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Sample records for cell-mediated cardiac allograft

  1. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  2. LYMPHATIC INJURY AND REGENERATION IN CARDIAC ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Thing Rinda; Pathak, Arvind; Asano, Hiroshi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Baldwin, William M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Severed donor heart lymphatics are not anastomosed to recipient lymphatics in cardiac transplantation. We evaluated the effects of cellular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages on the morphology of lymphatics in heart grafts. Methods: Dark Agouti (DA) hearts were transplanted to Lewis or control DA rats on sub-therapeutic doses of cyclosporin. Transplants were examined by immunohistology and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy using LYVE-1 as a lymphatic marker and CD8 and CD68 as markers for cellular infiltration at selected intervals from 1 to 8 weeks post-transplantation. Results: Allograft inner myocardial lymphatic density decreased by more than 30-fold at 1 week, and recovered to only 15% of the native level at 8 weeks post-transplantation. In contrast, allograft lymphatics in and near the epicardium showed no significant density decline, but increased in size by more than 5-fold at 2 weeks, and sustained about a 3-fold increase at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Lymphatic changes correlated temporally with the extent of T cell and macrophage infiltration in allografts, which peaked at 2-3 weeks post-transplantation. When grafts were retransplanted from allogeneic to isogeneic recipients at 3 weeks post-transplantation, inner lymphatic density returned close to native level within 2 weeks after retransplantation. Conclusions: This is the first characterization of regional and morphological effects of immunological responses on heart lymphatics after transplantation. Elimination of alloimmune responses produces rapid restoration of inner lymphatic vessels, suggesting that lymphatics injured during rejection can recover when rejection is reversed during the post-transplantation course. PMID:20118845

  3. Predicting the development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a lifesaving therapy for patients with end-stage cardiovascular disease. There has been remarkable progress in controlling acute rejection, and the early survival rate after the heart transplantation has significantly improved. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is one of the common causes of death and a major limiting factor for long-term graft survival years after heart transplantation. CAV is a progressive occlusion of arteries and veins of the transplanted heart. CAV is often clinically silent because of the denervation of the transplanted heart. CAV tends to be found at an advanced stage of disease, including myocardial infarction (MI), congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and/or sudden cardiac death. Because of the serious sequelae of CAV, risk factors, prevention, and prediction of CAV have been investigated. Despite the effort by many researchers, the pathogenesis is not yet completely understood. There are a number of both immune and nonimmune factors in the donor and recipient that are related to the development of CAV. In addition, several biomarkers in blood and tissue are found to correlate with the presence of CAV, and that may be able to predict CAV. Here, we review the pathology, pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis, and the potential for prediction of CAV.

  4. Effects of Lung Cotransplantation on Cardiac Allograft Tolerance Across a Full Major Histocompatibility Complex Barrier in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Madariaga, M. L. L.; Spencer, P. J.; Michel, S. G.; La Muraglia, G. M.; O’Neil, M. J.; Mannon, E. C.; Leblang, C.; Rosales, I. A.; Colvin, R. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Allan, J. S.; Madsen, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    A 12-day course of high-dose tacrolimus induces tolerance of major histocompatibility complex– mismatched lung allografts in miniature swine but does not induce tolerance of heart allografts unless a kidney is cotransplanted. To determine whether lungs share with kidneys the ability to induce cardiac allograft tolerance, we investigated heart–lung co-transplantation using the same induction protocol. Hearts (n = 3), heart–kidneys (n=3), lungs (n=6), and hearts–lungs (n=3) were transplanted into fully major histocompatibility complex–mismatched recipients treated with high-dose tacrolimus for 12 days. Serial biopsy samples were used to evaluate rejection, and in vitro assays were used to detect donor responsiveness. All heart–kidney recipients and five of six lung recipients demonstrated long-term graft survival for longer than 272 days, while all heart recipients rejected their allografts within 35 days. Tolerant recipients remained free of alloantibody and showed persistent donor-specific unresponsiveness by cell-mediated lympholysis/mixed-lymphocyte reaction. In contrast, heart–lung recipients demonstrated rejection of both allografts (days 47, 55, and 202) and antidonor responsiveness in vitro. In contrast to kidneys, lung cotransplantation leads to rejection of both heart and lung allografts, indicating that lungs do not have the same tolerogenic capacity as kidneys. We conclude that cells or cell products present in kidney, but not heart or lung allografts, have a unique capacity to confer unresponsiveness on cotransplanted organs, most likely by amplifying host regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26469344

  5. Total lymphoid irradiation for treatment of intractable cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, S.A.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Stinson, E.B. )

    1991-03-01

    The ability of postoperative total lymphoid irradiation to reverse otherwise intractable cardiac allograft rejection was examined in a group of 10 patients in whom conventional rejection therapy (including pulsed steroids and monoclonal or polyclonal anti-T-cell antibody therapy) had failed to provide sustained freedom from rejection. Follow-up periods range from 73 to 1119 days since the start of total lymphoid irradiation. No patient died or sustained serious morbidity because of the irradiation. Three patients have had no further rejection (follow-up periods, 105 to 365 days). Two patients died--one in cardiogenic shock during the course of total lymphoid irradiation, the other with recurrent rejection caused by noncompliance with his medical regimen. Total lymphoid irradiation appears to be a safe and a moderately effective immunosuppressive modality for 'salvage' therapy of cardiac allograft rejection unresponsive to conventional therapy.

  6. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  7. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  8. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  9. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  10. 21 CFR 862.1163 - Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1163 Cardiac allograft gene expression profiling test system....

  11. Th-17 Alloimmune Responses in Renal Allograft Biopsies From Recipients of Kidney Transplants Using Extended Criteria Donors During Acute T Cell-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Aissat, A; Canoui-Poitrine, F; Grondin, C; Pilon, C; Desvaux, D; Saadoun, D; Barathon, Q; Garrido, M; Audard, V; Rémy, P; Lang, P; Cohen, J; Grimbert, P

    2015-10-01

    Although renal transplantation using expanded criteria donors has become a common practice, immune responses related to immunosenescence in those kidney allografts have not been studied yet in humans. We performed a retrospective molecular analysis of the T cell immune response in 43 kidney biopsies from patients with acute T cell-mediated rejection including 25 from recipients engrafted with a kidney from expanded criteria donor and 18 from recipients grafted with optimal kidney allograft. The clinical, transplant and acute T cell-mediated rejection characteristics of both groups were similar at baseline. The expression of RORγt, Il-17 and T-bet mRNA was significantly higher in the elderly than in the optimal group (p = 0.02, p = 0.036, and p = 0.01, respectively). Foxp3 mRNA levels were significantly higher in elderly patients experiencing successful acute T cell-mediated rejection reversal (p = 0.03). The presence of IL-17 mRNA was strongly associated with nonsuccessful reversal in elderly patients (p = 0.008). Patients with mRNA IL17 expression detection and low mRNA Foxp3 expression experienced significantly more treatment failure (87.5%) than patients with no mRNA IL17 expression and/or high mRNA Foxp3 expression (26.7%; p = 0.017). Our study suggests that the Th17 pathway is involved in pathogenesis and prognosis of acute T cell-mediated rejection in recipients of expanded criteria allograft.

  12. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  13. Cardiac allografts: a 24-year South African experience.

    PubMed

    Botes, Lezelle; van den Heever, Johannes Jacobus; Smit, Francis Edwin; Neethling, William Morris Leonard

    2012-03-01

    The history of using homologous cardiac valves dates back more than 30 years. Through the years emphasis was placed on the optimization of graft retrieval, preservation techniques and clinical application. A cardiac homograft valve bank was established at the Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein in 1982. A retrospective analysis was performed on all allograft data since 1984. Since the first valve was successfully procured and transplanted in 1984, 2,540 aortic and pulmonary homografts were harvested from 1,792 donors, of which 1,545 [989 (64%) aortic and 556 (36%) pulmonary] were released for clinical use. Valves were discarded for various reasons, the main reasons being Human Immunodeficiency Virus (32.4%), Hepatitis B (9.6%) and venereal diseases (8.9%). The mean donor age was 26.98 years with a male predominance of 1,368 males versus 424 females. The average ischemic time was 33 h mainly due to medico-legal autopsies exceeding the desired 24 h time limit. The valves were disinfected in an antibiotic cocktail of Mefoxin, Piperacillin, Amikacin and Amphotericin B prior to cryopreservation. The surgical procedures utilizing the majority of homografts were aortic valve replacements (42.9%), aortic root replacements (19.3%) and right ventricular-pulmonary artery conduits (33.3%). The bank also supplied 23 other centers with homografts (402 aortic and 301 pulmonary). The Bloemfontein bank has established itself over the years as a viable and functional cardiac homograft bank. However, with increasing activity in the procurement arena and widened applications in the operating room the role of the homograft seems assured but availability still remains a major concern.

  14. Primary Cardiac Allograft Dysfunction—Validation of a Clinical Definition

    PubMed Central

    Dronavalli, Vamsidhar B.; Rogers, Chris A.; Banner, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart transplantation is an established treatment for advanced heart failure. Primary allograft dysfunction (PGD) is reported in up to 40% of transplants and is associated with a poor outcome. Methods As part of Heart Evaluation and Retrieval for Transplantation study, an investigation of the assessment of donor hearts for transplantation, we proposed a clinical definition for cardiac PGD comprising severely impaired systolic function affecting one or both ventricles accompanied by hypotension, low cardiac output, and high filling pressures occurring in the first 72 hours (in the absence of hyper acute rejection and technical surgical factors, such as cardiac tamponade). Here, we examine the prospective application of this definition to 290 heart transplants. We compared the clinical outcome of PGD and non-PGD cases. Results Ninety-four of 290 transplants developed PGD (32.4%). Inotrope use (score) was higher in the PGD group at 24, 48, and 72 hours after transplantation (P < 0.01). In the PGD group, there was a greater requirement for, intra-aortic balloon pump (50% vs 15%, P < 0.01), mechanical support (27% vs 0%, P < 0.01), and renal replacement therapy (61% vs 26%, P < 0.01). Intensive care stay was longer for recipients with PGD (median 14 vs 5 days, P < 0.01) and early mortality was higher (37% vs 4% at 30 days, 42% vs 8% at 1 year, P < 0.01). Conclusions In conclusion, our definition of PGD could be applied in a national multicenter study, and the cases it defined had more frequent complications and higher mortality. PMID:25742423

  15. The role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Saparov, Arman; Chen, Chien-Wen; Beckman, Sarah A; Wang, Yadong; Huard, Johnny

    2013-08-06

    Oxidative stress and inflammation play major roles in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease including myocardial infarction (MI). The pathological progression following MI is very complex and involves a number of cell populations including cells localized within the heart, as well as cells recruited from the circulation and other tissues that participate in inflammatory and reparative processes. These cells, with their secretory factors, have pleiotropic effects that depend on the stage of inflammation and regeneration. Excessive inflammation leads to enlargement of the infarction site, pathological remodeling and eventually, heart dysfunction. Stem cell therapy represents a unique and innovative approach to ameliorate oxidative stress and inflammation caused by ischemic heart disease. Consequently, it is crucial to understand the crosstalk between stem cells and other cells involved in post-MI cardiac tissue repair, especially immune cells, in order to harness the beneficial effects of the immune response following MI and further improve stem cell-mediated cardiac regeneration. This paper reviews the recent findings on the role of antioxidation and immunomodulation in postnatal multipotent stem cell-mediated cardiac repair following ischemic heart disease, particularly acute MI and focuses specifically on mesenchymal, muscle and blood-vessel-derived stem cells due to their antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties.

  16. Qualitative Perfusion Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Lacks Sensitivity in Detecting Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colvin-Adams, Monica; Petros, Salam; Raveendran, Ganesh; Missov, Emil; Medina, Eduardo; Wilson, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major complication after heart transplantation, requiring frequent surveillance angiography. Though cardiac angiography is the gold standard, it is insensitive in detecting transplant vasculopathy and invasive. Perfusion MRI provides a noninvasive alternative and possibly a useful modality for studying CAV. We sought to compare the accuracy of qualitative perfusion MRI to coronary angiography in detecting CAV. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in 68 heart transplant recipients who had simultaneous surveillance cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram and who underwent transplantation between 2000 and 2007. We compared results of qualitative MRI to those of the cardiac angiogram. Sensitivity and specificity of MR were calculated. Results Sixty-eight patients underwent both cardiac MRI and coronary angiogram. 73.5% were male; mean age was 45.37 ± 14 years. Mean duration of heart transplantation was 7.9 ± 5.2 years. The mean ejection fraction was 55% in the patients without CAV and 57.4% in those with CAV. There were 48 normal and 24 abnormal MRI studies. The overall sensitivity was 41% and specificity was 74%. Conclusions Qualitative assessment of perfusion cardiac MR has low sensitivity and moderate specificity for detecting CAV. The sensitivity of MRI was slightly improved with severity of disease.

  17. International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation working formulation of a standardized nomenclature for cardiac allograft vasculopathy-2010.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Crespo-Leiro, Maria G; Dipchand, Anne; Ensminger, Stephan M; Hiemann, Nicola E; Kobashigawa, Jon A; Madsen, Joren; Parameshwar, Jayan; Starling, Randall C; Uber, Patricia A

    2010-07-01

    The development of cardiac allograft vasculopathy remains the Achilles heel of cardiac transplantation. Unfortunately, the definitions of cardiac allograft vasculopathy are diverse, and there are no uniform international standards for the nomenclature of this entity. This consensus document, commissioned by the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation Board, is based on best evidence and clinical consensus derived from critical analysis of available information pertaining to angiography, intravascular ultrasound imaging, microvascular function, cardiac allograft histology, circulating immune markers, non-invasive imaging tests, and gene-based and protein-based biomarkers. This document represents a working formulation for an international nomenclature of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, similar to the development of the system for adjudication of cardiac allograft rejection by histology.

  18. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR–HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants. PMID:28066408

  19. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  20. Trichinella spiralis infection changes immune response in mice performed abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplantation and prolongs cardiac allograft survival time.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gengguo; Deng, Ronghai; Yao, Jianping; Liao, Bing; Chen, Yinghua; Wu, Zhongdao; Hu, Hongxing; Zhou, Xingwang; Ma, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Allograft rejection has been an obstacle for long-term survival of patients for many years. Current strategies for transplant rejection are not as optimal as we expected, especially for long-term treatments. Trichinella spiralis, a nematode parasitized in mammalian muscle and as an invader, maintains harmonious with host in the long term by evading host immune attack. To determine whether T. spiralis infection impacts on allograft rejection, we performed mice cardiac allograft transplantation model by using BALB/c (H-2(b)) mice as donors and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice orally infected with 300 muscle larvae for 28 days as recipients. Graft survival was monitored by daily palpation of the abdomen; histologic change was observed by H&E stain; and CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)IFN-γ(+), and CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells and regulatory T cells were examined with the use of flow cytometry. Serum cytokine levels were measured by Luminex. Finally, we found that mean survival time of cardiac allografts in T. spiralis group was 23.40 ± 1.99 days, while the vehicle control group was 10.60 ± 0.75 days. Furthermore, we observed alleviated histological changes in the heart allograft, decreased corresponding CD8(+) T cells, suppressed Th1 and Th17 responses, and increased regulatory T cell frequency in a murine cardiac transplantation model at day 7 post-transplantation in experimental group. These data suggest that T. spiralis infection resulted in prolonged allograft survival following murine cardiac transplantation, with suppressed Th1/Th17 responses and augmented regulatory T cells.

  1. Gene expression profiling and cardiac allograft rejection monitoring: is IMAGE just a mirage?

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Parameshwar, Jayan

    2010-06-01

    The search for an effective non-invasive monitoring technique for cardiac allograft rejection eluded us until the discovery and validation of a commercially available gene-based peripheral blood bio-signature signal. The Invasive Monitoring Attenuation through Gene Expression (IMAGE) trial tested the hypothesis of cardiac biopsy minimization using this gene-based panel in stable, low-risk survivors, late after cardiac transplantation and demonstrated non-inferiority of this strategy. We present a clinician's critical perspective on this important effort and outline the key caveats and highlights for the potential way forward in using these results. Furthermore, we contend that it may not be necessary to replace an invasive cardiac biopsy strategy with anything other than better standardized clinical and functional allograft vigilance in low-risk survivors.

  2. Prolongation of survival of rat cardiac allografts by T cell vaccination.

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, O M; Mor, E; Reshef, T; Pfeffermann, R A; Cohen, I R

    1993-01-01

    Administration of attenuated, activated autoimmune T lymphocytes to syngeneic mice and rats has been shown to prevent or induce remission of experimental autoimmune diseases specific for the autoimmune T cells. The process has been termed "T cell vaccination." In a recent study, T cell vaccination was done using T cells sensitized to rat alloantigens. The procedure produced a significant reduction of the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) against allogeneic cells. The reduction in MLR was not specific: Vaccination with T cells specific for stimulator cells of one allotype led to a reduced MLR stimulated by cells of another allotype. The present study was undertaken to examine whether T cell vaccination can induce tolerance to transplantation antigens in vivo. We used the model of heterotopic cardiac transplantation in rats. We now report that vaccinating rats with syngeneic, activated, alloantigen-primed T lymphocytes significantly prolonged survival of rat cardiac allografts. The effect of T cell vaccination was most evident when the T cells had been obtained from rats specifically sensitized against the donor rats: Brown-Norway (BN) allografts in control Wistar rats survived 8.5 +/- 0.4 d while BN allografts survived 29.2 +/- 7.1 d in Wistar rats that had been vaccinated with Wistar anti-BN cells. Vaccination of Wistar rats with Wistar anti-hooded T cells prolonged survival of BN heart allografts to a lesser but significant degree (13.0 +/- 1.1 d). Thus, T cell vaccination of recipients can prolong survival of allografts. PMID:8432846

  3. Sensitivity of scintigraphy with /sup 111/In-lymphocytes for detection of cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, S.B.; Eisen, H.J.; Sobel, B.E.; Bergmann, S.R.; Bolman, R.M. 3d.

    1988-12-01

    We recently demonstrated the feasibility of noninvasive detection of cardiac allograft rejection after administration of indium-111-labeled lymphocytes. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of the technique, as well as its value for delineating the severity of rejection, we studied 16 dogs with heterotopic thoracic cardiac allografts. Five animals were evaluated while exposed to immunosuppressive agents. Animals were scanned sequentially after administration of 100-400 microCi of indium-111-labeled autologous lymphocytes. Myocardial lymphocyte infiltration was expressed as the indium excess (IE), defined as the ratio of indium activity of the transplant or native heart compared with that in blood. Scintigraphic results were compared with characteristics of simultaneously obtained endomyocardial biopsies. Among 17 biopsy documented episodes of rejection, 16 were detected scintigraphically. Among 18 biopsies with no evidence of rejection, scintigraphy was uniformly negative. Thus, the sensitivity and specificity of scintigraphy were 94 and 100%, respectively. Biopsies graded as showing no rejection were associated with an IE of 0.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SD); those graded as mild, 2.8 +/- 1.7; those as moderate, 10.7 +/- 7.2; and those graded as indicative of severe rejection, 14.2 +/- 4.5. Thus, scintigraphy with indium-111-labeled lymphocytes sensitively and specifically detects cardiac allograft rejection and delineates the intensity of the rejection process. It should be useful clinically for assessing potential allograft rejection noninvasively.

  4. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts in lethally irradiated rats reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Generally, organ grafts from one individual animal to another are rejected in one-two weeks. However, if the recipients are given Total Body Irradiation (TBI) just prior to grafting, followed by reconstitution of hemopoietic function with syngeneic (recipient-type) bone marrow cells, then vascularized organ grafts are permanently accepted. Initially after irradiation, it is possible to induce tolerance to many strain combinations in rats. This thesis examines the system of TBI as applied to the induction of tolerance in LEW recipients of WF cardiac allografts. These two rat strains are mismatched across the entire major histocompatibility complex. When the LEW recipient are given 860 rads, a WF cardiac allograft and LEW bone marrow on the same day, 60% of the grafts are accepted. Methods employed to improve the rate of graft acceptance include: treating either donor or recipient with small amounts of methotrexate, or waiting until two days after irradiation to repopulate with bone marrow. It seems from these investigations of some of the early events in the induction of tolerance to allografts following TBI and syngeneic marrow reconstitution that an immature cell population in the bone marrow interacts with a radioresistant cell population in the spleen to produce tolerance to completely MHC-mismatched allografts.

  5. Autoantibodies to Vimentin Cause Accelerated Rejection of Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Mahesh, Balakrishnan; Leong, Hon-Sing; McCormack, Ann; Sarathchandra, Padmini; Holder, Angela; Rose, Marlene L.

    2007-01-01

    Autoimmune responses to vimentin occur after solid organ transplantation, but their pathogenic effects are unclear. The aim of these studies was to investigate the effects of vimentin preimmunization on allogeneic and isografted hearts in a murine transplant model. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with murine vimentin in complete Freund’s adjuvant resulted in anti-vimentin antibodies and vimentin-reactive Th-1 cells. Transplantation of 129/sv hearts into vimentin-immunized C57BL/6 recipients resulted in accelerated rejection (8.4 ± 1.5 days; n = 18), compared with hen egg lysozyme-immunized C57BL/6 (13.3 ± 2.2 days; n = 10; P < 0.0001, log-rank test). In contrast, isografts continued to beat beyond 90 days. Immunohistochemical analysis of allografts from vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant mice demonstrated increased numbers of T cells and enhanced microvascular deposition of C3d, CD41, and P-selectin compared with controls. Antibodies were necessary for accelerated rejection, shown by the fact that vimentin-immunized B-cell-deficient IgH6 mice did not show accelerated rejection of 129/sv allografts, but rejection was restored by adoptive transfer of serum containing anti-vimentin antibodies. Eluates from donor hearts placed in vimentin/complete Freund’s adjuvant recipients contained anti-vimentin antibodies, shown by Western blotting. Confocal imaging of rejected hearts demonstrated presence of vimentin and C3d on apoptosed leukocytes, endothelial cells, and platelet/leukocyte conjugates. These results demonstrate that autoantibodies to vimentin, in conjunction with the alloimmune response, have a pathogenic role in allograft rejection. PMID:17392180

  6. The recipient's heme oxygenase-1 promoter region polymorphism is associated with cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Freystaetter, Kathrin; Andreas, Martin; Bilban, Martin; Perkmann, Thomas; Kaider, Alexandra; Masetti, Marco; Kocher, Alfred; Wolzt, Michael; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2017-02-10

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyses the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. The promoter region contains a highly polymorphic (GT)n repeat, where shorter (GT)n repeat sequences are linked to higher transcriptional activity, which was shown to correlate with a cytoprotective effect. Higher HO-1 levels may protect from cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Cardiac allograft recipients transplanted between 1988 and 2012 were analyzed for the HO-1 (GT)n repeat polymorphism using PCR and DNA fragment analysis with capillary electrophoresis. A relation to cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) was analyzed using Cox regression including common risk factors for CAV and the occurrence of rejection episodes as explanatory variables. A total of 344 patients were analyzed, of which 127 patients were positive for CAV (36.9%). In our multivariable Cox regression analysis, the short homozygous HO-1 (GT)n genotype with <27 repeats (S/S) revealed a higher risk for CAV (P = 0.032). Donor age (P = 0.001) and donor weight (P = 0.005) were significant predictors for CAV. A potential risk for CAV was associated with rejection episodes (P = 0.058) and history of smoking (P = 0.06). The recipient HO-1 (GT)n genotype may contribute to CAV development. This finding has to be evaluated in larger series including studies targeting the underlying disease mechanism.

  7. Purified eicosapentaenoic acid induces prolonged survival of cardiac allografts and generates regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Iwami, D; Zhang, Q; Aramaki, O; Nonomura, K; Shirasugi, N; Niimi, M

    2009-06-01

    Fish oil, which is rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has been found to have immunomodulatory effects. We examined whether administration of purified EPA affected survival of fully mismatched murine cardiac allografts. Hearts from C57BL/10 (H-2(b)) mice were transplanted into CBA (H-2(k)) recipients treated with one intraperitoneal dose of purified EPA the day of transplantation. Untreated CBA recipients and recipients given 0.1 g/kg of EPA rejected C57BL/10 hearts (median survival time [MST], 8 and 13 days, respectively). With a 1.0 g/kg dose of EPA, graft survival was markedly prolonged (MST >100 days). To determine whether regulatory cells were generated, naïve mice (secondary recipients) underwent adoptive transfer of splenocytes from EPA-treated primary recipients and cardiac allograft transplantation. Adoptive transfer of whole, CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD25(+) splenocytes from EPA-treated recipients induced indefinite survival in secondary recipients. Flow cytometry showed that the CD4(+)CD25(+) cells were Foxp3(+). In reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) mRNA was upregulated by EPA treatment. A PPARgamma antagonist abrogated the prolongation of graft survival induced by EPA treatment (MST, 13 days). Thus, in our model, purified EPA induced prolonged survival of fully mismatched cardiac allografts and generated regulatory T cells dependent on PPARgamma activation.

  8. Effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on prolongation of cardiac allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Jin, X; Uchiyama, M; Zhang, Q; Harada, T; Otsuka, K; Shimokawa, T; Niimi, M

    2014-05-01

    Herbal medicines have been used for over 3,000 years in Asian as alternative therapy for their variety effects and have recently become popular in Europe and the United States. In the last 30 years, Japanese herbal medicines were widely used for treatment of diseases after been recognized officially by Japanese government. In this study, we investigated the effect of 34 kinds of traditional Japanese herbal medicines on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice (H2(k)) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (H2(b)) heart and received oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of the 34 kinds of herbal medicines from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naïve CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time [MST], 7 days). CBA transplant recipients given 2 g/kg/d of Sairei-to (TJ-114) and Tokishakuyaku-san (TJ-23) had prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival indefinitely (both MSTs > 100 days). Moreover, CBA transplant recipients given Seisinrensiin (TJ-111), Tokishigyakukagoshuyushokyoto (TJ-38), Rikkunshito (TJ-43), Maobushisaishinto (TJ-127), Ninjin-yoei-to (TJ-108), Ryokan-kyomi-shinge-nin-to (TJ-119), Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), Hochuekkito (TJ-41), Kihi-to (TJ-65), and Sinbu-to (TJ-30) had also prolonged C57BL/6 allograft survival significantly (MSTs of 28, 22, 16, 14, 14, 13, 12, 9.5, 9 and 9 days, respectively). However, none of other 22 kinds of herbal medicines could prolong the allograft survival. Furthermore, oral administration of 2 g/kg/d of Daikenchuto (TJ-100) induced sudden death (within 1 minute) in CBA mice. In conclusion, 12 kinds of Japanese herbal medicines prolonged allograft survival and one showed toxic effect in mice.

  9. Detection of rejection of canine orthotopic cardiac allografts with indium-111 lymphocytes and gamma scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Eisen, H.J.; Rosenbloom, M.; Laschinger, J.C.; Saffitz, J.E.; Cox, J.L.; Sobel, B.E.; Bolman, R.M. III; Bergmann, S.R.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of detecting canine heterotopic cardiac allograft rejection scintigraphically after administration of 111In lymphocytes. To determine whether the approach is capable of detecting rejection in orthotopic cardiac transplants in which labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool may reduce sensitivity, the present study was performed in which canine orthotopic cardiac transplants were evaluated in vivo. Immunosuppression was maintained with cyclosporine A (10-20 mg/kg/day) and prednisone (1 mg/kg/day) for 2 wk after transplantation. Subsequently, therapy was tapered. Five successful allografts were evaluated scintigraphically every 3 days after administration of 100-350 microCi 111In autologous lymphocytes. Correction for labeled lymphocytes circulating in the blood pool, but not actively sequestered in the allografts was accomplished by administering 3-6 mCi 99mTc autologous erythrocytes and employing a previously validated blood-pool activity correction technique. Cardiac infiltration of labeled lymphocytes was quantified as percent indium excess (%IE), scintigraphically detectable 111In in the transplant compared with that in blood, and results were compared with those of concomitantly performed endomyocardial biopsy. Scintigraphic %IE for hearts not undergoing rejection manifest histologically was 0.7 +/- 0.4. Percent IE for rejecting hearts was 6.8 +/- 4.0 (p less than 0.05). Scintigraphy detected each episode of rejection detected by biopsy. Scintigraphic criteria for rejection (%IE greater than 2 s.d. above normal) were not manifest in any study in which biopsies did not show rejection. Since scintigraphic results with 111In-labeled lymphocytes were concordant with biopsy results in orthotopic cardiac transplants, noninvasive detection of graft rejection in patients should be attainable with the approach developed.

  10. The Use of Donation After Cardiac Death Allografts Does Not Increase Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Croome, K P; Lee, D D; Burns, J M; Musto, K; Paz, D; Nguyen, J H; Perry, D K; Harnois, D M; Taner, C B

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence in patients undergoing liver transplantation (LT) with donation after brain death (DBD) and donation after cardiac death (DCD) allografts has not previously been investigated. Rates and patterns of HCC recurrences were investigated in patients undergoing DBD (N = 1633) and DCD (N = 243) LT between 2003 and 2012. LT for HCC was identified in 397 patients (340 DBD and 57 DCD). No difference in tumor number (p = 0.26), tumor volume (p = 0.34) and serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) (p = 0.47) was seen between the groups. HCC recurrence was identified in 41 (12.1%) patients in the DBD group and 7 (12.3%) patients in the DCD group. There was no difference in recurrence-free survival (p = 0.29) or cumulative incidence of HCC recurrence (p = 0.91) between the groups. Liver allograft was the first site of recurrence in 22 (65%) patients in the DBD group and two (37%) patients in the DCD group (p = 0.39). LT for HCC with DBD and DCD allografts demonstrate no difference in the rate of HCC recurrence. Previously published differences in survival demonstrated between recipients with HCC receiving DBD and DCD allografts despite statistical adjustment can likely be explained by practice patterns not captured by variables contained in the SRTR database.

  11. Morphologic and immunohistochemical findings in antibody-mediated rejection of the cardiac allograft.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Gregory A; Fishbein, Michael C

    2012-12-01

    The recognition and acceptance of the entity of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organs has been slow to develop. Greatest acceptance and most information relates to cardiac transplantation. AMR is thought to represent antibody/complement mediated injury to the microvasculature of the graft that can result in allograft dysfunction, allograft loss, accelerated graft vasculopathy, and increased mortality. The morphologic hallmark is microvascular injury with immunoglobulin and complement deposition in capillaries, accumulation of intravascular macrophages, and in more severe cases, microvascular hemorrhage and thrombosis, with inflammation and edema of the affected organ. Understanding of the pathogenesis of AMR, criteria and methods for diagnosis, and treatment strategies are still in evolution, and will be addressed in this review.

  12. Rapamycin Prolongs Cardiac Allograft Survival in a Mouse Model by Inducing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Nakao, T; Yoshimura, N; Ashihara, E

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are the main immunosuppressive drugs for organ transplant recipients. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which mTOR inhibitors induce immunosuppression is not fully understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) maintain host immunity; however, the relationship between mTOR inhibitors and MDSCs is unclear. Here, the results from a murine cardiac transplantation model revealed that rapamycin treatment (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, and 6) led to the recruitment of MDSCs and increased their expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that rapamycin induced the migration of iNOS-expressing MDSCs into the subintimal space within the allograft vessels, resulting in a significant prolongation of graft survival compared with that in the untreated group (67 days vs. 7 days, respectively). These effects were counterbalanced by the administration of an anti-Gr-1, which reduced allograft survival to 21 days. Moreover, adoptive transcoronary arterial transfer of MDSCs from rapamycin-treated recipients prolonged allograft survival; this increase was reversed by the anti-Gr-1 antibody. Finally, co-administration of rapamycin and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor trametinib reversed rapamycin-mediated MDSC recruitment. Thus, the mTOR and Raf/MEK/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways appear to play an important role in MDSC expansion.

  13. Perforin Mediates Endothelial Cell Death and Resultant Transplant Vascular Disease in Cardiac Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Jonathan C.; Kerjner, Alexandra; Wong, Brian W.; McManus, Bruce M.; Granville, David J.

    2004-01-01

    T cell-induced endothelial injury is an important event in the development of transplant vascular disease (TVD), the leading expression of chronic rejection of vascularized organ transplants. However, the precise contribution of perforin to vascular damage in allografts and resultant TVD has not been addressed in vivo. Minor histocompatability antigen mismatched mouse heterotopic cardiac transplants were performed from 129J donors into C57Bl/6 (wild-type (WT)) or perforin knockout (PKO) recipients. Perforin was abundant in immune infiltrates in the myocardium and vasculature of transplanted hearts in WT mice. Allograft coronary arteries in both WT and PKO mice had considerable vasculitis. There was also marked endothelial disruption, as well as TUNEL-positivity in the endothelial region, in coronary arteries of hearts transplanted into WT mice that was not evident in PKO recipients (P = 0.05). At 30 days post-transplantation, intimal thickening was assessed on elastic Van Gieson-stained ventricular sections. There was an average of 54.2 ± 6.7% luminal narrowing of coronary arteries in allografts from WT mice as compared to 13.4 ± 5.1% luminal narrowing in PKO counterparts (P < 0.00002). In summary, perforin plays a primary role in endothelial damage and the resultant onset and progression of TVD. PMID:15215168

  14. Long-term outcome of cardiac allograft vasculopathy treated by transmyocardial laser revascularization: early rewards, late losses.

    PubMed

    Mehra, M R; Uber, P A; Prasad, A K; Park, M H; Scott, R L; McFadden, P M; Van Meter, C H

    2000-08-01

    Transmyocardial laser revascularization (TLR) was initially touted as a promising therapeutic alternative for tackling the growing problem of cardiac allograft vasculopathy in late heart transplant survivors. We first described 4- and 8-week observations of application of this surgical technique, in which we professed enthusiasm for TLR in providing symptomatic relief and in reducing ischemic burden. In this report, we present the long-term (24-month) impact of TLR on clinical outcome, channel patency, and recrudescence of ischemic burden. In the long term, surgical TLR provides neither consistent symptomatic improvement nor an ameliorative effect on the natural history of cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

  15. Survival time of cardiac allografts prolonged by isogeneic BMT in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Jiang, H; Chen, R; Feng, S; Jin, J; Bi, Y; Yang, H; Chen, J

    2012-08-01

    To find an approach to prolong the survival time of cardiac allografts in a BALB/c-to-C57/BL6 heterotopic heart transplant model and to try to figure out related chemokines and cytokines, isogeneic and allogeneic BM cells were obtained from pregnant C57/BL6 (♀C57/BL6 × ♂BALB/c) and regular BALB/c mice and injected to the half lethally irradiated C57/BL6 mice 1 day before heart transplantation. Recipients were treated with CsA or phosphate-buffered saline for 7 days. Isogeneic BMT (iBMT) from pregnant C57/BL6 mice was observed to significantly prolong the survival of BALB/c allografts and reduce the lymphocyte infiltration. Allogeneic BMT (aBMT) and iBMT both exhibited signicantly less T-cell proliferation reactivity and the similar degree of chimerism. There was no significant difference in these groups of IFN-γ and IL-4 production. The level of chemokine MIG (CXCL9) dramatically decreased in aBMT and iBMT groups compared with the control group. But there were no significant differences between aBMT and iBMT group. IL-17 and RORγ(t) (receptor-related orphan receptor) production were downregulated in iBMT recipients. These results indicate that iBMT can prolong the survival of cardiac allografts. IL-17 production downregulated in iBMT recipients. This means that iBMT may have important therapeutic implications.

  16. Chronic cardiac allograft rejection: critical role of ED-A(+) fibronectin and implications for targeted therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Neri, Dario; Berndt, Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Chronic cardiac allograft rejection is characterized by cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) causing severe long-term complications after heart transplantation and determining allograft function and patients' prognosis. Until now, there have been no sufficient preventive or therapeutic strategies. CAV and CIF are accompanied by changes in the extracellular matrix, including re-expression of the fetal fibronectin splice variant known as ED-A(+) fibronectin. This molecule has been shown to be crucial for the development of myofibroblasts (MyoFbs) as the main cell type in CIF and for the activation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) as the main cell type in CAV. Relevant re-expression and protein deposition of ED-A(+) fibronectin has been demonstrated in animal models of chronic rejection, with spatial association to CAV and CIF, and a quantitative correlation to the rejection grade. The paper by Booth et al published in this issue of The Journal of Pathology could prove for the first time the functional importance of ED-A(+) fibronectin for the development of CIF as a main component of chronic cardiac rejection. Thus, promising conclusions for the development of new diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for chronic cardiac rejection focusing on ED-A(+) fibronectin can be suggested.

  17. Kupffer cell blockade prevents induction of portal venous tolerance in rat cardiac allograft transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamei, T.; Callery, M.P.; Flye, M.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Pretransplant portal venous (pv) administration of donor antigen induces allospecific partial tolerance. Although the involved mechanism has not been defined, antigen presentation by Kupffer cells (KC) in the liver is considered to be critical. We evaluated the effect of KC blockade on this pv tolerance induction in Buffalo (RT1b) rats receiving Lewis (RT1(1)) cardiac heterotopic allografts. Control rats received no treatment, while experimental animals received 25 X 10(6) ultraviolet B-irradiated (12,000 J/m2) donor spleen cells via either the iv (systemic intravenous) or the pv routes 7 days before transplantation. Gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), a rare earth metal known to inhibit KC phagocytosis, was given (7 mg/kg) 1 and 2 days before pv preimmunization. Cardiac graft prolongation was obtained by pv (MST = 13.3 +/- 1.9 days, n = 6, vs control = 7.3 +/- 0.5 days, n = 6; P less than 0.001) but not by iv preimmunization (7.7 +/- 0.7 days, n = 6, NS vs control). KC blockade abolished the pv tolerance, as indicated by abrogation of graft prolongation (PV + GdCl3 = 8.0 +/- 0.8 days, n = 6, NS vs control). These findings suggest that effective alloantigen uptake by KC in the liver is essential for the induction of pv tolerance in rat cardiac transplantation.

  18. A high isoflavone soy protein diet and intravenous genistein delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Timothy P; Liesen, Daniel A; Mann, Paul C; Rolando, Lori; Banz, William J

    2002-08-01

    Genistein, a soy isoflavone, has in vitro immunosuppressive properties. We investigated whether genistein or dietary soy protein containing isoflavones could influence the outcome of rat cardiac allografts. Lewis rats were fed a diet with protein from high isoflavone soy protein fraction (HIS), casein (CAS) or casein with isoflavones added (CI) starting 1 wk before heart transplants from Wistar Furth donors, and continuing throughout the study. HIS-fed rats had significantly prolonged time to rejection compared with CAS- and CI-fed recipients (10.8 +/- 2.62 vs. 7.18 +/- 0.75 and 7.22 +/- 0.44 d, P < 0.001). Intravenous genistein [20mg/(kg. d) for 14 d] significantly prolonged heart survival compared with controls and dissolvent-treated recipients (23.2 +/- 7.4 vs. 8.4 +/- 1.3 and 11.4+/3.6 d, P < 0.0005), and had an additive effect when given to heart recipients also receiving low dose cyclosporine for 7 d (30.8 +/- 2.3 vs. 23.4 +/- 2.4 d, P < 0.005). Concanavalin A-stimulated lymphocytes, isolated from Lewis rats given intraperitoneal genistein for 7 d, had decreased production of interferon gamma compared with controls or dimethyl sulfoxide-treated groups (22.6 +/- 9.9 vs 149 +/- 105 and 154 +/- 103 micro g/L, P < 0.05). In conclusion, a high isoflavone soy diet and intravenous genistein, but not isoflavone extract alone, delay rejection of rat cardiac allografts, with an additive effect in cyclosporine-treated rats. In addition, intraperitoneal genistein has immunosuppressive properties in vivo.

  19. Expression of fibronectin splicing variants in organ transplantation: a differential pattern between rat cardiac allografts and isografts.

    PubMed Central

    Coito, A. J.; Brown, L. F.; Peters, J. H.; Kupiec-Weglinski, J. W.; van de Water, L.

    1997-01-01

    Allograft rejection is associated with infiltration of inflammatory cells and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. The extent to which diversity in the extracellular matrix regulates inflammatory cell function in transplants remains unclear. One group of extracellular matrix proteins, termed fibronectins (FNs), exhibits inherent diversity as a consequence of alternative splicing in three segments: EIIIA, EIIIB, or V. Although the EIIIA segment has documented functions in mesenchymal cell differentiation, neither this segment nor the EIIIB segment have been tested for effects specific to leukocyte functions. By contrast, the V region can include the CS-1 segment to which leukocytes may adhere through alpha 4 beta 1 integrins. In this study, we demonstrate that EIIIA+, EIIIB+, and V+ FN variants are synthesized, primarily by macrophages in distinct temporal and spatial patterns in two rat cardiac transplant models: either with antigenic challenge, allografts, or without challenge, isografts. The ratio of EIIIA inclusion into FN increases by day 1 in allografts and isografts and remains high until allografts are rejected (approximately 7 days) but falls to normal levels in tolerated isografts (day 6). EIIIB+ FN ratios in allografts peak later than do EIIIA+ FNs (day 4). EIIIB+ FN ratios remain relatively low in isografts. Interestingly, EIIIA+ and EIIIB+ FNs are deposited prominently in the myocardium of rejecting allografts in close association with infiltrating leukocytes, and FN expression and deposition are prominent at sites of infarction. By contrast, these FNs are largely restricted to the epicardium and to a lesser degree in the immediately adjacent myocardium in isografts. CS-1+ FNs increase in allografts and isografts at 3 hours after transplantation but are particularly prominent in allografts 1 to 3 days before rejection. Our data suggest that FN splicing variants have a differential role in the effector functions of leukocytes in allografts and

  20. Essential role of PDL1 expression on nonhematopoietic donor cells in acquired tolerance to vascularized cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Riella, L V; Watanabe, T; Sage, P T; Yang, J; Yeung, M; Azzi, J; Vanguri, V; Chandraker, A; Sharpe, A H; Sayegh, M H; Najafian, N

    2011-04-01

    The PD1:PDL1 pathway is an essential negative costimulatory pathway that plays a key role in regulating the alloimune response. PDL1 is expressed not only on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) but also cardiac endothelium. In this study, we investigated the importance of PDL1 expression on donor cardiac allograft in acquired transplantation tolerance in a fully MHC-mismatched model. We generated PDL1 chimeric mice on B6 background that expressed PDL1 on either hematopoietic cells or nonhematopoietic cells of the heart. Sham animals were used as controls. These hearts were then transplanted into BALB/c recipients and treated with CTLA4-Ig to induce tolerance. Cardiac endothelium showed significant expression of PDL1, which was upregulated upon transplantation. While the absence of PDL1 on hematopoietic cells of the heart resulted in delayed rejection and prevented long-term tolerance in most but not all recipients, we observed an accelerated and early graft rejection of all donor allografts that lacked PDL1 on the endothelium. Moreover, PDL1-deficient endothelium hearts had significant higher frequency of IFN-γ-producing alloreactive cells as well as higher frequency of CD8(+) effector T cells. These findings demonstrate that PDL1 expression mainly on donor endothelium is functionally important in a fully allogeneic mismatched model for the induction of cardiac allograft tolerance.

