Science.gov

Sample records for cell-mediated cardiac allograft

  1. B cell-mediated antigen presentation is required for the pathogenesis of acute cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Noorchashm, Hooman; Reed, Amy J; Rostami, Susan Y; Mozaffari, Raha; Zekavat, Ghazal; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Caton, Andrew J; Naji, Ali

    2006-12-01

    Acute allograft rejection requires the activation of alloreactive CD4 T cells. Despite the capacity of B cells to act as potent APCs capable of activating CD4 T cells in vivo, their role in the progression of acute allograft rejection was unclear. To determine the contribution of B cell APC function in alloimmunity, we engineered mice with a targeted deficiency of MHC class II-mediated Ag presentation confined to the B cell compartment. Cardiac allograft survival was markedly prolonged in these mice as compared to control counterparts (median survival time, >70 vs 9.5 days). Mechanistically, deficient B cell-mediated Ag presentation disrupted both alloantibody production and the progression of CD4 T cell activation following heart transplantation. These findings demonstrate that indirect alloantigen presentation by recipients' B cells plays an important role in the efficient progression of acute vascularized allograft rejection.

  2. Triptolide inhibits CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated acute rejection and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shuiwei; Lv, Dingliang

    2017-10-01

    There have been numerous investigations into the immunosuppressive effects of triptolide; however, its inhibitory effects on memory T cells remain to be elucidated. Using a cluster of differentiation (CD)4(+) memory T-cell transfer model, the aim of the present study was to determine the inhibitory effects of triptolide on CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated acute rejection and to determine the potential underlying mechanisms. At 4 weeks after skin transplantation, mouse cervical heart transplantation was performed following the transfer of CD4(+) memory T cells. Mice were divided into two groups: A Control [normal saline, 30 ml/kg/day; intraperitoneal injection (ip)] and a triptolide group (triptolide, 3 mg/kg/day; ip). Graft survival, pathological examination and the corresponding International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) scores were assessed 5 days following heart transplantation, and levels of interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-10 and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in cardiac grafts and peripheral blood were assessed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA. The duration of cardiac graft survival in the triptolide group was significantly increased compared with the control group (14.3±0.4 vs. 5.3±0.2 days; P<0.001). Further pathological examinations revealed that the infiltration of inflammatory cells and myocardial damage in the cardiac grafts was notably reduced by triptolide, and the corresponding ISHLT scores in the triptolide group were significantly lower than those of the control group (grade 2.08±0.15 vs. 3.67±0.17; P<0.001). In addition, triptolide was able to significantly reduce IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion (P<0.01), significantly increase TGF-β1 secretion in the cardiac grafts and peripheral blood (P<0.01) and increase IL-10 secretion in the cardiac grafts. Therefore, the present study suggests that triptolide inhibits CD4(+) memory T cell-mediated acute rejection and

  3. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  4. LYMPHATIC INJURY AND REGENERATION IN CARDIAC ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Thing Rinda; Pathak, Arvind; Asano, Hiroshi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Baldwin, William M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Severed donor heart lymphatics are not anastomosed to recipient lymphatics in cardiac transplantation. We evaluated the effects of cellular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages on the morphology of lymphatics in heart grafts. Methods: Dark Agouti (DA) hearts were transplanted to Lewis or control DA rats on sub-therapeutic doses of cyclosporin. Transplants were examined by immunohistology and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy using LYVE-1 as a lymphatic marker and CD8 and CD68 as markers for cellular infiltration at selected intervals from 1 to 8 weeks post-transplantation. Results: Allograft inner myocardial lymphatic density decreased by more than 30-fold at 1 week, and recovered to only 15% of the native level at 8 weeks post-transplantation. In contrast, allograft lymphatics in and near the epicardium showed no significant density decline, but increased in size by more than 5-fold at 2 weeks, and sustained about a 3-fold increase at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Lymphatic changes correlated temporally with the extent of T cell and macrophage infiltration in allografts, which peaked at 2-3 weeks post-transplantation. When grafts were retransplanted from allogeneic to isogeneic recipients at 3 weeks post-transplantation, inner lymphatic density returned close to native level within 2 weeks after retransplantation. Conclusions: This is the first characterization of regional and morphological effects of immunological responses on heart lymphatics after transplantation. Elimination of alloimmune responses produces rapid restoration of inner lymphatic vessels, suggesting that lymphatics injured during rejection can recover when rejection is reversed during the post-transplantation course. PMID:20118845

  5. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV.

  6. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in mouse model after complement depletion with Yunnan cobra venom factor.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Wang, H-D; Zhu, X-X; Lan, G; Yang, K

    2009-12-01

    Activation of the complement system is the leading mechanism that causes antibody-mediated acute rejection and hyperacute rejection after xenotransplantation. The major cause of acute rejection in allogeneic transplantation is the T cell-mediated specific immune response. We studied the effects of complement on acute rejection after cardiac allotransplantation using complement depletion with cobra venom factor (CVF) in the mouse. The Balb/c-C57 mouse model of heterotopic cardiac allograft was used. The mice were divided into 2 groups, a control group and a CVF-treated group. After intravenous injection of CVF, the experimental group was observed for allograft survival time. Twelve mice from the control and experimental groups were sacrificed on days 3, 5, and 7 after the operation. The pathologic grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were compared between the 2 groups. In the CVF-treated group, mean (SD) survival of the cardiac allograft was 26.2 (1.7) days, and in the control group was 8.4 (0.4) days (P < .01). Pathologic examination and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the grade of acute rejection, deposition of C3 in tissue, extent of infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and expression of MHC-II, B7-1, and B7-2 were significantly decreased in the CVF-treated group. Depletion of complement in the serum with CVF inhibits acute cardiac allograft rejection in the mouse.

  7. Effects of Lung Cotransplantation on Cardiac Allograft Tolerance Across a Full Major Histocompatibility Complex Barrier in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, M. L. L.; Spencer, P. J.; Michel, S. G.; La Muraglia, G. M.; O’Neil, M. J.; Mannon, E. C.; Leblang, C.; Rosales, I. A.; Colvin, R. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Allan, J. S.; Madsen, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    A 12-day course of high-dose tacrolimus induces tolerance of major histocompatibility complex– mismatched lung allografts in miniature swine but does not induce tolerance of heart allografts unless a kidney is cotransplanted. To determine whether lungs share with kidneys the ability to induce cardiac allograft tolerance, we investigated heart–lung co-transplantation using the same induction protocol. Hearts (n = 3), heart–kidneys (n=3), lungs (n=6), and hearts–lungs (n=3) were transplanted into fully major histocompatibility complex–mismatched recipients treated with high-dose tacrolimus for 12 days. Serial biopsy samples were used to evaluate rejection, and in vitro assays were used to detect donor responsiveness. All heart–kidney recipients and five of six lung recipients demonstrated long-term graft survival for longer than 272 days, while all heart recipients rejected their allografts within 35 days. Tolerant recipients remained free of alloantibody and showed persistent donor-specific unresponsiveness by cell-mediated lympholysis/mixed-lymphocyte reaction. In contrast, heart–lung recipients demonstrated rejection of both allografts (days 47, 55, and 202) and antidonor responsiveness in vitro. In contrast to kidneys, lung cotransplantation leads to rejection of both heart and lung allografts, indicating that lungs do not have the same tolerogenic capacity as kidneys. We conclude that cells or cell products present in kidney, but not heart or lung allografts, have a unique capacity to confer unresponsiveness on cotransplanted organs, most likely by amplifying host regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26469344

  8. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  11. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. (a...

  13. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  14. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  15. Primary Cardiac Allograft Dysfunction—Validation of a Clinical Definition

    PubMed Central

    Dronavalli, Vamsidhar B.; Rogers, Chris A.; Banner, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation is an established treatment for advanced heart failure. Primary allograft dysfunction (PGD) is reported in up to 40% of transplants and is associated with a poor outcome. Methods As part of Heart Evaluation and Retrieval for Transplantation study, an investigation of the assessment of donor hearts for transplantation, we proposed a clinical definition for cardiac PGD comprising severely impaired systolic function affecting one or both ventricles accompanied by hypotension, low cardiac output, and high filling pressures occurring in the first 72 hours (in the absence of hyper acute rejection and technical surgical factors, such as cardiac tamponade). Here, we examine the prospective application of this definition to 290 heart transplants. We compared the clinical outcome of PGD and non-PGD cases. Results Ninety-four of 290 transplants developed PGD (32.4%). Inotrope use (score) was higher in the PGD group at 24, 48, and 72 hours after transplantation (P < 0.01). In the PGD group, there was a greater requirement for, intra-aortic balloon pump (50% vs 15%, P < 0.01), mechanical support (27% vs 0%, P < 0.01), and renal replacement therapy (61% vs 26%, P < 0.01). Intensive care stay was longer for recipients with PGD (median 14 vs 5 days, P < 0.01) and early mortality was higher (37% vs 4% at 30 days, 42% vs 8% at 1 year, P < 0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, our definition of PGD could be applied in a national multicenter study, and the cases it defined had more frequent complications and higher mortality. PMID:25742423

  16. Ursolic acid promotes robust tolerance to cardiac allografts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y; Huang, X; Li, Y; Li, C; Hu, X; Xue, C; Meng, F; Zhou, P

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor (NF)-κB is an important molecule in T cell activation. Our previous work has found that T cell-restricted NF-κB super-repressor (IκBαΔN-Tg) mice, expressing an inhibitor of NF-κB restricted to the T cell compartment, can permanently accept fully allogeneic cardiac grafts and secondary donor skin grafts. In this study, we explore if transient NF-κB inhibition by a small molecular inhibitor could induce permanent graft survival. Ursolic acid, a small molecular compound, dose-dependently inhibited T cell receptor (TCR)-triggered NF-κB nuclear translocation and T cell activation in vitro. In vivo, ursolic acid monotherapy prolonged significantly the survival of cardiac allograft in mice. Assisted with donor-specific transfusion (DST) on day 0, ursolic acid promoted 84·6% of first cardiac grafts to survive for more than 150 days. While the mice with long-term surviving grafts (LTS) did not reject the second donor strain hearts for more than 100 days without any treatment, they all promptly rejected the third-party strain hearts within 14 days. Interestingly, this protocol did not result in an increased proportion of CD4+CD25+forkhead box P3+ regulatory T cells in splenocytes. That adoptive transfer experiments also did not support regulation was the main mechanism in this model. Splenocytes from LTS showed reduced alloreactivity to donor antigen. However, depletion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells did not alter the donor-reactivity of LTS splenocytes. These data suggest that depletion of donor-reactive T cells may play an important role in this protocol. PMID:21391985

  17. Cardiac allografts: a 24-year South African experience.

    PubMed

    Botes, Lezelle; van den Heever, Johannes Jacobus; Smit, Francis Edwin; Neethling, William Morris Leonard

    2012-03-01

    The history of using homologous cardiac valves dates back more than 30 years. Through the years emphasis was placed on the optimization of graft retrieval, preservation techniques and clinical application. A cardiac homograft valve bank was established at the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein in 1982. A retrospective analysis was performed on all allograft data since 1984. Since the first valve was successfully procured and transplanted in 1984, 2,540 aortic and pulmonary homografts were harvested from 1,792 donors, of which 1,545 [989 (64%) aortic and 556 (36%) pulmonary] were released for clinical use. Valves were discarded for various reasons, the main reasons being Human Immunodeficiency Virus (32.4%), Hepatitis B (9.6%) and venereal diseases (8.9%). The mean donor age was 26.98 years with a male predominance of 1,368 males versus 424 females. The average ischemic time was 33 h mainly due to medico-legal autopsies exceeding the desired 24 h time limit. The valves were disinfected in an antibiotic cocktail of Mefoxin, Piperacillin, Amikacin and Amphotericin B prior to cryopreservation. The surgical procedures utilizing the majority of homografts were aortic valve replacements (42.9%), aortic root replacements (19.3%) and right ventricular-pulmonary artery conduits (33.3%). The bank also supplied 23 other centers with homografts (402 aortic and 301 pulmonary). The Bloemfontein bank has established itself over the years as a viable and functional cardiac homograft bank. However, with increasing activity in the procurement arena and widened applications in the operating room the role of the homograft seems assured but availability still remains a major concern.

  18. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  19. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  20. The role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Saparov, Arman; Chen, Chien-Wen; Beckman, Sarah A; Wang, Yadong; Huard, Johnny

    2013-08-06

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play major roles in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease including myocardial infarction (MI). The pathological progression following MI is very complex and involves a number of cell populations including cells localized within the heart, as well as cells recruited from the circulation and other tissues that participate in inflammatory and reparative processes. These cells, with their secretory factors, have pleiotropic effects that depend on the stage of inflammation and regeneration. Excessive inflammation leads to enlargement of the infarction site, pathological remodeling and eventually, heart dysfunction. Stem cell therapy represents a unique and innovative approach to ameliorate oxidative stress and inflammation caused by ischemic heart disease. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the crosstalk between stem cells and other cells involved in post-MI cardiac tissue repair, especially immune cells, in order to harness the beneficial effects of the immune response following MI and further improve stem cell-mediated cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the recent findings on the role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair following ischemic heart disease, particularly acute MI and focuses specifically on mesenchymal, muscle and blood-vessel-derived stem cells due to their antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties.

  1. Qualitative Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lacks Sensitivity in Detecting Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colvin-Adams, Monica; Petros, Salam; Raveendran, Ganesh; Missov, Emil; Medina, Eduardo; Wilson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major complication after heart transplantation, requiring frequent surveillance angiography. Though cardiac angiography is the gold standard, it is insensitive in detecting transplant vasculopathy and invasive. Perfusion MRI provides a noninvasive alternative and possibly a useful modality for studying CAV. We sought to compare the accuracy of qualitative perfusion MRI to coronary angiography in detecting CAV. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 68 heart transplant recipients who had simultaneous surveillance cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram and who underwent transplantation between 2000 and 2007. We compared results of qualitative MRI to those of the cardiac angiogram. Sensitivity and specificity of MR were calculated. Results Sixty-eight patients underwent both cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram. 73.5% were male; mean age was 45.37 ± 14 years. Mean duration of heart transplantation was 7.9 ± 5.2 years. The mean ejection fraction was 55% in the patients without CAV and 57.4% in those with CAV. There were 48 normal and 24 abnormal MRI studies. The overall sensitivity was 41% and specificity was 74%. Conclusions Qualitative assessment of perfusion cardiac MR has low sensitivity and moderate specificity for detecting CAV. The sensitivity of MRI was slightly improved with severity of disease.

  2. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology.

  3. Multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Sarma, Jaydeep; Naish, Josephine H; Yonan, Nizar; Williams, Simon G; Shaw, Steven M; Clark, David; Pearce, Keith; Stout, Martin; Potluri, Rahul; Borg, Alex; Coutts, Glyn; Chowdhary, Saqib; McCann, Gerry P; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Ray, Simon G; Schmitt, Matthias

    2014-03-04

    This study sought to evaluate the diagnostic performance of multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for detecting cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) using contemporary invasive epicardial artery and microvascular assessment techniques as reference standards, and to compare the performance of CMR with that of angiography. CAV continues to limit the long-term survival of heart transplant recipients. Coronary angiography has a Class I recommendation for CAV surveillance and annual or biannual surveillance angiography is performed routinely in most centers. All transplant recipients referred for surveillance angiography at a single UK center over a 2-year period were prospectively screened for study eligibility. Patients prospectively underwent coronary angiography followed by coronary intravascular ultrasound, fractional flow reserve, and index of microcirculatory resistance. Within 1 month, patients underwent multiparametric CMR, including assessment of regional and global ventricular function, absolute myocardial blood flow quantification, and myocardial tissue characterization. In addition, 10 healthy volunteers underwent CMR. Forty-eight patients were recruited, median 7.1 years (interquartile range: 4.6 to 10.3 years) since transplantation. The CMR myocardial perfusion reserve was the only independent predictor of both epicardial (β = -0.57, p < 0.001) and microvascular disease (β = -0.60, p < 0.001) on stepwise multivariable regression. The CMR myocardial perfusion reserve significantly outperformed angiography for detecting moderate CAV (area under the curve, 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.79 to 1.00] vs. 0.59 [95% CI: 0.42 to 0.77], p = 0.01) and severe CAV (area under the curve, 0.88 [95% CI: 0.78 to 0.98] vs. 0.67 [95% CI: 0.52 to 0.82], p = 0.05). CAV, including epicardial and microvascular components, can be detected more accurately using noninvasive CMR-based absolute myocardial blood flow assessment than with

  4. CD8(+)IL-17(+) T Cells Mediate Neutrophilic Airway Obliteration in T-bet-Deficient Mouse Lung Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lendermon, Elizabeth A; Dodd-o, Jeffrey M; Coon, Tiffany A; Miller, Hannah L; Ganguly, Sudipto; Popescu, Iulia; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Cardenes, Nayra; Levine, Melanie; Rojas, Mauricio; Weathington, Nathaniel M; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Yutong; McDyer, John F

    2015-05-01

    Acute cellular rejection is a known risk factor for the development of obliterative bronchiolitis, which limits the long-term survival of lung transplant recipients. However, the T cell effector mechanisms in both of these processes remain incompletely understood. Using the mouse orthotopic lung transplant model, we investigated whether C57BL/6 T-bet(-/-) recipients of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched BALB/c lung grafts develop rejection pathology and allospecific cytokine responses that differ from wild-type mice. T-bet(-/-) recipients demonstrated vigorous allograft rejection at 10 days, characterized by neutrophilic inflammation and predominantly CD8(+) T cells producing allospecific IL-17 and/or IFN-γ, in contrast to IFN-γ-dominant responses in WT mice. CD4(+) T cells produced IL-17 but not IFN-γ responses in T-bet(-/-) recipients, in contrast to WT controls. Costimulation blockade using anti-CD154 Ab significantly reduced allospecific CD8(+)IFN-γ(+) responses in both T-bet(-/-) and WT mice but had no attenuating effect on lung rejection pathology in T-bet(-/-) recipients or on the development of obliterative airway inflammation that occurred only in T-bet(-/-) recipients. However, neutralization of IL-17A significantly attenuated costimulation blockade-resistant rejection pathology and airway inflammation in T-bet(-/-) recipients. In addition, CXCL1 (neutrophil chemokine) was increased in T-bet(-/-) allografts, and IL-17 induced CXCL1 from mouse lung epithelial cells in vitro. Taken together, our data show that T-bet-deficient recipients of complete MHC-mismatched lung allografts develop costimulation blockade-resistant rejection characterized by neutrophilia and obliterative airway inflammation that is predominantly mediated by CD8(+)IL-17(+) T cells. Our data support T-bet-deficient mouse recipients of lung allografts as a viable animal model to study the immunopathogenesis of small airway injury in lung transplantation.

  5. Gene expression profiling and cardiac allograft rejection monitoring: is IMAGE just a mirage?

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Parameshwar, Jayan

    2010-06-01

    The search for an effective non-invasive monitoring technique for cardiac allograft rejection eluded us until the discovery and validation of a commercially available gene-based peripheral blood bio-signature signal. The Invasive Monitoring Attenuation through Gene Expression (IMAGE) trial tested the hypothesis of cardiac biopsy minimization using this gene-based panel in stable, low-risk survivors, late after cardiac transplantation and demonstrated non-inferiority of this strategy. We present a clinician's critical perspective on this important effort and outline the key caveats and highlights for the potential way forward in using these results. Furthermore, we contend that it may not be necessary to replace an invasive cardiac biopsy strategy with anything other than better standardized clinical and functional allograft vigilance in low-risk survivors. Copyright 2010 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system. 862.1163 Section 862.1163 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. Prolongation of survival of rat cardiac allografts by T cell vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Reshef, T; Pfeffermann, R A; Cohen, I R

    1993-01-01

    Administration of attenuated, activated autoimmune T lymphocytes to syngeneic mice and rats has been shown to prevent or induce remission of experimental autoimmune diseases specific for the autoimmune T cells. The process has been termed "T cell vaccination." In a recent study, T cell vaccination was done using T cells sensitized to rat alloantigens. The procedure produced a significant reduction of the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) against allogeneic cells. The reduction in MLR was not specific: Vaccination with T cells specific for stimulator cells of one allotype led to a reduced MLR stimulated by cells of another allotype. The present study was undertaken to examine whether T cell vaccination can induce tolerance to transplantation antigens in vivo. We used the model of heterotopic cardiac transplantation in rats. We now report that vaccinating rats with syngeneic, activated, alloantigen-primed T lymphocytes significantly prolonged survival of rat cardiac allografts. The effect of T cell vaccination was most evident when the T cells had been obtained from rats specifically sensitized against the donor rats: Brown-Norway (BN) allografts in control Wistar rats survived 8.5 +/- 0.4 d while BN allografts survived 29.2 +/- 7.1 d in Wistar rats that had been vaccinated with Wistar anti-BN cells. Vaccination of Wistar rats with Wistar anti-hooded T cells prolonged survival of BN heart allografts to a lesser but significant degree (13.0 +/- 1.1 d). Thus, T cell vaccination of recipients can prolong survival of allografts. PMID:8432846

  8. MRI Investigation of Macrophages in Acute Cardiac Allograft Rejection after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Liu, Li; Rosario, Bedda L.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; van Rooijen, Nico; Ho, Chien

    2013-01-01

    Background Current immunosuppressive therapy after heart transplantation either generally suppresses the recipient’s entire immune system or is mainly targeting T-lymphocytes. Monocytes/macrophages are recognized as a hallmark of acute allograft rejection, but the roles that they play are not well characterized in vivo, because the tools for accessing in-situ macrophage infiltration are lacking. In this study, we utilize MRI to investigate the role of macrophages in acute heart allograft rejection by cellular and functional MRI with selectively depleted systemic macrophages without affecting other leukocyte population and to explore the possibility that macrophages could be an alternative therapeutic target. Methods and Results A rodent heterotopic working heart-lung transplantation model was employed for studying acute allograft rejection. Systemic macrophages were selectively depleted by treating recipient animals with clodronate-liposomes. Macrophage infiltration in the graft hearts was monitored by cellular MRI with in-vivo ultra-small iron-oxide particles (USPIO) labeling. Graft heart function was evaluated by tagging MRI, followed by strain analysis. Clodronate-liposome-treatment depletes circulating monocytes/macrophages in transplant recipients, and both cellular MRI and pathological examinations indicate a significant reduction in macrophage accumulation in the rejecting allograft hearts. In clodronate-liposome-treated group, allograft hearts exhibit preserved tissue integrity, partially reverse functional deterioration, and prolong graft survival, compared to untreated controls. Conclusions Cardiac cellular and functional MRI is a powerful tool to explore the roles of targeted immune cells in vivo. Our results indicate that macrophages are essential in acute cardiac allograft rejection, and selective depletion of macrophages with clodronate-liposomes protects hearts against allograft rejection, suggesting a potential therapeutic avenue. Our findings

  9. Analysis of the mechanism of allograft rejection and cell-mediated immunity. I. Accelerated rejection of tumour allografts without augmented cytotoxicity in the spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nanishi, F; Nomoto, K; Taniguchi, K; Kubo, C

    1980-01-01

    While immunization with allogeneic spleen cells did not generate positive cytotoxic activity, it produced accelerated rejection of subsequent tumour grafts carrying the same H-2 antigen. No augmented generation of cytotoxicity was detectable by 51Cr-release assay in the host spleen cells, even in the presence of accelerated rejection of tumour allografts. However, augmented cytotoxicity was generated in mixed lymphocyte culture and in peritoneal lymphocytes after an intraperitoneal boost. These results indicate that while immunization with allogeneic spleen cells does not generate mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) detectable by the present assay, it may produce premature CTL that rapidly differentiate into mature CTL after direct contact with antigen at the site of graft rejection. The inability to generate a high degree of cytotoxicity in the spleen cells may be ascribed to the early development of CTL at the rejection site. The relationship between accelerated rejection of allogeneic tumour grafts and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions is also discussed. PMID:7419243

  10. Sensitivity of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-lymphocytes for detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.B.; Eisen, H.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.

    1988-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection after administration of indium-111-labeled lymphocytes. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique, as well as its value for delineating the severity of rejection, we studied 16 dogs with heterotopic thoracic cardiac allografts. Five animals were evaluated while exposed to immunosuppressive agents. Animals were scanned sequentially after administration of 100-400 microCi of indium-111-labeled autologous lymphocytes. Myocardial lymphocyte infiltration was expressed as the indium excess (IE), defined as the ratio of indium activity of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood. Scintigraphic results were compared with characteristics of simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies. Among 17 biopsy documented episodes of rejection, 16 were detected scintigraphically. Among 18 biopsies with no evidence of rejection, scintigraphy was uniformly negative. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy were 94 and 100%, respectively. Biopsies graded as showing no rejection were associated with an IE of 0.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD); those graded as mild, 2.8 +/- 1.7; those as moderate, 10.7 +/- 7.2; and those graded as indicative of severe rejection, 14.2 +/- 4.5. Thus, scintigraphy with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes sensitively and specifically detects cardiac allograft rejection and delineates the intensity of the rejection process. It should be useful clinically for assessing potential allograft rejection noninvasively.

  11. Extracorporeal life support in a case of fatal flecainide and betaxolol poisoning allowing successful cardiac allograft.

    PubMed

    Vivien, Benoît; Deye, Nicolas; Mégarbane, Bruno; Marx, Jean-Sébastien; Leprince, Pascal; Bonnet, Nicolas; Roussin, France; Jacob, Laurent; Pavie, Alain; Baud, Frédéric J; Carli, Pierre

    2010-10-01

    Use of cardiac allograft for transplantation from donors after acute poisoning is a matter of debate because of potential toxic organ injuries, especially if death results from massive ingestion of cardiotoxic drugs. We report successful allograft cardiac transplantation from a brain-dead patient after severe flecainide and betaxolol self-poisoning requiring extracorporeal life support. Extracorporeal life support was initiated in the emergency department because of a refractory cardiac arrest caused by the cardiotoxicants' ingestion and continued after the onset of brain death to facilitate organ donation of the heart, liver, and kidneys. Forty-five months later, each organ recipient was alive, with normal graft function. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modification of alternative messenger RNA splicing of fibroblast growth factor receptors in human cardiac allografts during rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X M; Frist, W H; Yeoh, T K; Miller, G G

    1994-01-01

    Accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in cardiac transplants (cardiac allograft vasculopathy, CAV) is characterized by coronary intimal hyperplasia. Acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, and its expression is increased in cardiac allografts, suggesting it may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAV. The activity of aFGF is dependent on binding to transmembrane receptors. To investigate whether receptors for aFGF are also induced after transplantation, polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze expression of four receptors for aFGF (FGFR1-FGFR4). Expression of mRNA encoding extracellular immunoglobulin-like domains of FGFR1 was increased 35-fold in cardiac allografts compared with normal hearts and was predominantly present in cardiac myocytes and vascular structures. Alternatively spliced mRNA that encodes transmembrane forms of FGFR1, which contain the signal-transducing tyrosine kinase domains, was induced in allografts during rejection, in infiltrating cells, vascular structures, and myocytes. In vitro experiments showed that differential expression of FGF receptor isoforms was induced by aFGF, and also by IL-6 and TGF-beta, which are expressed in cardiac allografts during rejection. The results show that expression of both aFGF and its receptors is altered in cardiac allografts and suggest that these events are important in the pathogenesis of CAV. Images PMID:7521891

  13. Autoantibodies to Vimentin Cause Accelerated Rejection of Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Leong, Hon-Sing; McCormack, Ann; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Holder, Angela; Rose, Marlene L.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune responses to vimentin occur after solid organ transplantation, but their pathogenic effects are unclear. The aim of these studies was to investigate the effects of vimentin preimmunization on allogeneic and isografted hearts in a murine transplant model. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with murine vimentin in complete Freund’s adjuvant resulted in anti-vimentin antibodies and vimentin-reactive Th-1 cells. Transplantation of 129/sv hearts into vimentin-immunized C57BL/6 recipients resulted in accelerated rejection (8.4 ± 1.5 days; n = 18), compared with hen egg lysozyme-immunized C57BL/6 (13.3 ± 2.2 days; n = 10; P < 0.0001, log-rank test). In contrast, isografts continued to beat beyond 90 days. Immunohistochemical analysis of allografts from vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant mice demonstrated increased numbers of T cells and enhanced microvascular deposition of C3d, CD41, and P-selectin compared with controls. Antibodies were necessary for accelerated rejection, shown by the fact that vimentin-immunized B-cell-deficient IgH6 mice did not show accelerated rejection of 129/sv allografts, but rejection was restored by adoptive transfer of serum containing anti-vimentin antibodies. Eluates from donor hearts placed in vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant recipients contained anti-vimentin antibodies, shown by Western blotting. Confocal imaging of rejected hearts demonstrated presence of vimentin and C3d on apoptosed leukocytes, endothelial cells, and platelet/leukocyte conjugates. These results demonstrate that autoantibodies to vimentin, in conjunction with the alloimmune response, have a pathogenic role in allograft rejection. PMID:17392180

  14. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  15. Complement C5 Inhibition Reduces T Cell-Mediated Allograft Vasculopathy Caused by Both Alloantibody and Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lingfeng; Li, Guangxin; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy; Clark, Pamela; Fang, Caodi; Wang, Yi; Yu, Zhao-Xue; Devore, Denise; Tellides, George; Pober, Jordan S; Jane-wit, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Allograft vasculopathy (AV) is characterized by diffuse stenoses in the vasculature of solid organ transplants. Previously, we developed two humanized models showing that alloantibody and ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) exacerbated T cell-mediated AV in human arterial xenografts in vivo. Here we examined a causal role for terminal complement activation in both settings. IRI, in contrast to alloantibody, elicited widespread membrane attack complex (MAC) assembly throughout the vessel wall. Both alloantibody and IRI caused early (24 h) and robust endothelial cell (EC) activation localized to regions of intimal MAC deposition, indicated by increases in NF-κB inducing kinase, a MAC-dependent activator of non-canonical NF-kB, VCAM-1 expression, and Gr-1+ neutrophil infiltration. Endothelial cell activation by alloantibody was inhibited by anti- mouse C5 mAb, but not by anti-C5a mAb or by control mAb, implicating MAC as the primary target of anti-C5 mAb. Anti-mouse C5 mAb significantly reduced alloantibody- and IRI-enhanced T cell infiltration and AV-like changes including neointimal hyperplasia as well as intraluminal thrombosis in a subset of IRI-treated arterial grafts. These results indicate that increased AV lesion formation in response to either alloantibody or IRI are dependent on complement C5 activation and accordingly inhibition of this pathway may attenuate AV. PMID:27104811

  16. Purified eicosapentaenoic acid induces prolonged survival of cardiac allografts and generates regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Iwami, D; Zhang, Q; Aramaki, O; Nonomura, K; Shirasugi, N; Niimi, M

    2009-06-01

    Fish oil, which is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been found to have immunomodulatory effects. We examined whether administration of purified EPA affected survival of fully mismatched murine cardiac allografts. Hearts from C57BL/10 (H-2(b)) mice were transplanted into CBA (H-2(k)) recipients treated with one intraperitoneal dose of purified EPA the day of transplantation. Untreated CBA recipients and recipients given 0.1 g/kg of EPA rejected C57BL/10 hearts (median survival time [MST], 8 and 13 days, respectively). With a 1.0 g/kg dose of EPA, graft survival was markedly prolonged (MST >100 days). To determine whether regulatory cells were generated, naïve mice (secondary recipients) underwent adoptive transfer of splenocytes from EPA-treated primary recipients and cardiac allograft transplantation. Adoptive transfer of whole, CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+) splenocytes from EPA-treated recipients induced indefinite survival in secondary recipients. Flow cytometry showed that the CD4(+)CD25(+) cells were Foxp3(+). In reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) mRNA was upregulated by EPA treatment. A PPARgamma antagonist abrogated the prolongation of graft survival induced by EPA treatment (MST, 13 days). Thus, in our model, purified EPA induced prolonged survival of fully mismatched cardiac allografts and generated regulatory T cells dependent on PPARgamma activation.

  17. The recipient's heme oxygenase-1 promoter region polymorphism is associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Freystaetter, Kathrin; Andreas, Martin; Bilban, Martin; Perkmann, Thomas; Kaider, Alexandra; Masetti, Marco; Kocher, Alfred; Wolzt, Michael; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2017-02-10

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyses the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. The promoter region contains a highly polymorphic (GT)n repeat, where shorter (GT)n repeat sequences are linked to higher transcriptional activity, which was shown to correlate with a cytoprotective effect. Higher HO-1 levels may protect from cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Cardiac allograft recipients transplanted between 1988 and 2012 were analyzed for the HO-1 (GT)n repeat polymorphism using PCR and DNA fragment analysis with capillary electrophoresis. A relation to cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was analyzed using Cox regression including common risk factors for CAV and the occurrence of rejection episodes as explanatory variables. A total of 344 patients were analyzed, of which 127 patients were positive for CAV (36.9%). In our multivariable Cox regression analysis, the short homozygous HO-1 (GT)n genotype with <27 repeats (S/S) revealed a higher risk for CAV (P = 0.032). Donor age (P = 0.001) and donor weight (P = 0.005) were significant predictors for CAV. A potential risk for CAV was associated with rejection episodes (P = 0.058) and history of smoking (P = 0.06). The recipient HO-1 (GT)n genotype may contribute to CAV development. This finding has to be evaluated in larger series including studies targeting the underlying disease mechanism.

  18. Effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on prolongation of cardiac allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Uchiyama, M; Zhang, Q; Harada, T; Otsuka, K; Shimokawa, T; Niimi, M

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines have been used for over 3,000 years in Asian as alternative therapy for their variety effects and have recently become popular in Europe and the United States. In the last 30 years, Japanese herbal medicines were widely used for treatment of diseases after been recognized officially by Japanese government. In this study, we investigated the effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice (H2(k)) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (H2(b)) heart and received oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of the 34 kinds of herbal medicines from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naïve CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time [MST], 7 days). CBA transplant recipients given 2 g/kg/d of Sairei-to (TJ-114) and Tokishakuyaku-san (TJ-23) had prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival indefinitely (both MSTs > 100 days). Moreover, CBA transplant recipients given Seisinrensiin (TJ-111), Tokishigyakukagoshuyushokyoto (TJ-38), Rikkunshito (TJ-43), Maobushisaishinto (TJ-127), Ninjin-yoei-to (TJ-108), Ryokan-kyomi-shinge-nin-to (TJ-119), Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), Hochuekkito (TJ-41), Kihi-to (TJ-65), and Sinbu-to (TJ-30) had also prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival significantly (MSTs of 28, 22, 16, 14, 14, 13, 12, 9.5, 9 and 9 days, respectively). However, none of other 22 kinds of herbal medicines could prolong the allograft survival. Furthermore, oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of Daikenchuto (TJ-100) induced sudden death (within 1 minute) in CBA mice. In conclusion, 12 kinds of Japanese herbal medicines prolonged allograft survival and one showed toxic effect in mice.

  19. The Use of Donation After Cardiac Death Allografts Does Not Increase Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Croome, K P; Lee, D D; Burns, J M; Musto, K; Paz, D; Nguyen, J H; Perry, D K; Harnois, D M; Taner, C B

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) with donation after brain death (DBD) and donation after cardiac death (DCD) allografts has not previously been investigated. Rates and patterns of HCC recurrences were investigated in patients undergoing DBD (N = 1633) and DCD (N = 243) LT between 2003 and 2012. LT for HCC was identified in 397 patients (340 DBD and 57 DCD). No difference in tumor number (p = 0.26), tumor volume (p = 0.34) and serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) (p = 0.47) was seen between the groups. HCC recurrence was identified in 41 (12.1%) patients in the DBD group and 7 (12.3%) patients in the DCD group. There was no difference in recurrence-free survival (p = 0.29) or cumulative incidence of HCC recurrence (p = 0.91) between the groups. Liver allograft was the first site of recurrence in 22 (65%) patients in the DBD group and two (37%) patients in the DCD group (p = 0.39). LT for HCC with DBD and DCD allografts demonstrate no difference in the rate of HCC recurrence. Previously published differences in survival demonstrated between recipients with HCC receiving DBD and DCD allografts despite statistical adjustment can likely be explained by practice patterns not captured by variables contained in the SRTR database. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Detection of rejection of canine orthotopic cardiac allografts with indium-111 lymphocytes and gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Rosenbloom, M.; Laschinger, J.C.; Saffitz, J.E.; Cox, J.L.; Sobel, B.E.; Bolman, R.M. III; Bergmann, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting canine heterotopic cardiac allograft rejection scintigraphically after administration of 111In lymphocytes. To determine whether the approach is capable of detecting rejection in orthotopic cardiac transplants in which labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool may reduce sensitivity, the present study was performed in which canine orthotopic cardiac transplants were evaluated in vivo. Immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine A (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 2 wk after transplantation. Subsequently, therapy was tapered. Five successful allografts were evaluated scintigraphically every 3 days after administration of 100-350 microCi 111In autologous lymphocytes. Correction for labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool, but not actively sequestered in the allografts was accomplished by administering 3-6 mCi 99mTc autologous erythrocytes and employing a previously validated blood-pool activity correction technique. Cardiac infiltration of labeled lymphocytes was quantified as percent indium excess (%IE), scintigraphically detectable 111In in the transplant compared with that in blood, and results were compared with those of concomitantly performed endomyocardial biopsy. Scintigraphic %IE for hearts not undergoing rejection manifest histologically was 0.7 +/- 0.4. Percent IE for rejecting hearts was 6.8 +/- 4.0 (p less than 0.05). Scintigraphy detected each episode of rejection detected by biopsy. Scintigraphic criteria for rejection (%IE greater than 2 s.d. above normal) were not manifest in any study in which biopsies did not show rejection. Since scintigraphic results with 111In-labeled lymphocytes were concordant with biopsy results in orthotopic cardiac transplants, noninvasive detection of graft rejection in patients should be attainable with the approach developed.

  1. Hospital Resource Use with Donation after Cardiac Death Allografts in Liver Transplantation: A Matched Controlled Analysis from 2007 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Ashish; Wima, Koffi; Hoehn, Richard S; Quillin, R Cutler; Woodle, E Steve; Paquette, Ian M; Paterno, Flavio; Abbott, Daniel E; Shah, Shimul A

    2015-05-01

    Although donation after cardiac death (DCD) liver allografts have been used to expand the donor pool, concerns exist regarding primary nonfunction and biliary complications. Our aim was to compare resource use and outcomes of DCD allografts with donation after brain death (DBD) liver allografts. Using a linkage between the University HealthSystem Consortium and Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients databases, we identified 11,856 patients who underwent deceased donor liver transplantation (LT) from 2007 to 2011. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts based on type of allograft (DCD vs DBD). Matched pair analysis (n = 613 in each group) was used to compare outcomes of the 2 donor types. Donation after cardiac death allografts comprised 5.2% (n = 613) of all LTs in the studied cohort; DCD allograft recipients were healthier and had lower median Model of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score (17 vs 19; p < 0.0001). Post LT, there was no significant difference in length of stay, perioperative mortality, and discharge to home rates. However, DCD allografts were associated with higher direct cost ($110,414 vs $99,543; p < 0.0001) and 30-day readmission rates (46.4% vs 37.1%; p < 0.0001). Matched analysis revealed that DCD allografts were associated with higher direct cost, readmission rates, and inferior graft survival. While confirming the previous reports of inferior graft survival associated with DCD allografts, this is the first national report to show increased financial and resource use associated with DCD compared with DBD allografts in a matched recipient cohort. Copyright © 2015 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Morphologic and immunohistochemical findings in antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    The recognition and acceptance of the entity of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organs has been slow to develop. Greatest acceptance and most information relates to cardiac transplantation. AMR is thought to represent antibody/complement mediated injury to the microvasculature of the graft that can result in allograft dysfunction, allograft loss, accelerated graft vasculopathy, and increased mortality. The morphologic hallmark is microvascular injury with immunoglobulin and complement deposition in capillaries, accumulation of intravascular macrophages, and in more severe cases, microvascular hemorrhage and thrombosis, with inflammation and edema of the affected organ. Understanding of the pathogenesis of AMR, criteria and methods for diagnosis, and treatment strategies are still in evolution, and will be addressed in this review.

  3. Comparison of Segmental Versus Longitudinal Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis for Pediatric Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, M A; Burch, M; Chinnock, R E; Fenton, M J

    2017-10-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has been routinely used in some centers to investigate cardiac allograft vasculopathy in pediatric heart transplant recipients. We present an alternative method using more sophisticated imaging software. This study presents a comparison of this method with an established standard method. All patients who had IVUS performed in 2014 were retrospectively evaluated. The standard technique consisted of analysis of 10 operator-selected segments along the vessel. Each study was re-evaluated using a longitudinal technique, taken at every third cardiac cycle, along the entire vessel. Semiautomatic edge detection software was used to detect vessel imaging planes. Measurements included outer and inner diameter, total and luminal area, maximal intimal thickness (MIT), and intimal index. Each IVUS was graded for severity using the Stanford classification. All results were given as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Groups were compared using Student t test. A P value <.05 was considered significant. There were 59 IVUS studies performed on 58 patients. There was no statistically significant difference between outer diameter, inner diameter, or total area. In the longitudinal group, there was a significantly smaller luminal area, higher MIT, and higher intimal index. Using the longitudinal technique, there was an increase in Stanford classification in 20 patients. The longitudinal technique appeared more sensitive in assessing the degree of cardiac allograft vasculopathy and may play a role in the increase in the degree of thickening seen. It may offer an alternative way of grading severity of cardiac allograft vasculopathy in pediatric heart transplant recipients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Confocal Scanning Microscopy in Assessment of Cardiac Allograft Rejection--A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    White, R; Crossman, D J; Isaacson, M; Gibbs, H; Ruygrok, P N

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac allograft rejection is typically diagnosed on the basis of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology of endomyocardial biopsies. This diagnosis is made based on the degree of immune cell infiltrate and associated myocyte damage. However, considerable variability in rejection grading between pathologists can occur. Confocal microscopy provides high contrast and high resolution imaging that has the potential to provide detailed views of pathological features of allograft rejection. In this pilot study we sought to determine if confocal microscopy could be used to detect features of cardiac rejection. This was achieved by collection of additional sample at 30 biopsy procedures from 15 heart transplant patients. Routine pathological grading of H&E histology identified 5 gradings of 0R, 21 gradings of 1R, and 3 gradings of 2R. From these gradings, 3 samples for 0R, 9 samples for 1R, and 3 samples for 2R were imaged by confocal microscopy. This was achieved by fluorescently labeling sections with DAPI, wheat germ agglutinin, and phalloidin, to visualize the cell nuclei, cell border and extracellular matrix, and muscle cell actin, respectively. Labeling with these fluorescent markers was of high contrast. However, we did note variability in DAPI and phalloidin labeling of tissue sections. Confocal imaging of these labels revealed the following features at high resolution: perivascular and/or interstitial infiltrate, myocyte damage, and Quilty lesions. In particular increased detail of damaged myocytes reveals distortion in myofilament organization that could be exploited to distinguish between 1R and 2R grades. In conclusion, confocal microscopy provided high contrast and resolution imaging of cardiac biopsies that could be explored further to aid assessment of cardiac allograft rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. AS2553627, a novel JAK inhibitor, prevents chronic rejection in rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Inami, Masamichi; Morio, Hiroki; Okuma, Kenji; Ito, Misato; Noto, Takahisa; Shirakami, Shohei; Hirose, Jun; Morokata, Tatsuaki

    2017-02-05

    Janus family kinases (JAKs) are essential molecules for cytokine responses and attractive targets for the treatment of transplant rejection and autoimmune diseases. Several JAK inhibitors have shown demonstrable effects on acute rejection in experimental cardiac transplant models. However, little is known about the potential benefits of JAK inhibitors on chronic rejection outcomes such as vasculopathy and fibrosis. Here, we examined the pharmacological profile of a novel JAK inhibitor, AS2553627, and explored its therapeutic potential in chronic rejection as well as acute rejection in a rat cardiac transplant model. AS2553627 potently inhibited JAK kinases but showed no inhibition of other kinases, including TCR-associated molecules. The compound also suppressed proliferation of IL-2 stimulated human and rat T cells. In a rat cardiac transplant model, oral administration of AS2553627 alone or co-administration with a sub-therapeutic dose of tacrolimus effectively prolonged cardiac allograft survival, suggesting the efficacy in treating acute rejection. To evaluate the effect on chronic rejection, recipient rats were administered a therapeutic dose of tacrolimus for 90 days. In combination with tacrolimus, AS2553627 significantly reduced cardiac allograft vasculopathy and fibrosis that tacrolimus alone did not inhibit. AS2553627 at the effective dose in rat transplantation models did not significantly reduce reticulocyte counts in peripheral whole blood after in vivo erythropoietin administration, indicating a low risk for anemia. These results suggest that AS2553627 may be a therapeutic candidate for the prevention of not only acute but also chronic rejection in cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapamycin Prolongs Cardiac Allograft Survival in a Mouse Model by Inducing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Nakao, T; Yoshimura, N; Ashihara, E

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are the main immunosuppressive drugs for organ transplant recipients. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which mTOR inhibitors induce immunosuppression is not fully understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) maintain host immunity; however, the relationship between mTOR inhibitors and MDSCs is unclear. Here, the results from a murine cardiac transplantation model revealed that rapamycin treatment (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, and 6) led to the recruitment of MDSCs and increased their expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that rapamycin induced the migration of iNOS-expressing MDSCs into the subintimal space within the allograft vessels, resulting in a significant prolongation of graft survival compared with that in the untreated group (67 days vs. 7 days, respectively). These effects were counterbalanced by the administration of an anti-Gr-1, which reduced allograft survival to 21 days. Moreover, adoptive transcoronary arterial transfer of MDSCs from rapamycin-treated recipients prolonged allograft survival; this increase was reversed by the anti-Gr-1 antibody. Finally, co-administration of rapamycin and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor trametinib reversed rapamycin-mediated MDSC recruitment. Thus, the mTOR and Raf/MEK/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways appear to play an important role in MDSC expansion.

  7. Perforin Mediates Endothelial Cell Death and Resultant Transplant Vascular Disease in Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jonathan C.; Kerjner, Alexandra; Wong, Brian W.; McManus, Bruce M.; Granville, David J.

    2004-01-01

    T cell-induced endothelial injury is an important event in the development of transplant vascular disease (TVD), the leading expression of chronic rejection of vascularized organ transplants. However, the precise contribution of perforin to vascular damage in allografts and resultant TVD has not been addressed in vivo. Minor histocompatability antigen mismatched mouse heterotopic cardiac transplants were performed from 129J donors into C57Bl/6 (wild-type (WT)) or perforin knockout (PKO) recipients. Perforin was abundant in immune infiltrates in the myocardium and vasculature of transplanted hearts in WT mice. Allograft coronary arteries in both WT and PKO mice had considerable vasculitis. There was also marked endothelial disruption, as well as TUNEL-positivity in the endothelial region, in coronary arteries of hearts transplanted into WT mice that was not evident in PKO recipients (P = 0.05). At 30 days post-transplantation, intimal thickening was assessed on elastic Van Gieson-stained ventricular sections. There was an average of 54.2 ± 6.7% luminal narrowing of coronary arteries in allografts from WT mice as compared to 13.4 ± 5.1% luminal narrowing in PKO counterparts (P < 0.00002). In summary, perforin plays a primary role in endothelial damage and the resultant onset and progression of TVD. PMID:15215168

  8. Long-term outcome of cardiac allograft vasculopathy treated by transmyocardial laser revascularization: early rewards, late losses.

    PubMed

    Mehra, M R; Uber, P A; Prasad, A K; Park, M H; Scott, R L; McFadden, P M; Van Meter, C H

    2000-08-01

    Transmyocardial laser revascularization (TLR) was initially touted as a promising therapeutic alternative for tackling the growing problem of cardiac allograft vasculopathy in late heart transplant survivors. We first described 4- and 8-week observations of application of this surgical technique, in which we professed enthusiasm for TLR in providing symptomatic relief and in reducing ischemic burden. In this report, we present the long-term (24-month) impact of TLR on clinical outcome, channel patency, and recrudescence of ischemic burden. In the long term, surgical TLR provides neither consistent symptomatic improvement nor an ameliorative effect on the natural history of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

  9. Survival time of cardiac allografts prolonged by isogeneic BMT in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Jiang, H; Chen, R; Feng, S; Jin, J; Bi, Y; Yang, H; Chen, J

    2012-08-01

    To find an approach to prolong the survival time of cardiac allografts in a BALB/c-to-C57/BL6 heterotopic heart transplant model and to try to figure out related chemokines and cytokines, isogeneic and allogeneic BM cells were obtained from pregnant C57/BL6 (♀C57/BL6 × ♂BALB/c) and regular BALB/c mice and injected to the half lethally irradiated C57/BL6 mice 1 day before heart transplantation. Recipients were treated with CsA or phosphate-buffered saline for 7 days. Isogeneic BMT (iBMT) from pregnant C57/BL6 mice was observed to significantly prolong the survival of BALB/c allografts and reduce the lymphocyte infiltration. Allogeneic BMT (aBMT) and iBMT both exhibited signicantly less T-cell proliferation reactivity and the similar degree of chimerism. There was no significant difference in these groups of IFN-γ and IL-4 production. The level of chemokine MIG (CXCL9) dramatically decreased in aBMT and iBMT groups compared with the control group. But there were no significant differences between aBMT and iBMT group. IL-17 and RORγ(t) (receptor-related orphan receptor) production were downregulated in iBMT recipients. These results indicate that iBMT can prolong the survival of cardiac allografts. IL-17 production downregulated in iBMT recipients. This means that iBMT may have important therapeutic implications.

  10. Noninvasive assessment of treatment of cardiac allograft rejection with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbloom, M.; Eisen, H.J.; Laschinger, J.; Saffitz, J.E.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. III

    1988-09-01

    We have shown previously that cardiac allograft rejection can be detected noninvasively with gamma scintigraphy after administration of indium-111 (111In)-labeled lymphocytes. To determine whether this technique could be used to monitor salvage immunosuppressive therapy in reversing rejection, 5 dogs were studied after thoracic heterotopic cardiac transplantation. Initial postoperative immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 7 days after transplantation and then discontinued. Scintigraphy after administration of labeled lymphocytes was performed during initial immunosuppression and every 3 days after its termination. Endomyocardial biopsies were obtained on each day scintigraphy was performed. Once scintigraphic criteria for rejection were met (111In-lymphocyte uptake greater than mean +/- 2SD of normal myocardium), animals were treated with high dose methylprednisolone and cyclosporine. Myocardial 111In-lymphocyte activity compared with that in blood was 0.7 +/- 0.8 during initial immunosuppression, increased to 5.7 +/- 3.5 after termination of therapy (P less than 0.01), and diminished with salvage immunosuppressive therapy to 0.5 +/- 0.8 (P = NS compared with native hearts or allografts during initial immunosuppression). Scintigraphy accurately predicted all but one episode of biopsy-documented rejection and accurately detected reversal of rejection during salvage. Thus, scintigraphy with 111In-labeled lymphocytes should facilitate noninvasive monitoring of antirejection therapy in patients.

  11. Recurrent Primary Cardiac Lymphoma on Aortic Valve Allograft: Implications for Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Fahmi J.

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant cardiac lymphomas associated with grafts are extremely rare: to our knowledge, only 6 cases of prosthesis-associated B-cell lymphoma have been reported. Ours is the first report of recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma associated with aortic valve allografts. We treated a 60-year-old man who presented in early 2007 with aortic valve endocarditis. He underwent aortic valve replacement with an allograft; the resected native valve showed active endocarditis without tumor. In January 2011, the patient underwent repeat aortic valve replacement because of symptomatic aortic regurgitation. The explanted valve specimen displayed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In September 2011, the patient presented with fever and a mass around the aortic valve. He died in January 2012. On autopsy, the explanted replacement valve displayed recurrent diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The recurrent lymphoma on a new graft leads us to believe that this tumor is more aggressive than had been thought. We propose early systemic chemotherapy, in addition to tumor resection, for the possibility of a better prognosis. We discuss our patient's case and review the relevant medical literature. PMID:25425992

  12. Chronic cardiac allograft rejection: critical role of ED-A(+) fibronectin and implications for targeted therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Chronic cardiac allograft rejection is characterized by cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) causing severe long-term complications after heart transplantation and determining allograft function and patients' prognosis. Until now, there have been no sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. CAV and CIF are accompanied by changes in the extracellular matrix, including re-expression of the fetal fibronectin splice variant known as ED-A(+) fibronectin. This molecule has been shown to be crucial for the development of myofibroblasts (MyoFbs) as the main cell type in CIF and for the activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as the main cell type in CAV. Relevant re-expression and protein deposition of ED-A(+) fibronectin has been demonstrated in animal models of chronic rejection, with spatial association to CAV and CIF, and a quantitative correlation to the rejection grade. The paper by Booth et al published in this issue of The Journal of Pathology could prove for the first time the functional importance of ED-A(+) fibronectin for the development of CIF as a main component of chronic cardiac rejection. Thus, promising conclusions for the development of new diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for chronic cardiac rejection focusing on ED-A(+) fibronectin can be suggested.

  13. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  14. A high isoflavone soy protein diet and intravenous genistein delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy P; Liesen, Daniel A; Mann, Paul C; Rolando, Lori; Banz, William J

    2002-08-01

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has in vitro immunosuppressive properties. We investigated whether genistein or dietary soy protein containing isoflavones could influence the outcome of rat cardiac allografts. Lewis rats were fed a diet with protein from high isoflavone soy protein fraction (HIS), casein (CAS) or casein with isoflavones added (CI) starting 1 wk before heart transplants from Wistar Furth donors, and continuing throughout the study. HIS-fed rats had significantly prolonged time to rejection compared with CAS- and CI-fed recipients (10.8 +/- 2.62 vs. 7.18 +/- 0.75 and 7.22 +/- 0.44 d, P < 0.001). Intravenous genistein [20mg/(kg. d) for 14 d] significantly prolonged heart survival compared with controls and dissolvent-treated recipients (23.2 +/- 7.4 vs. 8.4 +/- 1.3 and 11.4+/3.6 d, P < 0.0005), and had an additive effect when given to heart recipients also receiving low dose cyclosporine for 7 d (30.8 +/- 2.3 vs. 23.4 +/- 2.4 d, P < 0.005). Concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, isolated from Lewis rats given intraperitoneal genistein for 7 d, had decreased production of interferon gamma compared with controls or dimethyl sulfoxide-treated groups (22.6 +/- 9.9 vs 149 +/- 105 and 154 +/- 103 micro g/L, P < 0.05). In conclusion, a high isoflavone soy diet and intravenous genistein, but not isoflavone extract alone, delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts, with an additive effect in cyclosporine-treated rats. In addition, intraperitoneal genistein has immunosuppressive properties in vivo.

  15. Expression of fibronectin splicing variants in organ transplantation: a differential pattern between rat cardiac allografts and isografts.

    PubMed Central

    Coito, A. J.; Brown, L. F.; Peters, J. H.; Kupiec-Weglinski, J. W.; van de Water, L.

    1997-01-01

    Allograft rejection is associated with infiltration of inflammatory cells and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The extent to which diversity in the extracellular matrix regulates inflammatory cell function in transplants remains unclear. One group of extracellular matrix proteins, termed fibronectins (FNs), exhibits inherent diversity as a consequence of alternative splicing in three segments: EIIIA, EIIIB, or V. Although the EIIIA segment has documented functions in mesenchymal cell differentiation, neither this segment nor the EIIIB segment have been tested for effects specific to leukocyte functions. By contrast, the V region can include the CS-1 segment to which leukocytes may adhere through alpha 4 beta 1 integrins. In this study, we demonstrate that EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ FN variants are synthesized, primarily by macrophages in distinct temporal and spatial patterns in two rat cardiac transplant models: either with antigenic challenge, allografts, or without challenge, isografts. The ratio of EIIIA inclusion into FN increases by day 1 in allografts and isografts and remains high until allografts are rejected (approximately 7 days) but falls to normal levels in tolerated isografts (day 6). EIIIB+ FN ratios in allografts peak later than do EIIIA+ FNs (day 4). EIIIB+ FN ratios remain relatively low in isografts. Interestingly, EIIIA+ and EIIIB+ FNs are deposited prominently in the myocardium of rejecting allografts in close association with infiltrating leukocytes, and FN expression and deposition are prominent at sites of infarction. By contrast, these FNs are largely restricted to the epicardium and to a lesser degree in the immediately adjacent myocardium in isografts. CS-1+ FNs increase in allografts and isografts at 3 hours after transplantation but are particularly prominent in allografts 1 to 3 days before rejection. Our data suggest that FN splicing variants have a differential role in the effector functions of leukocytes in allografts and

  16. Essential role of PDL1 expression on nonhematopoietic donor cells in acquired tolerance to vascularized cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Riella, L V; Watanabe, T; Sage, P T; Yang, J; Yeung, M; Azzi, J; Vanguri, V; Chandraker, A; Sharpe, A H; Sayegh, M H; Najafian, N

    2011-04-01

    The PD1:PDL1 pathway is an essential negative costimulatory pathway that plays a key role in regulating the alloimune response. PDL1 is expressed not only on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) but also cardiac endothelium. In this study, we investigated the importance of PDL1 expression on donor cardiac allograft in acquired transplantation tolerance in a fully MHC-mismatched model. We generated PDL1 chimeric mice on B6 background that expressed PDL1 on either hematopoietic cells or nonhematopoietic cells of the heart. Sham animals were used as controls. These hearts were then transplanted into BALB/c recipients and treated with CTLA4-Ig to induce tolerance. Cardiac endothelium showed significant expression of PDL1, which was upregulated upon transplantation. While the absence of PDL1 on hematopoietic cells of the heart resulted in delayed rejection and prevented long-term tolerance in most but not all recipients, we observed an accelerated and early graft rejection of all donor allografts that lacked PDL1 on the endothelium. Moreover, PDL1-deficient endothelium hearts had significant higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing alloreactive cells as well as higher frequency of CD8(+) effector T cells. These findings demonstrate that PDL1 expression mainly on donor endothelium is functionally important in a fully allogeneic mismatched model for the induction of cardiac allograft tolerance.

