity of Graphene-Silver Nanocomposites against Non-Enveloped and Enveloped Viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Ning; Hsueh, Yi-Huang; Hsieh, Chien-Te; Tzou, Dong-Ying; Chang, Pai-Ling

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of novel antiviral materials is important because many infectious diseases are caused by viruses. Silver nanoparticles have demonstrated strong antiviral activity, and graphene is a potential antimicrobial material due to its large surface area, high carrier mobility, and biocompatibility. No studies on the antiviral activity of nanomaterials on non-enveloped viruses have been reported. To investigate the antiviral activity of graphene oxide (GO) sheets and GO sheets with silver particles (GO-Ag) against enveloped and non-enveloped viruses, feline coronavirus (FCoV) with an envelope and infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) without an envelope were chosen. The morphology and sizes of GO and GO-Ag were characterized by transmission, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. A virus inhibition assay was used to identify the antiviral activity of GO and GO-Ag. Go-Ag inhibited 25% of infection by FCoV and 23% by IBDV, whereas GO only inhibited 16% of infection by FCoV but showed no antiviral activity against the infection by IBDV. Further application of GO and GO-Ag can be considered for personal protection equipment to decrease the transmission of viruses. PMID:27104546

  13. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-07-19

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host-virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects.

  14. USP21 negatively regulates antiviral response by acting as a RIG-I deubiquitinase

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yihui; Mao, Renfang; Yu, Yang; Liu, Shangfeng; Shi, Zhongcheng; Cheng, Jin; Zhang, Huiyuan; An, Lei; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Xin; Chen, Zhenghu; Kogiso, Mari; Zhang, Dekai; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Pumin; Jung, Jae U.; Li, Xiaonan

    2014-01-01

    Lys63-linked polyubiquitination of RIG-I is essential in antiviral immune defense, yet the molecular mechanism that negatively regulates this critical step is poorly understood. Here, we report that USP21 acts as a novel negative regulator in antiviral responses through its ability to bind to and deubiquitinate RIG-I. Overexpression of USP21 inhibited RNA virus–induced RIG-I polyubiquitination and RIG-I–mediated interferon (IFN) signaling, whereas deletion of USP21 resulted in elevated RIG-I polyubiquitination, IRF3 phosphorylation, IFN-α/β production, and antiviral responses in MEFs in response to RNA virus infection. USP21 also restricted antiviral responses in peritoneal macrophages (PMs) and bone marrow–derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). USP21-deficient mice spontaneously developed splenomegaly and were more resistant to VSV infection with elevated production of IFNs. Chimeric mice with USP21-deficient hematopoietic cells developed virus-induced splenomegaly and were more resistant to VSV infection. Functional comparison of three deubiquitinases (USP21, A20, and CYLD) demonstrated that USP21 acts as a bona fide RIG-I deubiquitinase to down-regulate antiviral response independent of the A20 ubiquitin-editing complex. Our studies identify a previously unrecognized role for USP21 in the negative regulation of antiviral response through deubiquitinating RIG-I. PMID:24493797

  15. Pandemics, antiviral stockpiles and biosecurity in Australia: what about the generic option?

    PubMed

    Lokuge, Buddhima; Drahos, Peter; Neville, Warwick

    2006-01-01

    In view of the possibility of a human pandemic of avian influenza, a first-line strategy for many countries is stockpiling of antiviral neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir [Tamiflu] and zanamivir [Relenza]), which can reduce mortality, morbidity and influenza transmission. However, global supply of the antivirals is controlled by the European-based patent owners, Roche and GlaxoSmithKline. This prevents competition in the manufacturing and distribution of antivirals and has reduced global supply capacity and affordability. The Australian Government has acknowledged that, in the event of a pandemic, its own stockpile of antivirals will be limited and reserved for those on a confidential rationing list. Pharmacies are running out of stocks, limiting opportunities for individuals to secure supplies privately. Compulsory licensing provisions, permitted under domestic patent law, would allow Australian generic manufacturers to start producing antivirals locally or import them from generic producers at affordable prices. Australia also has an opportunity and a responsibility to promote compulsory licensing and generic antiviral production in the Asian region, to ensure our neighbours can establish pandemic stockpiles in a timely and affordable manner.