  1. Gene-based bio-signature patterns and cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Uber, Patricia A; Benitez, Roberto M

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians have long awaited an alternative to invasive endomyocardial biopsy for surveillance of cardiac transplant rejection. Transcriptional signals in peripheral blood mononuclear cells allow for the development of multigene-based panels that can inform on the presence or absence of immunologic quiescence. The informative genes represent several biologic pathways, including T-cell activation (PDCD1), T-cell migration (ITGA4), and mobilization of hematopoietic precursors (WDR40A and microRNA gene family cMIR), and steroid-responsive genes such as IL1R2, the decoy receptor for interleukin 2. The greatest value may include the ability to inform on the potential of future proclivity for rejection, allowing patients to be stratified into low, intermediate, or high risk subsets for future rejection. In these individuals, this knowledge may allow clinicians to use tailored approaches to immunosuppression, thereby avoiding adverse pharmacologic effects in low-risk patients while improving rejection outcomes in those at high risk for future allograft compromise. Despite these advances, clinical entrenchment of gene-based pharmacotherapy in cardiac transplantation will require independent replication and validation of investigational findings.

  2. Clinico-pathologic, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL study in early cardiac allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Panizo-Santos, A; Lozano, M D; Distefano, S; Inogés, S; Pardo, J

    2000-01-01

    Early cardiac allograft failure (ECAF) was defined as acute allograft failure in the early transplant period. The aim of this study is to elucidate the clinicopathological and immunohistochemical characteristics and the role of apoptosis in ECAF in nine patients. We reviewed preoperative clinical data and morphological data at the time of autopsy or retransplantation. We also performed TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry to study fibronectin and tubulin beta-II. The average recipient and donor age was 48 +/- 10.3 and 28 +/- 7.11 respectively. Seven patients died at a mean time of 26 hours. The remaining two patients underwent retransplantation and are alive. The mean cold ischemic time was 124. 1 +/- 44.5 minutes. No patient had a panel reactive antibody >15% and lymphocytic crossmatch was positive in one case. All cases had grade 2-3 of coagulative necrosis, which correlated positively with fibonectin accumulation in myocyte cytoplasm, and cytoplasmic tubulin loss (p < 0.05). TUNEL technique showed in all cases some degree of DNA strand breaks in cardiomyocytes. Endothelium DNA strand breaks were seen in seven cases. Patients transplanted because of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy had a significantly higher degree of DNA strand breaks in cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02) than those transplanted because of ischemic cardiomyopathy. These results indicate that ECAF may be caused by ischemic-reperfusion damage to the donor heart assessed by myocyte coagulative necrosis, fibronectin accumulation in myocytes, tubulin loss, and DNA strand breaks of cardiomyocytes and endothelium. The use of a combination of these techniques might be appropriate in the diagnosis of ECAF in endomyocardial biopsies when it is suspected clinically.

  3. The Role of MIG/CXCL9 in Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, James J.; Fischbein, Michael P.; Whiting, David; Irie, Yoshihito; Fishbein, Michael C.; Burdick, Marie D.; Belperio, John; Strieter, Robert M.; Laks, Hillel; Berliner, Judith A.; Ardehali, Abbas

    2002-01-01

    T lymphocytes play a critical role in chronic rejection of transplanted hearts, or cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). However, the molecular mediators of T lymphocyte recruitment in CAV are incompletely defined. We hypothesized that the chemokine, monokine induced by interferon-γ (MIG/CXCL9), which induces T lymphocyte migration in vitro, participates in T lymphocyte recruitment in CAV. In a previously characterized MHC II-mismatched murine model of CAV, intragraft MIG/CXCL9 gene transcript and protein levels increased on days 7, 14, and 24 days after transplantation, paralleling T lymphocyte recruitment and preceding intimal thickening. Antibody neutralization of MIG/CXCL9 significantly reduced CD4+ T lymphocyte infiltration and intimal thickening in this model. MIG/CXCL9 was produced by graft-infiltrating MOMA-2+ macrophages in early and late stages of CAV. And, although T lymphocytes did not produce MIG/CXCL9, recipient CD4+ T lymphocytes were required for sustained intragraft MIG/CXCL9 production and CAV development. These findings demonstrate that 1) MIG/CXCL9 plays an important role in CD4+ T lymphocyte recruitment and development of CAV, 2) MOMA-2+ macrophages are the predominant recipient-derived source of MIG/CXCL9, and 3) recipient CD4 lymphocytes are necessary for sustained MIG/CXCL9 production and CAV development in this model. Neutralization of the chemokine MIG/CXCL9 may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic rejection after heart transplantation. PMID:12368204

  4. Optical coherence tomography and highly sensitivity troponin T for evaluating cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Iris P; García-Lara, Juan; Pinar, Eduardo; Pastor-Pérez, Francisco; Sánchez-Mas, Jesus; Valdés-Chavarri, Mariano; Pascual-Figal, Domingo A

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a major impediment to long-term graft survival after heart transplantation. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is more sensitive than coronary angiography for diagnosis, but the identification of specific plaque components or plaque composition is limited. In addition, there is an evident need for other noninvasive tools for diagnosing CAV. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of 2 new techniques for evaluating CAV: optical coherence tomography (OCT), and new high-sensitivity troponin T (hsTnT) assays. In 21 heart transplantation patients, coronary arteriography with IVUS and OCT were performed. Maximal intimal thickness (MIT) and luminal area at the most severe site were measured using the 2 techniques. Immediately before cardiac catheterization, blood samples were obtained and hsTnT levels measured. The evaluation of CAV by OCT showed a good correlation with IVUS measurements, with a mean difference in MIT of 0.0033 (95% confidence interval -0.049 to 0.043), taking advantage of lower interobserver variability (r = 0.94 for OCT vs r = 0.78 for IVUS) and better plaque characterization. When independent predictors of MIT were assessed in a multiple linear regression model, time after transplantation (β = 0.488, p = 0.004) and hsTnT (β = 0.392, p = 0.011) were the only independent predictors of MIT (R(2) = 0.591). In conclusion, this study is the first to evaluate 2 new techniques, OCT and hsTnT, in the challenging setting of CAV. The findings suggest that OCT provides lower interobserver variability and better plaque characterization than IVUS. Also, hsTnT could become a useful tool for ruling out CAV.

  5. Cardiac allograft acceptance after localized bone marrow transplantation by isolated limb perfusion in nonmyeloablated recipients.

    PubMed

    Askenasy, Nadir; Yolcu, Esma S; Shirwan, Haval; Wang, Zhiliang; Farkas, Daniel L; Yoleuk, Esma S

    2003-01-01

    Donor-specific tolerance to cardiac grafts may be induced by hematopoietic chimerism. This study evaluates the potential of localized bone marrow transplantation (BMT) performed by isolated limb (IL) perfusion to induce tolerance to secondary cardiac grafts without myeloablative conditioning. BALB/c recipients (H2d) preconditioned with lethal and sublethal doses of busulfan were injected i.v. and IL with 10(7) whole bone marrow cells (wBMCs) from B10 donors (H2(b)). Two hours after IL infusion of PKH-labeled wBMCs into myeloablated hosts, there were few labeled cells in the host peripheral blood (p < 0.001 versus i.v.) and femurs of the infused limb contained 57% +/- 7% PKH-labeled blasts (p < 0.001 versus 8% +/- 0.6% after i.v.). Femurs of the noninfused limbs contained 60-70 PKH-labeled blasts (p < 0.001 versus i.v.-BMT) after 2 days and 47% +/- 5% of 0.32 x 10(7) donor cells (p < 0.001 versus 78% +/- 4% of 1.2 x 10(7) donor cells in infused femurs) after 4 weeks. The survival rates of myeloablated hosts were 90% and 80% after i.v. and IL infusion, respectively, and the chimeras had 78%-84% donor peripheral blood cells. In recipients conditioned with 35 mg/g busulfan, the levels of donor chimerism in peripheral blood were 33% +/- 4% and 21% +/- 4% at 3 weeks after i.v.- and IL-BMT, respectively. Transplantation of donor-matched (H2(b)) secondary vascularized hearts in these chimeras after 3 weeks resulted in graft survival for periods exceeding 8 weeks, while third-party (H2(k)) allografts were acutely rejected (p < 0.001 versus H2(b)). These data indicate that IL perfusion is a reliable alternative procedure for establishment of hematopoietic chimerism and donor-specific tolerance without myeloablative conditioning.

  6. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration.

  7. In vitro analysis of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity displayed by rat heart allograft recipients rendered unresponsive by total-lymphoid irradiation and extracted donor antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Florence, L.S.; Jiang, G.L.; Ang, K.K.; Stepkowski, S.M.; Kahan, B.D. )

    1990-02-01

    The addition of 3M KCl-extracted donor antigen (HAg) to immunosuppressive therapy with 16 Gy total lymphoid irradiation produces a significantly higher fraction of Wistar-Furth (WFu) recipients displaying indefinite survival of heterotopic buffalo (BUF) heart allografts, namely 80 versus 20%. The experiments presented herein analyzed the direct activity as well as estimated the potential precursor numbers at 1 and 3 months in treated recipients. At 1 month post-TLI/HAg therapy, recipients showed reduced proliferative responses in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) in a specific pattern toward donor but not third-party stimulators. Both TLI/Graft and TLI/HAg/Graft groups showed a higher frequency of BUF antigen-directed T-cytotoxic cells (fTc) than TLI-treated, but nontransplanted, WFu hosts. In addition, the TLI/HAg group alone displayed alloantigen-specific suppressor cells that suppressed the MLR proliferative responses of normal spleen T cells against donor, but not third-party, alloantigens. At 3 months postirradition, both TLI/Graft and TLI/HAg/Graft groups displayed variable MLR proliferative responses toward donor and third-party alloantigens. Whereas nontransplanted, TLI-treated WFu rats recovered their fTc to normal levels at 3 months, the TLI and TLI/HAg treated recipients bearing functional heart allografts demonstrated significantly decreased splenic fTc. These results show that reduced numbers of cytotoxic cell precursors may afford more reliable indices of prolonged heart allograft survival than MLR responses. The observations suggest that TLI/HAg transplant hosts display both reduced cytotoxic precursors and activated suppressor elements.

  8. Inchingorei-san (TJ-117) and Artemisiae Capillaris Herba Induced Prolonged Survival of Fully Mismatched Cardiac Allografts and Generated Regulatory Cells in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangyuan; Uchiyama, Masateru; Zhang, Qi; Hirai, Toshihito; Niimi, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), a 6-component Japanese herbal medicine, on alloimmune responses in murine cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6) heart and received oral administration of TJ-117 or each component of TJ-117 from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naive CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time (MST), 7 days). CBA recipients given 1 g/kg/day of TJ-117 had prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, 37 days). Moreover, given 1 g/kg/day of Artemisiae Capillaris Herba (ACH), one component of TJ-117, indefinitely prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, >100 days). However, other five components of TJ-117 were less effective than TJ-117 and ACH. Secondary CBA recipients given whole splenocytes, CD4(+), and CD4(+)CD25(+) cells from primary ACH-treated CBA recipients with B6 cardiac allografts 30 days after grafting had prolonged survival of B6 hearts (MSTs, 57, >100, and >100 days, resp.). Flow cytometry studies showed that the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cell population was increased in transplant recipients given ACH. Cell proliferation, interleukin-2, and interferon-γ were suppressed in ACH-treated mice, whereas interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 were upregulated. In conclusion, ACH, one component of TJ-117, as well as TJ-117 induced hyporesponsiveness to fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and may generate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cells.

  9. Inchingorei-san (TJ-117) and Artemisiae Capillaris Herba Induced Prolonged Survival of Fully Mismatched Cardiac Allografts and Generated Regulatory Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiangyuan; Uchiyama, Masateru; Zhang, Qi; Hirai, Toshihito; Niimi, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Inchingorei-san (TJ-117), a 6-component Japanese herbal medicine, on alloimmune responses in murine cardiac allograft transplantation. CBA mice underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6) heart and received oral administration of TJ-117 or each component of TJ-117 from the day of transplantation until 7 days afterward. Naive CBA mice rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (median survival time (MST), 7 days). CBA recipients given 1 g/kg/day of TJ-117 had prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, 37 days). Moreover, given 1 g/kg/day of Artemisiae Capillaris Herba (ACH), one component of TJ-117, indefinitely prolonged B6 allograft survival (MST, >100 days). However, other five components of TJ-117 were less effective than TJ-117 and ACH. Secondary CBA recipients given whole splenocytes, CD4+, and CD4+CD25+ cells from primary ACH-treated CBA recipients with B6 cardiac allografts 30 days after grafting had prolonged survival of B6 hearts (MSTs, 57, >100, and >100 days, resp.). Flow cytometry studies showed that the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory cell population was increased in transplant recipients given ACH. Cell proliferation, interleukin-2, and interferon-γ were suppressed in ACH-treated mice, whereas interleukin-4 and interleukin-10 were upregulated. In conclusion, ACH, one component of TJ-117, as well as TJ-117 induced hyporesponsiveness to fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and may generate CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory cells. PMID:22811750

  10. Endogenous Memory CD8 T Cells Directly Mediate Cardiac Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Su, C. A.; Iida, S.; Abe, T.; Fairchild, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Differences in levels of environmentally induced memory T cells that cross-react with donor MHC molecules are postulated to account for the efficacy of allograft tolerance inducing strategies in rodents versus their failure in nonhuman primates and human transplant patients. Strategies to study the impact of donor-reactive memory T cells on allografts in rodents have relied on the pre-transplant induction of memory T cells cross-reactive with donor allogeneic MHC molecules through recipient viral infection, priming directly with donor antigen, or adoptive transfer of donor-antigen primed memory T cells. Each approach accelerates allograft rejection and confers resistance to tolerance induction, but also biases the T cell repertoire to strong donor-reactivity. The ability of endogenous memory T cells within unprimed mice to directly reject an allograft is unknown. Here we show a direct association between increased duration of cold ischemic allograft storage and numbers and enhanced functions of early graft infiltrating endogenous CD8 memory T cells. These T cells directly mediate rejection of allografts subjected to prolonged ischemia and this rejection is resistant to costimulatory blockade. These findings recapitulate the clinically significant impact of endogenous memory T cells with donor reactivity in a mouse transplant model in the absence of prior recipient priming. PMID:24502272

  11. Induction of tolerance to cardiac allografts using donor splenocytes engineered to display on their surface an exogenous fas ligand protein.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Esma S; Gu, Xiao; Lacelle, Chantale; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2008-07-15

    The critical role played by Fas ligand (FasL) in immune homeostasis renders this molecule an attractive target for immunomodulation to achieve tolerance to auto- and transplantation Ags. Immunomodulation with genetically modified cells expressing FasL was shown to induce tolerance to alloantigens. However, genetic modification of primary cells in a rapid, efficient, and clinically applicable manner proved challenging. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of donor splenocytes rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface a chimeric form of FasL protein (SA-FasL) for tolerance induction to cardiac allografts. The i.p. injection of ACI rats with Wistar-Furth rat splenocytes displaying SA-FasL on their surface resulted in tolerance to donor, but not F344 third-party cardiac allografts. Tolerance was associated with apoptosis of donor reactive T effector cells and induction/expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells. Treg cells played a critical role in the observed tolerance as adoptive transfer of sorted Treg cells from long-term graft recipients into naive unmanipulated ACI rats resulted in indefinite survival of secondary Wistar-Furth grafts. Immunomodulation with allogeneic cells rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface SA-FasL protein provides an effective and clinically applicable means of cell-based therapy with potential application to regenerative medicine, transplantation, and autoimmunity.

  12. Use of indium-111-labeled cells in measurement of cellular dynamics of experimental cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.; Wang, T.; Fawwaz, R.; Satake, K.; Nowygrod, R.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    This study evaluates the kinetics and utility of infused indium-111-labeled cells in detecting rejection in ACI to Lewis rat heart allografts. Syngeneic leukocytes, lymph node lymphocytes, and platelets were isolated and labeled with indium-111 (/sup 111/In) oxine, respectively, and were infused i.v. into Lewis rats carrying beating ACI or syngeneic hearts from post-transplant days 0 to 6. Recipients were imaged serially at 24 hr after infusion of labeled cells followed by excision of both native and transplanted hearts for direct isotope count. Labeled leukocytes accumulative progressively in the allograft with the scan becoming positive by post-transplant day 4. The ratio of allograft to native heart isotope counts rose from 1.25 on day 1 to 10.07 (P less than 0.0001) on day 7. The Lewis recipients infused with labeled lymphocytes showed a positive scan on days 6 and 7 whereas the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose from 0.97 on day 1 to 5.33 (P less than 0.001) on day 7. Recipients infused with /sup 111/In-labeled platelets showed a positive scan on days 5 to 7 and the allograft to native heart isotope count ratio rose sharply from 2.56 on day 4 to 16.98 (P less than 0.005) on day 7. Syngeneic heart grafts failed to demonstrate significant accumulation of any of the labeled cell population. These studies confirm the importance of nonlymphocytic cells in cellular rejection, evaluate the kinetics of graft invasion by the various cell types, and suggest that the techniques used afford a method for a safe and an early detection of allograft rejection.

  13. Donor-reactive CD8 Memory T Cells Infiltrate Cardiac Allografts Within 24 Hours Post-Transplant in Naïve Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, A.D.; Nozaki, T.; Rabant, M.; Valujskikh, A.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Normal immune responses stimulated by pathogenic and environmental antigens generate memory T cells that react with donor antigens and no currently used immunosuppressive drug completely inhibits memory T cell function. While donor-reactive memory T cells clearly compromise graft outcomes, mechanisms utilized by memory T cells to promote rejection are largely unknown. In the current study we investigated how early endogenous memory cells infiltrate and express effector function in cardiac allografts. Endogenous CD8 memory T cells in non-sensitized recipients distinguish syngeneic vs. allogeneic cardiac allografts within 24 hours of reperfusion. CD8-dependent production of IFN-γ and CXCL9/Mig was observed 24–72 hours post-transplant in allografts but not isografts. CXCL9 was produced by donor cells in response to IFN-γ made by recipient CD8 T cells reactive to donor class I MHC molecules. Activated CD8 T cells were detected in allografts at least three days before donor-specific effector T cells producing IFN-γ were detected in the recipient spleen. Early inflammation mediated by donor-reactive CD8 memory T cells greatly enhanced primed effector T cell infiltration into allografts. These results suggest that strategies for optimal inhibition of alloimmunity should include neutralization of infiltrating CD8 memory T cells within a very narrow window after transplantation. PMID:18557725

  14. Brief treatment with a highly selective immunoproteasome inhibitor promotes long-term cardiac allograft acceptance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sula Karreci, Esilida; Fan, Hao; Uehara, Mayuko; Mihali, Albana B.; Singh, Pradeep K.; Kurdi, Ahmed T.; Solhjou, Zhabiz; Riella, Leonardo V.; Ghobrial, Irene; Laragione, Teresina; Routray, Sujit; Assaker, Jean Pierre; Wang, Rong; Sukenick, George; Shi, Lei; Barrat, Franck J.; Nathan, Carl F.; Lin, Gang; Azzi, Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive proteasomes (c-20S) are ubiquitously expressed cellular proteases that degrade polyubiquitinated proteins and regulate cell functions. An isoform of proteasome, the immunoproteasome (i-20S), is highly expressed in human T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and B cells, suggesting that it could be a potential target for inflammatory diseases, including those involving autoimmunity and alloimmunity. Here, we describe DPLG3, a rationally designed, noncovalent inhibitor of the immunoproteasome chymotryptic subunit β5i that has thousands-fold selectivity over constitutive β5c. DPLG3 suppressed cytokine release from blood mononuclear cells and the activation of DCs and T cells, diminished accumulation of effector T cells, promoted expression of exhaustion and coinhibitory markers on T cells, and synergized with CTLA4-Ig to promote long-term acceptance of cardiac allografts across a major histocompatibility barrier. These findings demonstrate the potential value of using brief posttransplant immunoproteasome inhibition to entrain a long-term response favorable to allograft survival as part of an immunomodulatory regimen that is neither broadly immunosuppressive nor toxic. PMID:27956634

  15. NK026680 inhibits T-cell function in an IL-2-dependent manner and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Susumu; Yamashita, Kenichiro; Goto, Ryoichi; Oura, Tetsu; Wakayama, Kenji; Hirokata, Gentaro; Shibata, Tomohiro; Igarashi, Rumi; Haga, Sanae; Ozaki, Michitaka; Todo, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    NK026680 is a triazolopyrimidine derivative that has been shown to inhibit dendritic cell maturation and activation. Here, we examined the immunosuppressive properties of NK026680 on T-cell function and assessed its immunosuppressive efficacy in an ACI (RT1(av1) haplotype) to Lewis (RT1(l)) rat heart transplantation model. The effects of NK026680 on T-cell proliferation, activation, and cytokine production were investigated in vitro. Heart transplant recipient rats were administered NK026680 daily for 14 days post-transplantation. In addition to graft survival time, alloimmune responses and graft histology at 4-10 days post-transplantation were assessed. NK026680 was found to inhibit proliferation, CD25 upregulation, IL-2 production, and cell cycle progression in αCD3/αCD28-stimulated murine T cells. These effects were likely due to suppression of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and the subsequent inhibition of p65, c-Fos, and to a lesser extent, c-Jun. Daily NK026680 treatment suppressed alloimmune responses, prevented cellular infiltration into allografts, and prolonged graft survival. The anti-rejection effects of NK026680 were enhanced by tacrolimus. In conclusion, NK026680 inhibits the activation of T cells and prolongs cardiac allograft survival in rats. These features make it a potential candidate immunosuppressant for the treatment of organ transplant patients in the future.

  16. Pathological characteristics of liver allografts from donation after brain death followed by cardiac death in pigs.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hui; Wang, Dong-Ping; Zhang, Chuan-Zhao; Zhang, Long-Juan; Wang, Hao-Chen; Li, Zhuo-Hui; Chen, Zhen; Zhang, Tao; Cai, Chang-Jie; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Ma, Yi; Guo, Zhi-Yong; He, Xiao-Shun

    2014-10-01

    Donation after brain death followed by circulatory death (DBCD) is a unique practice in China. The aim of this study was to define the pathologic characteristics of DBCD liver allografts in a porcine model. Fifteen male pigs (25-30 kg) were allocated randomly into donation after brain death (DBD), donation after circulatory death (DCD) and DBCD groups. Brain death was induced by augmenting intracranial pressure. Circulatory death was induced by withdrawal of life support in DBCD group and by venous injection of 40 mL 10% potassium chloride in DCD group. The donor livers were perfused in situ and kept in cold storage for 4 h. Liver tissue and common bile duct samples were collected for hematoxylin and eosin staining, TUNEL testing and electron microscopic examination. Spot necrosis was found in hepatic parenchyma of DBD and DBCD groups, while a large area of necrosis was shown in DCD group. The apoptosis rate of hepatocytes in DBD [(0.56±0.30)%] and DBCD [(0.50 ± 0.11)%] groups was much lower than that in DCD group [(3.78±0.33)%] (P<0.05). And there was no significant difference between DBD group and DBCD group (P>0.05)). The structures of bile duct were intact in both DBD and DBCD groups, while the biliary epithelium was totally damaged in DCD group. Under electron microscope, the DBD hepatocytes were characterized by intact cell membrane, well-organized endoplasmic reticulum, mild mitochondria edema and abundant glycogens. Broken cell membrane, mild inflammatory cell infiltration and sinusoidal epithelium edema, as well as reduced glycogen volume, were found in the DBCD hepatocytes. The DCD hepatocytes had more profound cell organelle injury and much less glycogen storage. In conclusion, the preservation injury of DBCD liver allografts is much less severe than that of un-controlled DCD, but more severe than that of DBD liver allografts under electron microscope, which might reflect post-transplant liver function to some extent.

  17. The Impact of Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury on Liver Allografts from Deceased after Cardiac Death versus Deceased after Brain Death Donors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin; Sayed, Blayne Amir; Casas-Ferreira, Ana Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Rela, Mohammed; Ma, Yun; Fuggle, Susan; Legido-Quigley, Cristina; Jassem, Wayel

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims The shortage of organs for transplantation has led to increased use of organs procured from donors after cardiac death (DCD). The effects of cardiac death on the liver remain poorly understood, however. Using livers obtained from DCD versus donors after brain death (DBD), we aimed to understand how ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury alters expression of pro-inflammatory markers ceramides and influences graft leukocyte infiltration. Methods Hepatocyte inflammation, as assessed by ceramide expression, was evaluated in DCD (n = 13) and DBD (n = 10) livers. Allograft expression of inflammatory and cell death markers, and allograft leukocyte infiltration were evaluated from a contemporaneous independent cohort of DCD (n = 22) and DBD (n = 13) livers. Results When examining the differences between transplant stages in each group, C18, C20, C24 ceramides showed significant difference in DBD (p<0.05) and C22 ceramide (p<0.05) were more pronounced for DCD. C18 ceramide is correlated to bilirubin, INR, and creatinine after transplant in DCD. Prior to transplantation, DCD livers have reduced leukocyte infiltration compared to DBD allografts. Following reperfusion, the neutrophil infiltration and platelet deposition was less prevalent in DCD grafts while cell death and recipients levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) of DCD allografts had significantly increased. Conclusion These data suggest that I/R injury generate necrosis in the absence of a strong inflammatory response in DCD livers with an appreciable effect on early graft function. The long-term consequences of increased inflammation in DBD and increased cell death in DCD allografts are unknown and warrant further investigation. PMID:26863224

  18. Donor-Specific Regulatory T Cells Acquired from Tolerant Mice Bearing Cardiac Allograft Promote Mixed Chimerism and Prolong Intestinal Allograft Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-Fei; Jiang, Jin-Peng; Yang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Guan, Wen-Xian; Du, Jun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The induction of donor-specific transplant tolerance has always been a central problem for small bowel transplantation (SBT), which is thought to be the best therapy for end-stage bowel failure. With the development of new tolerance-inducing strategies, mixed chimerism induced by co-stimulation blockade has become most potent for tolerance of allografts, such as skin, kidney, and heart. However, a lack of clinically available co-stimulation blockers has hindered efficient application in humans. Furthermore, unlike those for other types of solid organ transplantation, strategies to induce robust mixed chimerism for intestinal allografts have not been fully developed. To improve current mixed chimerism induction protocols for future clinical application, we developed a new protocol using donor-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells from mice with heart allograft tolerance, immunosuppressive drugs which could be used clinically and low doses of irradiation. Our results demonstrated that donor-specific Treg cells acquired from tolerant mice after in vitro expansion generate stable chimerism and lead to acceptance of intestinal allograft. Increased intragraft Treg cells and clonal deletion contribute to the development of SBT tolerance. PMID:27909438

  19. Left main coronary artery stenosis treatment with two paclitaxel-eluting stents in a patient with cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ríos, Marco A; Méndez-Ortíz, Arturo; Gaspar, Jorge; Barragán-García, Rodolfo; Fernández-de-la-Reguera, Guillermo; González-Quesada, Carlos J

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation is a well defined therapy for end stage heart failure. After the first year of transplantation, allograft coronary artery disease (ACAD) is the second main cause of death. The ACAD is defined as a diffuse process affecting the entire length of epicardial vessels. Once ACAD has been established, treatments such as coronary angioplasty, coronary stenting, and coronary bypass are performed. We present a case of successful stenting of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) in a patient with ACAD. The patient's medical history was significant for heart transplantation due to ischemic heart failure. Four years after transplantation the patient was admitted again due to sudden worsening of New York Heart Association functional class and extreme fatigue. Coronary angiogram showed a severe stenosis in the proximal segment of the LMCA; we performed stenting with a paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES). Six months after the procedure, the patient had an elective angiogram, where we discovered a new severe occlusion distally to the former stent; a second PES was implanted. Fourteen months after the second stenting, a new elective angiogram was performed without evidence of in-stent restenosis. After a 8-year follow-up since transplantation, the patient is free from dyspnea, angina, and adverse cardiovascular events. Our report suggests the efficacy of PES as ACAD treatment of the unprotected LMCA.

  20. Molecular Assessment of Microcirculation Injury in Formalin-Fixed Human Cardiac Allograft Biopsies With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Afzali, B; Chapman, E; Racapé, M; Adam, B; Bruneval, P; Gil, F; Kim, D; Hidalgo, L; Campbell, P; Sis, B; Duong Van Huyen, J P; Mengel, M

    2017-02-01

    Precise diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in cardiac allograft endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) remains challenging. This study assessed molecular diagnostics in human EMBs with AMR. A set of 34 endothelial, natural killer cell and inflammatory genes was quantified in 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded EMBs classified according to 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) criteria. The gene set expression was compared between ISHLT diagnoses and correlated with donor-specific antibody (DSA), endothelial injury by electron microscopy (EM) and prognosis. Findings were validated in an independent set of 57 EMBs. In the training set (n = 106), AMR cases (n = 70) showed higher gene set expression than acute cellular rejection (ACR; n = 21, p < 0.001) and controls (n = 15, p < 0.0001). Anti-HLA DSA positivity was associated with higher gene set expression (p = 0.01). Endothelial injury by electron microscopy strongly correlated with gene set expression, specifically in AMR cases (r = 0.62, p = 0.002). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis for diagnosing AMR showed greater accuracy with gene set expression (area under the curve [AUC] = 79.88) than with DSA (AUC = 70.47) and C4d (AUC = 70.71). In AMR patients (n = 17) with sequential biopsies, increasing gene set expression was associated with inferior prognosis (p = 0.034). These findings were confirmed in the validation set. In conclusion, biopsy-based molecular assessment of antibody-mediated microcirculation injury has the potential to improve diagnosis of AMR in human cardiac transplants.

  1. Blockade of very late antigen-4 integrin binding to fibronectin with connecting segment-1 peptide reduces accelerated coronary arteriopathy in rabbit cardiac allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Molossi, S; Elices, M; Arrhenius, T; Diaz, R; Coulber, C; Rabinovitch, M

    1995-01-01

    Graft arteriopathy, a leading cause of cardiac allograft failure, is associated with increased intimal smooth muscle cells, inflammatory cells, and accumulation of extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that cellular fibronectin plays a pivotal role in the progression of the allograft arteriopathy by directing the transendothelial trafficking of inflammatory cells through interaction of the connecting segment-1 (CS1) motif with the very late antigen-4 (VLA-4) integrin, and tested this in vivo using a blocking peptide. Cholesterol-fed rabbits underwent heterotopic cardiac transplantation without immunosuppression. The treatment group (n = 7) received a synthetic CS1 peptide (1 mg/kg per d, subcutaneously), and the controls (n = 7) received an inactive peptide (1 mg/kg per d, subcutaneously). At 7-8 d after transplantation, hearts were harvested and sectioned for morphometric analysis and immunohistochemical studies. We observed a > 50% decrease in the incidence (P < 0.001) and severity (P < 0.001) of donor coronary artery intimal thickening in the CS1-treated compared with the control group. These findings correlated with reduced infiltration of T cells (P < 0.05), a trend toward decreased expression of adhesion molecules (P < 0.06), and less accumulation of fibronectin (P < 0.03). Our data suggest that the VLA-4-fibronectin interaction is critical to the progression of the allograft arteriopathy by perpetuating the immune-inflammatory response in the vessel wall. Images PMID:7539456

  2. Effect of ultraviolet-B-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusions and peritransplant immunosuppression with cyclosporine on rat cardiac allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Lau, H.T.; Reemtsma, K.; Hardy, M.A.

    1988-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that pretreatment of ACI recipients with ultraviolet-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion (UV-DST) leads to permanent cardiac allograft survival without further host immunosuppression (ACI rats are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes in mixed-lymphocyte reaction). This study examines the effect of UV-DST and the timing of transfusions on ACI cardiac allograft survival in Lewis recipients with and without the addition of peritransplant cyclosporine (CsA) (20 mg/kg i.m.) given on days 0, +1, and +2 in relation to the time of transplantation. The mean survival time (MST) of ACI cardiac allografts in Lewis recipients was significantly increased to 33.6 +/- 5.7 days (P less than 0.001) by CsA treatment alone as compared to 6.5 +/- 0.5 days survival in control. When DST was given on day -3 combined with CsA, graft survival was increased to 42.0 +/- 9.3 days (P less than 0.01), as compared to 5.8 +/- 1.3 days when DST alone was used. When DST was irradiated with ultraviolet B (UV-DST) and administered on day -3 combined with peritransplant CsA, the MST was increased to 68.83 +/- 16.1 days as compared to an MST of 10.0 +/- 1.0 days in controls treated with UV-DST alone. When UV-DST was given on day -7 and combined with peritransplant CsA immunosuppression, the results were similar. However, when UV-DST was peritransplant CsA course, 4 of 6 recipients maintained their ACI heart allografts indefinitely (greater than 300 days) in contrast to the effect of UV-DST alone (MST of 13.5 days). Third-party (W/F) UV-irradiated blood transfusions were ineffective in prolonging ACI cardiac allografts in Lewis rats, regardless of whether the transfusions were given alone or in combination with peritransplant immunosuppression with CsA.

  3. In vitro correlates of in vivo therapy with cyclosporine to immunosuppress rejection of heterotopic rat cardiac allografts across strong (RT-1) plus weak (non-RT-1) histocompatibility differences.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, S; Stepkowski, S M; Lawen, J G; Rutzky, L P; Kahan, B D

    1991-11-01

    This study correlated different oral cyclosporine doses with in vivo graft survival, blood and tissue drug levels, and in vitro immune performances. Wistar-Furth (WFu, RT-1u) hosts engrafted with heterotopic cardiac transplants from strongly histoincompatible Buffalo (BUF, RT-1b) rats were treated postoperatively with 14-day courses of different doses of CsA delivered per gavage. There was a graded prolongation of graft survival--namely, no effect at the 1.5 mg/kg dose; a modest effect at 3 mg/kg; a therapeutic effect at 5 mg/kg; and long-term unresponsiveness at 10 mg/kg. Whole blood, serum, and tissue CsA concentrations correlated with drug dose. On day 7 posttransplantation--that is, during the peak of the immune response of untreated recipients and midway during the period of daily CsA therapy--in vitro immune performances were examined in each experimental group. On the one hand, the mixed lymphocyte reaction of WFu host splenic T cells toward donor-type BUF stimulators poorly reflected the administered CsA dose. On the other hand, there was a good correlation between drug dose and both impaired cell-mediated lympholysis and reduced frequency of alloantigen-specific T cytotoxic cell precursors f(CTL)p. Animals treated with therapeutic doses of CsA showed different patterns of T cell-mediated lympholysis: 3 mg/kg did not prevent anti-BUF Tc cell sensitization; 5 mg/kg maintained f(CTL)p levels similar to the normal controls; and 10 mg/kg significantly reduced Tc clones against donor but not third-party targets. These data demonstrate that the fate of alloantigen-specific Tc clones activated in vivo depends upon the local drug concentration. Furthermore, the present studies suggest that CML and f(CTL)p afford useful in vitro indices of in vivo immunosuppression with CsA in rat cardiac allograft recipients.

  4. ‘Default’ generated neonatal regulatory T cells are hypomethylated at conserved non-coding sequence 2 and promote long-term cardiac allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chao; Wang, Sihua; Ye, Ping; Huang, Xiaofan; Liu, Zheng; Wu, Jie; Sun, Yuan; Xie, Aini; Wang, Guohua; Xia, Jiahong

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of immune self-tolerance and homeostasis. We previously reported that neonatal CD4+ T cells have an intrinsic ‘default’ mechanism to become Treg (neoTreg) cells in response to T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear and the effects of neoTreg cells on regulating immune responses remain unknown. Due to their involvement in Foxp3 regulation, we examined the role of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNMT3b during the induction of neoTreg cells in the Foxp3gfp mice. The function of neoTreg cells was assessed in an acute allograft rejection model established in RAG2−/− mice with allograft cardiac transplantation and transferred with syngeneic CD4+ effector T cells. Following ex vivo TCR stimulation, the DNMT activity was increased threefold in adult CD4+ T cells, but not significantly increased in neonatal cells. However, adoptively transferred neoTreg cells significantly prolonged cardiac allograft survival (mean survival time 47 days, P < 0·001) and maintained Foxp3 expression similar to natural Treg cells. The neoTreg cells were hypomethylated at the conserved non-coding DNA sequence 2 locus of Foxp3 compared with adult Treg cells. The DNMT antagonist 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) induced increased Foxp3 expression in mature CD4+ T cells. 5-Aza-inducible Treg cells combined with continuous 5-Aza treatment prolonged graft survival. These results indicate that the ‘default’ pathway of neoTreg cell differentiation is associated with reduced DNMT1 and DNMT3b response to TCR stimulus. The neoTreg cells may be a strategy to alleviate acute allograft rejection. PMID:24944101

  5. Myocardial Gene Expression Profiling to Predict and Identify Cardiac Allograft Acute Cellular Rejection: The GET-Study

    PubMed Central

    Bodez, Diane; Hocini, Hakim; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Tisserand, Pascaline; Benhaiem, Nicole; Barau, Caroline; Kharoubi, Mounira; Guellich, Aziz; Guendouz, Soulef; Radu, Costin; Couetil, Jean-Paul; Ghaleh, Bijan; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Teiger, Emmanuel; Hittinger, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Aims Serial invasive endomyocardial biopsies (EMB) remain the gold standard for acute cellular rejection (ACR) diagnosis. However histological grading has several limitations. We aimed to explore the value of myocardial Gene Expression Profiling (GEP) for diagnosing and identifying predictive biomarkers of ACR. Methods A case-control study nested within a retrospective heart transplant patients cohort included 126 patients with median (IQR) age 50 (41–57) years and 111 (88%) males. Among 1157 EMB performed, 467 were eligible (i.e, corresponding to either ISHLT grade 0 or ≥3A), among which 36 were selected for GEP according to the grading: 0 (CISHLT, n = 13); rejection ≥3A (RISHLT, n = 13); 0 one month before ACR (BRISHLT, n = 10). Results We found 294 genes differentially expressed between CISHLT and RISHLT, mainly involved in immune activation, and inflammation. Hierarchical clustering showed a clear segregation of CISHLT and RISHLT groups and heterogeneity of GEP within RISHLT. All EMB presented immune activation, but some RISHLT EMB were strongly subject to inflammation, whereas others, closer to CISHLT, were characterized by structural modifications with lower inflammation level. We identified 15 probes significantly different between BRISHLT and CISHLT, including the gene of the muscular protein TTN. This result suggests that structural alterations precede inflammation in ACR. Linear Discriminant Analysis based on these 15 probes was able to identify the histological status of every 36 samples. Conclusion Myocardial GEP is a helpful method to accurately diagnose ACR, and predicts rejection one month before its histological occurrence. These results should be considered in cardiac allograft recipients’ care. PMID:27898719

  6. Cardiac allograft prolongation in mice treated with combined posttransplantation total-lymphoid irradiation and anti-L3T4 antibody therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Trager, D.K.; Banks, B.A.; Rosenbaum, G.E.; Holm, B.I.; Shizuru, J.A.; Strober, S.; Fathman, C.G.

    1989-04-01

    Neonatal cardiac allograft survival was examined in mice treated with anti-L3T4 antibody, posttransplantation total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) or a combination of both therapies. Independently, both posttransplantation TLI and short-course antibody treatment allowed minimal prolongation. However, synergistic prolongation in graft survival was observed with the combination (synergistic) therapy. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes from animals treated with combined anti-L3T4 and posttransplantation TLI additionally revealed ''synergy'' with respect to the degree of peripheral lymphocyte depletion.

  7. Regulation of human aortic endothelial cell-derived mesenchymal growth factors by allogeneic lymphocytes in vitro. A potential mechanism for cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, C R; Morris, T E; Shipley, G D; Hosenpud, J D

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy is thought to be triggered by an alloreactive response to the donor coronary vasculature, resulting in smooth muscle cell proliferation and ultimate occlusion of the donor coronary arteries. To determine whether allogeneic lymphocytes are capable of regulating endothelial-derived smooth muscle cell (SMC) growth factors, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were exposed to allogeneic lymphocytes. The HAEC-lymphocyte co-cultures were assessed for (a) lymphocyte proliferation in response to the allogeneic HAECs; (b) release of soluble factors that stimulate human aortic SMC proliferation; and (c) alteration of HAEC mRNA levels for a panel of known SMC growth factors. Co-culture conditioned medium increased SMC proliferation, compared to medium conditioned by HAECs alone. HAECs exposed to allogeneic lymphocytes increased their expression of mRNA for basic fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factors alpha and beta, and platelet derived growth factor A and B chains. These results demonstrate that allogeneic lymphocytes are capable of inducing HAECs to increase mRNA levels for several mesenchymal growth factors and to release bioactive products capable of stimulating SMC cell proliferation in vitro. Additionally, the data support the hypothesis that alloreactive lymphocytes can stimulate allogeneic donor endothelial cells to produce growth factors that may contribute to the intimal thickening seen in cardiac allograft vasculopathy. Images PMID:8376585

  8. Induction of Tolerance to Cardiac Allografts Using Donor Splenocytes Engineered to Display on Their Surface an Exogenous FasL Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Yolcu, Esma S.; Gu, Xiao; Lacelle, Chantale; Zhao, Hong; Bandura-Morgan, Laura; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2008-01-01

    The critical role played by FasL in immune homeostasis renders this molecule as an attractive target for immunomodulation to achieve tolerance to auto and transplantation antigens. Immunomodulation with genetically modified cells expressing FasL was shown to induce tolerance to alloantigens. However, genetic modification of primary cells in a rapid, efficient, and clinically applicable manner proved challenging. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of donor splenocytes rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface a chimeric form of FasL protein (SA-FasL) for tolerance induction to cardiac allografts. Intraperitoneal injection of ACI rats with WF splenocytes displaying SA-FasL on their surface resulted in tolerance to donor, but not F344 third party, cardiac allografts. Tolerance was associated with apoptosis of donor reactive T effector cells and induction/expansion of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells. Treg cells played a critical role in the observed tolerance as adoptive transfer of sorted Treg cells from long-term graft recipients into naïve unmanipulated ACI rats resulted in indefinite survival of secondary WF grafts. Immunomodulation with allogeneic cells rapidly and efficiently engineered to display on their surface SA-FasL protein provides an effective and clinically applicable means of cell-based therapy with potential application to regenerative medicine, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:18606644

  9. Long-term survival of cardiac allografts induced by cyclophosphamide combined with CTLA4Ig-gene transfer mediated by adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wang, G M; Ma, J B; Jin, Y Z; Feng, Y G; Hao, J; Gao, X; Xie, S S

    2006-11-01

    There is a need to achieve donor-specific tolerance in clinical organ transplantation, where potential benefits remain overshadowed by chronic rejection and the side-effects of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. It is known that the mature immune system in mice can be reprogrammed to accept a foreign graft as if it was "self". The AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer (SC) + cyclophosphamide (CP) treatment alone prolongs allograft survival but does not induce tolerance. However, in our study, the AdCTLA4Ig-mediated gene transfer combined with SC + CP treatment yielded significantly prolonged mean survival times (149.7 +/- 18.0 days), while those in the untreated or AdLacZ treated mice were rejected in normal fashion (5.3 +/- 0.5 and 5.2 +/- 0.4 days, respectively), and survival in the AdCTLA4Ig or SC + CP treated groups were 45.7 +/- 9.6 or 50.2 +/- 5.3 days, respectively. In conclusion, a protocol of AdCTLA4Ig + SC + CP improved the survival of DA-->LEW cardiac allografts.