  17. Gene-based bio-signature patterns and cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Uber, Patricia A; Benitez, Roberto M

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians have long awaited an alternative to invasive endomyocardial biopsy for surveillance of cardiac transplant rejection. Transcriptional signals in peripheral blood mononuclear cells allow for the development of multigene-based panels that can inform on the presence or absence of immunologic quiescence. The informative genes represent several biologic pathways, including T-cell activation (PDCD1), T-cell migration (ITGA4), and mobilization of hematopoietic precursors (WDR40A and microRNA gene family cMIR), and steroid-responsive genes such as IL1R2, the decoy receptor for interleukin 2. The greatest value may include the ability to inform on the potential of future proclivity for rejection, allowing patients to be stratified into low, intermediate, or high risk subsets for future rejection. In these individuals, this knowledge may allow clinicians to use tailored approaches to immunosuppression, thereby avoiding adverse pharmacologic effects in low-risk patients while improving rejection outcomes in those at high risk for future allograft compromise. Despite these advances, clinical entrenchment of gene-based pharmacotherapy in cardiac transplantation will require independent replication and validation of investigational findings.

  18. Clinico-pathologic, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL study in early cardiac allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Panizo-Santos, A; Lozano, M D; Distefano, S; Inogés, S; Pardo, J

    2000-01-01

    Early cardiac allograft failure (ECAF) was defined as acute allograft failure in the early transplant period. The aim of this study is to elucidate the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics and the role of apoptosis in ECAF in nine patients. We reviewed preoperative clinical data and morphological data at the time of autopsy or retransplantation. We also performed TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry to study fibronectin and tubulin beta-II. The average recipient and donor age was 48 +/- 10.3 and 28 +/- 7.11 respectively. Seven patients died at a mean time of 26 hours. The remaining two patients underwent retransplantation and are alive. The mean cold ischemic time was 124. 1 +/- 44.5 minutes. No patient had a panel reactive antibody >15% and lymphocytic crossmatch was positive in one case. All cases had grade 2-3 of coagulative necrosis, which correlated positively with fibonectin accumulation in myocyte cytoplasm, and cytoplasmic tubulin loss (p < 0.05). TUNEL technique showed in all cases some degree of DNA strand breaks in cardiomyocytes. Endothelium DNA strand breaks were seen in seven cases. Patients transplanted because of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy had a significantly higher degree of DNA strand breaks in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02) than those transplanted because of ischemic cardiomyopathy. These results indicate that ECAF may be caused by ischemic-reperfusion damage to the donor heart assessed by myocyte coagulative necrosis, fibronectin accumulation in myocytes, tubulin loss, and DNA strand breaks of cardiomyocytes and endothelium. The use of a combination of these techniques might be appropriate in the diagnosis of ECAF in endomyocardial biopsies when it is suspected clinically.

  19. Infusion of in vitro-generated DN T regulatory cells induces permanent cardiac allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Ford, M S; Young, K J; Zhang, L

    2003-11-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that pretransplant donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) can activate recipient-derived CD3+CD4-CD8- double negative T regulatory (DN Tr) cells which have a potent immune regulatory function in vitro and in vivo. Here we studied the regulatory ability of DN T cell clones generated from the spleens of nai;ve anti-L(d) transgenic TCR+ (2C x dm2)F1 mice. We were able to identify subsets of DN T cell clones that were able to kill anti-Ld CD8+ T cells, and therefore had regulatory properties, and DN T cells with no regulatory properties. Next, we investigated the ability of these in vitro generated DN T cell clones to enhance cardiac allograft survival. (2C x dm2)F1 transgenic mice were infused with either regulatory or non-regulatory DN T cell clones, or left untreated one day before receiving an Ld-mismatched cardiac grafts from (C57BL/6 x Balb/c)F1 mice. Injection of non-regulatory DN T clone cells did not prolong cardiac graft survival in (2C x dm2)F1 mice when compare to untreated controls. In contrast, all of the cardiac grafts survived more than 100 days in mice that received DN Tr clone cells prior to transplantation. These results demonstrate that DN Tr cells can be generated in vitro and protect cardiac allograft from rejection when infused into recipients prior to transplantation. They also suggest that DN Tr cells may provide a novel therapy for the treatment of allograft rejection.

  20. The Role of MIG/CXCL9 in Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, James J.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Whiting, David; Irie, Yoshihito; Fishbein, Michael C.; Burdick, Marie D.; Belperio, John; Strieter, Robert M.; Laks, Hillel; Berliner, Judith A.; Ardehali, Abbas

    2002-01-01

    T lymphocytes play a critical role in chronic rejection of transplanted hearts, or cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). However, the molecular mediators of T lymphocyte recruitment in CAV are incompletely defined. We hypothesized that the chemokine, monokine induced by interferon-γ (MIG/CXCL9), which induces T lymphocyte migration in vitro, participates in T lymphocyte recruitment in CAV. In a previously characterized MHC II-mismatched murine model of CAV, intragraft MIG/CXCL9 gene transcript and protein levels increased on days 7, 14, and 24 days after transplantation, paralleling T lymphocyte recruitment and preceding intimal thickening. Antibody neutralization of MIG/CXCL9 significantly reduced CD4+ T lymphocyte infiltration and intimal thickening in this model. MIG/CXCL9 was produced by graft-infiltrating MOMA-2+ macrophages in early and late stages of CAV. And, although T lymphocytes did not produce MIG/CXCL9, recipient CD4+ T lymphocytes were required for sustained intragraft MIG/CXCL9 production and CAV development. These findings demonstrate that 1) MIG/CXCL9 plays an important role in CD4+ T lymphocyte recruitment and development of CAV, 2) MOMA-2+ macrophages are the predominant recipient-derived source of MIG/CXCL9, and 3) recipient CD4 lymphocytes are necessary for sustained MIG/CXCL9 production and CAV development in this model. Neutralization of the chemokine MIG/CXCL9 may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic rejection after heart transplantation. PMID:12368204

  1. Optical coherence tomography and highly sensitivity troponin T for evaluating cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Iris P; García-Lara, Juan; Pinar, Eduardo; Pastor-Pérez, Francisco; Sánchez-Mas, Jesus; Valdés-Chavarri, Mariano; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major impediment to long-term graft survival after heart transplantation. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is more sensitive than coronary angiography for diagnosis, but the identification of specific plaque components or plaque composition is limited. In addition, there is an evident need for other noninvasive tools for diagnosing CAV. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of 2 new techniques for evaluating CAV: optical coherence tomography (OCT), and new high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) assays. In 21 heart transplantation patients, coronary arteriography with IVUS and OCT were performed. Maximal intimal thickness (MIT) and luminal area at the most severe site were measured using the 2 techniques. Immediately before cardiac catheterization, blood samples were obtained and hsTnT levels measured. The evaluation of CAV by OCT showed a good correlation with IVUS measurements, with a mean difference in MIT of 0.0033 (95% confidence interval -0.049 to 0.043), taking advantage of lower interobserver variability (r = 0.94 for OCT vs r = 0.78 for IVUS) and better plaque characterization. When independent predictors of MIT were assessed in a multiple linear regression model, time after transplantation (β = 0.488, p = 0.004) and hsTnT (β = 0.392, p = 0.011) were the only independent predictors of MIT (R(2) = 0.591). In conclusion, this study is the first to evaluate 2 new techniques, OCT and hsTnT, in the challenging setting of CAV. The findings suggest that OCT provides lower interobserver variability and better plaque characterization than IVUS. Also, hsTnT could become a useful tool for ruling out CAV.

  2. Cardiac allograft acceptance after localized bone marrow transplantation by isolated limb perfusion in nonmyeloablated recipients.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Yolcu, Esma S; Shirwan, Haval; Wang, Zhiliang; Farkas, Daniel L; Yoleuk, Esma S

    2003-01-01

    Donor-specific tolerance to cardiac grafts may be induced by hematopoietic chimerism. This study evaluates the potential of localized bone marrow transplantation (BMT) performed by isolated limb (IL) perfusion to induce tolerance to secondary cardiac grafts without myeloablative conditioning. BALB/c recipients (H2d) preconditioned with lethal and sublethal doses of busulfan were injected i.v. and IL with 10(7) whole bone marrow cells (wBMCs) from B10 donors (H2(b)). Two hours after IL infusion of PKH-labeled wBMCs into myeloablated hosts, there were few labeled cells in the host peripheral blood (p < 0.001 versus i.v.) and femurs of the infused limb contained 57% +/- 7% PKH-labeled blasts (p < 0.001 versus 8% +/- 0.6% after i.v.). Femurs of the noninfused limbs contained 60-70 PKH-labeled blasts (p < 0.001 versus i.v.-BMT) after 2 days and 47% +/- 5% of 0.32 x 10(7) donor cells (p < 0.001 versus 78% +/- 4% of 1.2 x 10(7) donor cells in infused femurs) after 4 weeks. The survival rates of myeloablated hosts were 90% and 80% after i.v. and IL infusion, respectively, and the chimeras had 78%-84% donor peripheral blood cells. In recipients conditioned with 35 mg/g busulfan, the levels of donor chimerism in peripheral blood were 33% +/- 4% and 21% +/- 4% at 3 weeks after i.v.- and IL-BMT, respectively. Transplantation of donor-matched (H2(b)) secondary vascularized hearts in these chimeras after 3 weeks resulted in graft survival for periods exceeding 8 weeks, while third-party (H2(k)) allografts were acutely rejected (p < 0.001 versus H2(b)). These data indicate that IL perfusion is a reliable alternative procedure for establishment of hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific tolerance without myeloablative conditioning.

  3. In vitro analysis of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity displayed by rat heart allograft recipients rendered unresponsive by total-lymphoid irradiation and extracted donor antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Florence, L.S.; Jiang, G.L.; Ang, K.K.; Stepkowski, S.M.; Kahan, B.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The addition of 3M KCl-extracted donor antigen (HAg) to immunosuppressive therapy with 16 Gy total lymphoid irradiation produces a significantly higher fraction of Wistar-Furth (WFu) recipients displaying indefinite survival of heterotopic buffalo (BUF) heart allografts, namely 80 versus 20%. The experiments presented herein analyzed the direct activity as well as estimated the potential precursor numbers at 1 and 3 months in treated recipients. At 1 month post-TLI/HAg therapy, recipients showed reduced proliferative responses in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) in a specific pattern toward donor but not third-party stimulators. Both TLI/Graft and TLI/HAg/Graft groups showed a higher frequency of BUF antigen-directed T-cytotoxic cells (fTc) than TLI-treated, but nontransplanted, WFu hosts. In addition, the TLI/HAg group alone displayed alloantigen-specific suppressor cells that suppressed the MLR proliferative responses of normal spleen T cells against donor, but not third-party, alloantigens. At 3 months postirradition, both TLI/Graft and TLI/HAg/Graft groups displayed variable MLR proliferative responses toward donor and third-party alloantigens. Whereas nontransplanted, TLI-treated WFu rats recovered their fTc to normal levels at 3 months, the TLI and TLI/HAg treated recipients bearing functional heart allografts demonstrated significantly decreased splenic fTc. These results show that reduced numbers of cytotoxic cell precursors may afford more reliable indices of prolonged heart allograft survival than MLR responses. The observations suggest that TLI/HAg transplant hosts display both reduced cytotoxic precursors and activated suppressor elements.

  4. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration.

  5. Late antibody-mediated rejection after heart transplantation: Mortality, graft function, and fulminant cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Coutance, Guillaume; Ouldamar, Salima; Rouvier, Philippe; Saheb, Samir; Suberbielle, Caroline; Bréchot, Nicolas; Hariri, Sarah; Lebreton, Guillaume; Leprince, Pascal; Varnous, Shaida

    2015-08-01

    Late antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) after heart transplantation is suspected to be associated with a poor short-term prognosis. A retrospective single-center observational study was performed. Late AMR was defined as AMR occurring at least 1 year after heart transplantation. The study included all consecutive patients with proven and treated late acute AMR at the authors' institution between November 2006 and February 2013. The aim was to analyze the prognosis after late AMR, including mortality, recurrence of AMR, left ventricular ejection fraction, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Selected endomyocardial biopsy specimens obtained before AMR were also blindly reviewed to identify early histologic signs of AMR. The study included 20 patients treated for late AMR. Despite aggressive immunosuppressive therapies (100% of patients received intravenous methylprednisolone, 90% received intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIg],85% received plasmapheresis, 45% received rituximab), the prognosis remained poor. Survival after late AMR was 80% at 1 month, 60% at 3 months, and 50% at 1 year. All early deaths (<3 months, n = 8) were directly attributable to graft dysfunction or to complication of the intense immunosuppressive regimen. Among survivors at 3 months (n = 12), histologic persistence or recurrence of AMR, persistent left ventricular dysfunction, and fulminant CAV were common (33%, 33%, and 17% of patients). Microvascular inflammation was detected in at least 1 biopsy specimen obtained before AMR in 13 patients (65%). Prognosis after late AMR is poor despite aggressive immunosuppressive therapies. Fulminant CAV is a common condition in these patients. Microvascular inflammation is frequent in endomyocardial biopsy specimens before manifestation of symptomatic AMR. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inchingorei-san (TJ-117) and Artemisiae Capillaris Herba Induced Prolonged Survival of Fully Mismatched Cardiac Allografts and Generated Regulatory Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiangyuan; Uchiyama, Masateru; Zhang, Qi; Hirai, Toshihito; Niimi, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), a 6-component Japanese herbal medicine, on alloimmune responses in murine cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6) heart and received oral administration of TJ-117 or each component of TJ-117 from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naive CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time (MST), 7 days). CBA recipients given 1 g/kg/day of TJ-117 had prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, 37 days). Moreover, given 1 g/kg/day of Artemisiae Capillaris Herba (ACH), one component of TJ-117, indefinitely prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, >100 days). However, other five components of TJ-117 were less effective than TJ-117 and ACH. Secondary CBA recipients given whole splenocytes, CD4+, and CD4+CD25+ cells from primary ACH-treated CBA recipients with B6 cardiac allografts 30 days after grafting had prolonged survival of B6 hearts (MSTs, 57, >100, and >100 days, resp.). Flow cytometry studies showed that the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory cell population was increased in transplant recipients given ACH. Cell proliferation, interleukin-2, and interferon-γ were suppressed in ACH-treated mice, whereas interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 were upregulated. In conclusion, ACH, one component of TJ-117, as well as TJ-117 induced hyporesponsiveness to fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and may generate CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory cells. PMID:22811750

  7. Inchingorei-san (TJ-117) and Artemisiae Capillaris Herba Induced Prolonged Survival of Fully Mismatched Cardiac Allografts and Generated Regulatory Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangyuan; Uchiyama, Masateru; Zhang, Qi; Hirai, Toshihito; Niimi, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), a 6-component Japanese herbal medicine, on alloimmune responses in murine cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6) heart and received oral administration of TJ-117 or each component of TJ-117 from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naive CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time (MST), 7 days). CBA recipients given 1 g/kg/day of TJ-117 had prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, 37 days). Moreover, given 1 g/kg/day of Artemisiae Capillaris Herba (ACH), one component of TJ-117, indefinitely prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, >100 days). However, other five components of TJ-117 were less effective than TJ-117 and ACH. Secondary CBA recipients given whole splenocytes, CD4(+), and CD4(+)CD25(+) cells from primary ACH-treated CBA recipients with B6 cardiac allografts 30 days after grafting had prolonged survival of B6 hearts (MSTs, 57, >100, and >100 days, resp.). Flow cytometry studies showed that the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cell population was increased in transplant recipients given ACH. Cell proliferation, interleukin-2, and interferon-γ were suppressed in ACH-treated mice, whereas interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 were upregulated. In conclusion, ACH, one component of TJ-117, as well as TJ-117 induced hyporesponsiveness to fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and may generate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cells.

  8. Endogenous Memory CD8 T Cells Directly Mediate Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Su, C. A.; Iida, S.; Abe, T.; Fairchild, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in levels of environmentally induced memory T cells that cross-react with donor MHC molecules are postulated to account for the efficacy of allograft tolerance inducing strategies in rodents versus their failure in nonhuman primates and human transplant patients. Strategies to study the impact of donor-reactive memory T cells on allografts in rodents have relied on the pre-transplant induction of memory T cells cross-reactive with donor allogeneic MHC molecules through recipient viral infection, priming directly with donor antigen, or adoptive transfer of donor-antigen primed memory T cells. Each approach accelerates allograft rejection and confers resistance to tolerance induction, but also biases the T cell repertoire to strong donor-reactivity. The ability of endogenous memory T cells within unprimed mice to directly reject an allograft is unknown. Here we show a direct association between increased duration of cold ischemic allograft storage and numbers and enhanced functions of early graft infiltrating endogenous CD8 memory T cells. These T cells directly mediate rejection of allografts subjected to prolonged ischemia and this rejection is resistant to costimulatory blockade. These findings recapitulate the clinically significant impact of endogenous memory T cells with donor reactivity in a mouse transplant model in the absence of prior recipient priming. PMID:24502272

  9. Prolonged cardiac allograft survival in presensitized rats after a high activity Yunnan-cobra venom factor therapy.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Chen, G; Guo, H; Wang, D W; Xie, L; Wang, S S; Wang, W Y; Xiong, Y L; Chen, S

    2006-12-01

    Complement-dependent antibody-mediated acute humoral rejection is the major obstacle of clinical transplantation across ABO incompatibility and human leukocyte antigen presensitization. We previously demonstrated that Yunnan-cobra venom factor (Y-CVF) could almost completely abrogate complement activity and successfully prevent hyperacute rejection in some xenotransplant models without any obvious toxicity. In this study we investigated whether depletion of complement by Y-CVF prevented acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats thereby prolonging graft survival. Presensitization was achieved in Lewis rats by sequential grafting of three full-thickness skin pieces from Brown Norway rats. Serum cytotoxic alloantibody titers were determined by a modified in vitro complement-dependent microcytotoxicity assay. After presensitization, each Lewis rat received a heterotopic Brown Norway cardiac allograft. Fifteen recipients were divided into two groups: (1) no treatment control (n = 7); (2) Y-CVF therapy group (86 u/kg, IV, day -1) (n = 8). After cessation of the heart beat, allograft rejection was confirmed by pathologic as well as IgG and C3 immunohistochemical examinations. The mean graft survival time was significantly prolonged to 99.50 +/- 38.72 hours among rats that received Y-CVF vs 12.71 +/- 13.94 hours in nontreated controls (P < .001). Upon pathological and immunohistochemical examination, acute humoral rejection was mainly exhibited in the control group, whereas acute cellular rejection was mainly displayed in the Y-CVF therapy group. Our study demonstrated that complement depletion by Y-CVF significantly inhibited acute humoral allograft rejection in presensitized rats. As a therapeutic immunointervention tool for complement, Y-CVF has shown potential efficacy across ABO incompatible and positive cross-match barriers.

  10. Music exposure induced prolongation of cardiac allograft survival and generated regulatory CD4⁺ cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M; Jin, X; Zhang, Q; Amano, A; Watanabe, T; Niimi, M

    2012-05-01

    In clinical practice, music has been used to decrease stress, heart rate, and blood pressure and to provide a distraction from disease symptoms. We investigated sound effects on alloimmune responses in murine heart transplantation. Naïve and eardrum-ruptured CBA/N (CBA, H2(K)) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6, H2(b)) heart and were exposed to 1 of 3 types of music-opera (La Traviata), classical (Mozart), and New Age (Enya)-or 1 of 6 different single sound frequencies for 7 days. An adoptive transfer study was performed to determine whether regulatory cells were generated in allograft recipients. Cell-proliferation, cytokine, and flow cytometry assessments were also performed. CBA recipients of a B6 graft exposed to opera and classical music had significantly prolonged allograft survival (median survival times [MSTs], 26.5 and 20 days, respectively), whereas those exposed to 6 single sound frequencies and New Age did not (MSTs, 7, 8, 9, 8, 8, 8, and 11 days, respectively). Untreated and eardrum-ruptured CBA rejected B6 grafts acutely (MSTs, 7 and 8.5 days, respectively). Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes, CD4(+) cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+) cells from opera-exposed primary recipients resulted in significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 36, 68, and >50 days, respectively). Cell-proliferation, interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon-γ were suppressed in opera-exposed mice, whereas IL-4 and IL-10 from opera-exposed recipients were up-regulated. Flow cytometry studies showed an increased CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cell population in splenocytes from opera-exposed mice. In conclusion, exposure to some types of music may induce prolonged survival of fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and generate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts using donor splenocytes engineered to display on their surface an exogenous fas ligand protein.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Esma S; Gu, Xiao; Lacelle, Chantale; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2008-07-15

    The critical role played by Fas ligand (FasL) in immune homeostasis renders this molecule an attractive target for immunomodulation to achieve tolerance to auto- and transplantation Ags. Immunomodulation with genetically modified cells expressing FasL was shown to induce tolerance to alloantigens. However, genetic modification of primary cells in a rapid, efficient, and clinically applicable manner proved challenging. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of donor splenocytes rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface a chimeric form of FasL protein (SA-FasL) for tolerance induction to cardiac allografts. The i.p. injection of ACI rats with Wistar-Furth rat splenocytes displaying SA-FasL on their surface resulted in tolerance to donor, but not F344 third-party cardiac allografts. Tolerance was associated with apoptosis of donor reactive T effector cells and induction/expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells. Treg cells played a critical role in the observed tolerance as adoptive transfer of sorted Treg cells from long-term graft recipients into naive unmanipulated ACI rats resulted in indefinite survival of secondary Wistar-Furth grafts. Immunomodulation with allogeneic cells rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface SA-FasL protein provides an effective and clinically applicable means of cell-based therapy with potential application to regenerative medicine, transplantation, and autoimmunity.

  12. Use of indium-111-labeled cells in measurement of cellular dynamics of experimental cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.; Fawwaz, R.; Satake, K.; Nowygrod, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the kinetics and utility of infused indium-111-labeled cells in detecting rejection in ACI to Lewis rat heart allografts. Syngeneic leukocytes, lymph node lymphocytes, and platelets were isolated and labeled with indium-111 (/sup 111/In) oxine, respectively, and were infused i.v. into Lewis rats carrying beating ACI or syngeneic hearts from post-transplant days 0 to 6. Recipients were imaged serially at 24 hr after infusion of labeled cells followed by excision of both native and transplanted hearts for direct isotope count. Labeled leukocytes accumulative progressively in the allograft with the scan becoming positive by post-transplant day 4. The ratio of allograft to native heart isotope counts rose from 1.25 on day 1 to 10.07 (P less than 0.0001) on day 7. The Lewis recipients infused with labeled lymphocytes showed a positive scan on days 6 and 7 whereas the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose from 0.97 on day 1 to 5.33 (P less than 0.001) on day 7. Recipients infused with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets showed a positive scan on days 5 to 7 and the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose sharply from 2.56 on day 4 to 16.98 (P less than 0.005) on day 7. Syngeneic heart grafts failed to demonstrate significant accumulation of any of the labeled cell population. These studies confirm the importance of nonlymphocytic cells in cellular rejection, evaluate the kinetics of graft invasion by the various cell types, and suggest that the techniques used afford a method for a safe and an early detection of allograft rejection.

  13. A peptide tetramer Tk-tPN induces tolerance of cardiac allografting by conversion of type 1 to type 2 immune responses via the Toll-like receptor 2 signal-promoted activation of the MCP1 gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuoqing; Yang, Neng; Zhou, Ling; Gu, Peng; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Peijun; Lu, Liming; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The plant protein trichosanthin (Tk) and its derived peptide tetramer Tk-tPN have been shown to stimulate the type 2 immune responses for treating autoimmune disease. This work explores the possibility of using Tk-tPN as a non-toxic immunosuppressant to induce transplantation tolerance using the mechanisms by which T-cell-mediated immune responses are transferred from type 1 to type 2 through innate immunity-related pathways. Immunocytes and cytokine secretions involved in the mouse cardiac allografting model with Tk-tPN treatment were characterized. Identification of critical genes and analysis of their functions through Toll-like receptor (TLR) -initiated signalling and the possible epigenetic changes were performed. Mean survival times of the cardiac allografts were delayed from 7.7 ± 0.3 days (control) to 22.7 ± 3.9 days (P < 0.01) or 79.1 ± 19.2 days (P < 0.0001) when Tk-tPN was introduced into the recipients alone or together with rapamycin, respectively. The grafting tolerance was donor-specific. The secretion pattern of the type 1 cytokine/transcription factor (IL-2(+) IFN-γ(+) T-bet(+)), which is responsible for the acute graft rejection, was shifted to the type 2 factor (IL-4(+) IL-10(+) Gata3+), together with a selective expansion of the IL-4/IL-10-producing CD8+ CD28- regulatory T-cell subset. A TLR2-initiated high expression of chemokine gene MCP1 was detectable simultaneously. Epigenetically Tk/Tk-tPN could also acetylate the histone H3K9 of MCP1 promoter to skew the immunity towards T helper type 2 responses. Tk/Tk-tPN is therefore capable of down-regulating the type 1 response-dominant rejection of cardiac allografts by evoking type 2 immunity through the activation of a TLR2-initiated signalling pathway and MCP1 gene to expand the IL-4/IL-10-secreting CD8+ CD28- regulatory T cells. Tk-tPN could be a promising novel immunosuppressant to induce tolerance in allotransplantation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Donor-reactive CD8 Memory T Cells Infiltrate Cardiac Allografts Within 24 Hours Post-Transplant in Naïve Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, A.D.; Nozaki, T.; Rabant, M.; Valujskikh, A.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Normal immune responses stimulated by pathogenic and environmental antigens generate memory T cells that react with donor antigens and no currently used immunosuppressive drug completely inhibits memory T cell function. While donor-reactive memory T cells clearly compromise graft outcomes, mechanisms utilized by memory T cells to promote rejection are largely unknown. In the current study we investigated how early endogenous memory cells infiltrate and express effector function in cardiac allografts. Endogenous CD8 memory T cells in non-sensitized recipients distinguish syngeneic vs. allogeneic cardiac allografts within 24 hours of reperfusion. CD8-dependent production of IFN-γ and CXCL9/Mig was observed 24–72 hours post-transplant in allografts but not isografts. CXCL9 was produced by donor cells in response to IFN-γ made by recipient CD8 T cells reactive to donor class I MHC molecules. Activated CD8 T cells were detected in allografts at least three days before donor-specific effector T cells producing IFN-γ were detected in the recipient spleen. Early inflammation mediated by donor-reactive CD8 memory T cells greatly enhanced primed effector T cell infiltration into allografts. These results suggest that strategies for optimal inhibition of alloimmunity should include neutralization of infiltrating CD8 memory T cells within a very narrow window after transplantation. PMID:18557725

  15. Anti-rejection effect of ethanol extract of Poria cocos wolf in rats after cardiac allograft implantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-wei; Liu, Hong-yu; Xia, Qiu-ming; Li, Jun-quan; Lü, Hang; Zhang, Qing-hua; Yao, Zhi-fa

    2004-06-01

    A living fetus within the maternal uterus provides an example of allogene tolerance in mammals. Poria cocos Wolf is the main component of many Chinese medicinal combination drugs that have therapeutic effects on recurrent spontaneous abortion and that can maintain pregnancy until delivery. It was hypothesized that this herbal medicine can also prolong allograft survival after organ transplantation. Here, in an in vivo study, we report the anti-rejection effect of the ethanol extract of Poria cocos Wolf (EEPCW) in rats after cardiac allograft implantation. Ten normal rats were healthy controls. Eighty rats receiving homologous heart transplants were divided into 4 groups of 20 rats each based on type of treatment: olive oil 8 ml.kg(-1).d(-1), EEPCW 25 mg.kg(-1).d(-1), EEPCW 50 mg.kg(-1).d(-1) or cyclosporin A 5 mg.kg(-1).d(-1). Allograft survival was observed in 10 rats from each group. On the seventh day post transplantation, pathological lesions and percentages of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ lymphocytes and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio in peripheral blood were assessed in another 10 rats from each group and in 10 normal rats. The survival time of donor hearts in the two EEPCW groups was significantly prolonged, to (15.9 +/- 2.4) days and (30.0 +/- 0.0) days, respectively, compared with (6.7 +/- 0.8) days in the control group. Pathological lesions in the two EEPCW groups were also less severe, and the percentages of CD3+, CD4+, and CD8+ lymphocytes and CD4+/CD8+ ratio were significantly lower in the EEPCW groups. Acute rejection of heart transplants and cellular immune reaction can be effectively suppressed using the EEPCW. Taking advantage of novel immunosuppressants derived from Chinese medicinal herbs used to treat abnormal pregnancy provides a hopeful road for future research and treatment in organ transplantation.

  16. Brief treatment with a highly selective immunoproteasome inhibitor promotes long-term cardiac allograft acceptance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sula Karreci, Esilida; Fan, Hao; Uehara, Mayuko; Mihali, Albana B.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Kurdi, Ahmed T.; Solhjou, Zhabiz; Riella, Leonardo V.; Ghobrial, Irene; Laragione, Teresina; Routray, Sujit; Assaker, Jean Pierre; Wang, Rong; Sukenick, George; Shi, Lei; Barrat, Franck J.; Nathan, Carl F.; Lin, Gang; Azzi, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive proteasomes (c-20S) are ubiquitously expressed cellular proteases that degrade polyubiquitinated proteins and regulate cell functions. An isoform of proteasome, the immunoproteasome (i-20S), is highly expressed in human T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and B cells, suggesting that it could be a potential target for inflammatory diseases, including those involving autoimmunity and alloimmunity. Here, we describe DPLG3, a rationally designed, noncovalent inhibitor of the immunoproteasome chymotryptic subunit β5i that has thousands-fold selectivity over constitutive β5c. DPLG3 suppressed cytokine release from blood mononuclear cells and the activation of DCs and T cells, diminished accumulation of effector T cells, promoted expression of exhaustion and coinhibitory markers on T cells, and synergized with CTLA4-Ig to promote long-term acceptance of cardiac allografts across a major histocompatibility barrier. These findings demonstrate the potential value of using brief posttransplant immunoproteasome inhibition to entrain a long-term response favorable to allograft survival as part of an immunomodulatory regimen that is neither broadly immunosuppressive nor toxic. PMID:27956634

  17. NK026680 inhibits T-cell function in an IL-2-dependent manner and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Susumu; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Goto, Ryoichi; Oura, Tetsu; Wakayama, Kenji; Hirokata, Gentaro; Shibata, Tomohiro; Igarashi, Rumi; Haga, Sanae; Ozaki, Michitaka; Todo, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    NK026680 is a triazolopyrimidine derivative that has been shown to inhibit dendritic cell maturation and activation. Here, we examined the immunosuppressive properties of NK026680 on T-cell function and assessed its immunosuppressive efficacy in an ACI (RT1(av1) haplotype) to Lewis (RT1(l)) rat heart transplantation model. The effects of NK026680 on T-cell proliferation, activation, and cytokine production were investigated in vitro. Heart transplant recipient rats were administered NK026680 daily for 14 days post-transplantation. In addition to graft survival time, alloimmune responses and graft histology at 4-10 days post-transplantation were assessed. NK026680 was found to inhibit proliferation, CD25 upregulation, IL-2 production, and cell cycle progression in αCD3/αCD28-stimulated murine T cells. These effects were likely due to suppression of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and the subsequent inhibition of p65, c-Fos, and to a lesser extent, c-Jun. Daily NK026680 treatment suppressed alloimmune responses, prevented cellular infiltration into allografts, and prolonged graft survival. The anti-rejection effects of NK026680 were enhanced by tacrolimus. In conclusion, NK026680 inhibits the activation of T cells and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats. These features make it a potential candidate immunosuppressant for the treatment of organ transplant patients in the future.

  18. Expression of cytokine genes in human cardiac allografts: correlation of IL-6 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) with histological rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X M; Frist, W H; Yeoh, T K; Miller, G G

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines may play critical roles in allograft rejection. Currently, a clear pattern of cytokine production that correlates with rejection has not emerged. Our preliminary studies suggested a trend toward increased IL-6 and TGF-beta gene expression in cardiac allografts during rejection. We have extended these studies using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) to detect the expression of IL-6, TGF-beta, and T cell receptor beta chain constant region (TCR-beta) genes in 21 additional consecutive myocardial biopsies obtained from six heart transplant patients and from five pre-transplant donor hearts. Cytokine gene expression was compared with histological diagnosis of rejection. There was strong correlation between IL-6 as well as TGF-beta gene expression, and histological rejection (6/8 biopsies with versus 0/7 without rejection (P = 0.006) and 7/9 biopsies with versus 0/7 without rejection (P = 0.003) respectively). Neither IL-6 nor TGF-beta transcripts were detected in any pre-transplant donor heart. TCR-beta chain mRNA was found in all allograft biopsies regardless of the presence of rejection, but was absent in pre-transplant donor hearts. Our results indicate that expression of IL-6 and TGF-beta is highly correlated with allograft rejection and thus may play an important role in regulation of cardiac allograft rejection. T cell infiltration of allografted myocardium is invariably detected by PCR regardless of histological rejection. The long-term functional significance of these cells in transplanted hearts needs further investigation. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8370174

  19. Pathological characteristics of liver allografts from donation after brain death followed by cardiac death in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Wang, Dong-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Zhao; Zhang, Long-Juan; Wang, Hao-Chen; Li, Zhuo-Hui; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Tao; Cai, Chang-Jie; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Ma, Yi; Guo, Zhi-Yong; He, Xiao-Shun

    2014-10-01

    Donation after brain death followed by circulatory death (DBCD) is a unique practice in China. The aim of this study was to define the pathologic characteristics of DBCD liver allografts in a porcine model. Fifteen male pigs (25-30 kg) were allocated randomly into donation after brain death (DBD), donation after circulatory death (DCD) and DBCD groups. Brain death was induced by augmenting intracranial pressure. Circulatory death was induced by withdrawal of life support in DBCD group and by venous injection of 40 mL 10% potassium chloride in DCD group. The donor livers were perfused in situ and kept in cold storage for 4 h. Liver tissue and common bile duct samples were collected for hematoxylin and eosin staining, TUNEL testing and electron microscopic examination. Spot necrosis was found in hepatic parenchyma of DBD and DBCD groups, while a large area of necrosis was shown in DCD group. The apoptosis rate of hepatocytes in DBD [(0.56±0.30)%] and DBCD [(0.50 ± 0.11)%] groups was much lower than that in DCD group [(3.78±0.33)%] (P<0.05). And there was no significant difference between DBD group and DBCD group (P>0.05)). The structures of bile duct were intact in both DBD and DBCD groups, while the biliary epithelium was totally damaged in DCD group. Under electron microscope, the DBD hepatocytes were characterized by intact cell membrane, well-organized endoplasmic reticulum, mild mitochondria edema and abundant glycogens. Broken cell membrane, mild inflammatory cell infiltration and sinusoidal epithelium edema, as well as reduced glycogen volume, were found in the DBCD hepatocytes. The DCD hepatocytes had more profound cell organelle injury and much less glycogen storage. In conclusion, the preservation injury of DBCD liver allografts is much less severe than that of un-controlled DCD, but more severe than that of DBD liver allografts under electron microscope, which might reflect post-transplant liver function to some extent.

  20. Evolution in functional complexity of heart rate dynamics: a measure of cardiac allograft adaptability.

    PubMed

    Kresh, J Y; Izrailtyan, I

    1998-09-01

    The capacity of self-organized systems to adapt is embodied in the functional organization of intrinsic control mechanisms. Evolution in functional complexity of heart rate variability (HRV) was used as measure of the capacity of the transplanted heart to express newly emergent regulatory order. In a cross-sectional study of 100 patients after (0-10 yr) heart transplantation (HTX), heart rate dynamics were assessed using pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) analysis. A new observation is that, commencing with the acute event of allograft transplantation, the dynamics of rhythm formation proceed through complex phase transitions. At implantation, the donor heart manifested metronome-like chronotropic behavior (PD2 approximately 1.0). At 11-100 days, dimensional complexity of HRV reached a peak (PD2 approximately 2.0) associated with resurgence in the high-frequency component (0.15-0.5 Hz) of the power spectral density. Subsequent dimensional loss to PD2 approximately 1.0 at 20-30 mo after HTX was followed by a progressive near-linear gain in system complexity, reaching PD2 approximately 3.0 7-10 yr after HTX. The "dynamic reorganization" in the allograft rhythm-generating system, seen in the first 100 days, is a manifestation of the adaptive capacity of intrinsic control mechanisms. The loss of HRV 2 yr after HTX implies a withdrawal of intrinsic autonomic control and/or development of an entrained dynamic pattern characteristic of extrinsic sympathetic input. The subsequent long-term progressive rise in dimensional complexity of HRV can be attributed to the restoration of a functional order patterning parasympathetic control. The recognition that the decentralized heart can restitute the multidimensional state space of HR generator dynamics independent of external autonomic signaling may provide a new perspective on principles that constitute homeodynamic regulation.

  1. The Impact of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury on Liver Allografts from Deceased after Cardiac Death versus Deceased after Brain Death Donors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Sayed, Blayne Amir; Casas-Ferreira, Ana Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Rela, Mohammed; Ma, Yun; Fuggle, Susan; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Jassem, Wayel

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The shortage of organs for transplantation has led to increased use of organs procured from donors after cardiac death (DCD). The effects of cardiac death on the liver remain poorly understood, however. Using livers obtained from DCD versus donors after brain death (DBD), we aimed to understand how ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury alters expression of pro-inflammatory markers ceramides and influences graft leukocyte infiltration. Methods Hepatocyte inflammation, as assessed by ceramide expression, was evaluated in DCD (n = 13) and DBD (n = 10) livers. Allograft expression of inflammatory and cell death markers, and allograft leukocyte infiltration were evaluated from a contemporaneous independent cohort of DCD (n = 22) and DBD (n = 13) livers. Results When examining the differences between transplant stages in each group, C18, C20, C24 ceramides showed significant difference in DBD (p<0.05) and C22 ceramide (p<0.05) were more pronounced for DCD. C18 ceramide is correlated to bilirubin, INR, and creatinine after transplant in DCD. Prior to transplantation, DCD livers have reduced leukocyte infiltration compared to DBD allografts. Following reperfusion, the neutrophil infiltration and platelet deposition was less prevalent in DCD grafts while cell death and recipients levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) of DCD allografts had significantly increased. Conclusion These data suggest that I/R injury generate necrosis in the absence of a strong inflammatory response in DCD livers with an appreciable effect on early graft function. The long-term consequences of increased inflammation in DBD and increased cell death in DCD allografts are unknown and warrant further investigation. PMID:26863224

  2. Donor-Specific Regulatory T Cells Acquired from Tolerant Mice Bearing Cardiac Allograft Promote Mixed Chimerism and Prolong Intestinal Allograft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Jin-Peng; Yang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Guan, Wen-Xian; Du, Jun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance has always been a central problem for small bowel transplantation (SBT), which is thought to be the best therapy for end-stage bowel failure. With the development of new tolerance-inducing strategies, mixed chimerism induced by co-stimulation blockade has become most potent for tolerance of allografts, such as skin, kidney, and heart. However, a lack of clinically available co-stimulation blockers has hindered efficient application in humans. Furthermore, unlike those for other types of solid organ transplantation, strategies to induce robust mixed chimerism for intestinal allografts have not been fully developed. To improve current mixed chimerism induction protocols for future clinical application, we developed a new protocol using donor-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells from mice with heart allograft tolerance, immunosuppressive drugs which could be used clinically and low doses of irradiation. Our results demonstrated that donor-specific Treg cells acquired from tolerant mice after in vitro expansion generate stable chimerism and lead to acceptance of intestinal allograft. Increased intragraft Treg cells and clonal deletion contribute to the development of SBT tolerance. PMID:27909438

  3. Auditory stimulation of opera music induced prolongation of murine cardiac allograft survival and maintained generation of regulatory CD4+CD25+ cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Interactions between the immune response and brain functions such as olfactory, auditory, and visual sensations are likely. This study investigated the effect of sounds on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Methods Naïve CBA mice (H2k) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6, H2b) heart and were exposed to one of three types of music--opera (La Traviata), classical (Mozart), and New Age (Enya)--or one of six different single sound frequencies, for 7 days. Additionally, we prepared two groups of CBA recipients with tympanic membrane perforation exposed to opera for 7 days and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment). An adoptive transfer study was performed to determine whether regulatory cells were generated in allograft recipients. Immunohistochemical, cell-proliferation, cytokine, and flow cytometry assessments were also performed. Results CBA recipients of a B6 cardiac graft that were exposed to opera music and Mozart had significantly prolonged allograft survival (median survival times [MSTs], 26.5 and 20 days, respectively), whereas those exposed to a single sound frequency (100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000, or 20,000 Hz) or Enya did not (MSTs, 7.5, 8, 9, 8, 7.5, 8.5 and 11 days, respectively). Untreated, CBA mice with tympanic membrane perforations and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment) rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (MSTs, 7, 8 and 8 days, respectively). Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes, CD4+ cells, or CD4+CD25+ cells from opera-exposed primary allograft recipients resulted in significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 36, 68, and > 100 days, respectively). Proliferation of splenocytes, interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production was suppressed in opera-exposed mice, and production of IL-4 and IL-10 from opera-exposed transplant recipients increased compared to

  4. Auditory stimulation of opera music induced prolongation of murine cardiac allograft survival and maintained generation of regulatory CD4+CD25+ cells.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Masateru; Jin, Xiangyuan; Zhang, Qi; Hirai, Toshihito; Amano, Atsushi; Bashuda, Hisashi; Niimi, Masanori

    2012-03-23

    Interactions between the immune response and brain functions such as olfactory, auditory, and visual sensations are likely. This study investigated the effect of sounds on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Naïve CBA mice (H2k) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6, H2b) heart and were exposed to one of three types of music--opera (La Traviata), classical (Mozart), and New Age (Enya)--or one of six different single sound frequencies, for 7 days. Additionally, we prepared two groups of CBA recipients with tympanic membrane perforation exposed to opera for 7 days and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment). An adoptive transfer study was performed to determine whether regulatory cells were generated in allograft recipients. Immunohistochemical, cell-proliferation, cytokine, and flow cytometry assessments were also performed. CBA recipients of a B6 cardiac graft that were exposed to opera music and Mozart had significantly prolonged allograft survival (median survival times [MSTs], 26.5 and 20 days, respectively), whereas those exposed to a single sound frequency (100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000, or 20,000 Hz) or Enya did not (MSTs, 7.5, 8, 9, 8, 7.5, 8.5 and 11 days, respectively). Untreated, CBA mice with tympanic membrane perforations and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment) rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (MSTs, 7, 8 and 8 days, respectively). Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes, CD4+ cells, or CD4+CD25+ cells from opera-exposed primary allograft recipients resulted in significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 36, 68, and > 100 days, respectively). Proliferation of splenocytes, interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production was suppressed in opera-exposed mice, and production of IL-4 and IL-10 from opera-exposed transplant recipients increased compared to that from splenocytes of

  5. Patterns of De Novo Allo B Cells and Antibody Formation in Chronic Cardiac Allograft Rejection After Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, J.; Oh, B. C.; Gibby, A. C.; Ruhil, R.; Lu, V. T.; Kim, D. W.; Page, E. K.; Bulut, O. P.; Song, M. Q.; Farris, A. B.; Kirk, A. D.; Knechtle, S. J.; Iwakoshi, N. N.

    2017-01-01

    Even though the etiology of chronic rejection (CR) is multifactorial, donor specific antibody (DSA) is considered to have a causal effect on CR development. Currently the antibody-mediated mechanisms during CR are poorly understood due to lack of proper animal models and tools. In a clinical setting, we previously demonstrated that induction therapy by lymphocyte depletion, using alemtuzumab (anti-human CD52), is associated with an increased incidence of serum alloantibody, C4d deposition and antibody-mediated rejection in human patients. In this study, the effects of T cell depletion in the development of antibody-mediated rejection were examined using human CD52 transgenic (CD52Tg) mice treated with alemtuzumab. Fully mismatched cardiac allografts were transplanted into alemtuzumab treated CD52Tg mice and showed no acute rejection while untreated recipients acutely rejected their grafts. However, approximately half of long-term recipients showed increased degree of vasculopathy, fibrosis and perivascular C3d depositions at posttransplant day 100. The development of CR correlated with DSA and C3d deposition in the graft. Using novel tracking tools to monitor donor-specific B cells, alloreactive B cells were shown to increase in accordance with DSA detection. The current animal model could provide a means of testing strategies to understand mechanisms and developing therapeutic approaches to prevent chronic rejection. PMID:22759336

  6. Left main coronary artery stenosis treatment with two paclitaxel-eluting stents in a patient with cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ríos, Marco A; Méndez-Ortíz, Arturo; Gaspar, Jorge; Barragán-García, Rodolfo; Fernández-de-la-Reguera, Guillermo; González-Quesada, Carlos J

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a well defined therapy for end stage heart failure. After the first year of transplantation, allograft coronary artery disease (ACAD) is the second main cause of death. The ACAD is defined as a diffuse process affecting the entire length of epicardial vessels. Once ACAD has been established, treatments such as coronary angioplasty, coronary stenting, and coronary bypass are performed. We present a case of successful stenting of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) in a patient with ACAD. The patient's medical history was significant for heart transplantation due to ischemic heart failure. Four years after transplantation the patient was admitted again due to sudden worsening of New York Heart Association functional class and extreme fatigue. Coronary angiogram showed a severe stenosis in the proximal segment of the LMCA; we performed stenting with a paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES). Six months after the procedure, the patient had an elective angiogram, where we discovered a new severe occlusion distally to the former stent; a second PES was implanted. Fourteen months after the second stenting, a new elective angiogram was performed without evidence of in-stent restenosis. After a 8-year follow-up since transplantation, the patient is free from dyspnea, angina, and adverse cardiovascular events. Our report suggests the efficacy of PES as ACAD treatment of the unprotected LMCA.

  7. Black-blood Steady State Free Precession (SSFP) coronary wall MRI for cardiac allografts: A feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kai; Bi, Xiaoming; Liu, Ying; Taimen, Kirsi; Lu, Biao; Li, Debiao; Carr, James

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the hypothesis that steady-state free procession (SSFP) allows for imaging of the coronary wall under the conditions of fast heart rate in patients of heart transplantation (HTx). Materials and methods With the approval of our institutional review board, 28 HTx patients were scanned with a 1.5T scanner. Cross-sectional black-blood images of the proximal portions of the left main artery, left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery were acquired with both two-dimensional (2D), double inversion recovery (DIR) prepared TSE sequence and 2D DIR SSFP sequence. Image quality (scored 0–3), vessel wall area, thickness, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, vessel wall) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, wall-lumen) were compared between TSE and SSFP. Results The overall image quality of SSFP was higher than TSE (1.23 ± 0.95 vs. 0.88 ± 0.69, P < 0.001). SSFP had a higher coronary wall SNR (20.1 ± 8.5 vs. 14.9 ± 4.8, P < 0.001) and wall-lumen CNR (8.2 ± 4.6 vs. 6.8 ± 3.7, P = 0.005) than TSE. Conclusion Black-blood SSFP coronary wall MRI provides higher image quality, SNR and CNR than traditional TSE does in HTx recipients. It has the potential to become an alternative means to noninvasive imaging of cardiac allografts. PMID:22282170

  8. Molecular Assessment of Microcirculation Injury in Formalin-Fixed Human Cardiac Allograft Biopsies With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Afzali, B; Chapman, E; Racapé, M; Adam, B; Bruneval, P; Gil, F; Kim, D; Hidalgo, L; Campbell, P; Sis, B; Duong Van Huyen, J P; Mengel, M

    2017-02-01

    Precise diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in cardiac allograft endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) remains challenging. This study assessed molecular diagnostics in human EMBs with AMR. A set of 34 endothelial, natural killer cell and inflammatory genes was quantified in 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded EMBs classified according to 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) criteria. The gene set expression was compared between ISHLT diagnoses and correlated with donor-specific antibody (DSA), endothelial injury by electron microscopy (EM) and prognosis. Findings were validated in an independent set of 57 EMBs. In the training set (n = 106), AMR cases (n = 70) showed higher gene set expression than acute cellular rejection (ACR; n = 21, p < 0.001) and controls (n = 15, p < 0.0001). Anti-HLA DSA positivity was associated with higher gene set expression (p = 0.01). Endothelial injury by electron microscopy strongly correlated with gene set expression, specifically in AMR cases (r = 0.62, p = 0.002). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for diagnosing AMR showed greater accuracy with gene set expression (area under the curve [AUC] = 79.88) than with DSA (AUC = 70.47) and C4d (AUC = 70.71). In AMR patients (n = 17) with sequential biopsies, increasing gene set expression was associated with inferior prognosis (p = 0.034). These findings were confirmed in the validation set. In conclusion, biopsy-based molecular assessment of antibody-mediated microcirculation injury has the potential to improve diagnosis of AMR in human cardiac transplants.

  9. Disinfection of human cardiac valve allografts in tissue banking: systematic review report.

    PubMed

    Germain, M; Strong, D M; Dowling, G; Mohr, J; Duong, A; Garibaldi, A; Simunovic, N; Ayeni, O R

    2016-12-01

    Cardiovascular allografts are usually disinfected using antibiotics, but protocols vary significantly between tissue banks. It is likely that different disinfection protocols will not have the same level of efficacy; they may also have varying effects on the structural integrity of the tissue, which could lead to significant differences in terms of clinical outcome in recipients. Ideally, a disinfection protocol should achieve the greatest bioburden reduction with the lowest possible impact on tissue integrity. We conducted a systematic review of methods applied to disinfect cardiovascular tissues. The use of multiple broad spectrum antibiotics in conjunction with an antifungal agent resulted in the greatest reduction in bioburden. Antibiotic incubation periods were limited to less than 24 h, and most protocols incubated tissues at 4 °C, however one study demonstrated a greater reduction of microbial load at 37 °C. None of the reviewed studies looked at the impact of these disinfection protocols on the risk of infection or any other clinical outcome in recipients.

  10. Blockade of very late antigen-4 integrin binding to fibronectin with connecting segment-1 peptide reduces accelerated coronary arteriopathy in rabbit cardiac allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Molossi, S; Elices, M; Arrhenius, T; Diaz, R; Coulber, C; Rabinovitch, M

    1995-01-01

    Graft arteriopathy, a leading cause of cardiac allograft failure, is associated with increased intimal smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, and accumulation of extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that cellular fibronectin plays a pivotal role in the progression of the allograft arteriopathy by directing the transendothelial trafficking of inflammatory cells through interaction of the connecting segment-1 (CS1) motif with the very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) integrin, and tested this in vivo using a blocking peptide. Cholesterol-fed rabbits underwent heterotopic cardiac transplantation without immunosuppression. The treatment group (n = 7) received a synthetic CS1 peptide (1 mg/kg per d, subcutaneously), and the controls (n = 7) received an inactive peptide (1 mg/kg per d, subcutaneously). At 7-8 d after transplantation, hearts were harvested and sectioned for morphometric analysis and immunohistochemical studies. We observed a > 50% decrease in the incidence (P < 0.001) and severity (P < 0.001) of donor coronary artery intimal thickening in the CS1-treated compared with the control group. These findings correlated with reduced infiltration of T cells (P < 0.05), a trend toward decreased expression of adhesion molecules (P < 0.06), and less accumulation of fibronectin (P < 0.03). Our data suggest that the VLA-4-fibronectin interaction is critical to the progression of the allograft arteriopathy by perpetuating the immune-inflammatory response in the vessel wall. Images PMID:7539456

  11. Effect of ultraviolet-B-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions and peritransplant immunosuppression with cyclosporine on rat cardiac allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Lau, H.T.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that pretreatment of ACI recipients with ultraviolet-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion (UV-DST) leads to permanent cardiac allograft survival without further host immunosuppression (ACI rats are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes in mixed-lymphocyte reaction). This study examines the effect of UV-DST and the timing of transfusions on ACI cardiac allograft survival in Lewis recipients with and without the addition of peritransplant cyclosporine (CsA) (20 mg/kg i.m.) given on days 0, +1, and +2 in relation to the time of transplantation. The mean survival time (MST) of ACI cardiac allografts in Lewis recipients was significantly increased to 33.6 +/- 5.7 days (P less than 0.001) by CsA treatment alone as compared to 6.5 +/- 0.5 days survival in control. When DST was given on day -3 combined with CsA, graft survival was increased to 42.0 +/- 9.3 days (P less than 0.01), as compared to 5.8 +/- 1.3 days when DST alone was used. When DST was irradiated with ultraviolet B (UV-DST) and administered on day -3 combined with peritransplant CsA, the MST was increased to 68.83 +/- 16.1 days as compared to an MST of 10.0 +/- 1.0 days in controls treated with UV-DST alone. When UV-DST was given on day -7 and combined with peritransplant CsA immunosuppression, the results were similar. However, when UV-DST was peritransplant CsA course, 4 of 6 recipients maintained their ACI heart allografts indefinitely (greater than 300 days) in contrast to the effect of UV-DST alone (MST of 13.5 days). Third-party (W/F) UV-irradiated blood transfusions were ineffective in prolonging ACI cardiac allografts in Lewis rats, regardless of whether the transfusions were given alone or in combination with peritransplant immunosuppression with CsA.

  12. In vitro correlates of in vivo therapy with cyclosporine to immunosuppress rejection of heterotopic rat cardiac allografts across strong (RT-1) plus weak (non-RT-1) histocompatibility differences.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, S; Stepkowski, S M; Lawen, J G; Rutzky, L P; Kahan, B D

    1991-11-01

    This study correlated different oral cyclosporine doses with in vivo graft survival, blood and tissue drug levels, and in vitro immune performances. Wistar-Furth (WFu, RT-1u) hosts engrafted with heterotopic cardiac transplants from strongly histoincompatible Buffalo (BUF, RT-1b) rats were treated postoperatively with 14-day courses of different doses of CsA delivered per gavage. There was a graded prolongation of graft survival--namely, no effect at the 1.5 mg/kg dose; a modest effect at 3 mg/kg; a therapeutic effect at 5 mg/kg; and long-term unresponsiveness at 10 mg/kg. Whole blood, serum, and tissue CsA concentrations correlated with drug dose. On day 7 posttransplantation--that is, during the peak of the immune response of untreated recipients and midway during the period of daily CsA therapy--in vitro immune performances were examined in each experimental group. On the one hand, the mixed lymphocyte reaction of WFu host splenic T cells toward donor-type BUF stimulators poorly reflected the administered CsA dose. On the other hand, there was a good correlation between drug dose and both impaired cell-mediated lympholysis and reduced frequency of alloantigen-specific T cytotoxic cell precursors f(CTL)p. Animals treated with therapeutic doses of CsA showed different patterns of T cell-mediated lympholysis: 3 mg/kg did not prevent anti-BUF Tc cell sensitization; 5 mg/kg maintained f(CTL)p levels similar to the normal controls; and 10 mg/kg significantly reduced Tc clones against donor but not third-party targets. These data demonstrate that the fate of alloantigen-specific Tc clones activated in vivo depends upon the local drug concentration. Furthermore, the present studies suggest that CML and f(CTL)p afford useful in vitro indices of in vivo immunosuppression with CsA in rat cardiac allograft recipients.