  16. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  17. A novel peptide with potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activities against multiple respiratory viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hanjun; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Ke; Chu, Hin; Liu, Dabin; Poon, Vincent Kwok-Man; Chan, Chris Chung-Sing; Leung, Ho-Chuen; Fai, Ng; Lin, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Anna Jin-Xia; Jin, Dong-Yan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    A safe, potent and broad-spectrum antiviral is urgently needed to combat emerging respiratory viruses. In light of the broad antiviral activity of β-defensins, we tested the antiviral activity of 11 peptides derived from mouse β-defensin-4 and found that a short peptide, P9, exhibited potent and broad-spectrum antiviral effects against multiple respiratory viruses in vitro and in vivo, including influenza A virus H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, H7N7, H7N9, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The antiviral activity of P9 was attributed to its high-affinity binding to viral glycoproteins, as well as the abundance of basic amino acids in its composition. After binding viral particles through viral surface glycoproteins, P9 entered into cells together with the viruses via endocytosis and prevented endosomal acidification, which blocked membrane fusion and subsequent viral RNA release. This study has paved the avenue for developing new prophylactic and therapeutic agents with broad-spectrum antiviral activities. PMID:26911565

  18. piRNA pathway is not required for antiviral defense in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Marine; Mongelli, Vanesa; Frangeul, Lionel; Blanc, Hervé; Jiggins, Francis; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery, RNA interference has been identified as involved in many different cellular processes, and as a natural antiviral response in plants, nematodes, and insects. In insects, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway is the major antiviral response. In recent years, the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway also has been implicated in antiviral defense in mosquitoes infected with arboviruses. Using Drosophila melanogaster and an array of viruses that infect the fruit fly acutely or persistently or are vertically transmitted through the germ line, we investigated in detail the extent to which the piRNA pathway contributes to antiviral defense in adult flies. Following virus infection, the survival and viral titers of Piwi, Aubergine, Argonaute-3, and Zucchini mutant flies were similar to those of wild type flies. Using next-generation sequencing of small RNAs from wild type and siRNA mutant flies, we showed that no viral-derived piRNAs were produced in fruit flies during different types of viral infection. Our study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that the piRNA pathway does not play a major role in antiviral defense in adult Drosophila and demonstrates that viral-derived piRNA production depends on the biology of the host–virus combination rather than being part of a general antiviral process in insects. PMID:27357659

  19. In vitro evaluation of marine-microorganism extracts for anti-viral activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Viral-induced infectious diseases represent a major health threat and their control remains an unachieved goal, due in part to the limited availability of effective anti-viral drugs and measures. The use of natural products in drug manufacturing is an ancient and well-established practice. Marine organisms are known producers of pharmacological and anti-viral agents. In this study, a total of 20 extracts from marine microorganisms were evaluated for their antiviral activity. These extracts were tested against two mammalian viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), using Vero cells as the cell culture system, and two marine virus counterparts, channel catfish virus (CCV) and snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV), in their respective cell cultures (CCO and EPC). Evaluation of these extracts demonstrated that some possess antiviral potential. In sum, extracts 162M(4), 258M(1), 298M(4), 313(2), 331M(2), 367M(1) and 397(1) appear to be effective broad-spectrum antivirals with potential uses as prophylactic agents to prevent infection, as evident by their highly inhibitive effects against both virus types. Extract 313(2) shows the most potential in that it showed significantly high inhibition across all tested viruses. The samples tested in this study were crude extracts; therefore the development of antiviral application of the few potential extracts is dependent on future studies focused on the isolation of the active elements contained in these extracts. PMID:20691099

  20. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.