  10. RNA Profiling in Human and Murine Transplanted Hearts: Identification and Validation of Therapeutic Targets for Acute Cardiac and Renal Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Van Aelst, L. N. L.; Summer, G.; Li, S.; Gupta, S. K.; Heggermont, W.; De Vusser, K.; Carai, P.; Naesens, M.; Van Cleemput, J.; Van de Werf, F.; Vanhaecke, J.; Thum, T.; Waer, M.; Papageorgiou, A.‐P.; Schroen, B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute cellular rejection (ACR) is the adverse response of the recipient's immune system against the allogeneic graft. Using human surveillance endomyocardial biopsies (EMBs) manifesting ACR and murine allogeneic grafts, we profiled implicated microRNAs (miRs) and mRNAs. MiR profiling showed that miR‐21, ‐142‐3p, ‐142‐5p, ‐146a, ‐146b, ‐155, ‐222, ‐223, and ‐494 increased during ACR in humans and mice, whereas miR‐149‐5p decreased. mRNA profiling revealed 70 common differentially regulated transcripts, all involved in immune signaling and immune‐related diseases. Interestingly, 33 of 70 transcripts function downstream of IL‐6 and its transcription factor spleen focus forming virus proviral integration oncogene (SPI1), an established target of miR‐155, the most upregulated miR in human EMBs manifesting rejection. In a mouse model of cardiac transplantation, miR‐155 absence and pharmacological inhibition attenuated ACR, demonstrating the causal involvement and therapeutic potential of miRs. Finally, we corroborated our miR signature in acute cellular renal allograft rejection, suggesting a nonorgan specific signature of acute rejection. We concluded that miR and mRNA profiling in human and murine ACR revealed the shared significant dysregulation of immune genes. Inflammatory miRs, for example miR‐155, and transcripts, in particular those related to the IL‐6 pathway, are promising therapeutic targets to prevent acute allograft rejection. PMID:26249758

  11. Low-dose donor bone marrow cells and splenocytes plus adenovirus encoding for CTLA4Ig gene promote stable mixed chimerism and long-term survival of rat cardiac allografts.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y-Z; Zhang, Q-Y; Xie, S-S

    2003-12-01

    Co-stimulatory blockade combined with donor bone marrow transfusion engenders stable mixed chimerism and robust tolerance to various organ and cell transplants. However, repeated administration of costly agents to block the co-stimulatory pathway and the high doses of donor bone marrow cells (BMCs) used in most protocols are impeding clinical development of this strategy. To circumvent these shortcomings, we developed a plan in which repeated administration of costly agents was replaced by a single injection of adenovirus containing the gene of interest, and the high dose of donor BMCs replaced by a mixture of low-dose donor BMCs and splenocytes (SPLCs). Cardiac allografts from DA(RT-1(a)) rats were transplanted heterotopically into the abdomens of LEW(RT-1(1)) rats. A cocktail of adenovirus containing CTLA4Ig gene (AdCTLA4Ig), donor BMCs (100 x 10(6)), and SPLCs (50 x 10(6)) was administered to recipients via the portal vein immediately after grafting (n = 6). Treatment with regimens, including AdCTLA4Ig only, AdCTLA4Ig plus donor BMCs, and AdCTLA4Ig plus donor SPLCs, significantly prolonged cardiac allograft survival in recipient rats, while animals that received no treatment or treatment with control adenovirus (AdLacZ) promptly rejected their allografts. Nevertheless, LEW recipients treated with AdCTLA4Ig and the mixture of a low dose of donor BMCs and SPLCs developed stable mixed chimerism, rendering them long-term survivors of cardiac allografts that also accepted skin grafts from the donor but not the third-party strain. We conclude that blockade of CD28-B7 pathway with AdCTLA4Ig plus a mixture of low doses of donor BMCs and SPLCs is a feasible strategy to induce long-term mixed chimerism with a potential application for clinical development.

  12. De novo expression of fetal ED-A(+) fibronectin and B (+) tenascin-C splicing variants in human cardiac allografts: potential impact for targeted therapy of rejection.

    PubMed

    Franz, Marcus; Matusiak-Brückner, Monika; Richter, Petra; Grün, Katja; Ziffels, Barbara; Neri, Dario; Maschek, Hansjörg; Schulz, Uwe; Pfeil, Alexander; Jung, Christian; Figulla, Hans R; Gummert, Jan; Berndt, Alexander; Renner, André

    2014-10-01

    Management of acute and especially chronic rejection after human cardiac transplantation is still challenging. Chronic rejection, represented by allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and cardiac interstitial fibrosis (CIF) is known to cause severe long-term complications. Rejection associated tissue-remodelling entails the reoccurrence of fetal variants of Fibronectin (Fn) and Tenascin-C (Tn-C), which are virtually absent in adult human organs. In a rat model, an extensive re-expression could be demonstrated for ED-A(+) Fn with spatial association to CAV and CIF. Thus, it is of great interest to investigate the cardiac tissue expression and distribution in human samples. From 48 heart transplanted patients, 64 tissue specimens derived from right ventricular biopsies were available. Histopathological analysis was performed according to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) guidelines for the detection of acute rejection. By immunohistochemistry, protein expression of ED-A(+) Fn, B(+) Tn-C, alpha-smooth muscle actin, CD31 and CD45 was assessed and analysed semiquantitatively. Co-localisation studies were performed by means of immunofluorescence double labelling. Histopathological analysis of the 64 samples revealed different ISHLT grades (0R in 36 cases, 1R in 20 cases and 2R in 8 cases). There was a distinct and quantitatively relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C in most samples. Semi-quantitative evaluation did not show any correlation to the acute rejection grade for all markers. Interestingly, significant correlations to the extent of inflammation could be shown for ED-A(+) Fn (r = 0.442, p = 0.000) and B(+) Tn-C (r = 0.408, p = 0.001) as well as between both proteins (r = 0.663, p = 0.000). A spatial association of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C to CAV and CIF could be demonstrated. A relevant re-occurrence of ED-A(+) Fn and B(+) Tn-C following human heart transplantation could be demonstrated with spatial association to

  13. The Effect of Everolimus Initiation and Calcineurin Inhibitor Elimination on Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy in De Novo Recipients: One-Year Results of a Scandinavian Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Andreassen, A K; Andersson, B; Gustafsson, F; Eiskjaer, H; Bøtker, H E; Rådegran, G; Gude, E; Ioanes, D; Solbu, D; Sigurdardottir, V; Dellgren, G; Erikstad, I; Solberg, O G; Ueland, T; Aukrust, P; Gullestad, L

    2015-07-01

    Early initiation of everolimus with calcineurin inhibitor therapy has been shown to reduce the progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) in de novo heart transplant recipients. The effect of de novo everolimus therapy and early total elimination of calcineurin inhibitor therapy has, however, not been investigated and is relevant given the morbidity and lack of efficacy of current protocols in preventing CAV. This 12-month multicenter Scandinavian trial randomized 115 de novo heart transplant recipients to everolimus with complete calcineurin inhibitor elimination 7-11 weeks after HTx or standard cyclosporine immunosuppression. Ninety-five (83%) patients had matched intravascular ultrasound examinations at baseline and 12 months. Mean (± SD) recipient age was 49.9 ± 13.1 years. The everolimus group (n = 47) demonstrated significantly reduced CAV progression as compared to the calcineurin inhibitor group (n = 48) (ΔMaximal Intimal Thickness 0.03 ± 0.06 and 0.08 ± 0.12 mm, ΔPercent Atheroma Volume 1.3 ± 2.3 and 4.2 ± 5.0%, ΔTotal Atheroma Volume 1.1 ± 19.2 mm(3) and 13.8 ± 28.0 mm(3) [all p-values ≤ 0.01]). Everolimus patients also had a significantly greater decline in levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 as compared to the calcineurin inhibitor group (p = 0.02). These preliminary results suggest that an everolimus-based CNI-free can potentially be considered in suitable de novo HTx recipients.

  14. [Tubulointerstitial rejection of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Malušková, Jana; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Tubulo-intersticial rejection represents T-cell mediated rejection of kidney allografts with the morphology of immune-mediated interstitial nephritis. Diagnosis is dependent on the histopathological evaluation of a graft biopsy sample. The key morphological features are interstitial inflammatory infiltrate and damage to tubular epithelial cell which in severe cases can result in the ruptures of the tubular basement membranes. The differential diagnosis of tubulo-interstitial rejection includes acute interstitial nephritis and viral inflammatory kidney diseases, mainly polyomavirus nephropathy.

  15. CXCR3 Antagonism Impairs the Development of Donor-reactive, IFN-γ-producing Effectors and Prolongs Allograft Survival 1

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, J.M.; Zhang, Q-W.; Siu, G.; Collins, T. L.; Sullivan, T.; Dairaghi, D.J.; Medina, J.C.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Current immunosuppression regimens are highly toxic to transplant recipients and, in many cases, acute rejection episodes occur due to escape of donor-reactive lymphocytes from the immunosuppression. T cells are the mediators of acute, cell-mediated graft damage and are hypothesized to use the CXCR3 chemokine axis for migration into the allograft. In the current study, we investigated the effect of CXCR3 blockade using a non-peptide, small molecule inhibitor, AMG1237845, in murine cardiac allograft survival. Methods C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice received vascularized cardiac allografts from A/J (H-2a) donors and were treated with the CXCR3 antagonist. Histological and flow cytometric analyses were used to measure infiltration of leukocytes, and qRT-PCR and IFN-γ ELISPOT assays were used to measure donor-specific reactivity. Results CXCR3 antagonism modestly prolonged allograft survival compared to vehicle treatment, but at time-matched intervals post-transplant, neutrophil, CD8+, and CD4+ T cell infiltration was indistinguishable. While proliferation of donor-reactive naïve T cells was unaffected by CXCR3 antagonism, the frequency of IFN-γ-producing cells in the recipient spleen was significantly reduced by AMG1237845 treatment. CXCR3 blockade for 30 days synergized with short-term, low-dose anti-CD154 mAb to prolong survival past 50 days in 75% of grafts and past 80 days in 25% of the cases. Conclusions These results indicate that in synergy with co-stimulation blockade, CXCR3 is a viable therapeutic target to prevent acute graft rejection. PMID:19202440

  16. Adoptive transfer of DNT cells induces long-term cardiac allograft survival and augments recipient CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhu-Xu; Lian, Dameng; Huang, Xuyan; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Hongtao; Liu, Weihua; Garcia, Bertha; Min, Wei-Ping; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2011-01-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the regulation of immune responses but whether Treg will induce tolerance in transplant recipients in the clinic remains unknown. Our previous studies have shown that TCRαβ(+)CD3(+)CD4⁻CD8⁻NK1.1⁻ (double negative, DN) T cells suppress T cell responses and prolong allograft survival in a single locus MHC-mismatched mouse model. In this study, we investigated the role of DNT cells in a more robust, fully MHC-mismatched BALB/c to C57BL/6 transplantation model, which may be more clinically relevant. Adoptive transfer of DNT cells in combination with short-term rapamycin treatment (days 1-9) induced long-term heart allograft survival (101±31 vs. 39±13 days rapamycin alone, p<0.01). Furthermore adoptive transfer DNT cells augmented CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells accumulation in transplant recipients while depletion of CD4(+) Treg cells by anti-CD25 inhibited the effect of DNT cells on long-term graft survival (48±12 days vs. 101±31 days, p<0.001). In conclusion, DNT cells combined with short-term immunosuppression can prolong allograft survival, which may be through the accumulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in the recipient. Our result suggests that allograft tolerance may require the co-existence of different type Treg cell phenotypes which are affected by current immunosuppression.

  17. Cell-Free DNA and Active Rejection in Kidney Allografts.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Roy D; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Poggio, Emilio D; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Langone, Anthony J; Sood, Puneet; Matas, Arthur J; Mehta, Shikha; Mannon, Roslyn B; Sharfuddin, Asif; Fischbach, Bernard; Narayanan, Mohanram; Jordan, Stanley C; Cohen, David; Weir, Matthew R; Hiller, David; Prasad, Preethi; Woodward, Robert N; Grskovic, Marica; Sninsky, John J; Yee, James P; Brennan, Daniel C

    2017-03-09

    Histologic analysis of the allograft biopsy specimen is the standard method used to differentiate rejection from other injury in kidney transplants. Donor-derived cell-free DNA (dd-cfDNA) is a noninvasive test of allograft injury that may enable more frequent, quantitative, and safer assessment of allograft rejection and injury status. To investigate this possibility, we prospectively collected blood specimens at scheduled intervals and at the time of clinically indicated biopsies. In 102 kidney recipients, we measured plasma levels of dd-cfDNA and correlated the levels with allograft rejection status ascertained by histology in 107 biopsy specimens. The dd-cfDNA level discriminated between biopsy specimens showing any rejection (T cell-mediated rejection or antibody-mediated rejection [ABMR]) and controls (no rejection histologically), P<0.001 (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve [AUC], 0.74; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.61 to 0.86). Positive and negative predictive values for active rejection at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 61% and 84%, respectively. The AUC for discriminating ABMR from samples without ABMR was 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.97). Positive and negative predictive values for ABMR at a cutoff of 1.0% dd-cfDNA were 44% and 96%, respectively. Median dd-cfDNA was 2.9% (ABMR), 1.2% (T cell-mediated types ≥IB), 0.2% (T cell-mediated type IA), and 0.3% in controls (P=0.05 for T cell-mediated rejection types ≥IB versus controls). Thus, dd-cfDNA may be used to assess allograft rejection and injury; dd-cfDNA levels <1% reflect the absence of active rejection (T cell-mediated type ≥IB or ABMR) and levels >1% indicate a probability of active rejection.

  18. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  19. Allograft immune response with sCR1 intervention.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-03-01

    The deposition of complement (C) components on tissues of transplanted organs may induce many proinflammatory responses. The role of such C activation in allograft rejection is uncertain. We addressed this question by inhibiting C at the level of the C3 and C5 convertases, preventing C activation and progression of its cascade, using recombinant human soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) in an unsensitized rat renal allograft model. Fully MHC disparate Lewis to DA rat renal allograft recipients given 25 mg/kg sCR1 daily, with saline-treated allograft recipients as controls (n = 15 in each group), were sacrificed from day 1 to day 5 post-transplant, and examined histopathologically, and for the deposition of C3 and C5b-9 membrane attack complex (MAC), and for the presence of leucocyte antigen markers. Treated animals demonstrated a reduction in vascular injury and cellular infiltration, coincident with reduced C deposition. Flow cytometric analysis of leucocyte subpopulations in the spleen showed a reduction in activated (CD25 positive) B and T cells in treated animals, compared to saline treated controls. The results suggest that C inhibition with sCR1, in an unsensitized model of allograft rejection, was able to suppress the vascular and cell mediated components of tissue injury. The data support not only a role for C in antibody and possibly cell mediated cytotoxicity in the graft, but also suggest a role in the primary immune response leading to both T cell and B cell activation.

  20. Studies on the antigenicity of bone. I. Freeze-dried and deep-frozen bone allografts in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, G E; Strong, D M; Sell, K W

    1976-09-01

    The antigenicity of deep-frozen and freeze-dried cortical and corticocancellous bone allografts placed orthotopically in rabbits was studied using a sensitive microcytotoxicity assay. Target cells were phytohemagglutinin-P-stimulated, 51chromium-labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes from the bone donors (Dutch belted rabbits), and sera or peripheral blood lymphocytes from the graft recipients (New Zealand white rabbits) were used as effectors of cytotoxicity. Fresh allografts and deep-frozen corticocancellous bone evoked detectable humoral and cell-mediated immunity,, whereas freeze-dried cortical bone allografts failed to sensitize the recipients and were the least antigenic of the allografts examined.

  1. B Lymphocytes Differentially Influence Acute and Chronic Allograft Rejection in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    DiLillo, David J.; Griffiths, Robert; Seshan, Surya V.; Magro, Cynthia M.; Ruiz, Phillip; Coffman, Thomas M.; Tedder, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    The relative contributions of B lymphocytes and plasma cells during allograft rejection remain unclear. Therefore, the effects of B cell depletion on acute cardiac rejection, chronic renal rejection, and skin graft rejection were compared using CD20 or CD19 mAbs. Both CD20 and CD19 mAbs effectively depleted mature B cells, while CD19 mAb treatment depleted plasmablasts and some plasma cells. B cell depletion did not affect acute cardiac allograft rejection, although CD19 mAb treatment prevented allograft-specific IgG production. Strikingly, CD19 mAb treatment significantly reduced renal allograft rejection and abrogated allograft-specific IgG development, while CD20 mAb treatment did not. By contrast, B cell depletion exacerbated skin allograft rejection and augmented the proliferation of adoptively transferred alloantigen-specific CD4+ T cells, demonstrating that B cells can also negatively regulate allograft rejection. Thereby, B cells can either positively or negatively regulate allograft rejection depending on the nature of the allograft and the intensity of the rejection response. Moreover, CD19 mAb may represent a new approach for depleting both B cells and plasma cells to concomitantly impair T cell activation, inhibit the generation of new allograft-specific Abs, or reduce preexisting allograft-specific Ab levels in transplant patients. PMID:21248259

  2. Inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shears, L L; Kawaharada, N; Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Watkins, S C; Kovesdi, I; Lizonova, A; Pham, S M

    1997-01-01

    In cardiac transplantation, chronic rejection takes the form of an occlusive vasculopathy. The mechanism underlying this disorder remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role nitric oxide (NO) may play in the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Rat aortic allografts from ACI donors to Wistar Furth recipients with a strong genetic disparity in both major and minor histocompatibility antigens were used for transplantation. Allografts collected at 28 d were found to have significant increases in both inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein as well as in intimal thickness when compared with isografts. Inhibiting NO production with an iNOS inhibitor increased the intimal thickening by 57.2%, indicating that NO suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Next, we evaluated the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on iNOS expression and allograft arteriosclerosis. CsA (10 mg/kg/d) suppressed the expression of iNOS in response to balloon-induced aortic injury. Similarly, CsA inhibited iNOS expression in the aortic allografts, associated with a 65% increase in intimal thickening. Finally, we investigated the effect of adenoviral-mediated iNOS gene transfer on allograft arteriosclerosis. Transduction with iNOS using an adenoviral vector suppressed completely the development of allograft arteriosclerosis in both untreated recipients and recipients treated with CsA. These results suggest that the early immune-mediated upregulation in iNOS expression partially protects aortic allografts from the development of allograft arteriosclerosis, and that iNOS gene transfer strategies may prove useful in preventing the development of this otherwise untreatable disease process. PMID:9329968

  3. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  4. Allograft vasculopathy after allogeneic vascularized knee transplantation.

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, Michael; Nerlich, Andreas; Schneeberger, Stefan; Wagner, Frithjof; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2011-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation represents a new discipline in reconstructive surgery. Over the past 10 years, we have performed six human vascularized allogeneic knee transplantations. All of these grafts have been lost within the first 56 months. A histomorphologic assessment of the latest case resulted in the detection of diffuse concentric fibrous intimal thickening and occlusion of graft vessels. Findings are comparable with cardiac allograft vasculopathy. The lack of adequate tools for monitoring graft rejection might have allowed multiple untreated episodes of acute rejection, triggering myointimal proliferation and occlusion of graft vessels. Graft vasculopathy represents an obstacle to long-term vascularized bone and joint allograft survival, and adequate tools for monitoring need to be developed.

  5. Knockdown of toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathways ameliorate bone graft rejection in a mouse model of allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Shen, Po-Chuan; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming; Wu, Chao-Liang; Shiau, Ai-Li; Wang, Chrong-Reen; Chong, Hao-Earn; Chuang, Shu-Han; Peng, Jia-Shiou; Chen, Shih-Yao

    2017-01-01

    Non-union occurring in structural bone grafting is a major problem in allograft transplantation because of impaired interaction between the host and graft tissue. Activated toll-like receptor (TLR) induces inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and triggers cell-mediated immune responses. The TLR-mediated signal pathway is important for mediating allograft rejection. We evaluated the effects of local knockdown of the TLR4 signaling pathway in a mouse segmental femoral graft model. Allografts were coated with freeze-dried lentiviral vectors that encoded TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), which were individually transplanted into the mice. They were assessed morphologically, radiographically, and histologically for tissue remodeling. Union occurred in autografted but not in allografted mice at the graft and host junctions after 4 weeks. TLR4 and MyD88 expression was up-regulated in allografted mice. TLR4 and MyD88 shRNAs inhibited TLR4 and MyD88 expression, which led to better union in the grafted sites. More regulatory T-cells in the draining lymph nodes suggested inflammation suppression. Local inhibition of TLR4 and MyD88 might reduce immune responses and ameliorate allograft rejection. PMID:28393847

  6. Bidirectional ventricular tachycardia due to coronary allograft vasculopathy a unique presentation.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sanjeev P; Clyne, Christopher A

    2012-10-01

    Bidirectional ventricular tachycardia (BVT) is an uncommon type of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PVT) with alternating polarity of the QRS complex most commonly described digitalis toxicity. Recent data has demonstrated the possible molecular basis of this electrocardiographic phenomenon. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of BVT in a patient with orthotopic cardiac transplantation and coronary allograft vasculopathy.

  7. Ageing and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Chmelar, V

    1975-01-01

    The lymphocyte transformation test with phytohemagglutinin as mitogen estimated according to the incorporation of 2-(14)C-thymidine in DNA was used as an indicator of cell-mediated reactivity in 53 healthy subjects. Three age groups were examined: up to 20 years (21 subjects), 21-40 years (10 subjects) and over 70 years (22 subjects). The responsiveness of lymphocytes decreased significantly with age. In the highest age group 12 pathologically low values were found.

  8. Adenohypophysitis in rat pituitary allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rotondo, Fabio; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Asa, Sylvia L; Lombardero, Matilde; Berczi, Istvan; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2010-01-01

    The histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations in 81 pituitary allografts from Lewis rats transplanted beneath the renal capsule of Wistar rats were investigated. Intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts were also examined. Recipient rats were sacrificed at various time points after transplantation. Two days after transplantation, the central portion of the allografts demonstrated ischaemic necrosis. A week later, massive mononuclear cell infiltrates consisting primarily of lymphocytes and to a lesser extent, macrophages, plasma cells and granulocytes became prominent. At about three to four weeks after transplantation, the mononuclear cell infiltrate diminished; the surviving adenohypophysial cells, mainly prolactin (PRL) cells, increased in number and necrosis was replaced by connective tissue. No histological changes were noted in the intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the surviving adenohypophysial cells were mainly PRL-producing cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenohypophysial cell destruction, a spectrum of inflammatory cells and, in late phase, accumulation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. PRL cells were the prominent cell types; they increased in number. It appears that pituitary allografts are ‘foreign’ and evoke an immune response, suggesting that they may be used as an experimental animal model for morphological investigation of the development and progression of adenohypophysitis, a rare disease occurring mainly in young women often associated with pregnancy. PMID:20586813

  9. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  10. Tissue allografts and health risks.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C

    1994-01-01

    Like vascularized transplants, tissue allografts are able to transmit viral and bacterial diseases. Transmission of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and HCV (Hepatitis C virus) has been proved for sterilized, unprocessed and deep-frozen allografts. It is the prime responsibility of the tissue bank to select the donor correctly and to perform careful biological screening. However, standard screening is not enough to detect a seronegative but contaminated donor. It is necessary to quarantine the tissues until complementary screening confirms the absence of viral disease. If secondary screening is not possible, the tissues should be discarded or should be processed. If donor selection, relevant and appropriate screening tests and adequate procurement of tissues are carefully made, then the risk of disease transmission from tissue allografts will remain remote.

  11. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  12. Calcium oxalate deposition in renal allografts: morphologic spectrum and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Yakupoglu, Ulkem; Feig, Daniel; Hicks, John; Cartwight, Joiner; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Suki, Wadi N

    2004-08-01

    Many aspects of calcium oxalate (CaOx) deposition in renal transplant biopsies are not known. Review of all renal transplant biopsies performed in a 7-year period showed that CaOx deposition could be classified into three groups. Group I: Seven biopsies within a month post-transplant displayed rare CaOx foci against a background of acute tubular necrosis or acute cell-mediated rejection. At follow-up, five grafts functioned well and two failed due to chronic allograft nephropathy. CaOx in this context was an incidental finding secondary to a sudden excretion of an end-stage renal disease-induced increased body burden of CaOx. Group II: Two biopsies performed 2 and 10 months post-transplant showed rare CaOx foci against a background of chronic allograft nephropathy, leading to graft loss. CaOx in this context reflected nonspecific parenchymal deposition due to chronic renal failure regardless of causes. Group III: One biopsy with recurrent PH1 characterized by marked CaOx deposition associated with severe tubulointerstitial injury and graft loss 6 months post-transplant. There were two previously reported cases in which CaOx deposition in the renal allografts was due the antihypertensive drug naftidrofuryl oxalate or increased intestinal absorption of CaOx. CaOx deposition in renal allografts can be classified in different categories with distinctive morphologic features and clinical implications.

  13. Prevention of allograft tolerance by bacterial infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongmin; Chen, Luqiu; Ahmed, Emily; Ma, Lianli; Yin, Dengping; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Jikun; Xu, Honglin; Wang$, Chyung-Ru; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to certain viruses and parasites has been shown to prevent the induction of transplantation tolerance in mice, via generation of cross-reactive memory T cell responses or induction of bystander activation. Bacterial infections are common in the peri-operative period of solid organ allograft recipients in the clinic, and correlations between bacterial infections and acute allograft rejection have been reported. However, whether bacterial infections at the time of transplantation have any effect on the generation of transplantation tolerance remains to be established. We used the Gram-positive intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (LM) as a model pathogen, as its effects on immune responses are well described. Peri-operative LM infection prevented cardiac and skin allograft acceptance induced by anti-CD154 and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in mice. LM-mediated rejection was not due to the generation of cross-reactive T cells and was largely independent of signaling via MyD88, an adaptor for most toll-like receptors (TLRs), IL-1 and IL-18. Instead, transplant rejection following LM infection was dependent on the expression of the phagosome-lysing pore-former listeriolysin O (LLO) and on IFNα/βR signaling. Our results indicate that bacterial exposure at the time of transplantation can antagonize tolerogenic regimens by enhancing alloantigen-specific immune responses, independent from the generation of cross-reactive memory T cells. PMID:18424719

  14. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  15. Cardiac catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; Heart failure - ...

  16. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception.

    PubMed

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-04

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner.

  17. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  18. Osteochondral allografts in arm and forearm surgery.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; De Nayer, P; Vincent, A

    1991-01-01

    Osteochondral allografting can restore the skeletal continuity anatomically after a limb salvage procedure. Evaluation of the clinical function indicates that a good result can be anticipated. Fracture was the most frequent complication, and the fixation technique we used initially predisposed the problem. The major advantage of allograft is the possibility of reinsertion of soft tissue to help stabilize the new joint. In addition, any part of the limb can potentially be reconstructed with an allograft.

  19. ABO-compatible Liver Allograft Antibody-mediated Rejection: an update

    PubMed Central

    Demetris, Anthony J.; Zeevi, Adriana; O’Leary, Jacqueline G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) studies have lagged behind parallel efforts in kidney and heart because of a comparative inherent hepatic resistance to AMR. Three developments, however, have increased interest: 1) solid phase antibody testing enabled more precise antibody characterization; 2) increased expectations for long-term, morbidity-free survival; and 3) immunosuppression minimization trials. Recent Findings Two overlapping liver allograft AMR phenotypic expressions are beginning to emerge: acute and chronic AMR. Acute AMR usually occurs within the several weeks after transplantation and characterized clinically by DSA persistence, allograft dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and hypocomplementemia. Acute AMR appears histopathologically similar to acute AMR in other organs: diffuse microvascular endothelial cell hypertrophy, C4d deposits, neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and macrophage-mediated microvasculitis/capillaritis, along with liver-specific ductular reaction, centrilobular hepatocyte swelling and hepatocanalicular cholestasis often combined with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). Chronic AMR is less well-defined, but strongly linked to serum class II DSA and associated with late-onset acute TCMR, fibrosis, chronic rejection and decreased survival. Unlike acute AMR, chronic AMR is a slowly evolving insult with a number of potential manifestations, but most commonly appears as low-grade lymphoplasmacytic portal and perivenular inflammation accompanied by unusual fibrosis patterns and variable microvascular C4d deposition; capillaritis is more difficult to identify than in acute AMR. Summary More precise DSA characterization, increasing expectations for long-term survival, and immunosuppression weaning precipitated a re-emergence of liver allograft AMR interest. Pathophysiological similarities exist between heart, kidney, and liver allografts, but liver-specific considerations may prove critical to our ultimate understanding of all

  20. Hyperlipidemia Promotes Anti-Donor Th17 Responses That Accelerate Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, J.; Bagley, J.; Iacomini, J.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia occurs in 95% of organ transplant recipients, however its effect on organ allograft rejection has not been investigated. We found that induction of hyperlipidemia in mice caused a significant acceleration of rejection of cardiac allografts. Accelerated rejection was associated with an aggressive T cell infiltrate that mediated significant tissue damage as well as increased serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. Hyperlipidemic mice had an increased number of Th17 cells in their periphery and rejecting allografts from hyperlipidemic mice contained significant numbers of IL-17 producing T cells that were not detectable in transplants harvested from controls. Neutralization or genetic ablation of IL-17 prolonged survival of cardiac allografts transplanted into hyperlipidemic recipients, suggesting that IL-17 production promotes accelerated rejection. Analysis of alloreactive T cell frequencies directly ex vivo in naïve mice revealed that the frequency of donor reactive IL-17 producing cells in hyperlipidemic was increased prior to antigen exposure, suggesting that hyperlipidemia was sufficient to alter T cell alloreactivity and promote anti-donor Th17 responses on first exposure to antigen. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia alters rejection by altering the types of T cell subsets that respond to donor antigen by promoting Th17 biased anti-donor reactivity. PMID:26079335

  1. Precision Subtypes of T Cell-Mediated Rejection Identified by Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kadota, Paul Ostrom; Hajjiri, Zahraa; Finn, Patricia W.; Perkins, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, the treatment of choice for acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) with pulse steroids or antibody protocols has variable outcomes. Some rejection episodes are resistant to an initial steroid pulse, but respond to subsequent antibody protocols. The biological mechanisms causing the different therapeutic responses are not currently understood. Histological examination of the renal allograft is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of acute rejection. The Banff Classification System was established to standardize the histopathological diagnosis and to direct therapy. Although widely used, it shows variability among pathologists and lacks criteria to guide precision individualized therapy. The analysis of the transcriptome in allograft biopsies, which we analyzed in this study, provides a strategy to develop molecular diagnoses that would have increased diagnostic precision and assist the development of individualized treatment. Our hypothesis is that the histological classification of TCMR contains multiple subtypes of rejection. Using R language algorithms to determine statistical significance, multidimensional scaling, and hierarchical, we analyzed differential gene expression based on microarray data from biopsies classified as TCMR. Next, we identified KEGG functions, protein–protein interaction networks, gene regulatory networks, and predicted therapeutic targets using the integrated database ConsesnsusPathDB (CPDB). Based on our analysis, two distinct clusters of biopsies termed TCMR01 and TCMR02 were identified. Despite having the same Banff classification, we identified 1933 differentially expressed genes between the two clusters. These genes were further divided into three major groups: a core group contained within both the TCMR01 and TCMR02 subtypes, as well as genes unique to TCMR01 or TCMR02. The subtypes of TCMR utilized different biological pathways, different regulatory networks and were predicted to

  2. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  3. Treatment with alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone preserves calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Gualtiero; Sordi, Andrea; Lonati, Caterina; Carlin, Andrea; Turcatti, Flavia; Leonardi, Patrizia; Gatti, Stefano; Catania, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Prevention of graft dysfunction is a major objective in transplantation medicine. Previous research on experimental heart transplantation indicated that treatment with the immunomodulatory peptide alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) improves histopathology, prolongs allograft survival, and reduces expression of the main tissue injury mediators. Because calcium-handling is critical in heart graft function, we determined the effects of transplantation injury and influences of alpha-MSH treatment on representative calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart allografts. Hearts from Brown Norway rats were transplanted heterotopically into MHC incompatible Lewis rats. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C epsilon (PKC epsilon), sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2 (SERCA2a), arrestin-beta1 (Arrb1), cholinergic receptor M2 (Chrm2), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor 1 (InsP(3)R1) were examined in: (1) non-transplanted donor hearts; (2) allografts from saline-treated rats; and (3) allografts from rats treated with the synthetic alpha-MSH analog Nle4-DPhe7-alpha-MSH (NDP-alpha-MSH) (100 microg i.p. every 12h). Transplantation injury was associated with severe reduction in calcium regulatory protein transcription and expression level. NDP-alpha-MSH administration partly reversed inhibition of protein transcription and almost completely prevented protein loss. Finally, because certain effects of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling on calcium handling in cardiac myocytes depend on activation of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), we determined Epac1 mRNA and protein expression in heart allografts. Transplantation injury markedly reduced Epac1. NDP-alpha-MSH treatment significantly preserved both Epac1 protein and mRNA in the allografts. Administration of alpha-MSH or related melanocortins could reduce transplantation-induced dysfunction through protection of heart calcium

  4. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  5. Vancomycin iontophoresis of allograft bone

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, M. C.; Day, R.; Wood, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The most concerning infection of allografts and operative procedures is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and no current iontophoresed antibiotics effectively combat this microbe. It was initially hypothesised that iontophoresis of vancomycin through bone would not be effective due to its large molecular size and lack of charge. The aim of this study was to determine whether this was a viable procedure and to find the optimum conditions for its use. Methods An iontophoresis cell was set up with varying concentrations of Vancomycin within the medulla of a section of sheep tibia, sealed from an external saline solution. The cell was run for varying times, Vancomycin concentrations and voltages, to gain information on optimisation of conditions for impregnating the graft. Each graft was then sectioned and dust ground from the exposed surface. The dust was serially washed to extract the Vancomycin and concentrations measured and plotted for all variables tested. Results Vancomycin was successfully delivered and impregnated to the graft using the iontophoresis technique. The first order fit to the whole data set gave a significant result (p = 0.0233), with a significant concentration (p = 0.02774) component. The time component was the next most significant (p = 0.0597), but did not exceed the 95% confidence level. Conclusions Iontophoresis is an effective method for delivering Vancomycin to allograft bone. The concentrations of the vancomycin solution affected the bone concentration, but results were highly variable. Further study should be done on the effectiveness of delivering different antibiotics using this method. PMID:24729101

  6. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. METHODS Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. RESULTS The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. CONCLUSION There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission. PMID:25631893

  7. [Hand allograft transplantation: what are the implications?].

    PubMed

    Masquelet, Alain Charles

    2013-12-01

    The first hand allograft transplantation was performed in 1998 by a French surgeons team and has opened the era of functional allotransfers. In France, the authorized preliminary study included five patients who sustained traumatic amputation of both hands. All patients had bilateral hand allograft transplantation. Long-term results (follow-up ranging from 3 to 12 years) undoubtedly show a useful daily function, a good psychological acceptance and a physiological integration. Despite several obstacles as the need of immunosuppressive therapy for life, hand allograft transplantation is worthy of interest in some outstanding situations.

  8. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  9. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  10. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts.

  11. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stegall, Mark D.; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:26284070

  12. Bone allografts in reconstructive middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Gersdorff, M; Vilain, J; Maisin, J P; Munting, E; Delloye, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors present their current experience with stored bone grafts, using allografts shaped from the cortices of long bones for reconstructing the tympano-ossicular chain. The materials and the methods are described. The anatomical results have been good in 97% of the cases, while the functional results are as satisfactory as those obtained with bioceramics. In addition to ossiculoplasty, the bone allografts can also be used in otology for reconstructing large bony defects of the temporal bone.

  13. Bone Allografts: What Is the Risk of Disease Transmission with Bone Allografts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety of Bone Allografts Used in Dentistry: A Review. JADA September 2008 vol. 139 no. 9 1192–1199. Mellonig JT. Donor selection, testing, and inactivation of the HIV virus in freeze-dried bone allografts. Pract Periodontics Aesthet Dent 1995;7:13–22. Mellonig JT, Prewett AB, Moyer ...

  14. Signaling factors in stem cell-mediated repair of infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Vandervelde, S; van Luyn, M J A; Tio, R A; Harmsen, M C

    2005-08-01

    Myocardial infarction leads to scar formation and subsequent reduced cardiac performance. The ultimate therapy after myocardial infarction would pursue stem cell-based regeneration. The aim of stem cell-mediated cardiac repair embodies restoration of cardiac function by regeneration of healthy myocardial tissue, which is accomplished by neo-angiogenesis and cardiogenesis. A major reservoir of adult autologous stem cells distal from the heart is the bone marrow. Adequate regulation of signaling between the bone marrow, the peripheral circulation and the infarcted myocardium is important in orchestrating the process of mobilization, homing, incorporation, survival, proliferation and differentiation of stem cells, that leads to myocardial regeneration. In this review, we discuss key signaling factors, including cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, which are involved in orchestrating the stem cell driven repair process. We focus on signaling factors known for their mobilizing and chemotactic abilities (SDF-1, G-CSF, SCF, IL-8, VEGF), signaling factors that are expressed after myocardial infarction involved in the patho-physiological healing process (TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-10, HIF-1alpha, VEGF, G-CSF) and signaling factors that are involved in cardiogenesis and neo-angiogenesis (VEGF, EPO, TGF-beta, HGF, HIF-1alpha, IL-8). The future therapeutic application and capacity of secreted factors to modulate tissue repair after myocardial infarction relies on the intrinsic potency of factors and on the optimal localization and timing of a combination of signaling factors to stimulate stem cells in their niche to regenerate the infarcted heart.

  15. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  16. Bortezomib for refractory antibody-mediated cardiac allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Eckman, Peter M; Thorsgard, Marit; Maurer, David; Kim, Youngki; Alloway, Rita R; Woodle, E Steve

    2009-01-01

    This experience demonstrates that a bortezomib-based regimen provided effective therapy for late, refractory AMR in an adult heart transplant recipient and was well tolerated. This remarkably positive experience despite the refractory nature of the AMR episode argues strongly for continued evaluation of bortezomib use in this patient population.

  17. Genetics and Epigenetics of Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Samadi, Nasser; Mostafidi, Elmira; Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Chronic allograft dysfunction is the most common cause of allograft lost. Chronic allograft dysfunction happens as a result of complex interactions at the molecular and cellular levels. Genetic and environmental factors both influence the evolution and progression of the chronic allograft dysfunction. Epigenetic modification could be considered as a therapeutically modifiable element to pause the fibrosis process through novel strategies. In this review, the PubMed database was searched for English-language articles on these new areas.

  18. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  19. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  20. Bone allografts: What they can offer and what they cannot.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Druez, V; Barbier, O

    2007-05-01

    Bone allografts can be used in any kind of surgery involving bone from minor defects to major bone loss after tumour resection. This review describes the various types of bone grafts and the current knowledge on bone allografts, from procurement and preparation to implantation. The surgical conditions for optimising the incorporation of bone are outlined, and surgeon expectations from a bone allograft discussed.

  1. Renal allograft eosinophilia: An unusual presentation of sudden graft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yuvaraj, A.; Ghosh, S.; Abraham, G.; Koshy, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of sudden allograft dysfunction 11 months after renal transplantation which presented as severe peripheral and allograft eosinophilia and was managed as a case of an acute cellular rejection with significant interstitial graft eosinophilic infiltration. Patient had partial response to antirejection therapy and eventually ended up in a chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:28356665

  2. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  3. Donation after cardiac death in abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reich, David J; Guy, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the field of donation after cardiac death, focusing on the history, ethicolegal issues, clinical outcomes, best practices, operative techniques, and emerging strategies to optimize utilization of this resource. Donation after cardiac death is one effective way to decrease the organ shortage and has contributed the largest recent increase in abdominal organ allografts. Currently, donation after cardiac death organs confer an increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy after liver transplant and of delayed graft function after kidney transplant. As this field matures, risk factors for donation after cardiac death organ transplant will be further identified and clinical outcomes will improve as a result of protocol standardization and ongoing research.

  4. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mimics the production of the human nerve allograft product used clinically. This includes detergent decellularization , treatment with...is  on  schedule.     The  early  Milestone  to  obtain  ACURO  approval  for   animal  use  was  accomplished...months  1-­‐6):       Task  1a.    Collect,  process  ( decellularize )  and  prepare  7  cm  acellular  allografts

  5. [Heart Transplantation;Allograft and Xenograft].

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Norihide

    2017-01-01

    Prior to starting clinical cardiac allotransplantation, cardiac xenotransplantation was performed in human in 1960s. In 1964, Hardy performed cardiac transplantation using a chimpanzee heart and Bailey performed cardiac transplantation using a baboon heart to an infant with hypoplastic left heart. The use of cyclosporine has greatly improved the outcome of clinical cardiac transplantation and cardiac allotransplantation became an established treatment strategy for the patients with end-stage heart failure. Although concordant cardiac xenotransplantation from a primate to a human may be successfully performed using current immunosuppressive regimen, a primate heart is not a good candidate for cardiac xenograft due to animal light issues and its size. Therefore, many investigators have tried to extend the survival period in discordant xenograft from pig to primate, but no prolonged surviving orthotropic cardiac xenograft has been established yet. In this review, experiments of concordant and discordant cardiac xenografts which were performed by the authors were introduced.