  13. ‘Default’ generated neonatal regulatory T cells are hypomethylated at conserved non-coding sequence 2 and promote long-term cardiac allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chao; Wang, Sihua; Ye, Ping; Huang, Xiaofan; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Jie; Sun, Yuan; Xie, Aini; Wang, Guohua; Xia, Jiahong

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immune self-tolerance and homeostasis. We previously reported that neonatal CD4+ T cells have an intrinsic ‘default’ mechanism to become Treg (neoTreg) cells in response to T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear and the effects of neoTreg cells on regulating immune responses remain unknown. Due to their involvement in Foxp3 regulation, we examined the role of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3b during the induction of neoTreg cells in the Foxp3gfp mice. The function of neoTreg cells was assessed in an acute allograft rejection model established in RAG2−/− mice with allograft cardiac transplantation and transferred with syngeneic CD4+ effector T cells. Following ex vivo TCR stimulation, the DNMT activity was increased threefold in adult CD4+ T cells, but not significantly increased in neonatal cells. However, adoptively transferred neoTreg cells significantly prolonged cardiac allograft survival (mean survival time 47 days, P < 0·001) and maintained Foxp3 expression similar to natural Treg cells. The neoTreg cells were hypomethylated at the conserved non-coding DNA sequence 2 locus of Foxp3 compared with adult Treg cells. The DNMT antagonist 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) induced increased Foxp3 expression in mature CD4+ T cells. 5-Aza-inducible Treg cells combined with continuous 5-Aza treatment prolonged graft survival. These results indicate that the ‘default’ pathway of neoTreg cell differentiation is associated with reduced DNMT1 and DNMT3b response to TCR stimulus. The neoTreg cells may be a strategy to alleviate acute allograft rejection. PMID:24944101

  14. A Novel Method of Measuring Cardiac Preservation Injury Demonstrates University of Wisconsin Solution Is Associated with Less Ischemic Necrosis than Celsior in Early Cardiac Allograft Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    George, Timothy J.; Arnaoutakis, George J.; Beaty, Claude A.; Shah, Ashish S.; Conte, John V.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose No consensus exists on the optimal heart preservative solution (HPS) for cardiac allograft preservation. The significance of varying degrees of acute ischemic necrosis (AIN) in early transplant biopsies is unknown. We investigated the effects of HPS on early cardiac histopathology by developing a novel grading system of AIN. Methods We retrospectively reviewed our institutional database of orthotopic heart transplants (OHT) identifying all hearts preserved with University of Wisconsin (UW) or Celsior (CS) solutions. A single blinded cardiovascular pathologist graded AIN severity on early post-transplant biopsies. Primary stratification was by HPS. Multivariable models examined mortality, AIN grade, primary graft dysfunction (PGD) and right heart failure (RHF). Results From 1996–2010, 174 adult OHT were preserved with UW (42) or CS (132) from which 431 biopsies were reviewed. UW and CS had similar 30-day (p=0.79) and 1-year mortality (p=0.92). CS was associated with significantly more AIN on the 1st (p=0.02) and 2nd (p=0.04) biopsies. This association persisted on multivariable analysis (1st biopsy OR: 2.93[1.26–6.83], p=0.01 and 2nd biopsy OR: 2.08[0.99–4.34], p=0.05). When stratified by AIN score, 30-day and 1-year mortality were similar (p>0.05). However, on adjusted analysis, increasing AIN score on the 1st biopsy was strongly associated with an increased incidence of PGD (OR: 1.59[1.02–2.47], p=0.04) and RHF (OR: 2.45[1.14–5.27], p=0.02). Conclusions Our novel grading system provides a simple, reproducible method for determining AIN. Preservation with UW is associated with less AIN than CS solution. Early biopsy ischemia is associated with primary graft dysfunction and right heart failure. AIN may have prognostic significance and its routine evaluation should be considered. PMID:22209353

  15. Cytomegalovirus infection and disease reduce 10-year cardiac allograft vasculopathy-free survival in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Inger; Andersson, Rune; Friman, Vanda; Selimovic, Nedim; Hanzen, Lars; Nasic, Salmir; Nyström, Ulla; Sigurdardottir, Vilborg

    2015-12-24

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is associated with an increased risk of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), the major limiting factor for long-term survival after heart transplantation (HTx). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of CMV infection during long-term follow-up after HTx. A retrospective, single-centre study analyzed 226 HTx recipients (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 78 % men) who underwent transplantation between January 1988 and December 2000. The incidence and risk factors for CMV infection during the first year after transplantation were studied. Risk factors for CAV were included in an analyses of CAV-free survival within 10 years post-transplant. The effect of CMV infection on the grade of CAV was analyzed. Survival to 10 years post-transplant was higher in patients with no CMV infection (69 %) compared with patients with CMV disease (55 %; p = 0.018) or asymptomatic CMV infection (54 %; p = 0.053). CAV-free survival time was higher in patients with no CMV infection (6.7 years; 95 % CI, 6.0-7.4) compared with CMV disease (4.2 years; CI, 3.2-5.2; p < 0.001) or asymptomatic CMV infection (5.4 years; CI, 4.3-6.4; p = 0.013). In univariate analysis, recipient age, donor age, coronary artery disease (CAD), asymptomatic CMV infection and CMV disease were significantly associated with CAV-free survival. In multivariate regression analysis, CMV disease, asymptomatic CMV infection, CAD and donor age remained independent predictors of CAV-free survival at 10 years post-transplant. CAV-free survival was significantly reduced in patients with CMV disease and asymptomatic CMV infection compared to patients without CMV infection. These findings highlight the importance of close monitoring of CMV viral load and appropriate therapeutic strategies for preventing asymptomatic CMV infection.

  16. Myocardial Gene Expression Profiling to Predict and Identify Cardiac Allograft Acute Cellular Rejection: The GET-Study

    PubMed Central

    Bodez, Diane; Hocini, Hakim; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Tisserand, Pascaline; Benhaiem, Nicole; Barau, Caroline; Kharoubi, Mounira; Guellich, Aziz; Guendouz, Soulef; Radu, Costin; Couetil, Jean-Paul; Ghaleh, Bijan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Hittinger, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Aims Serial invasive endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) remain the gold standard for acute cellular rejection (ACR) diagnosis. However histological grading has several limitations. We aimed to explore the value of myocardial Gene Expression Profiling (GEP) for diagnosing and identifying predictive biomarkers of ACR. Methods A case-control study nested within a retrospective heart transplant patients cohort included 126 patients with median (IQR) age 50 (41–57) years and 111 (88%) males. Among 1157 EMB performed, 467 were eligible (i.e, corresponding to either ISHLT grade 0 or ≥3A), among which 36 were selected for GEP according to the grading: 0 (CISHLT, n = 13); rejection ≥3A (RISHLT, n = 13); 0 one month before ACR (BRISHLT, n = 10). Results We found 294 genes differentially expressed between CISHLT and RISHLT, mainly involved in immune activation, and inflammation. Hierarchical clustering showed a clear segregation of CISHLT and RISHLT groups and heterogeneity of GEP within RISHLT. All EMB presented immune activation, but some RISHLT EMB were strongly subject to inflammation, whereas others, closer to CISHLT, were characterized by structural modifications with lower inflammation level. We identified 15 probes significantly different between BRISHLT and CISHLT, including the gene of the muscular protein TTN. This result suggests that structural alterations precede inflammation in ACR. Linear Discriminant Analysis based on these 15 probes was able to identify the histological status of every 36 samples. Conclusion Myocardial GEP is a helpful method to accurately diagnose ACR, and predicts rejection one month before its histological occurrence. These results should be considered in cardiac allograft recipients’ care. PMID:27898719

  17. Donor-Transmitted Atherosclerosis Associated With Worsening Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy After Heart Transplantation: Serial Volumetric Intravascular Ultrasound Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takuya; Seguchi, Osamu; Yanase, Masanobu; Fujita, Tomoyuki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Sato, Takuma; Sunami, Haruki; Nakajima, Seiko; Kataoka, Yu; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Hisamatsu, Eriko; Kuroda, Kensuke; Okada, Norihiro; Hori, Yumiko; Wada, Kyoichi; Hata, Hiroki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Fukushima, Norihide; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Background The influence of preexisting donor-transmitted atherosclerosis (DA) on cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) development remains unclear. Methods We performed 3-dimensional intravascular ultrasound (3D-IVUS) analysis in 42 heart transplantation (HTx) recipients at 2.1 ± 0.9 months (baseline) and 12.2 ± 0.4 months post-HTx, as well as consecutive 3D-IVUS analyses up to 3 years post-HTx in 35 of the 42 recipients. Donor-transmitted atherosclerosis was defined as a maximal intimal thickness of 0.5 mm or greater at baseline. Changes in volumetric IVUS parameters were compared in recipients with (DA group) and without DA (DA-free group) at baseline, 1 year, and 3 years post-HTx. Results Donor-transmitted atherosclerosis was observed in 57.1% of 42 recipients. The DA group exhibited a significantly greater increase in plaque volume at 1 year post-HTx (P < 0.001), leading to increased percent plaque volume (plaque volume/vessel volume, [%]) (P < 0.001) and decreased luminal volume (P = 0.021). Donor-transmitted atherosclerosis was independently associated with a greater increase in percent plaque volume during the first post-HTx year (P = 0.011). From 1 to 3 years post-HTx, the DA group underwent continuous reduction in luminal volume (P = 0.022). These changes resulted in a higher incidence of angiographic CAV at 3 years post-HTx in the DA group (58.8% vs 5.6%, P = 0.002). Conclusions This volumetric IVUS study suggests that DA correlates with the worsening change in CAV several years post-HTx. Donor-transmitted atherosclerosis recipients may require more aggressive treatment to prevent subsequent CAV progression. PMID:27472091

  18. Cardiac allograft prolongation in mice treated with combined posttransplantation total-lymphoid irradiation and anti-L3T4 antibody therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Trager, D.K.; Banks, B.A.; Rosenbaum, G.E.; Holm, B.I.; Shizuru, J.A.; Strober, S.; Fathman, C.G.

    1989-04-01

    Neonatal cardiac allograft survival was examined in mice treated with anti-L3T4 antibody, posttransplantation total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) or a combination of both therapies. Independently, both posttransplantation TLI and short-course antibody treatment allowed minimal prolongation. However, synergistic prolongation in graft survival was observed with the combination (synergistic) therapy. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from animals treated with combined anti-L3T4 and posttransplantation TLI additionally revealed ''synergy'' with respect to the degree of peripheral lymphocyte depletion.

  19. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting for a left main lesion due to cardiac allograft vasculopathy in Japan: first report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro; Hata, Hiroki; Murata, Yoshihiro; Seguchi, Osamu; Yanase, Masanobu; Shimahara, Yusuke; Sato, Shunsuke; Nakatani, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major cause of mortality after transplantation. We treated a 44-year-old female with off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCAB) 4 years after heart transplantation. Annual examinations, including coronary angiography and intravenous ultrasound (IVUS), revealed a severe lesion in the left main trunk. The left internal mammary artery was successfully anastomosed to the left anterior descending artery in an off-pump manner. To ensure that patients have a good long-term outcome after heart transplantation, routine examinations, including IVUS, are crucial, because of the nature of CAV. OPCAB is a good option for a left main trunk lesion due to CAV.

  20. Regulation of human aortic endothelial cell-derived mesenchymal growth factors by allogeneic lymphocytes in vitro. A potential mechanism for cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, C R; Morris, T E; Shipley, G D; Hosenpud, J D

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is thought to be triggered by an alloreactive response to the donor coronary vasculature, resulting in smooth muscle cell proliferation and ultimate occlusion of the donor coronary arteries. To determine whether allogeneic lymphocytes are capable of regulating endothelial-derived smooth muscle cell (SMC) growth factors, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were exposed to allogeneic lymphocytes. The HAEC-lymphocyte co-cultures were assessed for (a) lymphocyte proliferation in response to the allogeneic HAECs; (b) release of soluble factors that stimulate human aortic SMC proliferation; and (c) alteration of HAEC mRNA levels for a panel of known SMC growth factors. Co-culture conditioned medium increased SMC proliferation, compared to medium conditioned by HAECs alone. HAECs exposed to allogeneic lymphocytes increased their expression of mRNA for basic fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factors alpha and beta, and platelet derived growth factor A and B chains. These results demonstrate that allogeneic lymphocytes are capable of inducing HAECs to increase mRNA levels for several mesenchymal growth factors and to release bioactive products capable of stimulating SMC cell proliferation in vitro. Additionally, the data support the hypothesis that alloreactive lymphocytes can stimulate allogeneic donor endothelial cells to produce growth factors that may contribute to the intimal thickening seen in cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Images PMID:8376585

  1. Induction of Tolerance to Cardiac Allografts Using Donor Splenocytes Engineered to Display on Their Surface an Exogenous FasL Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Yolcu, Esma S.; Gu, Xiao; Lacelle, Chantale; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2008-01-01

    The critical role played by FasL in immune homeostasis renders this molecule as an attractive target for immunomodulation to achieve tolerance to auto and transplantation antigens. Immunomodulation with genetically modified cells expressing FasL was shown to induce tolerance to alloantigens. However, genetic modification of primary cells in a rapid, efficient, and clinically applicable manner proved challenging. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of donor splenocytes rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface a chimeric form of FasL protein (SA-FasL) for tolerance induction to cardiac allografts. Intraperitoneal injection of ACI rats with WF splenocytes displaying SA-FasL on their surface resulted in tolerance to donor, but not F344 third party, cardiac allografts. Tolerance was associated with apoptosis of donor reactive T effector cells and induction/expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells. Treg cells played a critical role in the observed tolerance as adoptive transfer of sorted Treg cells from long-term graft recipients into naïve unmanipulated ACI rats resulted in indefinite survival of secondary WF grafts. Immunomodulation with allogeneic cells rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface SA-FasL protein provides an effective and clinically applicable means of cell-based therapy with potential application to regenerative medicine, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:18606644

  2. Long-term survival of cardiac allografts induced by cyclophosphamide combined with CTLA4Ig-gene transfer mediated by adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wang, G M; Ma, J B; Jin, Y Z; Feng, Y G; Hao, J; Gao, X; Xie, S S

    2006-11-01

    There is a need to achieve donor-specific tolerance in clinical organ transplantation, where potential benefits remain overshadowed by chronic rejection and the side-effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. It is known that the mature immune system in mice can be reprogrammed to accept a foreign graft as if it was "self". The AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer (SC) + cyclophosphamide (CP) treatment alone prolongs allograft survival but does not induce tolerance. However, in our study, the AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer combined with SC + CP treatment yielded significantly prolonged mean survival times (149.7 +/- 18.0 days), while those in the untreated or AdLacZ treated mice were rejected in normal fashion (5.3 +/- 0.5 and 5.2 +/- 0.4 days, respectively), and survival in the AdCTLA4Ig or SC + CP treated groups were 45.7 +/- 9.6 or 50.2 +/- 5.3 days, respectively. In conclusion, a protocol of AdCTLA4Ig + SC + CP improved the survival of DA-->LEW cardiac allografts.

  3. Outcomes after percutaneous coronary artery revascularization procedures for cardiac allograft vasculopathy in pediatric heart transplant recipients: A multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Jeewa, Aamir; Chin, Clifford; Pahl, Elfriede; Atz, Andrew M; Carboni, Michael P; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Naftel, David C; Rodriguez, Rose; Dipchand, Anne I

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is an important cause of long-term graft loss. In adults, percutaneous revascularization procedures (PRPs) have variable success with high restenosis rates and little impact on graft survival. Limited data exist in pediatric recipients of transplants. Data from the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study (PHTS) were used to explore associations between PRPs and outcomes after heart transplant in patients listed ≤18 years old who received a first heart transplant between 1993 and 2009. Revascularization procedures were done in 28 of 3,156 (0.9%) patients; 13 patients had multiple PRPs giving a total of 51 PRPs performed across 15 centers. Mean recipient age at time of transplant was 7.7 ± 6.7 years; mean donor age was 15.9 ± 15.4 years. The mean time to first PRP was 5.7 ± 3.2 years. Vessels involved were left anterior descending artery (41%), right coronary artery (25%), circumflex artery (18%), other coronary branches/unknown (16%). PRPs consisted of 38 (75%) stent implantations and 13 (25%) balloon angioplasties with an overall procedural success rate of 73%. Freedom from graft loss after PRPs was 89%, 75%, and 61% at 1, 3, and 12 months. In addition, patients with transplants from donors >30 years old were found to have less freedom from the need for a revascularization procedure than patients with transplants from younger donors (p < 0.0001). In this large pediatric heart transplant cohort, use of PRPs for cardiac allograft vasculopathy was rare, likely related to procedural feasibility of the interventions. Despite technically successful interventions, graft loss occurred in 39% within 1 year post-procedure; relisting for heart transplant should be considered. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Longitudinal Tracking of Recipient Macrophages in a Rat Chronic Cardiac Allograft Rejection Model With Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Micrometer-Sized Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Wu, Yijen L.; Foley, Lesley M.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Eytan, Danielle F.; Shirwan, Haval; Ho, Chien

    2008-01-01

    Background Long-term survival of heart transplants is hampered by chronic rejection (CR). Studies indicate the involvement of host macrophages in the development of CR; however, the precise role of these cells in CR is unclear. Thus, it is important to develop noninvasive techniques to serially monitor the movement and distribution of recipient macrophages in chronic cardiac allograft rejection in vivo. Methods and Results We have employed a rat heterotopic working-heart CR model for a magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Twenty-one allograft (PVG.1U→PVG.R8) and 9 isograft (PVG.R8→PVG.R8) transplantations were performed. Recipient macrophages are labeled via intravenous injection of micron-sized paramagnetic iron oxide particles (0.9 μm in diameter) at a dose of 4.5 mg Fe per rat 1 day before transplantation. Serial in vivo magnetic resonance images were acquired for up to 16 weeks. The migration of labeled recipient cells in our CR model, in which cardiac CR is evident at 3 weeks and most extensive by 16 weeks after transplantation, can be assessed with the use of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging for >100 days after a single micron-sized paramagnetic iron oxide injection. The location and distribution of labeled recipient cells were confirmed with magnetic resonance microscopy and histology. Conclusions This approach may improve our understanding of the immune cells involved in CR and the management of heart transplantation. Moreover, this study demonstrates the feasibility of noninvasively observing individual targeted cells over long time periods by serial in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:18591438

  5. RNA Profiling in Human and Murine Transplanted Hearts: Identification and Validation of Therapeutic Targets for Acute Cardiac and Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Van Aelst, L. N. L.; Summer, G.; Li, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Heggermont, W.; De Vusser, K.; Carai, P.; Naesens, M.; Van Cleemput, J.; Van de Werf, F.; Vanhaecke, J.; Thum, T.; Waer, M.; Papageorgiou, A.‐P.; Schroen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is the adverse response of the recipient's immune system against the allogeneic graft. Using human surveillance endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) manifesting ACR and murine allogeneic grafts, we profiled implicated microRNAs (miRs) and mRNAs. MiR profiling showed that miR‐21, ‐142‐3p, ‐142‐5p, ‐146a, ‐146b, ‐155, ‐222, ‐223, and ‐494 increased during ACR in humans and mice, whereas miR‐149‐5p decreased. mRNA profiling revealed 70 common differentially regulated transcripts, all involved in immune signaling and immune‐related diseases. Interestingly, 33 of 70 transcripts function downstream of IL‐6 and its transcription factor spleen focus forming virus proviral integration oncogene (SPI1), an established target of miR‐155, the most upregulated miR in human EMBs manifesting rejection. In a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, miR‐155 absence and pharmacological inhibition attenuated ACR, demonstrating the causal involvement and therapeutic potential of miRs. Finally, we corroborated our miR signature in acute cellular renal allograft rejection, suggesting a nonorgan specific signature of acute rejection. We concluded that miR and mRNA profiling in human and murine ACR revealed the shared significant dysregulation of immune genes. Inflammatory miRs, for example miR‐155, and transcripts, in particular those related to the IL‐6 pathway, are promising therapeutic targets to prevent acute allograft rejection. PMID:26249758

  6. Low-dose donor bone marrow cells and splenocytes plus adenovirus encoding for CTLA4Ig gene promote stable mixed chimerism and long-term survival of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-Z; Zhang, Q-Y; Xie, S-S

    2003-12-01

    Co-stimulatory blockade combined with donor bone marrow transfusion engenders stable mixed chimerism and robust tolerance to various organ and cell transplants. However, repeated administration of costly agents to block the co-stimulatory pathway and the high doses of donor bone marrow cells (BMCs) used in most protocols are impeding clinical development of this strategy. To circumvent these shortcomings, we developed a plan in which repeated administration of costly agents was replaced by a single injection of adenovirus containing the gene of interest, and the high dose of donor BMCs replaced by a mixture of low-dose donor BMCs and splenocytes (SPLCs). Cardiac allografts from DA(RT-1(a)) rats were transplanted heterotopically into the abdomens of LEW(RT-1(1)) rats. A cocktail of adenovirus containing CTLA4Ig gene (AdCTLA4Ig), donor BMCs (100 x 10(6)), and SPLCs (50 x 10(6)) was administered to recipients via the portal vein immediately after grafting (n = 6). Treatment with regimens, including AdCTLA4Ig only, AdCTLA4Ig plus donor BMCs, and AdCTLA4Ig plus donor SPLCs, significantly prolonged cardiac allograft survival in recipient rats, while animals that received no treatment or treatment with control adenovirus (AdLacZ) promptly rejected their allografts. Nevertheless, LEW recipients treated with AdCTLA4Ig and the mixture of a low dose of donor BMCs and SPLCs developed stable mixed chimerism, rendering them long-term survivors of cardiac allografts that also accepted skin grafts from the donor but not the third-party strain. We conclude that blockade of CD28-B7 pathway with AdCTLA4Ig plus a mixture of low doses of donor BMCs and SPLCs is a feasible strategy to induce long-term mixed chimerism with a potential application for clinical development.

  7. De novo expression of fetal ED-A(+) fibronectin and B (+) tenascin-C splicing variants in human cardiac allografts: potential impact for targeted therapy of rejection.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Matusiak-Brückner, Monika; Richter, Petra; Grün, Katja; Ziffels, Barbara; Neri, Dario; Maschek, Hansjörg; Schulz, Uwe; Pfeil, Alexander; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R; Gummert, Jan; Berndt, Alexander; Renner, André

    2014-10-01

    Management of acute and especially chronic rejection after human cardiac transplantation is still challenging. Chronic rejection, represented by allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) is known to cause severe long-term complications. Rejection associated tissue-remodelling entails the reoccurrence of fetal variants of Fibronectin (Fn) and Tenascin-C (Tn-C), which are virtually absent in adult human organs. In a rat model, an extensive re-expression could be demonstrated for ED-A(+) Fn with spatial association to CAV and CIF. Thus, it is of great interest to investigate the cardiac tissue expression and distribution in human samples. From 48 heart transplanted patients, 64 tissue specimens derived from right ventricular biopsies were available. Histopathological analysis was performed according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for the detection of acute rejection. By immunohistochemistry, protein expression of ED-A(+) Fn, B(+) Tn-C, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and CD45 was assessed and analysed semiquantitatively. Co-localisation studies were performed by means of immunofluorescence double labelling. Histopathological analysis of the 64 samples revealed different ISHLT grades (0R in 36 cases, 1R in 20 cases and 2R in 8 cases). There was a distinct and quantitatively relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C in most samples. Semi-quantitative evaluation did not show any correlation to the acute rejection grade for all markers. Interestingly, significant correlations to the extent of inflammation could be shown for ED-A(+) Fn (r = 0.442, p = 0.000) and B(+) Tn-C (r = 0.408, p = 0.001) as well as between both proteins (r = 0.663, p = 0.000). A spatial association of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C to CAV and CIF could be demonstrated. A relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C following human heart transplantation could be demonstrated with spatial association to

  8. The predictive value of coronary artery calcium detected by computed tomography in a prospective study on cardiac allograft vasculopathy in heart transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Günther, Anne; Andersen, Rune; Gude, Einar; Jakobsen, Jarl; Edvardsen, Thor; Sandvik, Leiv; Abildgaard, Andreas; Aaberge, Lars; Gullestad, Lars

    2017-09-02

    The predictive value of coronary artery calcium (CAC) in heart transplant (HTX) patients is not established. We explored if the absence of CAC on computed tomography (CT) could exclude moderate and severe cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV₂₋₃; the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation [ISHLT] recommended nomenclature) and significant coronary artery stenosis (diameter reduction ≥50%), and predict long-term clinical outcomes. HTX recipients (n=133) were prospectively included and underwent CT for CAC scoring and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) 7.8±5.0 years after HTX. CAC was detected in 73 (55%) patients. Absence of CAC on CT had a negative predictive value of 97% for ISHLT CAV₂₋₃ and 88% for significant stenosis on ICA. During 7.5±2.6 years of follow-up after CAC CT (n=127), there were 57 (45%) non-fatal major adverse cardiac events and 23 (18%) deaths or graft losses registered as first events. Patients with CAC had significantly more events (p=0.011). In an adjusted Cox regression analysis, the presence of CAC was significantly associated with a negative outcome (HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0; p=0.023). The absence of CAC predicted low prevalences of ISHLT CAV₂₋₃ and significant coronary artery stenosis in HTX patients. The presence of CACS was significantly associated with a worse long-term outcome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effect of Yunnan-cobra venom factor in overcoming acute humoral rejection after allograft cardiac transplantation in presensitized recipients: experiment with rats].

    PubMed

    Li, Rong; Chen, Gang; Guo, Hui; Wang, Da-wei; Xie, Lin; Wang, Shu-sen; Wang, Wan-yu; Xiong, Yu-liang; Chen, Shi

    2006-06-06

    To investigate the effect of Yunnan-cobra venom factor (Y-CVF) in overcoming acute humoral rejection after allograft cardiac transplantation in presensitized recipients. Fifteen Lewis rats received the transplantation of full-thickness skin graft of BN rats three times so as to be presensitized. Fifteen pairs of Lewis rat, as recipients of heart, and BN rat, as heart donors, were randomly divided into 2 groups: experimental group (n = 8), and control group (n = 7). The Lewis rats in the experimental group received heart transplantation of the heart of the BN rat 7 approximately 10 days after the third skin transplantation, and were injected with Y-CVF 80 microg/kg 24 hours before the heart transplantation. The Lewis rat in the control group received only the heart transplantation without Y-CVF injection. Blood samples were collected from all rats before pre-sensitization and 7 days after the third skin transplantation so as to determine the titer of anti-BN rat lymphocyte antibody. 0 and 24 hours, and 6 and 8 days after Y-CVF injection blood samples were collected from the Lewis rats to determine the total complement activity with the complement activity before Y-CVF injection defined as 100%. The survival time of the transplanted heart was observed. After the transplanted hearts stopped to beat, they were resected and underwent HE staining and microscopy. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the deposition of IgG and complement 3 (C3). The titer of anti-BN rat lymphocyte antibody was 0 before the pre-sensitization, and increased to 1:1028 - 1:2056 7 days after the third skin pre-sensitization. The serum total complement activity of the Lewis rats decreased to 0 twenty-four hours after the Y-CVF injection, recovered to 2.01% - 15.41% 6 days after, and returned to the normal level (89.61% - 109.46%) 8 days after. The mean survival time of the transplanted hearts of the control group was 12.71 +/- 13.94 hours (with a range of 1.5 - 15 hours), significantly

  10. Management of acute severe perioperative failure of cardiac allografts: a single-centre experience with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Moheb; Hendry, Paul; Masters, Roy; Rubens, Fraser; Lam, B-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Davies, Ross; Haddad, Haissam; Veinot, John P; Mesana, Thierry

    2007-04-01

    Early graft failure is associated with high mortality and is the main cause of death within the first 30 days after transplantation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the investigators' experience of severe perioperative acute graft failure and to review the literature. Nine of 385 cardiac transplants (2.3%) performed from 1984 through 2005 developed severe perioperative acute graft failure either in the operating room or within 24 h after cardiac transplantation. Four patients had primary graft failure, two had right heart failure secondary to pulmonary hypertension, one had hyperacute rejection, one had accelerated acute rejection and one possibly sustained a particulate coronary embolus intraoperatively. All except the two patients who had right heart failure secondary to pulmonary hypertension received mechanical circulatory support. Three patients were supported with total artificial hearts, two patients received a left ventricular assist device, one patient was supported with extracorporeal life support followed by a right ventricular assist device when the left ventricle recovered, and one patient was supported for several hours with cardiopulmonary bypass. Three patients were retransplanted after mechanical circulatory support, but only one survived. Only one of the nine patients (11%) survived; this patient was supported with a total artificial heart followed by retransplantation. The outcome of severe perioperative acute graft failure is very poor. Mechanical circulatory support and retransplantation are not as successful as in other situations. Due to the shortage of donors and poor outcomes, retransplantation for hyperacute rejection is not advisable.

  11. Management of acute severe perioperative failure of cardiac allografts: A single-centre experience with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Moheb; Hendry, Paul; Masters, Roy; Rubens, Fraser; Lam, B-Khanh; Ruel, Marc; Davies, Ross; Haddad, Haissam; Veinot, John P; Mesana, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early graft failure is associated with high mortality and is the main cause of death within the first 30 days after transplantation. The purpose of the present study was to examine the investigators’ experience of severe perioperative acute graft failure and to review the literature. METHODS: Nine of 385 cardiac transplants (2.3%) performed from 1984 through 2005 developed severe perioperative acute graft failure either in the operating room or within 24 h after cardiac transplantation. Four patients had primary graft failure, two had right heart failure secondary to pulmonary hypertension, one had hyperacute rejection, one had accelerated acute rejection and one possibly sustained a particulate coronary embolus intraoperatively. RESULTS: All except the two patients who had right heart failure secondary to pulmonary hypertension received mechanical circulatory support. Three patients were supported with total artificial hearts, two patients received a left ventricular assist device, one patient was supported with extracorporeal life support followed by a right ventricular assist device when the left ventricle recovered, and one patient was supported for several hours with cardiopulmonary bypass. Three patients were retransplanted after mechanical circulatory support, but only one survived. Only one of the nine patients (11%) survived; this patient was supported with a total artificial heart followed by retransplantation. CONCLUSION: The outcome of severe perioperative acute graft failure is very poor. Mechanical circulatory support and retransplantation are not as successful as in other situations. Due to the shortage of donors and poor outcomes, retransplantation for hyperacute rejection is not advisable. PMID:17440641

  12. The Effect of Everolimus Initiation and Calcineurin Inhibitor Elimination on Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy in De Novo Recipients: One-Year Results of a Scandinavian Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Andreassen, A K; Andersson, B; Gustafsson, F; Eiskjaer, H; Bøtker, H E; Rådegran, G; Gude, E; Ioanes, D; Solbu, D; Sigurdardottir, V; Dellgren, G; Erikstad, I; Solberg, O G; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P; Gullestad, L

    2015-07-01

    Early initiation of everolimus with calcineurin inhibitor therapy has been shown to reduce the progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) in de novo heart transplant recipients. The effect of de novo everolimus therapy and early total elimination of calcineurin inhibitor therapy has, however, not been investigated and is relevant given the morbidity and lack of efficacy of current protocols in preventing CAV. This 12-month multicenter Scandinavian trial randomized 115 de novo heart transplant recipients to everolimus with complete calcineurin inhibitor elimination 7-11 weeks after HTx or standard cyclosporine immunosuppression. Ninety-five (83%) patients had matched intravascular ultrasound examinations at baseline and 12 months. Mean (± SD) recipient age was 49.9 ± 13.1 years. The everolimus group (n = 47) demonstrated significantly reduced CAV progression as compared to the calcineurin inhibitor group (n = 48) (ΔMaximal Intimal Thickness 0.03 ± 0.06 and 0.08 ± 0.12 mm, ΔPercent Atheroma Volume 1.3 ± 2.3 and 4.2 ± 5.0%, ΔTotal Atheroma Volume 1.1 ± 19.2 mm(3) and 13.8 ± 28.0 mm(3) [all p-values ≤ 0.01]). Everolimus patients also had a significantly greater decline in levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 as compared to the calcineurin inhibitor group (p = 0.02). These preliminary results suggest that an everolimus-based CNI-free can potentially be considered in suitable de novo HTx recipients.

  13. Multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance surveillance of acute cardiac allograft rejection and characterisation of transplantation-associated myocardial injury: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Naish, Josephine H; Shaw, Steven M; Yonan, Nizar; Williams, Simon G; Clark, David; Bishop, Paul W; Ainslie, Mark P; Borg, Alex; Coutts, Glyn; Parker, Geoffrey J M; Ray, Simon G; Schmitt, Matthias

    2014-07-20

    Serial surveillance endomyocardial biopsies are performed in patients who have recently undergone heart transplantation in order to detect acute cardiac allograft rejection (ACAR) before symptoms occur, however the biopsy process is associated with a number of limitations. This study aimed to prospectively and longitudinally evaluate the performance of multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for detecting and monitoring ACAR in the early phase post-transplant, and characterize graft recovery following transplantation. All patients receiving a heart transplant at a single UK centre over a period of 25 months were approached within one month of transplantation. Multiparametric CMR was prospectively performed on the same day as biopsy on four separate occasions (6 weeks, 10 weeks, 15 weeks and 20 weeks post-transplant). CMR included assessment of global and regional ventricular function, myocardial tissue characterization (T1 mapping, T2 mapping, extracellular volume, LGE) and pixel-wise absolute myocardial blood flow quantification. CMR parameters were compared with biopsy findings. As is standard, grade 2R or higher ACAR was considered significant. 88 CMR-matched biopsies were performed in 22 patients. Eight (9%) biopsies in 5 patients demonstrated significant ACAR. Significant ACAR was associated with a reduction in circumferential strain (-12.7±2.5% vs. -13.7±3.6%, p=0.047) but there was considerable overlap between groups. Whilst trends were observed between ACAR and proposed CMR markers of oedema, particularly after adjusting for primary graft dysfunction, differences were not significant. Significant improvements were seen in markers of graft structure and contractility, oedema and microvascular function over the period studied, although few parameters normalised. This study provides novel insight into the myocardial injury associated with transplantation, and its recovery, however multiparametric CMR was not able to accurately detect ACAR

  14. Targeted delivery of interleukin-10 to chronic cardiac allograft rejection using a human antibody specific to the extra domain A of fibronectin.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Doll, Fabia; Grün, Katja; Richter, Petra; Köse, Nilay; Ziffels, Barbara; Schubert, Harald; Figulla, Hans R; Jung, Christian; Gummert, Jan; Renner, André; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2015-09-15

    Management of chronic rejection is challenging since there are not sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. The rejection process leads to overexpression of ED-A(+) fibronectin (ED-A(+) Fn). The human antibody F8, specific to ED-A(+) Fn, may serve as a vehicle for targeted delivery of bioactive payloads, e.g. interleukin 10 (IL-10). The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of the fusion protein F8-interleukin-10 (F8-IL10) in the process of chronic rejection development. A heterotopic rat heart transplantation model was used to induce chronic rejection. For therapeutic interventions, the immunocytokines F8-humanIL10 (DEKAVIL), F8-ratIL10 as well as KSF-humanIL10 (irrelevant antigen-specificity) were used. Treatment was performed weekly for 10 weeks starting at day 7 after transplantation (1mg/animal). In the cardiac allografts, treatment with F8-huIL10 or F8-ratIL10 was associated with increased heart weights, a higher grade of chronic rejection, increased CIF, higher protein expression levels of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), an augmented infiltration with inflammatory cells (CD4+, CD8+ and CD68+ cells) and higher serum levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) compared to the control groups. All observed treatment effects are transplantation-specific since the F8 antibody is specific to ED-A(+) Fn that is not expressed in healthy hearts. A clear targeting effect of F8-huIL10 as well as F8-ratIL10 could be proven. Against that background, a further study is needed to address the question, if F8-IL10 treatment is capable to reduce CAV and CIF starting at a time point when chronic rejection has fully developed (therapeutic approach). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Tubulointerstitial rejection of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Malušková, Jana; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Tubulo-intersticial rejection represents T-cell mediated rejection of kidney allografts with the morphology of immune-mediated interstitial nephritis. Diagnosis is dependent on the histopathological evaluation of a graft biopsy sample. The key morphological features are interstitial inflammatory infiltrate and damage to tubular epithelial cell which in severe cases can result in the ruptures of the tubular basement membranes. The differential diagnosis of tubulo-interstitial rejection includes acute interstitial nephritis and viral inflammatory kidney diseases, mainly polyomavirus nephropathy.

  16. A ROLE FOR ANTIBODIES TO HLA, COLLAGEN-V AND K-α1-TUBULIN IN ANTIBODY MEDIATED REJECTION AND CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT VASCULOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Dilip S.; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Bash, Haseeb Ilias; Phelan, Donna; Moazami, Nader; Ewald, Gregory A.; Mohanakumar, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background We determined role of donor specific antibodies (DSA) and antibodies (Abs) to self-antigens, collagen-V (Col-V) and K-α1-Tubulin (KAT) in pathogenesis of acute antibody mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) following human heart transplantation (HTx). Methods 137 HTx recipients - 60 early period (≤ 12months) and 77 late period (> 12months) patients were enrolled. Circulating DSA was determined using LUMINEX. Abs against Col-I, II, IV, V and KAT were measured using ELISA. Frequency of CD4+T helper cells (CD4+Th) secreting IFN-γ, IL-5, IL-10 or IL-17 specific to self-antigens were determined using ELISPOT. Results A significant association between AMR and DSA was demonstrated. Development of DSA in AMR patients correlated well with the development of auto-Abs to Col-V(AMR(+): 383±72μg/mL, AMR(−): 172±49μg/mL, p=0.033) and KAT (AMR(+): 252±49μg/mL, AMR(−): 61±21μg/mL, p=0.014). Patients who developed AMR demonstrated increased frequencies of CD4+Th secreting IFN-γ and IL-5 with reduction in IL-10 specific for Col-V/KAT. Patients diagnosed with CAV also developed DSA and auto-Abs to Col-V (CAV(+): 835±142μg/mL, CAV(−): 242±68μg/mL, p=0.025) and KAT (CAV(+): 768±206μg/mL, CAV(−): 196±72μg/mL, p=0.001) with increased frequencies of CD4+Th secreting IL-17 with reduction in IL-10 specific for Col-V/KAT. Conclusions Development of Abs to HLA and self-antigens are associated with increases in CD4+Th secreting IFN-γ and IL-5 in AMR and IL-17 in CAV, with reduction in CD4+Th secreting IL-10 in both AMR and CAV. PMID:21383658

  17. CXCR3 Antagonism Impairs the Development of Donor-reactive, IFN-γ-producing Effectors and Prolongs Allograft Survival 1

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, J.M.; Zhang, Q-W.; Siu, G.; Collins, T. L.; Sullivan, T.; Dairaghi, D.J.; Medina, J.C.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Current immunosuppression regimens are highly toxic to transplant recipients and, in many cases, acute rejection episodes occur due to escape of donor-reactive lymphocytes from the immunosuppression. T cells are the mediators of acute, cell-mediated graft damage and are hypothesized to use the CXCR3 chemokine axis for migration into the allograft. In the current study, we investigated the effect of CXCR3 blockade using a non-peptide, small molecule inhibitor, AMG1237845, in murine cardiac allograft survival. Methods C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice received vascularized cardiac allografts from A/J (H-2a) donors and were treated with the CXCR3 antagonist. Histological and flow cytometric analyses were used to measure infiltration of leukocytes, and qRT-PCR and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays were used to measure donor-specific reactivity. Results CXCR3 antagonism modestly prolonged allograft survival compared to vehicle treatment, but at time-matched intervals post-transplant, neutrophil, CD8+, and CD4+ T cell infiltration was indistinguishable. While proliferation of donor-reactive naïve T cells was unaffected by CXCR3 antagonism, the frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells in the recipient spleen was significantly reduced by AMG1237845 treatment. CXCR3 blockade for 30 days synergized with short-term, low-dose anti-CD154 mAb to prolong survival past 50 days in 75% of grafts and past 80 days in 25% of the cases. Conclusions These results indicate that in synergy with co-stimulation blockade, CXCR3 is a viable therapeutic target to prevent acute graft rejection. PMID:19202440

  18. Cell-Free DNA and Active Rejection in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Roy D; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Poggio, Emilio D; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Langone, Anthony J; Sood, Puneet; Matas, Arthur J; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Sharfuddin, Asif; Fischbach, Bernard; Narayanan, Mohanram; Jordan, Stanley C; Cohen, David; Weir, Matthew R; Hiller, David; Prasad, Preethi; Woodward, Robert N; Grskovic, Marica; Sninsky, John J; Yee, James P; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-07-01

    Histologic analysis of the allograft biopsy specimen is the standard method used to differentiate rejection from other injury in kidney transplants. Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) is a noninvasive test of allograft injury that may enable more frequent, quantitative, and safer assessment of allograft rejection and injury status. To investigate this possibility, we prospectively collected blood specimens at scheduled intervals and at the time of clinically indicated biopsies. In 102 kidney recipients, we measured plasma levels of dd-cfDNA and correlated the levels with allograft rejection status ascertained by histology in 107 biopsy specimens. The dd-cfDNA level discriminated between biopsy specimens showing any rejection (T cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]) and controls (no rejection histologically), P<0.001 (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve [AUC], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.61 to 0.86). Positive and negative predictive values for active rejection at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 61% and 84%, respectively. The AUC for discriminating ABMR from samples without ABMR was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.97). Positive and negative predictive values for ABMR at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 44% and 96%, respectively. Median dd-cfDNA was 2.9% (ABMR), 1.2% (T cell-mediated types ≥IB), 0.2% (T cell-mediated type IA), and 0.3% in controls (P=0.05 for T cell-mediated rejection types ≥IB versus controls). Thus, dd-cfDNA may be used to assess allograft rejection and injury; dd-cfDNA levels <1% reflect the absence of active rejection (T cell-mediated type ≥IB or ABMR) and levels >1% indicate a probability of active rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Adoptive transfer of DNT cells induces long-term cardiac allograft survival and augments recipient CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhu-Xu; Lian, Dameng; Huang, Xuyan; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Hongtao; Liu, Weihua; Garcia, Bertha; Min, Wei-Ping; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2011-01-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the regulation of immune responses but whether Treg will induce tolerance in transplant recipients in the clinic remains unknown. Our previous studies have shown that TCRαβ(+)CD3(+)CD4⁻CD8⁻NK1.1⁻ (double negative, DN) T cells suppress T cell responses and prolong allograft survival in a single locus MHC-mismatched mouse model. In this study, we investigated the role of DNT cells in a more robust, fully MHC-mismatched BALB/c to C57BL/6 transplantation model, which may be more clinically relevant. Adoptive transfer of DNT cells in combination with short-term rapamycin treatment (days 1-9) induced long-term heart allograft survival (101±31 vs. 39±13 days rapamycin alone, p<0.01). Furthermore adoptive transfer DNT cells augmented CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells accumulation in transplant recipients while depletion of CD4(+) Treg cells by anti-CD25 inhibited the effect of DNT cells on long-term graft survival (48±12 days vs. 101±31 days, p<0.001). In conclusion, DNT cells combined with short-term immunosuppression can prolong allograft survival, which may be through the accumulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in the recipient. Our result suggests that allograft tolerance may require the co-existence of different type Treg cell phenotypes which are affected by current immunosuppression.

  20. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  1. Ultraviolet irradiated corneal allografts include antigen scientific unresponsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Niederkorn, J.Y. )

    1991-03-15

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the immunogenicity of corneal allografts was examined in a mouse model. BALB/c corneal allografts were exposed to 200 mJ/cm{sup 2} of UVB irradiation immediately prior to heterotopic transplantation of C57BL/6 recipients. Analysis of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses revealed profound impairment of both forms of cell-mediated immunity. Mice grafted with UVB irradiated corneal grafts 7 days prior to immunization with nonirradiated, immunogenic corneal grafts failed to mount either allospecific CTL or DTH responses. Suppression of DTH responses was cyclophosphamide sensitive; C57BL/6 hosts treated with cyclophosphamide one day prior to receiving UVB irradiated corneal grafts developed normal DTH responses. Allospecific suppression could be transferred to naive recipients using spleen cells from host grafted with UV irradiated corneal allografts. The results indicated that UVB irradiation not only rendered corneal allografts nonimmunogenic but also tolerogenic.

  2. Allograft immune response with sCR1 intervention.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-03-01

    The deposition of complement (C) components on tissues of transplanted organs may induce many proinflammatory responses. The role of such C activation in allograft rejection is uncertain. We addressed this question by inhibiting C at the level of the C3 and C5 convertases, preventing C activation and progression of its cascade, using recombinant human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in an unsensitized rat renal allograft model. Fully MHC disparate Lewis to DA rat renal allograft recipients given 25 mg/kg sCR1 daily, with saline-treated allograft recipients as controls (n = 15 in each group), were sacrificed from day 1 to day 5 post-transplant, and examined histopathologically, and for the deposition of C3 and C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC), and for the presence of leucocyte antigen markers. Treated animals demonstrated a reduction in vascular injury and cellular infiltration, coincident with reduced C deposition. Flow cytometric analysis of leucocyte subpopulations in the spleen showed a reduction in activated (CD25 positive) B and T cells in treated animals, compared to saline treated controls. The results suggest that C inhibition with sCR1, in an unsensitized model of allograft rejection, was able to suppress the vascular and cell mediated components of tissue injury. The data support not only a role for C in antibody and possibly cell mediated cytotoxicity in the graft, but also suggest a role in the primary immune response leading to both T cell and B cell activation.

  3. Studies on the antigenicity of bone. I. Freeze-dried and deep-frozen bone allografts in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, G E; Strong, D M; Sell, K W

    1976-09-01

    The antigenicity of deep-frozen and freeze-dried cortical and corticocancellous bone allografts placed orthotopically in rabbits was studied using a sensitive microcytotoxicity assay. Target cells were phytohemagglutinin-P-stimulated, 51chromium-labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes from the bone donors (Dutch belted rabbits), and sera or peripheral blood lymphocytes from the graft recipients (New Zealand white rabbits) were used as effectors of cytotoxicity. Fresh allografts and deep-frozen corticocancellous bone evoked detectable humoral and cell-mediated immunity,, whereas freeze-dried cortical bone allografts failed to sensitize the recipients and were the least antigenic of the allografts examined.

  4. B Lymphocytes Differentially Influence Acute and Chronic Allograft Rejection in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, David J.; Griffiths, Robert; Seshan, Surya V.; Magro, Cynthia M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Coffman, Thomas M.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of B lymphocytes and plasma cells during allograft rejection remain unclear. Therefore, the effects of B cell depletion on acute cardiac rejection, chronic renal rejection, and skin graft rejection were compared using CD20 or CD19 mAbs. Both CD20 and CD19 mAbs effectively depleted mature B cells, while CD19 mAb treatment depleted plasmablasts and some plasma cells. B cell depletion did not affect acute cardiac allograft rejection, although CD19 mAb treatment prevented allograft-specific IgG production. Strikingly, CD19 mAb treatment significantly reduced renal allograft rejection and abrogated allograft-specific IgG development, while CD20 mAb treatment did not. By contrast, B cell depletion exacerbated skin allograft rejection and augmented the proliferation of adoptively transferred alloantigen-specific CD4+ T cells, demonstrating that B cells can also negatively regulate allograft rejection. Thereby, B cells can either positively or negatively regulate allograft rejection depending on the nature of the allograft and the intensity of the rejection response. Moreover, CD19 mAb may represent a new approach for depleting both B cells and plasma cells to concomitantly impair T cell activation, inhibit the generation of new allograft-specific Abs, or reduce preexisting allograft-specific Ab levels in transplant patients. PMID:21248259

  5. Inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shears, L L; Kawaharada, N; Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Watkins, S C; Kovesdi, I; Lizonova, A; Pham, S M

    1997-01-01

    In cardiac transplantation, chronic rejection takes the form of an occlusive vasculopathy. The mechanism underlying this disorder remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role nitric oxide (NO) may play in the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Rat aortic allografts from ACI donors to Wistar Furth recipients with a strong genetic disparity in both major and minor histocompatibility antigens were used for transplantation. Allografts collected at 28 d were found to have significant increases in both inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein as well as in intimal thickness when compared with isografts. Inhibiting NO production with an iNOS inhibitor increased the intimal thickening by 57.2%, indicating that NO suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Next, we evaluated the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on iNOS expression and allograft arteriosclerosis. CsA (10 mg/kg/d) suppressed the expression of iNOS in response to balloon-induced aortic injury. Similarly, CsA inhibited iNOS expression in the aortic allografts, associated with a 65% increase in intimal thickening. Finally, we investigated the effect of adenoviral-mediated iNOS gene transfer on allograft arteriosclerosis. Transduction with iNOS using an adenoviral vector suppressed completely the development of allograft arteriosclerosis in both untreated recipients and recipients treated with CsA. These results suggest that the early immune-mediated upregulation in iNOS expression partially protects aortic allografts from the development of allograft arteriosclerosis, and that iNOS gene transfer strategies may prove useful in preventing the development of this otherwise untreatable disease process. PMID:9329968

  6. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  8. Allograft vasculopathy after allogeneic vascularized knee transplantation.

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, Michael; Nerlich, Andreas; Schneeberger, Stefan; Wagner, Frithjof; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2011-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation represents a new discipline in reconstructive surgery. Over the past 10 years, we have performed six human vascularized allogeneic knee transplantations. All of these grafts have been lost within the first 56 months. A histomorphologic assessment of the latest case resulted in the detection of diffuse concentric fibrous intimal thickening and occlusion of graft vessels. Findings are comparable with cardiac allograft vasculopathy. The lack of adequate tools for monitoring graft rejection might have allowed multiple untreated episodes of acute rejection, triggering myointimal proliferation and occlusion of graft vessels. Graft vasculopathy represents an obstacle to long-term vascularized bone and joint allograft survival, and adequate tools for monitoring need to be developed.

  9. A web-based pilot study of inter-pathologist reproducibility using the ISHLT 2004 working formulation for biopsy diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection: the European experience.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Annalisa; Andersen, Claus Boegelund; Bartoloni, Giovanni; Black, Fiona; Bishop, Paul; Doran, Helen; Fedrigo, Marny; Fries, Jochen W U; Goddard, Martin; Goebel, Heike; Neil, Desley; Leone, Ornella; Marzullo, Andrea; Ortmann, Monika; Paraf, Francois; Rotman, Samuel; Turhan, Nesrin; Bruneval, Patrick; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Grigoletto, Francesco; Gasparetto, Alessio; Mencarelli, Roberto; Thiene, Gaetano; Burke, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, at the European level and using digital technology, the inter-pathologist reproducibility of the ISHLT 2004 system and to compare it with the 1990 system We also assessed the reproducibility of the morphologic criteria for diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection detailed in the 2004 grading system. The hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections of 20 sets of endomyocardial biopsies were pre-selected and graded by two pathologists (A.A. and M.B.) and digitized using a telepathology digital pathology system (Aperio ImageScope System; for details refer to http://aperio.com/). Their diagnoses were considered the index diagnoses, which covered all grades of acute cellular rejection (ACR), early ischemic lesions, Quilty lesions, late ischemic lesions and (in the 2005 system) antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Eighteen pathologists from 16 heart transplant centers in 7 European countries participated in the study. Inter-observer reproducibility was assessed using Fleiss's kappa and Krippendorff's alpha statistics. The combined kappa value of all grades diagnosed by all 18 pathologists was 0.31 for the 1990 grading system and 0.39 for the 2005 grading system, with alpha statistics at 0.57 and 0.55, respectively. Kappa values by grade for 1990/2005, respectively, were: 0 = 0.52/0.51; 1A/1R = 0.24/0.36; 1B = 0.15; 2 = 0.13; 3A/2R = 0.29/0.29; 3B/3R = 0.13/0.23; and 4 = 0.18. For the 2 cases of AMR, 6 of 18 pathologists correctly suspected AMR on the hematoxylin-eosin slides, whereas, in each of 17 of the 18 AMR-negative cases a small percentage of pathologists (range 5% to 33%) overinterpreted the findings as suggestive for AMR. Reproducibility studies of cardiac biopsies by pathologists in different centers at the international level were feasible using digitized slides rather than conventional histology glass slides. There was a small improvement in interobserver agreement between pathologists of different European centers when moving from the

  10. Facial tissue allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Siemionow, M Z; Demir, Y; Sari, A; Klimczak, A

    2005-01-01

    A hemifacial allograft transplant model was used to investigate the rationale for development of functional tolerance across an MHC barrier. Thirty hemiface transplantations were performed in five groups of six Lewis (RT1(1)) rat recipients each. Isografts were performed in group 1. Transplants were obtained from semiallogenic LBN(RT1(1+n)) in group 2 and from fully allogenic ACI(RT1(a)) in group 3 donors, which served as allograft rejection controls. Group 4 grafts using LBN donors and group 5 using ACI donors in addition received CsA monotherapy (16 mg/kg/d for 1 week) and maintained at 2 mg/kg/d. Signs of graft rejection were sought daily. Isograft controls survived indefinitely. All nontreated allografts were rejected within 5 to 8 days posttransplant. Eighty-three percent of face-transplant recipients from LBN donors and 67% from ACI donors did not show any signs of rejection up to 270 days and 200 days, respectively. Flow cytometry at day 63 in LBN recipients showed the presence of donor-specific chimerism for MHC class I RT1(n) antigens, namely 3.39% CD4/RT1(n); 1.01% CD8/RT1(n) T-lymphocytes; and 3.54% CD45RA/RT1(n) B-lymphocytes. In ACI recipients the chimerism test revealed 10.55% CD4/RT1(a) and 4.59% of CD8/RT1(a) T-lymphocytes. MLR assay at day 160 posttransplant revealed suppressed responses against LBN donor antigens in group 4, but moderate reactivity to ACI donor antigens in group 5. Functional tolerance toward hemifacial allograft transplants induced across MHC barrier using a CsA monotherapy protocol was associated with the presence of donor-specific chimerism in T- and B-cell subpopulations.

  11. Chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Vadivel, Nidyanandh; Tullius, Stefan G; Chandraker, Anil

    2007-07-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) remains the Achilles heel of renal transplantation. In spite of the significant strides achieved in one-year renal allograft survival with newer immunosuppressant strategies, the fate of long-term renal allograft survival remains unchanged. The number of renal transplant recipients returning to dialysis has doubled in the past decade. This is especially important since these patients pose a significantly increased likelihood of dying while on the waiting list for retransplantation, due to increasing disparity between donor organ availability versus demand and longer waiting time secondary to heightened immunologic sensitization from their prior transplants. In this review we analyze the latest literature in detail and discuss the definition, natural history, pathophysiology, alloantigen dependent and independent factors that play a crucial role in CAN and the potential newer therapeutic targets on the horizon. This article highlights the importance of early identification and careful management of all the potential contributing factors with particular emphasis on prevention rather than cure of CAN as the core management strategy.

  12. Depression of Complement Regulatory Factors in Rat and Human Renal Grafts Is Associated with the Progress of Acute T-Cell Mediated Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Kazuaki; Kakuta, Yoichi; Miyagawa, Shuji; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Kato, Taigo; Abe, Toyofumi; Imamura, Ryoichi; Okumi, Masayoshi; Maeda, Akira; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Mizuno, Masashi; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of complement with the progression of acute T cell mediated rejection (ATCMR) is not well understood. We investigated the production of complement components and the expression of complement regulatory proteins (Cregs) in acute T-cell mediated rejection using rat and human renal allografts. Methods We prepared rat allograft and syngeneic graft models of renal transplantation. The expression of Complement components and Cregs was assessed in the rat grafts using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunofluorescent staining. We also administered anti-Crry and anti-CD59 antibodies to the rat allograft model. Further, we assessed the relationship between the expression of membrane cofactor protein (MCP) by immunohistochemical staining in human renal grafts and their clinical course. Results qRT-PCR results showed that the expression of Cregs, CD59 and rodent-specific complement regulator complement receptor 1-related gene/protein-y (Crry), was diminished in the rat allograft model especially on day 5 after transplantation in comparison with the syngeneic model. In contrast, the expression of complement components and receptors: C3, C3a receptor, C5a receptor, Factor B, C9, C1q, was increased, but not the expression of C4 and C5, indicating a possible activation of the alternative pathway. When anti-Crry and anti-CD59 mAbs were administered to the allograft, the survival period for each group was shortened. In the human ATCMR cases, the group with higher MCP expression in the grafts showed improved serum creatinine levels after the ATCMR treatment as well as a better 5-year graft survival rate. Conclusions We conclude that the expression of Cregs in allografts is connected with ATCMR. Our results suggest that controlling complement activation in renal grafts can be a new strategy for the treatment of ATCMR. PMID:26928779

  13. Bacterial contamination of allografts.

    PubMed

    Barrios, R H; Leyes, M; Amillo, S; Oteiza, C

    1994-01-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogenic bone transplantation is one of the major problems facing tissue banks. The purpose of this study is to report the contamination rate in 987 grafts obtained under strictly aseptic conditions, between 1989 and 1992. The grafts were stored at -80 degrees C (cortical bone and tendons) and -40 degrees C (cancellous bone). The overall contamination rate was 6.6%, with Gram-positive bacteria responsible for 80% of the positive cultures. We discuss the sources of contamination, the most frequently isolated bacteria and the steps in the donation and transplantation procedures that help to reduce the risk of contamination. We conclude that the methods of acquisition, processing and storage of tissues are effective in making sterile allografts available.

  14. Bacterial contamination of allografts.

    PubMed

    Barrios, R H; Leyes, M; Amillo, S; Oteiza, C

    1994-01-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogeneic bone transplantation is one of the problems facing tissue banks. The purpose of this study is to report the contamination rate in 987 grafts obtained under strictly aseptic conditions, between 1989 and 1992. The grafts were stored at -80 degrees C (cortical bone and tendons) and -40 degrees C (cancellous bone). The overall contamination rate was 6.6%, with Gram-positive bacteria responsible for 80% of the positive cultures. We discuss the sources of contamination, the most frequently isolated bacteria and the steps in the donation and transplantation procedures that help to reduce the risk of contamination. We conclude that the methods of procurement, processing and storage of tissues are effective in making sterile allografts available.

  15. Knockdown of toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways ameliorate bone graft rejection in a mouse model of allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Shen, Po-Chuan; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wang, Chrong-Reen; Chong, Hao-Earn; Chuang, Shu-Han; Peng, Jia-Shiou; Chen, Shih-Yao

    2017-01-01

    Non-union occurring in structural bone grafting is a major problem in allograft transplantation because of impaired interaction between the host and graft tissue. Activated toll-like receptor (TLR) induces inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and triggers cell-mediated immune responses. The TLR-mediated signal pathway is important for mediating allograft rejection. We evaluated the effects of local knockdown of the TLR4 signaling pathway in a mouse segmental femoral graft model. Allografts were coated with freeze-dried lentiviral vectors that encoded TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), which were individually transplanted into the mice. They were assessed morphologically, radiographically, and histologically for tissue remodeling. Union occurred in autografted but not in allografted mice at the graft and host junctions after 4 weeks. TLR4 and MyD88 expression was up-regulated in allografted mice. TLR4 and MyD88 shRNAs inhibited TLR4 and MyD88 expression, which led to better union in the grafted sites. More regulatory T-cells in the draining lymph nodes suggested inflammation suppression. Local inhibition of TLR4 and MyD88 might reduce immune responses and ameliorate allograft rejection. PMID:28393847

  16. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  17. VZV T cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Adriana; Levin, Myron J

    2010-01-01

    Primary varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection (varicella) induces VZV-specific antibody and VZV-specific T cell-mediated immunity. T cell-mediated immunity, which is detected within 1-2 weeks after appearance of rash, and consists of both CD4 and CD8 effector and memory T cells, is essential for recovery from varicella. Administration of a varicella vaccine also generates VZV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. The memory cell responses that develop during varicella or after vaccination contribute to protection following re-exposure to VZV. These responses are subsequently boosted either by endogenous re-exposure (silent reactivation of latent virus) or exogenous re-exposure (environmental). VZV-specific T cell-mediated immunity is also necessary to maintain latent VZV in a subclinical state in sensory ganglia. When these responses decline, as occurs with aging or iatrogenic immune suppression, reactivation of VZV leads to herpes zoster. Similarly, the magnitude of these responses early after the onset of herpes zoster correlates with the extent of zoster-associated pain. These essential immune responses are boosted by the VZV vaccine developed to prevent herpes zoster.

  18. [The immunologic function and role of allograft inflammatory factor-1].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Aihiro; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 is the protein that expressed in the macrophages around the coronary arteries in rat ectopic cardiac allograft model. AIF-1 is produced mainly by macrophages and regulated by interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). There are various splicing valiants in AIF-1, and the functions are different. AIF-1 has Ca-binding EF-hand motif that induces cell proliferation and migration by structural features. Besides cell proliferation and migration, AIF-1 contributes to secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines such as IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), insulin resistance by downregulation of GLUT4 or IRS-1, and fibrosis process by upregulation of collagen production. It has been elucidated that AIF-1 is responsible for the onset of various diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic sclerosis, atherosclerotic disease, diabetes mellitus. AIF-1 may have the therapeutic potential for chronic inflammatory diseases by elucidation of the mechanism.

  19. Adenohypophysitis in rat pituitary allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rotondo, Fabio; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Asa, Sylvia L; Lombardero, Matilde; Berczi, Istvan; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2010-01-01

    The histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations in 81 pituitary allografts from Lewis rats transplanted beneath the renal capsule of Wistar rats were investigated. Intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts were also examined. Recipient rats were sacrificed at various time points after transplantation. Two days after transplantation, the central portion of the allografts demonstrated ischaemic necrosis. A week later, massive mononuclear cell infiltrates consisting primarily of lymphocytes and to a lesser extent, macrophages, plasma cells and granulocytes became prominent. At about three to four weeks after transplantation, the mononuclear cell infiltrate diminished; the surviving adenohypophysial cells, mainly prolactin (PRL) cells, increased in number and necrosis was replaced by connective tissue. No histological changes were noted in the intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the surviving adenohypophysial cells were mainly PRL-producing cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenohypophysial cell destruction, a spectrum of inflammatory cells and, in late phase, accumulation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. PRL cells were the prominent cell types; they increased in number. It appears that pituitary allografts are ‘foreign’ and evoke an immune response, suggesting that they may be used as an experimental animal model for morphological investigation of the development and progression of adenohypophysitis, a rare disease occurring mainly in young women often associated with pregnancy. PMID:20586813

  20. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  1. Bidirectional ventricular tachycardia due to coronary allograft vasculopathy a unique presentation.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Clyne, Christopher A

    2012-10-01

    Bidirectional ventricular tachycardia (BVT) is an uncommon type of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PVT) with alternating polarity of the QRS complex most commonly described digitalis toxicity. Recent data has demonstrated the possible molecular basis of this electrocardiographic phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of BVT in a patient with orthotopic cardiac transplantation and coronary allograft vasculopathy.

  2. The nature and mechanisms of DN regulatory T-cell mediated suppression.

    PubMed

    Young, Kevin J; Zhang, Li

    2002-10-01

    Regulatory T cells have been reported to enhance survival of transplanted allografts. We have recently identified and cloned a novel CD3(+)CD4(-)CD8(-) (double negative, DN) regulatory T cell from mice that were given a single class I mismatched donor lymphocyte infusion and permanently accepted donor-specific skin allografts. When infused into naïve syngeneic mice, these DN T cells prolonged the survival of class I mismatched donor skin allografts. Here we further characterize the nature and mechanism of DN T-cell mediated suppression. This present study reveals that DN T cells are able to specifically eliminate activated syngeneic CD8(+) T cells that share the same T cell receptor (TCR) specificity as DN T cells in vitro. Similarly, we found that, along with an increase of recipient DN T cells in the peripheral blood, anti-donor CD8(+) T cells were also eliminated in vivo following a donor lymphocyte infusion. We further demonstrate that DN T regulatory cells do not mediate suppression by competition for growth factors or antigen presenting cells (APC) nor by modulation of APC, but require cell contact with the activated target CD8(+) T cells. This contact can be mediated either by the TCR on CD8(+) T cells that recognize constitutively expressed or acquired MHC molecules on DN T cells, or by the TCR on DN T cells that recognize constitutively expressed MHC molecules on CD8(+) T cells. Together, these data extend our previous findings, and expand the conditions in which DN T cells can potentially be used to specifically suppress allogeneic immune responses.

  3. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  4. Calcium oxalate deposition in renal allografts: morphologic spectrum and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Yakupoglu, Ulkem; Feig, Daniel; Hicks, John; Cartwight, Joiner; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Suki, Wadi N

    2004-08-01

    Many aspects of calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition in renal transplant biopsies are not known. Review of all renal transplant biopsies performed in a 7-year period showed that CaOx deposition could be classified into three groups. Group I: Seven biopsies within a month post-transplant displayed rare CaOx foci against a background of acute tubular necrosis or acute cell-mediated rejection. At follow-up, five grafts functioned well and two failed due to chronic allograft nephropathy. CaOx in this context was an incidental finding secondary to a sudden excretion of an end-stage renal disease-induced increased body burden of CaOx. Group II: Two biopsies performed 2 and 10 months post-transplant showed rare CaOx foci against a background of chronic allograft nephropathy, leading to graft loss. CaOx in this context reflected nonspecific parenchymal deposition due to chronic renal failure regardless of causes. Group III: One biopsy with recurrent PH1 characterized by marked CaOx deposition associated with severe tubulointerstitial injury and graft loss 6 months post-transplant. There were two previously reported cases in which CaOx deposition in the renal allografts was due the antihypertensive drug naftidrofuryl oxalate or increased intestinal absorption of CaOx. CaOx deposition in renal allografts can be classified in different categories with distinctive morphologic features and clinical implications.

  5. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  6. Prevention of allograft tolerance by bacterial infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Luqiu; Ahmed, Emily; Ma, Lianli; Yin, Dengping; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Jikun; Xu, Honglin; Wang$, Chyung-Ru; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to certain viruses and parasites has been shown to prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance in mice, via generation of cross-reactive memory T cell responses or induction of bystander activation. Bacterial infections are common in the peri-operative period of solid organ allograft recipients in the clinic, and correlations between bacterial infections and acute allograft rejection have been reported. However, whether bacterial infections at the time of transplantation have any effect on the generation of transplantation tolerance remains to be established. We used the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as a model pathogen, as its effects on immune responses are well described. Peri-operative LM infection prevented cardiac and skin allograft acceptance induced by anti-CD154 and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in mice. LM-mediated rejection was not due to the generation of cross-reactive T cells and was largely independent of signaling via MyD88, an adaptor for most toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-1 and IL-18. Instead, transplant rejection following LM infection was dependent on the expression of the phagosome-lysing pore-former listeriolysin O (LLO) and on IFNα/βR signaling. Our results indicate that bacterial exposure at the time of transplantation can antagonize tolerogenic regimens by enhancing alloantigen-specific immune responses, independent from the generation of cross-reactive memory T cells. PMID:18424719

  7. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  8. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  9. ABO-compatible Liver Allograft Antibody-mediated Rejection: an update

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, Anthony J.; Zeevi, Adriana; O’Leary, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) studies have lagged behind parallel efforts in kidney and heart because of a comparative inherent hepatic resistance to AMR. Three developments, however, have increased interest: 1) solid phase antibody testing enabled more precise antibody characterization; 2) increased expectations for long-term, morbidity-free survival; and 3) immunosuppression minimization trials. Recent Findings Two overlapping liver allograft AMR phenotypic expressions are beginning to emerge: acute and chronic AMR. Acute AMR usually occurs within the several weeks after transplantation and characterized clinically by DSA persistence, allograft dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Acute AMR appears histopathologically similar to acute AMR in other organs: diffuse microvascular endothelial cell hypertrophy, C4d deposits, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and macrophage-mediated microvasculitis/capillaritis, along with liver-specific ductular reaction, centrilobular hepatocyte swelling and hepatocanalicular cholestasis often combined with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Chronic AMR is less well-defined, but strongly linked to serum class II DSA and associated with late-onset acute TCMR, fibrosis, chronic rejection and decreased survival. Unlike acute AMR, chronic AMR is a slowly evolving insult with a number of potential manifestations, but most commonly appears as low-grade lymphoplasmacytic portal and perivenular inflammation accompanied by unusual fibrosis patterns and variable microvascular C4d deposition; capillaritis is more difficult to identify than in acute AMR. Summary More precise DSA characterization, increasing expectations for long-term survival, and immunosuppression weaning precipitated a re-emergence of liver allograft AMR interest. Pathophysiological similarities exist between heart, kidney, and liver allografts, but liver-specific considerations may prove critical to our ultimate understanding of all

  10. Primary vascularization of allografts governs their immunogenicity and susceptibility to tolerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Cavit D.; Akiyama, Yoshinobu; Tanaka, Katsunori; Shea, Susan; Connolly, Sarah E; Germana, Sharon; Winn, Henry J.; LeGuern, Christian; Tocco, Georges; Benichou, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of allograft primary vascularization on alloimmunity, rejection and tolerance in mice. First, we showed that fully allogeneic primarily vascularized and conventional skin transplants were rejected at the same pace. Remarkably, however, short-term treatment of mice with anti-CD40L antibodies achieved long-term survival of vascularized skin and cardiac transplants but not conventional skin grafts. Non-vascularized skin transplants triggered vigorous direct and indirect pro-inflammatory type 1 T cell responses (IL-2 and γIFN) while primarily-vascularized skin allografts failed to trigger a significant indirect alloresponse. Similar lack of indirect alloreactivity was also observed after placement of different vascularized organ transplants including hearts and kidneys while hearts placed under the skin (non-vascularized) triggers potent indirect alloresponses. Altogether, these results suggest that primary vascularization of allografts is associated with lack of indirect T cell alloreactivity. Finally, we show that long-term survival of vascularized skin allografts induced by anti-CD40L antibodies was associated with a combined lack of indirect alloresponse and a shift of the direct alloresponse towards a type 2 cytokine (IL-4, IL-10) secretion pattern but no activation/expansion of regulatory T cells. Therefore, primary vascularization of allografts governs their immunogenicity and tolerogenicity. PMID:23833234

  11. Donor Predictors of Allograft Utilization and Recipient Outcomes after Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Khush, Kiran K.; Menza, Rebecca; Nguyen, John; Zaroff, Jonathan G.; Goldstein, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite a national organ donor shortage and a growing population of patients with end-stage heart disease, the acceptance rate of donor hearts for transplantation is low. We sought to identify donor predictors of allograft non-utilization, and to determine whether these predictors are in fact associated with adverse recipient post-transplant outcomes. Methods and Results We studied a cohort of 1,872 potential organ donors managed by the California Transplant Donor Network from 2001–2008. Forty five percent of available allografts were accepted for heart transplantation. Donor predictors of allograft non-utilization included age>50 years, female sex, death due to cerebrovascular accident, hypertension, diabetes, a positive troponin assay, left ventricular dysfunction and regional wall motion abnormalities, and left ventricular hypertrophy. For hearts that were transplanted, only donor cause of death was associated with prolonged recipient hospitalization post-transplant, and only donor diabetes was predictive of increased recipient mortality. Conclusions While there are many donor predictors of allograft discard in the current era, these characteristics appear to have little effect on recipient outcomes when the hearts are transplanted. Our results suggest that more liberal use of cardiac allografts with relative contraindications may be warranted. PMID:23392789

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of allograft rejection in heart-lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Reitz, B A; Gaudiani, V A; Hunt, S A; Wallwork, J; Billingham, M E; Oyer, P E; Baumgartner, W A; Jamieson, S W; Stinson, E B; Shumway, N E

    1983-03-01

    Six patients received heart-lung transplants between March, 1981, and January, 1982. There were four women and two men between 26 and 45 years of age, three with primary pulmonary hypertension and three with congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension (Eisenmenger's syndrome). Immunosuppression was primarily with cyclosporin-A, with additional corticosteroid, azathioprine, and rabbit antihuman thymocyte globulin. Six episodes of allograft rejection in four patients (10, 11, 21, 24, 53, and 86 days after transplantation) were detected by means of transvenous endomyocardial biopsy. All patients experienced pulmonary edema early after transplantation (reimplantation response), and two patients required mechanical ventilatory support for allograft rejection at 10 and 11 days. Treatment of rejection consisted of intravenous methylprednisolone (four episodes) or augmented oral prednisone (two episodes), with resolution. No episode thought to be pulmonary rejection has occurred in the absence of cardiac findings. Four patients are alive from 6 to 15 months after transplantation and are functionally normal. Early experience with heart-lung transplantation suggests (1) that allograft rejection can be detected by cardiac findings and successfully treated by augmented corticosteroids, (2) that lung rejection does not occur in the absence of cardiac findings, (3) that the frequency and severity of rejection episodes are not greater than with standard cardiac transplantation, and (4) that the frequency of rejection episodes is highest within the first 60 days after transplantation.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: allograft versus autograft.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Egami, Darren K; Shaieb, Mark D; Kan, Darryl M; Richardson, Allen B

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the minimal 2-year outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allografts versus autografts, both augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Retrospective review. Forty-six of 52 BPTB ACL reconstructions using allografts and 33 of 37 BPTB ACL reconstructions using autografts were followed up at a mean of 2.75 and 3.36 years, respectively. All patients had an iliotibial band tenodesis. Evaluations included the Lysholm II scale, a questionnaire, physical examination findings, and KT-1000 arthrometry. No statistically significant differences were seen between groups in Lysholm II scores or in any subjective category. Most patients (91% allograft; 97% autograft) had good to excellent Lysholm II scores. Sixty-five percent of allograft patients and 73% of autograft patients returned to their preinjury activity level. More allograft patients complained of retropatellar pain (16% v 9% for autograft patients). Fifty-three percent of allograft patients versus 23% of autograft patients had a flexion deficit of 5 degrees or more when compared with the normal contralateral side. When comparing KT-1000 side-to-side differences, we found no significant differences between groups. Ninety-one percent of both groups had maximum side-to-side differences less than 5 mm. Three allograft patients (6.5%) had traumatic ruptures at 12, 19, and 43 months postoperatively versus none in the autograft group. All three allograft patients who sustained postoperative traumatic ruptures had received fresh frozen, nonirradiated allografts. Results of ACL reconstruction using allografts or autografts augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis were comparable. The BPTB autograft should remain the gold standard, although the BPTB allograft in ACL reconstruction is a reasonable alternative.

  14. Hyperlipidemia Promotes Anti-Donor Th17 Responses That Accelerate Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, J.; Bagley, J.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia occurs in 95% of organ transplant recipients, however its effect on organ allograft rejection has not been investigated. We found that induction of hyperlipidemia in mice caused a significant acceleration of rejection of cardiac allografts. Accelerated rejection was associated with an aggressive T cell infiltrate that mediated significant tissue damage as well as increased serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. Hyperlipidemic mice had an increased number of Th17 cells in their periphery and rejecting allografts from hyperlipidemic mice contained significant numbers of IL-17 producing T cells that were not detectable in transplants harvested from controls. Neutralization or genetic ablation of IL-17 prolonged survival of cardiac allografts transplanted into hyperlipidemic recipients, suggesting that IL-17 production promotes accelerated rejection. Analysis of alloreactive T cell frequencies directly ex vivo in naïve mice revealed that the frequency of donor reactive IL-17 producing cells in hyperlipidemic was increased prior to antigen exposure, suggesting that hyperlipidemia was sufficient to alter T cell alloreactivity and promote anti-donor Th17 responses on first exposure to antigen. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia alters rejection by altering the types of T cell subsets that respond to donor antigen by promoting Th17 biased anti-donor reactivity. PMID:26079335

  15. Resolution of cell-mediated airways diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    "Inflammation resolution" has of late become a topical research area. Activation of resolution phase mechanisms, involving select post-transcriptional regulons, transcription factors, 'autacoids', and cell phenotypes, is now considered to resolve inflammatory diseases. Critical to this discourse on resolution is the elimination of inflammatory cells through apoptosis and phagocytosis. For major inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD we propose an alternative path to apoptosis for cell elimination. We argue that transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes, followed by mucociliary clearance, efficiently and non-injuriously eliminates pro-inflammatory cells from diseased airway tissues. First, it seems clear that numerous infiltrated granulocytes and lymphocytes can be speedily transmitted into the airway lumen without harming the epithelial barrier. Then there are a wide range of 'unexpected' findings demonstrating that clinical improvement of asthma and COPD is not only associated with decreasing numbers of airway wall inflammatory cells but also with increasing numbers of these cells in the airway lumen. Finally, effects of inhibition of transepithelial migration support the present hypothesis. Airway inflammatory processes have thus been much aggravated when transepithelial exit of leukocytes has been inhibited. In conclusion, the present hypothesis highlights risks involved in drug-induced inhibition of transepithelial migration of airway wall leukocytes. It helps interpretation of common airway lumen data, and suggests approaches to treat cell-mediated airway inflammation. PMID:20540713

  16. Precision Subtypes of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Identified by Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Paul Ostrom; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, the treatment of choice for acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with pulse steroids or antibody protocols has variable outcomes. Some rejection episodes are resistant to an initial steroid pulse, but respond to subsequent antibody protocols. The biological mechanisms causing the different therapeutic responses are not currently understood. Histological examination of the renal allograft is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute rejection. The Banff Classification System was established to standardize the histopathological diagnosis and to direct therapy. Although widely used, it shows variability among pathologists and lacks criteria to guide precision individualized therapy. The analysis of the transcriptome in allograft biopsies, which we analyzed in this study, provides a strategy to develop molecular diagnoses that would have increased diagnostic precision and assist the development of individualized treatment. Our hypothesis is that the histological classification of TCMR contains multiple subtypes of rejection. Using R language algorithms to determine statistical significance, multidimensional scaling, and hierarchical, we analyzed differential gene expression based on microarray data from biopsies classified as TCMR. Next, we identified KEGG functions, protein–protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and predicted therapeutic targets using the integrated database ConsesnsusPathDB (CPDB). Based on our analysis, two distinct clusters of biopsies termed TCMR01 and TCMR02 were identified. Despite having the same Banff classification, we identified 1933 differentially expressed genes between the two clusters. These genes were further divided into three major groups: a core group contained within both the TCMR01 and TCMR02 subtypes, as well as genes unique to TCMR01 or TCMR02. The subtypes of TCMR utilized different biological pathways, different regulatory networks and were predicted to

  17. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  18. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  19. Vancomycin iontophoresis of allograft bone

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, M. C.; Day, R.; Wood, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The most concerning infection of allografts and operative procedures is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and no current iontophoresed antibiotics effectively combat this microbe. It was initially hypothesised that iontophoresis of vancomycin through bone would not be effective due to its large molecular size and lack of charge. The aim of this study was to determine whether this was a viable procedure and to find the optimum conditions for its use. Methods An iontophoresis cell was set up with varying concentrations of Vancomycin within the medulla of a section of sheep tibia, sealed from an external saline solution. The cell was run for varying times, Vancomycin concentrations and voltages, to gain information on optimisation of conditions for impregnating the graft. Each graft was then sectioned and dust ground from the exposed surface. The dust was serially washed to extract the Vancomycin and concentrations measured and plotted for all variables tested. Results Vancomycin was successfully delivered and impregnated to the graft using the iontophoresis technique. The first order fit to the whole data set gave a significant result (p = 0.0233), with a significant concentration (p = 0.02774) component. The time component was the next most significant (p = 0.0597), but did not exceed the 95% confidence level. Conclusions Iontophoresis is an effective method for delivering Vancomycin to allograft bone. The concentrations of the vancomycin solution affected the bone concentration, but results were highly variable. Further study should be done on the effectiveness of delivering different antibiotics using this method. PMID:24729101

  20. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  1. Treatment with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone preserves calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Gualtiero; Sordi, Andrea; Lonati, Caterina; Carlin, Andrea; Turcatti, Flavia; Leonardi, Patrizia; Gatti, Stefano; Catania, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Prevention of graft dysfunction is a major objective in transplantation medicine. Previous research on experimental heart transplantation indicated that treatment with the immunomodulatory peptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) improves histopathology, prolongs allograft survival, and reduces expression of the main tissue injury mediators. Because calcium-handling is critical in heart graft function, we determined the effects of transplantation injury and influences of alpha-MSH treatment on representative calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts. Hearts from Brown Norway rats were transplanted heterotopically into MHC incompatible Lewis rats. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C epsilon (PKC epsilon), sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2 (SERCA2a), arrestin-beta1 (Arrb1), cholinergic receptor M2 (Chrm2), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (InsP(3)R1) were examined in: (1) non-transplanted donor hearts; (2) allografts from saline-treated rats; and (3) allografts from rats treated with the synthetic alpha-MSH analog Nle4-DPhe7-alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) (100 microg i.p. every 12h). Transplantation injury was associated with severe reduction in calcium regulatory protein transcription and expression level. NDP-alpha-MSH administration partly reversed inhibition of protein transcription and almost completely prevented protein loss. Finally, because certain effects of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling on calcium handling in cardiac myocytes depend on activation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), we determined Epac1 mRNA and protein expression in heart allografts. Transplantation injury markedly reduced Epac1. NDP-alpha-MSH treatment significantly preserved both Epac1 protein and mRNA in the allografts. Administration of alpha-MSH or related melanocortins could reduce transplantation-induced dysfunction through protection of heart calcium

  2. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. METHODS Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. RESULTS The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. CONCLUSION There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission. PMID:25631893

  3. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving.

    PubMed

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-10-01

    The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission.

  4. [Hand allograft transplantation: what are the implications?].

    PubMed

    Masquelet, Alain Charles

    2013-12-01

    The first hand allograft transplantation was performed in 1998 by a French surgeons team and has opened the era of functional allotransfers. In France, the authorized preliminary study included five patients who sustained traumatic amputation of both hands. All patients had bilateral hand allograft transplantation. Long-term results (follow-up ranging from 3 to 12 years) undoubtedly show a useful daily function, a good psychological acceptance and a physiological integration. Despite several obstacles as the need of immunosuppressive therapy for life, hand allograft transplantation is worthy of interest in some outstanding situations.

  5. Murine islet allograft tolerance upon blockade of the B-lymphocyte stimulator, BLyS/BAFF.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Ronald F; Yu, Ming; Vivek, Kumar; Zekavat, Ghazal; Rostami, Susan Y; Ziaie, Amin S; Luo, Yanping; Koeberlein, Brigitte; Redfield, Robert R; Ward, Christopher D; Migone, Thi-Sau; Cancro, Michael P; Naji, Ali; Noorchashm, Hooman

    2012-04-15

    Immunologic rejection is a major barrier to successful long-term outcomes in clinical transplantation. The importance of B lymphocytes-and their secretory products, alloantibodies-in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection is accepted. Furthermore, it is now clear that the dominant regulator of peripheral B-cell homeostasis and tolerance is the B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), also referred to as the B-cell activating factor (BAFF). Recently, a novel class of clinical immunotherapeutic agents specific for BLyS, and its family of cytokines, has emerged for the treatment of B-cell-mediated diseases. In this study, we demonstrate the potential utility of BLyS-directed immunotherapy in preventing allograft rejection using a murine islet transplantation model. A transient period of mature peripheral B-cell depletion was induced by means of in vivo BLyS neutralization using a murine analog of the monoclonal antibody, Benlysta. Subsequently, fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched islets were transplanted into naïve diabetic mice followed by a short course of rapamycin. After BLyS neutralization, indefinite islet allograft survival was achieved. Induction therapy with rapamycin was necessary, but not sufficient, for the achievement of this long-term graft survival. The tolerant state was associated with (1) abrogation of the donor-specific antibody response, (2) transient preponderance of immature/transitional B cells in all lymphoid organs, (3) impaired CD4 T-cell activation during the period of B-cell depletion, and (4) presence of a "regulatory" cytokine milieu. In vivo BLyS neutralization effectively induces humoral tolerance and promotes long-term islet allograft survival in mice. Therefore, B-lymphocyte-directed immunotherapy targeting the homeostatic regulator, BLyS, may be effective in promoting transplantation tolerance.

  6. Differential expression of microRNAs during allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Wang, M; Qu, X; Mah, A; Xiong, X; Harris, A G C; Phillips, L K; Martinez, O M; Krams, S M

    2012-05-01

    MicrorRNA are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate the posttranscriptional expression of target genes. In addition to being involved in many biologic processes, microRNAs are important regulators in innate and adaptive immune responses. Distinct sets of expressed microRNAs are found in different cell types and tissues and aberrant expression of microRNAs is associated with many disease states. MicroRNA expression was examined in a model of heterotopic heart transplantation by microarray analyses and a unique profile was detected in rejecting allogeneic transplants (BALB/c → C57BL/6) as compared to syngeneic transplants (C57BL/6 → C57BL/6). The microRNA miR-182 was significantly increased in rejecting cardiac allografts and in mononuclear cells that infiltrate the grafts. Forkhead box (FOX) proteins are a family of important transcription factors and FOXO1 is a target of miR-182. As miR-182 increases after transplant, there is a concomitant posttranscriptional decrease in FOXO1 expression in heart allografts that is localized to both the cardiomyocytes and CD3(+) T cells. The microRNA miR-182 is significantly increased in both peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma during graft rejection suggesting potential as a biomarker of graft status. Our results identify microRNAs that may regulate alloimmune responses and graft outcomes.

  7. High Fat Diet-induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Kevin; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared to allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. Methods We used a mouse model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Results Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low fat diet (LFD), correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Conclusions Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome. PMID:27007226

  8. The composition of the microbiota modulates allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Stefka, Andrew T.; Molinero, Luciana L.; Theriault, Betty; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Sivan, Ayelet S.; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Gajewski, Thomas F.; Chong, Anita S.; Bartman, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is the only cure for end-stage organ failure, but without immunosuppression, T cells rapidly reject allografts. While genetic disparities between donor and recipient are major determinants of the kinetics of transplant rejection, little is known about the contribution of environmental factors. Because colonized organs have worse transplant outcome than sterile organs, we tested the influence of host and donor microbiota on skin transplant rejection. Compared with untreated conventional mice, pretreatment of donors and recipients with broad-spectrum antibiotics (Abx) or use of germ-free (GF) donors and recipients resulted in prolonged survival of minor antigen–mismatched skin grafts. Increased graft survival correlated with reduced type I IFN signaling in antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and decreased priming of alloreactive T cells. Colonization of GF mice with fecal material from untreated conventional mice, but not from Abx-pretreated mice, enhanced the ability of APCs to prime alloreactive T cells and accelerated graft rejection, suggesting that alloimmunity is modulated by the composition of microbiota rather than the quantity of bacteria. Abx pretreatment of conventional mice also delayed rejection of major antigen–mismatched skin and MHC class II–mismatched cardiac allografts. This study demonstrates that Abx pretreatment prolongs graft survival, suggesting that targeting microbial constituents is a potential therapeutic strategy for enhancing graft acceptance. PMID:27322054

  9. High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity Enhances Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Molinero, Luciana L; Yin, Dengping; Lei, Yuk Man; Chen, Luqiu; Wang, Ying; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-05-01

    Obesity promotes a state of low-grade inflammation that exacerbates chronic inflammatory diseases, such as asthma and inflammatory bowel disease. In transplantation, the survival of organs transplanted into obese patients is reduced compared with allografts in lean recipients. However, whether this is due to increased alloimmunity remains to be addressed conclusively. We used a mouse model of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and assessed immune responses to allogeneic stimulation in vitro, allogeneic splenocyte immunization in vivo, and allogeneic heart transplantation. Our results indicate that HFD altered the composition and phenotype of splenic antigen-presenting cells that led to their enhanced capacity to stimulate T cells. Immunization with allogeneic splenocytes in vivo resulted in increased alloreactivity, as determined by IFNγ production. Moreover, cardiac allograft rejection in HFD mice was modestly accelerated compared to aged-matched control animals fed a low-fat diet, correlating with enhanced alloreactive T cell function. Our results highlight the increased alloresponse triggered by HFD-induced obesity and its negative impact on transplant outcome.

  10. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  11. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts.

  12. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  13. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stegall, Mark D.; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:26284070

  14. Autograft versus Allograft for Cervical Spinal Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objective To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), non-ICBG autologous bone, and allograft in cervical spine fusion. To avoid problems at the donor site, various allograft materials have been used as a substitute for autograft. However, there are still questions as to the comparative effectiveness and safety of cadaver allograft compared with autologous ICBG. Methods A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases was conducted to identify studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with cervical degenerative disk disease using ICBG compared with non-ICBG autograft or allograft or non-ICBG autograft compared with allograft in the cervical spine. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. Results The search identified 13 comparative studies that met our inclusion criteria: 2 prospective cohort studies and 11 retrospective cohort studies. Twelve cohort studies compared allograft with ICBG autograft during anterior cervical fusion and demonstrated with a low evidence level of support that there are no differences in fusion percentages, pain scores, or functional results. There was insufficient evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with non-ICBG autograft for fusion, pain, revision, and functional and safety outcomes. No publications directly comparing non-ICBG autograft with ICBG were found. Conclusion Although the available literature suggests ICBG and allograft may have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes following anterior cervical fusion, there are too many limitations in the available literature to draw any significant conclusions. No individual study provided greater than class III evidence, and when evaluating the overall body of literature, no conclusion had better than low evidence support. A prospective

  15. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  16. Allograft inflammatory factor-1 in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Hidetake; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Seno, Takahiro; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Kida, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Amane; Kukida, Yuji; Fujioka, Kazuki; Fujii, Wataru; Murakami, Ken; Kohno, Masataka; Kawahito, Yutaka

    2016-02-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a protein expressed by macrophages infiltrating the area around the coronary arteries of rats with an ectopic cardiac allograft. Some studies have shown that expression of AIF-1 increased in a mouse model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced acute colitis and in acute cellular rejection of human cardiac allografts. These results suggest that AIF-1 is related to acute inflammation. The current study used bleomycin-induced acute lung injury to analyze the expression of AIF-1 and to examine its function in acute lung injury. Results showed that AIF-1 was significantly expressed in lung macrophages and increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice with bleomycin-induced acute lung injury in comparison to control mice. Recombinant AIF-1 increased the production of IL-6 and TNF-α from RAW264.7 (a mouse macrophage cell line) and primary lung fibroblasts, and it also increased the production of KC (CXCL1) from lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AIF-1 plays an important role in the mechanism underlying acute lung injury.

  17. Signaling factors in stem cell-mediated repair of infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Vandervelde, S; van Luyn, M J A; Tio, R A; Harmsen, M C

    2005-08-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to scar formation and subsequent reduced cardiac performance. The ultimate therapy after myocardial infarction would pursue stem cell-based regeneration. The aim of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair embodies restoration of cardiac function by regeneration of healthy myocardial tissue, which is accomplished by neo-angiogenesis and cardiogenesis. A major reservoir of adult autologous stem cells distal from the heart is the bone marrow. Adequate regulation of signaling between the bone marrow, the peripheral circulation and the infarcted myocardium is important in orchestrating the process of mobilization, homing, incorporation, survival, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells, that leads to myocardial regeneration. In this review, we discuss key signaling factors, including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which are involved in orchestrating the stem cell driven repair process. We focus on signaling factors known for their mobilizing and chemotactic abilities (SDF-1, G-CSF, SCF, IL-8, VEGF), signaling factors that are expressed after myocardial infarction involved in the patho-physiological healing process (TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-10, HIF-1alpha, VEGF, G-CSF) and signaling factors that are involved in cardiogenesis and neo-angiogenesis (VEGF, EPO, TGF-beta, HGF, HIF-1alpha, IL-8). The future therapeutic application and capacity of secreted factors to modulate tissue repair after myocardial infarction relies on the intrinsic potency of factors and on the optimal localization and timing of a combination of signaling factors to stimulate stem cells in their niche to regenerate the infarcted heart.

  18. Nitrogen-13-ammonia and PET to detect allograft coronary artery disease after heart transplantation: comparison with coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X M; Delbeke, D; Sandler, M P; Yeoh, T K; Votaw, J R; Frist, W H

    1995-06-01

    The diffuse nature of allograft coronary artery disease (CAD) suggests that global myocardial blood flow (MBF) may decrease with time after transplantation; therefore the diagnosis of this disease remains problematic. To investigate whether PET detects a fall in allograft MBF over time, PET scans (108) were obtained from 43 heart transplant recipients. Thirty-five patients underwent two serial PET scans 1 yr apart. MBF was measured by PET using 13N-ammonia as a tracer. Coronary angiography was performed parallel with PET imaging and compared with perfusion rates measured by PET scans. MBF measured by PET decreased sequentially with time. The mean MBF was 73 +/- 21, 56 +/- 13, 51 +/- 11 and 51 +/- 27 ml/min/100 g of tissue in patients surviving 3 mo, 1, 2 and 3 yr after transplantation, respectively. Significant MBF decrease occurred within 1 yr after transplantation. Sequential PET studies showed a decrease in MBF in 22 of 35 patients (63%). Mean MBF for the first and second scans was 65 +/- 18 and 54 +/- 16, respectively. MBF decrease was more profound in patients (n = 11) angiographic evidence of CAD. There was a trend towards increased rejection and CMV infection rates in patients with decreased MBF. With time, PET detects a decrease in MBF in cardiac allografts. The frequency of MBF decrease detected by PET is concordant with the true incidence of allograft CAD, suggesting that sequential PET is a more sensitive modality for monitoring allograft CAD than angiography.

  19. Magnetic Resonance for Noninvasive Detection of Microcirculatory Disease Associated With Allograft Vasculopathy: Intracoronary Measurement Validation.

    PubMed

    Mirelis, Jesús G; García-Pavía, Pablo; Cavero, Miguel A; González-López, Esther; Echavarria-Pinto, Mauro; Pastrana, Miguel; Segovia, Javier; Oteo, Juan F; Alonso-Pulpón, Luis; Escaned, Javier

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy affects both epicardial and microcirculatory coronary compartments. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging has been proposed as a useful tool to assess microcirculation mostly outside the heart transplantation setting. Instantaneous hyperemic diastolic flow velocity-pressure slope, an intracoronary physiology index, has demonstrated a better correlation with microcirculatory remodelling in cardiac allograft vasculopathy than other indices such as coronary flow velocity reserve. To investigate the potential of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging to detect the presence of microcirculatory remodeling in cardiac allograft vasculopathy, we compared magnetic resonance perfusion data with invasive intracoronary physiological indices to study microcirculation in a population of heart transplantation recipients with macrovascular nonobstructive disease demonstrated with intravascular ultrasound. We studied 8 heart transplantation recipients (mean age, 61 [12] years, 100% male) with epicardial allograft vasculopathy defined by intravascular ultrasound, nonsignificant coronary stenoses and negative visually-assessed wall-motion/perfusion dobutamine stress magnetic resonance. Quantitative stress and rest magnetic resonance perfusion data to build myocardial perfusion reserve index, noninvasively, and 4 invasive intracoronary physiological indices were determined. Postprocessed data showed a mean (standard deviation) myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.22 (0.27), while fractional flow reserve, coronary flow velocity reserve, hyperemic microvascular resistance and instantaneous hyperemic diastolic flow velocity-pressure slope were 0.98 (0.02), cm/s/mmHg, 2.34 (0.55) cm/s/mmHg, 2.00 (0.69) cm/s/mmHg and 0.91 (0.65) cm/s/mmHg, respectively. The myocardial perfusion reserve index correlated strongly only with the instantaneous hyperemic diastolic flow velocity-pressure slope (r=0.75; P=.033). Myocardial perfusion reserve index derived from a

  20. The natural history of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Nankivell, Brian J; Borrows, Richard J; Fung, Caroline L-S; O'Connell, Philip J; Allen, Richard D M; Chapman, Jeremy R

    2003-12-11

    With improved immunosuppression and early allograft survival, chronic allograft nephropathy has become the dominant cause of kidney-transplant failure. We evaluated the natural history of chronic allograft nephropathy in a prospective study of 120 recipients with type 1 diabetes, all but 1 of whom had received kidney-pancreas transplants. We obtained 961 kidney-transplant-biopsy specimens taken regularly from the time of transplantation to 10 years thereafter. Two distinctive phases of injury were evident as chronic allograft nephropathy evolved. An initial phase of early tubulointerstitial damage from ischemic injury (P<0.05), prior severe rejection (P<0.01), and subclinical rejection (P<0.01) predicted mild disease by one year, which was present in 94.2 percent of patients. Early subclinical rejection was common (affecting 45.7 percent of biopsy specimens at three months), and the risk was increased by the occurrence of a prior episode of severe rejection and reduced by tacrolimus and mycophenolate therapy (both P<0.05) and gradually abated after one year. Both subclinical rejection and chronic rejection were associated with increased tubulointerstitial damage (P<0.01). Beyond one year, a later phase of chronic allograft nephropathy was characterized by microvascular and glomerular injury. Chronic rejection (defined as persistent subclinical rejection for two years or longer) was uncommon (5.8 percent). Progressive high-grade arteriolar hyalinosis with luminal narrowing, increasing glomerulosclerosis, and additional tubulointerstitial damage was accompanied by the use of calcineurin inhibitors. Nephrotoxicity, implicated in late ongoing injury, was almost universal at 10 years, even in grafts with excellent early histologic findings. By 10 years, severe chronic allograft nephropathy was present in 58.4 percent of patients, with sclerosis in 37.3 percent of glomeruli. Tubulointerstitial and glomerular damage, once established, was irreversible, resulting in

  1. Scintigraphy of lower extremity cadaveric bone allografts in osteosarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sever, Z; Connolly, L P; Gebhardt, M C; Treves, S T

    1997-08-01

    To describe scintigraphic characteristics of bone allografts used in limb salvage reconstruction after resection of lower extremity osteosarcoma. The authors reviewed 85 skeletal scintigrams of 20 pediatric patients followed up for 0.5-5.7 years after resection of lower extremity osteosarcoma and allograft reconstruction. Uptake in the allograft and adjacent host tissues was assessed visually. Lack of tracer uptake in the allografts was seen in 99% of the studies and a faint rim of tracer localization outlining the allograft's periphery was seen in 95% of the studies. Increased uptake was noted at the allograft-host bone junction in 78% of the studies. Uptake was increased in the joint surfaces of native bones articulating with allografts (97% of studies), including the patella (93% of studies) when the knee was involved. These findings were stabilized as time passed. Cadaveric bone allografts have a characteristic scintigraphic appearance in this selected patient group that reflects the physiology of their incorporation process.

  2. REJECTION OF ASCITES TUMOR ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Berke, Gideon; Sullivan, Karen A.; Amos, Bernard

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells (PEC), obtained after the rejection of EL4 leukemia by BALB/c mice, are much more effective in the specific in vitro destruction of 51Cr-labeled EL4 cells than are spleen, thymus, lymph node, or peripheral blood lymphocytes. The presence of a large number of effector cells at the site of graft rejection is reflected in the potent cytolytic activity seen in vitro. Effector cells temporarily lose cytolytic reactivity when treated with trypsin but regain reactivity with time. This recovery occurs in normal as well as in immune serum. The destructive reactivity of PEC is increased when macrophages are removed. The remaining population of nonadherent PEC is composed primarily of small- to medium-sized lymphocytes. Complex tissue culture media are not needed, but there is a definite requirement for serum. The required serum component is heat stable, nondialyzable, and is not consumed during the reaction. The use of an ascites allograft system made these observations possible and permitted the isolation of those host cells intimately associated with rejection. PMID:5025438

  3. Allograft materials in phalloplasty: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Mark P; Komlo, Caroline; Defrain, Molly

    2013-09-01

    Allograft use has increased recently with the rising use of allograft materials in breast surgery. There are few data that compare the performance of the various allograft materials in this application, despite marketing efforts by the manufacturers to present one allograft material as superior to another. Phalloplasty is a procedure that uses allografts for penis girth augmentation. Preparation of these grafts differs with each manufacturer. We report our experience with 3 different types of allografts for this procedure. This allows for the comparison of these materials in their performance with a single model. Forty-seven patients who underwent penis girth enhancement with allograft material were reviewed. All patients underwent circumferential grafting to the shaft of the penis at the level of Buck's fascia. Graft materials included AlloDerm (n = 9), Belladerm (n = 20), and Repriza (n = 21). Charts were reviewed for material type, presence and type of infection, wound exposure, and graft loss with attention to the type of allograft material that was used. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 120 months with an average of 11.25 months. Infection, defined as an open wound with graft exposure, occurred in 20 (42%) of 47 patients. Of these, graft exposure only occurred in 17 (36%) patients, whereas 3 (6%) patients sustained total graft loss. Graft exposure or loss occurred in 3 patients who had AlloDerm, 9 patients with Belladerm, and 8 patients with Repriza. No patients with AlloDerm sustained graft loss, whereas 2 patients with Belladerm and 1 patient with Repriza sustained graft loss. There were no statistical differences among these graft types with regard to infection or graft loss. Three different brands of allograft material were used in 1 surgical procedure and followed up for their performance with regard to exposure and infection. In this model, there is no difference in the rate of infection in these materials despite their different methods of preparation

  4. Genetics and Epigenetics of Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Samadi, Nasser; Mostafidi, Elmira; Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Chronic allograft dysfunction is the most common cause of allograft lost. Chronic allograft dysfunction happens as a result of complex interactions at the molecular and cellular levels. Genetic and environmental factors both influence the evolution and progression of the chronic allograft dysfunction. Epigenetic modification could be considered as a therapeutically modifiable element to pause the fibrosis process through novel strategies. In this review, the PubMed database was searched for English-language articles on these new areas.

  5. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  6. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  7. Antimyosin monoclonal antibodies for early detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, A.; Fritsch, S.; Kemkes, B.M.; Kugler, C.; Angermann, C.; Spes, C.; Anthuber, M.; Weiler, A.; Wenke, K.; Gokel, J.M. )

    1990-11-01

    Sixty-eight indium 111-labeled antimyosin Fab-DTPA imaging studies (0.5 mg intravenously with a radioactivity of 65 to 75 MBq) were executed on 37 of 116 patients undergoing heart transplantation to assess diagnostic accuracy and clinical utility. As controls, 21 patients with cardiomyopathy (n = 8), unstable angina (n = 9), and myocardial infarction (n = 4) were selected. After 48 hours, single photon emission computed tomographic images were evaluated visually, and heart/lung ratios were measured, using the region of interest technique. They were compared with echocardiographic and endomyocardial biopsy results. In 40 studies a heart/lung ratio less than or equal to 1.6 corresponded to a negative biopsy result in 98% (40/41). Echocardiography enabled correct identification of 95% of the patients with normal biopsy findings. In 91% (22/24) a positive biopsy finding correlated with a heart/lung ratio greater than 1.6 including 20 mild rejections, but in only 64%, with an increase in wall thickness and/or decrease of fractional diameter shortening seen on echocardiogram. In addition, the various stages of rejection episodes determined the amount of the heart-lung ratio. There was a significant relationship between the histologic findings and the antimyosin uptake. In 13 patients a second investigation was performed after rejection therapy. All patients had a negative biopsy result, and the heart/lung ratio decreased to normal ranges (less than or equal to 1.6). Five antimyosin antibody studies were excluded, as in these cases, negative uptake results were found during rejection therapy with high-dose steroids. The overall sensitivity was calculated at 93% and the specificity at 98%.

  8. Bortezomib for refractory antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Thorsgard, Marit; Maurer, David; Kim, Youngki; Alloway, Rita R; Woodle, E Steve

    2009-01-01

    This experience demonstrates that a bortezomib-based regimen provided effective therapy for late, refractory AMR in an adult heart transplant recipient and was well tolerated. This remarkably positive experience despite the refractory nature of the AMR episode argues strongly for continued evaluation of bortezomib use in this patient population.

  9. Renal allograft eosinophilia: An unusual presentation of sudden graft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yuvaraj, A.; Ghosh, S.; Abraham, G.; Koshy, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of sudden allograft dysfunction 11 months after renal transplantation which presented as severe peripheral and allograft eosinophilia and was managed as a case of an acute cellular rejection with significant interstitial graft eosinophilic infiltration. Patient had partial response to antirejection therapy and eventually ended up in a chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:28356665

  10. Active haemorrhage of a renal allograft detected on portable ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ricketts, James; Pang, Chun Lap; Dissanayake, Prageeth; Hutchinson, Rachel; Gutteridge, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Function of a renal allograft relies on the integrity of its vascular anatomy. Renal biochemistry, ultrasound and percutaneous biopsy are used in combination to determine allograft function. Biopsy is not without risk, and in this case study we demonstrate a rare but a potentially life-threatening complication of renal allograft biopsy. PMID:23682093

  11. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  12. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mimics the production of the human nerve allograft product used clinically. This includes detergent decellularization , treatment with...is  on  schedule.     The  early  Milestone  to  obtain  ACURO  approval  for   animal  use  was  accomplished...months  1-­‐6):       Task  1a.    Collect,  process  ( decellularize )  and  prepare  7  cm  acellular  allografts

  13. In situ expression of cytokines in human heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Van Hoffen, E; Van Wichen, D; Stuij, I; De Jonge, N; Klöpping, C; Lahpor, J; Van Den Tweel, J; Gmelig-Meyling, F; De Weger, R

    1996-12-01

    Although allograft rejection, the major complication of human organ transplantation, has been extensively studied, little is known about the exact cellular localization of the cytokine expression inside the graft during rejection. Therefore, we used in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to study local cytokine mRNA and protein expression in human heart allografts, in relation to the phenotypical characteristics of the cellular infiltrate. Clear expression of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-9, and IL-10 and weak expression for IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was detected in biopsies exhibiting high rejection grades (grade 3A/B). Also at lower grades of rejection, mRNA for IL-6 and IL-9 was present. Some mRNA for IL-1 beta, TNF-beta, and interferon (IFN)-gamma was detected in only a few biopsies. Using immunohistochemistry, IL-2, IL-3, and IL-10 protein was detected in biopsies with high rejection grades, whereas few cells expressed IL-6, IL-8, and IFN-gamma. In biopsies with lower grades of rejection, a weaker expression of these cytokines was observed. IL-4 was hardly detected in any of the biopsies. The level of IL-12 expression was equal in all biopsies. Although mRNA expression of several cytokines was expressed at a low level compared with the protein level of those cytokines, there was a good correlation between localization of cytokine mRNA and protein. Expression of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma was mainly detected in lymphocytes. IL-3, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-12 were not detected or not only detected in lymphocytes but also in other stromal elements (eg, macrophages). Macrophage production of IL-3 and IL-12 was confirmed by immunofluorescent double labeling with CD68. We conclude that cardiac allograft rejection is not simply regulated by T helper cell cytokine production, but other intragraft elements contribute considerably to this process.

  14. Use of lung allografts from brain-dead donors after cardiopulmonary arrest and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Castleberry, Anthony W; Worni, Mathias; Osho, Asishana A; Snyder, Laurie D; Palmer, Scott M; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Davis, R Duane; Hartwig, Matthew G

    2013-08-15

    Patients who progress to brain death after resuscitation from cardiac arrest have been hypothesized to represent an underused source of potential organ donors; however, there is a paucity of data regarding the viability of lung allografts after a period of cardiac arrest in the donor. To analyze postoperative complications and survival after lung transplant from brain-dead donors resuscitated after cardiac arrest. The United Network for Organ Sharing database records donors with cardiac arrest occurring after brain death. Adult recipients of lung allografts from these arrest/resuscitation donors between 2005 and 2011 were compared with nonarrest donors. Propensity score matching was used to reduce the effect of confounding. Postoperative complications and overall survival were assessed using McNemar's test for correlated binary proportions and Kaplan-Meier methods. A total of 479 lung transplant recipients from arrest/resuscitation donors were 1:1 propensity matched from a cohort of 9,076 control subjects. Baseline characteristics in the 1:1-matched cohort were balanced. There was no significant difference in perioperative mortality, airway dehiscence, dialysis requirement, postoperative length of stay (P ≥ 0.38 for all), or overall survival (P = 0.52). A subanalysis of the donor arrest group demonstrated similar survival when stratified by resuscitation time quartile (P = 0.38). There is no evidence of inferior outcomes after lung transplant from brain-dead donors who have had a period of cardiac arrest provided that good lung function is preserved and the donor is otherwise deemed acceptable for transplantation. Potential expansion of the donor pool to include cardiac arrest as the cause of brain death requires further study.

  15. Use of Lung Allografts from Brain-Dead Donors after Cardiopulmonary Arrest and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Worni, Mathias; Osho, Asishana A.; Snyder, Laurie D.; Palmer, Scott M.; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Davis, R. Duane; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Patients who progress to brain death after resuscitation from cardiac arrest have been hypothesized to represent an underused source of potential organ donors; however, there is a paucity of data regarding the viability of lung allografts after a period of cardiac arrest in the donor. Objectives: To analyze postoperative complications and survival after lung transplant from brain-dead donors resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Methods: The United Network for Organ Sharing database records donors with cardiac arrest occurring after brain death. Adult recipients of lung allografts from these arrest/resuscitation donors between 2005 and 2011 were compared with nonarrest donors. Propensity score matching was used to reduce the effect of confounding. Postoperative complications and overall survival were assessed using McNemar’s test for correlated binary proportions and Kaplan–Meier methods. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 479 lung transplant recipients from arrest/resuscitation donors were 1:1 propensity matched from a cohort of 9,076 control subjects. Baseline characteristics in the 1:1-matched cohort were balanced. There was no significant difference in perioperative mortality, airway dehiscence, dialysis requirement, postoperative length of stay (P ≥ 0.38 for all), or overall survival (P = 0.52). A subanalysis of the donor arrest group demonstrated similar survival when stratified by resuscitation time quartile (P = 0.38). Conclusions: There is no evidence of inferior outcomes after lung transplant from brain-dead donors who have had a period of cardiac arrest provided that good lung function is preserved and the donor is otherwise deemed acceptable for transplantation. Potential expansion of the donor pool to include cardiac arrest as the cause of brain death requires further study. PMID:23777361

  16. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  17. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  18. Arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs.

    PubMed

    Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Seijas Vázquez, Roberto; García Balletbó, Montserrat; Álvarez Díaz, Pedro; Steinbacher, Gilbert; Cuscó Segarra, Xavier; Rius Vilarrubia, Marta; Cugat Bertomeu, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Partial or total meniscectomy are common procedures performed at Orthopedic Surgery departments. Despite providing a great relief of pain, it has been related to early onset knee osteoarthritis. Meniscal allograft transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to meniscectomy. The purposes of this study were to describe an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs technique and to report the preliminary results. All meniscal allograft transplantations performed between 2001 and 2006 were approached for eligibility, and a total of 35 patients (involving 37 menisci) were finally engaged in the study. Patients were excluded if they had ipsilateral knee ligament reconstruction or cartilage repair surgery before meniscal transplantation or other knee surgeries after the meniscal transplantation. Scores on Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale for pain were obtained at a mean follow-up of 38.6 months and compared to pre-operative data. Data on chondral lesions were obtained during the arthroscopic procedure and through imaging (radiographs and MRI) studies pre-operatively. Two graft failures out of 59 transplants (3.4%) were found. Daily life accidents were responsible for all graft failures. Significant improvements for Lysholm, Subjective IKDC Form, and VAS for pain scores following the meniscal allograft transplantation were found (P < 0.0001). Controlling for chondral lesion, there was no significant interactions for Lysholm (n.s.), Subjective IKDC Form (n.s.), and VAS for pain scores (n.s.). This study demonstrated that an arthroscopic meniscal allograft transplantation without bone plugs improved knee function and symptoms after a total meniscectomy. Improvements were observed independently of the degree of chondral lesion.

  19. PECULIAR IMMUNOBIOLOGY OF BONE MARROW ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Cudkowicz, Gustavo; Bennett, Michael

    1971-01-01

    Mice are capable of rejecting H-2-incompatible bone marrow grafts after a single lethal exposure to X-rays. The onset of rejection begins 18–24 hr after transplantation and is completed by 96 hr. Maturation of this type of allograft reactivity does not occur until the 22nd day of life. In adult mice, the resistance to marrow allografts can be weakened by administration of cyclophosphamide or dead cultures of Corynebacterium parvum, but not heterologous anti-thymocyte serum. Sublethal exposures to X-rays 7 or 14 days before transplantation also weaken resistance. There is considerable interstrain variation in the ability of mice to resist allografts, even when H-2 differences between hosts and donor are kept identical. Although H-2 incompatibility is a necessary prerequisite for resistance, additional genetic factors influence the outcome of marrow allografts, presumably by controlling recognition. The regulator genes are determinant specific and the alleles for resistance or responder status appear to be dominant. The responder phenotype is expressed by hemopoietic cells and not by the environment. Accordingly, resistance is conferred to otherwise susceptible mice upon transfer of bone marrow cells but not of serum. The production and differentiation of effector cells for marrow graft rejection are thymus independent. In conclusion, bone marrow allografts elicit a particular transplantation reaction, previously unknown, in irradiated mice. Peculiar features of this reaction are the lack of proliferation of host lymphoid cells, tissue specificity, thymus independence, and regulation by genetic factors which apparently do not affect the fate of other grafts. PMID:4397663

  20. Significance of Anti-HLA Antibodies on Adult and Pediatric Heart Allograft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Massimo; Marrari, Marilyn; Feingold, Brian; Zeevi, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    As methods for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) antibody detection have evolved and newer solid phase assays are much more sensitive, the last 15 years has seen a renewed focus on the importance of HLA antibodies in solid organ transplant rejection. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical significance of antibody level as depicted by the mean fluorescence intensity of a patient’s neat serum. Emerging techniques, including those that identify antibody level and function, show promise for the detection of individuals at risk of allograft rejection, determination of the effectiveness of desensitization prior to transplant, and for monitoring treatment of rejection. Here, we review current publications regarding the relevance of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in adult and pediatric heart transplantation (HT) with graft survival, development of antibody-mediated rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). The negative impact of DSA on patient and allograft survival is evident in adult and pediatric HT recipients. Many questions remain regarding the most appropriate frequency of assessment of pre- and posttransplant DSA as well as the phenotype of DSA memory vs. true de novo antibody using large multicenter adult and pediatric cohorts and state-of-the-art methodologies for DSA detection and characterization. PMID:28191005

  1. Donor dendritic cell–derived exosomes promote allograft-targeting immune response

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Divito, Sherrie J.; Shufesky, William J.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Erdos, Geza; Sullivan, Mara L.G.; Gibson, Gregory A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    The immune response against transplanted allografts is one of the most potent reactions mounted by the immune system. The acute rejection response has been attributed to donor dendritic cells (DCs), which migrate to recipient lymphoid tissues and directly activate alloreactive T cells against donor MHC molecules. Here, using a murine heart transplant model, we determined that only a small number of donor DCs reach lymphoid tissues and investigated how this limited population of donor DCs efficiently initiates the alloreactive T cell response that causes acute rejection. In our mouse model, efficient passage of donor MHC molecules to recipient conventional DCs (cDCs) was dependent on the transfer of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from donor DCs that migrated from the graft to lymphoid tissues. These EVs shared characteristics with exosomes and were internalized or remained attached to the recipient cDCs. Recipient cDCs that acquired exosomes became activated and triggered full activation of alloreactive T cells. Depletion of recipient cDCs after cardiac transplantation drastically decreased presentation of donor MHC molecules to directly alloreactive T cells and delayed graft rejection in mice. These findings support a key role for transfer of donor EVs in the generation of allograft-targeting immune responses and suggest that interrupting this process has potential to dampen the immune response to allografts. PMID:27348586

  2. [Heart Transplantation;Allograft and Xenograft].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide

    2017-01-01

    Prior to starting clinical cardiac allotransplantation, cardiac xenotransplantation was performed in human in 1960s. In 1964, Hardy performed cardiac transplantation using a chimpanzee heart and Bailey performed cardiac transplantation using a baboon heart to an infant with hypoplastic left heart. The use of cyclosporine has greatly improved the outcome of clinical cardiac transplantation and cardiac allotransplantation became an established treatment strategy for the patients with end-stage heart failure. Although concordant cardiac xenotransplantation from a primate to a human may be successfully performed using current immunosuppressive regimen, a primate heart is not a good candidate for cardiac xenograft due to animal light issues and its size. Therefore, many investigators have tried to extend the survival period in discordant xenograft from pig to primate, but no prolonged surviving orthotropic cardiac xenograft has been established yet. In this review, experiments of concordant and discordant cardiac xenografts which were performed by the authors were introduced.