  6. Significance of Anti-HLA Antibodies on Adult and Pediatric Heart Allograft Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Massimo; Marrari, Marilyn; Feingold, Brian; Zeevi, Adriana

    2017-01-01

    As methods for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) antibody detection have evolved and newer solid phase assays are much more sensitive, the last 15 years has seen a renewed focus on the importance of HLA antibodies in solid organ transplant rejection. However, there is still much controversy regarding the clinical significance of antibody level as depicted by the mean fluorescence intensity of a patient’s neat serum. Emerging techniques, including those that identify antibody level and function, show promise for the detection of individuals at risk of allograft rejection, determination of the effectiveness of desensitization prior to transplant, and for monitoring treatment of rejection. Here, we review current publications regarding the relevance of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in adult and pediatric heart transplantation (HT) with graft survival, development of antibody-mediated rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). The negative impact of DSA on patient and allograft survival is evident in adult and pediatric HT recipients. Many questions remain regarding the most appropriate frequency of assessment of pre- and posttransplant DSA as well as the phenotype of DSA memory vs. true de novo antibody using large multicenter adult and pediatric cohorts and state-of-the-art methodologies for DSA detection and characterization. PMID:28191005

  7. Donor dendritic cell–derived exosomes promote allograft-targeting immune response

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Divito, Sherrie J.; Shufesky, William J.; Stolz, Donna Beer; Erdos, Geza; Sullivan, Mara L.G.; Gibson, Gregory A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    The immune response against transplanted allografts is one of the most potent reactions mounted by the immune system. The acute rejection response has been attributed to donor dendritic cells (DCs), which migrate to recipient lymphoid tissues and directly activate alloreactive T cells against donor MHC molecules. Here, using a murine heart transplant model, we determined that only a small number of donor DCs reach lymphoid tissues and investigated how this limited population of donor DCs efficiently initiates the alloreactive T cell response that causes acute rejection. In our mouse model, efficient passage of donor MHC molecules to recipient conventional DCs (cDCs) was dependent on the transfer of extracellular vesicles (EVs) from donor DCs that migrated from the graft to lymphoid tissues. These EVs shared characteristics with exosomes and were internalized or remained attached to the recipient cDCs. Recipient cDCs that acquired exosomes became activated and triggered full activation of alloreactive T cells. Depletion of recipient cDCs after cardiac transplantation drastically decreased presentation of donor MHC molecules to directly alloreactive T cells and delayed graft rejection in mice. These findings support a key role for transfer of donor EVs in the generation of allograft-targeting immune responses and suggest that interrupting this process has potential to dampen the immune response to allografts. PMID:27348586

  8. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  9. Predictors and risk factors for recurrent scleroderma renal crisis in the kidney allograft: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pham, Phuong-Thu T; Pham, Phuong-Chi T; Danovitch, Gabriel M; Gritsch, H Albin; Singer, Jennifer; Wallace, William D; Hayashi, Rick; Wilkinson, Alan H

    2005-10-01

    Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) can lead to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and subsequent need for dialysis and/or renal transplantation. We review all reported cases of renal transplantations in scleroderma patients from PubMed search, present UNOS data on transplant outcomes, and identify predictors for allograft SRC. Of the five cases with recurrent SRC, all developed ESRD within a year of onset of native kidney SRC, whereas none of those who developed ESRD more than 1-2 years after the onset of SRC developed recurrence. Anemia preceded allograft SRC in two cases, pericardial effusion in one, and skin tightening in two others. UNOS data (October 1987-July 2004) documented 260 transplants performed for the renal diagnosis of scleroderma, with a 5-year graft survival rate of 56.7%. The risk for allograft SRC recurrence appears to correlate with early native renal function loss following the onset of SRC. Recurrent SRC in the allograft may be heralded by multiple clinical markers known to be predictive of severe scleroderma, including progression of diffuse skin thickening, new-onset anemia and cardiac complications.

  10. Laminins affect T cell trafficking and allograft fate.

    PubMed

    Warren, Kristi J; Iwami, Daiki; Harris, Donald G; Bromberg, Jonathan S; Burrell, Bryna E

    2014-05-01

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are integral sites for the generation of immune tolerance, migration of CD4⁺ T cells, and induction of Tregs. Despite the importance of LNs in regulation of inflammatory responses, the LN-specific factors that regulate T cell migration and the precise LN structural domains in which differentiation occurs remain undefined. Using intravital and fluorescent microscopy, we found that alloreactive T cells traffic distinctly into the tolerant LN and colocalize in exclusive regions with alloantigen-presenting cells, a process required for Treg induction. Extracellular matrix proteins, including those of the laminin family, formed regions within the LN that were permissive for colocalization of alloantigen-presenting cells, alloreactive T cells, and Tregs. We identified unique expression patterns of laminin proteins in high endothelial venule basement membranes and the cortical ridge that correlated with alloantigen-specific immunity or immune tolerance. The ratio of laminin α4 to laminin α5 was greater in domains within tolerant LNs, compared with immune LNs, and blocking laminin α4 function or inducing laminin α5 overexpression disrupted T cell and DC localization and transmigration through tolerant LNs. Furthermore, reducing α4 laminin circumvented tolerance induction and induced cardiac allograft inflammation and rejection in murine models. This work identifies laminins as potential targets for immune modulation.

  11. Mechanisms of allograft rejection of corneal endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Y.; Silverstein, A.M.; Prendergast, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    The local intraocular graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction, involving the destruction of the corneal endothelial cells of the rabbit host by sensitized donor lymphoid cells, has been used to study the mechanism of corneal allograft rejection. Pretreatment of donor cells with a specific mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-T cell antibody and complement suppresses the destructive reaction, suggesting that a cellular-immune mechanism is primarily involved. Pretreatment of donor cells with mitomycin-C completely abolishes the local GVH reaction, indicating that the effector lymphocytes must undergo mitosis within the eye before they can engage in target cell destruction. Finally, studies of the local GVH reaction in irradiated leukopenic recipients or in preinflamed rabbit eyes suggest that host leukocytes may contribute nonspecifically to enhance the destructive process. These studies show that the local ocular GVH reaction may provide a useful model for the study of the mechanisms involved in the rejection of corneal allografts.

  12. Cortical bone allografting in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O

    1999-01-01

    Ten femoral heads (six patients) with avascular necrosis were operated on using a fibular allograft. The procedure included core decompression followed by insertion of a cortical bone graft in order to relieve mechanical stresses from the overlying subchondral bone. The presence of the supporting graft should avoid an expected collapse or prevent its worsening if already present. A freeze-dried and processed cortical bone allograft was preferred to an autograft. Weightbearing was normally and fully resumed at the second postoperative month. There were three failures within the first year, four satisfactory results, in which the hip was replaced after 4 years while there are still 3 hips that have been preserved from arthroplasty in young patients after 5 years. The technique is easy and able to substantially delay an arthroplasty in an active patient.

  13. Perforations of cortical bone allografts improve their incorporation.

    PubMed

    Delloye, Christian; Simon, Patrick; Nyssen-Behets, Catherine; Banse, Xavier; Bresler, Franck; Schmitt, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    The incorporation of perforated cortical bone allografts was compared with non-perforated allografts. A 5-cm circumferential defect in the middiaphysis at the tibia was created in adult sheep. A frozen tibial allograft was implanted and fixed with a locked nail for 6 months. There was no postoperative immobilization. Group I consisted of eight sheep with non-perforated allografts, whereas Group II was comprised of 10 sheep with perforated allografts. Union was evaluated radiographically, whereas the central part of the allograft had a densitometric evaluation. Creeping substitution was assessed on microradiographs from cross-sections of the central 3 cm of graft by measurement of porosity and percentage of new and old bone area within the confines of the graft. The width of periosteal and endosteal callus also was determined. There was no statistical difference between both groups for the union score and bone density. However, the cortical bone graft porosity and the amount of new bone within the cortical bone differed significantly between the perforated allografts and the non-perforated ones. Periosteal callus was similar in both groups, whereas endosteal callus was significantly more wide and extended in the perforated allografts. Perforation of a cortical bone substantially improved the amount of newly formed bone by the host when compared with a non-perforated bone. The creation of channels seemed to increase the interface between living soft tissues of the host and the allografted bone with a resulting enhanced incorporation.

  14. Osteoarticular and Total Elbow Allograft Reconstruction With Severe Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Busfield, Benjamin T.; Khorshad, Daniel S.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Mankin, Henry J.

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarticular allograft reconstruction is an option in patients with massive periarticular elbow bone loss secondary to tumor surgery or trauma. Our consecutive series consisted of 18 patients with tumors and one patient with trauma. Reconstruction consisted of 16 hemiarticular allografts and three total elbow osteoarticular allografts; patients had a minimum followup of 2 years (mean, 9.9 years; range, 2–12 years). For patients who had hemiarticular allografts, 14 of 16 were able to return to their preoperative level of occupational function, with one patient experiencing failure of the allograft from infection. For the three patients who had total elbow allograft reconstructions, all had degenerative changes develop after surgery and two of the allografts failed. Complications occurred in six of 19 patients. Hemiarticular elbow allograft reconstruction is useful for limb salvage with massive bone loss. Total elbow allograft reconstructions have a high failure rate in the mid-term. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196394

  15. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate.

  16. Digital Reconstruction with a Nonfrozen Osteotendinous Allograft, Nerve Allografts, and Autogenous Radial Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Martin; Butrón, Patricia; Palafox, Damian; Cruz-Reyes, Angel U

    2015-08-01

    A 21-year-old man underwent amputation of his second to fifth fingers at the proximal phalanx level on the right hand. The third and fourth fingers were reconstructed with 2 toe-to-hand free transfers. The fifth digit was reconstructed with a nonfrozen osteotendinous allograft, nerve allografts, and autogenous radial free flap without immunosuppression. The patient was lost to follow-up for 19 years. He received no rehabilitation. He reported that he had experienced no adverse reactions to the materials or the graft, or infection, or fractures. No additional surgical procedures were performed. Today, the digit is functional and has acceptable aesthetic appearance. This outcome is similar to those obtained in digits reconstructed with frozen osteotendinous allografts and autologous cutaneous covers and opens the possibility for future research.

  17. MANAGEMENT OF ALLOSENSITIZED CARDIAC TRANSPLANT CANDIDATES

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Mauricio; Johnson, Maryl R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation remains the best treatment in advanced heart failure patients with a high risk of death. However, an inadequate supply of donor hearts decreases the likelihood of transplantation for many patients. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are being increasingly used as a bridge to transplant in patients who may not survive long enough to receive a heart. This expansion in VAD use has been associated with increasing rates of allosensitization in cardiac transplant candidates. Anti-HLA antibodies can be detected prior to transplantation using different techniques. Complement-dependent lymphocytotoxicity assays are widely used to measure the panel reactive antibody (PRA), and for crossmatch purposes. Newer assays using solid phase flow techniques feature improved specificity and offer detailed information concerning antibody specificities, which may lead to improvements in donor-recipient matching. Allosensitization prolongs the wait time for transplantation and increases the risk of post-transplant complications and death; therefore, decreasing anti-HLA antibodies in sensitized transplant candidates is of vital importance. Plasmapheresis, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and rituximab have been used to decrease the PRA prior to transplantation with varying degrees of success. The most significant post-transplant complications seen in allosensitized recipients are antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). AMR often manifests with severe allograft dysfunction and hemodynamic compromise. The underlying pathophysiology is not fully understood, but appears to involve complement-mediated activation of endothelial cells resulting in ischemic injury. The treatment of AMR in cardiac recipients is largely empirical, and includes high-dose corticosteroids, plasmapheresis, IVIG and rituximab. Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is characterized by diffuse concentric stenosis of allograft coronary arteries due to intimal

  18. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, H-M; Li, W; Gelman, A E; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D

    2016-04-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at nonlymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, autoantigens or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3(+) cells are present in long-term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of "tolerogenic" TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity.

  19. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hsao, Hsi-Min; Li, Wenjun; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at non-lymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, auto- or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3+ cells are present in long term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of “tolerogenic” TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity. PMID:26614734

  20. Cardiac catheterization - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - cardiac - discharge; Heart catheterization - discharge: Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization discharge; CAD - cardiac catheterization discharge; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization ...

  1. Protamine and mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, A.; Sörbo, J.; Norrby, K.

    1990-01-01

    Different doses of protamine sulphate (PS) given s.c. (at 12-h intervals) were tested for signs of non-specific toxicity measured as effect on body weight and small-gut proliferation as well as on mast-cell secretion and mast-cell-mediated mitogenesis in the mesenteric windows following i.p. injection of Compound 48/80, a potent mast cell secretagogue, in normal rats. In a non-toxic dose range, the effect of PS on mast-cell-mediated angiogenesis, effected by 48/80, was quantified as the number of vessels per mm of mesenteric window in histological sections at x 400. No intelligible dose-effect relationship was discernible between the dose of PS given and the effect on angiogenesis. Only in a tight interval, at 40 mg PS/kg but not at 20 or 60 mg PS/kg, was the angiogenesis statistically significantly suppressed. Hence, it was concluded that PS can be angiostatic but does not exert a more general angiostatic effect in the autogenous systems used. PMID:1691920

  2. Fitness of cell-mediated immunity independent of repertoire diversity.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Rebrovich, Michelle; Wettstein, Peter J; Vuk-Pavlovic, Zvezdana; Limper, Andrew H; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2007-03-01

    Fitness of cell-mediated immunity is thought to depend on TCR diversity; however, this concept has not been tested formally. We tested the concept using JH(-/-) mice that lack B cells and have TCR Vbeta diversity <1% that of wild-type mice and quasimonoclonal (QM) mice with oligoclonal B cells and TCR Vbeta diversity 7% that of wild-type mice. Despite having a TCR repertoire contracted >99% and defective lymphoid organogenesis, JH(-/-) mice rejected H-Y-incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild-type mice. JH(-/-) mice exhibited T cell priming by peptide and delayed-type hypersensitivity, although these responses were less than normal owing either to TCR repertoire contraction or defective lymphoid organogenesis. QM mice with TCR diversity contracted >90%, and normal lymphoid organs rejected H-Y incompatible skin grafts as rapidly as wild type mice and exhibited normal T cell priming and normal delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. QM mice also resisted Pneumocystis murina like wild-type mice. Thus, cell-mediated immunity can function normally despite contractions of TCR diversity >90% and possibly >99%.

  3. The use of allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Mousny, Maryline; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian

    2007-10-01

    Autograft harvesting in a growing child sometimes leads to disastrous consequences. Allograft can advantageously replace autograft in the majority of the cases. This overview presents the most frequently used allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery and discusses their benefits. Illustrative cases are presented to highlight specific indications.

  4. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail.

  5. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  6. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  7. Evaluation of C1q Status and Titer of De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies as Predictors of Allograft Survival.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, C; Gareau, A J; Pochinco, D; Gibson, I W; Ho, J; Birk, P E; Blydt-Hansen, T; Karpinski, M; Goldberg, A; Storsley, L; Rush, D N; Nickerson, P W

    2017-03-01

    De novo donor-specific antibodies (dnDSAs) that develop after renal transplantation are independent predictors of allograft loss. However, it is unknown if dnDSA C1q status or titer at the time of first detection can independently predict allograft loss. In a consecutive cohort of 508 renal transplant recipients, 70 developed dnDSAs. Histologic and clinical outcomes were correlated with the C1q assay or dnDSA titer. C1q positivity correlated with dnDSA titer (p < 0.01) and mean fluorescence intensity (p < 0.01) and was more common in class II versus class I dnDSAs (p < 0.01). C1q status correlated with tubulitis (p = 0.02) and C4d status (p = 0.03) in biopsies at the time of dnDSA development, but not T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) or antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). De novo DSA titer correlated with Banff g, i, t, ptc, C4d scores, TCMR (p < 0.01) and ABMR (p < 0.01). Post-dnDSA graft loss was observed more frequently in recipients with C1q-positve dnDSA (p < 0.01) or dnDSA titer ≥ 1:1024 (p ≤ 0.01). However, after adjustment for clinical phenotype and nonadherence in multivariate models, neither C1q status nor dnDSA titer were independently associated with allograft loss, questioning the utility of these assays at the time of dnDSA development.

  8. Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Dermal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Soares, Eduardo; Mook, William R; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Because hip arthroscopic procedures are increasing in number, complications related to the operation itself are starting to emerge. Whereas the capsule has been recognized as an important static stabilizer for the hip, it has not been until recently that surgeons have realized the importance of its preservation and restoration. Disruption of the capsule during arthroscopic procedures is a potential contributor to postoperative iatrogenic hip instability. In cases of a symptomatic deficient capsule, a capsular reconstruction is mandatory because instability may lead to detrimental chondral and labral changes. The purpose of this report was to describe our technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using dermal allograft.

  9. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    decellularized allografts tested did not perform well in this repair model. Additional evaluations and...2c  was  completed.    All   animals  were  assessed  weekly  until  termination  26  weeks  after   receiving  the...the  engrafted  nerves  were  examined  for  nerve-­‐graft  continuity.     Animals  with  a  loss  of   continuity

  10. Long-Term Study of Vascularized Free-Draining Intraperitoneal Pancreatic Segmental Allografts in Beagle Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kyriakides, George K.; Rabinovitch, Alexander; Mintz, Daniel; Olson, Les; Rapaport, Felix T.; Miller, Joshua

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the significance of immunogenetic factors on the survival of pancreatic allografts in beagle dogs. Donors and recipients were leukocyte antigen (DLA)-typed and mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC)-tested. Recipients were made diabetic by total pancreatectomy and immediately implanted intraperitoneally with a vascularized, free-draining (duct unligated) pancreatic segmental (FDPS) allograft. Two groups of dogs were studied. In group I consisting of donor-recipient littermates, recipients were immunosuppressed with prednisone and azathioprine (n = 16 dogs), or not immunosuppressed (n = 4). In group II, recipients were made specifically unresponsive by total body radiation, autologous marrow implantation, and kidney transplantation from DLA-MLC identical donors, 1 yr before FDPS transplantation from the corresponding original kidney donors. Survival of the FDPS grafts in group I was inversely related to pretransplant MLC reactivity, irrespective of DLA genotyped match between donor and recipient. Thus, immunosuppressed high MLC reactors (n = 8) rejected FDPS grafts between 7 and 14 d, whereas immunosuppressed low MLC reactors (n = 8) accepted grafts for 25 to 260+ days, and nonimmunosuppressed low MLC reactors (n = 4) accepted grafts for 9-55 d. Rejection (hyperglycemia) of FDPS grafts was sudden, permanent, and unpredictable despite weekly intravenous glucose tolerance tests with measurements of glucose disappearance rates and serum insulin responses. Nevertheless, serial in vitro cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity (CML) assays revealed increases in CML before graft rejection in low MLC reactors, and decreases in both CML and MLC responses before graft rejection in high MLC reactors. FDPS graft survival was indefinite (>6 mo) in group II dogs, despite low-grade MLC reactivity (2:4 dogs) and CML responses (4:4 dogs). Biopsies of FDPS grafts at 6 mo in normoglycemic dogs showed disappearance of exocrine tissue and coalescence of

  11. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. Methods: All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 68 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into one of the two groups (autograft and irradiated allograft groups). The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months of follow-up (ranging from 24 to 47 months), patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Results: Of these patients, 65 (autograft 33, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When the irradiated allograft group was compared to the autograft group at the 31-month follow-up by the Lachman test, the anterior drawer test (ADT), the pivot shift test, and KT-2000 arthrometer test, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the autograft group and just only 31.3% in the irradiated allograft group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%). The anterior and rotational stabilities decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), functional and subjective evaluations, and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. Besides, patients in the irradiated allograft group had a shorter operation time and a longer duration of postoperative fever. When the patients had a fever, the

  12. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects.

    PubMed

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J A; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-06-19

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects.

  13. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects

    PubMed Central

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J.A.; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects. PMID:26091097

  14. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  15. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  16. Allograft selection for distal femur through cutting contour registration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Lihui; Niu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Allograft reconstruction is an acceptable procedure for the recovery of normal anatomy after the bone tumor resection. During the past few years, several automated methods have been proposed to select the best anatomically matching allograft from the virtual donor bone bank. The surface-based automated method uses the contralateral healthy bone to obtain the normal surface shape of the diseased bone, which could achieve good matching of the defect and the selected allograft. However, the surface-based method focuses on the matching of the whole bone so that the matching of the contact surface between the allograft and the recipient bone may not be optimal. To deal with the above problem, we propose a cutting contour based method for the allograft selection. Cutting contour from the recipient bone could reflect the structural information of the defect and is seldom influenced by tumor. Thus the cutting contour can be used as the matching template to find the optimal alignment of the recipient bone and the allograft. The proposed method is validated using the data of distal femurs where bone transplantation is commonly performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method generally outperforms the surface-based method within modest extra time. Overall, our contour-based method is an effective complementary technique for allograft selection in the virtual bone bank.

  17. PDL1 is required for peripheral transplantation tolerance and protection from chronic allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Albin, Monica J; Yuan, Xueli; Yamaura, Kazuhiro; Habicht, Antje; Murayama, Takaya; Grimm, Martin; Waaga, Ana Maria; Ueno, Takuya; Padera, Robert F; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki; Shin, Tahiro; Blazar, Bruce R; Rothstein, David M; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Najafian, Nader

    2007-10-15

    The PD-1:PDL pathway plays an important role in regulating alloimmune responses but its role in transplantation tolerance is unknown. We investigated the role of PD-1:PDL costimulatory pathway in peripheral and a well established model of central transplantation tolerance. Early as well as delayed blockade of PDL1 but not PDL2 abrogated tolerance induced by CTLA4Ig in a fully MHC-mismatched cardiac allograft model. Accelerated rejection was associated with a significant increase in the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing alloreactive T cells and expansion of effector CD8(+) T cells in the periphery, and a decline in the percentage of Foxp3(+) graft infiltrating cells. Similarly, studies using PDL1/L2-deficient recipients confirmed the results with Ab blockade. Interestingly, while PDL1-deficient donor allografts were accepted by wild-type recipients treated with CTLA4Ig, the grafts developed severe chronic rejection and vasculopathy when compared with wild-type grafts. Finally, in a model of central tolerance induced by mixed allogeneic chimerism, engraftment was not abrogated by PDL1/L2 blockade. These novel data demonstrate the critical role of PDL1 for induction and maintenance of peripheral transplantation tolerance by its ability to alter the balance between pathogenic and regulatory T cells. Expression of PDL1 in donor tissue is critical for prevention of in situ graft pathology and chronic rejection.

  18. High-pressure saline washing of allografts reduces bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M Y; Salmela, P M; Vuento, R E

    2001-02-01

    60 fresh-frozen bone allografts were contaminated on the operating room floor. No bacterial growth was detected in 5 of them after contamination. The remaining 55 grafts had positive bacterial cultures and were processed with three methods: soaking in saline, soaking in antibiotic solution or washing by high-pressure saline. After high-pressure lavage, the cultures were negative in three fourths of the contaminated allografts. The corresponding figures after soaking grafts in saline and antibiotic solution were one tenth and two tenths, respectively. High-pressure saline cleansing of allografts can be recommended because it improves safety by reducing the superficial bacterial bioburden.

  19. Immunosuppression in cardiac graft rejection: A human in vitro model to study the potential use of new immunomodulatory drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Crescioli, Clara Squecco, Roberta; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Sottili, Mariangela; Gelmini, Stefania; Borgogni, Elisa; Sarchielli, Erica; Scolletta, Sabino; Francini, Fabio; Annunziato, Francesco; Vannelli, Gabriella Barbara; Serio, Mario

    2008-04-01

    CXCL10-CXCR3 axis plays a pivotal role in cardiac allograft rejection, so that targeting CXCL10 without inducing generalized immunosuppression may be of therapeutic significance in allotransplantation. Since the role of resident cells in cardiac rejection is still unclear, we aimed to establish reliable human cardiomyocyte cultures to investigate Th1 cytokine-mediated response in allograft rejection. We used human fetal cardiomyocytes (Hfcm) isolated from fetal hearts, obtained after legal abortions. Hfcm expressed specific cardiac lineage markers, specific cardiac structural proteins, typical cardiac currents and generated ventricular action potentials. Thus, Hfcm represent a reliable in vitro tool for allograft rejection research, since they resemble the features of mature cells. Hfcm secreted CXCL10 in response to IFN{gamma} and TNF{alpha}{alpha}; this effect was magnified by cytokine combination. Cytokine synergy was associated to a significant TNF{alpha}-induced up-regulation of IFN{gamma}R. The response of Hfcm to some currently used immunosuppressive drugs compared to rosiglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} agonist and Th1-mediated response inhibitor, was also evaluated. Only micophenolic acid and rosiglitazone halved CXCL10 secretion by Hfcm. Given the pivotal role of IFN{gamma}-induced chemokines in Th1-mediated allograft rejection, these preliminary results suggest that the combined effects of immunosuppressive agents and rosiglitazone could be potentially beneficial to patients receiving heart transplants.

  20. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-09-03

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P = 0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation.

  1. Allelic and Epitopic Characterization of Intra-Kidney Allograft Anti-HLA Antibodies at Allograft Nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Milongo, D; Kamar, N; Del Bello, A; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Sallusto, F; Esposito, L; Dörr, G; Blancher, A; Congy-Jolivet, N

    2017-02-01

    The reasons for the increased incidence of de novo anti-human leukocyte antibody (HLA) donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) observed after kidney allograft nephrectomy are not fully understood. One advocated mechanism suggests that at graft loss, DSAs are not detected in the serum because they are fixed on the nonfunctional transplant; removal of the kidney allows DSAs to then appear in the blood circulation. The aim of our study was to compare anti-HLA antibodies present in the serum and in the graft at the time of an allograft nephrectomy. Using solid-phase assays, anti-HLA antibodies were searched for in the sera of 17 kidney transplant patients undergoing allograft nephrectomy. No anti-HLA antibodies were detected in the graft if they were not also detected in the serum. Eleven of the 12 patients who had DSAs detected in their sera also had DSAs detected in the grafts. Epitopic analysis revealed that most anti-HLA antibodies detected in removed grafts were directed against the donor. In summary, our data show that all anti-HLA antibodies that were detected in grafts were also detected in the sera. These intragraft anti-HLA antibodies are mostly directed against the donor at an epitopic level but not always at an antigenic level.

  2. Cell-mediated immunity to soluble and particulate inhaled antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hill, J. O.; Burrell, R.

    1979-01-01

    In order to determine the influence of an antigen's physical properties on the development of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in the lung following aerosol immunization, human serum albumin (HSA) was prepared in either a soluble or a particulate form, the latter being coupled to respirable, carboxylated latex beads. Antigen was administered via an aerosol to groups of guinea-pigs, twice weekly for up to 4 weeks. Additional groups of animals served as unexposed and unconjugated latex controls. Lymphoid cells for CMI assays were isolated from the lung by bronchopulmonary lavage and from blood for use in mitogen- and antigen-induced lymphocyte transformation assays, as well as indirect macrophage migration inhibition tests. Particulate HSA-exposed animals yielded the highest numbers of free lung cells containing predominantly macrophages, with up to 33% lymphocytes. These were followed by the latex control, soluble HSA and unexposed control groups, respectively. Only the animals exposed to particulate HSA had evidence of antigen reactivation in the lung cell populations as measured by lymphocyte stimulation assays. In contrast, a response to polyclonal mitogens was found only in animals exposed to antigen in a soluble form. Data from macrophage depletion experiments suggest that the antigenicity of inhaled antigens may be due to the types and numbers of cells responding to the stimulus, and the subsequent role the alveolar macrophage may play in the modulation of cellular immunity. PMID:393444

  3. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  4. Suppression of Cell-Mediated Immunity in Experimental African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, John M.; Wallace, John H.

    1974-01-01

    Adult New Zealand white rabbits were experimentally infected with a parasitic African hemoflagellate, Trypanosoma congolense, and were subsequently tested for in vivo and in vitro aspects of cell-mediated immune function. Chronically infected rabbits were sensitized to mycobacterial protein and skin-tested with purified protein derivative; all infected animals demonstrated much milder skin-test responses to antigen than control groups. Similarly, peripheral blood lymphocyte responses in vitro to purified protein derivative and, as well, to phytohemagglutinin were markedly suppressed. Supernatant fluids of antigen-stimulated lymph node cell cultures from T. congolense-infected rabbits failed to demonstrate migration inhibitory factor activity but did possess normal levels of blastogenic factor activity. An active infection was necessary for demonstration of suppressed immune responses, and components present in infected rabbit serum were apparently not responsible for the observed abnormalities. Suppression of T-lymphocyte subpopulations may well explain the occurrence of numerous immunological aberrations arising during human and animal infections with the African trypanosomes. PMID:4854532

  5. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  6. CXCR5+ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Slight, Samantha R.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A.; Randall, Troy D.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world’s population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy. PMID:23281399

  7. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research.

  8. Mast cell mediators and peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Langer, J C; Liebman, S M; Monk, P K; Pelletier, G J

    1995-09-01

    We have previously shown that mast cell stabilization attenuates peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat. The present study investigated the mechanism of this protection. Adhesions were created in weanling rats using cecal scraping and application of 95% ethanol. Rats received specific blockers for the mast cell products histamine, serotonin (5HT), leukotriene D4, and platelet activating factor intraperitoneally 30 min before laparotomy and at the time of abdominal closure. Control animals received saline. Adhesions were assessed blindly 1 week later using a standardized scale. Adhesion formation was not affected by histamine blockade using combined mepyramine and ranitidine, 5-HT1 blockade using methysergide, 5-HT3 blockade using ondansetron, leukotriene D4 blockade using MK-571, or platelet activating factor blockade using WEB-2086. However, blockade of the 5-HT2 receptor using ketanserin resulted in significant dose-dependent attenuation of adhesions compared to saline. These data suggest that mast cells mediate peritoneal adhesion formation in the rat through release of serotonin acting on 5HT2 receptors. Further understanding of this process may lead to new strategies for the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  9. [Hand allografts: experience from Lyon team].

    PubMed

    Gazarian, A; Abrahamyan, D-O; Petruzzo, P; Kanitakis, J; Guigal, V; Garret, J; Rizzo, C; Durand, P-Y; Fredenucci, J-F; Streichenberger, T; Parmentier, H; Galewicz, T; Guillot, M; Sirigu, A; Burloux, G; Morelon, E; Braye, F; Badet, L; Martin, X; Dubernard, J-M; Eljaafari, A

    2007-10-01

    Hand allograft is a method in the stage of clinical experimentation, which is reserved in France for the treatment of bilateral traumatic amputees. This study reports the Lyon team experience, which is pioneer in this domain. Four patients (3 males and 1 female) underwent seven (one unilateral and three bilateral) hand transplantations from September 1998 to February 2007. The level of amputation was at the wrist or at the mid-forearm. Delay since hand loss ranged from 2.5 to 9 years. The surgical protocol was elaborated and planned case by case. All recipients received the same immunosuppressive treatment. Episodes of acute rejection were observed in the first 3 months after transplantation, which were easily managed after a few days increasing oral prednisone doses and applying topical immunosuppressants. Currently the patients receive the doses of immunosuppressants comparable to those in kidney-grafted patients. We have not registered any severe complication of immunosuppressive treatment up till now (7 years follow-up for the earliest graft). We performed analytical and functional clinical, as well as questionnaire evaluation of patients. The first case (unilateral graft) resulted in graft failure at 2 years due to non-compliance of the patient. The three bilateral graftees demonstrate a favorable evolution despite some immunological (hyperglycemia, serum sickness) and surgical (thrombosis, osteomyelitis, skin loss) complications, which could be managed. The middle and long-term follow-up evaluation revealed good to excellent sensorimotor recovery of 4 hands in both male recipients (4 and 7 years) with satisfactory social adaptation, higher or equal to those expected after post-traumatic replantations at the equivalent level and higher to those obtained with currently available myoelectric prosthesis. The last patient, a young female who has been grafted in February 2007, receives ongoing reeducation course and shows normal progress of functional restoration

  10. Human Split-Thickness Skin Allograft from Brain-Dead Donors

    PubMed Central

    Khodadadi, A.; Olang, O; Makhllough, A; Nozary Heshmati, B.; Azmoudeh Ardalan, F.; Tavakoli, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Looking for an appropriate skin substitute for temporary and permanent coverage of wounds remains one of the main obstacles of medical researchers. Objective: To investigate the rate of inflammation, symbiosis, and survival of grafted allograft skin from brain-dead donors (BDDs) in rabbits. Methods: After receiving negative serologic tests of BDDs, we prepared partial thickness skin grafts. They were then used in treating wounds of 5 rabbits in comparison with split-thickness skins taken from cardiac dead donors. Results: On histopathological examinations, we found no difference between the skins. All samples were separated from the baseline in 15–20 days. Conclusion: Gamma-irradiated freeze-dried human split-thickness skin taken from BDDs is safe and can be used for the treatment of deep skin burns. PMID:27721966

  11. Excellent results of cardiac surgery in patients with previous liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Filsoufi, Farzan; Rahmanian, Parwis B; Castillo, Javier G; Karlof, Eva; Schiano, Thomas D; Adams, David H

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases requiring surgical therapy in patients with prior liver transplantation are rare. Little is known about the outcome of patients with liver allograft undergoing cardiac surgery. Herein we report our experience in this patient population with an emphasis on operative outcomes and mid-term survival. Between January 1998 and December 2004, 12 patients (mean +/- standard deviation age 68 +/- 9 years, 7 [58%] male) with previous liver transplantation who underwent cardiac surgery were identified. Main outcome measures were hospital mortality, postoperative complications, allograft function, and long-term survival. There was no in-hospital mortality. Three major complications (25%) occurred, including 1 each (8%) of respiratory failure, renal failure, and biliary leakage. All complications were resolved by the time of discharge. Allograft dysfunction determined by an increase of liver function parameters was noticed in 4 (33%) and recovered before discharge. The average length of stay in intensive care unit was 72 +/- 45 hours, and the mean length of stay in hospital was 22 +/- 17 days. One- and 5-year survival was 91% +/- 8% and 67% +/- 14%, respectively. Cardiac surgery can be performed safely in liver transplant recipients with extremely low mortality and acceptable morbidities. Allograft dysfunction is a common finding, but it is transient, with early functional recovery. Five-year survival of liver recipients undergoing cardiac procedures is similar to that of the general population undergoing cardiac surgery. Our data suggest that these patients should be considered for cardiac surgery in reference centers with expertise in complex cardiac procedures and perioperative management of these highly specific patients.

  12. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David; Ha, Andrew C T; Gula, Lorne J; Chakrabarti, Santabhanu; Beanlands, Rob S B; Nery, Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Studies suggest clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in 5% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis. The principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. Data indicate that an 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic (clinically silent) cardiac involvement. An international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS recommends that patients be screened for cardiac involvement. Most studies suggest a benign prognosis for patients with clinically silent CS. Immunosuppression therapy is advocated for clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, with implantable cardioverter defibrillators, is recommended for some patients.

  13. Multifocal bacterial osteomyelitis in a renal allograft recipient following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Valson, A T; David, V G; Balaji, V; John, G T

    2014-05-01

    Non-tubercular bacterial osteomyelitis is a rare infection. We report on a renal allograft recipient with osteomyelitis complicating urosepsis, manifesting as a multifocal infection poorly responsive to appropriate antibiotics and surgical intervention and culminating in graft loss.

  14. Dysplasia Epiphysealis Hemimelica Treated with Osteochondral Allograft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Chris A.; Wolf, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH), or Trevor's disease, is a developmental disorder of the pediatric skeleton characterized by asymmetric osteochondral overgrowth. Methods We present the case of a five year old boy with a two year history of right knee pain and evidence of DEH on imaging who underwent initial arthroscopic resection of his lesion with subsequent recurrence. The patient then underwent osteochondral allograft revision surgery and was asymptomatic at two year follow-up with a congruent joint surface. Results To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a DEH lesion treated with osteochondral allograft and also the youngest reported case of osteochondral allograft placement in the literature. Conclusions Osteochondral allograft may be a viable option in DEH and other deformities of the pediatric knee. Level of Evidence Level V PMID:26361443

  15. Allorecognition by T Lymphocytes and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Jose; Paster, Joshua; Benichou, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of donor antigens by recipient T cells in secondary lymphoid organs initiates the adaptive inflammatory immune response leading to the rejection of allogeneic transplants. Allospecific T cells become activated through interaction of their T cell receptors with intact allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on donor cells (direct pathway) and/or donor peptides presented by self-MHC molecules on recipient antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (indirect pathway). In addition, recent studies show that alloreactive T cells can also be stimulated through recognition of allogeneic MHC molecules displayed on recipient APCs (MHC cross-dressing) after their transfer via cell–cell contact or through extracellular vesicles (semi-direct pathway). The specific allorecognition pathway used by T cells is dictated by intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the allograft and can influence the nature and magnitude of the alloresponse and rejection process. Consequently, various organs and tissues such as skin, cornea, and solid organ transplants are recognized differently by pro-inflammatory T cells through these distinct pathways, which may explain why these grafts are rejected in a different fashion. On the other hand, the mechanisms by which anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells (Tregs) recognize alloantigen and promote transplantation tolerance are still unclear. It is likely that thymic Tregs are activated through indirect allorecognition, while peripheral Tregs recognize alloantigens in a direct fashion. As we gain insights into the mechanisms underlying allorecognition by pro-inflammatory and Treg cells, novel strategies are being designed to prevent allograft rejection in the absence of ongoing immunosuppressive drug treatment in patients. PMID:28018349

  16. Tuberculosis in a renal allograft: a successful outcome.

    PubMed

    George, Pratish; Pawar, Basant; Calton, Nalini

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in most South-East Asian countries including India. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients and often, it is not diagnosed early, due to its innocuous clinical presentations. A high index of suspicion and proactive management in the early phase of presentation can reduce allograft nephropathy, graft nephrectomy and mortality. A patient with an unusual presentation of tuberculosis localized to the allograft and successful management with anti-tuberculosis medications is described.

  17. Treatment of allograft nonunions with recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMP).

    PubMed

    Delloye, Christian; Suratwala, Sanjeev J; Cornu, Olivier; Lee, Francis Y

    2004-12-01

    Fractures and nonunions are the main complications associated with bone allografts. Although the osteogenic role of recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins (rhBMPs) has been demonstrated in experimental models and human tibial nonunions, the results are unknown for allograft nonunions. In this study, the efficacy of rhBMPs was evaluated in nonunions of femoral allografts. The results of six allograft nonunions in five patients who underwent resection of malignant bone tumours and allograft bone transplantation were analysed one to five years following application of rhBMPs at the nonunion site. There were two osteoarticular allografts and three intercalary allografts. Of three intercalary allografts, one demonstrated nonunion at both ends. Four patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and three had additional radiation therapy. There were two allograft fracture nonunions and four nonunions at the allograft-host junction. Two allograft fracture nonunions and one nonunion at the allograft-host junction were treated with 12 mg of rhBMP-2. The remaining three nonunions were treated with 7 mg of rhBMP-7 (Osigraft). The outcome and radiological evidence of healing were evaluated at a minimal follow-up of twelve months. There was neither healing of allograft fractures nor union of allograft-host junction. There was elongation or enlargement of the callus from the host. One patient continued to develop resorption of the allograft, which led to allograft fracture. Two patients who were treated with rhBMP-7 and corticocancellous allografts developed sterile drainage. There was no tumour recurrence with the use of rhBMPs after a mean follow-up of 39+/-25 months. rhBMP's alone were not sufficient to achieve healing in allograft nonunions and fractures following wide resection including periosteum and soft tissues.

  18. Engineering nanomaterials to address cell-mediated inflammation in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Sean; Liu, Yu-Gang; Scott, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder with a pathophysiology driven by both innate and adaptive immunity and a primary cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) worldwide. Vascular inflammation and accumulation of foam cells and their products induce maturation of atheromas, or plaques, which can rupture by metalloprotease action, leading to ischemic stroke or myocardial infarction. Diverse immune cell populations participate in all stages of plaque maturation, many of which directly influence plaque stability and rupture via inflammatory mechanisms. Current clinical treatments for atherosclerosis focus on lowering serum levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using therapeutics such as statins, administration of antithrombotic drugs, and surgical intervention. Strategies that address cell-mediated inflammation are lacking, and consequently have recently become an area of considerable research focus. Nanomaterials have emerged as highly advantageous tools for these studies, as they can be engineered to target specific inflammatory cell populations, deliver therapeutics of wide-ranging solubilities and enhance analytical methods that include imaging and proteomics. Furthermore, the highly phagocytic nature of antigen presenting cells (APCs), a diverse cell population central to the initiation of immune responses and inflammation, make them particularly amenable to targeting and modulation by nanoscale particulates. Nanomaterials have therefore become essential components of vaccine formulations and treatments for inflammation-driven pathologies like autoimmunity, and present novel opportunities for immunotherapeutic treatments of CVD. Here, we review recent progress in the design and use of nanomaterials for therapeutic assessment and treatment of atherosclerosis. We will focus on promising new approaches that utilize nanomaterials for cell-specific imaging, gene therapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27135051

  19. Cell-Mediated Immunity and Its Role in Resistance to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Edward J.; Remington, Jack S.

    1977-01-01

    The recently acquired knowledge of the importance of cell-mediated immunity in many illnesses and the discovery of a variety of substances that can restore certain cell-mediated immune functions has served to focus the attention of physicians on this area of immunity. It is important for practicing physicians to have a clear understanding of current knowledge of the role of cell-mediated immunity in resistance to infection and how this arm of the immune system relates to the diagnosis and therapy of infectious diseases. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:318786

  20. [Multiple perforation in cryogenically preserved bone allografts. Comparative histological and microradiographic study of perforated and non-perforated allograft in sheep].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Babin, S R; Delloye, C; Schmitt, D

    1993-01-01

    Incorporation of massive cortical bone allografts in the human is slow and remains incomplete. Late biopsies of implanted allografts or histological studies of explanted allografts always show the partial substitution of necrotic bone by new bone from the host. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of drilling the massive deep-frozen cortical allografts in order to induce osteogenesis. Thirteen sheep were operated on and a standard segment of the proximal ulna was removed and the gap filled either by an unperforated allograft or by a perforated one. Based on histological and microradiographic examination, a complete substitution of the perforated allografts was observed but in this model no statistically significant difference was observed between perforated and unperforated allografts. Further study is needed to assess the effect of the perforations.