  3. Donation after cardiac death in abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reich, David J; Guy, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the field of donation after cardiac death, focusing on the history, ethicolegal issues, clinical outcomes, best practices, operative techniques, and emerging strategies to optimize utilization of this resource. Donation after cardiac death is one effective way to decrease the organ shortage and has contributed the largest recent increase in abdominal organ allografts. Currently, donation after cardiac death organs confer an increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy after liver transplant and of delayed graft function after kidney transplant. As this field matures, risk factors for donation after cardiac death organ transplant will be further identified and clinical outcomes will improve as a result of protocol standardization and ongoing research.

  4. Predictors and risk factors for recurrent scleroderma renal crisis in the kidney allograft: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pham, Phuong-Thu T; Pham, Phuong-Chi T; Danovitch, Gabriel M; Gritsch, H Albin; Singer, Jennifer; Wallace, William D; Hayashi, Rick; Wilkinson, Alan H

    2005-10-01

    Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) can lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and subsequent need for dialysis and/or renal transplantation. We review all reported cases of renal transplantations in scleroderma patients from PubMed search, present UNOS data on transplant outcomes, and identify predictors for allograft SRC. Of the five cases with recurrent SRC, all developed ESRD within a year of onset of native kidney SRC, whereas none of those who developed ESRD more than 1-2 years after the onset of SRC developed recurrence. Anemia preceded allograft SRC in two cases, pericardial effusion in one, and skin tightening in two others. UNOS data (October 1987-July 2004) documented 260 transplants performed for the renal diagnosis of scleroderma, with a 5-year graft survival rate of 56.7%. The risk for allograft SRC recurrence appears to correlate with early native renal function loss following the onset of SRC. Recurrent SRC in the allograft may be heralded by multiple clinical markers known to be predictive of severe scleroderma, including progression of diffuse skin thickening, new-onset anemia and cardiac complications.

  5. Humeral Head Reconstruction With Osteochondral Allograft Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, Bryan M; Riboh, Jonathan C; Cole, Brian J; Yanke, Adam B

    2015-09-01

    To synthesize, in a systematic review, the available clinical evidence of osteochondral allograft transplants for large osteochondral defects of the humeral head. The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for studies reporting clinical or radiographic outcomes of osteochondral allograft transplantation for humeral head defects. Descriptive statistics were provided for all outcomes. After checking for data normality, we compared postoperative and preoperative values using the Student t test. We included 12 studies (8 case reports and 4 case series) in this review. The study group consisted of 35 patients. The mean age was 35.4 ± 18.1 years; 77% of patients were male patients. Thirty-three patients had large Hill-Sachs lesions due to instability, 1 had an osteochondritis dissecans lesion, and 1 had an iatrogenic lesion after resection of synovial chondromatosis. The mean lesion size was 3 ± 1.4 cm (anteroposterior) by 2.25 ± 0.3 cm (medial-lateral), representing on average 40.5% ± 4.73% of the native articular surface. Of the 35 patients, 3 received a fresh graft, with all others receiving frozen grafts. Twenty-three femoral heads, 10 humeral heads, and 2 sets of osteochondral plugs were used. The mean length of follow-up was 57 months. Significant improvements were seen in forward flexion at 6 months (68° ± 18.1°, P < .001), forward flexion at 12 months (83.42° ± 18.3°, P < .001), and external rotation at 12 months (38.72° ± 18.8°, P < .001). American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved by 14 points (P = .02). Radiographic studies at final follow-up showed allograft necrosis in 8.7% of cases, resorption in 36.2%, and glenohumeral arthritic changes in 35.7%. Complication rates were between 20% and 30%, and the reoperation rate was 26.67%. Although only 3 patients received fresh allografts, there were no reports of graft resorption, necrosis, or arthritic changes in these patients. Humeral head allograft-most commonly used in the

  6. Factors Predicting Meniscal Allograft Transplantation Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Ben; Smith, Nicholas; Asplin, Laura; Thompson, Peter; Spalding, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is performed to improve symptoms and function in patients with a meniscal-deficient compartment of the knee. Numerous studies have shown a consistent improvement in patient-reported outcomes, but high failure rates have been reported by some studies. The typical patients undergoing MAT often have multiple other pathologies that require treatment at the time of surgery. The factors that predict failure of a meniscal allograft within this complex patient group are not clearly defined. Purpose: To determine predictors of MAT failure in a large series to refine the indications for surgery and better inform future patients. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: All patients undergoing MAT at a single institution between May 2005 and May 2014 with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were prospectively evaluated and included in this study. Failure was defined as removal of the allograft, revision transplantation, or conversion to a joint replacement. Patients were grouped according to the articular cartilage status at the time of the index surgery: group 1, intact or partial-thickness chondral loss; group 2, full-thickness chondral loss 1 condyle; and group 3, full-thickness chondral loss both condyles. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine significant predictors of failure, independently of other factors. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were produced for overall survival and significant predictors of failure in the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: There were 125 consecutive MATs performed, with 1 patient lost to follow-up. The median follow-up was 3 years (range, 1-10 years). The 5-year graft survival for the entire cohort was 82% (group 1, 97%; group 2, 82%; group 3, 62%). The probability of failure in group 1 was 85% lower (95% CI, 13%-97%) than in group 3 at any time. The probability of failure with lateral allografts was 76% lower (95% CI, 16%-89%) than medial allografts at

  7. Mechanisms of allograft rejection of corneal endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Y.; Silverstein, A.M.; Prendergast, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    The local intraocular graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction, involving the destruction of the corneal endothelial cells of the rabbit host by sensitized donor lymphoid cells, has been used to study the mechanism of corneal allograft rejection. Pretreatment of donor cells with a specific mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-T cell antibody and complement suppresses the destructive reaction, suggesting that a cellular-immune mechanism is primarily involved. Pretreatment of donor cells with mitomycin-C completely abolishes the local GVH reaction, indicating that the effector lymphocytes must undergo mitosis within the eye before they can engage in target cell destruction. Finally, studies of the local GVH reaction in irradiated leukopenic recipients or in preinflamed rabbit eyes suggest that host leukocytes may contribute nonspecifically to enhance the destructive process. These studies show that the local ocular GVH reaction may provide a useful model for the study of the mechanisms involved in the rejection of corneal allografts.

  8. Osseous metaplasia in a kidney allograft.

    PubMed

    Bataille, Stanislas; Daniel, Laurent; Legris, Tristan; Vacher-Coponat, Henri; Purgus, Raj; Berland, Yvon; Moal, Valerie

    2010-11-01

    Osseous metaplasia is defined by the presence of heterotopic normal bone tissue in a soft tissue. The bone matrix is associated with osteoblasts, osteoclasts, adipocytes and haematopoietic stem cells. Osseous metaplasia pathophysiology is not well known, but many factors have been incriminated including chronic inflammation and chronic ischaemia. We describe the second case of osseous metaplasia in a kidney allograft. Numerous factors might favour its development including factors linked to transplantation failure environment.

  9. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate.

  10. Digital Reconstruction with a Nonfrozen Osteotendinous Allograft, Nerve Allografts, and Autogenous Radial Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Martin; Butrón, Patricia; Palafox, Damian; Cruz-Reyes, Angel U

    2015-08-01

    A 21-year-old man underwent amputation of his second to fifth fingers at the proximal phalanx level on the right hand. The third and fourth fingers were reconstructed with 2 toe-to-hand free transfers. The fifth digit was reconstructed with a nonfrozen osteotendinous allograft, nerve allografts, and autogenous radial free flap without immunosuppression. The patient was lost to follow-up for 19 years. He received no rehabilitation. He reported that he had experienced no adverse reactions to the materials or the graft, or infection, or fractures. No additional surgical procedures were performed. Today, the digit is functional and has acceptable aesthetic appearance. This outcome is similar to those obtained in digits reconstructed with frozen osteotendinous allografts and autologous cutaneous covers and opens the possibility for future research.

  11. Laminins affect T cell trafficking and allograft fate.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kristi J; Iwami, Daiki; Harris, Donald G; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Burrell, Bryna E

    2014-05-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are integral sites for the generation of immune tolerance, migration of CD4⁺ T cells, and induction of Tregs. Despite the importance of LNs in regulation of inflammatory responses, the LN-specific factors that regulate T cell migration and the precise LN structural domains in which differentiation occurs remain undefined. Using intravital and fluorescent microscopy, we found that alloreactive T cells traffic distinctly into the tolerant LN and colocalize in exclusive regions with alloantigen-presenting cells, a process required for Treg induction. Extracellular matrix proteins, including those of the laminin family, formed regions within the LN that were permissive for colocalization of alloantigen-presenting cells, alloreactive T cells, and Tregs. We identified unique expression patterns of laminin proteins in high endothelial venule basement membranes and the cortical ridge that correlated with alloantigen-specific immunity or immune tolerance. The ratio of laminin α4 to laminin α5 was greater in domains within tolerant LNs, compared with immune LNs, and blocking laminin α4 function or inducing laminin α5 overexpression disrupted T cell and DC localization and transmigration through tolerant LNs. Furthermore, reducing α4 laminin circumvented tolerance induction and induced cardiac allograft inflammation and rejection in murine models. This work identifies laminins as potential targets for immune modulation.

  12. Laminins affect T cell trafficking and allograft fate

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Kristi J.; Iwami, Daiki; Harris, Donald G.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Burrell, Bryna E.

    2014-01-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are integral sites for the generation of immune tolerance, migration of CD4+ T cells, and induction of Tregs. Despite the importance of LNs in regulation of inflammatory responses, the LN-specific factors that regulate T cell migration and the precise LN structural domains in which differentiation occurs remain undefined. Using intravital and fluorescent microscopy, we found that alloreactive T cells traffic distinctly into the tolerant LN and colocalize in exclusive regions with alloantigen-presenting cells, a process required for Treg induction. Extracellular matrix proteins, including those of the laminin family, formed regions within the LN that were permissive for colocalization of alloantigen-presenting cells, alloreactive T cells, and Tregs. We identified unique expression patterns of laminin proteins in high endothelial venule basement membranes and the cortical ridge that correlated with alloantigen-specific immunity or immune tolerance. The ratio of laminin α4 to laminin α5 was greater in domains within tolerant LNs, compared with immune LNs, and blocking laminin α4 function or inducing laminin α5 overexpression disrupted T cell and DC localization and transmigration through tolerant LNs. Furthermore, reducing α4 laminin circumvented tolerance induction and induced cardiac allograft inflammation and rejection in murine models. This work identifies laminins as potential targets for immune modulation. PMID:24691446

  13. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, H-M; Li, W; Gelman, A E; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D

    2016-04-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at nonlymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, autoantigens or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3(+) cells are present in long-term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of "tolerogenic" TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity.

  14. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hsao, Hsi-Min; Li, Wenjun; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at non-lymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, auto- or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3+ cells are present in long term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of “tolerogenic” TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity. PMID:26614734

  15. Sterilisation of skin allograft with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Rooney, P; Eagle, M; Hogg, P; Lomas, R; Kearney, J

    2008-08-01

    The primary surgical requirement of skin allografts within the UK is for cryopreserved viable allografts as these engraft to the wound bed and gain a vascular supply, thus providing true wound closure and a superior clinical performance. Consequently the only disinfection treatment the skin receives is exposure to an antibiotic cocktail. However, antibiotic treatment does not reliably decontaminate skin allografts and 22% of cryopreserved skin fails microbial acceptance criteria and cannot be used clinically. We describe here a study which was carried out to determine a means of saving and using the microbiologically failed skin. Four different treatment regimens were investigated; treatment with 20%, 50% and 85% glycerol followed by 25 kGy irradiation at -80 degrees C, and treatment with 85% glycerol at ambient (30-40 degrees C) temperature and irradiation. Following treatment, the grafts were evaluated for their histological structure, in vitro cytotoxicity and handling properties. The radioprotective effects of the different glycerol concentrations and temperatures on microorganisms were also determined. The data indicate that 25 kGy irradiation of deep-frozen skin in 20% glycerol sterilised the tissue without any histological, cytotoxicological or physical alterations compared to normal cryopreserved skin. In contrast, irradiation of all other glycerol concentrations elicited some cytotoxicity and/or histological effect. These non-viable grafts can be made available for surgical use when cryopreserved viable grafts are not available or required.

  16. Rabbit trochlear model of osteochondral allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    To, Nhat; Curtiss, Shane; Neu, Corey P; Salgado, Christopher J; Jamali, Amir A

    2011-10-01

    Allografting and autografting of osteochondral tissues is a promising strategy to treat articular cartilage lesions in damaged joints. We developed a new model of fresh osteochondral allografting using the entire rabbit trochlea. The objective of the current study was to demonstrate that this model would achieve reproducible graft-host healing and maintain normal articular cartilage histologic, immunolocalization, and biochemical characteristics after transplantation under diverse storage and transplantation conditions. New Zealand white (n = 8) and Dutch belted (n = 8) rabbits underwent a 2-stage transplantation operation using osteochondral grafts that had been stored for 2 or 4 wk. Trochlear grafts harvested from the left knee were transplanted to the right knee as either autografts or allografts. Grafts were fixed with 22-gauge steel wire or 3-0 nylon suture. Rabbits were euthanized for evaluation at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 12 wk after transplantation. All grafts that remained in vivo for at least 4 wk demonstrated 100% interface healing by microCT. Trabecular bridging was present at the host-graft interface starting at 2 wk after transplantation, with no significant difference in cartilage histology between the various groups. The combined histology scores indicated minimal evidence of osteoarthritis. Immunostaining revealed that superficial zone protein was localized at the surface of all transplants. The rabbit trochlear model met our criteria for a successful model in regard to the ease of the procedure, low rate of surgical complications, relatively large articular cartilage surface area, and amount of host-graft bone interface available for analysis.

  17. Inhibition of chronic rejection by antibody induced vascular accommodation in fully allogeneic heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Semiletova, Natalya V; Shen, Xiu-Da; Baibakov, Boris; Feldman, Daniel M; Mukherjee, Kaushik; Frank, Jonathan M; Stepkowski, Stainslaw M; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Ghobrial, Rafik M

    2005-12-15

    The potential role of altered antibody responses as an effector protective mechanism to induce graft accommodation has been widely investigated in xenogeneic responses. Here we investigate the protective effects of antibody binding to vascular endothelium in a fully mismatched allogeneic model of heart transplantation. ACI recipients of WF cardiac grafts were treated either with allochimeric [alpha1h ]-RT1.A class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) extracts (1 mg/rat, p.v. day 0) or high dose of CsA (10 mg/kg/day, p.o., day 0-6). Cardiac allografts were evaluated at 100 days posttransplant by immunohistology for evidence of chronic rejection and/or vascular accommodation. Activation of apoptotic or antiapoptotic mechanisms was verified by DNA fragmentation (TUNEL) analysis. Allochimeric therapy resulted in inhibition of chronic rejection, absence of neointimal formation and induction of vascular accommodation of fully allogeneic WF hearts in ACI hosts. Such accommodation was evident by IgG and IgM vascular endothelial binding and marked reduction of DNA fragmentation. In contrast, CsA therapy resulted in marked neointimal proliferation, without evidence of vascular accommodation. Immunohistochemical analysis failed to demonstrate vascular endothelial antibody binding. Further, severe chronic rejection following CsA treatment was accompanied by marked DNA fragmentation. Alteration of humoral immunity induces vascular accommodation in allogeneic transplantation. Vascular accommodation is the underlying mechanism for inhibition allograft vasculopathy following allochimeric MHC class I therapy.

  18. Protamine and mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, A.; Sörbo, J.; Norrby, K.

    1990-01-01

    Different doses of protamine sulphate (PS) given s.c. (at 12-h intervals) were tested for signs of non-specific toxicity measured as effect on body weight and small-gut proliferation as well as on mast-cell secretion and mast-cell-mediated mitogenesis in the mesenteric windows following i.p. injection of Compound 48/80, a potent mast cell secretagogue, in normal rats. In a non-toxic dose range, the effect of PS on mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis, effected by 48/80, was quantified as the number of vessels per mm of mesenteric window in histological sections at x 400. No intelligible dose-effect relationship was discernible between the dose of PS given and the effect on angiogenesis. Only in a tight interval, at 40 mg PS/kg but not at 20 or 60 mg PS/kg, was the angiogenesis statistically significantly suppressed. Hence, it was concluded that PS can be angiostatic but does not exert a more general angiostatic effect in the autogenous systems used. PMID:1691920

  19. Fitness of cell-mediated immunity independent of repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Rebrovich, Michelle; Wettstein, Peter J; Vuk-Pavlovic, Zvezdana; Limper, Andrew H; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2007-03-01

    Fitness of cell-mediated immunity is thought to depend on TCR diversity; however, this concept has not been tested formally. We tested the concept using JH(-/-) mice that lack B cells and have TCR Vbeta diversity <1% that of wild-type mice and quasimonoclonal (QM) mice with oligoclonal B cells and TCR Vbeta diversity 7% that of wild-type mice. Despite having a TCR repertoire contracted >99% and defective lymphoid organogenesis, JH(-/-) mice rejected H-Y-incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild-type mice. JH(-/-) mice exhibited T cell priming by peptide and delayed-type hypersensitivity, although these responses were less than normal owing either to TCR repertoire contraction or defective lymphoid organogenesis. QM mice with TCR diversity contracted >90%, and normal lymphoid organs rejected H-Y incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild type mice and exhibited normal T cell priming and normal delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. QM mice also resisted Pneumocystis murina like wild-type mice. Thus, cell-mediated immunity can function normally despite contractions of TCR diversity >90% and possibly >99%.

  20. PTH promotes allograft integration in a calvarial bone defect.

    PubMed

    Sheyn, Dmitriy; Cohn Yakubovich, Doron; Kallai, Ilan; Su, Susan; Da, Xiaoyu; Pelled, Gadi; Tawackoli, Wafa; Cook-Weins, Galen; Schwarz, Edward M; Gazit, Dan; Gazit, Zulma

    2013-12-02

    Allografts may be useful in craniofacial bone repair, although they often fail to integrate with the host bone. We hypothesized that intermittent administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) would enhance mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and differentiation, resulting in allograft osseointegration in cranial membranous bones. Calvarial bone defects were created in transgenic mice, in which luciferase is expressed under the control of the osteocalcin promoter. The mice were given implants of allografts with or without daily PTH treatment. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was performed to monitor host osteprogenitor differentiation at the implantation site. Bone formation was evaluated with the aid of fluorescence imaging (FLI) and microcomputed tomography (μCT) as well as histological analyses. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to evaluate the expression of key osteogenic and angiogenic genes. Osteoprogenitor differentiation, as detected by BLI, in mice treated with an allograft implant and PTH was over 2-fold higher than those in mice treated with an allograft implant without PTH. FLI also demonstrated that the bone mineralization process in PTH-treated allografts was significantly higher than that in untreated allografts. The μCT scans revealed a significant increase in bone formation in allograft + PTH treated mice comparing to allograft + PBS treated mice. The osteogenic genes osteocalcin (Oc/Bglap) and integrin binding sialoprotein (Ibsp) were upregulated in the allograft + PTH treated animals. In summary, PTH treatment enhances osteoprogenitor differentiation and augments bone formation around structural allografts. The precise mechanism is not clear, but we show that infiltration pattern of mast cells, associated with the formation of fibrotic tissue, in the defect site is significantly affected by the PTH treatment.

  1. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  2. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infections among renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ramandeep; Geerlings, Suzanne E; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2015-02-01

    Bacteriuria is common among renal allograft recipients. It can be categorized into asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI). However, in medical literature, the classifications of bacteriuria are often not clear or ASB is also classified as a UTI. This contributes to difficulties in interpretation of the incidence and risk factors of these two entities. In this review, we describe the epidemiology, risk factors, management and the impact on renal allograft function of these two entities separately according to the recent literature. Risk factors for ASB are not completely comparable to the risk factors of UTIs. Persistent ASB has been associated with development of acute rejection and allograft pyelonephritis. The available data suggest that treatment of ASB is not very effective. Prophylaxis with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole does not prevent UTIs such as allograft pyelonephritis. Blood stream infections and emphysematous allograft pyelonephritis are associated with renal allograft loss. ASB is the most common manifestation of bacteriuria after renal transplantation. More effective interventions are needed to prevent bacteriuria. Renal allograft recipients with persistent ASB should be closely monitored since they could be at risk for developing not only UTIs, such as allograft pyelonephritis, but also acute rejection.

  3. Focal posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder at the renal allograft hilum.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ben, R; Smith, J K; Kew, C E; Kenney, P J; Julian, B A; Robbin, M L

    2000-11-01

    This report describes the imaging characteristics of focal posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder. Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder may be limited to the allograft. A focal complex mass in the renal allograft hilum surrounding the main renal blood vessels is a common finding and can be visualized with sonography. MR imaging can help increase diagnostic confidence.

  4. Incidence, risk factors, and the impact of allograft pyelonephritis on renal allograft function.

    PubMed

    Singh, R; Geerlings, S E; Peters-Sengers, H; Idu, M M; Hodiamont, C J; Ten Berge, I J M; Bemelman, F J

    2016-10-01

    The impact of allograft pyelonephritis (AGPN) on renal allograft function is controversial. In this study, we evaluated the incidence, risk factors, and the impact of AGPN on renal allograft function. Retrospective cohort study in adult renal allograft recipients with 1-year follow-up after transplantation (Tx). Renal allograft function was evaluated by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (by Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula) and 24-h urine protein excretion. A total of 431 renal allograft recipients were analyzed; 57 (13.2%) developed AGPN within 1 year after Tx. Median time between Tx and AGPN was 50 days. Risk factors for AGPN were the presence of a urological catheter (odds ratio [OR] = 18.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.00-44.81, P < 0.001) and preceding asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.20-3.90, P = 0.009). In 72.7%, the causative microorganism of ASB was identical to that of the succeeding AGPN episode. Multivariable linear regression analysis showed that experiencing AGPN did not decrease the eGFR (P = 0.61) nor did increased proteinuria (P = 0.29) 1 year after Tx. For the eGFR, an interaction was found between AGPN/bacteriuria (BU) and acute rejection (AR): the group experiencing BU preceding AR had significantly (P < 0.001) lower eGFR compared with the group that experienced only AR (21 mL/min/1.73 m(2) vs. 48 mL/min/1.73 m(2) ), as a result of increased prevalence of combined rejections within the BU group. Indwelling urological catheters and preceding ASB are associated with developing AGPN. An incident of AGPN itself does not impair renal allograft function 1 year after Tx. However, a relevant interaction occurs between BU and AR, in which the sequence of occurrence of these 2 events synergistically impairs the eGFR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail.

  6. Proximal humeral osteoarticular allografts: technique, pearls and pitfalls, outcomes.

    PubMed

    Farfalli, German L; Ayerza, Miguel A; Muscolo, D Luis; Aponte-Tinao, Luis A

    2015-12-01

    Allograft transplantation is a biologic reconstruction option for massive bone defects after resection of bone sarcomas. This type of reconstruction not only restores bone stock but it also allows us to reconstruct the joint anatomically. These factors are a major concern, especially in a young and active population.We are describing indications, surgical techniques, pearls and pitfalls, and outcomes of proximal humeral osteoarticular allografts, done at present time in our institution.We found that allograft fractures and articular complications, as epiphyseal resorption and subchondral fracture, are the main complications observed in proximal humerus osteoarticular allograft reconstructions. Nevertheless, only fractures need a reconstruction revision. Joint complications may adversely affect the limb function, but for this reason, an allograft revision is rarely performed.

  7. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  8. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  9. Capturing echocardiographic allograft valve function over time after allograft aortic valve or root replacement.

    PubMed

    Mokhles, M Mostafa; Rajeswaran, Jeevanantham; Bekkers, Jos A; Borsboom, Gerard J J M; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Bogers, Ad J J C; Takkenberg, Johanna J M; Blackstone, Eugene H

    2014-11-01

    This study describes echocardiographic allograft valve function over time in a cohort of patients who were prospectively followed after allograft aortic valve or root replacement, illustrating the use of longitudinal data analysis for assessing valve function over time. Serial, standardized echocardiographic measurements of aortic regurgitation, aortic gradient, annulus diameter, left ventricular outflow tract diameter, and aortic diameter in 301 hospital survivors (mean age, 46 years; range, 16-83 years) after allograft aortic valve (N=77) or root (N=224) replacement were analyzed using nonlinear longitudinal models. Aortic regurgitation increased over time. At 15 years, 41% of patients had at least moderate aortic regurgitation. Younger patient age and subcoronary implantation technique were associated with increased aortic regurgitation. Aortic gradient increased over time (from 9.4 mm Hg at 6 months to 21.3 mm Hg at 15 years); both initial and increase in aortic gradient were greater in younger patients and after subcoronary implantation technique. Annulus diameter slightly increased (from 21.9 mm at 6 months to 22.4 mm at 15 years), whereas aortic diameter slightly decreased over time (from 34.3 mm at 6 months to 32.7 mm at 15 years). Left ventricular outflow tract diameter remained constant at 22 mm. Younger patients in the subcoronary implantation group had a larger annulus diameter. Both aortic regurgitation and stenosis increase over time after allograft aortic valve or root replacement. Younger patient age and use of the subcoronary implantation technique are associated with increased regurgitation and stenosis. The use of nonlinear longitudinal models allows for an insightful analysis of allograft valve function over time. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacterial colonization of bone allografts: establishment and effects of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ketonis, Constantinos; Barr, Stephanie; Adams, Christopher S; Hickok, Noreen J; Parvizi, Javad

    2010-08-01

    Bone grafts are frequently used to supplement bone stock and to establish structural stability. However, graft-associated infection represents a challenging complication leading to increased patient morbidity and healthcare costs. We therefore designed this study to (1) determine if increasing initial S. aureus inoculation of bone allograft results in a proportionate increase in colonization; (2) assess if antibiotics decrease colonization and if antibiotic tethering to allograft alters its ability to prevent bacterial colonization; and (3) determine if covalent modification alters the allograft topography or its biological properties. Allograft bone and vancomycin-modified bone (VAN-bone) was challenged with different doses of S. aureus for times out to 24 hours in the presence or absence of solution vancomycin. Bacterial colonization was assessed by fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by direct colony counting. Cell density and distribution of osteoblast-like cells on control and modified allograft were then compared. Bacterial attachment was apparent within 6 hours with colonization and biofilm formation increasing with time and dose. Solution vancomycin failed to prevent bacterial attachment whereas VAN-bone successfully resisted colonization. The allograft modification did not affect the attachment and distribution of osteoblast-like cells. Allograft bone was readily colonized by S. aureus and covered by a biofilm with especially florid growth in natural topographic niches. Using a novel covalent modification, allograft bone was able to resist colonization by organisms while retaining the ability to allow adhesion of osteoblastic cells. Generation of allograft bone that can resist infection in vivo would be important in addressing one of the most challenging problems associated with the use of allograft, namely infection.

  11. Platonin improves survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shih-Ping; Lee, Jie-Jen; Chi, Chin-Wen; Chang, Kuo-Ming; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Platonin is an immunomodulator with NF-κB inhibitory activity. It not only inhibits interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production in sepsis, but also attenuates heatstroke reactions. In addition, platonin redirects differentiation of dendritic cells toward an intermediate stage of maturation. The study was designed to examine whether platonin can reduce acute graft rejection. A C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice skin transplantation model was used. Platonin was given intraperitoneally to transplant recipients at various doses. Skin grafts were submitted to histologic analysis. NF-κB DNA binding activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were determined in harvested draining lymph nodes. Leukocyte count, hepatic and renal functions were serially assessed. An array of serum cytokines was evaluated on d 1, 3, 5, and 7 after skin transplantation. Platonin resulted in significantly prolonged skin allograft survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Histologic changes in the skin allografts paralleled the gross appearance of rejection. Serum cytokine analysis shows that platonin significantly suppressed the production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. However, no significant changes occurred in the serum levels of Th1-type and Th2-type cytokines. NF-κB activity and iNOS expression were remarkably suppressed in draining lymph nodes. In terms of toxicity, there were no significant differences in body weight, leukocyte count, plasma alanine aminotransferase, or creatinine between the platonin-treated and control groups. Platonin effectively prolongs skin allograft survival without major toxicity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chemical sterilization of allograft dermal tissues.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Abigail; Vaynshteyn, Edward; Kowalski, John B; Ngo, Manh-Dan; Merritt, Karen; Osborne, Joel; Chnari, Evangelia

    2017-08-10

    Common terminal sterilization methods are known to alter the natural structure and properties of soft tissues. One approach to providing safe grafts with preserved biological properties is the combination of a validated chemical sterilization process followed by an aseptic packaging process. This combination of processes is an accepted method for production of sterile healthcare products as described in ANSI/AAMI ST67:2011. This article describes the validation of the peracetic acid and ethanol-based (PAAE) chemical sterilization process for allograft dermal tissues at the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation (MTF, Edison, NJ). The sterilization capability of the PAAE solution used during routine production of aseptically processed dermal tissue forms was determined based on requirements of relevant ISO standards, ISO 14161:2009 and ISO 14937:2009. The resistance of spores of Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium sporogenes, Mycobacterium terrae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecium, and Staphylococcus aureus to the chemical sterilization process employed by MTF was determined. Using a worst-case scenario testing strategy, the D value was calculated for the most resistant microorganism, Bacillus. The 12D time parameter determined the minimum time required to achieve a SAL of 10(-6). Microbiological performance qualification demonstrated a complete kill of 10(6) spores at just a quarter of the full cycle time. The validation demonstrated that the PAAE sterilization process is robust, achieves sterilization of allograft dermal tissue to a SAL 10(-6), and that in combination with aseptic processing secures the microbiological safety of allograft dermal tissue while avoiding structural and biochemical tissue damage previously observed with other sterilization methods such as ionizing irradiation.

  13. Banff schema for grading pancreas allograft rejection: working proposal by a multi-disciplinary international consensus panel.

    PubMed

    Drachenberg, C B; Odorico, J; Demetris, A J; Arend, L; Bajema, I M; Bruijn, J A; Cantarovich, D; Cathro, H P; Chapman, J; Dimosthenous, K; Fyfe-Kirschner, B; Gaber, L; Gaber, O; Goldberg, J; Honsová, E; Iskandar, S S; Klassen, D K; Nankivell, B; Papadimitriou, J C; Racusen, L C; Randhawa, P; Reinholt, F P; Renaudin, K; Revelo, P P; Ruiz, P; Torrealba, J R; Vazquez-Martul, E; Voska, L; Stratta, R; Bartlett, S T; Sutherland, D E R

    2008-06-01

    Accurate diagnosis and grading of rejection and other pathological processes are of paramount importance to guide therapeutic interventions in patients with pancreas allograft dysfunction. A multi-disciplinary panel of pathologists, surgeons and nephrologists was convened for the purpose of developing a consensus document delineating the histopathological features for diagnosis and grading of rejection in pancreas transplant biopsies. Based on the available published data and the collective experience, criteria for the diagnosis of acute cell-mediated allograft rejection (ACMR) were established. Three severity grades (I/mild, II/moderate and III/severe) were defined based on lesions known to be more or less responsive to treatment and associated with better- or worse-graft outcomes, respectively. The features of chronic rejection/graft sclerosis were reassessed, and three histological stages were established. Tentative criteria for the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection were also characterized, in anticipation of future studies that ought to provide more information on this process. Criteria for needle core biopsy adequacy and guidelines for pathology reporting were also defined. The availability of a simple, reproducible, clinically relevant and internationally accepted schema for grading rejection should improve the level of diagnostic accuracy and facilitate communication between all parties involved in the care of pancreas transplant recipients.

  14. Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Dermal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Soares, Eduardo; Mook, William R; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Because hip arthroscopic procedures are increasing in number, complications related to the operation itself are starting to emerge. Whereas the capsule has been recognized as an important static stabilizer for the hip, it has not been until recently that surgeons have realized the importance of its preservation and restoration. Disruption of the capsule during arthroscopic procedures is a potential contributor to postoperative iatrogenic hip instability. In cases of a symptomatic deficient capsule, a capsular reconstruction is mandatory because instability may lead to detrimental chondral and labral changes. The purpose of this report was to describe our technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using dermal allograft.

  15. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    decellularized allografts tested did not perform well in this repair model. Additional evaluations and...2c  was  completed.    All   animals  were  assessed  weekly  until  termination  26  weeks  after   receiving  the...the  engrafted  nerves  were  examined  for  nerve-­‐graft  continuity.     Animals  with  a  loss  of   continuity

  16. Evaluation of C1q Status and Titer of De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies as Predictors of Allograft Survival.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, C; Gareau, A J; Pochinco, D; Gibson, I W; Ho, J; Birk, P E; Blydt-Hansen, T; Karpinski, M; Goldberg, A; Storsley, L; Rush, D N; Nickerson, P W

    2017-03-01

    De novo donor-specific antibodies (dnDSAs) that develop after renal transplantation are independent predictors of allograft loss. However, it is unknown if dnDSA C1q status or titer at the time of first detection can independently predict allograft loss. In a consecutive cohort of 508 renal transplant recipients, 70 developed dnDSAs. Histologic and clinical outcomes were correlated with the C1q assay or dnDSA titer. C1q positivity correlated with dnDSA titer (p < 0.01) and mean fluorescence intensity (p < 0.01) and was more common in class II versus class I dnDSAs (p < 0.01). C1q status correlated with tubulitis (p = 0.02) and C4d status (p = 0.03) in biopsies at the time of dnDSA development, but not T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) or antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). De novo DSA titer correlated with Banff g, i, t, ptc, C4d scores, TCMR (p < 0.01) and ABMR (p < 0.01). Post-dnDSA graft loss was observed more frequently in recipients with C1q-positve dnDSA (p < 0.01) or dnDSA titer ≥ 1:1024 (p ≤ 0.01). However, after adjustment for clinical phenotype and nonadherence in multivariate models, neither C1q status nor dnDSA titer were independently associated with allograft loss, questioning the utility of these assays at the time of dnDSA development.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF ALLOSENSITIZED CARDIAC TRANSPLANT CANDIDATES

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Johnson, Maryl R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation remains the best treatment in advanced heart failure patients with a high risk of death. However, an inadequate supply of donor hearts decreases the likelihood of transplantation for many patients. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are being increasingly used as a bridge to transplant in patients who may not survive long enough to receive a heart. This expansion in VAD use has been associated with increasing rates of allosensitization in cardiac transplant candidates. Anti-HLA antibodies can be detected prior to transplantation using different techniques. Complement-dependent lymphocytotoxicity assays are widely used to measure the panel reactive antibody (PRA), and for crossmatch purposes. Newer assays using solid phase flow techniques feature improved specificity and offer detailed information concerning antibody specificities, which may lead to improvements in donor-recipient matching. Allosensitization prolongs the wait time for transplantation and increases the risk of post-transplant complications and death; therefore, decreasing anti-HLA antibodies in sensitized transplant candidates is of vital importance. Plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and rituximab have been used to decrease the PRA prior to transplantation with varying degrees of success. The most significant post-transplant complications seen in allosensitized recipients are antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). AMR often manifests with severe allograft dysfunction and hemodynamic compromise. The underlying pathophysiology is not fully understood, but appears to involve complement-mediated activation of endothelial cells resulting in ischemic injury. The treatment of AMR in cardiac recipients is largely empirical, and includes high-dose corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, IVIG and rituximab. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is characterized by diffuse concentric stenosis of allograft coronary arteries due to intimal

  18. Long-Term Study of Vascularized Free-Draining Intraperitoneal Pancreatic Segmental Allografts in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakides, George K.; Rabinovitch, Alexander; Mintz, Daniel; Olson, Les; Rapaport, Felix T.; Miller, Joshua

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the significance of immunogenetic factors on the survival of pancreatic allografts in beagle dogs. Donors and recipients were leukocyte antigen (DLA)-typed and mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-tested. Recipients were made diabetic by total pancreatectomy and immediately implanted intraperitoneally with a vascularized, free-draining (duct unligated) pancreatic segmental (FDPS) allograft. Two groups of dogs were studied. In group I consisting of donor-recipient littermates, recipients were immunosuppressed with prednisone and azathioprine (n = 16 dogs), or not immunosuppressed (n = 4). In group II, recipients were made specifically unresponsive by total body radiation, autologous marrow implantation, and kidney transplantation from DLA-MLC identical donors, 1 yr before FDPS transplantation from the corresponding original kidney donors. Survival of the FDPS grafts in group I was inversely related to pretransplant MLC reactivity, irrespective of DLA genotyped match between donor and recipient. Thus, immunosuppressed high MLC reactors (n = 8) rejected FDPS grafts between 7 and 14 d, whereas immunosuppressed low MLC reactors (n = 8) accepted grafts for 25 to 260+ days, and nonimmunosuppressed low MLC reactors (n = 4) accepted grafts for 9-55 d. Rejection (hyperglycemia) of FDPS grafts was sudden, permanent, and unpredictable despite weekly intravenous glucose tolerance tests with measurements of glucose disappearance rates and serum insulin responses. Nevertheless, serial in vitro cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) assays revealed increases in CML before graft rejection in low MLC reactors, and decreases in both CML and MLC responses before graft rejection in high MLC reactors. FDPS graft survival was indefinite (>6 mo) in group II dogs, despite low-grade MLC reactivity (2:4 dogs) and CML responses (4:4 dogs). Biopsies of FDPS grafts at 6 mo in normoglycemic dogs showed disappearance of exocrine tissue and coalescence of

  19. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. Methods: All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 68 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into one of the two groups (autograft and irradiated allograft groups). The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months of follow-up (ranging from 24 to 47 months), patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Results: Of these patients, 65 (autograft 33, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When the irradiated allograft group was compared to the autograft group at the 31-month follow-up by the Lachman test, the anterior drawer test (ADT), the pivot shift test, and KT-2000 arthrometer test, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the autograft group and just only 31.3% in the irradiated allograft group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%). The anterior and rotational stabilities decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), functional and subjective evaluations, and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. Besides, patients in the irradiated allograft group had a shorter operation time and a longer duration of postoperative fever. When the patients had a fever, the

  20. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects.

    PubMed

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J A; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-06-19

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects.

  1. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects

    PubMed Central

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J.A.; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects. PMID:26091097

  2. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  3. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  4. Sterilization of skin allografts by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Bourroul, Selma Cecília; Herson, Marisa Roma; Pino, Eddy; Matho, Monica Beatriz

    2002-11-01

    The skin has a fundamental role in the viability of human body. In the case of extensive wounds, skin allografts provide an alternative to cover temporarily the damaged areas. After donor screening and preservation in glycerol 85%, the skin can be stored in a Skin Bank. Glycerol at this concentration has a bacteriostatic effect after certain time of preservation. On the other hand, skin sterilization by ionizing radiation may reduce the quarentine period for transplantation in patients. The objective of this work was to evaluate allograft sterilization using two sources of ionizing radiation. Through the analysis of stress-strain, it was intended to verify possible effects of the radiation on the structure of preserved grafts. Three groups of skin samples were selected. The first group was maintained in the initial conditions, not irradiated. The second was exposed to cobalt-60, while the third one was irradiated using an Dynamitron Accelerator JOB188 electron beam. The irradiation dose was 25 kGy for both tests. Both irradiation sources, and the Instron Universal Machine used for biomechanical experiments, are installed at the Centro de Tecnologia das Radiações/Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (São Paulo, Brazil). According to the preliminary results, biomechanical characteristics of the samples irradiated seem to be maintained with regard to the non irradiated group.

  5. Allograft selection for distal femur through cutting contour registration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Lihui; Niu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Allograft reconstruction is an acceptable procedure for the recovery of normal anatomy after the bone tumor resection. During the past few years, several automated methods have been proposed to select the best anatomically matching allograft from the virtual donor bone bank. The surface-based automated method uses the contralateral healthy bone to obtain the normal surface shape of the diseased bone, which could achieve good matching of the defect and the selected allograft. However, the surface-based method focuses on the matching of the whole bone so that the matching of the contact surface between the allograft and the recipient bone may not be optimal. To deal with the above problem, we propose a cutting contour based method for the allograft selection. Cutting contour from the recipient bone could reflect the structural information of the defect and is seldom influenced by tumor. Thus the cutting contour can be used as the matching template to find the optimal alignment of the recipient bone and the allograft. The proposed method is validated using the data of distal femurs where bone transplantation is commonly performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method generally outperforms the surface-based method within modest extra time. Overall, our contour-based method is an effective complementary technique for allograft selection in the virtual bone bank.

  6. [The clinical use of cryopreserved human skin allografts for transplantation].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Flores, Francisco; Chacón-Gómez, María; Madinaveitia-Villanueva, Juan Antonio; Barrera-Lopez, Araceli; Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Querevalu-Murillo, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The biological recovery of human skin allografts is the gold standard for preservation in Skin Banks. However, there is no worldwide consensus about specific allocation criteria for preserved human skin allografts with living cells. A report is presented on the results of 5 years of experience of using human skin allografts in burned patient in the Skin and Tissue Bank at the "Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" The human skin allografts were obtained from multi-organ donors. processed and preserved at -80 °C for 12 months. Allocation criteria were performed according to blood type match, clinical history, and burned body surface. Up to now, the Skin and Tissue Bank at 'Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitacion" has processed and recovered 125,000 cm(2) of human skin allografts. It has performed 34 surgical implants on 21 burned patients. The average of burn body surface was 59.2%. More than two-thirds (67.7%) of recipients of skin allografts were matched of the same to type blood of the donor, and 66.6% survived after 126 days hospital stay. It is proposed to consider recipient's blood group as allocation criteria to assign tissue; and use human skin allografts on patiens affected with burns over 30% of body surface (according the "rule of the 9"). Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Sterilization of bone allografts by microwave and gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer

    2012-09-01

    Bone allografts are used to enhance healing in osteotomies, arthrodesis, fractures and to replace bone loss resulting from tumour or trauma. However, a major concern associated with the bone allografts is the potential for disease transmission. Various sterilization techniques have been developed to prevent infection through allografts. This study was undertaken with the aim of exploring the use of microwave radiation for sterilization of bone allografts and to compare with gamma radiation sterilization. Bone allografts were processed from femoral heads obtained from living donors. The effect of microwave and gamma radiation on the bacteria isolated from bone allograft was evaluated. The microwave radiation treatment was performed at 2450 MHz (frequency) for varying lengths of time at maximum power 900 Watts (W). Viability of three Gram-positive bacteria - Bacillus subtilis, Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus aureus and three Gram-negative bacteria - Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined after irradiation of bacterial suspensions and contaminated processed bone allografts. The sterility test of microwave and gamma irradiated bone allograft was carried out in accordance with ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 11737-2. Microwave irradiation (2450 MHz and 900 W) of bacterial isolates resulted in complete inactivation within 60 seconds. The contaminated bone samples showed no growth of organisms after 2 minutes of exposure to microwave irradiation. No viable counts were detected in bone grafts inoculated with Gram-negative bacterial species on gamma irradiation to a dose of 15 kGy. Bones contaminated with Gram-positive bacteria required a higher dose of 20 kGy for complete inactivation. The study shows that sterilization of contaminated femoral head bone allografts can be achieved by short exposure of 2 min to 2450 MHz and 900 W microwave radiation.

  8. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  9. High-pressure saline washing of allografts reduces bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M Y; Salmela, P M; Vuento, R E

    2001-02-01

    60 fresh-frozen bone allografts were contaminated on the operating room floor. No bacterial growth was detected in 5 of them after contamination. The remaining 55 grafts had positive bacterial cultures and were processed with three methods: soaking in saline, soaking in antibiotic solution or washing by high-pressure saline. After high-pressure lavage, the cultures were negative in three fourths of the contaminated allografts. The corresponding figures after soaking grafts in saline and antibiotic solution were one tenth and two tenths, respectively. High-pressure saline cleansing of allografts can be recommended because it improves safety by reducing the superficial bacterial bioburden.

  10. Adenovirus Interstitial Nephritis and Rejection in an Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Storsley, Leroy

    2011-01-01

    Viral infections are an important complication of solid organ transplantation. Although polyoma is the virus that most commonly infects the renal allograft, adenoviral infections are also reported. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings in a patient with adenoviral infection associated with acute rejection of the renal allograft. The pathologic findings of adenovirus infection usually include a granulomatous interstitial nephritis, which is helpful in distinguishing from acute rejection. We discuss the differential diagnosis and pathophysiology of allograft viral infections and concomitant rejection. PMID:21436288

  11. Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells prolong survival of corneal allograft in corneal allograft transplantation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jing; Wang, Dajiang; Chen, Guoling; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Han

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells could inhibit allograft rejection in corneal allograft transplantation mouse model. Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells were constructed by transfection of retroviral expression plasmid expressing Foxp3 into the sensi-Teff cells from a Balb/c mouse immunized by C57BL/6(H2b) mouse splenocytes. Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 5 groups: Four groups received tail vein injection of Foxp3-expressing sensitized Teff cells, or Foxp3-expressing Teff cells, or Treg cells or no intervention 1 day prior to corneal allograft transplantation. C57BL/6(H2b) was the donor mouse. The last group received corneal autograft transplantation. Corneal allograft survival time and percentage of CD4(+) T cells were detected. ELISPOT and Footpad swelling test were used to measure IL-2 and IFN-γ, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, respectively. Mice that had received an injection of Foxp3-expressing sensitized T cells prior to an allograft corneal transplantation, showed significantly longer survival time of corneal allograft, decreased percentage of CD4(+) T cells, IL-2 and IFN-γ, and alleviated footpad swelling than the mice that had received either Foxp3-Teff or Treg cells. Foxp3-sensi-Teff cell treatment that prolongs corneal allograft survival in the mouse model, might partly through suppressing CD4(+) T cells, IL-2 and IFN-γ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PDL1 is required for peripheral transplantation tolerance and protection from chronic allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Albin, Monica J; Yuan, Xueli; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Habicht, Antje; Murayama, Takaya; Grimm, Martin; Waaga, Ana Maria; Ueno, Takuya; Padera, Robert F; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Shin, Tahiro; Blazar, Bruce R; Rothstein, David M; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Najafian, Nader

    2007-10-15

    The PD-1:PDL pathway plays an important role in regulating alloimmune responses but its role in transplantation tolerance is unknown. We investigated the role of PD-1:PDL costimulatory pathway in peripheral and a well established model of central transplantation tolerance. Early as well as delayed blockade of PDL1 but not PDL2 abrogated tolerance induced by CTLA4Ig in a fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allograft model. Accelerated rejection was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing alloreactive T cells and expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells in the periphery, and a decline in the percentage of Foxp3(+) graft infiltrating cells. Similarly, studies using PDL1/L2-deficient recipients confirmed the results with Ab blockade. Interestingly, while PDL1-deficient donor allografts were accepted by wild-type recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, the grafts developed severe chronic rejection and vasculopathy when compared with wild-type grafts. Finally, in a model of central tolerance induced by mixed allogeneic chimerism, engraftment was not abrogated by PDL1/L2 blockade. These novel data demonstrate the critical role of PDL1 for induction and maintenance of peripheral transplantation tolerance by its ability to alter the balance between pathogenic and regulatory T cells. Expression of PDL1 in donor tissue is critical for prevention of in situ graft pathology and chronic rejection.

  13. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-09-03

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation.

  14. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  15. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  16. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  17. Human cell-mediated immune responses to chlamydial antigens.

    PubMed

    Hanna, L; Schmidt, L; Sharp, M; Stites, D P; Jawetz, E

    1979-02-01

    A reproducible method was developed to determine the ability of chlamydial antigens to stimulate lymphocytes from volunteers. In tests repeated 4 to 14 times, the cells from a given volunteer gave a relatively narrow range of responses, but there were great differences in the mean response of different volunteers. In the entire group of 52 volunteers, lymphocyte stimulation was significantly associated with the presence of antibody, but in a given individual results of one test did not aid in predicting the results of the other. A majority of persons with either antichlamydial antibody or elevated lymphocyte stimulation, or both, did not have a history of signs or symptoms within a spectrum of chlamydial diseases. This may reflect the great frequency of asymptomatic infection with these organisms. The lymphocytes of some individuals were stimulated to a significantly greater degree by antigens of one chlamydial species (Chlamydia trachomatis or C. psittaci) than by the other. These and other cell-mediated reactions in human chlamydial infections, and their possible medical significance, are under continued study.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. © 2016 Henry et al.

  19. Silibinin attenuates mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Ho; Yan, Guang Hai

    2009-05-01

    Silibinin is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, roles of silibinin in the immediate-type allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have not fully been investigated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that silibinin attenuated mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions involved in allergic diseases. Oral administration of silibinin inhibited compound 48/80-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reaction in mice. Silibinin also attenuated anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis. Silibinin had no cytotoxicity on rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC). Silibinin dose-dependently reduced histamine release from RPMC activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Moreover, silibinin inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in RPMC. Pretreatment of silibinin suppressed the antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in RPMC. Furthermore, silibinin increased the intracellular cAMP level. Increased cAMP, decreased calcium uptake and suppressed NF-kappaB activity might be involved in the inhibitory effect of silibinin on the secretory response. Our findings provide possibility that silibinin may serve as an effective therapeutic agent for allergic diseases.

  20. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  2. Endothelial cells mediate the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bei; Bailey, Alexis S.; Jiang, Shuguang; Liu, Bin; Goldman, Devorah C.; Fleming, William H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that endothelial cells are a critical component of the normal hematopoietic microenvironment. Therefore, we sought to determine whether primary endothelial cells have the capacity to repair damaged hematopoietic stem cells. Highly purified populations of primary CD31+ microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the brain or lung did not express the pan hematopoietic marker CD45, hematopoietic lineage markers, or the progenitor marker c-kit and did not give rise hematopoietic cells in vitro or in vivo. Remarkably, the transplantation of small numbers of these microvascular endothelial cells consistently restored hematopoiesis following bone marrow lethal doses of irradiation. Analysis of the peripheral blood of rescued recipients demonstrated that both short term and long term multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution was exclusively of host origin. Secondary transplantation studies revealed that microvascular endothelial cell-mediated hematopoietic regeneration also occurs at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell. These findings suggest a potential therapeutic role for microvascular endothelial cells in the self-renewal and repair of adult hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:19720572

  3. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  4. HIV-1 adaptation to NK cell mediated immune pressure

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Galit; Heckerman, David; Schneidewind, Arne; Fadda, Lena; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Oniangue-Ndza, Cesar; Martin, Maureen; Li, Bin; Khakoo, Salim I.; Carrington, Mary; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play an important role in the control of viral infections, recognizing virally infected cells through a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors1–3. Epidemiological and functional studies have recently suggested that NK cells can also contribute to the control of HIV-1 infection through recognition of virally infected cells by both activating and inhibitory Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs)4–7. However, it remains unknown whether NK cells can directly mediate antiviral immune pressure in vivo in humans. Here we describe KIR-associated amino acid polymorphisms in the HIV-1 sequence of chronically infected individuals on a population level. We show that these KIR-associated HIV-1 sequence polymorphisms can enhance the binding of inhibitory KIRs to HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells, leading to reduced antiviral activity of KIR+ NK cells. These data demonstrate that KIR+ NK cells can place immunological pressure on HIV-1, and that the virus can evade such NK cell mediated immune pressure by selecting for sequence polymorphisms, as previously described for virus-specific T cells and neutralizing antibodies8. NK cells might therefore play a previously underappreciated role in contributing to viral evolution. PMID:21814282

  5. Suppression of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Experimental African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Wallace, John H.

    1974-01-01

    Adult New Zealand white rabbits were experimentally infected with a parasitic African hemoflagellate, Trypanosoma congolense, and were subsequently tested for in vivo and in vitro aspects of cell-mediated immune function. Chronically infected rabbits were sensitized to mycobacterial protein and skin-tested with purified protein derivative; all infected animals demonstrated much milder skin-test responses to antigen than control groups. Similarly, peripheral blood lymphocyte responses in vitro to purified protein derivative and, as well, to phytohemagglutinin were markedly suppressed. Supernatant fluids of antigen-stimulated lymph node cell cultures from T. congolense-infected rabbits failed to demonstrate migration inhibitory factor activity but did possess normal levels of blastogenic factor activity. An active infection was necessary for demonstration of suppressed immune responses, and components present in infected rabbit serum were apparently not responsible for the observed abnormalities. Suppression of T-lymphocyte subpopulations may well explain the occurrence of numerous immunological aberrations arising during human and animal infections with the African trypanosomes. PMID:4854532

  6. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research.

  7. Natural Killer Cell Mediated Cytotoxic Responses in the Tasmanian Devil

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gabriella K.; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A. Bruce; Woods, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  8. Efficient use of a limited resource femoral head allograft: A comparison of allograft preparation methods.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy; Chow, Jason; Sivakumar, Brahman; Ahmed, Nushin; Smith, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the yield and compressed volume of femoral head allograft prepared by either hand morselization or a bone mill. Twenty human femoral head allografts were donated from a bone bank and morselized by two different methods. The heads were divided in half and split into two sample groups. One group underwent hand morselization with large bone nibblers, while the other was prepared using a bone mill. The volume of graft produced was measured. Ten-gram aliquots of each sample then underwent 30 impactions in a contained cavity, with the volume of graft compression measured. Bone milling yielded approximately 31% more usable graft than hand morselization (81% to 50%; p = 0.0001). There was no difference between the compressed volume of graft prepared by either method ( p = 0.14). This study demonstrates the efficacy of preparation of allograft with a bone mill and assists the clinician in determining the yield of graft by the weight of femoral head, thereby potentially minimizing excessive ordering and wastage.

  9. Allelic and Epitopic Characterization of Intra-Kidney Allograft Anti-HLA Antibodies at Allograft Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Milongo, D; Kamar, N; Del Bello, A; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Sallusto, F; Esposito, L; Dörr, G; Blancher, A; Congy-Jolivet, N

    2017-02-01

    The reasons for the increased incidence of de novo anti-human leukocyte antibody (HLA) donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) observed after kidney allograft nephrectomy are not fully understood. One advocated mechanism suggests that at graft loss, DSAs are not detected in the serum because they are fixed on the nonfunctional transplant; removal of the kidney allows DSAs to then appear in the blood circulation. The aim of our study was to compare anti-HLA antibodies present in the serum and in the graft at the time of an allograft nephrectomy. Using solid-phase assays, anti-HLA antibodies were searched for in the sera of 17 kidney transplant patients undergoing allograft nephrectomy. No anti-HLA antibodies were detected in the graft if they were not also detected in the serum. Eleven of the 12 patients who had DSAs detected in their sera also had DSAs detected in the grafts. Epitopic analysis revealed that most anti-HLA antibodies detected in removed grafts were directed against the donor. In summary, our data show that all anti-HLA antibodies that were detected in grafts were also detected in the sera. These intragraft anti-HLA antibodies are mostly directed against the donor at an epitopic level but not always at an antigenic level.

  10. [Hand allografts: experience from Lyon team].

    PubMed

    Gazarian, A; Abrahamyan, D-O; Petruzzo, P; Kanitakis, J; Guigal, V; Garret, J; Rizzo, C; Durand, P-Y; Fredenucci, J-F; Streichenberger, T; Parmentier, H; Galewicz, T; Guillot, M; Sirigu, A; Burloux, G; Morelon, E; Braye, F; Badet, L; Martin, X; Dubernard, J-M; Eljaafari, A

    2007-10-01

    Hand allograft is a method in the stage of clinical experimentation, which is reserved in France for the treatment of bilateral traumatic amputees. This study reports the Lyon team experience, which is pioneer in this domain. Four patients (3 males and 1 female) underwent seven (one unilateral and three bilateral) hand transplantations from September 1998 to February 2007. The level of amputation was at the wrist or at the mid-forearm. Delay since hand loss ranged from 2.5 to 9 years. The surgical protocol was elaborated and planned case by case. All recipients received the same immunosuppressive treatment. Episodes of acute rejection were observed in the first 3 months after transplantation, which were easily managed after a few days increasing oral prednisone doses and applying topical immunosuppressants. Currently the patients receive the doses of immunosuppressants comparable to those in kidney-grafted patients. We have not registered any severe complication of immunosuppressive treatment up till now (7 years follow-up for the earliest graft). We performed analytical and functional clinical, as well as questionnaire evaluation of patients. The first case (unilateral graft) resulted in graft failure at 2 years due to non-compliance of the patient. The three bilateral graftees demonstrate a favorable evolution despite some immunological (hyperglycemia, serum sickness) and surgical (thrombosis, osteomyelitis, skin loss) complications, which could be managed. The middle and long-term follow-up evaluation revealed good to excellent sensorimotor recovery of 4 hands in both male recipients (4 and 7 years) with satisfactory social adaptation, higher or equal to those expected after post-traumatic replantations at the equivalent level and higher to those obtained with currently available myoelectric prosthesis. The last patient, a young female who has been grafted in February 2007, receives ongoing reeducation course and shows normal progress of functional restoration

  11. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  12. Multifocal bacterial osteomyelitis in a renal allograft recipient following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Valson, A T; David, V G; Balaji, V; John, G T

    2014-05-01

    Non-tubercular bacterial osteomyelitis is a rare infection. We report on a renal allograft recipient with osteomyelitis complicating urosepsis, manifesting as a multifocal infection poorly responsive to appropriate antibiotics and surgical intervention and culminating in graft loss.

  13. Allorecognition by T Lymphocytes and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jose; Paster, Joshua; Benichou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of donor antigens by recipient T cells in secondary lymphoid organs initiates the adaptive inflammatory immune response leading to the rejection of allogeneic transplants. Allospecific T cells become activated through interaction of their T cell receptors with intact allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on donor cells (direct pathway) and/or donor peptides presented by self-MHC molecules on recipient antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (indirect pathway). In addition, recent studies show that alloreactive T cells can also be stimulated through recognition of allogeneic MHC molecules displayed on recipient APCs (MHC cross-dressing) after their transfer via cell–cell contact or through extracellular vesicles (semi-direct pathway). The specific allorecognition pathway used by T cells is dictated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the allograft and can influence the nature and magnitude of the alloresponse and rejection process. Consequently, various organs and tissues such as skin, cornea, and solid organ transplants are recognized differently by pro-inflammatory T cells through these distinct pathways, which may explain why these grafts are rejected in a different fashion. On the other hand, the mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs) recognize alloantigen and promote transplantation tolerance are still unclear. It is likely that thymic Tregs are activated through indirect allorecognition, while peripheral Tregs recognize alloantigens in a direct fashion. As we gain insights into the mechanisms underlying allorecognition by pro-inflammatory and Treg cells, novel strategies are being designed to prevent allograft rejection in the absence of ongoing immunosuppressive drug treatment in patients. PMID:28018349

  14. Bipolar fresh osteochondral allograft of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Sandro; Buda, Roberto; Grigolo, Brunella; Bevoni, Roberto; Di Caprio, Francesco; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Desando, Giovanna; Vannini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Severe post-traumatic ankle arthritis poses a reconstructive challenge in the young and active patient. Bipolar fresh osteochondral allograft (BFOA) may represent an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis and prosthetic replacement. The aim of this study was to describe a lateral trans-malleolar technique for BFOA, and to evaluate the results in a case series. From 2004 to 2006, 32 patients, mean age of 36.8 +/- 8.4 years, affected by ankle arthritis underwent BFOA with a mean followup of 31.2 months. The graft was prepared by specifically designed jigs, including the talus and the tibia with the medial malleolus. The host surfaces were prepared by the same jigs through a lateral approach. The graft was placed and fixed with twist-off screws. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically at 2, 4, and 6 month after operation, and at a minimum 24 months followup. A biopsy of the grafted areas was obtained from 7 patients at 1-year followup for histological and immunohistochemical examination. Preoperative AOFAS score was 33.1 +/- 10.9 and postoperatively 69.5 +/- 19.4 (p < 0.0005). Six failures occurred. Cartilage harvests showed hyaline-like histology with a normal collagen component but low proteoglycan presence and a disorganized structure. Samples were positive for MMP-1, MMP-13 and Capsase-3. The use of BFOA represents an intriguing alternative to arthrodesis or arthroplasty. We believe precise allograft sizing, stable fitting and fixation and delayed weightbearing were key factors for a successful outcome. Further research regarding the immunological behavior of transplanted cartilage is needed.

  15. Human Split-Thickness Skin Allograft from Brain-Dead Donors

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, A.; Olang, O; Makhllough, A; Nozary Heshmati, B.; Azmoudeh Ardalan, F.; Tavakoli, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Looking for an appropriate skin substitute for temporary and permanent coverage of wounds remains one of the main obstacles of medical researchers. Objective: To investigate the rate of inflammation, symbiosis, and survival of grafted allograft skin from brain-dead donors (BDDs) in rabbits. Methods: After receiving negative serologic tests of BDDs, we prepared partial thickness skin grafts. They were then used in treating wounds of 5 rabbits in comparison with split-thickness skins taken from cardiac dead donors. Results: On histopathological examinations, we found no difference between the skins. All samples were separated from the baseline in 15–20 days. Conclusion: Gamma-irradiated freeze-dried human split-thickness skin taken from BDDs is safe and can be used for the treatment of deep skin burns. PMID:27721966

  16. Autograft versus Allograft for Cervical Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S; Youssef, Jim A; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-02-01

    Systematic review. To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG), non-ICBG autologous bone, and allograft in cervical spine fusion. To avoid problems at the donor site, various allograft materials have been used as a substitute for autograft. However, there are still questions as to the comparative effectiveness and safety of cadaver allograft compared with autologous ICBG. A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases was conducted to identify studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with cervical degenerative disk disease using ICBG compared with non-ICBG autograft or allograft or non-ICBG autograft compared with allograft in the cervical spine. Radiographic fusion, patient-reported outcomes, and functional outcomes were the primary outcomes of interest. Adverse events were evaluated for safety. The search identified 13 comparative studies that met our inclusion criteria: 2 prospective cohort studies and 11 retrospective cohort studies. Twelve cohort studies compared allograft with ICBG autograft during anterior cervical fusion and demonstrated with a low evidence level of support that there are no differences in fusion percentages, pain scores, or functional results. There was insufficient evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with non-ICBG autograft for fusion, pain, revision, and functional and safety outcomes. No publications directly comparing non-ICBG autograft with ICBG were found. Although the available literature suggests ICBG and allograft may have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes following anterior cervical fusion, there are too many limitations in the available literature to draw any significant conclusions. No individual study provided greater than class III evidence, and when evaluating the overall body of literature, no conclusion had better than low evidence support. A prospective randomized trial with adequate sample size to

  17. Tuberculosis in a renal allograft: a successful outcome.

    PubMed

    George, Pratish; Pawar, Basant; Calton, Nalini

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in most South-East Asian countries including India. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients and often, it is not diagnosed early, due to its innocuous clinical presentations. A high index of suspicion and proactive management in the early phase of presentation can reduce allograft nephropathy, graft nephrectomy and mortality. A patient with an unusual presentation of tuberculosis localized to the allograft and successful management with anti-tuberculosis medications is described.

  18. Deceased donor skin allograft banking: Response and utilization

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Madhuri A.; De, Anuradha S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the absence of xenograft and biosynthetic skin substitutes, deceased donor skin allografts is a feasible option for saving life of patient with extensive burn injury in our country. Aims: The first deceased donor skin allograft bank in India became functional at Lokmanya Tilak Municipal (LTM) medical college and hospital on 24th April 2000. The response of Indian society to this new concept of skin donation after death and the pattern of utilization of banked allografts from 2000 to 2010 has been presented in this study. Settings and Design: This allograft skin bank was established by the department of surgery. The departments of surgery and microbiology share the responsibility of smooth functioning of the bank. Materials and Methods: The response in terms of number of donations and the profile of donors was analyzed from records. Pattern and outcome of allograft utilization was studied from specially designed forms. Results: During these ten years, 262 deceased donor skin allograft donations were received. The response showed significant improvement after counselling was extended to the community. Majority of the donors were above 70 years of age and procurement was done at home for most. Skin allografts from 249 donors were used for 165 patients in ten years. The outcome was encouraging with seven deaths in 151 recipients with burn injuries. Conclusions: Our experience shows that the Indian society is ready to accept the concept of skin donation after death. Use of skin allografts is life saving for large burns. We need to prepare guidelines for the establishment of more skin banks in the country. PMID:21321645

  19. Utility of sentinel flaps in assessing facial allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Kueckelhaus, Maximilian; Fischer, Sebastian; Lian, Christine G; Bueno, Ericka M; Marty, Francisco M; Tullius, Stefan G; Pribaz, Julian J; Murphy, George J; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsies are critical for histologic evaluation of rejection and proper treatment after facial allotransplantation. Many facial allografts provide only limited skin area, and frequent biopsies may also compromise aesthetic outcome. Sentinel flaps, recovered as free fasciocutaneous radial forearm flaps, have been used for remote-site rejection monitoring. They maintain their axial blood supply, similar to facial allografts. The correlation between facial allografts and sentinel flaps in cases of rejection is presented. The authors analyzed the experience of the Boston team's use of four sentinel flaps. Rejection was evaluated and results were compared for each time point. Sentinel flaps were used as functional flaps whenever possible. Results showed a reliable correlation between biopsy specimens taken from the facial allograft and sentinel flaps. During severe rejection episodes in 100 percent of biopsy pairs, both sites displayed a similar grade of rejection. In one case, clinical findings suggested rejection in the facial allograft but were unraveled as rosacea, because clinically there was no rejection displayed in the sentinel flap. The sentinel flap shows a reliable correlation to the facial allograft in cases of severe rejection, therefore providing a valuable tool for rejection monitoring in facial allotransplantation. Advantages of using these flaps include the avoidance of further surgical procedures to the primary vascularized composite allotransplant, additional use of the sentinel flap to repair damaged nonfacial sites, and its utility as both a clinical and histopathologic barometer of rejection and predictor of the potential existence of facial dermatitis unrelated to rejection. Therapeutic, IV.

  20. Complications of irradiated allografts in orthopaedic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Lietman, S A; Tomford, W W; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J

    2000-06-01

    Massive structural allografts used for replacement of bone defects after removal of bone tumors have several complications, including fracture, infection, and nonunion. To decrease the rate of infection, irradiation of selected allografts before their implantation was performed. This study evaluated the complications in patients with these irradiated grafts. Twenty-four patients were identified who had received allografts from 1987 through 1991 that were irradiated before implantation. The dosage of radiation was between 10 kGy and 30 kGy. The mean length of followup of the patients was 5 years (range, 2-9 years). These grafts were compared with a control group of grafts that were not irradiated but were implanted during the same time and used for similar diagnostic problems with defects of similar size. The outcomes of the groups differed significantly only in the incidence of allograft fracture. These findings indicate that high-dose irradiation to bone allografts is associated with a higher rate of fracture than are similar reconstructions using nonirradiated allografts.

  1. Primary integumentary allograft reactivity in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    George, J F; Howcroft, T K; Karp, R D

    1987-04-01

    Previous reports have failed to demonstrate integumentary allograft rejection in insects. We realized however, that these studies may not have fully appreciated the structure of the insect exoskeleton. Since the subcuticlar epidermal layer constitutes the only living tissue associated with insect integument, its destruction would indicate that the animal recognized and responded to the foreign tissue. Thus, we investigated allograft reactivity in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, by observing the fate of the epidermal portion of the integument. Each animal in a pair received a 3 X 4-mm integumentary allograft from its partner, as well as a 3 X 4-mm control autograft. The transplants were then examined histologically for signs of epidermal destruction at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10-70 days (in 10-day increments) posttransplantation. The results indicated that significant rejection of the allografts began by day 3, with peak reactivity occurring by day 7 when 92% of the grafts were scored as rejected. At later periods (greater than 20 days), the graft sites showed signs of repopulation by host epidermal cells. The allograft reaction was found to lag behind the xenograft reaction, which showed peak activity after only 1 day posttransplantation. Even so, allograft rejection in this insect occurred quite rapidly (as compared with some other invertebrates), and would appear to be due to a cytotoxic reaction against the epidermal layer.

  2. Ex Situ Perfusion of Human Limb Allografts for 24 Hours.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole L; Alghanem, Fares; Rakestraw, Stephanie L; Sarver, Dylan C; Nicely, Bruce; Pietroski, Richard E; Lange, Paul; Rudich, Steven M; Mendias, Christopher L; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Magee, John C; Bartlett, Robert H; Ozer, Kagan

    2017-03-01

    Vascularized composite allografts, particularly hand and forearm, have limited ischemic tolerance after procurement. In bilateral hand transplantations, this demands a 2 team approach and expedited transfer of the allograft, limiting the recovery to a small geographic area. Ex situ perfusion may be an alternative allograft preservation method to extend allograft survival time. This is a short report of 5 human limbs maintained for 24 hours with ex situ perfusion. Upper limbs were procured from brain-dead organ donors. Following recovery, the brachial artery was cannulated and flushed with 10 000 U of heparin. The limb was then attached to a custom-made, near-normothermic (30-33°C) ex situ perfusion system composed of a pump, reservoir, and oxygenator. Perfusate was plasma-based with a hemoglobin concentration of 4 to 6 g/dL. Average warm ischemia time was 76 minutes. Perfusion was maintained at an average systolic pressure of 93 ± 2 mm Hg, flow 310 ± 20 mL/min, and vascular resistance 153 ± 16 mm Hg/L per minute. Average oxygen consumption was 1.1 ± 0.2 mL/kg per minute. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation continually displayed contraction until the end of perfusion, and histology showed no myocyte injury. Human limb allografts appeared viable after 24 hours of near-normothermic ex situ perfusion. Although these results are early and need validation with transplantation, this technology has promise for extending allograft storage times.

  3. Engineering nanomaterials to address cell-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sean; Liu, Yu-Gang; Scott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder with a pathophysiology driven by both innate and adaptive immunity and a primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) worldwide. Vascular inflammation and accumulation of foam cells and their products induce maturation of atheromas, or plaques, which can rupture by metalloprotease action, leading to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. Diverse immune cell populations participate in all stages of plaque maturation, many of which directly influence plaque stability and rupture via inflammatory mechanisms. Current clinical treatments for atherosclerosis focus on lowering serum levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using therapeutics such as statins, administration of antithrombotic drugs, and surgical intervention. Strategies that address cell-mediated inflammation are lacking, and consequently have recently become an area of considerable research focus. Nanomaterials have emerged as highly advantageous tools for these studies, as they can be engineered to target specific inflammatory cell populations, deliver therapeutics of wide-ranging solubilities and enhance analytical methods that include imaging and proteomics. Furthermore, the highly phagocytic nature of antigen presenting cells (APCs), a diverse cell population central to the initiation of immune responses and inflammation, make them particularly amenable to targeting and modulation by nanoscale particulates. Nanomaterials have therefore become essential components of vaccine formulations and treatments for inflammation-driven pathologies like autoimmunity, and present novel opportunities for immunotherapeutic treatments of CVD. Here, we review recent progress in the design and use of nanomaterials for therapeutic assessment and treatment of atherosclerosis. We will focus on promising new approaches that utilize nanomaterials for cell-specific imaging, gene therapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27135051

  4. Intermediate outcomes with ex-vivo allograft perfusion for heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Joshua L; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Reich, Heidi J; Ramzy, Danny; Thottam, Maria M; Yu, Zhe; Aintablian, Tamar L; Liou, Frank; Patel, Jignesh K; Kittleson, Michelle M; Czer, Lawrence S; Trento, Alfredo; Esmailian, Fardad

    2017-03-01

    The Organ Care System, an ex-vivo heart perfusion platform, represents an alternative to the current standard of cold organ storage that sustains the donor heart in a near-physiologic state. It is unknown whether using the Organ Care System influences 2-year outcomes after heart transplantation. We reviewed our institutional experience to compare 2-year outcomes for patients randomized to the Organ Care System or standard cold storage. Between 2011 and 2013, heart transplant candidates from a single tertiary-care medical center enrolled within the PROCEED II trial were randomized to either standard cold storage or the Organ Care System. Outcomes assessed included 2-year survival, freedom from cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), non-fatal major cardiac events (NF-MACE), biopsy-proven cellular rejection (CMR) and biopsy-proven antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Thirty-eight patients were randomized to the Organ Care System (n = 19) or cold storage group (n = 19). There was no significant difference in 2-year patient survival (Organ Care System: 72.2%; cold storage: 81.6%; p = 0.38). Similarly, there were no differences in freedom from CAV, NF-MACE, CMR or AMR. The Organ Care System group had significantly longer total ischemia time (361 ± 96 minutes vs 207 ± 50 minutes; p < 0.001) and shorter cold ischemia time (134 ± 45 minutes vs 207 ± 50 minutes; p < 0.001) compared with the cold storage group. The Organ Care System did not appear to be associated with significant differences in intermediate results compared with conventional strategies. These results suggest that this ex-vivo allograft perfusion system is a promising and valid platform for donor heart transportation. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell-Mediated Immunity and Its Role in Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Edward J.; Remington, Jack S.

    1977-01-01

    The recently acquired knowledge of the importance of cell-mediated immunity in many illnesses and the discovery of a variety of substances that can restore certain cell-mediated immune functions has served to focus the attention of physicians on this area of immunity. It is important for practicing physicians to have a clear understanding of current knowledge of the role of cell-mediated immunity in resistance to infection and how this arm of the immune system relates to the diagnosis and therapy of infectious diseases. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:318786

  6. Immunosuppression in cardiac graft rejection: A human in vitro model to study the potential use of new immunomodulatory drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Crescioli, Clara Squecco, Roberta; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Sottili, Mariangela; Gelmini, Stefania; Borgogni, Elisa; Sarchielli, Erica; Scolletta, Sabino; Francini, Fabio; Annunziato, Francesco; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Serio, Mario

    2008-04-01

    CXCL10-CXCR3 axis plays a pivotal role in cardiac allograft rejection, so that targeting CXCL10 without inducing generalized immunosuppression may be of therapeutic significance in allotransplantation. Since the role of resident cells in cardiac rejection is still unclear, we aimed to establish reliable human cardiomyocyte cultures to investigate Th1 cytokine-mediated response in allograft rejection. We used human fetal cardiomyocytes (Hfcm) isolated from fetal hearts, obtained after legal abortions. Hfcm expressed specific cardiac lineage markers, specific cardiac structural proteins, typical cardiac currents and generated ventricular action potentials. Thus, Hfcm represent a reliable in vitro tool for allograft rejection research, since they resemble the features of mature cells. Hfcm secreted CXCL10 in response to IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}{alpha}; this effect was magnified by cytokine combination. Cytokine synergy was associated to a significant TNF{alpha}-induced up-regulation of IFN{gamma}R. The response of Hfcm to some currently used immunosuppressive drugs compared to rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist and Th1-mediated response inhibitor, was also evaluated. Only micophenolic acid and rosiglitazone halved CXCL10 secretion by Hfcm. Given the pivotal role of IFN{gamma}-induced chemokines in Th1-mediated allograft rejection, these preliminary results suggest that the combined effects of immunosuppressive agents and rosiglitazone could be potentially beneficial to patients receiving heart transplants.

  7. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  8. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  9. Development of a Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Program Outside North America

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Bugbee, William Dick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To standardize and to develop a fresh osteochondral allograft protocol of procurement, processing and surgical utilization in Brazil. This study describes the steps recommended to make fresh osteochondral allografts a viable treatment option in a country without previous fresh allograft availability. Design The process involves regulatory process modification, developing and establishing procurement, and processing and surgical protocols. Results Legislation: Fresh osteochondral allografts were not feasible in Brazil until 2009 because the law prohibited preservation of fresh grafts at tissue banks. We approved an amendment that made it legal to preserve fresh grafts for 30 days from 2°C to 6°C in tissue banks. Procurement: We changed the protocol of procurement to decrease tissue contamination. All tissues were procured in an operating room. Processing: Processing of the grafts took place within 12 hours of tissue recovery. A serum-free culture media with antibiotics was developed to store the grafts. Surgeries: We have performed 8 fresh osteochondral allografts on 8 knees obtaining grafts from 5 donors. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 31.99 ± 13.4, improving to 81.26 ± 14.7 at an average of 24 months’ follow-up. Preoperative Knee Injury and Oseoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score was 46.8 ± 20.9 and rose to 85.24 ± 13.9 after 24 months. Mean preoperative Merle D’Aubigne-Postel score was 8.75 ± 2.25 rising to 16.1 ± 2.59 at 24 months’ follow-up. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation in South America. We believe that this experience may be of value for physicians in countries that are trying to establish an osteochondral allograft transplant program. PMID:27375837

  10. Development of a Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Program Outside North America.

    PubMed

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Bugbee, William Dick

    2016-07-01

    To standardize and to develop a fresh osteochondral allograft protocol of procurement, processing and surgical utilization in Brazil. This study describes the steps recommended to make fresh osteochondral allografts a viable treatment option in a country without previous fresh allograft availability. The process involves regulatory process modification, developing and establishing procurement, and processing and surgical protocols. Legislation: Fresh osteochondral allografts were not feasible in Brazil until 2009 because the law prohibited preservation of fresh grafts at tissue banks. We approved an amendment that made it legal to preserve fresh grafts for 30 days from 2°C to 6°C in tissue banks. Procurement: We changed the protocol of procurement to decrease tissue contamination. All tissues were procured in an operating room. Processing: Processing of the grafts took place within 12 hours of tissue recovery. A serum-free culture media with antibiotics was developed to store the grafts. Surgeries: We have performed 8 fresh osteochondral allografts on 8 knees obtaining grafts from 5 donors. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 31.99 ± 13.4, improving to 81.26 ± 14.7 at an average of 24 months' follow-up. Preoperative Knee Injury and Oseoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score was 46.8 ± 20.9 and rose to 85.24 ± 13.9 after 24 months. Mean preoperative Merle D'Aubigne-Postel score was 8.75 ± 2.25 rising to 16.1 ± 2.59 at 24 months' follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation in South America. We believe that this experience may be of value for physicians in countries that are trying to establish an osteochondral allograft transplant program.

  11. Methenamine silver staining quantitative digital histochemistry in chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Sakar, M; Sonmez, D; Tekis, D

    2004-12-01

    Renal function and final outcome of renal allografts have been correlated with irreversible damage. This study describes a quantitative histochemical method relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining of all renal compartments. Among 60 renal allograft biopsies from 43 patients, 15 biopsies showing pure chronic allograft nephropathy were selected to determine PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP), using image analysis with quantitative histochemistry. Of the 15 cases, 9 (60%) were grade I and 6 (40%) were grade II chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The mean serum creatinine (sCr) value was 1.86 +/- 0.47 for allograft biopsies. The mean (+/-SD) SAP for the implantation biopsies was 10.58 +/- 1.87%, and for allograft biopsies 25.26 +/- 9.67 (P <.000). The serum creatinine (sCr) values for grade I versus II CAN were 1.63 +/- 0.24 versus 2.20 +/- 0.54 mg/dL, respectively (P=.019), and SAP values were 18.97 +/- 0.24 versus 34.7 +/- 5.89 (P=.003). There was a strong positive correlation between sCr values and SAP (P=.005; r=0.64). These findings show the PAMS approach to be a useful alternative method for reflecting damage in more than one compartment of the renal tissue. Also, the method can discriminated implantation and allograft biopsies as well as grade I and II CAN cases. The series is small for a multivariate analysis of the value of SAP measurements in PAMS-stained sections as a prognosticator, but the data support its use.

  12. Excellent results of cardiac surgery in patients with previous liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Filsoufi, Farzan; Rahmanian, Parwis B; Castillo, Javier G; Karlof, Eva; Schiano, Thomas D; Adams, David H

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases requiring surgical therapy in patients with prior liver transplantation are rare. Little is known about the outcome of patients with liver allograft undergoing cardiac surgery. Herein we report our experience in this patient population with an emphasis on operative outcomes and mid-term survival. Between January 1998 and December 2004, 12 patients (mean +/- standard deviation age 68 +/- 9 years, 7 [58%] male) with previous liver transplantation who underwent cardiac surgery were identified. Main outcome measures were hospital mortality, postoperative complications, allograft function, and long-term survival. There was no in-hospital mortality. Three major complications (25%) occurred, including 1 each (8%) of respiratory failure, renal failure, and biliary leakage. All complications were resolved by the time of discharge. Allograft dysfunction determined by an increase of liver function parameters was noticed in 4 (33%) and recovered before discharge. The average length of stay in intensive care unit was 72 +/- 45 hours, and the mean length of stay in hospital was 22 +/- 17 days. One- and 5-year survival was 91% +/- 8% and 67% +/- 14%, respectively. Cardiac surgery can be performed safely in liver transplant recipients with extremely low mortality and acceptable morbidities. Allograft dysfunction is a common finding, but it is transient, with early functional recovery. Five-year survival of liver recipients undergoing cardiac procedures is similar to that of the general population undergoing cardiac surgery. Our data suggest that these patients should be considered for cardiac surgery in reference centers with expertise in complex cardiac procedures and perioperative management of these highly specific patients.

  13. CCR5 and CXCR3 Are Dispensable for Liver Infiltration, but CCR5 Protects against Virus-Induced T-Cell-Mediated Hepatic Steatosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Holst, P. J.; Orskov, C.; Qvortrup, K.; Christensen, J. P.; Thomsen, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR3 are important molecules in regulating the migration of activated lymphocytes. Thus, the majority of tissue-infiltrating T cells found in the context of autoimmune conditions and viral infections express CCR5 and CXCR3, and the principal chemokine ligands are expressed within inflamed tissues. Accordingly, intervention studies have pointed to nonredundant roles of these receptors in models of allograft rejection, viral infection, and autoimmunity. In spite of this, considerable controversy exists, with many studies failing to support a role for CCR5 or CXCR3 in disease pathogenesis. One possible explanation is that different chemokine receptors may take over in the absence of any individual receptor, thus rendering individual receptors redundant. We have attempted to address this issue by analyzing CCR5−/−, CXCR3−/−, and CCR5/CXCR3−/− mice with regard to virus-induced liver inflammation, generation and recruitment of effector cells, virus control, and immunopathology. Our results indicate that CCR5 and CXCR3 are largely dispensable for tissue infiltration and virus control. In contrast, the T-cell response is accelerated in CCR5−/− and CCR5/CXCR3−/− mice and the absence of CCR5 is associated with the induction of CD8+ T-cell-mediated immunopathology consisting of marked hepatic microvesicular steatosis. PMID:17626099

  14. Transmission of infection with human allografts: essential considerations in donor screening.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jay A; Greenwald, Melissa A; Grossi, Paolo A

    2012-09-01

    Transmission of infection via transplantation of allografts including solid organs, eyes, and tissues are uncommon but potentially life-threatening events. Donor-derived infections have been documented following organ, tissue, and ocular transplants. Each year, more than 70 000 organs, 100 000 corneas, and 2 million human tissue allografts are implanted worldwide. Single donors may provide allografts for >100 organ and tissue recipients; each allograft carries some, largely unquantifiable, risk of disease transmission. Protocols for screening of organ or tissue donors for infectious risk are nonuniform, varying with the type of allograft, national standards, and availability of screening assays. In the absence of routine, active surveillance, coupled with the common failure to recognize or report transmission events, few data are available on the incidence of allograft-associated disease transmission. Research is needed to define the optimal screening assays and the transmissibility of infection with allografts. Approaches are reviewed that may contribute to safety in allograft transplantation.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Elastography to Assess Fibrosis in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Kirpalani, Anish; Hashim, Eyesha; Leung, General; Kim, Jin K; Krizova, Adriana; Jothy, Serge; Deeb, Maya; Jiang, Nan N; Glick, Lauren; Mnatzakanian, Gevork; Yuen, Darren A

    2017-10-06

    Fibrosis is a major cause of kidney allograft injury. Currently, the only means of assessing allograft fibrosis is by biopsy, an invasive procedure that samples <1% of the kidney. We examined whether magnetic resonance elastography, an imaging-based measure of organ stiffness, could noninvasively estimate allograft fibrosis and predict progression of allograft dysfunction. Kidney allograft recipients >1 year post-transplant undergoing an allograft biopsy first underwent free-breathing, flow-compensated magnetic resonance elastography on a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Each patient had serial eGFR measurements after the elastography scan for a follow-up period of up to 1 year. The mean stiffness value of the kidney allograft was compared with both the histopathologic Banff fibrosis score and the rate of eGFR change during the follow-up period. Sixteen patients who underwent magnetic resonance elastography and biopsy were studied (mean age: 54±9 years old). Whole-kidney mean stiffness ranged between 3.5 and 7.3 kPa. Whole-kidney stiffness correlated with biopsy-derived Banff fibrosis score (Spearman rho =0.67; P<0.01). Stiffness was heterogeneously distributed within each kidney, providing a possible explanation for the lack of a stronger stiffness-fibrosis correlation. We also found negative correlations between whole-kidney stiffness and both baseline eGFR (Spearman rho =-0.65; P<0.01) and eGFR change over time (Spearman rho =-0.70; P<0.01). Irrespective of the baseline eGFR, increased kidney stiffness was associated with a greater eGFR decline (regression r(2)=0.48; P=0.03). Given the limitations of allograft biopsy, our pilot study suggests the potential for magnetic resonance elastography as a novel noninvasive measure of whole-allograft fibrosis burden that may predict future changes in kidney function. Future studies exploring the utility and accuracy of magnetic resonance elastography are needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of

  16. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  17. Recurrent renal allograft dysfunction due to ureteric stenosis in a patient with the BK virus infection.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Yogesh N V; Trabert, Johannes; Wunderer, Florian; Abraham, Georgi; Reddy, Yuvaram N V

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of the genitourinary tract in association with the BK virus (BKV) infection are increasing among renal allograft recipients. We herewith report a young, female renal transplant recipient who presented with allograft dysfunction secondary to proximal ureteric stenosis. The allograft function improved dramatically after correction and stenting of the stenosis. Our case suggests that screening for BKV infection should be an integral part of evaluation of allograft dysfunction.

  18. Imaging mouse lung allograft rejection with 1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinbang; Huang, Howard J.; Wang, Xingan; Wang, Wei; Ellison, Henry; Thomen, Robert P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that longitudinal, non-invasive monitoring via MRI can characterize acute cellular rejection (ACR) in mouse orthotopic lung allografts. Methods Nineteen Balb/c donor to C57BL/6 recipient orthotopic left lung transplants were performed, further divided into control-Ig vs anti-CD4/anti-CD8 treated groups. A two-dimensional multi-slice gradient-echo pulse sequence synchronized with ventilation was used on a small-animal MR scanner to acquire proton images of lung at post-operative days 3, 7 and 14, just before sacrifice. Lung volume and parenchymal signal were measured, and lung compliance was calculated as volume change per pressure difference between high and low pressures. Results Normalized parenchymal signal in the control-Ig allograft increased over time, with statistical significance between day 14 and day 3 post transplantation (0.046→0.789, P < 0.05), despite large inter-mouse variations; this was consistent with histopathologic evidence of rejection. Compliance of the control-Ig allograft decreased significantly over time (0.013→0.003, P < 0.05), but remained constant in mice treated with anti-CD4/anti-CD8 antibodies. Conclusion Lung allograft rejection in individual mice can be monitored by lung parenchymal signal changes and by lung compliance through MRI. Longitudinal imaging can help us better understand the time course of individual lung allograft rejection and response to treatment. PMID:24954886

  19. T-cell alloimmunity and chronic allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Niloufar; Afzali, Behdad; Atalar, Kerem; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I

    2010-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the standard treatment to improve both the quality of life and survival in patients with various end-stage organ diseases. The primary barrier against successful transplantation is recipient alloimmunity and the need to be maintained on immunosuppressive therapies with associated side effects. Despite such treatments in renal transplantation, after death with a functioning graft, chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Recipient recognition of donor histocompatibility antigens, via direct, indirect, and semidirect pathways, is critically dependent on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and elicits effector responses dominated by recipient T cells. In allograft rejection, the engagement of recipient and donor cells results in recruitment of T-helper (Th) cells of the Th1 and Th17 lineage to the graft. In cases in which the alloresponse is dominated by regulatory T cells (Tregs), rejection can be prevented and the allograft tolerated with minimum or no immunosuppression. Here, we review the pathways of allorecognition that underlie CAD and the T-cell effector phenotypes elicited as part of the alloresponse. Future therapies including depletion of donor-reactive lymphocytes, costimulation blockade, negative vaccination using dendritic cell subtypes, and Treg therapy are inferred from an understanding of these mechanisms of allograft rejection.

  20. Significant prolongation of segmental pancreatic allograft survival in two species

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the suppression of segmental pancreatic allograft rejection by cyclosporine (CSA) alone in baboons and dogs, and subtotal marrow irradiation (TL1) alone and TL 1 in combination with CSA in baboons. Total pancreatectomy in the dog and primate provided a reliable diabetic model, induced an absolute deficiency of insulin and was uniformly lethal if not treated. Continuous administration of CSA in baboons resulted in modest allograft survival. As in baboons, dogs receiving CSA 25 mg/kg/d rendered moderate graft prolongation but a dose of 40 mg/kg/d resulted in significant graft survival (greater than 100 days) in 5 of 8 allograft recipients. Irradiation alone resulted in minimal baboon pancreatic allograft survival of 20 baboons receiving TL1 1,000 rad and CSA, 3 had graft survival greater than of 100 days. Of 15 baboons receiving TL1 800 rad and CSA, 6 had graft survival of greater than 100 days. In conclusion, CSA administration in dogs and TL1 in combination with CSA in baboons resulted in highly significant segmental pancreatic allograft survival.

  1. Factors affecting nonunion of the allograft-host junction.

    PubMed

    Hornicek, F J; Gebhardt, M C; Tomford, W W; Sorger, J I; Zavatta, M; Menzner, J P; Mankin, H J

    2001-01-01

    Nonunion of allograft-host junction after bone transplantation is not uncommon, and its treatment frequently is problematic. To improve the understanding of these nonunions, a retrospective review was performed of 163 nonunions in 945 patients who underwent allograft transplantation (17.3%) for various benign and malignant tumors at the authors' institution between 1974 and 1997. Of these 945 patients, 558 did not receive adjuvant therapy. Chemotherapy was administered to 354 patients and only 33 patients received radiation therapy alone. Seventy-one patients had radiation treatment and chemotherapy. Of the 163 patients who had nonunion develop at the allograft-host junction, there were 269 reoperations performed on the involved extremity. In 108 patients, treatment was successful resulting in union of the allograft-host junction. Forty-nine patients did not respond to multiple surgical treatment attempts. The greater the number of surgical procedures, the worse the outcome. The rate of nonunions increased to 27% for the patients who received chemotherapy as compared with 11% for the patients who did not receive chemotherapy. The order of allografts from highest rate of nonunion to lowest was as follows: alloarthrodesis, intercalary, osteoarticular, and alloprosthesis. Infection and fracture rates were higher in the patients with nonunions as compared with the patients without nonunions.

  2. Morphological and functional alterations in glycerol preserved rat aortic allografts.

    PubMed

    Fahner, P J; Idu, M M; Legemate, D A; Vanbavel, E; Borstlap, J; Pfaffendorf, M; van Marle, J; van Gulik, T M

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol preservation is an effective method for long-term preservation of skin allografts and has a potential use in preserving arterial allografts. We evaluated the effect of glycerol concentration and incubation period on vessel-wall integrity of rat aortic allografts. No significant differences were measured in breaking strength (2.3 +/- 0.3 N) and bursting pressure (223 +/- 32 kPa) between standard glycerolized and control segments (1.7 +/- 0.3 N, 226 +/- 17 kPa). Isometric tension measurements showed complete lack of functional contraction and relaxation capacity in allograft segments prepared according to all preservation protocols. Morphologically, thickness of the vessel-wall media diminished after preservation using low (30/50/75%) or high (70/85/98%) concentrations of glycerol, as compared to control segments (i.e. 81 +/- 2.4 microm, 95 +/- 5.6 microm and 125 +/- 3.5 microm, respectively). Confocal microscopy and Fourier analysis demonstrated that vascular collagen and elastin bundle orientation had remained unaltered. Electron microscopy showed defragmentation of luminal endothelial cells. In conclusion, glycerol preservation of rat aorta resulted in an acellular tissue matrix, which maintained biomechanical integrity and extracellular matrix characteristics. The next step in the investigation will be to test the concept of glycerol preservation of arterial allografts in a vascular transplantation model.

  3. Differential gene expression pattern in biopsies with renal allograft pyelonephritis and allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Oghumu, Steve; Nori, Uday; Bracewell, Anna; Zhang, Jianying; Bott, Cherri; Nadasdy, Gyongyi M.; Brodsky, Sergey V.; Pelletier, Ronald; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from acute rejection (AR) in renal allograft biopsies can sometimes be difficult because of overlapping clinical and histologic features, lack of positive urine cultures, and variable response to antibiotics. We wanted to study differential gene expression between AR and APN using biopsy tissue. Thirty-three biopsies were analyzed using NanoString multiplex platform and PCR (6 transplant baseline biopsies, 8 AR, 15 APN [8 culture positive, 7 culture negative], and 4 native pyelonephritis [NP]). Additional 22 biopsies were tested by PCR to validate the results. CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IDO1 were the top differentially expressed genes, upregulated in AR. Lactoferrin (LTF) and CXCL1 were higher in APN and NP. No statistically significant difference in transcript levels was seen between culture-positive and culture-negative APN biopsies. Comparing the overall mRNA signature using Ingenuity pathway analysis, interferon-gamma emerged as the dominant upstream regulator in AR and allograft APN, but not in NP (which clustered separately). Our study suggests that chemokine pathways in graft APN may differ from NP and in fact resemble AR, due to a component of alloreactivity, resulting in variable response to antibiotic treatment. Therefore, cautious addition of steroids might help in resistant cases of graft APN. PMID:27352120

  4. CD256 can be found in antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection tissues.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; He, Xiaozhou; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Hui; Shi, Qianqian; Zhu, Yibei; Zhang, Xueguang

    2012-01-01

    CD256 and CD257 belong to the TNFSF (Tumor necrosis factor superfamily), share closest homology structure, and can form functional heterotrimers. They may be involved in the progression of SLE (Systemic lupus erythematosus), RA (Rheumatoid arthritis), and other autoimmune disorders. In this present study, CD256 and some related molecules were detected and were investigated regarding the potential role of the CD256 signal during the development of renal allograft rejection. In 2009, 46 cases of renal allografts were collected, excised for evaluation of dysfunction, and 10 renal protocol biopsies with normal renal function were controlled. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was applied to detect CD256, CD257, C4d, CD138 and other related molecules. HistoQuest Analysis software and SPSS16.0 were used to read and analyse the results. Pathological diagnosis was made according to Banff 2005 guidelines: antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) 15 cases, T-cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) 16 cases, and 15 unknown aetiology cases (UAC). IHC results showed that CD256, CD257, and receptors for B cell activating factor receptor (BAFF-R), B cell maturation antigen (BCMA), and transmembrane activator calcium modulator, and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) were expressed on the membrane/cytoplasm of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) in the ABMR and TCMR group, while these molecules were not or weakly expressed in UAC and protocol biopsies. CD257 strong staining could be seen in ABMR, CD256 strong staining in both BCMR and TCMR, and there was statistical significance compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The receptors BAFF-R, BCMA, and TACI all strongly stained in ABMR, TACI also stained strongly in TCMR, and there was statistical significance compared with other groups (p < 0.05). The CD138+ molecule could be found in the renal interstitium and membrane/cytoplasm of RTEC, the CD138 mean expression in ABMR was statistically higher than other groups (p < 0.05). The correlation

  5. Allograft Reconstruction for the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Tumors of the Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Tinao, Luis A.; Ayerza, Miguel A.; Muscolo, D. Luis; Farfalli, German L.

    2013-01-01

    In comparison with the lower extremity, there is relatively paucity literature reporting survival and clinical results of allograft reconstructions after excision of a bone tumor of the upper extremity. We analyze the survival of allograft reconstructions in the upper extremity and analyze the final functional score according to anatomical site and type of reconstruction. A consecutive series of 70 allograft reconstruction in the upper limb with a mean followup of 5 years was analyzed, 38 osteoarticular allografts, 24 allograft-prosthetic composites, and 8 intercalary allografts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of the allografts was performed, with implant revision for any cause and amputation used as the end points. The function evaluation was performed using MSTS functional score. Sixteen patients (23%) had revision surgery for 5 factures, 2 infections, 5 allograft resorptions, and 2 local recurrences. Allograft survival at five years was 79% and 69% at ten years. In the group of patients treated with an osteoarticular allograft the articular surface survival was 90% at five years and 54% at ten years. The limb salvage rate was 98% at five and 10 years. We conclude that articular deterioration and fracture were the most frequent mode of failure in proximal humeral osteoarticular reconstructions and allograft resorption in elbow reconstructions. The best functional score was observed in the intercalary humeral allograft. PMID:23476115

  6. Circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies are a major factor in premature and accelerated allograft fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gosset, Clément; Viglietti, Denis; Rabant, Marion; Vérine, Jérôme; Aubert, Olivier; Glotz, Denis; Legendre, Christophe; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Duong Van-Huyen, Jean-Paul; Loupy, Alexandre; Lefaucheur, Carmen

    2017-09-01

    Addressing the causes of kidney allograft-accelerated aging is an important challenge for improving long-term transplant outcomes. Here we investigated the role of circulating donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (HLA-DSAs) in the development and the progression of kidney allograft fibrosis with inclusion of traditional risk factors for allograft fibrosis. We prospectively enrolled 1539 consecutive kidney recipients transplanted in two centers and assessed interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IF/TA) in biopsies performed at one year post-transplantation. The HLA-DSAs and all traditional determinants of IF/TA were recorded at transplantation and within the first year post-transplantation, including histological diagnoses in 2260 "for cause" biopsies. This identified 498 (32%) patients with severe IF/TA (Banff IF/TA grade 2 or more). HLA-DSAs were significantly associated with severe IF/TA (adjusted odds ratio, 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.16-2.01) after including 37 determinants. HLA-DSAs remained significantly associated with severe IF/TA in patients without antibody-mediated rejection (adjusted odds ratio 1.54; 1.11-2.14). HLA-DSAs were the primary contributor, being involved in 11% of cases, while T cell-mediated rejection, calcineurin-inhibitor toxicity, acute tubular necrosis, pyelonephritis, and BK virus-associated nephropathy were involved in 9%, 8%, 6%, 5%, and 4% of cases, respectively. One hundred fifty-four patients with HLA-DSA-associated severe IF/TA showed significantly increased microvascular inflammation, transplant glomerulopathy, C4d deposition in capillaries, and decreased allograft survival compared to 344 patients with severe IF/TA without HLA-DSAs. Three hundred seventy-eight patients with post-transplant HLA-DSAs exhibited significantly accelerated progression of IF/TA compared to 1161 patients without HLA-DSAs in the biopsies performed at one year post-transplant and beyond. Thus, circulating HLA-DSAs are major determinants of

  7. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  8. Cholera toxin-induced tolerance to allografts in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, S; Taniguchi, M; Shinomiya, N; Fujisawa, H; Zinnaka, Y; Nomoto, K

    1987-01-01

    When C3H/HeN (C3H) mice were primed with viable C57BL/6 (B6) spleen cells and treated with cholera toxin (CT) on the same day, a profound tolerance to tumour allografts of B6 origin was induced. The tolerant state was sustained for as long as 6 weeks or more. Skin allografts of B6 were rejected by such tolerant C3H mice, although the survival times were prolonged very slightly. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes was reduced markedly in the tolerant mice, whereas delayed footpad reaction to B6 cells was maintained at the normal immune level or higher. There is a possibility that a T-cell subset responsible for delayed footpad reaction is resistant to CT-induced tolerance and participates in the rejection of skin allografts in tolerant mice. PMID:2438209

  9. Cefuroxime, rifampicin and pulse lavage in decontamination of allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M; Laitinen, M; Pirkkalainen, S; Vuento, R

    2004-03-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogenic bone transplantation is one of the major problems facing tissue banks. Different screening methods and decontamination procedures are being used to achieve a safe surgical result. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contamination rate in fresh frozen bone allografts after treating them with different decontamination methods. The allografts were contaminated by rubbing on the operating theatre floor for 60 min, after which they were rinsed either with sterile physiological saline, cefuroxime or rifampicin solution or they were washed with low-pressure pulse lavage of sterile physiological saline. Our findings show that low-pressure pulse lavage with sterile saline solution is very effective in removing bacteria from bone allograft, when compared with the antibiotic solutions tested.

  10. Lung transplantation: chronic allograft dysfunction and establishing immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gracon, Adam S A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-08-01

    Despite significant medical advances since the advent of lung transplantation, improvements in long-term survival have been largely unrealized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction, in particular obliterative bronchiolitis, is the primary limiting factor. The predominant etiology of obliterative bronchiolitis involves the recipient's innate and adaptive immune response to the transplanted allograft. Current therapeutic strategies have failed to provide a definitive treatment paradigm to improve long-term outcomes. Inducing immune tolerance is an emerging therapeutic strategy that abrogates allograft rejection, avoids immunosuppression, and improves long-term graft function. The aim of this review is to discuss the key immunologic components of obliterative bronchiolitis, describe the state of establishing immune tolerance in transplantation, and highlight those strategies being evaluated in lung transplantation.

  11. Mechanisms of stem subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne; Frei, Hanspeter; Duncan, Clive; Fernlund, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Failure of the femoral component of total hip arthroplasty is often accompanied by bone loss that can pose a significant challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Femoral impaction allografting has attractive potential for restoring bone stock in deficient femurs. However, there have been reports of problematic postoperative stem subsidence with this procedure. Subsidence is highly variable among patients, and there is disagreement over the mechanisms that cause it. This article reviews the various mechanisms that can contribute to subsidence in femoral impaction allografting. Variables such as graft density, cement penetration profile, use of synthetic graft substitutes, or other graft additives are discussed, as well as their potential impact on subsidence. Finally, recommendations are made for future studies aiming to reduce the risk of excessive subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

  12. Immunomodulatory Strategies Directed Towards Tolerance of Vascularized Composite Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Sebastian G.; Villani, Vincenzo; Muraglia, Glenn M. La; Torabi, Radbeh; Leonard, David A.; Randolph, Mark A.; Colvin, Robert B.; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Madsen, Joren C.; Cetrulo, Curtis L.; Sachs, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achieving tolerance of vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) would improve the risk-to-benefit ratio in patients who undergo this life-enhancing, though not life-saving, transplant. Kidney co-transplantation along with a short course of high-dose immunosuppression enables tolerance of heart allografts across a full MHC mismatch. In this study, we investigated whether tolerance of VCA across full MHC disparities could be achieved in animals already tolerant of heart and kidney allografts. Methods Miniature swine that were tolerant of heart and/or kidney allografts long-term underwent transplantation of myocutaneous VCA across the same MHC barrier. Prior to VCA transplant, Group 1 (n=3) underwent Class I-mismatched kidney transplantation; Group 2 (n=3) underwent two sequential Class I-mismatched kidney transplantations; Group 3 (n=2) underwent haploidentical MHC-mismatched heart/kidney transplantation; and Group 4 (n=2) underwent full MHC-mismatched heart/kidney transplantation. Results All three animals in Group 1 and two of three animals in Group 2 showed skin rejection ≤85 days; one animal in Group 2 showed prolonged skin survival >200 days. Animals in Groups 3 and 4 showed skin rejection ≤30 days and regained in vitro evidence of donor responsiveness. Conclusion This is the first pre-clinical study in which hearts, kidneys, and VCAs have been transplanted into the same recipient. Despite VCA rejection, tolerance of heart and kidney allografts was maintained. These results suggest that regulatory tolerance of skin is possible but not generally achieved by the same level of immunomodulation that is capable of inducing tolerance of heart and kidney allografts. Achieving tolerance of skin may require additional immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:25757218

  13. Postransplant lymphoproliferative disorder localized near the allograft in renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kew, C E; Lopez-Ben, R; Smith, J K; Robbin, M L; Cook, W J; Gaston, R S; Deierhoi, M H; Julian, B A

    2000-03-15

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a complication of immunosuppression, develops in approximately 1% of renal allograft recipients. Typically, PTLD is a proliferation of B-cells associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection; it is said to be most often a systemic disease. Involvement occasionally is localized near the allograft. This is a retrospective analysis of all cases of PTLD in recipients of 1474 renal transplants performed at University of Alabama at Birmingham between 1993 and 1997. Of 14 patients developing PTLD, 10 had disease localized near the allograft. The mean interval from transplantation to diagnosis was 221 +/- 70 days. All patients presented with renal dysfunction; an ultrasound examination revealed a hilar mass, with hydronephrosis in five and stenosis of renal vessels in eight. No patient had lymphadenopathy, according to computerized tomographic or magnetic resonance imaging findings. After reduction of immunosuppressive therapy, seven required a nephrectomy because of rejection, progressive dysfunction, or mass enlargement. Tissue recovered in four patients was consistent with PTLD; the tumors in the remaining three patients were unresectable and regressed. One patient died 1 month after a nephrectomy, and another died 4 years after surgery; neither had evidence of PTLD when they died. Three patients retain functional grafts without clinical or radiographical evidence of progression. All patients with disseminated disease died. In a large cohort of renal allograft recipients, PTLD affected 1%. Disease localized near the allograft was the most common variant. For most patients with localized disease, the outcome was graft loss, and the mortality was low. Localized PTLD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of allograft dysfunction in the 1st posttransplant year.

  14. Autograft versus sterilized allograft for lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian A.; Barg, Alexej; Vavken, Patrick; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sterilized allografts may be less resistant to collapse and prone to nonunion leading to loss of correction in open wedge osteotomies. These adverse events usually occur at early time points (i.e., < 9 months postoperatively). The goal of this study was to compare sterilized allografts to autologous grafts in respect to secondary loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation after lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies. Fifty patients (22 F/ 28 M, age: 16–69 years) who had undergone 50 lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies for adult flatfoot deformity were included in this retrospective study. Cortical sterilized allografts were used in 25 patients, autologous grafts in the remaining 25. Patients’ preoperative, 6 and 12 weeks, and 6 to 9 months follow-up weight-bearing radiographs of the affected foot were analyzed by 2 blinded radiologists: on each radiograph, graft incorporation, the talo-first metatarsal angle (TFMA), the talo-navicular coverage angle (TNCA), and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) were assessed. Loss of hindfoot alignment was defined as an increase of the TFMA or the TNCA or a decrease of the CPA, each by 5°. Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for TFMA, TNCA, and CPA measurements ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. At all follow-up visits, the ratio of patients with loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation was not significantly different between the allograft and autograft group. However, loss of correction was associated with failure of graft incorporation. Compared with autografts, sterilized allografts do not increase the risk for loss of hindfoot alignment in lateral column lengthening of the calcaneus. With respect to mechanical resistance, allografts thus mean an equal and valid alternative without risk of donor site morbidities. PMID:27472719

  15. Accelerated acute allograft rejection accompanied by enhanced T-cell proliferation and attenuated Treg function in RBP-J deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tao; Zhang, Ping; Feng, Lei; Ji, Gang; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Zheng, Min-Hua; Qin, Hong-Yan; Chen, Dong-Li; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Han, Hua

    2011-02-01

    Acute allograft rejection (AAR) involves both the innate and the adaptive immune systems. As a critical pathway in peripheral T-cell differentiation and function, Notch signaling is potentially involved in the modulation of AAR, but its role in alloimmune responses has not been fully addressed. By using fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation model and T-cell specific RBP-J deficient mice, we examined the role of Notch/RBP-J pathway in alloimmune responses in vivo. AAR was significantly accelerated in RBP-J deficient mice compared with the wild-type controls, as demonstrated by the marked reduction in graft survival. The reduction in graft survival was associated with augmented alloantigen specific T-cell proliferation and increased number of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cells in the RBP-J deficient recipient mice. Furthermore, although the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs was intact in RBP-J knockout recipients, their ability to suppress Teff responses in vitro was significantly dampened. These findings suggest that Notch/RBP-J pathway may attenuate AAR by suppressing in vivo expansion of alloreactive T-cell proliferation and facilitating CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg suppression ability, indicating that Notch pathway could be exploited to limit T-cell-mediated AAR. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary metabolomics for noninvasive detection of borderline and acute T cell-mediated rejection in children after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Blydt-Hansen, T D; Sharma, A; Gibson, I W; Mandal, R; Wishart, D S

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of urinary metabolomics for noninvasive diagnosis of T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) in pediatric kidney transplant recipients. Urine samples (n = 277) from 57 patients with surveillance or indication kidney biopsies were assayed for 134 unique metabolites by quantitative mass spectrometry. Samples without TCMR (n = 183) were compared to borderline tubulitis (n = 54) and TCMR (n = 30). Partial least squares discriminant analysis identified distinct classifiers for TCMR (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.892; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.827-0.957) and borderline tubulitis (AUC = 0.836; 95% CI 0.781-0.892), respectively. Application of the TCMR classifier to borderline tubulitis samples yielded a discriminant score (-0.47 ± 0.33) mid-way between TCMR (-0.20 ± 0.34) and No TCMR (-0.80 ± 0.32) (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Discriminant scoring for combined borderline/TCMR versus No TCMR (AUC = 0.900; 95% CI 0.859-0.940) applied to a validation cohort robustly distinguished between samples with (-0.08 ± 0.52) and without (-0.65 ± 0.54, p < 0.001) borderline/TCMR (p < 0.001). The TCMR discriminant score was driven by histological t-score, ct-score, donor-specific antibody and biopsy indication, and was unaffected by renal function, interstitial or microcirculatory inflammation, interstitial fibrosis or pyuria. These preliminary findings suggest that urinary metabolomics is a sensitive, specific and noninvasive tool for TCMR identification that is superior to serum creatinine, with minimal confounding by other allograft injury processes. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes.

  18. Porous Allograft Bone Scaffolds: Doping with Strontium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28±0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60±0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes. PMID:23922703

  19. Rare Presentations of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral infection after kidney transplantation. Clinical presentations of cytomegalovirus infection range from asymptomatic infection to organ-specific involvement. Most symptomatic infections manifest as fever and cytopenia. The gastrointestinal tract is the most common site of tissue-invasive infection, often presenting as diarrhea or gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation, thrombosis of large gastrointestinal veins, splenic artery thrombosis, and pancreatitis are rare gastrointestinal presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. Renal-allograft ureteral stricture and skin involvement are other rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. hemophagocytic syndrome, thrombotic microangiopathy, adrenal insufficiency, and renal allograft artery stenosis are other rare symptoms of cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:23573461

  20. Surgical management of extensive burns treatment using allografts

    PubMed Central

    Calota, DR; Nitescu, C; Florescu, IP; Lascar, I

    2012-01-01

    Patients with extensive burns (TBSA over 45%) can benefit from treatment with split thickness skin allotransplants (skin bank or honorific donors). In this study, we present our protocols for the surgical treatment by using allografts. We emphasize the criteria for the staging of the procedures, the prioritisation of the areas that need to be grafted and the postoperative management. The treatment includes a serial excision grafting with simple grafts or the sandwich method, which implies the covering of the wound with a widely meshed autograft (6:1). This layer is covered by a 1,5:1 or 3:1 expanded mesh allograft. PMID:23346256

  1. Successful liver allograft inflow reconstruction with the right gastroepiploic vein.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rafael S; Cruz, Ruy J; Nacif, Lucas S; Vane, Matheus F; D'Albuquerque, Luiz A C

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a common complication in cirrhotic patients. When portal vein thrombectomy is not a suitable option, a large collateral vessel can be used for allograft venous inflow reconstruction. We describe an unusual case of successful portal revascularization using the right gastroepiploic vein. The patient underwent a cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation with end-to-end anastomosis of the portal vein to the right gastroepiploic vein. Six months after liver transplantation the patient is well with good liver function. The use of the right gastroepiploic vein for allograft venous reconstruction is feasible and safe, with a great advantage of avoiding the need of venous jump graft.

  2. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-12-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection.

  3. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your body can lead to cardiac arrest. This can include trauma, electrical shock, or major blood loss. Recreational drugs. Using certain drugs, such as cocaine ...

  4. Influence of preformed donor-specific antibodies and C4d on early liver allograft function.

    PubMed

    Perera, M T; Silva, M A; Murphy, N; Briggs, D; Mirza, D F; Neil, D A H

    2013-12-01

    INTRODUCTION. The impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) is incompletely understood in liver transplantation. The incidence and impact of preformed DSA on early post liver transplant were assessed and these were correlated with compliment fragment C4d on allograft biopsy. METHODS. Pretransplant serum from 41 consecutive liver transplant recipients (brain dead donors; DBD = 27 and cardiac death donors; DCD = 14) were tested for class-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and compared against donor HLA types. Liver biopsies were taken during cold storage (t-1) and post-reperfusion (t0) stained with C4d and graded for preservation-reperfusion injury (PRI). RESULTS. Of the 41 recipients, 8 (20%) had anti-HLA class I/II antibodies pretransplant, 3 (7%) were confirmed preformed DSA; classes I and II (n=1) and class I only (n=2). No biopsies showed definite evidence of antibody-mediated rejection. Graft biopsies in overall showed only mild PRI with ischemic hepatocyte C4d pattern similar in both positive and negative DSA patients. One DSA-positive (33%) compared with four DSA-negative patients (10%) had significant early graft dysfunction; severe PRI causing graft loss from primary nonfunction was seen only in DSA-negative group. Allograft biopsy of preformed DSA-positive patient demonstrated only minimal PRI; however, no identifiable cause could be attributed to graft dysfunction other than preformed DSA. CONCLUSION. Preformed DSA are present in 5-10% liver transplant recipients. There is no association between anti-HLA DSA and PRI and C4d, but preformed DSA may cause early morbidity. Larger studies on the impact of DSA with optimization of C4d techniques are required.