  1. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  2. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  3. Development of a Fresh Osteochondral Allograft Program Outside North America

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Santos, Luiz Augusto Ubirajara; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo; Croci, Alberto Tesconi; Bugbee, William Dick

    2015-01-01

    Objective To standardize and to develop a fresh osteochondral allograft protocol of procurement, processing and surgical utilization in Brazil. This study describes the steps recommended to make fresh osteochondral allografts a viable treatment option in a country without previous fresh allograft availability. Design The process involves regulatory process modification, developing and establishing procurement, and processing and surgical protocols. Results Legislation: Fresh osteochondral allografts were not feasible in Brazil until 2009 because the law prohibited preservation of fresh grafts at tissue banks. We approved an amendment that made it legal to preserve fresh grafts for 30 days from 2°C to 6°C in tissue banks. Procurement: We changed the protocol of procurement to decrease tissue contamination. All tissues were procured in an operating room. Processing: Processing of the grafts took place within 12 hours of tissue recovery. A serum-free culture media with antibiotics was developed to store the grafts. Surgeries: We have performed 8 fresh osteochondral allografts on 8 knees obtaining grafts from 5 donors. Mean preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score was 31.99 ± 13.4, improving to 81.26 ± 14.7 at an average of 24 months’ follow-up. Preoperative Knee Injury and Oseoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) score was 46.8 ± 20.9 and rose to 85.24 ± 13.9 after 24 months. Mean preoperative Merle D’Aubigne-Postel score was 8.75 ± 2.25 rising to 16.1 ± 2.59 at 24 months’ follow-up. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of fresh osteochondral allograft transplantation in South America. We believe that this experience may be of value for physicians in countries that are trying to establish an osteochondral allograft transplant program. PMID:27375837

  4. Methenamine silver staining quantitative digital histochemistry in chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Celik, A; Sakar, M; Sonmez, D; Tekis, D

    2004-12-01

    Renal function and final outcome of renal allografts have been correlated with irreversible damage. This study describes a quantitative histochemical method relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining of all renal compartments. Among 60 renal allograft biopsies from 43 patients, 15 biopsies showing pure chronic allograft nephropathy were selected to determine PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP), using image analysis with quantitative histochemistry. Of the 15 cases, 9 (60%) were grade I and 6 (40%) were grade II chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). The mean serum creatinine (sCr) value was 1.86 +/- 0.47 for allograft biopsies. The mean (+/-SD) SAP for the implantation biopsies was 10.58 +/- 1.87%, and for allograft biopsies 25.26 +/- 9.67 (P <.000). The serum creatinine (sCr) values for grade I versus II CAN were 1.63 +/- 0.24 versus 2.20 +/- 0.54 mg/dL, respectively (P=.019), and SAP values were 18.97 +/- 0.24 versus 34.7 +/- 5.89 (P=.003). There was a strong positive correlation between sCr values and SAP (P=.005; r=0.64). These findings show the PAMS approach to be a useful alternative method for reflecting damage in more than one compartment of the renal tissue. Also, the method can discriminated implantation and allograft biopsies as well as grade I and II CAN cases. The series is small for a multivariate analysis of the value of SAP measurements in PAMS-stained sections as a prognosticator, but the data support its use.

  5. Transmission of infection with human allografts: essential considerations in donor screening.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Jay A; Greenwald, Melissa A; Grossi, Paolo A

    2012-09-01

    Transmission of infection via transplantation of allografts including solid organs, eyes, and tissues are uncommon but potentially life-threatening events. Donor-derived infections have been documented following organ, tissue, and ocular transplants. Each year, more than 70 000 organs, 100 000 corneas, and 2 million human tissue allografts are implanted worldwide. Single donors may provide allografts for >100 organ and tissue recipients; each allograft carries some, largely unquantifiable, risk of disease transmission. Protocols for screening of organ or tissue donors for infectious risk are nonuniform, varying with the type of allograft, national standards, and availability of screening assays. In the absence of routine, active surveillance, coupled with the common failure to recognize or report transmission events, few data are available on the incidence of allograft-associated disease transmission. Research is needed to define the optimal screening assays and the transmissibility of infection with allografts. Approaches are reviewed that may contribute to safety in allograft transplantation.

  6. Cardiac Cephalgia

    PubMed Central

    Wassef, Nancy; Ali, Ali Turab; Katsanevaki, Alexia-Zacharoula; Nishtar, Salman

    2014-01-01

    Although most of the patients presenting with ischemic heart disease have chest pains, there are other rare presenting symptoms like cardiac cephalgia. In this report, we present a case of acute coronary syndrome with an only presentation of exertional headache. It was postulated as acute presentation of coronary artery disease, due to previous history of similar presentation associated with some chest pains with previous left coronary artery stenting. We present an unusual case with cardiac cephalgia in a young patient under the age of 50 which was not reported at that age before. There are four suggested mechanisms for this cardiac presentation. PMID:28352454

  7. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  8. Significant prolongation of segmental pancreatic allograft survival in two species

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    A study was conducted to assess the suppression of segmental pancreatic allograft rejection by cyclosporine (CSA) alone in baboons and dogs, and subtotal marrow irradiation (TL1) alone and TL 1 in combination with CSA in baboons. Total pancreatectomy in the dog and primate provided a reliable diabetic model, induced an absolute deficiency of insulin and was uniformly lethal if not treated. Continuous administration of CSA in baboons resulted in modest allograft survival. As in baboons, dogs receiving CSA 25 mg/kg/d rendered moderate graft prolongation but a dose of 40 mg/kg/d resulted in significant graft survival (greater than 100 days) in 5 of 8 allograft recipients. Irradiation alone resulted in minimal baboon pancreatic allograft survival of 20 baboons receiving TL1 1,000 rad and CSA, 3 had graft survival greater than of 100 days. Of 15 baboons receiving TL1 800 rad and CSA, 6 had graft survival of greater than 100 days. In conclusion, CSA administration in dogs and TL1 in combination with CSA in baboons resulted in highly significant segmental pancreatic allograft survival.

  9. Imaging mouse lung allograft rejection with 1H MRI

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinbang; Huang, Howard J.; Wang, Xingan; Wang, Wei; Ellison, Henry; Thomen, Robert P.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Woods, Jason C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that longitudinal, non-invasive monitoring via MRI can characterize acute cellular rejection (ACR) in mouse orthotopic lung allografts. Methods Nineteen Balb/c donor to C57BL/6 recipient orthotopic left lung transplants were performed, further divided into control-Ig vs anti-CD4/anti-CD8 treated groups. A two-dimensional multi-slice gradient-echo pulse sequence synchronized with ventilation was used on a small-animal MR scanner to acquire proton images of lung at post-operative days 3, 7 and 14, just before sacrifice. Lung volume and parenchymal signal were measured, and lung compliance was calculated as volume change per pressure difference between high and low pressures. Results Normalized parenchymal signal in the control-Ig allograft increased over time, with statistical significance between day 14 and day 3 post transplantation (0.046→0.789, P < 0.05), despite large inter-mouse variations; this was consistent with histopathologic evidence of rejection. Compliance of the control-Ig allograft decreased significantly over time (0.013→0.003, P < 0.05), but remained constant in mice treated with anti-CD4/anti-CD8 antibodies. Conclusion Lung allograft rejection in individual mice can be monitored by lung parenchymal signal changes and by lung compliance through MRI. Longitudinal imaging can help us better understand the time course of individual lung allograft rejection and response to treatment. PMID:24954886

  10. T-cell alloimmunity and chronic allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Safinia, Niloufar; Afzali, Behdad; Atalar, Kerem; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I

    2010-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the standard treatment to improve both the quality of life and survival in patients with various end-stage organ diseases. The primary barrier against successful transplantation is recipient alloimmunity and the need to be maintained on immunosuppressive therapies with associated side effects. Despite such treatments in renal transplantation, after death with a functioning graft, chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) is the most common cause of late allograft loss. Recipient recognition of donor histocompatibility antigens, via direct, indirect, and semidirect pathways, is critically dependent on the antigen-presenting cell (APC) and elicits effector responses dominated by recipient T cells. In allograft rejection, the engagement of recipient and donor cells results in recruitment of T-helper (Th) cells of the Th1 and Th17 lineage to the graft. In cases in which the alloresponse is dominated by regulatory T cells (Tregs), rejection can be prevented and the allograft tolerated with minimum or no immunosuppression. Here, we review the pathways of allorecognition that underlie CAD and the T-cell effector phenotypes elicited as part of the alloresponse. Future therapies including depletion of donor-reactive lymphocytes, costimulation blockade, negative vaccination using dendritic cell subtypes, and Treg therapy are inferred from an understanding of these mechanisms of allograft rejection.

  11. Nuclear cardiac

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques. (KRM)

  12. Differential gene expression pattern in biopsies with renal allograft pyelonephritis and allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Oghumu, Steve; Nori, Uday; Bracewell, Anna; Zhang, Jianying; Bott, Cherri; Nadasdy, Gyongyi M.; Brodsky, Sergey V.; Pelletier, Ronald; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Nadasdy, Tibor; Satoskar, Anjali A.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiating acute pyelonephritis (APN) from acute rejection (AR) in renal allograft biopsies can sometimes be difficult because of overlapping clinical and histologic features, lack of positive urine cultures, and variable response to antibiotics. We wanted to study differential gene expression between AR and APN using biopsy tissue. Thirty-three biopsies were analyzed using NanoString multiplex platform and PCR (6 transplant baseline biopsies, 8 AR, 15 APN [8 culture positive, 7 culture negative], and 4 native pyelonephritis [NP]). Additional 22 biopsies were tested by PCR to validate the results. CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and IDO1 were the top differentially expressed genes, upregulated in AR. Lactoferrin (LTF) and CXCL1 were higher in APN and NP. No statistically significant difference in transcript levels was seen between culture-positive and culture-negative APN biopsies. Comparing the overall mRNA signature using Ingenuity pathway analysis, interferon-gamma emerged as the dominant upstream regulator in AR and allograft APN, but not in NP (which clustered separately). Our study suggests that chemokine pathways in graft APN may differ from NP and in fact resemble AR, due to a component of alloreactivity, resulting in variable response to antibiotic treatment. Therefore, cautious addition of steroids might help in resistant cases of graft APN. PMID:27352120

  13. Allograft Reconstruction for the Treatment of Musculoskeletal Tumors of the Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Tinao, Luis A.; Ayerza, Miguel A.; Muscolo, D. Luis; Farfalli, German L.

    2013-01-01

    In comparison with the lower extremity, there is relatively paucity literature reporting survival and clinical results of allograft reconstructions after excision of a bone tumor of the upper extremity. We analyze the survival of allograft reconstructions in the upper extremity and analyze the final functional score according to anatomical site and type of reconstruction. A consecutive series of 70 allograft reconstruction in the upper limb with a mean followup of 5 years was analyzed, 38 osteoarticular allografts, 24 allograft-prosthetic composites, and 8 intercalary allografts. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of the allografts was performed, with implant revision for any cause and amputation used as the end points. The function evaluation was performed using MSTS functional score. Sixteen patients (23%) had revision surgery for 5 factures, 2 infections, 5 allograft resorptions, and 2 local recurrences. Allograft survival at five years was 79% and 69% at ten years. In the group of patients treated with an osteoarticular allograft the articular surface survival was 90% at five years and 54% at ten years. The limb salvage rate was 98% at five and 10 years. We conclude that articular deterioration and fracture were the most frequent mode of failure in proximal humeral osteoarticular reconstructions and allograft resorption in elbow reconstructions. The best functional score was observed in the intercalary humeral allograft. PMID:23476115

  14. Cardiac cameras.

    PubMed

    Travin, Mark I

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac imaging with radiotracers plays an important role in patient evaluation, and the development of suitable imaging instruments has been crucial. While initially performed with the rectilinear scanner that slowly transmitted, in a row-by-row fashion, cardiac count distributions onto various printing media, the Anger scintillation camera allowed electronic determination of tracer energies and of the distribution of radioactive counts in 2D space. Increased sophistication of cardiac cameras and development of powerful computers to analyze, display, and quantify data has been essential to making radionuclide cardiac imaging a key component of the cardiac work-up. Newer processing algorithms and solid state cameras, fundamentally different from the Anger camera, show promise to provide higher counting efficiency and resolution, leading to better image quality, more patient comfort and potentially lower radiation exposure. While the focus has been on myocardial perfusion imaging with single-photon emission computed tomography, increased use of positron emission tomography is broadening the field to include molecular imaging of the myocardium and of the coronary vasculature. Further advances may require integrating cardiac nuclear cameras with other imaging devices, ie, hybrid imaging cameras. The goal is to image the heart and its physiological processes as accurately as possible, to prevent and cure disease processes.

  15. Cefuroxime, rifampicin and pulse lavage in decontamination of allograft bone.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M; Laitinen, M; Pirkkalainen, S; Vuento, R

    2004-03-01

    The risk of bacterial infection through allogenic bone transplantation is one of the major problems facing tissue banks. Different screening methods and decontamination procedures are being used to achieve a safe surgical result. The purpose of this study was to investigate the contamination rate in fresh frozen bone allografts after treating them with different decontamination methods. The allografts were contaminated by rubbing on the operating theatre floor for 60 min, after which they were rinsed either with sterile physiological saline, cefuroxime or rifampicin solution or they were washed with low-pressure pulse lavage of sterile physiological saline. Our findings show that low-pressure pulse lavage with sterile saline solution is very effective in removing bacteria from bone allograft, when compared with the antibiotic solutions tested.

  16. Lung transplantation: chronic allograft dysfunction and establishing immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Gracon, Adam S A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-08-01

    Despite significant medical advances since the advent of lung transplantation, improvements in long-term survival have been largely unrealized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction, in particular obliterative bronchiolitis, is the primary limiting factor. The predominant etiology of obliterative bronchiolitis involves the recipient's innate and adaptive immune response to the transplanted allograft. Current therapeutic strategies have failed to provide a definitive treatment paradigm to improve long-term outcomes. Inducing immune tolerance is an emerging therapeutic strategy that abrogates allograft rejection, avoids immunosuppression, and improves long-term graft function. The aim of this review is to discuss the key immunologic components of obliterative bronchiolitis, describe the state of establishing immune tolerance in transplantation, and highlight those strategies being evaluated in lung transplantation.

  17. Cholera toxin-induced tolerance to allografts in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuru, S; Taniguchi, M; Shinomiya, N; Fujisawa, H; Zinnaka, Y; Nomoto, K

    1987-01-01

    When C3H/HeN (C3H) mice were primed with viable C57BL/6 (B6) spleen cells and treated with cholera toxin (CT) on the same day, a profound tolerance to tumour allografts of B6 origin was induced. The tolerant state was sustained for as long as 6 weeks or more. Skin allografts of B6 were rejected by such tolerant C3H mice, although the survival times were prolonged very slightly. Generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes was reduced markedly in the tolerant mice, whereas delayed footpad reaction to B6 cells was maintained at the normal immune level or higher. There is a possibility that a T-cell subset responsible for delayed footpad reaction is resistant to CT-induced tolerance and participates in the rejection of skin allografts in tolerant mice. PMID:2438209

  18. Mechanisms of stem subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

    PubMed

    Albert, Carolyne; Frei, Hanspeter; Duncan, Clive; Fernlund, Goran

    2011-01-01

    Failure of the femoral component of total hip arthroplasty is often accompanied by bone loss that can pose a significant challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. Femoral impaction allografting has attractive potential for restoring bone stock in deficient femurs. However, there have been reports of problematic postoperative stem subsidence with this procedure. Subsidence is highly variable among patients, and there is disagreement over the mechanisms that cause it. This article reviews the various mechanisms that can contribute to subsidence in femoral impaction allografting. Variables such as graft density, cement penetration profile, use of synthetic graft substitutes, or other graft additives are discussed, as well as their potential impact on subsidence. Finally, recommendations are made for future studies aiming to reduce the risk of excessive subsidence in femoral impaction allografting.

  19. Autograft versus sterilized allograft for lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian A.; Barg, Alexej; Vavken, Patrick; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sterilized allografts may be less resistant to collapse and prone to nonunion leading to loss of correction in open wedge osteotomies. These adverse events usually occur at early time points (i.e., < 9 months postoperatively). The goal of this study was to compare sterilized allografts to autologous grafts in respect to secondary loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation after lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies. Fifty patients (22 F/ 28 M, age: 16–69 years) who had undergone 50 lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies for adult flatfoot deformity were included in this retrospective study. Cortical sterilized allografts were used in 25 patients, autologous grafts in the remaining 25. Patients’ preoperative, 6 and 12 weeks, and 6 to 9 months follow-up weight-bearing radiographs of the affected foot were analyzed by 2 blinded radiologists: on each radiograph, graft incorporation, the talo-first metatarsal angle (TFMA), the talo-navicular coverage angle (TNCA), and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) were assessed. Loss of hindfoot alignment was defined as an increase of the TFMA or the TNCA or a decrease of the CPA, each by 5°. Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for TFMA, TNCA, and CPA measurements ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. At all follow-up visits, the ratio of patients with loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation was not significantly different between the allograft and autograft group. However, loss of correction was associated with failure of graft incorporation. Compared with autografts, sterilized allografts do not increase the risk for loss of hindfoot alignment in lateral column lengthening of the calcaneus. With respect to mechanical resistance, allografts thus mean an equal and valid alternative without risk of donor site morbidities. PMID:27472719

  20. Effects of complement inhibition with soluble complement receptor-1 on vascular injury and inflammation during renal allograft rejection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pratt, J R; Hibbs, M J; Laver, A J; Smith, R A; Sacks, S H

    1996-12-01

    Complement is both an effector of the humoral immune response and a stimulator of leukocyte activation. To examine the influence of complement on the allograft response, we inhibited complement using recombinant human soluble complement receptor-1 (sCR1; TP10), in an unsensitized model of rat renal allograft rejection. Lewis to DA renal transplant recipients were treated daily with 25 mg/kg sCR1 or saline and sacrificed on days 1 to 5 after transplant. Transplanted organs were examined histologically and immunohistochemically for leukocyte subset markers and for the third component of complement, C3, and membrane attack complex deposition. A second set of recipients was followed from day 5 to day 9 to assess graft survival. sCR1-treated recipients displayed > 90% inhibition of plasma complement activity and a marked reduction in tissue C3 and membrane attack complex deposition. Inactivation of complement reduced the vascular injury such that there was almost complete sparing of vascular damage in day 5 sCR1-treated rats. There was a significant reduction in infiltrating leukocytes by day 5 after transplant, and complement inhibition delayed the time to reach a histologically defined end point of graft survival from 5 days in controls to 9 days in the sCR1-treated group. These results imply that the vascular and cell-mediated injury arises, in part, from complement activation. The partial inhibition of these injuries by sCR1 may have functional implications for strategies to inhibit allograft rejection.

  1. Influence of preformed donor-specific antibodies and C4d on early liver allograft function.

    PubMed

    Perera, M T; Silva, M A; Murphy, N; Briggs, D; Mirza, D F; Neil, D A H

    2013-12-01

    INTRODUCTION. The impact of preformed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) is incompletely understood in liver transplantation. The incidence and impact of preformed DSA on early post liver transplant were assessed and these were correlated with compliment fragment C4d on allograft biopsy. METHODS. Pretransplant serum from 41 consecutive liver transplant recipients (brain dead donors; DBD = 27 and cardiac death donors; DCD = 14) were tested for class-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and compared against donor HLA types. Liver biopsies were taken during cold storage (t-1) and post-reperfusion (t0) stained with C4d and graded for preservation-reperfusion injury (PRI). RESULTS. Of the 41 recipients, 8 (20%) had anti-HLA class I/II antibodies pretransplant, 3 (7%) were confirmed preformed DSA; classes I and II (n=1) and class I only (n=2). No biopsies showed definite evidence of antibody-mediated rejection. Graft biopsies in overall showed only mild PRI with ischemic hepatocyte C4d pattern similar in both positive and negative DSA patients. One DSA-positive (33%) compared with four DSA-negative patients (10%) had significant early graft dysfunction; severe PRI causing graft loss from primary nonfunction was seen only in DSA-negative group. Allograft biopsy of preformed DSA-positive patient demonstrated only minimal PRI; however, no identifiable cause could be attributed to graft dysfunction other than preformed DSA. CONCLUSION. Preformed DSA are present in 5-10% liver transplant recipients. There is no association between anti-HLA DSA and PRI and C4d, but preformed DSA may cause early morbidity. Larger studies on the impact of DSA with optimization of C4d techniques are required.

  2. The use of mycophenolate mofetil suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bunchman, T; Navarro, M; Broyer, M; Sherbotie, J; Chavers, B; Tönshoff, B; Birk, P; Lerner, G; Lirenman, D; Greenbaum, L; Walker, R; Zimmerhackl, L B; Blowey, D; Clark, G; Ettenger, R; Arterburn, S; Klamerus, K; Fong, A; Tang, H; Thomas, S; Ramos, E

    2001-12-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is widely used to prevent acute rejection in adults after renal, cardiac, and liver transplantation. This study investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of MMF suspension in pediatric renal allograft recipients. One hundred renal allograft recipients were enrolled into three age groups (33 patients, 3 months to <6 years; 34 patients, 6 to <12 years; 33 patients, 12 to 18 years). Patients received MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. concomitantly with cyclosporine and corticosteroids with or without antilymphocyte antibody induction. One year after transplantation, patient and graft survival (including death) were 98% and 93%, respectively. Twenty-five patients (25%) experienced a biopsy-proven (Banff grade borderline or higher) or presumptive acute rejection within the first 6 months post-transplantation. Analysis of pharmacokinetic parameters for mycophenolic acid (MPA) and mycophenolic acid glucuronide showed no clinically significant differences among the age groups. The dosing regimen of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. achieved the targeted early post-transplantation MPA 12-h area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of 27.2 microg h per ml. Adverse events had similar frequencies among the age groups (with the exception of diarrhea, leukopenia, sepsis, and anemia, which were more frequent in the <6 years age group) and led to withdrawal of MMF in about 10% of patients. Administration of MMF 600 mg/m2 b.i.d. is effective in prevention of acute rejection, provides predictable pharmacokinetics, and is associated with an acceptable safety profile in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

  3. Rare Presentations of Cytomegalovirus Infection in Renal Allograft Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ardalan, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral infection after kidney transplantation. Clinical presentations of cytomegalovirus infection range from asymptomatic infection to organ-specific involvement. Most symptomatic infections manifest as fever and cytopenia. The gastrointestinal tract is the most common site of tissue-invasive infection, often presenting as diarrhea or gastrointestinal bleeding. Gastrointestinal obstruction, perforation, thrombosis of large gastrointestinal veins, splenic artery thrombosis, and pancreatitis are rare gastrointestinal presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. Renal-allograft ureteral stricture and skin involvement are other rare presentations of cytomegalovirus infection. hemophagocytic syndrome, thrombotic microangiopathy, adrenal insufficiency, and renal allograft artery stenosis are other rare symptoms of cytomegalovirus infection. PMID:23573461

  4. Successful liver allograft inflow reconstruction with the right gastroepiploic vein.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rafael S; Cruz, Ruy J; Nacif, Lucas S; Vane, Matheus F; D'Albuquerque, Luiz A C

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is a common complication in cirrhotic patients. When portal vein thrombectomy is not a suitable option, a large collateral vessel can be used for allograft venous inflow reconstruction. We describe an unusual case of successful portal revascularization using the right gastroepiploic vein. The patient underwent a cadaveric orthotopic liver transplantation with end-to-end anastomosis of the portal vein to the right gastroepiploic vein. Six months after liver transplantation the patient is well with good liver function. The use of the right gastroepiploic vein for allograft venous reconstruction is feasible and safe, with a great advantage of avoiding the need of venous jump graft.

  5. Digital image analysis of bone allograft union in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bresler, F; Simon, P; Schmitt, D; Verhelpen, M; De Gasperi, M; Delloye, C

    1998-04-01

    We compared the reliability of computer-assisted radiographic analysis (CARA) and visual evaluation of radiographs to assess host-graft junctions. 68 host bone/allograft junctions were obtained from an ongoing study on bone allografting in sheep. At 6 months, the grafted tibias were explanted and healing of the host-graft junctions were macroscopically determined. 49 junctions were macroscopically healed, whereas 19 had not united. 51 (0.8) of the junctions were correctly classified by radiographs, while 63 (0.9) of the junctions were correctly classified by CARA (p = 0.03). These findings warrant further evaluation in a clinical setting.

  6. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes.

  7. Urinary C-X-C Motif Chemokine 10 Independently Improves the Noninvasive Diagnosis of Antibody-Mediated Kidney Allograft Rejection.

    PubMed

    Rabant, Marion; Amrouche, Lucile; Lebreton, Xavier; Aulagnon, Florence; Benon, Aurélien; Sauvaget, Virginia; Bonifay, Raja; Morin, Lise; Scemla, Anne; Delville, Marianne; Martinez, Frank; Timsit, Marc Olivier; Duong Van Huyen, Jean-Paul; Legendre, Christophe; Terzi, Fabiola; Anglicheau, Dany

    2015-11-01

    Urinary levels of C-X-C motif chemokine 9 (CXCL9) and CXCL10 can noninvasively diagnose T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) of renal allografts. However, performance of these molecules as diagnostic/prognostic markers of antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is unknown. We investigated urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels in a highly sensitized cohort of 244 renal allograft recipients (67 with preformed donor-specific antibodies [DSAs]) with 281 indication biopsy samples. We assessed the benefit of adding these biomarkers to conventional models for diagnosing/prognosing ABMR. Urinary CXCL9 and CXCL10 levels, normalized to urine creatinine (Cr) levels (CXCL9:Cr and CXCL10:Cr) or not, correlated with the extent of tubulointerstitial (i+t score; all P<0.001) and microvascular (g+ptc score; all P<0.001) inflammation. CXCL10:Cr diagnosed TCMR (area under the curve [AUC]=0.80; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.68 to 0.92; P<0.001) and ABMR (AUC=0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.82; P<0.001) with high accuracy, even in the absence of tubulointerstitial inflammation (AUC=0.70; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.79; P<0.001). Although mean fluorescence intensity of the immunodominant DSA diagnosed ABMR (AUC=0.75; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.82; P<0.001), combining urinary CXCL10:Cr with immunodominant DSA levels improved the diagnosis of ABMR (AUC=0.83; 95% CI, 0.77 to 0.89; P<0.001). At the time of ABMR, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio was independently associated with an increased risk of graft loss. In conclusion, urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio associates with tubulointerstitial and microvascular inflammation of the renal allograft. Combining the urinary CXCL10:Cr ratio with DSA monitoring significantly improves the noninvasive diagnosis of ABMR and the stratification of patients at high risk for graft loss.

  8. Allograft rejection mediated by memory T cells is resistant to regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jaeseok; Brook, Matthew O; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela; Zhang, Jidong; Ramon, Hilda E; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Wood, Kathryn J; Turka, Laurence A; Jones, Nick D

    2007-12-11

    Alloreactive memory T cells may be refractory to many of the tolerance-inducing strategies that are effective against naive T cells and thus present a significant barrier to long-term allograft survival. Because CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are critical elements of many approaches to successful induction/maintenance of transplantation tolerance, we used MHC class I and II alloreactive TCR-transgenic models to explore the ability of antigen-specific Tregs to control antigen-specific memory T cell responses. Upon coadoptive transfer into RAG-1(-/-) mice, we found that Tregs effectively suppressed the ability of naive T cells to reject skin grafts, but neither antigen-unprimed nor antigen-primed Tregs suppressed rejection by memory T cells. Interestingly, different mechanisms appeared to be active in the ability of Tregs to control naive T cell-mediated graft rejection in the class II versus class I alloreactive models. In the former case, we observed decreased early expansion of effector cells in lymphoid tissue. In contrast, in the class I model, an effect of Tregs on early proliferation and expansion was not observed. However, at a late time point, significant differences in cell numbers were seen, suggesting effects on responding T cell survival. Overall, these data indicate that the relative resistance of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) alloreactive memory T cells to regulation may mediate resistance to tolerance induction seen in hosts with preexisting alloantigen-specific immunity and further indicate the multiplicity of mechanisms by which Tregs may control alloimmune responses in vivo.

  9. Intraoperative culture positive allograft bone and subsequent postoperative infections: a retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Laura; Kulyk, Paul; Woo, Allan

    2017-01-01

    Background Obtaining intraoperative cultures of allograft bone just before use in orthopedic procedures is standard practice in many centres; however, the association between positive cultures and subsequent surgical infections is unknown. Our study had 3 goals: to determine the prevalence of positive intraoperative allograft culture and subsequent infection; to determine if, in cases of subsequent infection, organisms isolated at reoperation were the same as those cultured from the allograft at the time of the index procedure; and to assess the costs associated with performing intraoperative allograft cultures. Methods In this retrospective case series, we obtained data on patients receiving allograft bone between 2009 and 2012. Patients receiving allograft with positive cultures were reviewed to identify cases of significant infection. Organisms isolated at reoperation were compared with the allograft culture taken at the time of implantation, and we performed a cost assessment. Results Of the 996 allograft bone grafts used, 43 (4.3%) had positive intraoperative cultures and significant postoperative infections developed in 2, requiring reoperation. Antibiotics based on culture results were prescribed in 24% of cases. Organisms cultured at the time of reoperation differed from those isolated initially. The cost of performing 996 allograft cultures was $169 320. Conclusion This series suggests that rates of positive intraoperative bone allograft culture are low, and subsequent infection is rare. In cases of postoperative infection, primary allograft culture and secondary tissue cultures isolated different organisms. Costs associated with performing cultures are high. Eliminating initial culture testing could save $42 500 per year in our health region. PMID:28234217

  10. [Elbow reconstruction with massive total osteoarticular allograft: early failure due to instability].

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Dubuc, J-E; Vincent, A; Barbier, O

    2004-06-01

    Total elbow allografts were implanted for the treatment of trauma-induced bone defects in three patients between 1986 and 1990. Six allografts were implanted and finally explanted. The longest follow-up for an implanted allograft was five years. Allografts had to be removed because of nonunion in one patient and gross instability in the others. A constrained elbow prosthesis was implanted in all three patients. This short series illustrates mid-term failure to be expected with total elbow allografts, mainly due to instability. Accordingly, we no longer recommend the use of total elbow allografts alone as a salvage procedure for bony defects. If an allograft is needed, it should be implanted with a prosthesis.

  11. Local complications of massive bone allografts: an appraisal of their prevalence in 128 patients.

    PubMed

    Delloye, Christian; van Cauter, Maïté; Dufrane, Denis; Francq, Bernard G; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cornu, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Bone allografts were used in our department since twenty-five years to reconstruct segmental bone loss and our data were retrospectively reviewed to assess the complications related to the use of a bone allograft. A consecutive series of 128 patients who received a bone allograft was analyzed. The minimal follow-up was 18 months. Fracture, nonunion, infection and explantation were investigated using a multivariate analysis and logistical regression. Kaplan-Meier survival of the allograft was performed, using allograft removal as the end point. Tumour disease was excluded from this study. Patients were followed up for an average 103 months. Bone tumour occurred in 78% of the patients whereas revision arthroplasty was the cause of implantation in 15% of them. Nonunion was the most prevalent complication, occurring in 35% of the grafts. For nonunion occurrence, the type of reconstruction was found to be a significant variable, the intercalary allograft being the most exposed. Primary bone autografting at the anastomotic site was not significant to prevent nonunion. Fracture of the allograft was the second most frequent complication with a prevalence of 16.4%. The length of the allograft and an osteoarticular allograft were two significant variables in that occurrence. Infection of the allograft was present with a rate of 5.4% of patients. Explantation of failed allografts occurred in 30% of them. The duration of the frozen storage of the allograft and the donor age of the allograft were not significant on any local complication occurrence. Bone allografts are a reliable material but a high rate of local complications must be anticipated.

  12. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  13. Inhibition of the immune response to experimental fresh osteoarticular allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigo, J.J.; Schnaser, A.M.; Reynolds, H.M. Jr.; Biggart, J.M. 3d.; Leathers, M.W.; Chism, S.E.; Thorson, E.; Grotz, T.; Yang, Q.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The immune response to osteoarticular allografts is capable of destroying the cartilage--a tissue that has antigens on its cells identical to those on the bone and marrow cells. Osteoarticular allografts of the distal femur were performed in rats using various methods to attempt to temporarily inhibit the antibody response. The temporary systemic immunosuppressant regimens investigated were cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and total lymphoid irradiation. The most successful appeared to be cyclosporine A, but significant side effects were observed. To specifically inhibit the immune response in the allograft antigens without systemically inhibiting the entire immune system, passive enhancement and preadministration of donor blood were tried. Neither was as effective as coating the donor bone with biodegradable cements, a method previously found to be successful. Cyclosporine A was investigated in dogs in a preliminary study of medial compartmental knee allografts and was found to be successful in inhibiting the antibody response and in producing a more successful graft; however, some significant side effects were similarly observed.

  14. Kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Schwarzengrund.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kenta; Nishio, Haruomi; Iwatani, Yuji; Yamada, Ryo; Okawa, Takao; Yamamoto, Takumi; Murakami, Masaaki; Matsuo, Yoko; Matsuo, Ken; Tanaka, Satoshi; Mori, Kiyoshi; Mori, Noriko

    2017-03-13

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) taking immunosuppressive drugs have a 20-fold greater risk of nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection than the healthy adult population. Among KTRs, the urinary tract is the most common site of infection. However, few cases of urinary tract infection caused by NTS have been documented in KTRs, and only one in Japan. Furthermore, it frequently induces acute allograft rejection with high mortality. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Schwarzengrund (S. Schwarzengrund) is now among the more common Salmonella serovars isolated in Japan and is likely to be invasive. We present a case of a 45-year old female with vesicoureteral reflux to her transplanted kidney who developed kidney allograft pyelonephritis caused by S. Schwarzengrund. She was admitted to our hospital with fever, urodynia, lower abdominal pain, gross hematuria, and cloudy urine. Urine cultures were positive for S. Schwarzengrund. Exposure to cats, especially stray cats, were identified as the most likely source. We administered antibiotics for 4 weeks (ceftriaxone then amoxicillin, each for 2 weeks) and educated her about pet safety. She experienced no recurrence of infection or clinical kidney allograft rejection for 3 months post-treatment. NTS should be considered as a possible pathogen of urinary tract infection among KTRs, especially in cases with animal exposure or structural urologic abnormalities. When the pathogen is NTS, appropriate antibiotics and treatment periods are essential for preventing recurrence and allograft rejection after the completion of treatment.

  15. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft. PMID:27725836

  16. Recurrence of Acute Page Kidney in a Renal Transplant Allograft.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Rajan; Zayas, Carlos; Mulloy, Laura; Jagadeesan, Muralidharan

    2016-01-01

    Acute Page Kidney (APK) phenomenon is a rare cause of secondary hypertension, mediated by activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Timely intervention is of great importance to prevent any end organ damage from hypertension. We present a unique case of three episodes of APK in the same renal transplant allograft.

  17. Pulse lavage washing in decontamination of allografts improves safety.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M; Laitinen, M; Vuento, R

    2003-01-01

    We analyzed the bacterial contamination rate of 140 femoral head allografts after rinsing the allografts in different decontamination solutions. Bacterial screening methods and cleansing effect of antibiotics (cefuroxime and rifampicin) and pulse lavage were compared. Swabbing and taking small pieces of bone for culture were the screening methods used. Both methods proved to be quite unreliable. Approximately one-fourth of the results were false negative. Culturing small pieces of bone gave the most accurate and reliable results and, therefore, can be recommended as a bacterial screening method. The use of antibiotics in allograft decontamination is controversial. In prophylactic use antibiotics include risks of allergic reactions and resistant development and our results in the present study show that antibiotics do not improve the decontamination any better than low-pressure pulse lavage with sterile saline solution. Therefore, pulse lavage with sterile saline solution can be recommended for allograft decontamination. Our results demonstrate that it decreases bacterial bioburden as effectively as the antibiotics without persisting the disadvantages.

  18. Multifocal Primary Neoplasms in Kidney Allografts: Evaluation of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Keng Lim; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Del Vecchio, Sharon J.; Wood, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the fifth most common malignancy in kidney transplant recipients, with increased risk arising due to immunosuppression. De novo RCC occurrence in kidney allografts is much less common when compared with the native kidneys. Multifocal RCC in allograft kidneys is rarely described. In this report, we discuss two cases of de novo multifocal renal neoplasms in allograft kidneys. Case 1 had three distinct neoplastic lesions of >5 mm, and case 2 had four. Using the World Health Organization 2016 classification of adult renal tumours, case 1 had one clear-cell (cc) RCC (grade 3) and two papillary adenomas; all confined to the kidney. Case 2 had a nodular lesion classified as ccRCC (grade 4) with focal rhabdoid differentiation and some infiltration of renal sinus fat; a cc tubulopapillary RCC; a multilocular cystic renal neoplasm of low malignant potential; and a mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma; the last three all confined to the kidney. This is the first report of mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma in a kidney allograft. When considering multifocal RCC with discordant histology, it is likely that these represent independent tumourigenic events. PMID:28326280

  19. Kidney allograft survival in dogs treated with total lymphoid irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, R.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Lum, C.T.; Lewis, W.I.; Kim, T.H.; Slavin, S.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-02-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) is immunosuppressive and, in rodents, can induce a state where transplantation of allogenic bone marrow results in chimerism and permanent acceptance of organ allografts from the donor strain. Twelve splenectomized dogs were treated with TLI (150 rads per fraction, total dose 1950 to 3000 rads) before bilateral nephrectomy and renal allotransplantation. Eight dogs received bone marrow from the kidney donor. In 13 untreated control dogs renal allografts functioned for a mean +- (SE) of 4.7 +- 0.3 days. In the four TLI treated dogs who did not receive bone marrow the renal allografts functioned for 15 to 76 days (two dogs died with functioning grafts). In the eight TLI treated dogs who received donor bone marrow, two died immediately after transplantation, two rejected at 3 and 13 days, one died at 13 days with a functioning graft, and two have had the grafts function for longer than 500 days. Chimerism was not detected in the one dog tested. The response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to stimulation with phytohemaglutinin and in mixed lymphocyte culture was suppressed for at least one month after TLI. The results confirm the immunosuppressive effect of TLI. The absence of kidney rejection in two recipients of donor bone marrow show the potential of this approach to induce long-term immunologic unresponsiveness as to an organ allograft, but the outcome is unpredictable and further experiments are needed to define the optimal conditions for administration of TLI and bone marrow to the recipients.

  20. How to improve the incorporation of massive allografts?

    PubMed

    Delloye, C

    2003-01-01

    The incorporation of a bone graft is the result of creeping and substitutional activities that remove the original grafted bone and replace it by newly formed bone from the host cells. However, this intricate process is very limited in time and space. A bone allograft is poorly remodeled and is almost non viable even after several years of implantation. This lack of vitality accounts for the high rate of complications such as non union and fracture. One way to minimize the allograft complications is to improve its incorporation. The process of incorporation in animals and human beings is reviewed as well as the various avenues for a biologic improvement either through modulation on the host: the immune response, the inhibition of bone resorption, the use of bone morphogenetic proteins, the autogenous cell augmentation or through processing the bone allograft: bisphosphonate adsorption or bone perforations. In 2002, biologic enhancement of the incorporation is still in its infancy but will be in a near future a reality through influence on both the host and the allograft.

  1. Urine Proteomics to Detect Biomarkers for Chronic Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Luís F.; Solé-Gonzalez, Amanda; Kalko, Susana G.; Bañon-Maneus, Elisenda; Solé, Manel; Diekmann, Fritz; Gutierrez-Dalmau, Alex; Abian, Joaquin; Campistol, Josep M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite optimal immunosuppressive therapy, more than 50% of kidney transplants fail because of chronic allograft dysfunction. A noninvasive means to diagnose chronic allograft dysfunction may allow earlier interventions that could improve graft half-life. In this proof-of-concept study, we used mass spectrometry to analyze differences in the urinary polypeptide patterns of 32 patients with chronic allograft dysfunction (14 with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 18 with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection) and 18 control subjects (eight stable recipients and 10 healthy control subjects). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed good segregation of samples in groups corresponding mainly to the four biomedical conditions. Moreover, the composition of the proteome of the pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy group differed from that of the chronic active antibody-mediated rejection group, and an independent validation set confirmed these results. The 14 protein ions that best discriminated between these two groups correctly identified 100% of the patients with pure interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy and 100% of the patients with chronic active antibody-mediated rejection. In summary, this study establishes a pattern for two histologic lesions associated with distinct graft outcomes and constitutes a first step to designing a specific, noninvasive diagnostic tool for chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:19056874

  2. Composite tissue allograft extends a helping hand to transplant immunologists.

    PubMed

    Thaunat, O; Badet, L; El-Jaafari, A; Kanitakis, J; Dubernard, J-M; Morelon, E

    2006-10-01

    The first successful human hand transplantation, performed on September 1998, has translated the scope of 'composite tissue allotransplantation' from research concepts into clinical practice. Beyond microsurgical problems that have been overcome several years ago, the main obstacle that still prevents the generalization of composite tissue allotransplantation is immunologic. This review, which summarizes the evidence obtained both from experimental animal models and from the first recipients of a hand transplant, is focused on the two immunological characteristics of composite allografts that set them apart from other solid organ allografts: (i) they contain skin tissue that elicits a strong immune response; and (ii) they contain lymphoid tissues (such as bone marrow and lymph nodes) that have the potential both to attack the recipient, and also to down-modulate the host immune response and induce tolerance. While on one hand, the composite tissue allografts raise new challenges to transplant immunologists, on the other they provide answers to questions that have remained unresolved for a long time. In this sense, composite tissue allografts extend a helping hand to transplant immunologists.

  3. Therapeutic lymphangiogenesis ameliorates established acute lung allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ye; Liu, Kaifeng; Monzon-Medina, Maria E.; Padera, Robert F.; Wang, Hao; George, Gautam; Toprak, Demet; Abdelnour, Elie; D’Agostino, Emmanuel; Goldberg, Hilary J.; Perrella, Mark A.; Forteza, Rosanna Malbran; Rosas, Ivan O.; Visner, Gary; El-Chemaly, Souheil

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is the only viable option for patients suffering from otherwise incurable end-stage pulmonary diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Despite aggressive immunosuppression, acute rejection of the lung allograft occurs in over half of transplant recipients, and the factors that promote lung acceptance are poorly understood. The contribution of lymphatic vessels to transplant pathophysiology remains controversial, and data that directly address the exact roles of lymphatic vessels in lung allograft function and survival are limited. Here, we have shown that there is a marked decline in the density of lymphatic vessels, accompanied by accumulation of low-MW hyaluronan (HA) in mouse orthotopic allografts undergoing rejection. We found that stimulation of lymphangiogenesis with VEGF-C156S, a mutant form of VEGF-C with selective VEGFR-3 binding, alleviates an established rejection response and improves clearance of HA from the lung allograft. Longitudinal analysis of transbronchial biopsies from human lung transplant recipients demonstrated an association between resolution of acute lung rejection and decreased HA in the graft tissue. Taken together, these results indicate that lymphatic vessel formation after lung transplantation mediates HA drainage and suggest that treatments to stimulate lymphangiogenesis have promise for improving graft outcomes. PMID:26485284

  4. A Lifetime of Allograft Function with Kidneys from Older Donors.

    PubMed

    Rose, Caren; Schaeffner, Elke; Frei, Ulrich; Gill, Jagbir; Gill, John S

    2015-10-01

    Strategies to increase expanded criteria donor (ECD) transplantation are needed. We quantified the extent to which ECD kidneys provide recipients with a lifetime of allograft function by determining the difference between patient survival and death-censored allograft survival (graft survival). Initial analyses compared 5-year outcomes in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (European) and the United States Renal Data System. Among European recipients ≥65 years, patient survival exceeded graft survival, and ECD recipients returned to dialysis for an average of 5.2 months after transplant failure. Among United States recipients ≥60 years, graft survival exceeded patient survival. Although patient survival in elderly recipients in the United States was low (49% at 5 years), the average difference in patient survival at 10 years in elderly recipients in the United States with an ECD versus non-ECD transplant was only 7 months. The probability of patient survival with a functioning allograft at 5 years was higher with ECD transplantation within 1 year after activation to the waiting list than with delayed non-ECD transplantation ≥3 years after activation to the waiting list. Subsequent analyses demonstrated that ECD transplants do not provide a lifetime of allograft function in recipients <50 years in the United States. These findings should encourage ECD transplantation in patients ≥60 years, demonstrate that rapid ECD transplantation is superior to delayed non-ECD transplantation, and challenge the policy in the United States of allowing patients <50 years to receive an ECD transplant.

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... your risk of future heart problems, and to improve your health and quality of life. Cardiac rehabilitation programs increase ... exercise routine at home or at a local gym. You may also continue to ... health concerns. Education about nutrition, lifestyle and weight loss ...

  6. Tolerability of sirolimus: a decade of experience at a single cardiac transplant center.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Kaiser, Patricia A; Ayers, Colby R; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Ring, William Steves; Peltz, Matthias; Drazner, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    Sirolimus is used in cardiac transplant recipients to prevent rejection, progression of cardiac allograft vasculopathy, and renal dysfunction. However, sirolimus has many potential side effects and its tolerability when used outside of clinical trials is not well established. We describe a decade of experience with sirolimus in cardiac transplant recipients at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed records of all adult cardiac transplant recipients living between September 1999 and February 2010 (n = 329) and identified 67 patients (20%) who received sirolimus. The indications for sirolimus were cardiac allograft vasculopathy (67%), renal dysfunction (25%), rejection (4%), and intolerability of tacrolimus (3%). One-third of patients discontinued sirolimus at a median (25th, 75th percentiles) of 0.9 (0.2, 1.6) yr of duration. Over 70% of subjects experienced an adverse event attributed to sirolimus. Adverse events were associated with higher average sirolimus levels (9.1 ng/mL vs. 7.1 ng/mL, p = 0.004). We conclude that sirolimus is frequently used in cardiac transplant recipients (20%) and commonly causes side effects, often necessitating discontinuation. Higher average sirolimus levels were associated with adverse events, suggesting that tolerability may improve if levels are maintained within the lower end of the current therapeutic range; however, the improvement in tolerability would need to be balanced with the potential for decreased efficacy.

  7. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  8. Splenic microenvironment and self recognition as factors in allograft rejection in rats. A study using indium-111-labeled cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pollak, R.; Blanchard, J.M.; Lazda, V.A.

    1986-11-01

    Splenectomy facilitates organ allograft survival in some rat strains, and in weak donor-recipient histoincompatible pairs. We have found using a heart spleen twin graft model, using ACI rats as recipients and Lewis rats as donors, that the transplanted heart will survive in most recipients after delayed host splenectomy. The presence of a viable mass of splenic tissue will allow rejection to proceed only when the transplanted spleen is of host origin, and not when it comes from the donor (i.e., when it is allogeneic). The use of 111In-labeled cells has allowed us to show that lymphocyte traffic and trapping is markedly altered in the transplanted allogeneic spleens, when compared with control transplanted syngeneic spleens. Thus, despite the presence of the splenic ''microenvironment,'' cardiac allograft rejection does not occur in the absence of syngeneic splenic tissue. We conclude that the role of the spleen in the immune response is to facilitate the recognition of self and the acquisition of alloreactivity in weak responder rat strains and donor-recipient pairs.

  9. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4(+) TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D; McKeague, Matthew G; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-11

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4(+) or CD8(+) TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4(+) TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4(+) T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. [The influence of HX- I on rabbit thyroid allografts].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Shen, W; Tan, J; Du, C; Li, K; Huang, X

    1996-03-01

    We studied the anti-rejection effect of HX- I, a preparation of traditional Chinese herbs, on rabbit thyroid allografts. The transplantations were performed on 28 rabbits after total thyroidectomies. The grafting sites were in their pretrachial muscles. These animals were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: homografts: Group I: allografts without medication; Group II: allografts with dexamethason (0.25 mg/(kg.d) intramuscularly), and Group IV: allografts with HX-I water solution, (5g/(kg.d), peros). The medication lasted 28 days. Blood samples were drawn every week postoperatively. Serum T3 and T4 were tested by RIA. The grafts were removed for histopathological evaluation on the 28th day postoperatively. The histopathology of rejection and survival were scored and classified. On the 7th and 14th days, serum T3 and T4 levels were almost the same between groups. On the 21st and 28th days, the T3 and T4 levels were higher in Groups I and IV than those in Group II (P < 0.05). The histopathological findings were; in Group I, damaged follicles with much lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis, and 6 cases being rejected; in Group II, two deaths and three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and much lymphocytes infiltration; in Group IV, three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and four intact grafts. Our results indicate that HX-I and dexamethason both can inhibit rejection in thyroid allografts in rabbits, but dexamethason has more side effects HX-I has many components and the machanism of its early anti-rejection effect is worthy of further study.

  11. Metabolomic Profiling in Individuals with a Failing Kidney Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Biancone, Luigi; Bussolino, Stefania; Merugumala, Sai; Tezza, Sara; D’Addio, Francesca; Ben Nasr, Moufida; Valderrama-Vasquez, Alessandro; Usuelli, Vera; De Zan, Valentina; El Essawy, Basset; Venturini, Massimo; Secchi, Antonio; De Cobelli, Francesco; Lin, Alexander; Chandraker, Anil; Fiorina, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Background Alteration of certain metabolites may play a role in the pathophysiology of renal allograft disease. Methods To explore metabolomic abnormalities in individuals with a failing kidney allograft, we analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS; for ex vivo profiling of serum and urine) and two dimensional correlated spectroscopy (2D COSY; for in vivo study of the kidney graft) 40 subjects with varying degrees of chronic allograft dysfunction stratified by tertiles of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; T1, T2, T3). Ten healthy non-allograft individuals were chosen as controls. Results LC-MS/MS analysis revealed a dose-response association between GFR and serum concentration of tryptophan, glutamine, dimethylarginine isomers (asymmetric [A]DMA and symmetric [S]DMA) and short-chain acylcarnitines (C4 and C12), (test for trend: T1-T3 = p<0.05; p = 0.01; p<0.001; p = 0.01; p = 0.01; p<0.05, respectively). The same association was found between GFR and urinary levels of histidine, DOPA, dopamine, carnosine, SDMA and ADMA (test for trend: T1-T3 = p<0.05; p<0.01; p = 0.001; p<0.05; p = 0.001; p<0.001; p<0.01, respectively). In vivo 2D COSY of the kidney allograft revealed significant reduction in the parenchymal content of choline, creatine, taurine and threonine (all: p<0.05) in individuals with lower GFR levels. Conclusions We report an association between renal function and altered metabolomic profile in renal transplant individuals with different degrees of kidney graft function. PMID:28052095

  12. Stable mixed hematopoietic chimerism permits tolerance of vascularized composite allografts across a full major histocompatibility mismatch in swine.

    PubMed

    Mathes, David W; Solari, Mario G; Gazelle, Guy Scott; Butler, Peter E M; Wu, Anette; Nazzal, Adam; Nielsen, Gunnlauger P; Huang, Christene A; Sachs, David H; Lee, Wei Ping Andrew; Randolph, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that vascularized composite allografts (VCA) could be accepted in a robust model of hematopoietic chimerism by injecting allogeneic bone marrow cells (BMC) into swine fetuses. Outbred Yorkshire sows and boars were screened to ensure the absence of the major histocompatibility (MHC) allele SLA(cc) of inbred MGH miniature swine and then mated. Bone marrow harvested from an SLA(cc) swine donor was T-cell depleted and injected intravenously into the fetuses between days 50-55 of gestation. After birth, the piglets were studied with flow cytometry to detect donor cells and mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) assays to assess their response to donor. Donor-matched VCAs from SLA(cc) donors were performed on four chimeric and two nonchimeric swine. The results showed donor cell engraftment and multilineage macrochimerism after the in utero transplantation of adult BMC, and chimeric animals were unresponsive to donor antigens in vitro. Both control VCAs were rejected by 21 days and were alloreactive. Chimeric animals accepted the VCAs and never developed antidonor antibodies or alloreactivity to donor. These results confirm that the intravascular, in utero transplantation of adult BMC leads to donor cell chimerism and donor-specific tolerance of VCAs across a full MHC barrier in this animal model.

  13. Inaccuracy in selection of massive bone allograft using template comparison method.

    PubMed

    Paul, Laurent; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2008-06-01

    The use of massive bone allografts is increasing year by year and selection method remains unchanged. Superposition of patient's radiograph over allograft image and comparison of distances is the gold standard. Experiment was led to test selection procedure of a major european tissue bank. Four observers were asked to select an allograft for 10 fictive recipients. Nine allografts were provided. To simulate a perfect allograft, recipient himself was inserted in the pool of allografts (trap graft). The 10 potential bone transplants were classified in four categories (from adequate to unacceptable). In addition, observers were asked to choose the three best grafts for a given recipient. Quadratic kappa measuring agreement on classification between two observers ranged between 0.74 (substantial) and 0.47 (moderate). Trap graft was quoted by observers as adequate four times (10%) and was cited eight times (20%) among the three best matching allografts. None of the observers discovered that recipient was among allograft panel. This study demonstrates that current selection method is inaccurate for hemipelvic allograft selection. New methods should be developed and tested to assist tissue banks in bone allograft selection.

  14. Differential role for competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and intracellular cytokine staining as diagnostic tools for the assessment of intragraft cytokine profiles in rejecting and nonrejecting heart allografts.

    PubMed

    Spriewald, B M; Hara, M; Bushell, A; Jenkins, S; Morris, P J; Wood, K J

    2000-11-01

    The early and reliable diagnosis of allograft rejection is a difficult task and the assessment of cytokine expression in the grafts can be a helpful parameter. We have compared competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with intracellular cytokine staining by flow cytometry as tools to measure cytokine expression in rejecting and nonrejecting murine cardiac allografts. Both techniques gave comparable results for cytokine expression in rejecting allografts and syngeneic controls. Grafts from mice pretreated with anti-CD4 antibody and donor-specific blood transfusion showed a marked reduction in cytokine expression, as assessed by competitive RT-PCR, even though a cellular infiltrate was present in the graft. In contrast, the cytokine production measured by intracellular cytokine staining of the isolated graft-infiltrating cells was high and exceeded even that of the rejecting allografts. We conclude that intracellular cytokine staining of graft-infiltrating leukocytes by flow cytometry does not necessarily reflect accurately the cytokine milieu in the graft. This technique might therefore have a limited clinical application in contrast to competitive RT-PCR for the differentiation between graft acceptance and graft rejection.

  15. Viral Infection Induces De Novo Lesions of Coronary Allograft Vasculopathy through a Natural Killer Cell-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Jay A.; Wilkinson, Robert A.; Hirohashi, Tsutomu; Chase, Catharine M.; Colvin, Robert B.; Madsen, Joren C.; Fishman, Jay A.; Russell, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections including those due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) have been associated with accelerated cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) in clinical trials and some animal models. Evidence demonstrating a direct causal relationship between such infections and de novo formation of coronary vascular lesions is lacking. Heterotopic murine cardiac transplants were performed in a parental to F1 combination in animals lacking both T- and B-lymphocytes (RAG−/−). Coronary vasculopathy developed almost exclusively in the presence of recipient infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) but not in uninfected controls. This process was also dependent upon the presence of NK cells as depletion of NK cells abrogated the process. These data show that a viral infection in its native host, and not previously implicated in the production of CAV, can contribute to the development of advanced coronary vascular lesions in cardiac allotransplants in mice. These data also suggest that virus-induced CAV can develop via an NK-cell dependent pathway in the absence of T- and B-lymphocytes. PMID:19843029

  16. Quantitative digital histochemistry with methenamine silver staining in renal allograft biopsies excluding pure chronic allograft nephropathy cases.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, S; Sis, B; Celik, A; Tekis, D; Kavukcu, S; Bora, S; Camsari, T

    2006-03-01

    Deterioration of renal function is correlated with irreversible damage in chronic diseases. Recently we described a digital quantitative histochemistry method, relying on periodic acid methenamine silver (PAMS) staining to determine the chronic renal lesions. This index was strongly correlated with progressive deterioration of renal function in grafts with chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Herein the method has been applied to a cohort of renal allografts which were biopsied for various reasons, we sought to highlight its value to quantify chronic graft damage. Forty-four renal allograft biopsies from 37 patients with elevated serum creatinine values (SCr) underwent light microscopic image analysis (Mediscope, Dokuz Eylül University, Clinical Engineering Department, Izmir, Turkey) of the PAMS-stained area percentage (SAP). SCr was recorded at four intervals to overcome acute effects: the under SCr value before (SCr1) and after a biopsy within 3 months (SCr3), SCr at the time of the biopsy (SCr2), and the latest value (SCr4). The PAMS-SAP scores were strongly associated with increased interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy Banff scores (Kruskal-Wallis test, P = .006 and P = .003, respectively). There was a moderate positive correlation between PAMS and SCr3 (Pearson correlation test, P = .04, r = .312), and a strong positive correlation between time from transplantation to biopsy (Pearson correlation test, P < .000, r = .532). The present results show that PAMS-SAP seems to be of value to quantify renal scarring in allograft biopsies, reflecting four compartments. The strong correlation with time is noteworthy especially as a probable reflection of aging of the renal allograft.

  17. Genetic diversity predicts pathogen resistance and cell-mediated immunocompetence in house finches

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, George V; Dhondt, André A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that genetic variation within individual hosts can influence their susceptibility to pathogens. However, there have been few opportunities to experimentally test this relationship, particularly within outbred populations of non-domestic vertebrates. We performed a standardized pathogen challenge in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) to test whether multilocus heterozygosity across 12 microsatellite loci predicts resistance to a recently emerged strain of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We simultaneously tested whether the relationship between heterozygosity and pathogen susceptibility is mediated by differences in cell-mediated or humoral immunocompetence. We inoculated 40 house finches with MG under identical conditions and assayed both humoral and cell-mediated components of the immune response. Heterozygous house finches developed less severe disease when infected with MG, and they mounted stronger cell-mediated immune responses to phytohaemagglutinin. Differences in cell-mediated immunocompetence may, therefore, partly explain why more heterozygous house finches show greater resistance to MG. Overall, our results underscore the importance of multilocus heterozygosity for individual pathogen resistance and immunity. PMID:17148199

  18. Natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity is increased by a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Chan; Lai, Ching-Yi; Lin, Wen-Chuan

    2017-01-02

    This study investigated the effects of a type II arabinogalactan from Anoectochilus formosanus (AGAF) on natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and the possible underlying mechanisms. This study reported that sustained exposure to AGAF increased NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as characterized according to the cellular lactic dehydrogenase leakage from K562 leukemia cells. Additionally, antibody neutralization studies have reported that interferon (IFN)-γ, but not perforin or tumor necrosis factor-α, released by NK-92MI NK cells is crucial in enhancing cytotoxicity through an autocrine loop. In this study, AGAF was further demonstrated to induce IFN-γ expression, increasing the susceptibility to NK-92MI cell-mediated cytotoxicity through the toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, TLR4, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and nuclear factor-κB pathways. A pharmacological study revealed that Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of the signal transducers and of transcription 3 signaling are involved in IFN-γ-induced NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

  19. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  20. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  1. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  2. The use of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the reconstruction of tibial plateau fractures.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Fu, Li; Liu, Jianguo; Li, Dongsong; Qi, Xin

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the clinical behavior of deep frozen and irradiated bone allografts in the treatment of depressed tibial plateau fractures. Twenty-two patients with a tibial plateau fracture were treated with cancellous bone allografts. The bone allograft preparation process included fresh-freezing at -70 °C for 4 weeks and gamma-irradiation at 25 kGy. All of the patients were followed for 1-2 years. The clinical effects were assessed using the Rasmussen score for tibial head fractures and X-rays. Postoperatively, the average excellent and fair Rasmussen scores were 88.9%. Only one patient developed an infection, with no integration between allograft and recipient bone observed. All of the other bone allografts were incorporated successfully, and no osteoporosis or sclerosis was observed. The frozen and gamma-irradiated bone allograft is a good alternative in the treatment of tibial plateau fractures, which we have shown can integrate with the surrounding host bone.

  3. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  4. Kidney retransplantation for BK virus nephropathy with active viremia without allograft nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingbo; Danovitch, Gabriel; Pham, Phuong-Thu; Bunnapradist, Suphamai; Huang, Edmund

    2015-12-01

    BK virus nephropathy is an important cause of kidney allograft failure. Retransplantation has been successfully performed for patients with previous allograft loss due to BK virus nephropathy; however, whether allograft nephrectomy and viral clearance are required prior to retransplantation is controversial. Some recent studies have suggested that retransplantion can be successfully achieved without allograft nephrectomy if viremia is cleared prior to retransplant. The only published experience of successful retransplantation in the presence of active viremia occurred in the presence of concomitant allograft nephrectomy of the failing kidney. In this report, we describe a case of successful repeat kidney transplant in a patient with high-grade BK viremia and fulminant hepatic failure without concomitant allograft nephrectomy performed under the setting of a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant.

  5. Lipidomics comparing DCD and DBD liver allografts uncovers lysophospholipids elevated in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Casas-Ferreira, Ana M; Ma, Yun; Sen, Arundhuti; Kim, Min; Proitsi, Petroula; Shkodra, Maltina; Tena, Maria; Srinivasan, Parthi; Heaton, Nigel; Jassem, Wayel; Legido-Quigley, Cristina

    2015-12-04

    Finding specific biomarkers of liver damage in clinical evaluations could increase the pool of available organs for transplantation. Lipids are key regulators in cell necrosis and hence this study hypothesised that lipid levels could be altered in organs suffering severe ischemia. Matched pre- and post-transplant biopsies from donation after circulatory death (DCD, n = 36, mean warm ischemia time = 2 min) and donation after brain death (DBD, n = 76, warm ischemia time = none) were collected. Lipidomic discovery and multivariate analysis (MVA) were applied. Afterwards, univariate analysis and clinical associations were conducted for selected lipids differentiating between these two groups. MVA grouped DCD vs. DBD (p = 6.20 × 10(-12)) and 12 phospholipids were selected for intact lipid measurements. Two lysophosphatidylcholines, LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0), showed higher levels in DCD at pre-transplantation (q < 0.01). Lysophosphatidylcholines were associated with aspartate aminotransferase (AST) 14-day post-transplantation (q < 0.05) and were more abundant in recipients undergoing early allograft dysfunction (EAD) (p < 0.05). A receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve combining both lipid levels predicted EAD with 82% accuracy. These findings suggest that LysoPC (16:0) and LysoPC (18:0) might have a role in signalling liver tissue damage due to warm ischemia before transplantation.

  6. Modulating Wnt Signaling Pathway to Enhance Allograft Integration in Orthopedic Trauma Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    DKK1 with monoclonal antibodies will enhance allograft integration to the host bone. The proposed work in this project was designed to test this...of modulating the LRP-5/Wnt pathway with anti- Dkk1 monoclonal antibody on allograft incorporation in a rat segmental repair model using radiographical...Frozen and Freeze-Dried allografts at 4, 8 and 12 week time points for saline, anti- Sost and anti- Dkk1 using µCT scanning. Data is presented below

  7. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  8. Selection of massive bone allografts using shape-matching 3-dimensional registration

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Cartiaux, Olivier; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Massive bone allografts are used when surgery causes large segmental defects. Shape-matching is the primary criterion for selection of an allograft. The current selection method, based on 2-dimensional template comparison, is inefficient for 3-dimensional complex bones. We have analyzed a 3-dimensional (3-D) registration method to match the anatomy of the allograft with that of the recipient. Methods 3-D CT-based registration was performed to match the shapes of both bones. We used the registration to align the allograft volume onto the recipient's bone. Hemipelvic allograft selection was tested in 10 virtual recipients with a panel of 10 potential allografts, including one from the recipient himself (trap graft). 4 observers were asked to visually inspect the superposition of allograft over the recipient, to classify the allografts into 4 categories according to the matching of anatomic zones, and to select the 3 best matching allografts. The results obtained using the registration method were compared with those from a previous study on the template method. Results Using the registration method, the observers systematically detected the trap graft. Selections of the 3 best matching allografts performed using registration and template methods were different. Selection of the 3 best matching allografts was improved by the registration method. Finally, reproducibility of the selection was improved when using the registration method. Interpretation 3-D CT registration provides more useful information than the template method but the final decision lies with the surgeon, who should select the optimal allograft according to his or her own preferences and the needs of the recipient. PMID:20175643

  9. T-cell immune response cDNA 7 in allograft rejection and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Utku, Nalân; Heinemann, Thomas; Milford, Edgar L

    2007-05-01

    The membrane protein T-cell immune response cDNA 7 (TIRC7) is transiently expressed in subsets of lymphocytes following antigen stimulation. The importance of TIRC7 in immune activation is demonstrated by the effect of antibodies directed against extracellular domains of TIRC7. In vitro targeting of TIRC7 inhibits proliferation and cytokine expression in human, mouse and rat lymphocytes, and these inhibitory effects have been associated with induction of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 mRNA and protein in the presence of TIRC7 antibodies. In vivo, anti-TIRC7 antibodies prevent kidney transplant rejection in rats and heart allograft rejection in mice. Treatment with an anti-TIRC7 antibody as monotherapy or in combination with TNFalpha blockade inhibits disease progression in collagen-induced arthritis. TIRC7 expression decreases in the peripheral blood of humans who have undergone cardiac transplant prior to clinical rejection, and is therefore a promising noninvasive tool for the prediction of rejection. Thus, targeting of TIRC7 may lead to the development of specific and effective therapeutic and diagnostic approaches by unifying relevant cellular and molecular responses in T- and B-cell subsets, and represents a promising new pathway for immune regulation in transplantation and autoimmune disease.

  10. Imaging-based diagnosis of acute renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Kentrup, Dominik; Pawelski, Helga; Reuter, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best available treatment for patients with end stage renal disease. Despite the introduction of effective immunosuppressant drugs, episodes of acute allograft rejection still endanger graft survival. Since efficient treatment of acute rejection is available, rapid diagnosis of this reversible graft injury is essential. For diagnosis of rejection, invasive core needle biopsy of the graft is the “gold-standard”. However, biopsy carries the risk of significant graft injury and is not immediately feasible in patients taking anticoagulants. Therefore, a non-invasive tool assessing the whole organ for specific and fast detection of acute allograft rejection is desirable. We herein review current imaging-based state of the art approaches for non-invasive diagnostics of acute renal transplant rejection. We especially focus on new positron emission tomography-based as well as targeted ultrasound-based methods. PMID:27011915

  11. The Tips and Pitfalls of Meniscus Allograft Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Rak; Nam, Sang Wook

    2012-01-01

    When faced with an irrepairable meniscus or a patient who has had a total or subtotal meniscectomy, meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT) is the preferred modality to restore biomechanical function of the meniscus. The indications for meniscus allograft transplantation are yet to be established. However, currently, MAT has previously been indicated for symptomatic patients who have mild or early osteoarthritis, are younger than 50 years of age, and present with an Outerbridge grade II or lower. The short- to intermediate-term results confirmed noteworthy clinical improvements and consistent objective findings. On the other hand, the successful outcome would be reduced by various complications. Therefore, long-term observation required to evaluate the longevity of these results. The purpose of this article is to review the current research of concerns on the results of MAT, and to describe the technical tips and pitfalls so as to successful clinical results. PMID:22977790

  12. Creeping attachment: autogenous graft vs dermal matrix allograft.

    PubMed

    Haeri, A; Parsell, D

    2000-09-01

    For many years, free autogenous grafts have been used as a method of gaining keratinized tissue around teeth with mucogingival problems. Creeping attachment using autogenous graft material has been actively studied. In addition, biocompatible, acellular connective-tissue material has recently been used as an alternative to free gingival grafts to increase the zone of keratinization. This report presents a patient with bilateral mucogingival defects in the canine and premolar areas. The patient received an autogenous graft on one side and a dermal matrix allograft on the contralateral side. Creeping attachments were measured and compared at 3 months and 12 months after surgery. After 12 months of healing, an average of 1.23 mm of creeping attachment was measured on the free gingival graft side and 0.96 mm of creeping attachment was measured with the dermal matrix allograft.

  13. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue.

  14. Human renal allograft blood flow and early renal function.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, C B; Etheredge, E E

    1977-01-01

    Renal allograft blood flow (RBF) was measured at operation by electromagnetic flow meter and probes in 45 patients (34 cadaver donors and 11 living related donors). Mean RBF in 26 patients without acute tubular necrosis (ATN), was 412 +/- 80 ml/min and in 19 patients with ATN, 270 +/- 100 ml/min (p less than .001). Only two of 24 transplants (8%) with RBF greater than 350 ml/min had ATN; whereas, 17 of 21 transplants (81 per cent) with RBF less than 350 ml/min had ATN (p less than .001). In cadaver donor transplants, RBF did not correlate with duration of ATN, warm ischemia time, total ischemia time, pulsatile perfusion time or renal vascular resistance during perfusion. Measurement of renal allograft blood flow can predict presence or absence of postoperative ATN in 87% of patients. PMID:335986

  15. Prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts in the primate with total-lymphoid irradiation and cyclosporine

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Els, D.; Du Toit, L.B.; Weideman, A.; Davids, H.; van der Merwe, E.

    1987-09-01

    The prolongation of segmental and pancreaticoduodenal allografts (PDA) by total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and in combination with cyclosporine (CsA) was assessed in a well established total pancreatectomy, diabetic, primate transplantation model. Pancreatic transplantation was performed in 119 pancreatectomized baboons (Papio ursinus). Of a total of 109 allografts performed, 71 were segmental allografts (open duct drainage) and 38 PDA. Of 119 graft recipients, 10 received segmental pancreatic autografts. TLI and CsA administered separately to segmental allograft recipients resulted in modest allograft survival and indefinite graft survival was not observed. 8 of 17 (47%) segmental allograft recipients that received TLI and CsA had graft survival beyond 100 days, indicating highly significant pancreatic allograft survival. All long-term segmental allograft recipients were rendered normoglycemic (plasma glucose less than 8 mmol/L) by this immunosuppressive regimen. In contrast, poor results were observed in PDA recipients treated with TLI and CsA. Mean survival in 18 treated PDA recipients was 23.8 days, 8 survived longer than 20 days (44.4%), and 1 greater than 100 days (5.5%). Despite treatment, early rejection of the duodenum in PDA recipients frequently resulted in necrosis and perforation and contributed to a high morbidity and mortality. This study indicates that, in contrast to the significant prolongation of segmental allografts by TLI and CsA, poor immunosuppression was achieved by this regimen in PDA recipients and was associated with a high morbidity and mortality caused by early rejection of the duodenum.

  16. Quantitative podocyte parameters predict human native kidney and allograft half-lives

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Abhijit S.; Afshinnia, Farsad; Cibrik, Diane; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Zhang, Min; Kikuchi, Masao; Wickman, Larysa; Samaniego, Milagros; Bitzer, Markus; Wiggins, Jocelyn E.; Ojo, Akinlolu; Li, Yi; Wiggins, Roger C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Kidney function decreases with age. A potential mechanistic explanation for kidney and allograft half-life has evolved through the realization that linear reduction in glomerular podocyte density could drive progressive glomerulosclerosis to impact both native kidney and allograft half-lives. METHODS. Predictions from podometrics (quantitation of podocyte parameters) were tested using independent pathologic, functional, and outcome data for native kidneys and allografts derived from published reports and large registries. RESULTS. With age, native kidneys exponentially develop glomerulosclerosis, reduced renal function, and end-stage kidney disease, projecting a finite average kidney life span. The slope of allograft failure rate versus age parallels that of reduction in podocyte density versus age. Quantitative modeling projects allograft half-life at any donor age, and rate of podocyte detachment parallels the observed allograft loss rate. CONCLUSION. Native kidneys are designed to have a limited average life span of about 100–140 years. Allografts undergo an accelerated aging-like process that accounts for their unexpectedly short half-life (about 15 years), the observation that older donor age is associated with shorter allograft half-life, and the fact that long-term allograft survival has not substantially improved. Podometrics provides potential readouts for these processes, thereby offering new approaches for monitoring and intervention. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. PMID:27280173

  17. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  18. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  19. Retrieval of the pancreas allograft for whole-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Powelson, John A; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Burke, George W; Sageshima, Junichiro; Rogers, Jeffrey; Stratta, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Proper pancreas retrieval during multi-organ recovery is one of the cornerstones of technically successful whole-organ pancreas transplantation. With evolving surgical approaches for organ retrieval and implantation, it has become standard to procure the pancreas in conjunction with other abdominal organs without compromising either vasculature, graft quality, or transplant outcomes. This review summarizes the major steps required for proper whole-organ retrieval of the pancreas allograft with suggestions and tips whenever alternative approaches are available.

  20. About Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? Cardiac arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart ...

  1. STAT4 gene polymorphism in patients after renal allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dąbrowska-Żamojcin, Ewa; Dziedziejko, Violetta; Safranow, Krzysztof; Domański, Leszek; Słuczanowska-Głabowska, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction STAT4 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 4) is involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Some studies have suggested that STAT4 may be involved in the immune response after graft transplantation. Several polymorphisms in the STAT4 gene have been identified. The most commonly studied polymorphism in the STAT4 gene is rs7574865. In our study, we examined whether this polymorphism is associated with the early and late functions of renal allografts. Material and methods A total of 270 recipients of first renal transplants were included in the study. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the STAT4 gene were genotyped using TaqMan genotyping assays. Results There were no statistically significant associations between the STAT4 gene rs7574865 polymorphism and delayed graft function, acute rejection, chronic allograft dysfunction, post-transplant diabetes mellitus, or creatinine serum concentrations after transplantation. Conclusions Our results suggest a lack of association between the STAT4 rs7574865 SNP and kidney allograft function in the Polish population. PMID:27833442

  2. Impact of freezing on immunology and incorporation of bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Reikerås, Olav; Sigurdsen, Ulf W; Shegarfi, Hamid

    2010-09-01

    With an increasing clinical use of deep frozen allograft for bone reconstruction, it is important to understand the immunological and biological events of allograft incorporation. In this study, we have investigated the impact of deep freezing on immunology and biopotency for incorporation of bone allografts. Deep frozen bone grafts matched or mismatched for major histoscompatibilty complex (MHC) were implanted in an 8-mm segmental defect in the tibia in rats. The construct was stabilized with intramedullary nailing. The immune response was evaluated by determination of serum antibody against the grafts MHC molecules at day 1 and after 2 and 4 months. Incorporation of the graft was compared with fresh syngeneic grafts and assessed with the use of conventional radiography, biomechanical testing and measurement of bone mineral content and density after 4 months. The analyses revealed no antibody responses in the rats that received grafts from donors differing at histocompatibility loci, and at 4 months the frozen grafts showed an overall reconstruction that was not significantly different from the fresh grafts. This study indicates that in the long run there are no significant consequences; either immunological or biomechanical, of the use of deep frozen allogenous bone as compared to fresh autogenous bone grafts in this animal model.

  3. Renal allograft tuberculosis with infected lymphocele transmitted from the donor.

    PubMed

    Al-Nesf, Maryam Ali; Al-Ani, Omar Isam; Al-Ani, Ahmed Abdul-Rahman; Rashed, Awad Hamed

    2014-03-01

    Transmission of tuberculosis (TB) from a donor through renal transplantation is a rare incident. We are reporting a 53-year-old Qatari woman diagnosed with renal allograft TB infection. The disease was confirmed by isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fluid from the lymphocele and demonstration of caseating granuloma in graft biopsy with acid-fast bacilli seen on Ziehl-Neelsen staining. The diagnosis was made quite early post-transplantation. The presence of the granuloma, which is unusual with patients on intensive immunosuppressant medications, suggests that transmission of the infection occurred from the donor rather than from the activation of latent infection. In reviewing the literature, we found ten case reports of TB in transplanted kidney with transmission of TB infection from the donor. The presence of TB in lymphocele in association with the infected transplant by TB, to the best of our knowledge, was reported only once in the literature. Our case had unfavorable outcome and ended by renal allograft nephrectomy and hemodialysis. We are presenting this case of TB infection of renal allograft and lymphocele diagnosed early post-transplantation transmitted from the donor and pertinent review from the literature.

  4. Immunohistochemical Investigation of the Heart Allograft Myocardium (1991-1998).

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, Ludmila V.; Baranova, Flora S.; Khalimova, Zarema A.; Zaidenov, Vladimir A.; Kurenkova, Lubov G.; Kormer, Arkadiy Ya.; Khubutia, Anzor Sh.; Kupriyanova, Anna G.; Shumakov, Valeriy I.

    2000-04-01

    What is a contribution of the humoral (vascular) and mixed type of the rejection episodes to all the episodes of heart allograft rejection is not quite clear, though this factor is of considerable importance for the choice of the treatment methods. The hearts from recipients, as well as endomyocardial biopsies of the heart allografts and postmortem material were investigated with the aim to determine the immunopathological process. Overall, 420 samples from 80 patients were analyzed. Immunofluorescence examination of endomyocardial biopsy showed that in 8 from 44 patients with heart allograft in postoperative period for the first six weeks there were revealed the immunomorphological signs of the acute humoral rejection, manifested as fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in capillaries. Six of them exhibited rejection of mixed type. Most patients in the later postoperative period exhibited a discrete local fixation of immunoglobulins and complement in myocardium, that can be assessed as one of the compartments of the chronic rejection process. In cases of the secondary administration of serum preparations, the fixation of immune complexes was shown in sarcolemma and capillaries, and can be proposed as a sign of serum disease. Repeated acute rejection episodes of humoral or mixed types raised at the first six weeks after transplantation. In the period from 1-5 years after operation, patients displayed discrete deposits of the immunoglobulins and complement as part of the chronic rejection process.

  5. Allograft Heart Valves: Current Aspects and Future Applications.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Milan; Kalender, Guenay; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Biermann, Anna; Stock, Ulrich Alfred

    2017-02-02

    Human heart valve allografts continue to represent almost perfect substitutes for heart valves. They have optimal hemodynamic characteristics and are highly resistant to infections. The first clinical use of allograft heart valves was as homovitals being transplanted after antibiotic incubation without any preservation. Since 1968, relatively standardized frozen cryopreservation (SFC) has been employed, including storage in vapor-phase liquid nitrogen. Disadvantages, particularly in pediatric patients, are limited availability due to organ scarcity, inability to grow, degeneration, immune response, and long-term failure. However, in contrast to alternative prosthetic or bioprosthetic heart valve replacements, they represent the best pediatric and juvenile replacement options for the pulmonary valve. Application of multiphoton imaging analysis for three-dimensional visualization of elastin and collagen by induction of autofluorescence without chemical fixation, embedding, and staining has revealed partial destruction of elastic and collagenous matrix in SFC valves. As the overall amount of collagen and elastin remains unchanged, the observed destruction is attributed to freezing-induced extracellular matrix damages due to ice crystal formation during SFC. The objective of this review is an assessment of current allograft preservation methods and the potential of novel preservation techniques to avoid ice formation with accompanied better long-term function.

  6. Gr-1intCD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells accumulate in corneal allograft and improve corneal allograft survival.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wungrak; Ji, Yong Woo; Ham, Hwa-Yong; Yeo, Areum; Noh, Hyemi; Jin, Su-Eon; Song, Jong Suk; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kim, Eung Kwon; Lee, Hyung Keun

    2016-12-01

    We identified the characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and investigated their mechanism of induction and their functional role in allograft rejection using a murine corneal allograft model. In mice, MDSCs coexpress CD11b and myeloid differentiation antigen Gr-1. Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells infiltrated allografted corneas between 4 d and 4 wk after surgery; however, the frequencies of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) cells were not different between accepted and rejected allografts or in peripheral blood or BM. Of interest, Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells, but not Gr-1(hi)CD11b(+) cells, infiltrated the accepted graft early after surgery and expressed high levels of immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10, TGF-β, and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. This population remained until 4 wk after surgery. In vitro, only high dose (>100 ng/ml) of IFN-γ plus GM-CSF could induce immunosuppressive cytokine expression in Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) cells reduced T cell infiltration, which improved graft survival. In conclusion, high-dose IFN-γ in allograft areas is essential for development of Gr-1(int)CD11b(+) MDSCs in corneal allografts, and subtle environmental changes in the early period of the allograft can result in a large difference in graft survival.

  7. Genome-wide transcription profile of endothelial cells after cardiac transplantation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mikalsen, B; Fosby, B; Wang, J; Hammarström, C; Bjaerke, H; Lundström, M; Kasprzycka, M; Scott, H; Line, P-D; Haraldsen, G

    2010-07-01

    Transcriptome analyses of organ transplants have until now usually focused on whole tissue samples containing activation profiles from different cell populations. Here, we enriched endothelial cells from rat cardiac allografts and isografts, establishing their activation profile at baseline and on days 2, 3 and 4 after transplantation. Modulated transcripts were assigned to three categories based on their regulation profile in allografts and isografts. Categories A and B contained the majority of transcripts and showed similar regulation in both graft types, appearing to represent responses to surgical trauma. By contrast, category C contained transcripts that were partly allograft-specific and to a large extent associated with interferon-gamma-responsiveness. Several transcripts were verified by immunohistochemical analysis of graft lesions, among them the matricellular protein periostin, which was one of the most highly upregulated transcripts but has not been associated with transplantation previously. In conclusion, the majority of the differentially expressed genes in graft endothelial cells are affected by the transplantation procedure whereas relatively few are associated with allograft rejection.

  8. Fresh vein allograft survival in dogs after cyclosporine treatment.

    PubMed

    Mingoli, A; Edwards, J D; Feldhaus, R J; Hunter, W J; Naspetti, R; Cavallari, N; Sapienza, P; Kretchmar, D H; Cavallaro, A

    1996-04-01

    Synthetic grafts are widely used for peripheral arterial reconstructions when autologous veins are not available, but their results have not been satisfactory. Venous allograft may be used as an alternative to synthetic prostheses. The aim of the study was to explore the immunosuppressive efficacy of Cyclosporine A (CyA) as a means of preventing venous allograft failures and rejection. We utilized 56 mongrel dogs. Immunological incompatibility was checked with the skin graft method. Donor inferior vena cava was transplanted into the infrarenal abdominal aorta of recipient animals. One group (group 1, 10 dogs) served as a control and three groups received CyA treatment regimens. Group 2 (10 dogs) received postoperative oral CyA treatment for 30 days. Group 3 (12 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution without postoperative immunosuppressive therapy. Group 4 (9 dogs) received a vein graft pretreated with a CyA solution and postoperative CyA treatment for 30 days. Allografts were examined at 30 days for patency, aneurysmal dilatation, gross structural changes, inflammatory response, and lymphocytic infiltration. Sex chromatine assessment determined the origin (donor or recipient) of the endothelial cells. The allografts from groups 1 and 3 showed significant aneurysmal dilatation and perivenous inflammation when compared to dogs treated with oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0002). Moreover allografts treated with CyA therapy had a better-developed venous neointima (P < 0.009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02) and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) with less fibrin (P < 0.02), and thinner medial (P < 0.0009) and adventitial layers (P < 0.02). No significant differences were observed in neointimal thickness among the four groups. Lymphocytic infiltration was greater in the group of animals who did not receive oral CyA therapy (P < 0.0004). Barr bodies status showed significant differences between oral CyA treated groups and nontreated groups (P < 0.0003). Oral CyA therapy

  9. Impaired cell mediated immunity in haemophilia in the absence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Madhok, R; Gracie, A; Lowe, G D; Burnett, A; Froebel, K; Follett, E; Forbes, C D

    1986-01-01

    The cell mediated immune response was evaluated in vivo in 29 patients with clinically severe haemophilia by means of the dinitrochlorobenzene skin test. All patients had a response below the median normal value, and in 19 the response was on or below the lower limit of the normal range. There was no difference in skin response between patients positive and negative for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; formerly known as human T cell lymphotropic virus III or lymphadenopathy associated virus). In the whole group, and in seronegative patients (n = 17), there was an inverse relation between exposure to clotting factor and skin response. In seropositive patients (n = 12) no such association was apparent. This study shows that clotting factor concentrate impairs the cell mediated immune response to a new antigen in the absence of infection with HIV. PMID:3094762

  10. Cell-mediated and humoral immune response in diabetic patients with periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Anil, S; Remani, P; Vijayakumar, T; Hari, S

    1990-07-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed in 50 patients with type II or non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and 50 nondiabetic patients with periodontitis. The values were compared with those of 50 age and sex-matched control subjects. The cell-mediated immunity assessed by enumerating the total and high-affinity rosette-forming cells of the patient did not show any significant variation from that of the normal control subjects. The humoral immune response was assessed by estimating serum immunoglobulins G, A, M, D, and E by single radial immunodiffusion. Except IgD, all other immunoglobulins were found to be elevated significantly in both diabetic and nondiabetic subjects. The alteration in humoral immune response may be the cause or the effect of periodontitis. The defective host response reported in diabetic patients may be responsible for the increased incidence of periodontitis in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetic patients.

  11. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in patients with localized juvenile periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Anil, S; Hari, S; Remani, P; Vijayakumar, T; Ankathil, R

    1990-03-01

    Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed in 21 patients with localized juvenile periodontitis (LJP), and in an equal number of control subjects. The cell-mediated immunity, assessed by enumeration of total rosette forming cells [TRFC] and high affinity rosette forming cells [HARFC], was found to be depressed in LJP patients compared to controls. Estimation of serum immunoglobulins G,A,M,D and E levels were done using single radial immunodiffusion. All the immunoglobulins except IgD were found to be elevated significantly in LJP patients. The defective immune response found in LJP patients may be the cause or effect of the disease process. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these defects are genetically controlled.

  12. Noninvasive Imaging of Cell-Mediated Therapy for Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akins, Elizabeth J.; Dubey, Purnima

    2013-01-01

    Cell-mediated therapy (immunotherapy) for the treatment of cancer is an active area of investigation in animal models and clinical trials. Despite many advances, objective responses to immunotherapy are observed in a small number of cases, for certain tumor types. To better understand differences in outcomes, it is critical to develop assays for tracking effector cell localization and function in situ. The fairly recent use of molecular imaging techniques to track cell populations has presented researchers and clinicians with a powerful diagnostic tool for determining the efficacy of cell-mediated therapy for the treatment of cancer. This review highlights the application of whole-body noninvasive radioisotopic, magnetic, and optical imaging methods for monitoring effector cells in vivo. Issues that affect sensitivity of detection, such as methods of cell marking, efficiency of cell labeling, toxicity, and limits of detection of imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:18523073

  13. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  14. In vitro allograft irradiation prevents graft-versus-host disease in small-bowel transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.K.; Schraut, W.H.