  5. The use of mycophenolate mofetil suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bunchman, T; Navarro, M; Broyer, M; Sherbotie, J; Chavers, B; Tönshoff, B; Birk, P; Lerner, G; Lirenman, D; Greenbaum, L; Walker, R; Zimmerhackl, L B; Blowey, D; Clark, G; Ettenger, R; Arterburn, S; Klamerus, K; Fong, A; Tang, H; Thomas, S; Ramos, E

    2001-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is widely used to prevent acute rejection in adults after renal, cardiac, and liver transplantation. This study investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of MMF suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients. One hundred renal allograft recipients were enrolled into three age groups (33 patients, 3 months to <6 years; 34 patients, 6 to <12 years; 33 patients, 12 to 18 years). Patients received MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. concomitantly with cyclosporine and corticosteroids with or without antilymphocyte antibody induction. One year after transplantation, patient and graft survival (including death) were 98% and 93%, respectively. Twenty-five patients (25%) experienced a biopsy-proven (Banff grade borderline or higher) or presumptive acute rejection within the first 6 months post-transplantation. Analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters for mycophenolic acid (MPA) and mycophenolic acid glucuronide showed no clinically significant differences among the age groups. The dosing regimen of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. achieved the targeted early post-transplantation MPA 12-h area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of 27.2 microg h per ml. Adverse events had similar frequencies among the age groups (with the exception of diarrhea, leukopenia, sepsis, and anemia, which were more frequent in the <6 years age group) and led to withdrawal of MMF in about 10% of patients. Administration of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. is effective in prevention of acute rejection, provides predictable pharmacokinetics, and is associated with an acceptable safety profile in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

  6. Allograft rejection mediated by memory T cells is resistant to regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaeseok; Brook, Matthew O; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela; Zhang, Jidong; Ramon, Hilda E; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Wood, Kathryn J; Turka, Laurence A; Jones, Nick D

    2007-12-11

    Alloreactive memory T cells may be refractory to many of the tolerance-inducing strategies that are effective against naive T cells and thus present a significant barrier to long-term allograft survival. Because CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical elements of many approaches to successful induction/maintenance of transplantation tolerance, we used MHC class I and II alloreactive TCR-transgenic models to explore the ability of antigen-specific Tregs to control antigen-specific memory T cell responses. Upon coadoptive transfer into RAG-1(-/-) mice, we found that Tregs effectively suppressed the ability of naive T cells to reject skin grafts, but neither antigen-unprimed nor antigen-primed Tregs suppressed rejection by memory T cells. Interestingly, different mechanisms appeared to be active in the ability of Tregs to control naive T cell-mediated graft rejection in the class II versus class I alloreactive models. In the former case, we observed decreased early expansion of effector cells in lymphoid tissue. In contrast, in the class I model, an effect of Tregs on early proliferation and expansion was not observed. However, at a late time point, significant differences in cell numbers were seen, suggesting effects on responding T cell survival. Overall, these data indicate that the relative resistance of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) alloreactive memory T cells to regulation may mediate resistance to tolerance induction seen in hosts with preexisting alloantigen-specific immunity and further indicate the multiplicity of mechanisms by which Tregs may control alloimmune responses in vivo.

  7. Time course of pathologic changes in kidney allografts of positive crossmatch HLA-incompatible transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, Serena M; Zachary, Andrea A; Racusen, Lorraine C; Arend, Lois J; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Alachkar, Nada; Nazarian, Susanna M; Lonze, Bonnie E; Montgomery, Robert A; Kraus, Edward S

    2014-02-27

    Recipients of incompatible allografts are at increased risk of graft loss. We hypothesized that analysis of sequential biopsies from these grafts could define progression of graft lesions and identify features predictive of progression. We studied the time course of histologic injury in 745 kidney graft biopsies from 129 patients transplanted with a positive crossmatch human leukocyte antigen-incompatible kidney between 2000 and 2010 (follow-up of 1-9 years). Graft survival was 98% at 1 year and 80% at 5 years after transplantation. Throughout follow-up, 70% of patients experienced rejection, with 52% showing subclinical rejection in the first year. Cell-mediated rejection was more frequent than antibody-mediated rejection throughout follow-up. Transplant glomerulopathy (TxGN; cg≥1) developed in 47% of patients over the period of the study, as early as 3 months in a few patients. TxGN was preceded by glomerulitis in more than 90% of cases, with a median time interval of 12 months. Glomerulitis and detectable posttransplantation donor-specific antibodies were risk factors for TxGN (P<0.0001 and P<0.05). C4d-negative antibody-mediated rejection manifesting as capillaritis (g≥1 and ptc≥1) with detectable donor-specific antibodies was observed in some recipients (<20%). There was progressively higher average tubulointerstitial scarring (ci+ct) from 3 to 6 to 12 months (P<0.001). Despite good graft survival, a significant incidence of biopsy-proven rejection occurred in this subset of closely monitored human leukocyte antigen-incompatible recipients throughout follow-up. Microcirculation inflammation, particularly glomerulitis, irrespective of C4d, is associated with a high risk of development of TxGN at 1 year.

  8. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Anglicheau, Dany

    2015-11-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor-specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  9. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  10. Can Skin Allograft Occasionally Act as a Permanent Coverage in Deep Burns? A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Ezzatollah; Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Ahmadabadi, Ali; Tavousi, Seyed Hassan; Alipour Tabrizi, Arash; Fotuhi, Kazem; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi; Manafi, Amir; Ahmadi Moghadam, Shokoofeh

    2017-01-01

    Skin allograft is the gold standard of wound coverage in patients with extensive burns; however, it is considered as a temporary wound coverage and rejection of the skin allograft is considered inevitable. In our study, skin allograft as a permanent coverage in deep burns is evaluated. Skin allograft survival was assessed in 38 patients from March 2009 to March 2014, retrospectively. Because of the lack of tissue specimen from the skin donors, patients with long skin allograft survival in whom the gender of donor and recipient of allograft was the same were excluded. Seven cases with skin allograft longevity and opposite gender in donor and recipient were finally enrolled. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on the biopsy specimen from recipients and donors were undertaken. PCR on the biopsy specimen from recipients confirmed those specimens belong to the donors. All patients received allograft from the opposite sex. Two (28.57%) patients received allograft from their first-degree blood relatives, and in one (14.29%) case, the allograft was harvested from an alive individual with no blood relation. The rest were harvested from multiorgan donors. In eight months of follow up, no clinical evidence of graft rejection was noted. Long term persistence of skin allograft in patients is worthy of more attention. Further studies An increase in knowledge of factors influencing this longevity could realize the dream of burn surgeons to achieve a permanent coverage other than autograft for major burn patients.

  11. Intraoperative culture positive allograft bone and subsequent postoperative infections: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Laura; Kulyk, Paul; Woo, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Background Obtaining intraoperative cultures of allograft bone just before use in orthopedic procedures is standard practice in many centres; however, the association between positive cultures and subsequent surgical infections is unknown. Our study had 3 goals: to determine the prevalence of positive intraoperative allograft culture and subsequent infection; to determine if, in cases of subsequent infection, organisms isolated at reoperation were the same as those cultured from the allograft at the time of the index procedure; and to assess the costs associated with performing intraoperative allograft cultures. Methods In this retrospective case series, we obtained data on patients receiving allograft bone between 2009 and 2012. Patients receiving allograft with positive cultures were reviewed to identify cases of significant infection. Organisms isolated at reoperation were compared with the allograft culture taken at the time of implantation, and we performed a cost assessment. Results Of the 996 allograft bone grafts used, 43 (4.3%) had positive intraoperative cultures and significant postoperative infections developed in 2, requiring reoperation. Antibiotics based on culture results were prescribed in 24% of cases. Organisms cultured at the time of reoperation differed from those isolated initially. The cost of performing 996 allograft cultures was $169 320. Conclusion This series suggests that rates of positive intraoperative bone allograft culture are low, and subsequent infection is rare. In cases of postoperative infection, primary allograft culture and secondary tissue cultures isolated different organisms. Costs associated with performing cultures are high. Eliminating initial culture testing could save $42 500 per year in our health region. PMID:28234217

  12. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  13. Cardiac cachexia.

    PubMed

    Anker, Stefan D; Steinborn, Wolfram; Strassburg, Sabine

    2004-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains an important and increasing public health care problem. It is a complex syndrome affecting many body systems. Body wasting (i.e., cardiac cachexia) has long been recognised as a serious complication of CHF. Cardiac cachexia is associated with poor prognosis, independently of functional disease severity, age, and measures of exercise capacity and cardiac function. Patients with cardiac cachexia suffer from a general loss of fat tissue, lean tissue, and bone tissue. Cachectic CHF patients are weaker and fatigue earlier, which is due to both reduced skeletal muscle mass and impaired muscle quality. The pathophysiologic alterations leading to cardiac cachexia remain unclear, but there is increasing evidence that metabolic, neurohormonal and immune abnormalities may play an important role. Cachectic CHF patients show raised plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol, and they show high plasma renin activity and increased plasma aldosterone level. Several studies have also shown that cardiac cachexia is linked to raised plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha and other inflammatory cytokines. The degree of body wasting is strongly correlated with neurohormonal and immune abnormalities. The available evidence suggests that cardiac cachexia is a multifactorial neuroendocrine and metabolic disorder with a poor prognosis. A complex imbalance of different body systems may cause the development of body wasting.

  14. Allograft biopsy findings in patients with small bowel transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koo, Jamie; Dawson, David W; Dry, Sarah; French, Samuel W; Naini, Bita V; Wang, Hanlin L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of post-transplant complications including acute cellular rejection (ACR), infection, and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in mucosal allograft biopsies in patients with small bowel transplant at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed pathology reports from 5675 small bowel allograft biopsies from 99 patients and analyzed the following: indications for biopsy, frequency and grade of ACR, the presence of infectious agents, results of workup for potential PTLD, results of C4d immunohistochemistry (IHC), features of chronic mucosal injury, and findings in concurrent native bowel biopsies. Findings from 42 allograft resection specimens were also correlated with prior biopsy findings. Indeterminate, mild, moderate, and severe ACR were seen in 276 (4.9%), 409 (7.2%), 100 (1.8%), and 207 (3.6%) of biopsies, respectively. Although ACR may show histologic overlap with mycophenolate mofetil toxicity, we found the analysis of concurrent native bowel biopsies to be helpful in this distinction. Adenovirus was the most common infectious agent seen (11%), and we routinely performed adenovirus IHC on biopsies. Eighteen patients (18%) developed PTLD, 83% of which were EBV associated, but only 28% of PTLD cases were diagnosed on mucosal allograft biopsies. C4d IHC did not correlate with the presence of donor-specific antibodies in limited cases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biceps tenodesis versus allograft reconstruction for varus instability.

    PubMed

    Beiro, Cristobal; Parks, Brent G; Tsai, Michael; Hinton, Richard Y

    2014-04-01

    Although effective to restore stability in varus laxity, a fibula-based procedure such as figure-of-8 reconstruction can be technically demanding and requires use of allograft or autograft. Biceps rerouting offers an alternative without the potential complications of allograft or autograft procedures. It is not known whether biceps tenodesis is effective in addressing isolated varus laxity with lateral collateral ligament (LCL) rupture. We compared biceps tenodesis and figure-of-8 allograft reconstruction for restoration of varus stability. Nine knees were loaded at 10 N-m at 0- and 30-degree knee flexion in intact, LCL sectioned, and reconstructed state. Both biceps tenodesis and figure-of-8 reconstruction restored varus stability to at least baseline stability. Normalized displacement with biceps tenodesis measured at time zero was significantly lower than with allograft reconstruction at 0 degrees (0.75 ± 0.26 vs. 1.09 ± 0.31 degrees; p = 0.04) and 30 degrees (0.66 ± 0.14 vs. 0.91 ± 0.27 degrees; p =  0.04). Biceps tenodesis was effective at restoring baseline varus stability in isolated varus laxity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. [Functionality and osteointegration of bone allografts in long bone osteosarcomas].

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, J J; García-Sandoval, P P; Fernández-Hernández, J A; Valcárcel-Díaz, A

    2012-01-01

    In patients undergoing long bone resection for osteosarcoma the use of bone allografts is a treatment option. How do they behave functionally and what is their long term osteointegration? A retrospective, observational, longitudinal study was conducted to obtain clinical and radiologic data of the sample composed of a group of 15 patients with a diagnosis of limb osteosarcoma treated at our hospital with structural bone allografts. The Mankin and ISOLS (International Symposium on Limb Salvage) scales were applied to assess allograft functionality and osteointegration, respectively, from 1993 to 2006. Functional results were as follows: excellent, 10 patients (66.6%); good, one patient (6.6%), and poor, 4 patients (26%). The osteointegration assessment reported excellent results in 77% of cases at 18 months and in 87% at 2 years. Surgical wound infection was reported as a complication in only 2 patients (13.3%). Functionality and osteointegration in patients undergoing conservative surgery with bone allografts are excellent in most cases, and this is the technique of choice for the treatment of long bone osteosarcomas.

  17. Pulse lavage washing in decontamination of allografts improves safety.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M; Laitinen, M; Vuento, R

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the bacterial contamination rate of 140 femoral head allografts after rinsing the allografts in different decontamination solutions. Bacterial screening methods and cleansing effect of antibiotics (cefuroxime and rifampicin) and pulse lavage were compared. Swabbing and taking small pieces of bone for culture were the screening methods used. Both methods proved to be quite unreliable. Approximately one-fourth of the results were false negative. Culturing small pieces of bone gave the most accurate and reliable results and, therefore, can be recommended as a bacterial screening method. The use of antibiotics in allograft decontamination is controversial. In prophylactic use antibiotics include risks of allergic reactions and resistant development and our results in the present study show that antibiotics do not improve the decontamination any better than low-pressure pulse lavage with sterile saline solution. Therefore, pulse lavage with sterile saline solution can be recommended for allograft decontamination. Our results demonstrate that it decreases bacterial bioburden as effectively as the antibiotics without persisting the disadvantages.

  18. Inhibition of the immune response to experimental fresh osteoarticular allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigo, J.J.; Schnaser, A.M.; Reynolds, H.M. Jr.; Biggart, J.M. 3d.; Leathers, M.W.; Chism, S.E.; Thorson, E.; Grotz, T.; Yang, Q.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The immune response to osteoarticular allografts is capable of destroying the cartilage--a tissue that has antigens on its cells identical to those on the bone and marrow cells. Osteoarticular allografts of the distal femur were performed in rats using various methods to attempt to temporarily inhibit the antibody response. The temporary systemic immunosuppressant regimens investigated were cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and total lymphoid irradiation. The most successful appeared to be cyclosporine A, but significant side effects were observed. To specifically inhibit the immune response in the allograft antigens without systemically inhibiting the entire immune system, passive enhancement and preadministration of donor blood were tried. Neither was as effective as coating the donor bone with biodegradable cements, a method previously found to be successful. Cyclosporine A was investigated in dogs in a preliminary study of medial compartmental knee allografts and was found to be successful in inhibiting the antibody response and in producing a more successful graft; however, some significant side effects were similarly observed.

  19. Multifocal Primary Neoplasms in Kidney Allografts: Evaluation of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Keng Lim; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Del Vecchio, Sharon J.; Wood, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the fifth most common malignancy in kidney transplant recipients, with increased risk arising due to immunosuppression. De novo RCC occurrence in kidney allografts is much less common when compared with the native kidneys. Multifocal RCC in allograft kidneys is rarely described. In this report, we discuss two cases of de novo multifocal renal neoplasms in allograft kidneys. Case 1 had three distinct neoplastic lesions of >5 mm, and case 2 had four. Using the World Health Organization 2016 classification of adult renal tumours, case 1 had one clear-cell (cc) RCC (grade 3) and two papillary adenomas; all confined to the kidney. Case 2 had a nodular lesion classified as ccRCC (grade 4) with focal rhabdoid differentiation and some infiltration of renal sinus fat; a cc tubulopapillary RCC; a multilocular cystic renal neoplasm of low malignant potential; and a mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma; the last three all confined to the kidney. This is the first report of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma in a kidney allograft. When considering multifocal RCC with discordant histology, it is likely that these represent independent tumourigenic events. PMID:28326280

  20. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  1. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  2. Viable cells survive in fresh frozen human bone allografts.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David; Kakarala, Gopikrishna; Hampson, Karen; Steele, Niall; Ashton, Brian

    2007-02-01

    Fresh frozen bone allograft is available for human recipients after at least 6 months of quarantine at -80 degrees C. It is assumed that cryopreservation without cryoprotectant removes all viable donor cells. We studied the in vitro cell growth from samples of fresh frozen human femoral head allografts after they had been released for patient use, and compared it with cell growth from a control group of fresh cancellous bone specimens from excised femoral heads (8 samples in each group). Cell outgrowths were seen in all of the fresh cancellous bone specimens (100% of replicates, 48 replicates per specimen) but only in a small minority of replicates from 4 of the allograft samples (mean 3.1%). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) investigations revealed that cell outgrowths from both groups contained mRNA for transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, and also for matrix proteins collagen type I, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein. This is consistent with the cells being osteoblast-related. This study confirms that fresh frozen human bone allograft cells have the potential to grow in vitro, but the significance of this in recipients is currently unknown.

  3. Kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Schwarzengrund.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenta; Nishio, Haruomi; Iwatani, Yuji; Yamada, Ryo; Okawa, Takao; Yamamoto, Takumi; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuo, Yoko; Matsuo, Ken; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mori, Noriko

    2017-03-13

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) taking immunosuppressive drugs have a 20-fold greater risk of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection than the healthy adult population. Among KTRs, the urinary tract is the most common site of infection. However, few cases of urinary tract infection caused by NTS have been documented in KTRs, and only one in Japan. Furthermore, it frequently induces acute allograft rejection with high mortality. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Schwarzengrund (S. Schwarzengrund) is now among the more common Salmonella serovars isolated in Japan and is likely to be invasive. We present a case of a 45-year old female with vesicoureteral reflux to her transplanted kidney who developed kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by S. Schwarzengrund. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, urodynia, lower abdominal pain, gross hematuria, and cloudy urine. Urine cultures were positive for S. Schwarzengrund. Exposure to cats, especially stray cats, were identified as the most likely source. We administered antibiotics for 4 weeks (ceftriaxone then amoxicillin, each for 2 weeks) and educated her about pet safety. She experienced no recurrence of infection or clinical kidney allograft rejection for 3 months post-treatment. NTS should be considered as a possible pathogen of urinary tract infection among KTRs, especially in cases with animal exposure or structural urologic abnormalities. When the pathogen is NTS, appropriate antibiotics and treatment periods are essential for preventing recurrence and allograft rejection after the completion of treatment.

  4. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  5. A Lifetime of Allograft Function with Kidneys from Older Donors.

    PubMed

    Rose, Caren; Schaeffner, Elke; Frei, Ulrich; Gill, Jagbir; Gill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Strategies to increase expanded criteria donor (ECD) transplantation are needed. We quantified the extent to which ECD kidneys provide recipients with a lifetime of allograft function by determining the difference between patient survival and death-censored allograft survival (graft survival). Initial analyses compared 5-year outcomes in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (European) and the United States Renal Data System. Among European recipients ≥65 years, patient survival exceeded graft survival, and ECD recipients returned to dialysis for an average of 5.2 months after transplant failure. Among United States recipients ≥60 years, graft survival exceeded patient survival. Although patient survival in elderly recipients in the United States was low (49% at 5 years), the average difference in patient survival at 10 years in elderly recipients in the United States with an ECD versus non-ECD transplant was only 7 months. The probability of patient survival with a functioning allograft at 5 years was higher with ECD transplantation within 1 year after activation to the waiting list than with delayed non-ECD transplantation ≥3 years after activation to the waiting list. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that ECD transplants do not provide a lifetime of allograft function in recipients <50 years in the United States. These findings should encourage ECD transplantation in patients ≥60 years, demonstrate that rapid ECD transplantation is superior to delayed non-ECD transplantation, and challenge the policy in the United States of allowing patients <50 years to receive an ECD transplant.

  6. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  7. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  8. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  9. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  10. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma with metastatic spread to the lungs. Difficulty in diagnosing and treating cardiac tumours is discussed. PMID:20428274

  11. Assessment of Kidney Function After Allograft Transplantation by Texture Analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbasian Ardakani, Ali; Mohammadi, Afshin; Khalili Najafabad, Bahareh; Abolghasemi, Jamileh

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonography is the preferable imaging technique for monitoring and assessing complications in kidney allograft transplants. Computer-aided diagnostic system based on texture analysis in ultrasonographic imaging is recommended to identify changes in kidney function after allograft transplantation. A total of 61 biopsy-proven kidney allograft recipients (11 rejected and 50 unrejected) were assessed by a computer-aided diagnostic system. Up to 270 statistical texture features were extracted as descriptors for each region of interest in each recipient. Correlations of texture features with serum creatinine level and differences between rejected and unrejected allografts were analyzed. An area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated for each significant texture feature. Linear discriminant analysis was employed to analyze significant features and increase discriminative power. Recipients were classified by the first nearest neighbor classifier. Fourteen texture features had a significant correlation with serum creatinine level and 16 were significantly different between the rejected and unrejected allografts, for which an area under the curve values were in the range of 0.575 for difference entropy S(4,0) to 0.676 for kurtosis. Using all 16 features, linear discriminant analysis indicated higher performance for classification of the two groups with an area under the curve of 0.975, which corresponded to a sensitivity of 90.9%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 98.0%. Texture analysis was a reliable method, with the potential for characterization, and can help physicians to diagnose kidney failure after transplantation on ultrasonographic imaging.

  12. Metabolomic Profiling in Individuals with a Failing Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Luigi; Bussolino, Stefania; Merugumala, Sai; Tezza, Sara; D’Addio, Francesca; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Valderrama-Vasquez, Alessandro; Usuelli, Vera; De Zan, Valentina; El Essawy, Basset; Venturini, Massimo; Secchi, Antonio; De Cobelli, Francesco; Lin, Alexander; Chandraker, Anil; Fiorina, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Background Alteration of certain metabolites may play a role in the pathophysiology of renal allograft disease. Methods To explore metabolomic abnormalities in individuals with a failing kidney allograft, we analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS; for ex vivo profiling of serum and urine) and two dimensional correlated spectroscopy (2D COSY; for in vivo study of the kidney graft) 40 subjects with varying degrees of chronic allograft dysfunction stratified by tertiles of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; T1, T2, T3). Ten healthy non-allograft individuals were chosen as controls. Results LC-MS/MS analysis revealed a dose-response association between GFR and serum concentration of tryptophan, glutamine, dimethylarginine isomers (asymmetric [A]DMA and symmetric [S]DMA) and short-chain acylcarnitines (C4 and C12), (test for trend: T1-T3 = p<0.05; p = 0.01; p<0.001; p = 0.01; p = 0.01; p<0.05, respectively). The same association was found between GFR and urinary levels of histidine, DOPA, dopamine, carnosine, SDMA and ADMA (test for trend: T1-T3 = p<0.05; p<0.01; p = 0.001; p<0.05; p = 0.001; p<0.001; p<0.01, respectively). In vivo 2D COSY of the kidney allograft revealed significant reduction in the parenchymal content of choline, creatine, taurine and threonine (all: p<0.05) in individuals with lower GFR levels. Conclusions We report an association between renal function and altered metabolomic profile in renal transplant individuals with different degrees of kidney graft function. PMID:28052095

  13. [The influence of HX- I on rabbit thyroid allografts].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Shen, W; Tan, J; Du, C; Li, K; Huang, X

    1996-03-01

    We studied the anti-rejection effect of HX- I, a preparation of traditional Chinese herbs, on rabbit thyroid allografts. The transplantations were performed on 28 rabbits after total thyroidectomies. The grafting sites were in their pretrachial muscles. These animals were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: homografts: Group I: allografts without medication; Group II: allografts with dexamethason (0.25 mg/(kg.d) intramuscularly), and Group IV: allografts with HX-I water solution, (5g/(kg.d), peros). The medication lasted 28 days. Blood samples were drawn every week postoperatively. Serum T3 and T4 were tested by RIA. The grafts were removed for histopathological evaluation on the 28th day postoperatively. The histopathology of rejection and survival were scored and classified. On the 7th and 14th days, serum T3 and T4 levels were almost the same between groups. On the 21st and 28th days, the T3 and T4 levels were higher in Groups I and IV than those in Group II (P < 0.05). The histopathological findings were; in Group I, damaged follicles with much lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis, and 6 cases being rejected; in Group II, two deaths and three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and much lymphocytes infiltration; in Group IV, three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and four intact grafts. Our results indicate that HX-I and dexamethason both can inhibit rejection in thyroid allografts in rabbits, but dexamethason has more side effects HX-I has many components and the machanism of its early anti-rejection effect is worthy of further study.

  14. Ambulatory Blood Pressure, Left Ventricular Hypertrophy, and Allograft Function in Children and Young Adults After Kidney Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hamdani, Gilad; Nehus, Edward J; Hanevold, Coral D; Sebestyen Van Sickle, Judith; Woroniecki, Robert; Wenderfer, Scott E; Hooper, David K; Blowey, Douglas; Wilson, Amy; Warady, Bradley A; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common complication and is an important risk factor for graft loss and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in pediatric kidney transplantation. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is the preferred method to characterize blood pressure status. We conducted a retrospective review of a large cohort of children and young adults with kidney transplant to estimate the prevalence of abnormal ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), assess factors associated with abnormal ABP, and examine whether ambulatory hypertension is associated with worse allograft function and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Two hundred twenty-one patients had ABPM, and 142 patients had echocardiographic results available for analysis. One third of the patients had masked hypertension, 32% had LVH, and 38% had estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min per 1.73 m. African-American race/Hispanic ethnicity and requirement for more than 1 antihypertensive medication were independently associated with having masked hypertension. In a multivariate analysis, abnormal blood pressure (masked or sustained hypertension combined) was an independent predictor for LVH among patients not receiving antihypertensive treatment (P = 0.025). In a separate analysis, the use of antihypertensive medications was independently associated with worse allograft function (P = 0.002) although abnormal blood pressure was not a significant predictor. In young kidney transplant recipients, elevated ABP is frequently unrecognized and undertreated. The high prevalence of abnormal ABP, including masked hypertension, and its association with LVH supports the case for routine ABPM and cardiac structure evaluation as the standard of care in these patients.

  15. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4+ TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle L.; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D.; McKeague, Matthew G.; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S.; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4+ or CD8+ TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4+ TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8+ T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4+ T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. PMID:27063351

  16. Splenic microenvironment and self recognition as factors in allograft rejection in rats. A study using indium-111-labeled cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollak, R.; Blanchard, J.M.; Lazda, V.A.

    1986-11-01

    Splenectomy facilitates organ allograft survival in some rat strains, and in weak donor-recipient histoincompatible pairs. We have found using a heart spleen twin graft model, using ACI rats as recipients and Lewis rats as donors, that the transplanted heart will survive in most recipients after delayed host splenectomy. The presence of a viable mass of splenic tissue will allow rejection to proceed only when the transplanted spleen is of host origin, and not when it comes from the donor (i.e., when it is allogeneic). The use of 111In-labeled cells has allowed us to show that lymphocyte traffic and trapping is markedly altered in the transplanted allogeneic spleens, when compared with control transplanted syngeneic spleens. Thus, despite the presence of the splenic ''microenvironment,'' cardiac allograft rejection does not occur in the absence of syngeneic splenic tissue. We conclude that the role of the spleen in the immune response is to facilitate the recognition of self and the acquisition of alloreactivity in weak responder rat strains and donor-recipient pairs.

  17. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4(+) TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D; McKeague, Matthew G; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-11

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4(+) or CD8(+) TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4(+) TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4(+) T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism permits tolerance of vascularized composite allografts across a full major histocompatibility mismatch in swine.

    PubMed

    Mathes, David W; Solari, Mario G; Gazelle, Guy Scott; Butler, Peter E M; Wu, Anette; Nazzal, Adam; Nielsen, Gunnlauger P; Huang, Christene A; Sachs, David H; Lee, Wei Ping Andrew; Randolph, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that vascularized composite allografts (VCA) could be accepted in a robust model of hematopoietic chimerism by injecting allogeneic bone marrow cells (BMC) into swine fetuses. Outbred Yorkshire sows and boars were screened to ensure the absence of the major histocompatibility (MHC) allele SLA(cc) of inbred MGH miniature swine and then mated. Bone marrow harvested from an SLA(cc) swine donor was T-cell depleted and injected intravenously into the fetuses between days 50-55 of gestation. After birth, the piglets were studied with flow cytometry to detect donor cells and mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays to assess their response to donor. Donor-matched VCAs from SLA(cc) donors were performed on four chimeric and two nonchimeric swine. The results showed donor cell engraftment and multilineage macrochimerism after the in utero transplantation of adult BMC, and chimeric animals were unresponsive to donor antigens in vitro. Both control VCAs were rejected by 21 days and were alloreactive. Chimeric animals accepted the VCAs and never developed antidonor antibodies or alloreactivity to donor. These results confirm that the intravascular, in utero transplantation of adult BMC leads to donor cell chimerism and donor-specific tolerance of VCAs across a full MHC barrier in this animal model.

  19. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, coronary artery bypass grafting, or percutaneous coronary intervention. Cardiac rehab involves adopting heart-healthy lifestyle changes to address risk factors for cardiovascular disease. To help you adopt lifestyle changes, this program ...

  20. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... eating a heart-healthy diet, keeping a healthy weight and quitting smoking. The goals of cardiac rehabilitation include establishing an individualized plan to help you regain strength, preventing your condition from worsening, reducing your ...

  1. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  2. The use of cement in osteoarticular allografts for proximal humeral bone tumors.

    PubMed

    DeGroot, Henry; Donati, Davide; Di Liddo, Michele; Gozzi, Enrico; Mercuri, Mario

    2004-10-01

    In a proximal humerus resection for a bone tumor, the use of an osteoarticular allograft is considered the best restoration of shoulder function. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 31 patients who had an intraarticular resection of the proximal humerus for a bone tumor. Twenty-three of the allografts were filled with cement. The average followup was 5.3 years. Of the 31 patients with more than 24 months followup, seven had revision surgery or removal of the allograft. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the probability of survival of the reconstruction was 78% at 5 years. Fracture was the main complication in 11 patients (37%) of whom seven were in the noncemented group. Four of these patients had successful surgery for conversion to an allograft-prosthetic composite, whereas one patient had a new allograft. Allografts that were filled with cement had four fractures (18%); three were subchondral fractures discovered by routine CT scans. None of these patients had pain or needed revision surgery. Osteochondral allograft in proximal humerus replacement is a reliable reconstructive technique if the allograft is augmented by filling the intramedullary space with cement. Moreover, cement augmented allografts are less expensive and technically easier than allograft-prosthetic composites.

  3. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  4. Quantitative digital histochemistry with methenamine silver staining in renal allograft biopsies excluding pure chronic allograft nephropathy cases.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Sis, B; Celik, A; Tekis, D; Kavukcu, S; Bora, S; Camsari, T

    2006-03-01

    Deterioration of renal function is correlated with irreversible damage in chronic diseases. Recently we described a digital quantitative histochemistry method, relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining to determine the chronic renal lesions. This index was strongly correlated with progressive deterioration of renal function in grafts with chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Herein the method has been applied to a cohort of renal allografts which were biopsied for various reasons, we sought to highlight its value to quantify chronic graft damage. Forty-four renal allograft biopsies from 37 patients with elevated serum creatinine values (SCr) underwent light microscopic image analysis (Mediscope, Dokuz Eylül University, Clinical Engineering Department, Izmir, Turkey) of the PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP). SCr was recorded at four intervals to overcome acute effects: the under SCr value before (SCr1) and after a biopsy within 3 months (SCr3), SCr at the time of the biopsy (SCr2), and the latest value (SCr4). The PAMS-SAP scores were strongly associated with increased interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy Banff scores (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = .006 and P = .003, respectively). There was a moderate positive correlation between PAMS and SCr3 (Pearson correlation test, P = .04, r = .312), and a strong positive correlation between time from transplantation to biopsy (Pearson correlation test, P < .000, r = .532). The present results show that PAMS-SAP seems to be of value to quantify renal scarring in allograft biopsies, reflecting four compartments. The strong correlation with time is noteworthy especially as a probable reflection of aging of the renal allograft.

  5. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  6. Genetic diversity predicts pathogen resistance and cell-mediated immunocompetence in house finches

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, George V; Dhondt, André A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that genetic variation within individual hosts can influence their susceptibility to pathogens. However, there have been few opportunities to experimentally test this relationship, particularly within outbred populations of non-domestic vertebrates. We performed a standardized pathogen challenge in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) to test whether multilocus heterozygosity across 12 microsatellite loci predicts resistance to a recently emerged strain of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We simultaneously tested whether the relationship between heterozygosity and pathogen susceptibility is mediated by differences in cell-mediated or humoral immunocompetence. We inoculated 40 house finches with MG under identical conditions and assayed both humoral and cell-mediated components of the immune response. Heterozygous house finches developed less severe disease when infected with MG, and they mounted stronger cell-mediated immune responses to phytohaemagglutinin. Differences in cell-mediated immunocompetence may, therefore, partly explain why more heterozygous house finches show greater resistance to MG. Overall, our results underscore the importance of multilocus heterozygosity for individual pathogen resistance and immunity. PMID:17148199

  7. Differential role for competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and intracellular cytokine staining as diagnostic tools for the assessment of intragraft cytokine profiles in rejecting and nonrejecting heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Spriewald, B M; Hara, M; Bushell, A; Jenkins, S; Morris, P J; Wood, K J

    2000-11-01

    The early and reliable diagnosis of allograft rejection is a difficult task and the assessment of cytokine expression in the grafts can be a helpful parameter. We have compared competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry as tools to measure cytokine expression in rejecting and nonrejecting murine cardiac allografts. Both techniques gave comparable results for cytokine expression in rejecting allografts and syngeneic controls. Grafts from mice pretreated with anti-CD4 antibody and donor-specific blood transfusion showed a marked reduction in cytokine expression, as assessed by competitive RT-PCR, even though a cellular infiltrate was present in the graft. In contrast, the cytokine production measured by intracellular cytokine staining of the isolated graft-infiltrating cells was high and exceeded even that of the rejecting allografts. We conclude that intracellular cytokine staining of graft-infiltrating leukocytes by flow cytometry does not necessarily reflect accurately the cytokine milieu in the graft. This technique might therefore have a limited clinical application in contrast to competitive RT-PCR for the differentiation between graft acceptance and graft rejection.

  8. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  9. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  10. Viral Infection Induces De Novo Lesions of Coronary Allograft Vasculopathy through a Natural Killer Cell-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jay A.; Wilkinson, Robert A.; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Chase, Catharine M.; Colvin, Robert B.; Madsen, Joren C.; Fishman, Jay A.; Russell, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections including those due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been associated with accelerated cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) in clinical trials and some animal models. Evidence demonstrating a direct causal relationship between such infections and de novo formation of coronary vascular lesions is lacking. Heterotopic murine cardiac transplants were performed in a parental to F1 combination in animals lacking both T- and B-lymphocytes (RAG−/−). Coronary vasculopathy developed almost exclusively in the presence of recipient infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) but not in uninfected controls. This process was also dependent upon the presence of NK cells as depletion of NK cells abrogated the process. These data show that a viral infection in its native host, and not previously implicated in the production of CAV, can contribute to the development of advanced coronary vascular lesions in cardiac allotransplants in mice. These data also suggest that virus-induced CAV can develop via an NK-cell dependent pathway in the absence of T- and B-lymphocytes. PMID:19843029

  11. The potential role of CD16+ Vγ2Vδ2 T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in control of HIV type 1 disease.

    PubMed

    He, Xuan; Liang, Hua; Hong, Kunxue; Li, Haishan; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Jia, Manxue; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming

    2013-12-01

    Increasing evidence has suggested that HIV infection severely damages the Vγ2Vδ2 (Vδ2) T cells that play an important role in the first-line host response to infectious disease. However, little is known about Vδ2 T cell-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in HIV disease. We found that although the CD16(+) Vδ2 T cell subset hardly participated in phosphoantigen responses dominated by the CD16(-) Vδ2 T cell subset, the potency of the ADCC function of Vδ2 T cells was correlated with the frequency of the CD16(+) subset. Thus, two distinct and complementary Vδ2 T cell subsets discriminated by CD16 were characterized to explore the respective impacts of HIV-1 infection on them. HIV-1 disease progression was not only associated with the phosphoantigen responsiveness of the CD16(-) Vδ2 subset, but also with the ability of the CD16(+) Vδ2 subset to kill antibody-coated target cells. Furthermore, both of the two Vδ2 functional subsets could be partially restored in HIV-infected patients with antiretroviral therapy. Notably, in the context of an overall HIV-mediated Vδ2 T cell depletion, despite the decline of phosphoantigen-responsive CD16(-) Vδ2 cells, CD16(+) Vδ2 cell-mediated ADCC was not compromised but exhibited a functional switch with dramatic promotion of degranulation in the early phase of HIV infection and chronic infection with slower disease progression. Our study reveals functional characterizations of the two Vδ2 T cell subsets with different activation pathways during HIV-1 infection and provides a rational direction for activating the CD16(+) Vδ2 T cells capable of mediating ADCC as a means to control HIV-1 disease.

  12. Antigen-Specificity of T Cell Infiltrates in Biopsies With T Cell-Mediated Rejection and BK Polyomavirus Viremia: Analysis by Next Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Huang, Y; Lyu, Z; Lesniak, D; Randhawa, P

    2016-11-01

    This study interrogates the antigen-specificity of inflammatory infiltrates in renal biopsies with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) viremia (BKPyVM) with or without allograft nephropathy (BKPyVN). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from five healthy HLA-A0101 subjects were stimulated by peptides derived from the BKPYV proteome or polymorphic regions of HLA. Next generation sequencing of the T cell-receptor complementary DNA was performed on peptide-stimulated PBMC and 23 biopsies with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) or BKPyVN. Biopsies from patients with BKPyVM or BKVPyVN contained 7.7732 times more alloreactive than virus-reactive clones. Biopsies with TCMR also contained BKPyV-specific clones, presumably a manifestation of heterologous immunity. The mean cumulative T cell clonal frequency was 0.1378 for alloreactive clones and 0.0375 for BKPyV-reactive clones. Samples with BKPyVN and TCMR clustered separately in dendrograms of V-family and J-gene utilization patterns. Dendrograms also revealed that V-gene, J-gene, and D-gene usage patterns were a function of HLA type. In conclusion, biopsies with BKPyVN contain abundant allospecific clones that exceed the number of virus-reactive clones. The T cell component of tissue injury in viral nephropathy appears to be mediated primarily by an "innocent bystander" mechanism in which the principal element is secondary T cell influx triggered by both antiviral and anti-HLA immunity. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  13. Lipidomics comparing DCD and DBD liver allografts uncovers lysophospholipids elevated in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Casas-Ferreira, Ana M; Ma, Yun; Sen, Arundhuti; Kim, Min; Proitsi, Petroula; Shkodra, Maltina; Tena, Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Jassem, Wayel; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-12-04

    Finding specific biomarkers of liver damage in clinical evaluations could increase the pool of available organs for transplantation. Lipids are key regulators in cell necrosis and hence this study hypothesised that lipid levels could be altered in organs suffering severe ischemia. Matched pre- and post-transplant biopsies from donation after circulatory death (DCD, n = 36, mean warm ischemia time = 2 min) and donation after brain death (DBD, n = 76, warm ischemia time = none) were collected. Lipidomic discovery and multivariate analysis (MVA) were applied. Afterwards, univariate analysis and clinical associations were conducted for selected lipids differentiating between these two groups. MVA grouped DCD vs. DBD (p = 6.20 × 10(-12)) and 12 phospholipids were selected for intact lipid measurements. Two lysophosphatidylcholines, LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0), showed higher levels in DCD at pre-transplantation (q < 0.01). Lysophosphatidylcholines were associated with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 14-day post-transplantation (q < 0.05) and were more abundant in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction (EAD) (p < 0.05). A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve combining both lipid levels predicted EAD with 82% accuracy. These findings suggest that LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0) might have a role in signalling liver tissue damage due to warm ischemia before transplantation.

  14. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  15. The use of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the reconstruction of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Fu, Li; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Dongsong; Qi, Xin

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the clinical behavior of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures. Twenty-two patients with a tibial plateau fracture were treated with cancellous bone allografts. The bone allograft preparation process included fresh-freezing at -70 °C for 4 weeks and gamma-irradiation at 25 kGy. All of the patients were followed for 1-2 years. The clinical effects were assessed using the Rasmussen score for tibial head fractures and X-rays. Postoperatively, the average excellent and fair Rasmussen scores were 88.9%. Only one patient developed an infection, with no integration between allograft and recipient bone observed. All of the other bone allografts were incorporated successfully, and no osteoporosis or sclerosis was observed. The frozen and gamma-irradiated bone allograft is a good alternative in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures, which we have shown can integrate with the surrounding host bone.

  16. Remodeling of cortical bone allografts mediated by adherent rAAV-RANKL and VEGF gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu; Koefoed, Mette; Tiyapatanaputi, Prarop; Gromov, Kirill; Goater, J Jeffrey; Carmouche, Jonathan; Zhang, Xinping; Rubery, Paul T; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Samulski, R Jude; Nakamura, Takashi; Soballe, Kjeld; O'Keefe, Regis J; Boyce, Brendan F; Schwarz, Edward M

    2006-01-01

    Structural allograft healing is limited because of a lack of vascularization and remodeling. To study this we developed a mouse model that recapitulates the clinical aspects of live autograft and processed allograft healing. Gene expression analyses showed that there is a substantial decrease in the genes encoding RANKL and VEGF during allograft healing. Loss-of-function studies showed that both factors are required for autograft healing. To determine whether addition of these signals could stimulate allograft vascularization and remodeling, we developed a new approach in which rAAV can be freeze-dried onto the cortical surface without losing infectivity. We show that combination rAAV-RANKL- and rAAV-VEGF-coated allografts show marked remodeling and vascularization, which leads to a new bone collar around the graft. In conclusion, we find that RANKL and VEGF are necessary and sufficient for efficient autograft remodeling and can be transferred using rAAV to revitalize structural allografts. PMID:15711561

  17. Kidney retransplantation for BK virus nephropathy with active viremia without allograft nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Danovitch, Gabriel; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund

    2015-12-01

    BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney allograft failure. Retransplantation has been successfully performed for patients with previous allograft loss due to BK virus nephropathy; however, whether allograft nephrectomy and viral clearance are required prior to retransplantation is controversial. Some recent studies have suggested that retransplantion can be successfully achieved without allograft nephrectomy if viremia is cleared prior to retransplant. The only published experience of successful retransplantation in the presence of active viremia occurred in the presence of concomitant allograft nephrectomy of the failing kidney. In this report, we describe a case of successful repeat kidney transplant in a patient with high-grade BK viremia and fulminant hepatic failure without concomitant allograft nephrectomy performed under the setting of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  18. Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...2009 The Author(s) Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs Daniel K. Park,* MD...4-stranded allografts are used for soft tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; however, the fixation properties of fixation devices are

  19. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  20. Creeping attachment: autogenous graft vs dermal matrix allograft.

    PubMed

    Haeri, A; Parsell, D

    2000-09-01

    For many years, free autogenous grafts have been used as a method of gaining keratinized tissue around teeth with mucogingival problems. Creeping attachment using autogenous graft material has been actively studied. In addition, biocompatible, acellular connective-tissue material has recently been used as an alternative to free gingival grafts to increase the zone of keratinization. This report presents a patient with bilateral mucogingival defects in the canine and premolar areas. The patient received an autogenous graft on one side and a dermal matrix allograft on the contralateral side. Creeping attachments were measured and compared at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. After 12 months of healing, an average of 1.23 mm of creeping attachment was measured on the free gingival graft side and 0.96 mm of creeping attachment was measured with the dermal matrix allograft.

  1. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue.

  2. The Tips and Pitfalls of Meniscus Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Rak; Nam, Sang Wook

    2012-01-01

    When faced with an irrepairable meniscus or a patient who has had a total or subtotal meniscectomy, meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) is the preferred modality to restore biomechanical function of the meniscus. The indications for meniscus allograft transplantation are yet to be established. However, currently, MAT has previously been indicated for symptomatic patients who have mild or early osteoarthritis, are younger than 50 years of age, and present with an Outerbridge grade II or lower. The short- to intermediate-term results confirmed noteworthy clinical improvements and consistent objective findings. On the other hand, the successful outcome would be reduced by various complications. Therefore, long-term observation required to evaluate the longevity of these results. The purpose of this article is to review the current research of concerns on the results of MAT, and to describe the technical tips and pitfalls so as to successful clinical results. PMID:22977790

  3. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  4. Human renal allograft blood flow and early renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C B; Etheredge, E E

    1977-01-01

    Renal allograft blood flow (RBF) was measured at operation by electromagnetic flow meter and probes in 45 patients (34 cadaver donors and 11 living related donors). Mean RBF in 26 patients without acute tubular necrosis (ATN), was 412 +/- 80 ml/min and in 19 patients with ATN, 270 +/- 100 ml/min (p less than .001). Only two of 24 transplants (8%) with RBF greater than 350 ml/min had ATN; whereas, 17 of 21 transplants (81 per cent) with RBF less than 350 ml/min had ATN (p less than .001). In cadaver donor transplants, RBF did not correlate with duration of ATN, warm ischemia time, total ischemia time, pulsatile perfusion time or renal vascular resistance during perfusion. Measurement of renal allograft blood flow can predict presence or absence of postoperative ATN in 87% of patients. PMID:335986

  5. Tolerability of sirolimus: a decade of experience at a single cardiac transplant center.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Kaiser, Patricia A; Ayers, Colby R; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Ring, William Steves; Peltz, Matthias; Drazner, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    Sirolimus is used in cardiac transplant recipients to prevent rejection, progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, and renal dysfunction. However, sirolimus has many potential side effects and its tolerability when used outside of clinical trials is not well established. We describe a decade of experience with sirolimus in cardiac transplant recipients at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed records of all adult cardiac transplant recipients living between September 1999 and February 2010 (n = 329) and identified 67 patients (20%) who received sirolimus. The indications for sirolimus were cardiac allograft vasculopathy (67%), renal dysfunction (25%), rejection (4%), and intolerability of tacrolimus (3%). One-third of patients discontinued sirolimus at a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 0.9 (0.2, 1.6) yr of duration. Over 70% of subjects experienced an adverse event attributed to sirolimus. Adverse events were associated with higher average sirolimus levels (9.1 ng/mL vs. 7.1 ng/mL, p = 0.004). We conclude that sirolimus is frequently used in cardiac transplant recipients (20%) and commonly causes side effects, often necessitating discontinuation. Higher average sirolimus levels were associated with adverse events, suggesting that tolerability may improve if levels are maintained within the lower end of the current therapeutic range; however, the improvement in tolerability would need to be balanced with the potential for decreased efficacy.

  6. Allograft Reconstruction of Chronic Tibialis Anterior Tendon Ruptures.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jeannie; Boyette, Deanna M; Parekh, Selene G; Nunley, James A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic ruptures of the tibialis anterior tendon are often associated with tendon retraction and poor-quality tissue, resulting in large segmental defects that make end-to-end repair impossible. Interpositional allograft reconstruction has previously been described as an operative option in these cases; however, there are no reports of the clinical outcomes of this technique in the literature. Eleven patients with chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures underwent intercalary allograft recon-struction between 2006 and 2013. Patient demographics, injury presentation, and details of surgery were reviewed. Postoperative outcomes at a mean follow-up of 43.8 (range, 6-105) months included the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot score, Short Form-12 (SF-12) physical health score, Lower Extremity Functional Score (LEFS), visual analog scale (VAS) pain rating, dorsiflexion strength, gait analysis, and complications. The average postoperative dorsiflexion strength, as categorized by the Medical Council grading scale, was 4.8 ± 0.45. The average postoperative VAS score was 0.8 ± 1.1. The average LEFS was 66.9 ± 17.2, SF-12 physical health score was 40.1 ± 14.4, and AOFAS score was 84.3 ± 7.7. One complication occurred, consisting of transient neuritic pain in the superficial peroneal nerve distribution. There were no postoperative infections, tendon reruptures, reoperations, or allograft-associated complications. Allograft reconstruction of chronic irreparable tibialis anterior tendon ruptures yielded satisfactory strength, pain, and patient-reported functional outcomes. This technique offers a safe and reliable alternative, without the donor site morbidity associated with tendon transfer or autograft harvest. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Retrieval of the pancreas allograft for whole-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Powelson, John A; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Burke, George W; Sageshima, Junichiro; Rogers, Jeffrey; Stratta, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Proper pancreas retrieval during multi-organ recovery is one of the cornerstones of technically successful whole-organ pancreas transplantation. With evolving surgical approaches for organ retrieval and implantation, it has become standard to procure the pancreas in conjunction with other abdominal organs without compromising either vasculature, graft quality, or transplant outcomes. This review summarizes the major steps required for proper whole-organ retrieval of the pancreas allograft with suggestions and tips whenever alternative approaches are available.

  8. Efficacy of Acellular Nerve Allografts in Trigeminal Nerve Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yampolsky, Andrew; Ziccardi, Vincent; Chuang, Sung-Kiang

    2017-10-01

    During trigeminal nerve repair, a gap is sometimes encountered that prevents the tension-free apposition of nerve endings. The use of a processed acellular nerve allograft is a novel technique that shows promise in overcoming this problem. The goal of the present study was to support the slowly evolving body of evidence that acellular processed nerve allografts (Avance; Axogen, Alachua, FL) are a viable alternative to autogenous nerve grafting and the use of conduits for reconstructing defects of the trigeminal nerve. The study design consisted of a retrospective review of the medical records of patients referred to Rutgers School of Dental Medicine for management of trigeminal nerve injuries from July 2008 to August 2014. Sixteen patients met the inclusion criteria for the present study. All patients underwent nerve grafting using a processed nerve allograft. All operations were performed by the same surgeon (V.Z.). Serial neurosensory testing was performed by 1 clinician (V.Z.) in a standardized fashion. The primary outcome variable was the interval to functional sensory recovery as defined by the Medical Research Council Scale. The participants ranged in age from 16 to 62 years (mean 32). Of the 16 patients, 12 were female (75%) and 4 were male (25%), and 3 were smokers (18.75%) and 13 were nonsmokers (81.25%). One half of the patients (n = 8; 50%) underwent surgery on the inferior alveolar nerve, and 8 (50%) underwent surgery on the lingual nerve. The most common mechanism of injury was impacted third molar removal (n = 9; 56.25%) Of the 16 patients, 15 (93.75%) achieved functional sensory recovery during the study period. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that processed nerve allografts are effective in reconstructing small (<2-cm) trigeminal nerve defects. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  10. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit S.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS. Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS. With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION. Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  11. Inability to determine tissue health is main indication of allograft use in intermediate extent burns.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, John L; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Sinha, Indranil; Leung, Kai P; Renz, Evan M; Chan, Rodney K

    2015-12-01

    Cutaneous allograft is commonly used in the early coverage of excised burns when autograft is unavailable. However, allograft is also applied in intermediate-extent burns (25-50%), during cases in which it is possible to autograft. In this population, there is a paucity of data on the indications for allograft use. This study explores the indications for allograft usage in moderate size burns. Under an IRB-approved protocol, patients admitted to our burn unit between March 2003 and December 2010 were identified through a review of the burn registry. Data on allograft use, total burn surface area, operation performed, operative intent, number of operations, intensive care unit length of stay, and overall length of stay were collected and analyzed. Data are presented as means±standard deviations, except where noted. In the study period, 146 patients received allograft during their acute hospitalization. Twenty-five percent of allograft recipients sustained intermediate-extent burns. Patients with intermediate-extent burns received allograft later in their hospitalization than those with large-extent (50-75% TBSA) burns (6.8 days vs. 3.4 days, p=0.01). Allografted patients with intermediate-extent burns underwent more operations (10.8 vs. 6.1, p=0.002) and had longer hospitalizations (78.3 days vs. 40.9 days, p<0.001) than non-allografted patients, when controlled for TBSA. Clinical rationale for placement of allograft in this population included autograft failure, uncertain depth of excision, lack of autograft donor site, and wound complexity. When uncertain depth of excision was the indication, allograft was universally applied onto the face. In half of allografted intermediate-extent burn patients the inability to identify a viable recipient bed was the ultimate reason for allograft use. Unlike large body surface area burns, allograft skin use in intermediate-extent injury occurs later in the hospitalization and is driven by the inability to determine wound bed

  12. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  13. Serum neopterin as an indicator of increased risk of renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Carey, B Sean; Jain, Rashmi; Adams, Claire L; Wong, Kam Yim; Shaw, Steve; Tse, Wai Yee; Kaminski, Edward R

    2013-03-01

    Acute rejection remains associated with poor graft outcome. An early predictor of acute renal transplant rejection is the long sought after goal for transplant immunologists. In this study we measured levels of serum neopterin at day 5 post-transplant in a cohort of 216 consecutive renal allograft recipients, and compared this with serum creatinine and acute rejection episodes during the first year post transplant. We compared serum neopterin in recipients from living donors (LD), donors after brain death (DBD) and donors after cardiac death (DCD). In all cases higher neopterin levels were correlated with acute rejection in the first year post transplant, but this was only significant in recipients of DCD kidneys who suffered acute cellular or vascular rejection (p=0.04, odds ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.003-1.012). The neopterin/creatinine ratio, which takes into account the effect of kidney function on circulating neopterin levels, was significantly higher for all recipients who suffered biopsy proven cellular or vascular rejection in the first year post transplant, compared to all other patients (p=0.001, for an increase of 0.1, odds ratio=1.64, 95% CI 1.21-2.20). The ability to use non-invasive biomarkers in the transplant recipient has the potential to increase transplant survival for these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 19F MRI Detection of Acute Allograft Rejection with In Vivo Perfluorocarbon Labeling of Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ye, Qing; Eytan, Danielle F.; Janjic, Jelena M.; Ahrens, Eric T.; Ho, Chien

    2010-01-01

    Current diagnosis of organ rejection following transplantation relies on tissue biopsy, which is not ideal due to sampling limitations and risks associated with the invasive procedure. We have previously shown that cellular MRI of iron-oxide labeled immune-cell infiltration can provide a non-invasive measure of rejection status by detecting areas of hypointensity on T2*-weighted images. In the current study, we tested the feasibility of using a fluorine-based cellular tracer agent to detect macrophage accumulation in rodent models of acute allograft rejection by fluorine-19 (19F) MRI and MRS. This study used two rat models of acute rejection, including abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplant and orthotopic kidney transplant models. Following in vivo labeling of monocytes and macrophages with a commercially available agent containing perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, we observed 19F-signal intensity in the organs experiencing rejection by 19F MRI, and conventional 1H MRI was used for anatomical context. Immunofluorescense and histology confirmed macrophage labeling. These results are consistent with our previous studies and show the complementary nature of the two cellular imaging techniques. With no background signal, 19F MRI/MRS can provide unambiguous detection of fluorine labeled cells, and may be a useful technique for detecting and quantifying rejection grade in patients. PMID:21305593

  15. T-cell immune response cDNA 7 in allograft rejection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Utku, Nalân; Heinemann, Thomas; Milford, Edgar L

    2007-05-01

    The membrane protein T-cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) is transiently expressed in subsets of lymphocytes following antigen stimulation. The importance of TIRC7 in immune activation is demonstrated by the effect of antibodies directed against extracellular domains of TIRC7. In vitro targeting of TIRC7 inhibits proliferation and cytokine expression in human, mouse and rat lymphocytes, and these inhibitory effects have been associated with induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 mRNA and protein in the presence of TIRC7 antibodies. In vivo, anti-TIRC7 antibodies prevent kidney transplant rejection in rats and heart allograft rejection in mice. Treatment with an anti-TIRC7 antibody as monotherapy or in combination with TNFalpha blockade inhibits disease progression in collagen-induced arthritis. TIRC7 expression decreases in the peripheral blood of humans who have undergone cardiac transplant prior to clinical rejection, and is therefore a promising noninvasive tool for the prediction of rejection. Thus, targeting of TIRC7 may lead to the development of specific and effective therapeutic and diagnostic approaches by unifying relevant cellular and molecular responses in T- and B-cell subsets, and represents a promising new pathway for immune regulation in transplantation and autoimmune disease.