    1985-04-01

    In small-bowel transplantation, the transfer of large numbers of donor lymphocytes with the intestinal allograft may provoke a lethal graft-versus-host reaction. The effectiveness of allograft irradiation in vitro as a method of preventing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was studied in a rat model of small-bowel transplantation, with the Lewis----Lewis X Brown Norway F1 hybrid strain combination. Cold harvested small-bowel allografts were irradiated immediately prior to heterotopic or orthotopic transplantation. Animals that had received heterotopic allografts irradiated with 0, 250, or 500 rad all died of GVHD after 14.4 +/- 3.0, 15.0 +/- 1.3, and 14.2 +/- 1.9 days, respectively. None of the animals that had received allografts treated with 1000 rad developed clinical or pathologic evidence of GVHD, however, and all survived for more than 6 months (P less than 0.001). Allograft function was studied in animals that underwent orthotopic transplantation. Recipients of nonirradiated orthotopic allografts all died of GVHD after 14.0 +/- 0.7 days, whereas recipients of allografts irradiated with 1000 rad all survived for more than 5 months (P less than 0.001). After 120 days, weight gain (51.8 +/- 11.7%), serum albumin (3.9 +/- 0.7 g/dl), serum triglycerides (67.0 +/- 24.3 mg/dl), CBC, and differential in these animals were not statistically different from those in either age-matched isograft recipients or normal animals, and when the rats were sacrificed, irradiated allografts showed no changes suggestive of radiation injury. These results indicate that irradiation of small-bowel allografts in vitro prevents development of GVHD, and that this can be achieved at a dose which does not cause injury to or malfunction of the allograft.

  15. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization on collagen gels: Effect of densification and bioglass incorporation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gengbo; Pastakia, Meet; Fenn, Michael B; Kishore, Vipuil

    2016-05-01

    Plastic compression is a collagen densification process that has been widely used for the development of mechanically robust collagen-based materials. Incorporation of bioglass within plastically compressed collagen gels has been shown to mimic the microstructural properties of native bone and enhance in vitro cell-mediated mineralization. The current study seeks to decouple the effects of collagen densification and bioglass incorporation to understand the interplay between collagen packing density and presence of bioglass on cell-mediated mineralization. Saos-2 cell-mediated mineralization was assessed as a measure of the osteoconductivity of four different collagen gels: (1) uncompressed collagen gel (UC), (2) bioglass incorporated uncompressed collagen gel (UC + BG), (3) plastically compressed collagen gel (PC), and (4) bioglass incorporated plastically compressed collagen gel (PC + BG). The results indicated that collagen densification enhanced mineralization as shown by SEM, increased alkaline phosphatase activity and produced significantly higher amounts of mineralized nodules on PC gels compared to UC gels. Further, the amount of nodule formation on PC gels was significantly higher compared to UC + BG gels indicating that increase in matrix stiffness due to collagen densification had a greater effect on cell-mediated mineralization compared to bioglass incorporation into loosely packed UC gels. Incorporation of bioglass into PC gels further enhanced mineralization as evidenced by significantly larger nodule size and higher amount of mineralization on PC + BG gels compared to PC gels. In conclusion, collagen densification via plastic compression improves the osteoconductivity of collagen gels. Further, incorporation of bioglass within PC gels has an additive effect and further enhances the osteoconductivity of collagen gels.

  16. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd.

  17. RB mutation and RAS overexpression induce resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Morales, Mario; Sánchez-García, Francisco Javier; Golán-Cancela, Irene; Hernández-Pedro, Norma; Costoya, Jose A; de la Cruz, Verónica Pérez; Moreno-Jiménez, Sergio; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Several theories aim to explain the malignant transformation of cells, including the mutation of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Deletion of Rb (a tumor suppressor), overexpression of mutated Ras (a proto-oncogene), or both, are sufficient for in vitro gliomagenesis, and these genetic traits are associated with their proliferative capacity. An emerging hallmark of cancer is the ability of tumor cells to evade the immune system. Whether specific mutations are related with this, remains to be analyzed. To address this issue, three transformed glioma cell lines were obtained (Rb(-/-), Ras(V12), and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12)) by in vitro retroviral transformation of astrocytes, as previously reported. In addition, Ras(V12) and Rb(-/-)/Ras(V12) transformed cells were injected into SCID mice and after tumor growth two stable glioma cell lines were derived. All these cells were characterized in terms of Rb and Ras gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity, expression of MHC I, Rae1δ, and Rae1αβγδε, mult1, H60a, H60b, H60c, as ligands for NK cell receptors, and their susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Our results show that transformation of astrocytes (Rb loss, Ras overexpression, or both) induced phenotypical and functional changes associated with resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Moreover, the transfer of cell lines of transformed astrocytes into SCID mice increased resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, thus suggesting that specific changes in a tumor suppressor (Rb) and a proto-oncogene (Ras) are enough to confer resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in glioma cells and therefore provide some insight into the ability of tumor cells to evade immune responses.

  18. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  19. Differential effect of pancreatectomy on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed Central

    Fabris, N; Piantanelli, L

    1977-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune reactions, such as allogenic skin-graft rejection and PHA or MLC responses, and antibody synthesis against different antigens (sheep erythrocytes, Brucella antigen, bovine serum albumin) have been evaluated in rats suffering from experimentally-induced diabetes and in age-matched sham-treated controls. Cell-mediated immune reactions are strongly depressed diabetic rats. The cellularity of the thymus and of thymus-dependent areas and the number of peripheral blood lymphocytes is significantly reduced in pancreatectomized rats. Moreover, the immunological recovery from heavy cortisonization is also greatly impaired. Daily treatment with insulin may prevent these immunological alterations. By contrast, antibody responses in diabetic rats are not quantitatively altered in respect to either the number of antibody producing cells in the spleen or the circulating antibody titres. The discrepancy between the abnormality of cell-mediated immune reactions in diabetic rats and their physiological capacity to synthetize antibodies suggests that the sensitivity to an insulin-deprived environment is present only in a definite, although yet undefined, subpopulation of lymphoid cells rather than in the whole lymphoid system. Images Fig. 4 PMID:141353

  20. Spleen tyrosine kinase contributes to acute renal allograft rejection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Ramessur Chandran, Sharmila; Tesch, Greg H; Han, Yingjie; Woodman, Naomi; Mulley, William R; Kanellis, John; Blease, Kate; Ma, Frank Y; Nikolic-Paterson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Kidney allografts induce strong T-cell and antibody responses which mediate acute rejection. Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) is expressed by most leucocytes, except mature T cells, and is involved in intracellular signalling following activation of the Fcγ-receptor, B-cell receptor and some integrins. A role for Syk signalling has been established in antibody-dependent native kidney disease, but little is known of Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Sprague–Dawley rats underwent bilateral nephrectomy and received an orthotopic Wistar renal allograft. Recipient rats were treated with a Syk inhibitor (CC0482417, 30 mg/kg/bid), or vehicle, from 1 h before surgery until being killed 5 days later. Vehicle-treated recipients developed severe allograft failure with marked histologic damage in association with dense leucocyte infiltration (T cells, macrophages, neutrophils and NK cells) and deposition of IgM, IgG and C3. Immunostaining identified Syk expression by many infiltrating leucocytes. CC0482417 treatment significantly improved allograft function and reduced histologic damage, although allograft injury was still clearly evident. CC0482417 failed to prevent T-cell infiltration and activation within the allograft. However, CC0482417 significantly attenuated acute tubular necrosis, infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils and thrombosis of peritubular capillaries. In conclusion, this study identifies a role for Syk in acute renal allograft rejection. Syk inhibition may be a useful addition to T-cell-based immunotherapy in renal transplantation. PMID:25529862

  1. Morphometric and physical investigations of segmental cortical bone autografts and allografts in canine ulnar defects.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Verhelpen, M; d'Hemricourt, J; Govaerts, B; Bourgois, R

    1992-09-01

    Cortical bone grafts were implanted for six months in mature dogs using an osteoperiosteal 3-cm defect in the ulna to evaluate their respective morphometric and physical values compared with autografts. The bone-grafting material included fresh auto- and allografts, frozen and thimerosal preserved allografts, and partially demineralized bone allografts. The grafts were evaluated by roentgenograms, microradiograms, photon absorptiometry, porosity, fluorescence labeling measurements, and torsional loading at failure. Autografts achieved a better union score than the allografts, but intracortical bone porosity, percentage of cumulative new bone, and mineral apposition rate were not variables with statistical significance. Lamellar bone was found earlier and in greater quantity in autografts. Within the graft, new bone was deposited at a slower rate than in the recipient bone. Autografts showed less peripheral resorption and a greater torsional resistance than allografts. Photon absorptiometry demonstrated that nondemineralized allografts underwent a substantial loss of peripheral bone. This marked reduction in the outer diameter of the graft had more influence on torsional resistance than did the intracortical porosity of the graft. Demineralized allografts were osteoinductive in only 28% of the cases and appeared to respond in an all-or-nothing pattern. Frozen and thimerosal preserved allografts were the most acceptable substitutes to autografts.

  2. Endocrine function after immunosuppression of pancreatic allograft by ionizing irradiation in the primate

    SciTech Connect

    Du Toit, D.F.; Heydenrych, J.J.; Smit, B.; Louw, G.; Zuurmond, T.; Laker, L.; Els, D.; Weideman, A.; Wolfe-Coote, S.; Du Toit, L.B.

    1986-05-01

    The object of this preliminary study was to evaluate the endocrine function after heterotopic intraperitoneal segmental pancreatic allotransplantation with unligated duct in irradiated, totally pancreatectomized primates. All allograft recipients received, pre- and peroperative donor-specific blood transfusions and peroperative external irradiation from a linear accelerator; 200 rads was administered weekly and increased to a total dose of 1,500 rads. Pancreatic transplantation was performed between 2 and 6 weeks after completion of irradiation and preoperative blood transfusions. As previously reported, only minimal pancreatic allograft survival was achieved following preoperative irradiation. One recipient remained normoglycaemic for greater than 100 days after transplantation, the longest surviving pancreatic allograft recipient reported from this laboratory. Intravenous glucose tolerance test results in this recipient revealed normoglycaemia, reduced K-value, hypoinsulinaemia, normal glucagon response, reduced C-peptide values, and moderate glucose intolerance. Aortography and electron-microscopic examination of allograft biopsy tissue confirmed the presence of a functioning allograft.

  3. Results of 32 Allograft-prosthesis Composite Reconstructions of the Proximal Femur

    PubMed Central

    Larousserie, Frédérique; Thévenin, Fabrice; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie; Anract, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The use of allograft-prosthesis composites for reconstruction after bone tumor resection at the proximal femur has generated considerable interest since the mid1980s on the basis that their use would improve function and survival, and restore bone stock. Although functional improvement has been documented, it is unknown whether these composites survive long periods and whether they restore bone stock. We therefore determined long-term allograft-prosthesis composite survival, identified major complications that led to revision, and determined whether allograft bone stock could be spared at the time of revision. We also compared the radiographic appearance of allografts sterilized by gamma radiation and fresh-frozen allografts. We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with bone malignancy in the proximal femur who underwent reconstruction with a cemented allograft-prosthesis composite. The allograft-prosthesis composite was a primary reconstruction for 23 patients and a revision procedure for nine. The minimum followup was 2 months (median, 68 months; range, 2–232 months). The cumulative incidence of revision for any reason was 14% at 5 years (95% confidence interval, 1%–28%) and 19% at 10 years (95% confidence interval, 3%–34%). Nine patients (28%) had revision of the reconstruction during followup; four of these patients had revision surgery for infection. Allografts sterilized by gamma radiation showed worse resorption than fresh-frozen allografts. Based on reported results, allograft-composite prostheses do not appear to improve survival compared with megaprostheses. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:19851817

  4. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  5. Meniscal Allograft Interposition Combined with Proximal Row Carpectomy.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Murphy M; Willsey, Matthew R; Werner, Frederick W; Harley, Brian J; Klein, Shay; Setter, Kevin J

    2017-02-01

    Background Proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is contraindicated in wrists with preexisting arthritis of the proximal capitate or radiolunate fossa. Patients with these conditions frequently pursue wrist arthrodesis with its associated functional limitations. Questions/Purposes The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of using lateral meniscal allograft interposition (LMAI), in combination with PRC, in patients with symptomatic wrist arthritis. The primary question is whether this allograft will allow wrist function comparable to that in patients having only a PRC. A secondary question was to determine the short-term longevity of the allograft. Patients/Method Between 2006 and 2012, nine wrists underwent PRC with LMAI. Patient demographics and rates of complication or graft failure were determined. During independent clinical exams, functional outcomes were reviewed, patients completed a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores, and radiographs were taken. Results Four patients met the inclusion criteria, having clinical follow-up at an average of 4.2 years. DASH scores at the time of follow-up ranged from 9 to 33, with an average of 24. Average radiocapitate joint space in the first postoperative radiograph was 2.8 mm compared with 1.8 mm at the time of final follow-up. No wrists went on to arthrodesis. Conclusion Early outcomes of PRC with LMAI are comparable to those results found in the literature of PRC alone. LMAI with PRC may be a valid short-term option as a motion-preserving procedure in those patients contraindicated to having a PRC alone. Level of Evidence Level IV.

  6. Urine Metabolite Profiles Predictive of Human Kidney Allograft Status.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Karsten; Schwartz, Joseph E; Sharma, Vijay K; Chen, Qiuying; Lee, John R; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana M; Ding, Ruchuang; Ikle, David N; Bridges, Nancy D; Williams, Nikki M; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Karoly, Edward D; Mohney, Robert P; Abecassis, Michael; Friedewald, John; Knechtle, Stuart J; Becker, Yolanda T; Samstein, Benjamin; Shaked, Abraham; Gross, Steven S; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2016-02-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis and prognostication of acute cellular rejection in the kidney allograft may help realize the full benefits of kidney transplantation. To investigate whether urine metabolites predict kidney allograft status, we determined levels of 749 metabolites in 1516 urine samples from 241 kidney graft recipients enrolled in the prospective multicenter Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation-04 study. A metabolite signature of the ratio of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine in biopsy specimen-matched urine supernatants best discriminated acute cellular rejection biopsy specimens from specimens without rejection. For clinical application, we developed a high-throughput mass spectrometry-based assay that enabled absolute and rapid quantification of the 3-sialyllactose-to-xanthosine ratio in urine samples. A composite signature of ratios of 3-sialyllactose to xanthosine and quinolinate to X-16397 and our previously reported urinary cell mRNA signature of 18S ribosomal RNA, CD3ε mRNA, and interferon-inducible protein-10 mRNA outperformed the metabolite signatures and the mRNA signature. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the composite metabolite-mRNA signature was 0.93, and the signature was diagnostic of acute cellular rejection with a specificity of 84% and a sensitivity of 90%. The composite signature, developed using solely biopsy specimen-matched urine samples, predicted future acute cellular rejection when applied to pristine samples taken days to weeks before biopsy. We conclude that metabolite profiling of urine offers a noninvasive means of diagnosing and prognosticating acute cellular rejection in the human kidney allograft, and that the combined metabolite and mRNA signature is diagnostic and prognostic of acute cellular rejection with very high accuracy.

  7. Significance and Suppression of Redundant IL17 Responses in Acute Allograft Rejection by Bioinformatics Based Drug Repositioning of Fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Homare; Hsieh, Szu-Chuan; Gong, Yongquan; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advanced immunosuppression, redundancy in the molecular diversity of acute rejection (AR) often results in incomplete resolution of the injury response. We present a bioinformatics based approach for identification of these redundant molecular pathways in AR and a drug repositioning approach to suppress these using FDA approved drugs currently available for non-transplant indications. Two independent microarray data-sets from human renal allograft biopsies (n = 101) from patients on majorly Th1/IFN-y immune response targeted immunosuppression, with and without AR, were profiled. Using gene-set analysis across 3305 biological pathways, significant enrichment was found for the IL17 pathway in AR in both data-sets. Recent evidence suggests IL17 pathway as an important escape mechanism when Th1/IFN-y mediated responses are suppressed. As current immunosuppressions do not specifically target the IL17 axis, 7200 molecular compounds were interrogated for FDA approved drugs with specific inhibition of this axis. A combined IL17/IFN-y suppressive role was predicted for the antilipidemic drug Fenofibrate. To assess the immunregulatory action of Fenofibrate, we conducted in-vitro treatment of anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated human peripheral blood cells (PBMC), and, as predicted, Fenofibrate reduced IL17 and IFN-γ gene expression in stimulated PMBC. In-vivo Fenofibrate treatment of an experimental rodent model of cardiac AR reduced infiltration of total leukocytes, reduced expression of IL17/IFN-y and their pathway related genes in allografts and recipients’ spleens, and extended graft survival by 21 days (p<0.007). In conclusion, this study provides important proof of concept that meta-analyses of genomic data and drug databases can provide new insights into the redundancy of the rejection response and presents an economic methodology to reposition FDA approved drugs in organ transplantation. PMID:23437201

  8. Until they have faces: the ethics of facial allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Agich, G J; Siemionow, M

    2005-12-01

    The ethical discussion of facial allograft transplantation (FAT) for severe facial deformity, popularly known as facial transplantation, has been one sided and sensationalistic. It is based on film and fiction rather than science and clinical experience. Based on our experience in developing the first IRB approved protocol for FAT, we critically discuss the problems with this discussion, which overlooks the plight of individuals with severe facial deformities. We discuss why FAT for facial deformity is ethically and surgically justified despite its negative portrayal in the media.

  9. Microvascular transplantation of epiphyseal plates: studies utilizing allograft donor material.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Martin I; Bowen, C Vaughan A

    2007-01-01

    Compromised function of an epiphyseal plate caused by trauma, tumor, infection, or congenital malformation can result in significant musculoskeletal deformity. Techniques used to correct or minimize the extent of these deformities include autogenous or allogeneic cancellous bone grafts, nonvascularized cortical allografts, vascularized bone and composite tissue transfers, and distraction osteogenesis. These solutions are not ideal for children because they do not adequately address the actively growing nature of the extremity. Microvascular techniques have enabled the experimental transplantation of vascularized epiphyseal plates with high levels of postoperative viability and subsequent growth and offer a potential advantage over conventional treatments.

  10. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  11. Vascularized composite allograft-specific characteristics of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Issa, Fadi

    2016-06-01

    Vascularized composite allograft (VCA) transplantation, or reconstructive transplantation, has revolutionized the treatment of complex tissue and functional defects. Despite arriving during an age in which the immunology of solid organ transplant rejection has been investigated in much detail, these transplants have offered new perspectives from which to explore the immunobiology of transplantation. VCAs have a number of unique molecular, cellular, and architectural features which alter the character and intensity of the rejection response. While much is yet to be clarified, an understanding of these distinct mechanisms affords new possibilities for the control of immune responses in an effort to improve outcomes after VCA transplantation.

  12. [Microradiographic aspects of massive bone allografts in man].

    PubMed

    Coutelier, L; Delloye, C; de Nayer, P; Vincent, A

    1984-01-01

    Two stored frozen massive bone allografts were implanted after resection of femoral and tibial tumours in two patients. Eighteen and thirty months later the authors had the opportunity to make a microscopic examination of the grafts. The cortical bone grafts were incorporated by the classic "creeping substitution." The repair of the cortical transplant was very incomplete and showed large resorption cavities. The newly-formed living bone was not fully mineralized. These phenomena related only to the outer area of the cortical bone, the dead intra-cortical area being left unaffected by the process. Cancellous bone graft repair was faster and more efficient.

  13. Stem cell autograft and allograft in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    De Cata, Angelo; Matarangolo, Angela; Inglese, Michele; Rubino, Rosa; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2016-02-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by an insufficiency of immune tolerance and, although treated with a number of useful drugs, may need more unconventional therapeutic strategies for their more severe presentations. Among such unconventional therapeutic approaches, stem cell autograft and allograft have been used, with the aim of stimulating disease remission by modifying the pathogenic mechanisms that induce anomalous responses against self-antigens. Autologous transplantation is performed with the purpose of retuning autoimmune cells, whereas allogeneic transplantation is performed with the purpose of replacing anomalous immune effectors and mediators. In this article, we comprehensively review up-to-date information on the autoimmune diseases for which the transplantation of stem cells is indicated.

  14. Cardiac xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    DiSesa, V J

    1997-12-01

    Heart failure is an important medical and public health problem. Although medical therapy is effective for many people, the only definitive therapy is heart transplantation, which is limited severely by the number of donors. Mechanical devices presently are used as "bridges" to transplantation. Their widespread use may solve the donor shortage problem, but at present, mechanical devices are limited by problems related to blood clotting, power supply, and foreign body infection. Cardiac xenotransplantation using animal donors is a potential biologic solution to the donor organ shortage. The immune response, consisting of hyperacute rejection, acute vascular rejection, and cellular rejection, currently prevents clinical xenotransplantation. Advances in the solution of these problems have been made using conventional immunosuppressive drugs and newer agents whose use is based on an understanding of important steps in xenoimmunity. The most exciting approaches use tools of molecular biology to create genetically engineered donors and to induce states of donor and recipient bone marrow chimerism and tolerance in xenogeneic organ recipients. The successful future strategy may use a combination of a genetically engineered donor and a chimeric recipient with or without nonspecific immunosuppressive drugs.

  15. Two-Stage, In Silico Deconvolution of the Lymphocyte Compartment of the Peripheral Whole Blood Transcriptome in the Context of Acute Kidney Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Casey P.; Balshaw, Robert; Ng, Raymond T.; Wilson-McManus, Janet E.; Keown, Paul; McMaster, Robert; McManus, Bruce M.; Landsberg, David; Isbel, Nicole M.; Knoll, Greg; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2014-01-01

    Acute rejection is a major complication of solid organ transplantation that prevents the long-term assimilation of the allograft. Various populations of lymphocytes are principal mediators of this process, infiltrating graft tissues and driving cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Understanding the lymphocyte-specific biology associated with rejection is therefore critical. Measuring genome-wide changes in transcript abundance in peripheral whole blood cells can deliver a comprehensive view of the status of the immune system. The heterogeneous nature of the tissue significantly affects the sensitivity and interpretability of traditional analyses, however. Experimental separation of cell types is an obvious solution, but is often impractical and, more worrying, may affect expression, leading to spurious results. Statistical deconvolution of the cell type-specific signal is an attractive alternative, but existing approaches still present some challenges, particularly in a clinical research setting. Obtaining time-matched sample composition to biologically interesting, phenotypically homogeneous cell sub-populations is costly and adds significant complexity to study design. We used a two-stage, in silico deconvolution approach that first predicts sample composition to biologically meaningful and homogeneous leukocyte sub-populations, and then performs cell type-specific differential expression analysis in these same sub-populations, from peripheral whole blood expression data. We applied this approach to a peripheral whole blood expression study of kidney allograft rejection. The patterns of differential composition uncovered are consistent with previous studies carried out using flow cytometry and provide a relevant biological context when interpreting cell type-specific differential expression results. We identified cell type-specific differential expression in a variety of leukocyte sub-populations at the time of rejection. The tissue-specificity of these differentially

  16. Can Skin Allograft Occasionally Act as a Permanent Coverage in Deep Burns? A Pilot Study 

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Ezzatollah; Beiraghi-Toosi, Arash; Ahmadabadi, Ali; Tavousi, Seyed Hassan; Alipour Tabrizi, Arash; Fotuhi, Kazem; Jabbari Nooghabi, Mehdi; Manafi, Amir; Ahmadi Moghadam, Shokoofeh

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Skin allograft is the gold standard of wound coverage in patients with extensive burns; however, it is considered as a temporary wound coverage and rejection of the skin allograft is considered inevitable. In our study, skin allograft as a permanent coverage in deep burns is evaluated. METHODS Skin allograft survival was assessed in 38 patients from March 2009 to March 2014, retrospectively. Because of the lack of tissue specimen from the skin donors, patients with long skin allograft survival in whom the gender of donor and recipient of allograft was the same were excluded. Seven cases with skin allograft longevity and opposite gender in donor and recipient were finally enrolled. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test on the biopsy specimen from recipients and donors were undertaken. RESULTS PCR on the biopsy specimen from recipients confirmed those specimens belong to the donors. All patients received allograft from the opposite sex. Two (28.57%) patients received allograft from their first-degree blood relatives, and in one (14.29%) case, the allograft was harvested from an alive individual with no blood relation. The rest were harvested from multiorgan donors. In eight months of follow up, no clinical evidence of graft rejection was noted. CONCLUSION Long term persistence of skin allograft in patients is worthy of more attention. Further studies An increase in knowledge of factors influencing this longevity could realize the dream of burn surgeons to achieve a permanent coverage other than autograft for major burn patients.

  17. [Value of multiple cortical perforations for the rehabilitation of massive deep-frozen bone allografts. Experimental study in sheep].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Babin, S R; Delloye, C; Schmitt, D

    1992-01-01

    Incorporation of massive cortical bone allografts in human is slow and remains incomplete. Late biopsies of implanted allografts or histological studies of explanted allografts always show the partial substitution of necrotic bone by new bone from the host. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of drilling the massive deep-frozen cortical allografts in order to induce osteogenesis. Thirteen sheep were operated on and a standard segment of the proximal ulna was removed and the gap filled either by an unperforated allograft or by a perforated one. Based on histological and microradiographic examination, a quite complete substitution of the perforated allografts was observed but in this model no statistically significant difference was observed between perforated and unperforated allografts. Further study is needed to assess the effect of the perforations.

  18. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  19. Ornamental comb colour predicts T-cell-mediated immunity in male red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougeot, Francois

    2008-02-01

    Sexual ornaments might reliably indicate the ability to cope with parasites and diseases, and a better ability to mount a primary inflammatory response to a novel challenge. Carotenoid-based ornaments are amongst the commonest sexual signals of birds and often influence mate choice. Because carotenoids are immuno-stimulants, signallers may trade-off allocating these to ornamental colouration or using them for immune responses, so carotenoid-based ornaments might be particularly useful as honest indicators of immuno-compentence. Tetraonid birds, such as the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus, exhibit supra-orbital yellow red combs, a conspicuous ornament which functions in intra- and inter-sexual selection. The colour of combs is due to epidermal pigmentation by carotenoids, while their size is testosterone-dependent. In this study, I investigated whether comb characteristics, and in particular, comb colour, indicated immuno-competence in free-living male red grouse. I assessed T-cell-mediated immunity using a standardised challenge with phytohaemagglutinin. Red grouse combs reflect in the red and in the ultraviolet spectrum of light, which is not visible to humans but that grouse most likely see, so I measured comb colour across the whole bird visible spectrum (300 700 nm) using a reflectance spectrometer. I found that males with bigger and redder combs, but with less ultraviolet reflectance, had greater T-cell-mediated immune response. Comb colour predicted T-cell-mediated immune response better than comb size, indicating that the carotenoid-based colouration of this ornament might reliably signal this aspect of male quality.

  20. Cell mediated immunity after measles in Guinea-Bissau: historical cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, S. O.; Aaby, P.; Hall, A. J.; Barker, D. J.; Heyes, C. B.; Shiell, A. W.; Goudiaby, A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether children who have had measles have reduced general cell mediated immunity three years later compared with vaccinated children who have not had measles. DESIGN: Historical cohort study. SETTING: Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. SUBJECTS: 391 children aged 3-13 years who were living in Bissau during a measles epidemic in 1991 and still lived there. These included 131 primary cases and 139 secondary cases from the epidemic and 121 vaccinated controls with no history of measles. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: General cell mediated immunity assessed by measurement of delayed type hypersensitivity skin responses to seven recall antigens. Anergy was defined as a lack of response to all antigens. RESULTS: 82 out of 268 cases of measles (31%) were anergic compared with 20 of the 121 vaccinated controls (17%) (odds ratio adjusted for potential confounding variables 2.2 (95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.0); P 0.009). The prevalence of anergy was higher in secondary cases (33% (46/138)) than in primary cases (28% (36/130)), although this difference was not significant. Anergy was more common in the rainy season (unadjusted prevalence 31% (91/291) than in the dry season (11% (11/98)) (adjusted odds ratio 4.8 (2.2 to 10.3)). This seasonal increase occurred predominantly in the case of measles. CONCLUSION: Reduced general cell mediated immunity may contribute to the higher long term mortality in children who have had measles compared with recipients of standard measles vaccine and to the higher child mortality in the rainy season in west Africa. PMID:8892416

  1. Ornamental comb colour predicts T-cell-mediated immunity in male red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus.

    PubMed

    Mougeot, Francois

    2008-02-01

    Sexual ornaments might reliably indicate the ability to cope with parasites and diseases, and a better ability to mount a primary inflammatory response to a novel challenge. Carotenoid-based ornaments are amongst the commonest sexual signals of birds and often influence mate choice. Because carotenoids are immuno-stimulants, signallers may trade-off allocating these to ornamental colouration or using them for immune responses, so carotenoid-based ornaments might be particularly useful as honest indicators of immuno-compentence. Tetraonid birds, such as the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus, exhibit supra-orbital yellow-red combs, a conspicuous ornament which functions in intra- and inter-sexual selection. The colour of combs is due to epidermal pigmentation by carotenoids, while their size is testosterone-dependent. In this study, I investigated whether comb characteristics, and in particular, comb colour, indicated immuno-competence in free-living male red grouse. I assessed T-cell-mediated immunity using a standardised challenge with phytohaemagglutinin. Red grouse combs reflect in the red and in the ultraviolet spectrum of light, which is not visible to humans but that grouse most likely see, so I measured comb colour across the whole bird visible spectrum (300-700 nm) using a reflectance spectrometer. I found that males with bigger and redder combs, but with less ultraviolet reflectance, had greater T-cell-mediated immune response. Comb colour predicted T-cell-mediated immune response better than comb size, indicating that the carotenoid-based colouration of this ornament might reliably signal this aspect of male quality.

  2. The PHA Test Reflects Acquired T-Cell Mediated Immunocompetence in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L.; Lemus, Jesús A.; Carrete, Martina; Blanco, Guillermo

    2008-01-01

    Background cological immunology requires techniques to reliably measure immunocompetence in wild vertebrates. The PHA-skin test, involving subcutaneous injection of a mitogen (phytohemagglutinin, PHA) and measurement of subsequent swelling as a surrogate of T-cell mediated immunocompetence, has been the test of choice due to its practicality and ease of use in the field. However, mechanisms involved in local immunological and inflammatory processes provoked by PHA are poorly known, and its use and interpretation as an acquired immune response is currently debated. Methodology Here, we present experimental work using a variety of parrot species, to ascertain whether PHA exposure produces larger secondary than primary responses as expected if the test reflects acquired immunocompetence. Moreover, we simultaneously quantified T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+, CD5+ and CD8+) and plasma proteins circulating in the bloodstream, potentially involved in the immunological and inflammatory processes, through flow cytometry and electrophoresis. Principal Findings Our results showed stronger responses after a second PHA injection, independent of species, time elapsed and changes in body mass of birds between first and second injections, thus supporting the adaptive nature of this immune response. Furthermore, the concomitant changes in the plasma concentrations of T-lymphocyte subsets and globulins indicate a causal link between the activation of the T-cell mediated immune system and local tissue swelling. Conclusions/Significance These findings justify the widespread use of the PHA-skin test as a reliable evaluator of acquired T-cell mediated immunocompetence in diverse biological disciplines. Further experimental research should be aimed at evaluating the relative role of innate immunocompetence in wild conditions, where the access to dietary proteins varies more than in captivity, and to ascertain how PHA responses relate to particular host-parasite interactions. PMID:18820730

  3. A DEPRESSION OF CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY TO MEASLES ANTIGEN IN PATIENTS WITH SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

    PubMed Central

    Utermohlen, Virginia; Winfield, John B.; Zabriskie, John B.; Kunkel, Henry G.

    1974-01-01

    Using the direct migration inhibition test, response to measles antigen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) was found to be decreased when compared with that of normal subjects. No alteration was observed in similar experiments using parainfluenza type 1 and rubella antigens. The specific decrease in measles antigen effect showed no obvious correlation with activity of SLE or with the presence of lymphocytotoxic antibodies. Whether the specificity of the decrease in reactivity is due to some particular relationship between the measles virus or antigen and SLE, or to the possibility that measles reactivity is a more sensitive indicator of a generalized defect of cell-mediated immunity, remains unclear. PMID:4361242

  4. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity.

  5. Immunohistological observations in rat kidney allografts after local steroid administration

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    In this report we investigated local regulatory mechanisms in graft rejection and their response to local immunosuppressive therapy. For this purpose local immunosuppression was induced in rat kidney allografts by intrarenal infusion of prednisolone. Intrarenal drug delivery resulted in high drug levels within the graft and low systemic drug levels. Systemic drug levels were by themselves not sufficiently immunosuppressive to induce graft survival, and local prednisolone levels within the graft proved to be responsible for prolongation of graft survival. During intrarenal drug delivery, systemic responsiveness to the renal allograft proved normal, since intrarenally treated grafts were infiltrated by MHC class II-positive host cells and, except for a somewhat lower percentage of macrophages, cellular infiltration in intrarenal treated grafts was comparable to untreated grafts. However, T cells and macrophages present in intrarenally treated grafts were not able to destroy the grafted tissue. Local immunosuppressive therapy resulted in inhibition of IL-2-R expression, absence of IFN-gamma, and prevention of MHC class II induction on grafted tissue. These observations strongly indicate the presence of local regulatory mechanisms in graft rejection. The experimental model described can be used for further analysis of these intragraft events. Moreover, the results demonstrate that local immunosuppressive therapy can contribute to effective inhibition of cellular immune response in graft rejection. PMID:3119756

  6. Reassortment of lymphocytes in lymph from normal and allografted sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, H. R.; Adams, E. P.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution and nature of surface immunoglobulin-bearing (SIg) cells were studied in various sources of lymph from normal sheep and from sheep bearing renal autografts and renal allografts. In normal sheep, 12.2% +/- 1.5 of all mononuclear cells in peripheral lymph SIg and, of these, more than 50% were monocytes and macrophages. Less than 6% of the lymphocytes in peripheral lymph carried SIg. In contrast, 24.7% +/- 1.3 of the mononuclear cells in central lymph had SIg, and all of the labeled cells were lymphocytes. The frequencies of SIg cells in peripheral lymph issuing from renal autografts and from renal allografts were 6.7% +/- 1.3 and 6.9% +/- 0.8, respectively, and the labeled cells were predominantly lymphocytes. The proportion of SIg cells in central lymph from graft-bearing sheep was similar to that from normal sheep. The differences between central lymph and peripheral lymph from both normal and graft-bearing sheep are thought to reflect a restriction on the passage of SIg cells through capillary endothelium in nonlymphoid tissues. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:322506

  7. Mechanical integrity of subchondral bone in osteochondral autografts and allografts

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, Greg; Goplen, Gordon; Ford, Jason; Novak, Kelli; Hurtig, Mark; McPherson, Roger; McGann, Locksley; Schachar, Norman; Zernicke, Ronald F.

    1998-01-01

    Objective To assess the influence of osteochondral graft preservation techniques on post-transplant biomechanics of graft and host subchondral bone in the knee joint. Design An experimental animal model (sheep), specifically the weight-bearing articular surface of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joints. Intervention Each sheep received, in the ipsilateral knee, an allograft that was (a) frozen without dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), (b) snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen or (c) frozen with DMSO. The contralateral knee received an autograft that was (a) snap-frozen, (b) treated with DMSO or (c) left untreated (fresh). Main outcome measures Mechanical and material properties of bone, including maximal compression stress, modulus of elasticity and bone mineral ash content of subchondral bone cores (from the graft centre and surrounding host bone). Results No significant differences were found in the mechanical properties of the subchondral bone under the graft, but there were significant changes in surrounding bone. Bone surrounding the grafts that were snap-frozen or frozen without DMSO was significantly stronger than the normal control bone. However, bone surrounding fresh autografts and cryoprotected allografts was not significantly different from normal control bone. Conclusions The changes in the mechanical behaviour of the host bone may be associated with graft cell viability. The greater stiffness of the subchondral host bone may have consequences for long-term graft integrity and for the development of degenerative osteoarthritis. PMID:9627549

  8. Meniscal allograft sterilisation: effect on biomechanical and histological properties.

    PubMed

    Bui, David; Lovric, Vedran; Oliver, Rema; Bertollo, Nicky; Broe, David; Walsh, William R

    2015-09-01

    Sterilisation of allografts are a crucial step in ensuring safety and viability. Current sterilisation standards such as 25 kGy gamma irradiation (γ) can have adverse effects on the ultrastructure and biomechanical properties of allograft tissue. Supercritical CO2 (SCCO2) technology, represents an improved sterilisation process that potentially preserves tissue properties. This study aimed to test the effect of SCCO2 sterilisation on the biomechanical and histological properties of the meniscus and compare this to the current standard of γ. Thirty-two 18-month old ovine menisci were randomly assigned into three groups for sterilisation (SCCO2, γ and control). After treatment, biomechanical indentation testing (stiffness and stress relaxation) or histological analysis [percentage of void, cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) per slide] was undertaken. Both SCCO2 and gamma groups displayed an increase in stiffness and stress relaxation as compared to control, however, this difference was lesser in samples treated with SCCO2. No significant histological quantitative differences were detected between SCCO2 and control specimens. Gamma-treated samples demonstrated a significant increase in void and decrease in ECM. Interestingly, both treatment groups demonstrated a decreasing mean void and increasing ECM percentage when analysed from outer to inner zones. No significant differences were detected in all-endpoints when analysed by section. SCCO2 sterilisation represents a potential feasible alternative to existing sterilization techniques such as γ.

  9. Tissue banking in India: gamma-irradiated allografts.

    PubMed

    Lobo Gajiwala, A

    2003-01-01

    In India, the procurement of tissues for transplantation is governed by the Transplantation of Human Organs Act, 1994. Although this law exists, it is primarily applied to organ transplantation and rules and regulations that are specific to tissue banking which have yet to be developed. The Tata Memorial Hospital (TMH) Tissue Bank was started in 1988 as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) programme to promote the use of ionising radiation for the sterilisation of biological tissues. It represents the Government of India within this project and was the first facility in the country to use radiation for the sterilisation of allografts. It is registered with the Health Services Maharashtra State and provides freeze-dried, gamma irradiated amnion, dura mater, skin and bone. The tissues are obtained either from cadavers or live donors. To date the TMH Tissue Bank has provided 6328 allografts which have found use as biological dressings and in various reconstructive procedures. The TMH Tissue Bank has helped initiate a Tissue Bank at the Defence Laboratory (DL), Jodhpur. At present these are the only two Banks in the country using radiation for the terminal sterilisation of preserved tissues. The availability of safe, clinically useful and cost effective grafts has stimulated innovative approaches to surgery. There is an increased demand for banked tissues and a heightened interest in the development of tissue banks. Inadequate infrastructure for donor referral programmes and the lack of support for tissue transplant co-ordinators however, continue to limit the availability of donor tissue.

  10. Utility of an allograft tendon for scoliosis correction via the costo-transverse foreman.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; McCarthy, Michael; Dooley, Adam C; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Shelton, R Shane; McLaren, Sandra G; Skinner, Robert A; Suva, Larry J; McCarthy, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    Current convex tethering techniques for treatment of scoliosis have centered on anterior convex staples or polypropylene tethers. We hypothesized that an allograft tendon tether inserted via the costo-transverse foramen would correct an established spinal deformity. In the pilot study, six 8-week-old pigs underwent allograft tendon tethering via the costo-transverse foreman or sham to test the strength of the transplanted tendon to retard spine growth. After 4 months, spinal deformity in three planes was induced in all animals with allograft tendons. In the treatment study, the allograft tendon tether was used to treat established scoliosis in 11 8-week-old pigs (spinal deformity > 50°). Once the deformity was observed (4 months) animals were assigned to either no treatment group or allograft tendon tether group and progression assessed by monthly radiographs. At final follow-up, coronal Cobb angle and maximum vertebral axial rotation of the treatment group was significantly smaller than the non-treatment group, whereas sagittal kyphosis of the treatment group was significantly larger than the non-treatment group. In sum, a significant correction was achieved using a unilateral allograft tendon spinal tether, suggesting that an allograft tendon tethering approach may represent a novel fusion-less procedure to correct idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:183-192, 2017.

  11. Renal cell carcinoma in kidney allografts: histologic types, including biphasic papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Higgins, John P

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for malignancy, with about 5% incidence of cancer in native end-stage kidneys. Carcinoma in the renal allograft is far less common. Prior studies have demonstrated a propensity for renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) of papillary subtypes in end-stage kidneys, and perhaps in allograft kidneys, but most allograft studies lack detailed pathologic review and predate the current classification system. We reviewed our experience with renal carcinoma in kidney allografts at 2 academic centers applying the International Society of Urological Pathology classification, informed by immunohistochemistry. The incidence of renal allograft carcinoma was about 0.26% in our population. Of 12 allograft carcinomas, 6 were papillary (50%), 4 were clear cell (33%), 1 was clear cell (tubulo)papillary, and 1 chromophobe. Two of the papillary carcinomas had distinctive biphasic glomeruloid architecture matching the newly named "biphasic squamoid alveolar" pattern and were difficult to classify on core biopsies. The 2 cell types had different immunophenotypes in our hands (eosinophilic cells: RCC-/CK34betaE12+ weight keratin +/cyclin D1+; clear cells: RCC+/cytokeratin high molecular weight negative to weak/cyclin D1-). None of the patients experienced cancer recurrences or metastasis. Our study confirms the predilection for papillary RCCs in kidney allografts and highlights the occurrence of rare morphologic variants. Larger studies are needed with careful pathologic review, which has been lacking in the literature.