  16. Histologic evaluation of socket augmentation with mineralized human allograft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Tsao, Yi-Pin

    2008-06-01

    Socket augmentation performed at the time of tooth extraction has been recommended by many authors, since successful socket augmentation may reduce or eliminate the need for future ridge grafts. An augmentation procedure is described here, along with histologic and histomorphometric findings. Five patients (three men, two women; mean age 56 years) were recruited for this pilot study, and seven sites were treated. Solvent-preserved mineralized cancellous allograft was used to fill each socket up to the bone crest (2 mm below soft tissue surface), and sites were covered with a bioabsorbable collagen wound dressing. Core biopsies were taken from the center of extraction sockets 5 to 6 months after augmentation. Histologic evaluation of the prepared biopsies showed formation and remodeling of trabecular bone in areas of mineralized cancellous allografts and no signs of inflammation. Histomorphometric analysis of the samples showed an average of 68.5% vital bone, 3.8% residual graft particles, and 27.7% of connective tissue/bone marrow. In addition, vital bone and connective tissues were seen in close contact with the remaining allograft. These data suggest that this combination of human mineralized bone and absorbable collagen wound dressing is a suitable technique for socket augmentation. Nevertheless, future controlled clinical trials with larger sample sizes are recommended to validate the findings of the current technique.

  17. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on human tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Gardner, E M H; VonderHeide, N; Fisher, R; Brooker, G; Yates, P J

    2013-12-01

    Bacterial contamination of tendon allografts at the completion of processing has historically been about 2 %, with tendons that are found to be culture positive being discarded. Treatment of tendon allograft with hydrogen peroxide at the beginning of tissue processing may reduce bacterial contamination, however, the potential side effects of hydrogen peroxide treatment include hydrolysis of the collagen and this may alter the mechanical properties of the graft. Pairs of human tendons were used. One was washed in 3 % hydrogen peroxide for 5 min and the untreated tendon was used as a control. The ultimate tensile strength of the tendons was determined using a material testing machine. A freeze clamp technique was used to hold the tendons securely at the high loads required to cause tendon failure. There was no statistical difference in the ultimate tensile strength between the treated and untreated tendons. Mean strength ranged from Extensor Hallucis Longus at 588 Newtons to Tibialis Posterior at 2,366 Newtons. Hydrogen peroxide washing may reduce bacterial contamination of tendon allograft and does not affect the strength of the tendon.

  18. STAT4 gene polymorphism in patients after renal allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska-Żamojcin, Ewa; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Domański, Leszek; Słuczanowska-Głabowska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction STAT4 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 4) is involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Some studies have suggested that STAT4 may be involved in the immune response after graft transplantation. Several polymorphisms in the STAT4 gene have been identified. The most commonly studied polymorphism in the STAT4 gene is rs7574865. In our study, we examined whether this polymorphism is associated with the early and late functions of renal allografts. Material and methods A total of 270 recipients of first renal transplants were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the STAT4 gene were genotyped using TaqMan genotyping assays. Results There were no statistically significant associations between the STAT4 gene rs7574865 polymorphism and delayed graft function, acute rejection, chronic allograft dysfunction, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, or creatinine serum concentrations after transplantation. Conclusions Our results suggest a lack of association between the STAT4 rs7574865 SNP and kidney allograft function in the Polish population. PMID:27833442

  19. Impact of freezing on immunology and incorporation of bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Reikerås, Olav; Sigurdsen, Ulf W; Shegarfi, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    With an increasing clinical use of deep frozen allograft for bone reconstruction, it is important to understand the immunological and biological events of allograft incorporation. In this study, we have investigated the impact of deep freezing on immunology and biopotency for incorporation of bone allografts. Deep frozen bone grafts matched or mismatched for major histoscompatibilty complex (MHC) were implanted in an 8-mm segmental defect in the tibia in rats. The construct was stabilized with intramedullary nailing. The immune response was evaluated by determination of serum antibody against the grafts MHC molecules at day 1 and after 2 and 4 months. Incorporation of the graft was compared with fresh syngeneic grafts and assessed with the use of conventional radiography, biomechanical testing and measurement of bone mineral content and density after 4 months. The analyses revealed no antibody responses in the rats that received grafts from donors differing at histocompatibility loci, and at 4 months the frozen grafts showed an overall reconstruction that was not significantly different from the fresh grafts. This study indicates that in the long run there are no significant consequences; either immunological or biomechanical, of the use of deep frozen allogenous bone as compared to fresh autogenous bone grafts in this animal model.

  20. Immunohistochemical Investigation of the Heart Allograft Myocardium (1991-1998).

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, Ludmila V.; Baranova, Flora S.; Khalimova, Zarema A.; Zaidenov, Vladimir A.; Kurenkova, Lubov G.; Kormer, Arkadiy Ya.; Khubutia, Anzor Sh.; Kupriyanova, Anna G.; Shumakov, Valeriy I.

    2000-04-01

    What is a contribution of the humoral (vascular) and mixed type of the rejection episodes to all the episodes of heart allograft rejection is not quite clear, though this factor is of considerable importance for the choice of the treatment methods. The hearts from recipients, as well as endomyocardial biopsies of the heart allografts and postmortem material were investigated with the aim to determine the immunopathological process. Overall, 420 samples from 80 patients were analyzed. Immunofluorescence examination of endomyocardial biopsy showed that in 8 from 44 patients with heart allograft in postoperative period for the first six weeks there were revealed the immunomorphological signs of the acute humoral rejection, manifested as fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in capillaries. Six of them exhibited rejection of mixed type. Most patients in the later postoperative period exhibited a discrete local fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in myocardium, that can be assessed as one of the compartments of the chronic rejection process. In cases of the secondary administration of serum preparations, the fixation of immune complexes was shown in sarcolemma and capillaries, and can be proposed as a sign of serum disease. Repeated acute rejection episodes of humoral or mixed types raised at the first six weeks after transplantation. In the period from 1-5 years after operation, patients displayed discrete deposits of the immunoglobulins and complement as part of the chronic rejection process.

  1. Zoledronic acid, an aminobisphosphonate, prolongs survival of skin allografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Yuan; Yang, Po-Sheng; Cheng, Shih-Ping; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Lee, Jie-Jen; Ko, Chun-Chuan; Shieh, Hui-Ru; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2012-08-04

    Zoledronic acid (ZOL), an effective nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate used to prevent excessive bone loss in clinical practice, has been shown to affect the development of dendritic cells by redirecting differentiation toward a state of atypical maturation. The study was aimed to examine whether ZOL can reduce acute rejection of skin allografts. A skin transplantation model using C57BL/6 to BALB/c mice was used. ZOL was injected intraperitoneally into transplant recipients post-surgically. Graft survival, body weight, leukocyte count, hepatic and renal functions were assessed. ZOL treatment significantly prolonged skin allograft survival in mice. In terms of toxicity, there were no significant differences in body weight, leukocyte count, plasma alanine aminotransferase or creatinine levels between the ZOL-treated and control groups. Histopathology showed that the loss of skin integrity seen in control group was prevented by ZOL treatment. In draining lymph nodes and spleen, the number and clustering extent of mononuclear cells were markedly declined by ZOL treatment. The plasma IL-6 levels were reduced by treatment of ZOL. ZOL can prolong skin allograft survival without major toxicity.

  2. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  3. [Oral mucosa analog allografts in non-consanguineous rats].

    PubMed

    González, Luis; Padrón, Karla; Salmen, Siham; Jerez, Elsy; Dávila, Lorena; Solórzano, Eduvigis

    2017-01-24

    Although there are therapeutic options for the treatment of oral mucosa defects, the need for functional, anatomical and aesthetically similar substitutes persists, as well as for solutions to reduce autologous grafts morbidity. To determine clinical and histological compatibility of equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated through tissue engineering in non-consanguineous rats. We used a sample of oral mucosa from Sprague Dawley rats to obtain a fibroblast culture and a keratinocytes and fibroblasts co-culture. In both cases, we used a commercial collagen membrane as "scaffold". After ten weeks of culture, we grafted the resulting membranes into four Wistar rats. The first phase of the study was the development of the oral mucosa equivalents generated by tissue engineering. Then, we implanted them in immunocompetent Wistar rats, and finallywe evaluated the clinical and histological features of the allografts. In vivo evaluation of mucosal substitutes showed a correct integration of artificial oral mucosa in immunocompetent hosts, with an increase in periodontal biotype and the creation of a zone with increased keratinization. Histologically, the tissue was similar to the control oral mucosa sample with no inflammatory reaction nor clinical or histological rejection signs. The equivalent oral mucosa allografts generated by tissue engineering showed clinical and histological compatibility.

  4. Remodeling of ACL Allografts is Inhibited by Peracetic Acid Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Gonnermann, Johannes; Kamp, Julia; Przybilla, Dorothea; Pruss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Sterilization of allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has become an important prerequisite to prevent disease transmission. However, current sterilization techniques impair the biological or mechanical properties of such treated grafts. Peracetic acid (PAA) has been successfully used to sterilize bone allografts without these disadvantages and does not impair the mechanical properties of soft tissue grafts in vitro. We asked whether PAA sterilization would influence recellularization, restoration of crimp length and pattern, and revascularization of ACL grafts during early healing. We used an in vivo sheep model for open ACL reconstruction. We also correlated the histologic findings with the restoration of anteroposterior stability and structural properties during load-to-failure testing. PAA slowed remodeling activity at 6 and 12 weeks compared to nonsterilized allografts and autografts. The mechanical properties of PAA grafts were also reduced compared to these control groups at both time points. We conclude PAA sterilization currently should not be used to sterilize soft tissue grafts typically used in ACL reconstruction. PMID:18491201

  5. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using peroneus brevis tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Ruben; Damacen, Harvey; Nyland, John; Caborn, David

    2007-07-01

    We describe the use of a double-strand peroneus brevis allograft to reconstruct the coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular (AC) joint ligaments. Through sharp dissection, the distal clavicle, the AC joint, and the torn superior AC and coracoacromial ligaments are identified. The coracoid process and injured coracoclavicular ligaments are identified with blunt dissection. A 1-cm segment of the lateral clavicle is resected. Vertical and connecting horizontal tunnels are created (4.5 mm) in the lateral clavicle and in the medial acromion process. The 5.5- to 6.0-mm-diameter allograft is looped around the coracoid process, and both strands are passed through the vertical clavicle tunnel with a nitinol wire loop. One strand passes through the vertical clavicle tunnel, and the other strand passes through the horizontal tunnel, exiting through the lateral end. The allograft strand passed through the vertical clavicle tunnel is then passed inferiorly through the superior vertical acromion tunnel, and the strand passed completely through the horizontal clavicle tunnel is passed laterally through the medial horizontal acromion tunnel. After both strands exit inferiorly through the vertical acromion tunnel, they are tensioned and sutured with AC joint reduction. Soft tissue closure uses No. 0 and No. 2-0 absorbable sutures with No. 3-0 nylon sutures at the skin.

  6. Allograft Heart Valves: Current Aspects and Future Applications.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Milan; Kalender, Guenay; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Biermann, Anna; Stock, Ulrich Alfred

    2017-02-02

    Human heart valve allografts continue to represent almost perfect substitutes for heart valves. They have optimal hemodynamic characteristics and are highly resistant to infections. The first clinical use of allograft heart valves was as homovitals being transplanted after antibiotic incubation without any preservation. Since 1968, relatively standardized frozen cryopreservation (SFC) has been employed, including storage in vapor-phase liquid nitrogen. Disadvantages, particularly in pediatric patients, are limited availability due to organ scarcity, inability to grow, degeneration, immune response, and long-term failure. However, in contrast to alternative prosthetic or bioprosthetic heart valve replacements, they represent the best pediatric and juvenile replacement options for the pulmonary valve. Application of multiphoton imaging analysis for three-dimensional visualization of elastin and collagen by induction of autofluorescence without chemical fixation, embedding, and staining has revealed partial destruction of elastic and collagenous matrix in SFC valves. As the overall amount of collagen and elastin remains unchanged, the observed destruction is attributed to freezing-induced extracellular matrix damages due to ice crystal formation during SFC. The objective of this review is an assessment of current allograft preservation methods and the potential of novel preservation techniques to avoid ice formation with accompanied better long-term function.

  7. Gr-1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulate in corneal allograft and improve corneal allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wungrak; Ji, Yong Woo; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Yeo, Areum; Noh, Hyemi; Jin, Su-Eon; Song, Jong Suk; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Hyung Keun

    2016-12-01

    We identified the characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and investigated their mechanism of induction and their functional role in allograft rejection using a murine corneal allograft model. In mice, MDSCs coexpress CD11b and myeloid differentiation antigen Gr-1. Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells infiltrated allografted corneas between 4 d and 4 wk after surgery; however, the frequencies of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells were not different between accepted and rejected allografts or in peripheral blood or BM. Of interest, Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells, but not Gr-1(hi)CD11b(+) cells, infiltrated the accepted graft early after surgery and expressed high levels of immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. This population remained until 4 wk after surgery. In vitro, only high dose (>100 ng/ml) of IFN-γ plus GM-CSF could induce immunosuppressive cytokine expression in Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells reduced T cell infiltration, which improved graft survival. In conclusion, high-dose IFN-γ in allograft areas is essential for development of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) MDSCs in corneal allografts, and subtle environmental changes in the early period of the allograft can result in a large difference in graft survival.

  8. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  9. A Biomechanical Comparison of Allograft Tendons for Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Jeremiah E; Russell, Joseph P; Grieshober, Jason; Iacangelo, Abigail; Ellison, Benjamin A; Lease, T Dylan; Kim, Hyunchul; Henn, R Frank; Hsieh, Adam H

    2017-03-01

    Allograft tendons are frequently used for ligament reconstruction about the knee, but they entail availability and cost challenges. The identification of other tissues that demonstrate equivalent performance to preferred tendons would improve limitations. Hypothesis/Purpose: We compared the biomechanical properties of 4 soft tissue allograft tendons: tibialis anterior (TA), tibialis posterior (TP), peroneus longus (PL), and semitendinosus (ST). We hypothesized that allograft properties would be similar when standardized by the looped diameter. Controlled laboratory study. This study consisted of 2 arms evaluating large and small looped-diameter grafts: experiment A consisted of TA, TP, and PL tendons (n = 47 each) with larger looped diameters of 9.0 to 9.5 mm, and experiment B consisted of TA, TP, PL, and ST tendons (n = 53 each) with smaller looped diameters of 7.0 to 7.5 mm. Each specimen underwent mechanical testing to measure the modulus of elasticity (E), ultimate tensile force (UTF), maximal elongation at failure, ultimate tensile stress (UTS), and ultimate tensile strain (UTε). Experiment A: No significant differences were noted among tendons for UTF, maximal elongation at failure, and UTϵ. UTS was significantly higher for the PL (54 MPa) compared with the TA (44 MPa) and TP (43 MPa) tendons. E was significantly higher for the PL (501 MPa) compared with the TP (416 MPa) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TP and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the TA tendons for all outcomes. Experiment B: All groups exhibited a similar E. UTF was again highest in the PL tendons (2294 N) but was significantly different from only the ST tendons (1915 N). UTϵ was significantly higher for the ST (0.22) compared with the TA (0.19) and TP (0.19) tendons. Equivalence testing showed that the TA, TP, and PL tendon properties were equivalent or superior to those of the ST tendons. Compared with TA tendons, TP and PL tendons of a given looped

  10. Fresh vein allograft survival in dogs after cyclosporine treatment.

    PubMed

    Mingoli, A; Edwards, J D; Feldhaus, R J; Hunter, W J; Naspetti, R; Cavallari, N; Sapienza, P; Kretchmar, D H; Cavallaro, A

    1996-04-01

    Synthetic grafts are widely used for peripheral arterial reconstructions when autologous veins are not available, but their results have not been satisfactory. Venous allograft may be used as an alternative to synthetic prostheses. The aim of the study was to explore the immunosuppressive efficacy of Cyclosporine A (CyA) as a means of preventing venous allograft failures and rejection. We utilized 56 mongrel dogs. Immunological incompatibility was checked with the skin graft method. Donor inferior vena cava was transplanted into the infrarenal abdominal aorta of recipient animals. One group (group 1, 10 dogs) served as a control and three groups received CyA treatment regimens. Group 2 (10 dogs) received postoperative oral CyA treatment for 30 days. Group 3 (12 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution without postoperative immunosuppressive therapy. Group 4 (9 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution and postoperative CyA treatment for 30 days. Allografts were examined at 30 days for patency, aneurysmal dilatation, gross structural changes, inflammatory response, and lymphocytic infiltration. Sex chromatine assessment determined the origin (donor or recipient) of the endothelial cells. The allografts from groups 1 and 3 showed significant aneurysmal dilatation and perivenous inflammation when compared to dogs treated with oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0002). Moreover allografts treated with CyA therapy had a better-developed venous neointima (P < 0.009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02) and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02), and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) and adventitial layers (P < 0.02). No significant differences were observed in neointimal thickness among the four groups. Lymphocytic infiltration was greater in the group of animals who did not receive oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0004). Barr bodies status showed significant differences between oral CyA treated groups and nontreated groups (P < 0.0003). Oral CyA therapy

  11. Cell Mediated Immunity to Herpesvirus Type 1 in Carcinoma and Pre-cancerous Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T.; Shillitoe, E. J.; Wilton, J. M. A.; Ivanyi, L.

    1973-01-01

    The response of lymphocytes to Herpesvirus hominis type 1 (HVH1), Candida albicans and phytohaemagglutinin was studied sequentially over a period of 3 years in patients with leukoplakia and carcinoma. In the keratosis-acanthosis group of leukoplakia there was a significant decrease in stimulation of lymphocytes by HVH1, in contrast to epithelial atypia which yielded both increased stimulation indices and macrophage migration inhibition to HVH1. Non-specific depressed cell mediated immune responses were found in carcinoma. Sequential data revealed major fluctuations in stimulation indices to HVH1 during the course of epithelial atypia and a fall in the stimulation indices from > 7 to < 2 was associated with carcinomatous transformation. These changes argue in favour of participation of HVH1 in the pathogenesis of some leukoplakias, and the development of epithelial atypia with subsequent carcinoma might be a function of the cell mediated immune responses to the virus. PMID:4374226

  12. Noninvasive Imaging of Cell-Mediated Therapy for Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akins, Elizabeth J.; Dubey, Purnima

    2013-01-01

    Cell-mediated therapy (immunotherapy) for the treatment of cancer is an active area of investigation in animal models and clinical trials. Despite many advances, objective responses to immunotherapy are observed in a small number of cases, for certain tumor types. To better understand differences in outcomes, it is critical to develop assays for tracking effector cell localization and function in situ. The fairly recent use of molecular imaging techniques to track cell populations has presented researchers and clinicians with a powerful diagnostic tool for determining the efficacy of cell-mediated therapy for the treatment of cancer. This review highlights the application of whole-body noninvasive radioisotopic, magnetic, and optical imaging methods for monitoring effector cells in vivo. Issues that affect sensitivity of detection, such as methods of cell marking, efficiency of cell labeling, toxicity, and limits of detection of imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:18523073

  13. Recognition of viral antigens in 6/94 virus-induced T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pickel, K; Solvay, M J

    1979-01-24

    Distinct events in the virus-stimulated T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity (V-CMC) have been investigated: 1.) The induction of V-CMC is possible by immunizing mice with infectious as well as UV-inactivated virus (parainfluenza type 1 strain 6/94), or with virus-infected cells either compatible or imcompatible with the recipient. 2). Recognition of viral antigens by the effector cells occurs independently of the H2 environment: Fractionation of effector cells on columns loaded with virus-infected cells eliminates virus-specific cytotoxic cells. Effector cells and cells on the column need not share H-2 antigens. The findings are discussed with regard to the H2 restriction of the virus induced T-cells mediated cytotoxicity.

  14. Neutrophils as effector cells of T-cell-mediated, acquired immunity in murine listeriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Silva, M T

    1994-01-01

    The control of the infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes, considered an example of an intracellular parasite, is thought to involve co-operation between antigen-specific T cells and activated macrophages. Here we investigated the participation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the mechanisms of resistance during the immune phase of the antimicrobial response to L. monocytogenes infection. We found that BALB/c mice were unable to express T-cell-mediated (acquired) immunity to this pathogen in the absence of granulocytes. We propose that neutrophils should be included in the concept of cell-mediated immunity and that their antimicrobial role is not exclusively expressed during the early phases of a primary infection. PMID:7835951

  15. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  16. Impaired cell mediated immunity in haemophilia in the absence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Madhok, R; Gracie, A; Lowe, G D; Burnett, A; Froebel, K; Follett, E; Forbes, C D

    1986-01-01

    The cell mediated immune response was evaluated in vivo in 29 patients with clinically severe haemophilia by means of the dinitrochlorobenzene skin test. All patients had a response below the median normal value, and in 19 the response was on or below the lower limit of the normal range. There was no difference in skin response between patients positive and negative for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; formerly known as human T cell lymphotropic virus III or lymphadenopathy associated virus). In the whole group, and in seronegative patients (n = 17), there was an inverse relation between exposure to clotting factor and skin response. In seropositive patients (n = 12) no such association was apparent. This study shows that clotting factor concentrate impairs the cell mediated immune response to a new antigen in the absence of infection with HIV. PMID:3094762

  17. Cell-mediated and humoral immune response in diabetic patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Anil, S; Remani, P; Vijayakumar, T; Hari, S

    1990-07-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed in 50 patients with type II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 50 nondiabetic patients with periodontitis. The values were compared with those of 50 age and sex-matched control subjects. The cell-mediated immunity assessed by enumerating the total and high-affinity rosette-forming cells of the patient did not show any significant variation from that of the normal control subjects. The humoral immune response was assessed by estimating serum immunoglobulins G, A, M, D, and E by single radial immunodiffusion. Except IgD, all other immunoglobulins were found to be elevated significantly in both diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. The alteration in humoral immune response may be the cause or the effect of periodontitis. The defective host response reported in diabetic patients may be responsible for the increased incidence of periodontitis in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetic patients.

  18. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in patients with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Anil, S; Hari, S; Remani, P; Vijayakumar, T; Ankathil, R

    1990-03-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed in 21 patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and in an equal number of control subjects. The cell-mediated immunity, assessed by enumeration of total rosette forming cells [TRFC] and high affinity rosette forming cells [HARFC], was found to be depressed in LJP patients compared to controls. Estimation of serum immunoglobulins G,A,M,D and E levels were done using single radial immunodiffusion. All the immunoglobulins except IgD were found to be elevated significantly in LJP patients. The defective immune response found in LJP patients may be the cause or effect of the disease process. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these defects are genetically controlled.

  19. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  20. Cell mediated and humoral immunity and light-chain proteinuria in rifampicin-treated tuberculous patients.

    PubMed

    Galal, S H; Khalil, S H; el Husseiny, W; Brock, J

    1988-01-01

    The present study was devoted to assess the humoral and cell mediated immune responsiveness in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis before and after rifampicin therapy. Skin test using PPD and PHA; Rosette forming cells test, serum IgG, M and A; and light chain proteinuria have been tested for 15 newly diagnosed tuberculous patients and 15 normal controls. Rifampicin showed an immunosuppressive effect on both cellular and humoral immune responses as well as by the advent of light chain proteinuria.

  1. RB mutation and RAS overexpression induce resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier; Golán-Cancela, Irene; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Costoya, Jose A; de la Cruz, Verónica Pérez; Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Several theories aim to explain the malignant transformation of cells, including the mutation of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Deletion of Rb (a tumor suppressor), overexpression of mutated Ras (a proto-oncogene), or both, are sufficient for in vitro gliomagenesis, and these genetic traits are associated with their proliferative capacity. An emerging hallmark of cancer is the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system. Whether specific mutations are related with this, remains to be analyzed. To address this issue, three transformed glioma cell lines were obtained (Rb(-/-), Ras(V12), and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12)) by in vitro retroviral transformation of astrocytes, as previously reported. In addition, Ras(V12) and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12) transformed cells were injected into SCID mice and after tumor growth two stable glioma cell lines were derived. All these cells were characterized in terms of Rb and Ras gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity, expression of MHC I, Rae1δ, and Rae1αβγδε, mult1, H60a, H60b, H60c, as ligands for NK cell receptors, and their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results show that transformation of astrocytes (Rb loss, Ras overexpression, or both) induced phenotypical and functional changes associated with resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, the transfer of cell lines of transformed astrocytes into SCID mice increased resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, thus suggesting that specific changes in a tumor suppressor (Rb) and a proto-oncogene (Ras) are enough to confer resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells and therefore provide some insight into the ability of tumor cells to evade immune responses.

  2. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd.

  3. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization on collagen gels: Effect of densification and bioglass incorporation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gengbo; Pastakia, Meet; Fenn, Michael B; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-05-01

    Plastic compression is a collagen densification process that has been widely used for the development of mechanically robust collagen-based materials. Incorporation of bioglass within plastically compressed collagen gels has been shown to mimic the microstructural properties of native bone and enhance in vitro cell-mediated mineralization. The current study seeks to decouple the effects of collagen densification and bioglass incorporation to understand the interplay between collagen packing density and presence of bioglass on cell-mediated mineralization. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization was assessed as a measure of the osteoconductivity of four different collagen gels: (1) uncompressed collagen gel (UC), (2) bioglass incorporated uncompressed collagen gel (UC + BG), (3) plastically compressed collagen gel (PC), and (4) bioglass incorporated plastically compressed collagen gel (PC + BG). The results indicated that collagen densification enhanced mineralization as shown by SEM, increased alkaline phosphatase activity and produced significantly higher amounts of mineralized nodules on PC gels compared to UC gels. Further, the amount of nodule formation on PC gels was significantly higher compared to UC + BG gels indicating that increase in matrix stiffness due to collagen densification had a greater effect on cell-mediated mineralization compared to bioglass incorporation into loosely packed UC gels. Incorporation of bioglass into PC gels further enhanced mineralization as evidenced by significantly larger nodule size and higher amount of mineralization on PC + BG gels compared to PC gels. In conclusion, collagen densification via plastic compression improves the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. Further, incorporation of bioglass within PC gels has an additive effect and further enhances the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In vitro allograft irradiation prevents graft-versus-host disease in small-bowel transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.; Schraut, W.H.

    1985-04-01

    In small-bowel transplantation, the transfer of large numbers of donor lymphocytes with the intestinal allograft may provoke a lethal graft-versus-host reaction. The effectiveness of allograft irradiation in vitro as a method of preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied in a rat model of small-bowel transplantation, with the Lewis----Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrid strain combination. Cold harvested small-bowel allografts were irradiated immediately prior to heterotopic or orthotopic transplantation. Animals that had received heterotopic allografts irradiated with 0, 250, or 500 rad all died of GVHD after 14.4 +/- 3.0, 15.0 +/- 1.3, and 14.2 +/- 1.9 days, respectively. None of the animals that had received allografts treated with 1000 rad developed clinical or pathologic evidence of GVHD, however, and all survived for more than 6 months (P less than 0.001). Allograft function was studied in animals that underwent orthotopic transplantation. Recipients of nonirradiated orthotopic allografts all died of GVHD after 14.0 +/- 0.7 days, whereas recipients of allografts irradiated with 1000 rad all survived for more than 5 months (P less than 0.001). After 120 days, weight gain (51.8 +/- 11.7%), serum albumin (3.9 +/- 0.7 g/dl), serum triglycerides (67.0 +/- 24.3 mg/dl), CBC, and differential in these animals were not statistically different from those in either age-matched isograft recipients or normal animals, and when the rats were sacrificed, irradiated allografts showed no changes suggestive of radiation injury. These results indicate that irradiation of small-bowel allografts in vitro prevents development of GVHD, and that this can be achieved at a dose which does not cause injury to or malfunction of the allograft.

  5. Tendon allograft sterilized by peracetic acid/ethanol combined with gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mo; Zhang, Naili; Liu, Xiaoming; Li, Youchen; Zhang, Yumin; Wang, Xusheng; Li, Baoming; Li, Baoxing

    2014-07-01

    Research and clinical applications have demonstrated that the effects of tendon allografts are comparable to those of autografts when reconstructing injured tendons or ligaments, but allograft safety remains problematic. Sterilisation could eliminate or decrease the possibility of disease transmission, but current methods seldom achieve satisfactory sterilisation without affecting the mechanical properties of the tendon. Peracetic acid-ethanol in combination with low-dose gamma irradiation (PE-R) would inactivate potential deleterious microorganisms without affecting mechanical and biocompatible properties of tendon allograft. Controlled laboratory design. HIV, PPV, PRV and BVDV inactivation was evaluated. After verifying viral inactivation, the treated tendon allografts were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile testing, and the cytocompatibility was assessed with an MTT assay and by subcutaneous implantation. Effective and efficient inactivation of HIV, PPV, PRV and BVDV was observed. Histological structure and ultrastructure were unchanged in the treated tendon allograft, which also exhibited comparable biomechanical properties and good biocompatibility. The preliminary results confirmed our hypothesis and demonstrated that the PE-R tendon allograft has significant potential as an alternative to ligament/tendon reconstruction. Tendon allografts have been extensively used in ligament reconstruction and tendon repair. However, current sterilisation methods have various shortcomings, so PE-R has been proposed. This study suggests that PE-R tendon allograft has great potential as an alternative for ligament/tendon reconstruction. Sterilisation has been a great concern for tendon allografts. However, most sterilisation methods cannot inactivate viruses and bacteria without impairing the mechanical properties of the tendon allograft. Peracetic acid/ethanol with gamma irradiation can effectively inactivate viruses and bacteria

  6. Fibrin facilitates both innate and T cell-mediated defense against Yersinia pestis.1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Deyan; Lin, Shiuan; Parent, Michelle A.; Kanevsky, Isis Mullarky; Szaba, Frank M.; Kummer, Lawrence W.; Duso, Debra K.; Tighe, Michael; Hill, Jim; Gruber, Andras; Mackman, Nigel; Gailani, David; Smiley, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis causes plague, a rapidly progressing and often fatal disease. The formation of fibrin at sites of Y. pestis infection supports innate host defense against plague, perhaps by providing a non-diffusible spatial cue that promotes the accumulation of inflammatory cells expressing fibrin-binding integrins. This report demonstrates that fibrin is an essential component of T cell-mediated defense against plague but can be dispensable for antibody-mediated defense. Genetic or pharmacologic depletion of fibrin abrogated innate and T cell-mediated defense in mice challenged intranasally with Y. pestis. The fibrin-deficient mice displayed reduced survival, increased bacterial burden, and exacerbated hemorrhagic pathology. They also showed fewer neutrophils within infected lung tissue and reduced neutrophil viability at sites of liver infection. Depletion of neutrophils from wild type mice weakened T cell-mediated defense against plague. The data suggest that T cells combat plague in conjunction with neutrophils, which require help from fibrin in order to withstand Y. pestis encounters and effectively clear bacteria. PMID:23487423

  7. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  8. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext.

  9. Differential effect of pancreatectomy on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, N; Piantanelli, L

    1977-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune reactions, such as allogenic skin-graft rejection and PHA or MLC responses, and antibody synthesis against different antigens (sheep erythrocytes, Brucella antigen, bovine serum albumin) have been evaluated in rats suffering from experimentally-induced diabetes and in age-matched sham-treated controls. Cell-mediated immune reactions are strongly depressed diabetic rats. The cellularity of the thymus and of thymus-dependent areas and the number of peripheral blood lymphocytes is significantly reduced in pancreatectomized rats. Moreover, the immunological recovery from heavy cortisonization is also greatly impaired. Daily treatment with insulin may prevent these immunological alterations. By contrast, antibody responses in diabetic rats are not quantitatively altered in respect to either the number of antibody producing cells in the spleen or the circulating antibody titres. The discrepancy between the abnormality of cell-mediated immune reactions in diabetic rats and their physiological capacity to synthetize antibodies suggests that the sensitivity to an insulin-deprived environment is present only in a definite, although yet undefined, subpopulation of lymphoid cells rather than in the whole lymphoid system. Images Fig. 4 PMID:141353

  10. Spleen tyrosine kinase contributes to acute renal allograft rejection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ramessur Chandran, Sharmila; Tesch, Greg H; Han, Yingjie; Woodman, Naomi; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Blease, Kate; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Kidney allografts induce strong T-cell and antibody responses which mediate acute rejection. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is expressed by most leucocytes, except mature T cells, and is involved in intracellular signalling following activation of the Fcγ-receptor, B-cell receptor and some integrins. A role for Syk signalling has been established in antibody-dependent native kidney disease, but little is known of Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and received an orthotopic Wistar renal allograft. Recipient rats were treated with a Syk inhibitor (CC0482417, 30 mg/kg/bid), or vehicle, from 1 h before surgery until being killed 5 days later. Vehicle-treated recipients developed severe allograft failure with marked histologic damage in association with dense leucocyte infiltration (T cells, macrophages, neutrophils and NK cells) and deposition of IgM, IgG and C3. Immunostaining identified Syk expression by many infiltrating leucocytes. CC0482417 treatment significantly improved allograft function and reduced histologic damage, although allograft injury was still clearly evident. CC0482417 failed to prevent T-cell infiltration and activation within the allograft. However, CC0482417 significantly attenuated acute tubular necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and thrombosis of peritubular capillaries. In conclusion, this study identifies a role for Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Syk inhibition may be a useful addition to T-cell-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation. PMID:25529862

  11. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  12. Cardiac emergencies.

    PubMed

    Barata, Isabel Araujo

    2013-08-01

    The diagnosis and management of pediatric cardiac emergencies can be challenging and complicated. Early presentations are usually the result of ductal-dependent lesions and appear with cyanosis and shock. Later presentations are the result of volume overload or pump failure and present with signs of congestive heart failure. Acquired diseases also present as congestive heart failure or arrhythmias. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiac lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Imtiaz; Al-Khafaji, Khalid; Mutyala, Monica; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Cotter, William; Hakim, Hosam; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Lipomas of the heart are encapsulated tumors that are composed primarily of mature fat cells. Cardiac lipomas can originate either from subendocardium (approximately 50%), subpericardium (25%), or from the myocardium (25%) and may be located more frequently in left ventricle or right atrium. We report a 74-year-old female who presented with dyspnea on exertion and was found to have 5×5 cm mass occupying most of the right atrium on a transesophageal echocardiogram. PMID:26486106

  14. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  15. Cardiac optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Entcheva, Emilia

    2013-05-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart.

  16. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  17. Three-Dimensional Virtual Bone Bank System Workflow for Structural Bone Allograft Selection: A Technical Report

    PubMed Central

    Ritacco, Lucas Eduardo; Farfalli, German Luis; Milano, Federico Edgardo; Ayerza, Miguel Angel; Muscolo, Domingo Luis

    2013-01-01

    Structural bone allograft has been used in bone defect reconstruction during the last fifty years with acceptable results. However, allograft selection methods were based on 2-dimensional templates using X-rays. Thanks to preoperative planning platforms, three-dimensional (3D) CT-derived bone models were used to define size and shape comparison between host and donor. The purpose of this study was to describe the workflow of this virtual technique in order to explain how to choose the best allograft using a virtual bone bank system. We measured all bones in a 3D virtual environment determining the best match. The use of a virtual bone bank system has allowed optimizing the allograft selection in a bone bank, providing more information to the surgeons before surgery. In conclusion, 3D preoperative planning in a virtual environment for allograft selection is an important and helpful tool in order to achieve a good match between host and donor. PMID:23690733

  18. Endocrine function after immunosuppression of pancreatic allograft by ionizing irradiation in the primate

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; Du Toit, L.B.

    1986-05-01

    The object of this preliminary study was to evaluate the endocrine function after heterotopic intraperitoneal segmental pancreatic allotransplantation with unligated duct in irradiated, totally pancreatectomized primates. All allograft recipients received, pre- and peroperative donor-specific blood transfusions and peroperative external irradiation from a linear accelerator; 200 rads was administered weekly and increased to a total dose of 1,500 rads. Pancreatic transplantation was performed between 2 and 6 weeks after completion of irradiation and preoperative blood transfusions. As previously reported, only minimal pancreatic allograft survival was achieved following preoperative irradiation. One recipient remained normoglycaemic for greater than 100 days after transplantation, the longest surviving pancreatic allograft recipient reported from this laboratory. Intravenous glucose tolerance test results in this recipient revealed normoglycaemia, reduced K-value, hypoinsulinaemia, normal glucagon response, reduced C-peptide values, and moderate glucose intolerance. Aortography and electron-microscopic examination of allograft biopsy tissue confirmed the presence of a functioning allograft.

  19. Supercharging allografts with mesenchymal stem cells in the operating room during hip revision.

    PubMed

    Homma, Yasuhiro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Hernigou, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have been proposed to improve allografts used during hip revision. However, no study has reported the number of MSCs that could be associated with the allograft and the best technique to load MSCs in allografts. The optimal loading technique should combine methods to increase the initial cell density and create an appropriate environment to accelerate the efficiency of the cell-allograft constructs into clinically applicable grafts. We designed a study to evaluate the number of MSCs in an autograft femoral head considered as the gold standard and to determine the best operating room procedure for loading in allograft with MSCs to approach the same number as in an autograft femoral head. Therefore this study explored a potential of charging whole femoral head allografts with autologous MSCs from iliac crest aspirate for hip revision procedures. First, the study evaluated the total number of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in 1 cc of an average autograft femoral head; this number then serves as a target for loading allografts, in order to achieve the same density of MSCs. For the loading technique itself, several questions were asked and hence several options were investigated. For example, is it better to load the whole allograft or break it up into several fragments? Which way of injecting works best for the whole femoral head allograft (through cartilage or femoral neck)? How concentrated (in terms of MSCs) should the injected iliac crest marrow be? Bone marrow for injection in allografts was obtained from residual marrow from patients undergoing surgical procedures with concentrated bone marrow. With this bone marrow (with and without concentration) we tested different techniques (injection and soaking) to load stem cells in allografts of different sizes: bulk allografts, pieces or blocks (8 or 1 cm(3) blocks) and morselized fragments (from 125 to 8 mm(3)) or particules (1 mm(3)). We also evaluated the release of

  20. Polymorphisms in genes related to the complement system and antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Marrón-Liñares, Grecia M; Núñez, Lucía; Crespo-Leiro, María G; Barge-Caballero, Eduardo; Pombo, Jorge; Paniagua-Martin, María Jesús; Suarez-Fuentetaja, Natalia; Cid, Javier; Grille-Cancela, Zulaika; Muñiz-Garcia, Javier; Tan, Carmela D; Rodríguez, E Rene; Vázquez-Rodríguez, José Manuel; Hermida-Prieto, Manuel

    2017-07-15

    Heart transplantation (HT) is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure. One of the main problems after HT is the humoral response termed antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Complement activation plays a key role in AMR contributing to graft damage. The aim of this study was to analyze genetic variants in genes related to the complement pathways that could be associated with the development of AMR. Analysis of 51 genes related to the complement pathway was performed by next-generation sequencing in 46 HT recipients, 23 with and 23 without AMR. Statistical analysis was performed with SNPstats and R. We identified 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 1 in the mannose-binding lectin 2 gene (p.Gly54Asp-MBL2) and 1 in the complement factor properdin gene (p.Asn428(p=)-CFP), that showed significant association with the absence and development of AMR, respectively. Moreover, the presence of the rare allele in p.Gly54Asp-MBL2 control patients correlated with an immunodeficiency of mannose-binding lectin (6.24 ng/ml vs 207.50 ng/ml, p < 0.01), whereas the presence of the rare allele p.Asn428(p=)-CFP in patients with AMR correlated with higher levels of properdin protein (14.65 μg/ml vs 10.77 μg/ml, p < 0.05). AMR is a complex phenotype affected by many recipient factors. Variants in p.Gly54Asp-MBL2 and p.Asn428(p=)-CFP genes, encoding mannose-binding lectin 2 and properdin, may influence the risk of AMR. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-invasive approaches for the diagnosis of acute cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christopher A; Fildes, James E; Ray, Simon G; Doran, Helen; Yonan, Nizar; Williams, Simon G; Schmitt, Matthias

    2013-04-01

    Despite modern immunosuppressive regimes, acute rejection remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in heart transplant recipients. Clinical features are unreliable, and therefore, screening is performed in order to detect rejection, and hence, augment immunosuppressive therapy, at an early stage, with the aim of reducing short- and long-term sequelae. Histological analysis of right ventricular myocardial tissue obtained at endomyocardial biopsy remains the 'gold standard' surveillance technique; however 'biopsy-negative' rejection occurs in up to 20% of patients, the procedure is associated with uncommon but potentially serious complications and it is expensive. Non-invasive screening would, conceivably, be safer, more tolerable and cheaper, and could potentially allow more comprehensive monitoring. The evidence for non-invasive methods of diagnosing acute rejection, including assessment of myocardial deformation, myocardial tissue characterisation, electrophysiological monitoring, visualisation of cellular and molecular components of rejection and peripheral monitoring of immune activation, is reviewed.

  2. Results of 32 Allograft-prosthesis Composite Reconstructions of the Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Larousserie, Frédérique; Thévenin, Fabrice; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Anract, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The use of allograft-prosthesis composites for reconstruction after bone tumor resection at the proximal femur has generated considerable interest since the mid1980s on the basis that their use would improve function and survival, and restore bone stock. Although functional improvement has been documented, it is unknown whether these composites survive long periods and whether they restore bone stock. We therefore determined long-term allograft-prosthesis composite survival, identified major complications that led to revision, and determined whether allograft bone stock could be spared at the time of revision. We also compared the radiographic appearance of allografts sterilized by gamma radiation and fresh-frozen allografts. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with bone malignancy in the proximal femur who underwent reconstruction with a cemented allograft-prosthesis composite. The allograft-prosthesis composite was a primary reconstruction for 23 patients and a revision procedure for nine. The minimum followup was 2 months (median, 68 months; range, 2–232 months). The cumulative incidence of revision for any reason was 14% at 5 years (95% confidence interval, 1%–28%) and 19% at 10 years (95% confidence interval, 3%–34%). Nine patients (28%) had revision of the reconstruction during followup; four of these patients had revision surgery for infection. Allografts sterilized by gamma radiation showed worse resorption than fresh-frozen allografts. Based on reported results, allograft-composite prostheses do not appear to improve survival compared with megaprostheses. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19851817

  3. First Metatarsophalangeal Joint Arthrodesis Technique With Interposition Allograft Bone Block.

    PubMed

    Luk, Pamela C; Johnson, Jeffrey E; McCormick, Jeremy J; Klein, Sandra E

    2015-08-01

    We present a technique of first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis utilizing an interposition allograft bone block with a bipolar reaming technique that creates congruent fusion surfaces on both ends of the graft-host bone interface. In addition, we examined the union rates, fusion position, patient satisfaction, and functional outcome of this technique. Fifteen patients underwent first metatarsophalangeal joint arthrodesis with an interposition allograft bone block between September 2004 and October 2013. Charts and radiographs were reviewed. Six measures were compared on preoperative and postoperative radiographs. Clinical outcomes were measured using a telephone questionnaire, pre- and postoperative visual analog scale pain scale, and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. Average follow-up was 46 weeks (range, 19 to 97). Thirteen of 15 (87%) patients achieved bony union at an average of 21 weeks. One patient underwent revision arthrodesis for their nonunion. Symptomatic hardware was removed in 3 cases. Improvement was noted in visual analog scale pain scores (6 to 2) and functional scores as measured by the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. There were no postoperative wound complications or infections. Average length of the first ray on anteroposterior radiograph increased from 10.7 to 11.3 cm and from 10.0 to 10.7 cm on the lateral radiograph. Thirteen of 14 patients were very satisfied or satisfied. One patient expressed dissatisfaction with the procedure. One patient was not available for clinical follow-up. First metatarsophalangeal joint allograft bone block arthrodesis using the bipolar reaming technique achieved high bony union rates and satisfactory radiographic and clinical outcomes. This procedure was an effective salvage option for managing bone loss on 1 or both sides of the joint. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Injury-induced allograft rejection: A rendezvous with evolution.

    PubMed

    Land, Walter G

    2013-01-01

    Modern immunology, in many ways, is based on three major paradigms: the clonal selection theory, the pattern recognition theory, and the danger/injury theory. The last theory holds that any cell stress and tissue injury, including allograft injury, via induction of damage-associated molecular patterns, induces immunity, including alloimmunity, leading to allograft rejection. On the other hand, the concept precludes that non-self per se induces immunity as proposed by the two former theories. Recently, the danger/injury model has gained considerable acceptance by immunologists, in particular as promoted by new insights into the function of the mammalian gut microbiota, representing a huge assemblage of non-self. Harboring microbiota by hosts is characterized by the fact that harmless noninjurious commensal microbes are protected by innate immunity-based tolerance, whereas intestinal injury-causing pathogenic microbes are immunologically attacked. Plausibility and validity of the danger/injury concept is stringently supported by observations of similar phenomena across the tree of life: the ability of the immune system to discriminate between harmful life-threatening non-self to induce immunity and harmless beneficial non-self to induce tolerance has apparently emerged during evolution. Immune defense responses to injuring/injured non-self (e.g., as reflected by plant resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses on one hand, and allograft rejection on the other hand) as well as immunity-controlled protection of beneficial non-self (e.g., as reflected by microbiota and the fetus of placental mammals) are processes in the interest of evolution and, thus, evolved under pressure across the phylogenetic tree.

  5. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  6. Heart transplantation using allografts from older donors: Multicenter study results.

    PubMed

    Roig, Eulàlia; Almenar, Luís; Crespo-Leiro, Marisa; Segovia, Javier; Mirabet, Sònia; Delgado, Juan; Pérez-Villa, Felix; Luís Lambert, Jose; Teresa Blasco, M; Muñiz, Javier

    2015-06-01

    The lengthy waiting time for heart transplantation is associated with high mortality. To increase the number of donors, new strategies have emerged, including the use of hearts from donors ≥50 years old. However, this practice remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate outcomes of patients receiving heart transplants from older donors. We retrospectively analyzed 2,102 consecutive heart transplants in 8 Spanish hospitals from 1998 to 2010. Acute and overall mortality were compared in patients with grafts from donors ≥50 years old versus grafts from younger donors. There were 1,758 (84%) transplanted grafts from donors < 50 years old (Group I) and 344 (16%) from donors ≥50 years old (Group II). Group I had more male donors than Group II (71% vs. 57%, p = 0.0001). The incidence of cardiovascular risk factors was higher in older donors. There were no differences in acute mortality or acute rejection episodes between the 2 groups. Global mortality was higher in Group II (rate ratio, 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.67; p = 0.001) than in Group I. After adjusting for donor cause of death, donor smoking history, recipient age, induction therapy, and cyclosporine therapy, the differences lost significance. Group II had a higher incidence of coronary allograft vasculopathy at 5 years (rate ratio, 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-2.27; p = 0.001). There were no differences in acute and overall mortality after adjusting for confounding factors. However, there was a midterm increased risk of coronary allograft vasculopathy with the use of older donors. Careful selection of recipients and close monitoring of coronary allograft vasculopathy are warranted in these patients. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Meniscal Allograft Interposition Combined with Proximal Row Carpectomy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Murphy M; Willsey, Matthew R; Werner, Frederick W; Harley, Brian J; Klein, Shay; Setter, Kevin J

    2017-02-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is contraindicated in wrists with preexisting arthritis of the proximal capitate or radiolunate fossa. Patients with these conditions frequently pursue wrist arthrodesis with its associated functional limitations. Questions/Purposes The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of using lateral meniscal allograft interposition (LMAI), in combination with PRC, in patients with symptomatic wrist arthritis. The primary question is whether this allograft will allow wrist function comparable to that in patients having only a PRC. A secondary question was to determine the short-term longevity of the allograft. Patients/Method Between 2006 and 2012, nine wrists underwent PRC with LMAI. Patient demographics and rates of complication or graft failure were determined. During independent clinical exams, functional outcomes were reviewed, patients completed a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores, and radiographs were taken. Results Four patients met the inclusion criteria, having clinical follow-up at an average of 4.2 years. DASH scores at the time of follow-up ranged from 9 to 33, with an average of 24. Average radiocapitate joint space in the first postoperative radiograph was 2.8 mm compared with 1.8 mm at the time of final follow-up. No wrists went on to arthrodesis. Conclusion Early outcomes of PRC with LMAI are comparable to those results found in the literature of PRC alone. LMAI with PRC may be a valid short-term option as a motion-preserving procedure in those patients contraindicated to having a PRC alone. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  8. Genome-wide transcription profile of endothelial cells after cardiac transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mikalsen, B; Fosby, B; Wang, J; Hammarström, C; Bjaerke, H; Lundström, M; Kasprzycka, M; Scott, H; Line, P-D; Haraldsen, G

    2010-07-01

    Transcriptome analyses of organ transplants have until now usually focused on whole tissue samples containing activation profiles from different cell populations. Here, we enriched endothelial cells from rat cardiac allografts and isografts, establishing their activation profile at baseline and on days 2, 3 and 4 after transplantation. Modulated transcripts were assigned to three categories based on their regulation profile in allografts and isografts. Categories A and B contained the majority of transcripts and showed similar regulation in both graft types, appearing to represent responses to surgical trauma. By contrast, category C contained transcripts that were partly allograft-specific and to a large extent associated with interferon-gamma-responsiveness. Several transcripts were verified by immunohistochemical analysis of graft lesions, among them the matricellular protein periostin, which was one of the most highly upregulated transcripts but has not been associated with transplantation previously. In conclusion, the majority of the differentially expressed genes in graft endothelial cells are affected by the transplantation procedure whereas relatively few are associated with allograft rejection.

  9. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  10. Stem cell autograft and allograft in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    De Cata, Angelo; Matarangolo, Angela; Inglese, Michele; Rubino, Rosa; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an insufficiency of immune tolerance and, although treated with a number of useful drugs, may need more unconventional therapeutic strategies for their more severe presentations. Among such unconventional therapeutic approaches, stem cell autograft and allograft have been used, with the aim of stimulating disease remission by modifying the pathogenic mechanisms that induce anomalous responses against self-antigens. Autologous transplantation is performed with the purpose of retuning autoimmune cells, whereas allogeneic transplantation is performed with the purpose of replacing anomalous immune effectors and mediators. In this article, we comprehensively review up-to-date information on the autoimmune diseases for which the transplantation of stem cells is indicated.

  11. Vascularized composite allograft-specific characteristics of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation, or reconstructive transplantation, has revolutionized the treatment of complex tissue and functional defects. Despite arriving during an age in which the immunology of solid organ transplant rejection has been investigated in much detail, these transplants have offered new perspectives from which to explore the immunobiology of transplantation. VCAs have a number of unique molecular, cellular, and architectural features which alter the character and intensity of the rejection response. While much is yet to be clarified, an understanding of these distinct mechanisms affords new possibilities for the control of immune responses in an effort to improve outcomes after VCA transplantation.

  12. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  13. Until they have faces: the ethics of facial allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Agich, G; Siemionow, M

    2005-01-01

    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation (FAT) for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative portrayal in the media. PMID:16319234

  14. Until they have faces: the ethics of facial allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Agich, G J; Siemionow, M

    2005-12-01

    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation (FAT) for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative portrayal in the media.

  15. Acellular flexor tendon allografts: a new horizon for tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Drake, David B; Tilt, Alexandra C; DeGeorge, Brent R

    2013-12-01

    Flexor tendon injuries continue to pose a significant challenge to the hand surgeon. In particular, chronic tendon ruptures with adhesions of the tendons and sheath, damage or loss of the intrasynovial flexor tendons in zone II, and combined soft tissue and bone injuries present especially difficult problems for restoring satisfactory digital function. This challenge in flexor tendon reconstruction has motivated hand surgeons to explore and develop novel solutions for nearly a century. Recent advances and techniques in processing and decellularizing allograft human flexor tendon constructs may prove to be a new horizon for tendon reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Microvascular transplantation of epiphyseal plates: studies utilizing allograft donor material.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Martin I; Bowen, C Vaughan A

    2007-01-01

    Compromised function of an epiphyseal plate caused by trauma, tumor, infection, or congenital malformation can result in significant musculoskeletal deformity. Techniques used to correct or minimize the extent of these deformities include autogenous or allogeneic cancellous bone grafts, nonvascularized cortical allografts, vascularized bone and composite tissue transfers, and distraction osteogenesis. These solutions are not ideal for children because they do not adequately address the actively growing nature of the extremity. Microvascular techniques have enabled the experimental transplantation of vascularized epiphyseal plates with high levels of postoperative viability and subsequent growth and offer a potential advantage over conventional treatments.

  17. Significance and Suppression of Redundant IL17 Responses in Acute Allograft Rejection by Bioinformatics Based Drug Repositioning of Fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Homare; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Gong, Yongquan; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advanced immunosuppression, redundancy in the molecular diversity of acute rejection (AR) often results in incomplete resolution of the injury response. We present a bioinformatics based approach for identification of these redundant molecular pathways in AR and a drug repositioning approach to suppress these using FDA approved drugs currently available for non-transplant indications. Two independent microarray data-sets from human renal allograft biopsies (n = 101) from patients on majorly Th1/IFN-y immune response targeted immunosuppression, with and without AR, were profiled. Using gene-set analysis across 3305 biological pathways, significant enrichment was found for the IL17 pathway in AR in both data-sets. Recent evidence suggests IL17 pathway as an important escape mechanism when Th1/IFN-y mediated responses are suppressed. As current immunosuppressions do not specifically target the IL17 axis, 7200 molecular compounds were interrogated for FDA approved drugs with specific inhibition of this axis. A combined IL17/IFN-y suppressive role was predicted for the antilipidemic drug Fenofibrate. To assess the immunregulatory action of Fenofibrate, we conducted in-vitro treatment of anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated human peripheral blood cells (PBMC), and, as predicted, Fenofibrate reduced IL17 and IFN-γ gene expression in stimulated PMBC. In-vivo Fenofibrate treatment of an experimental rodent model of cardiac AR reduced infiltration of total leukocytes, reduced expression of IL17/IFN-y and their pathway related genes in allografts and recipients’ spleens, and extended graft survival by 21 days (p<0.007). In conclusion, this study provides important proof of concept that meta-analyses of genomic data and drug databases can provide new insights into the redundancy of the rejection response and presents an economic methodology to reposition FDA approved drugs in organ transplantation. PMID:23437201

  18. Two-Stage, In Silico Deconvolution of the Lymphocyte Compartment of the Peripheral Whole Blood Transcriptome in the Context of Acute Kidney Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Casey P.; Balshaw, Robert; Ng, Raymond T.; Wilson-McManus, Janet E.; Keown, Paul; McMaster, Robert; McManus, Bruce M.; Landsberg, David; Isbel, Nicole M.; Knoll, Greg; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major complication of solid organ transplantation that prevents the long-term assimilation of the allograft. Various populations of lymphocytes are principal mediators of this process, infiltrating graft tissues and driving cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Understanding the lymphocyte-specific biology associated with rejection is therefore critical. Measuring genome-wide changes in transcript abundance in peripheral whole blood cells can deliver a comprehensive view of the status of the immune system. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue significantly affects the sensitivity and interpretability of traditional analyses, however. Experimental separation of cell types is an obvious solution, but is often impractical and, more worrying, may affect expression, leading to spurious results. Statistical deconvolution of the cell type-specific signal is an attractive alternative, but existing approaches still present some challenges, particularly in a clinical research setting. Obtaining time-matched sample composition to biologically interesting, phenotypically homogeneous cell sub-populations is costly and adds significant complexity to study design. We used a two-stage, in silico deconvolution approach that first predicts sample composition to biologically meaningful and homogeneous leukocyte sub-populations, and then performs cell type-specific differential expression analysis in these same sub-populations, from peripheral whole blood expression data. We applied this approach to a peripheral whole blood expression study of kidney allograft rejection. The patterns of differential composition uncovered are consistent with previous studies carried out using flow cytometry and provide a relevant biological context when interpreting cell type-specific differential expression results. We identified cell type-specific differential expression in a variety of leukocyte sub-populations at the time of rejection. The tissue-specificity of these differentially

  19. MicroRNA profiles in allograft tissues and paired urines associate with chronic allograft dysfunction with IF/TA

    PubMed Central

    Scian, MJ; Maluf, DG; David, KG; Archer, KJ; Suh, JL; Wolen, AR; Mba, MU; Massey, HD; King, AL; Gehr, T; Cotterell, A; Posner, M; Mas, V

    2011-01-01

    Despite the advances in immunosuppression, renal allograft attrition over time remains unabated due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) with interstitial fibrosis (IF) and tubular atrophy (TA). We aimed to evaluate microRNA (miRNA) signatures in CAD with IF/TA and appraise correlation with paired urine samples and potential utility in prospective evaluation of graft function. MicroRNA signatures were established between CAD with IF/TA vs. normal allografts by microarray. Validation of the microarray results and prospective evaluation of urine samples was performed using RT-qPCR. Fifty-six miRNAs were identified in samples with CAD-IF/TA. Five miRNAs were selected for further validation based on: array fold change, p-value and in silico predicted mRNA targets. We confirmed the differential expression of these 5 miRNAs by RT-qPCR using an independent set of samples. Differential expression was detected for miR-142-3p, miR-204, miR-107, and miR-211 (P<0.001) and miR-32 (p<0.05). Furthermore, differential expression of miR-142-3p (p<0.01), miR-204 (p<0.01) and miR-211 (p<0.05) was also observed between patient groups in urine samples. A characteristic miRNA signature for IF/TA that correlates with paired urine samples was identified. These results support the potential use of miRNAs as non-invasive markers of IF/TA and for monitoring graft function. PMID:21794090