  12. Restrictive allograft syndrome post lung transplantation is characterized by pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Efrat; Sato, Masaaki; Saito, Tomohito; Wagnetz, Ute; Roberts, Heidi C; Chaparro, Cecilia; Waddell, Thomas K; Singer, Lianne G; Hutcheon, Michael A; Keshavjee, Shaf; Hwang, David M

    2013-03-01

    We previously described restrictive allograft syndrome as a form of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, demonstrating restrictive pulmonary function decline. However, the histopathological correlates of restrictive allograft syndrome have yet to be satisfactorily described. We hypothesized that pulmonary pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis, as has recently been described in bone marrow transplant recipients, may also be present in the lungs of patients with restrictive allograft syndrome. Retrospective review of 493 patients who underwent lung transplantation between 1 January 1996 and 30 June 2009, was conducted. Out of 47 patients with clinical features of restrictive allograft syndrome, 16 had wedge biopsy, re-transplant lung explant, or autopsy lung specimens available for review. All lungs showed varying degrees of pleural fibrosis. Fifteen of 16 showed parenchymal fibroelastosis, characterized by hypocellular collagen deposition with preservation and thickening of the underlying alveolar septal elastic network. The fibroelastosis was predominantly subpleural in distribution, with some cases also showing centrilobular and paraseptal distribution. A sharp demarcation was often seen between areas of fibroelastosis and unaffected lung parenchyma, with fibroblastic foci often present at this interface. Concurrent features of obliterative bronchiolitis were present in 14 cases. Another common finding was the presence of diffuse alveolar damage (13 cases), usually in specimens obtained <1 year after clinical onset of restrictive allograft syndrome. The single specimen in which fibroelastosis was not identified was obtained before the clinical onset of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, and showed features of diffuse alveolar damage. In conclusion, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a major histopathologic correlate of restrictive allograft syndrome, and was often found concurrently with diffuse alveolar damage. Our findings support a temporal sequence of diffuse

  13. Novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics but with combinations and probability: bystanders in bulk effector cells influence results of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Toshiaki

    2011-07-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays are widely implemented to evaluate cell-mediated cytotoxic activity, and some assays are analyzed using the analogy of enzyme kinetics. In the analogy, the effector cell is regarded as the enzyme, the target cell as the substrate, the effector cell-target cell conjugate as the enzyme-substrate complex and the dead target cell as the product. However, the assumptions analogous to those of enzyme kinetics are not always true in cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays, and the parameter analogous to the Michaelis-Menten constant is not constant but is dependent on the number of effector cells. Therefore I present novel mathematical models for cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays without applying enzyme kinetics. I instead use combinations and probability, because analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays by applying enzyme kinetics seems controversial. With my original models, I demonstrate simulations of the data in previously published papers. The results are exhibited in the same forms as the corresponding data. Comparing the simulation results with the published data, the results seem to agree well with the data. From simulations of cytotoxic assays with bulk effector cells, it appears that bystanders in bulk effector cells increase both the cytotoxic activity and the motility of effector cells.

  14. Quality control in tissue banking--ensuring the safety of allograft tissues.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Linda K; Mansavage, Vicki L

    2006-09-01

    DESPITE FEDERAL REGULATIONS for tissue-banking practices, inadequate quality control led to the largest allograft tissue recall in history in October 2005. THE RECALL INCLUDED all allograft tissues obtained from 761 donors and distributed by five tissue banks. Many of these tissues already had been implanted and were unrecoverable. THIS ARTICLE DESCRIBES the many tissue-banking industry variables, including donor selection and testing and tissue recovery, processing, and preservation. QUESTIONS THAT HEALTH CARE providers can ask to determine which tissue banks' quality control measures best ensure the safety of the allografts they provide also are included.

  15. Modulating Wnt Signaling Pathway to Enhance Allograft Integration in Orthopedic Trauma Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    inhibitors Sost or DKK1 with monoclonal antibodies will enhance allograft integration to the host bone. The proposed work in this project was designed...Determine the effect of modulating the LRP-5/Wnt pathway with anti- Dkk1 monoclonal antibody on allograft incorporation in a rat segmental repair model using...bones from Fresh Frozen and Freeze-Dried allografts at 4, 8 and 12 week time points for saline, anti- Sost and anti- Dkk1 using µCT scanning. Data is

  16. Effect of a stable prostacyclin analogue on canine renal allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Tobimatsu, M; Ueda, Y; Toyoda, K; Saito, S; Konomi, K

    1987-01-01

    The effect of OP-41483 (Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Osaka, Japan), a stable prostacyclin analogue, on canine renal allograft rejection was investigated. Administration for 4 days after transplantation significantly increased renal cortical blood flow and urine output when compared with untreated dogs with renal allografts. Serum creatinine levels remained relatively low during postoperative days 1-4. Mean animal survival time was prolonged. Vascular lesions and mononuclear cell infiltration were greatly diminished in biopsy specimens removed on day 4. This stable prostacyclin analogue provided a degree of protection against canine renal allograft rejection. Images Figs. 1A and B. PMID:3545109

  17. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  18. Stephanthraniline A suppressed CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis through impairing PKCθ function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Yang; Zhou, Li-Fei; Li, Xiao-Yu; Zhao, Jia-Wen; Xu, Shi-Fang; Huang, Wen-Hai; Gao, Li-Juan; Hao, Shu-Juan; Ye, Yi-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2016-10-15

    Stephanthraniline A (STA), a C21 steroid isolated from Stephanotis mucronata (Blanco) Merr., was previously shown to inhibit T cells activation and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the in vivo immunosuppressive activity of STA and to elucidate its potential mechanisms. The results showed that pretreatment with STA significantly attenuated concanavalin A (Con A)-induced hepatitis and reduced CD4(+) T cells activation and aggregation in hepatic tissue in mice. STA directly suppressed the activation and proliferation of Con A-induced CD4(+) T cells, and inhibited NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Moreover, it was proved that STA inhibited T cells activation and proliferation through proximal T cell-receptor (TCR) signaling- and Ca(2+) signaling-independent way. The molecular docking studies predicted that STA could tight bind to PKCθ via five hydrogen. The further findings indicated STA directly inhibited PKCθ kinase activity, and its phosphorylation in activated CD4(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, the present study indicated that STA could protect against CD4(+) T cell-mediated immunological hepatitis in mice through PKCθ and its downstream NFAT, NFκB and MAPK signaling cascades. These results highlight the potential of STA as an effective leading compound for use in the treatment of CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  19. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy.

  20. HLA-B8 and cell-mediated immunity to gluten.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, F G; Bullen, A W; Robertson, D A; Losowsky, M S

    1981-01-01

    The leucocyte migration inhibition (LMI) test was used as an indicator of cell mediated immunity to gluten fraction III in 30 healthy controls and 58 patients with adult coeliac disease and the results related to HLA status and duration of treatment with a gluten-free diet. HLA-B8 controls showed significantly lower leucocyte migration indices, indicating greater immune response, than non-HLA B8 controls. Untreated coeliacs showed no difference from HLA-B8 controls. There was no difference between results from HLA-B8 and non-HLA-B8 coeliacs. Leucocyte migration was even lower in coeliacs early in treatment but rose after treatment for over one year. These results may reflect an immune response gene for gluten in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B8. The increased immune response to gluten as measured in this test cannot be the sole factor in aetiology of coeliac disease. Furthermore, it is necessary to re-evaluate earlier results of cell-mediated immunity in coeliac disease with reference to HLA status of the controls. PMID:6974678

  1. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  2. Regulation of herpes simplex virus-specific cell-mediated immunity by a specific suppressor factor.

    PubMed Central

    Horohov, D W; Wyckoff, J H; Moore, R N; Rouse, B T

    1986-01-01

    Our study was designed to investigate the nature of an antigen-specific suppressor factor generated by antigen-stimulated herpes simplex virus (HSV)-immune splenocytes. Factor SF-200, a 90,000- to 100,000-dalton fraction obtained after Sephacryl gel filtration, suppressed the generation of HSV-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and lymphoproliferative responses. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis of SF-200 indicated that it contained an I-J+, anti-idiotypic protein. It was possible to adsorb the suppressor activity of SF-200 to an anti-I-J immunoaffinity column. The suppressor activity could be eluted from the immunoaffinity column with a low-pH buffer. The acid-eluted material was determined to be both I-J+ and reactive with anti-HSV antiserum by Western blot analysis. Both SF-200 and the I-J+ suppressor activity suppressed only HSV-specific cell-mediated immunity responses. However, it was possible to generate nonspecific suppressor activity by incubating the I-J+ suppressor factor with Lyt 1+ splenocytes from HSV-immune mice. The implication of these results with respect to the model for a suppressor cell circuit regulating HSV-specific cell-mediated immunity responses is discussed. Images PMID:3009850

  3. ITIM-dependent negative signaling pathways for the control of cell-mediated xenogeneic immune responses.

    PubMed

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Seebach, Jörg D; Fernández-Renedo, Carlos; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is an innovative field of research with the potential to provide us with an alternative source of organs to face the severe shortage of human organ donors. For several reasons, pigs have been chosen as the most suitable source of organs and tissues for transplantation in humans. However, porcine xenografts undergo cellular immune responses representing a major barrier to their acceptance and normal functioning. Innate and adaptive xenogeneic immunity is mediated by both the recognition of xenogeneic tissue antigens and the lack of inhibition due to molecular cross-species incompatibilities of regulatory pathways. Therefore, the delivery of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-dependent and related negative signals to control innate (NK cells, macrophages) and adaptive T and B cells might overcome cell-mediated xenogeneic immunity. The proof of this concept has already been achieved in vitro by the transgenic overexpression of human ligands of several inhibitory receptors in porcine cells resulting in their resistance against xenoreactivity. Consequently, several transgenic pigs expressing tissue-specific human ligands of inhibitory coreceptors (HLA-E, CD47) or soluble competitors of costimulation (belatacept) have already been generated. The development of these robust and innovative approaches to modulate human anti-pig cellular immune responses, complementary to conventional immunosuppression, will help to achieve long-term xenograft survival. In this review, we will focus on the current strategies to enhance negative signaling pathways for the regulation of undesirable cell-mediated xenoreactive immune responses.

  4. Cordyceps militaris Enhances Cell-Mediated Immunity in Healthy Korean Men.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Joon; Baik, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sang Jung; Lee, Seong Gyu; Ahn, Hong Yup; Park, Ju Sang; Park, Sang Jong; Jang, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang Woon; Choi, Jin Young; Sung, Ji Hee; Lee, Seung Min

    2015-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a mushroom traditionally used for diverse pharmaceutical purposes in East Asia, including China, and has been found to be effective for enhancing immunity through various types of animal testing. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of C. militaris for enhancing cell-mediated immunity and its safety in healthy male adults. Healthy male adults were divided into the experimental group (n = 39), given 1.5 g/day of ethanol treated C. militaris in capsules, and the control group (n = 40), given the same number of identical placebo capsules filled with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose for 4 weeks from February 13 to March 14, 2012; the natural killer (NK) cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation index (PI), and T-helper cell 1 (Th1) cytokine cluster (interferon [IFN]-γ, interleukin [IL]-12, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) were measured, along with stability test, at weeks 0, 2, and 4. The C. militaris group showed a statistically significant greater increase in NK200 (P = .0010), lymphocyte PI (P ≤ .0001), IL-2 (P = .0096), and IFN-γ (P = .0126), compared with the basal level, than the placebo group. There was no statistically significant adverse reaction. C. militaris enhanced the NK cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation and partially increased Th1 cytokine secretion. Therefore, C. militaris is safe and effective for enhancing cell-mediated immunity of healthy male adults.

  5. In vitro enhancement of human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity by purified influenza virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, D J; Houde, M; Justewicz, D M; Mandeville, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of the glycoproteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) in the in vitro stimulation of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) or natural killer activity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated with radiolabeled K562 cells as target cells in an overnight chromium release assay. Three different approaches were used. (i) Purified viral proteins were obtained by extraction with Nonidet P-40, separation on a sucrose gradient, and further purification by affinity chromatography. Ficoll-Hypaque-purified peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to HA or NA individually or to a mixture of both significantly increased NCMC (32 to 50%). (ii) Treatment of HA and NA with their respective homologous antisera or F(ab')2 antibody abrogated the stimulation of NCMC by these glycoproteins. (iii) Virions treated with proteolytic enzymes resulted in viral cores lacking either HA or NA or both activities. Compared to whole virions, viral cores devoid of HA activity only induced a 50% increase in NCMC, whereas viral cores lacking HA activity and with traces of NA activity stimulated only 10% of the NCMC. These results suggest that influenza virus-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity is largely due to its glycoproteins. PMID:6387178

  6. Cardiac tamponade (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cardiac tamponade is a condition involving compression of the heart caused by blood or fluid accumulation in the space ... they cannot adequately fill or pump blood. Cardiac tamponade is an emergency condition that requires hospitalization.

  7. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system's electrical activity in the heart.

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  9. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  10. Combination of monoclonal antibodies with DST inhibits accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Chen, Jibing; Dai, Helong; Peng, Yuanzheng; Wang, Feng; Xia, Junjie; Thorlacius, Henrik; Zhu, Qi; Qi, Zhongquan

    2011-08-30

    Donor-reactive memory T cells mediated accelerated rejection is known as a barrier to the survival of transplanted organs. We investigated the combination of different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and donor-specific transfusion (DST) in memory T cells-based adoptive mice model. In the presence of donor-reactive memory T cells, the mean survival time (MST) of grafts in the anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group was 49.8d. Adding anti-CD44/CD70 mAbs to anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST treatment. The MST was more than 100 d (MST>100 d). Compared with anti-CD40L/LFA-1/DST group, anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70/DST group notably reduced the expansion of memory T cells, enhanced the proportion of CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppressed donor-specific responses. Our data suggest that anti-CD40L/LFA-1/CD44/CD70mAbs and DST can synergistically inhibit accelerated rejection mediated by memory T cells to induce long-lived heart allograft acceptance in mice.

  11. Management of Liver Allograft Trauma Resulting in Massive Subcapsular Hematoma After Living Donor Liver Transplantation: Can We Salvage the Liver Allograft?

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Chao; Thorat, Ashok; Poon, Kin-Shing; Yeh, Chun-Chieh; Chen, Te-Hung; Yang, Horng-Ren; Jeng, Long-Bin

    2017-01-05

    BACKGROUND Liver allograft trauma resulting in subcapsular hematoma after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT), although rare, is a life-threatening condition and requires prompt management to avoid any catastrophe. Herein we describe our successful experience in dealing with liver allograft hematoma that developed in the post-operative period after LDLT. MATERIAL AND METHODS From January 2002 to May 2015, a total of 616 recipients underwent LDLT at our institute. The intra-operative and postoperative records of these patients were analyzed to study the cases of liver allograft hematoma. Four patients (n=4) who developed liver allograft subcapsular hematoma during the intra-operative and post-operative periods were included in study. The outcomes of these patients were studied after the administration of the medical, surgical, or combined modalities of treatment. RESULTS Out of 616 LDLT recipients, 4 (0.64%) developed subcapsular hematoma. Patients were managed by a stepwise approach: Initial non-operative management with transarterial embolization (if extravasation of the contrast was noticed during imaging studies) was performed (n=1). Three patients developed hemodynamic instability with signs of hematoma rupture and were successfully treated by surgical exploration. CONCLUSIONS Timely diagnosis and suitable management can successfully salvage a liver allograft even in the presence of massive subcapsular hematoma. Our emphasis is on perihepatic packing rather than open surgical drainage if exploration is required, which can achieve a 100% success rate.

  12. Disinfection of human skin allografts in tissue banking: a systematic review report.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C; Callum, J; Mohr, J; Duong, A; Garibaldi, A; Simunovic, N; Ayeni, O R

    2016-12-01

    The use of skin allografts to temporarily replace lost or damaged skin is practiced worldwide. Naturally occurring contamination can be present on skin or can be introduced at recovery or during processing. This contamination can pose a threat to allograft recipients. Bacterial culture and disinfection of allografts are mandated, but the specific practices and methodologies are not dictated by standards. A systematic review of literature from three databases found 12 research articles that evaluated bioburden reduction processes of skin grafts. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics and antifungal agents was the most frequently identified disinfection method reported demonstrating reductions in contamination rates. It was determined that the greatest reduction in the skin allograft contamination rates utilized 0.1 % peracetic acid or 25 kGy of gamma irradiation at lower temperatures.

  13. Platelet deposition in rat heart allografts and the effect of a thromboxane receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Foegh, M.L.; Khirabadi, B.S.; Ramwell, P.W.

    1986-07-01

    The effect of a thromboxane antagonist, L640,035 on platelet deposition in heart allografts was studied. Twenty Lewis rats received heterotopic allografts from Lewis x Brown-Norway F1 hybrid. All recipients received azathioprine (5 mg/kg/day). The rats were divided into three groups. Groups II and III were also treated daily with either the vehicle for L640,035 or L640,035 respectively. Syngeneic indium-111-labeled platelet deposition was determined in the allograft and the native heart at 6, 9, and 13 days after transplantation; group III was studied on the sixth and ninth day only. A rapidly increasing platelet deposition was seen in allografts from rats given azathioprine; whereas the thromboxane antagonist prevented the increase in platelet deposition on the ninth day.

  14. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Allograft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Restuccia, Giuseppe; Lippi, Alessandro; Casella, Francesco; Citarelli, Carmine; Sacchetti, Federico; Benifei, Maurizio

    2017-02-07

    In clinical practice, chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. Usually, these lesions are discovered four to six weeks after injuries. More frequently, Achilles tendon ruptures are acute and treated with tendon sutures.1 Many surgical techniques are available to treat chronic lesions such as sutures or V-Y elongation with or without augments.2-3 Our case is about a chronic Achilles tendon rupture discovered two years after injury. Our patient came to our attention with a 6 cm tendon gap. We performed tendon repair with cadaver allograft. After four years of follow-up, our patient has a complete functional recovery and he can normally perform daily and working tasks without pain.

  15. Rational clinical trial design for antibody mediated renal allograft injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandal, Shaifali; Zand, Martin S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody mediated renal allograft rejection is a significant cause of acute and chronic graft loss. Recent work has revealed that AMR is a complex processes, involving B and plasma cells, donor-specific antibodies, complement, vascular endothelial cells, NK cells, Fc receptors, cytokines and chemokines. These insights have led to the development of numerous new therapies, and adaptation of others originally developed for treatment of hemetologic malignancies, autoimmune and complement mediated conditions. Here we review emerging insights into the pathophysiology of AMR as well as current and emerging therapies for both acute and chronic AMR. Finally, we discuss rational clinical trial design in light of antibody and B cell immunobiology, as well as appropriate efficacy metrics to identify robust protocols and therapeutic agents. PMID:25553476

  16. Cardiac ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Birgit T; McDermott, Jeff S

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels are critical for all aspects of cardiac function, including rhythmicity and contractility. Consequently, ion channels are key targets for therapeutics aimed at cardiac pathophysiologies such as atrial fibrillation or angina. At the same time, off-target interactions of drugs with cardiac ion channels can be the cause of unwanted side effects. This manuscript aims to review the physiology and pharmacology of key cardiac ion channels. The intent is to highlight recent developments for therapeutic development, as well as elucidate potential mechanisms for drug-induced cardiac side effects, rather than present an in-depth review of each channel subtype. PMID:26556552

  17. HER2-specific immunoligands engaging NKp30 or NKp80 trigger NK-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells and enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peipp, Matthias; Derer, Stefanie; Lohse, Stefan; Staudinger, Matthias; Klausz, Katja; Valerius, Thomas; Gramatzki, Martin; Kellner, Christian

    2015-10-13

    NK cells detect tumors through activating surface receptors, which bind self-antigens that are frequently expressed upon malignant transformation. To increase the recognition of tumor cells, the extracellular domains of ligands of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30, NKp80 and DNAM-1 (i.e. B7-H6, AICL and PVR, respectively) were fused to a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is displayed by various solid tumors. The resulting immunoligands, designated B7-H6:HER2-scFv, AICL:HER2-scFv, and PVR:HER2-scFv, respectively, bound HER2 and the addressed NK cell receptor. However, whereas B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv triggered NK cells to kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, PVR:HER2-scFv was not efficacious. Moreover, NK cell cytotoxicity was enhanced synergistically when B7-H6:HER2-scFv or AICL:HER2-scFv were applied in combination with another HER2-specific immunoligand engaging the stimulatory receptor NKG2D. In contrast, no improvements were achieved by combining B7-H6:HER2-scFv with AICL:HER2-scFv. Additionally, B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by the therapeutic antibodies trastuzumab and cetuximab synergistically, with B7-H6:HER2-scFv exhibiting a higher efficacy. In summary, antibody-derived proteins engaging NKp30 or NKp80 may represent attractive biologics to further enhance anti-tumor NK cell responses and may provide an innovative approach to sensitize tumor cells for antibody-based immunotherapy.

  18. Renal allograft glomerulopathy and the value of immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Freese, P M; Svalander, C T; Mölne, J; Nyberg, G

    2004-10-01

    Studies of late renal allograft biopsies focus on chronic damage investigated by light microscopy (LM). We evaluated the use of immunohistochemistry (IH) as applied in the routine study of transplant glomerulopathies. Among renal transplants in 1985 - 1997, 129 were identified where a graft biopsy had been obtained 6 months or more after transplantation, studied by LM and IH and the original renal disease was known. IH results were evaluated in relation to glomerular LM findings and the original diagnosis. The risk of graft loss in relation to recurrent and de novo glomerulopathy was evaluated. By LM, 69 biopsies (53%) showed glomerulopathy, mesangial sclerosis only in 26, proliferative changes in 15, membranous in 15 and combined membranous and proliferative in 13. By IH, 46 biopsies (36%) stained positive with IgM and/or complement only and 24 with immune complexes including IgA and/or IgG. Seven biopsies (5.4%) showed glomerular disease by IH in spite of normal LM. Recurrence was diagnosed in 22 grafts; 12 had IgA nephropathy, 3 had SLE, 6 other immune complex nephritides and 1 systemic vasculitis. Twenty-eight biopsies (22%) with proliferative and/or membranous glomerulopathy lacked clear connection to the original renal disorder. More than half of these had deposits of IgM and C3 only. The further graft survival was significantly reduced in the presence of de novo glomerulopathy by LM, relative risk 2.0 (confidence interval 1.1 - 3.8) in a Cox-proportional hazards analysis also including serum creatinine and Banff chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) grade, p = 0.03. In conclusion, transplant glomerulopathy should be separated from recurrence. De novo glomerulopathy is frequent and ominous.

  19. Symptomatic Respiratory Virus Infection and Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Cynthia E.; Preiksaitis, Carl M.; Lease, Erika D.; Edelman, Jeffrey; Kirby, Katharine A.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Raghu, Ganesh; Boeckh, Michael; Limaye, Ajit P.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is a major cause of allograft loss post-lung transplantation. Prior studies have examined the association between respiratory virus infection (RVI) and CLAD were limited by older diagnostic techniques, study design, and case numbers. We examined the association between symptomatic RVI and CLAD using modern diagnostic techniques in a large contemporary cohort of lung transplant recipients (LTRs). Methods. We retrospectively assessed clinical variables including acute rejection, cytomegalovirus pneumonia, upper and lower RVI, and the primary endpoint of CLAD (determined by 2 independent reviewers) in 250 LTRs in a single university transplantation program. Univariate and multivariate Cox models were used to analyze the relationship between RVI and CLAD in a time-dependent manner, incorporating different periods of risk following RVI diagnosis. Results. Fifty patients (20%) were diagnosed with CLAD at a median of 95 weeks post-transplantation, and 79 (32%) had 114 episodes of RVI. In multivariate analysis, rejection and RVI were independently associated with CLAD (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]) 2.2 (1.2–3.9), P = .01 and 1.9 (1.1–3.5), P = .03, respectively. The association of RVI with CLAD was stronger the more proximate the RVI episode: 4.8 (1.9–11.6), P < .01; 3.4 (1.5–7.5), P < .01; and 2.4 (1.2–5.0), P = .02 in multivariate analysis for 3, 6, and 12 months following RVI, respectively. Conclusions. Symptomatic RVI is independently associated with development of CLAD, with increased risk at shorter time periods following RVI. Prospective studies to characterize the virologic determinants of CLAD and define the underlying mechanisms are warranted. PMID:26565010

  20. Effects of growth hormone administration in pediatric renal allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Bartosh, S; Kaiser, B; Rezvani, I; Polinsky, M; Schulman, S; Palmer, J; Baluarte, H J

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rGH) was assessed in five pediatric allograft recipients with severe growth retardation despite successful renal transplants. rGH 0.05 mg/kg per dose was given six times weekly by subcutaneous injection to five prepubertal children (mean age 15.2 +/- 2.0 years) all of whom had bone ages less than or equal to 12 years (10.0 +/- 1.4 years), a height standard deviation score of less than -2.5 (-4.9 +/- 1.5), no evidence of catch-up growth, a calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of more than 40 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (51 +/- 6.8 ml/min per 1.73 m2), and stable renal function on alternate-day prednisone (16.7 +/- 2.6 mg/m2 per dose). Growth hormone profiles were abnormal in all children before treatment. rGH administration led to a significant increase in both growth rate (3.5 +/- 1.6 cm/year pre therapy, 8.5 +/- 1.4 cm/year post therapy, P less than 0.001) and percentage of expected growth velocity for bone age (67 +/- 31% pre therapy, 163 +/- 27% post therapy, P less than 0.001) with evidence of true catch-up growth. During the study period, three children had the appearance of secondary sexual characteristics, and one had premature advancement of his bone age. GFR decreased in three children, and in one rGH was discontinued due to a steady rise in serum creatinine. No significant changes were seen in serum calcium, phosphorus, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, or thyroid function, although a significant increase in alkaline phosphatase was found. In summary, growth-retarded pediatric renal allograft recipients may have abnormal endogenous GH production and respond favorably to rGH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Is Duplex-Ultrasound a useful tool in defining rejection episodes in composite tissue allograft transplants?

    PubMed

    Loizides, Alexander; Kronberger, Irmgard-Elisabeth; Plaikner, Michaela; Gruber, Hannes

    2015-12-01

    Immunologic reactions in transplanted organs are in more or less all allograft patients detectable: clear parameters exist as e.g. in renal transplants where the clearance power reduces by rejection. On the contrary, in composite tissue allografts clear and objective indicators stating a rejection episode lack. We present the case of a hand-transplanted subject with signs of acute transplant rejection diagnosed by means of Duplex Ultrasound and confirmed by biopsy.

  2. Modulating Wnt Signaling Pathway to Enhance Allograft Integration in Orthopaedic Trauma Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    neutralizing the LRP5/Wnt pathway inhibitors Sost or DKK1 with monoclonal antibodies will enhance allograft integration to the host bone. The proposed work in...endpoints. Aim 2: Determine the effect of modulating the LRP-5/Wnt pathway with anti- Dkk1 monoclonal antibody on allograft incorporation in a rat...time point, saline/anti-Sost/Anti- Dkk1 ; N=16 each treatment) have been treated, samples harvested and banked for analysis. In vivo radiographs as

  3. Iliac Crest Bone Graft versus Local Autograft or Allograft for Lumbar Spinal Fusion: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Tuchman, Alexander; Brodke, Darrel S.; Youssef, Jim A.; Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Dettori, Joseph R.; Park, Jong-Beom; Yoon, S. Tim; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design  Systematic review. Objective  To compare the effectiveness and safety between iliac crest bone graft (ICBG) and local autologous bone and allograft in the lumbar spine. Methods  A systematic search of multiple major medical reference databases identified studies evaluating spinal fusion in patients with degenerative joint disease using ICBG, local autograft, or allograft in the thoracolumbar spine. Results  Six comparative studies met our inclusion criteria. A “low” strength of the overall body of evidence suggested no difference in fusion percentages in the lumbar spine between local autograft and ICBG. We found no difference in fusion percentages based on low evidence comparing allograft with ICBG autograft. There were no differences in pain or functional results comparing local autograft or allograft with ICBG autograft. Donor site pain and hematoma/seroma occurred more frequently in ICBG autograft group for lumbar fusion procedures. There was low evidence around the estimate of patients with donor site pain following ICBG harvesting, ranging from 16.7 to 20%. With respect to revision, low evidence demonstrated no difference between allograft and ICBG autograft. There was no evidence comparing patients receiving allograft with local autograft for fusion, pain, functional, and safety outcomes. Conclusion  In the lumbar spine, ICBG, local autograft, and allograft have similar effectiveness in terms of fusion rates, pain scores, and functional outcomes. However, ICBG is associated with an increased risk for donor site-related complications. Significant limitations exist in the available literature when comparing ICBG, local autograft, and allograft for lumbar fusion, and thus ICBG versus other fusion methods necessitates further investigation. PMID:27556001

  4. Mechanical behaviour of Bioactive Glass granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in load bearing defects.

    PubMed

    Hulsen, D J W; Geurts, J; van Gestel, N A P; van Rietbergen, B; Arts, J J

    2016-05-03

    Bioactive Glass (BAG) granules are osteoconductive and possess unique antibacterial properties for a synthetic biomaterial. To assess the applicability of BAG granules in load-bearing defects, the aim was to compare mechanical behaviour of graft layers consisting of BAG granules and morselized cancellous bone allograft in different volume mixtures under clinically relevant conditions. The graft layers were mechanically tested, using two mechanical testing modalities with simulated physiological loading conditions: highly controllable confined compression tests (CCT) and more clinically realistic in situ compression tests (ISCT) in cadaveric porcine bone defects. Graft layer impaction strain, residual strain, aggregate modulus, and creep strain were determined in CCT. Graft layer porosity was determined using micro computed tomography. The ISCT was used to determine graft layer subsidence in bone environment. ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.001) between different graft layer compositions. True strains absolutely decreased for increasing BAG content: impaction strain -0.92 (allograft) to -0.39 (BAG), residual strain -0.12 to -0.01, and creep strain -0.09 to 0.00 respectively. Aggregate modulus increased with increasing BAG content from 116 to 653MPa. Porosity ranged from 66% (pure allograft) to 15% (pure BAG). Subsidence was highest for allograft, and remarkably low for a 1:1 BAG-allograft volume mixture. Both BAG granules and allograft morsels as stand-alone materials exhibit suboptimal mechanical behaviour for load-bearing purpose. BAG granules are difficult to handle and less porous, whereas allograft subsides and creeps. A 1:1 volume mixture of BAG and allograft is therefore proposed as the best graft material in load-bearing defects.

  5. High-Throughput Proteomic Approaches to the Elucidation of Potential Biomarkers of Chronic Allograft Injury (CAI)

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Hilary; Slyne, Jennifer; Frain, Helena; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the role of OMICs technologies, concentrating in particular on proteomics, in biomarker discovery in chronic allograft injury (CAI). CAI is the second most prevalent cause of allograft dysfunction and loss in the first decade post-transplantation, after death with functioning graft (DWFG). The term CAI, sometimes referred to as chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), describes the deterioration of renal allograft function and structure as a result of immunological processes (chronic antibody-mediated rejection), and other non-immunological factors such as calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) induced nephrotoxicity, hypertension and infection. Current methods for assessing allograft function are costly, insensitive and invasive; traditional kidney function measurements such as serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) display poor predictive abilities, while the current “gold-standard” involving histological diagnosis with a renal biopsy presents its own inherent risks to the overall health of the allograft. As early as two years post-transplantation, protocol biopsies have shown more than 50% of allograft recipients have mild CAN; ten years post-transplantation more than 50% of the allograft recipients have progressed to severe CAN which is associated with diminishing graft function. Thus, there is a growing medical requirement for minimally invasive biomarkers capable of identifying the early stages of the disease which would allow for timely intervention. Proteomics involves the study of the expression, localization, function and interaction of the proteome. Proteomic technologies may be powerful tools used to identify novel biomarkers which would predict CAI in susceptible individuals. In this paper we will review the use of proteomics in the elucidation of novel predictive biomarkers of CAI in clinical, animal and in vitro studies. PMID:28250402

  6. Controlled Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenglin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Ge

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has been a hot topic for years because of the clinical importance of cardiac diseases and the rapid evolution of CT systems. In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for controlled cardiac CT that may effectively reduce image artifacts due to cardiac and respiratory motions. Our approach is radically different from existing ones and is based on controlling the X-ray source rotation velocity and powering status in reference to the cardiac motion. We theoretically show that by such a control-based intervention the data acquisition process can be optimized for cardiac CT in the cases of periodic and quasiperiodic cardiac motions. Specifically, we formulate the corresponding coordination/control schemes for either exact or approximate matches between the ideal and actual source positions, and report representative simulation results that support our analytic findings. PMID:23165017

  7. Expression of growth arrest-specific gene 6 and its receptors in dysfunctional human renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian L; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shi S; Painter, Dorothy; Bishop, G Alex; Eris, Josette M

    2003-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and its receptors Rse, Axl and Mer have recently been found to be involved in a rat model of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Thus, in this study we investigated the function of Gas6 and its receptors in human renal allograft dysfunction. Expression of Gas6 and its receptors was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Gas6 and its receptors were widely expressed in glomeruli, tubules and vessels of renal allografts. Gas6 expression was detected in normal-functioning allografts and was increased in acute rejection ( P<0.05), acute tubular necrosis ( P<0.05) and CAN ( P<0.01). Gas6 receptors were not upregulated in any of the allograft groups, except for the Axl receptor, which increased only in acute tubular necrosis ( P<0.01). Gas6 expression was also found to correspond with the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, a general marker of CAN ( r(2)=0.21, P<0.01). These findings suggest that Gas6, acting as a growth factor, is increased in the process of kidney allograft dysfunction and in CAN.

  8. The impact of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies on late kidney allograft failure.

    PubMed

    Loupy, Alexandre; Hill, Gary S; Jordan, Stanley C

    2012-04-17

    Despite improvements in outcomes of renal transplantation, kidney allograft loss remains substantial, and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and costs. Identifying the pathologic pathways responsible for allograft loss, and the attendant development of therapeutic interventions, will be one of the guiding future objectives of transplant medicine. One of the most important advances of the past decade has been the demonstration of the destructive power of anti-HLA alloantibodies and their association with antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). Compelling evidence exists to show that donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSAs) are largely responsible for the chronic deterioration of allografts, a condition previously attributed to calcineurin inhibitor toxicity and chronic allograft nephropathy. The emergence of sensitive techniques to detect DSAs, together with advances in the assessment of graft pathology, have expanded the spectrum of what constitutes ABMR. Today, subtler forms of rejection--such as indolent ABMR, C4d-negative ABMR, and transplant arteriopathy--are seen in which DSAs exert a marked pathological effect. In addition, arteriosclerosis, previously thought to be a bystander lesion related to the vicissitudes of aging, is accelerated in ABMR. Advances in our understanding of the pathological significance of DSAs and ABMR show their primacy in the mediation of chronic allograft destruction. Therapies aimed at B cells, plasma cells and antibodies will be important therapeutic options to improve the length and quality of kidney allograft survival.

  9. Identification of microRNAs involved in acute rejection and spontaneous tolerance in murine hepatic allografts

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Miwa; Chen, Jiajie; Fujino, Masayuki; Kitazawa, Yusuke; Sugioka, Atsushi; Zhong, Liang; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Graft acceptance without the need for immunosuppressive drugs is the ultimate goal of transplantation therapy. In murine liver transplantation, allografts are accepted across major histocompatibility antigen complex barriers without the use of immunosuppressive drugs and constitute a suitable model for research on immunological rejection and tolerance. MicroRNA (miRNA) has been known to be involved in the immunological responses. In order to identify mRNAs in spontaneous liver allograft tolerance, miRNA expression in hepatic allografts was examined using this transplantation model. According to the graft pathological score and function, miR-146a, 15b, 223, 23a, 27a, 34a and 451 were upregulated compared with the expression observed in the syngeneic grafts. In contrast, miR-101a, 101b and 148a were downregulated. Our results demonstrated the alteration of miRNAs in the allografts and may indicate the role of miRNAs in the induction of tolerance after transplantation. Furthermore, our data suggest that monitoring the graft expression of novel miRNAs may allow clinicians to differentiate between rejection and tolerance. A better understanding of the tolerance inducing mechanism observed in murine hepatic allografts may provide a therapeutic strategy for attenuating allograft rejection. PMID:25323448

  10. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation.

  11. AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft: a report of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Rebecca; Josephson, Michelle A.; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M.

    2012-01-01

    AA amyloidosis is a disorder characterized by the abnormal formation, accumulation and systemic deposition of fibrillary material that frequently involves the kidney. Recurrent AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft has been documented in patients with tuberculosis, familial Mediterranean fever, ankylosing spondylitis, chronic pyelonephritis and rheumatoid arthritis. De novo AA amyloidosis is rarely described. We report two cases of AA amyloidosis in the renal allograft. Our first case is a 47-year-old male with a history of ankylosing spondylitis who developed end-stage renal disease reportedly from tubulointerstitial nephritis from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent use. A biopsy was never performed. One year after transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the femoral head and 8 years post-transplantation, AA amyloidosis was identified in the renal allograft. He was treated with colchicine and adalimumab and has stable renal function at 1 year-follow-up. Our second case is a 57-year-old male with a long history of intravenous drug use and hepatitis C infection who developed end-stage kidney disease due to AA amyloidosis. Our second patient's course was complicated by renal adenovirus, pulmonary aspergillosis and hepatitis C with AA amyloidosis subsequently being identified in the allograft 2.5 years post-transplantation. Renal allograft function remains stable 4-years post-transplantation. These reports describe clinical and pathologic features of two cases of AA amyloidosis presenting with proteinuria and focal involvement of the renal allograft. PMID:22833808

  12. The effects of prolonged deep freezing on the biomechanical properties of osteochondral allografts.

    PubMed

    Rozen, Benjamin; Brosh, Tamar; Salai, Moshe; Herman, Amir; Dudkiewicz, Israel

    2009-02-01

    Musculo-skeletal allografts sterilized and deep frozen are among the most common human tissue to be preserved and utilized in modern medicine. The effects of a long deep freezing period on cortical bone has already been evaluated and found to be insignificant. However, there are no reports about the influences of a protracted deep freezing period on osteochondral allografts. One hundred osteochondral cylinders were taken from a fresh specimen and humeral heads of 1 year, 2 years, 3 years and 4 year old bones. Twenty chips from each period, with a minimum of 3 chips per humeral head. Each was mechanically tested by 3 point compression. The fresh osteochondral allografts were significantly mechanically better than the deep frozen osteochondral allografts. There was no statistical significant time dependent difference between the deep frozen groups in relation to the freezing period. Therefore, we conclude that, from the mechanical point of view deep freezing of osteochondral allografts over a period of 4 years, is safe without further deterioration of the biomechanical properties of the osteochondral allografts.

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P < 0.001). In the allograft group, use of vascular access started within 7 days in 16 patients (80%), as soon as from the day of surgery in 10 patients. Primary (unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  14. [The humoral and cell-mediated immune response induced by the NIVGRIP inactivated influenza vaccine].

    PubMed

    Mihail, A; Steiner, N; Berca, C; Jucu, V; Muşat, G

    1988-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted in patients vaccinated with the NIVGRIP trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine and in placebo receiving controls on the kinetics of the serum hemagglutination inhibiting (HAI) antibodies and the neutralizing secretory antibodies in the nasopharyngeal secretions (NPS), of the blastic transformation of lymphocytes index, of the rosette formation index and of the serum immunoglobulins. A significant rise of the H.A.I. and the neutralizing secretory antibodies as well as of the blastic transformation of lymphocytes index was recorded after stimulation with the influenza vaccine. There were no significant changes in controls. No significant variations of the blastic transformation of lymphocytes index after stimulation with P.P.D. and of the rosette formation index were recorded in both investigated groups. Serum immunoglobulin titres showed significant variations in vaccinated as well as in control groups. The results point out the stimulating effect of the NIVGRIP inactivated influenza vaccine on both humoral and cell mediated immune responses.

  15. Development of a simplified and convenient assay for cell-mediated immunity to the mumps virus.

    PubMed

    Otani, Naruhito; Shima, Masayuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Okuno, Toshiomi

    2014-09-01

    Because methods for measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to the mumps virus are expensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding, the role of CMI in mumps virus infection remains unclear. To address this issue, we report here the development of a simplified method for measuring mumps virus-specific CMI that is suitable for use in diverse laboratory and clinical settings. A mumps vaccine was cultured with whole blood, and interferon (IFN)-γ released into the culture supernatant was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IFN-γ production in blood from vaccinated subjects markedly increased in response to the vaccine and decreased before the antibody titer decreased in some cases, suggesting that this assay may be used as a simple surrogate method for measuring CMI specific for the mumps virus.

  16. Effect of viral and bacterial pneumonias on cell-mediated immunity in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, C A; Linnemann, C C; Schiff, G M; Phair, J P

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was assessed during infection and after convalescence in 12 patients with influenza pneumonia and 10 patients with bacterial pneumonia. The patients with influenza pneumonia had a marked impairment of skin test reactivity, and their lymphocytes showed a diminished response to phytohemagglutinin and streptokinase-streptodornase stimulation in vitro. Suppression of CMI was related to the severity of the pneumonia. Patients with bacterial pneumonia showed as great a suppression of the response to phytohemagglutinin and streptokinase-streptodornase as the patients with viral pneumonia. All parameters of CMI returned to normal in both groups after convalescence. The depression of CMI could not be related to a decrease in the number of thymus-derived lymphocytes or to serum-suppressive factors in these patients. PMID:1082445

  17. Postoperative Depression of Tumour-directed Cell-mediated Immunity in Patients with Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, A. J.; Spilg, W. G. S.; Mackie, Rona M.; Thomas, Catherine E.

    1972-01-01

    Leucocytes from 46 melanoma patients, 45 breast carcinoma patients, and 95 control donors were tested by the leucocyte migration test against the supernatants of homogenates of malignant melanomas, breast carcinomas, simple breast tumours, and breasts showing simple cystic disease. By comparison with controls inhibition of migration occurred significantly more frequently when tumour patients' leucocytes were exposed to extracts of histogenetically similar tumours. Cell-mediated immunity to tumour-associated antigens was measured in 12 patients with breast carcinoma and 12 with malignant melanoma immediately before surgical operation and in the postoperative period. All patients tested before operation showed significant inhibition of migration on contact with extracts of histogenetically similar tumours. Postoperatively the degree of leucocyte migration inhibition was reduced in all patients with melanoma and breast carcinoma. Significant inhibition of leucocyte migration returned in most patients 6-22 days after operation. PMID:5077468

  18. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  19. Molecular, genetic and stem cell-mediated therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Zanetta, Chiara; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease. It is the first genetic cause of infant mortality. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to the reduction of SMN protein. The most striking component is the loss of alpha motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, resulting in progressive paralysis and eventually premature death. There is no current treatment other than supportive care, although the past decade has seen a striking advancement in understanding of both SMA genetics and molecular mechanisms. A variety of disease modifying interventions are rapidly bridging the translational gap from the laboratory to clinical trials. In this review, we would like to outline the most interesting therapeutic strategies that are currently developing, which are represented by molecular, gene and stem cell-mediated approaches for the treatment of SMA.

  20. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  1. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  2. Optimistic Expectancies and Cell-Mediated Immunity: The Role of Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimistic expectancies affect many psychosocial outcomes and may also predict immune system changes and health, but the nature and mechanisms of any such physiological effects have not been identified. The present study related law-school expectancies to cell-mediated immunity (CMI), examining the within- and between-person components of this relationship and affective mediators. First-year law students (N = 124) completed questionnaire measures of expectancies and affect and received delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests at five time points. A positive relationship between optimistic expectancies and CMI occurred, in which that changes in optimism correlated with changes in CMI. Likewise, changes in optimism predicted changes in positive and, to a lesser degree, negative affect, but the relationship between optimism and immunity was partially accounted for only by positive affect. This dynamic relationship between expectancies and immunity has positive implications for psychological interventions to improve health, particularly those that increase positive affect. PMID:20424083

  3. A convergent and essential interneuron pathway for Mauthner-cell-mediated escapes.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, Alix M B; Schoppik, David; Robson, Drew N; Haesemeyer, Martin; Portugues, Ruben; Li, Jennifer M; Randlett, Owen; Wee, Caroline L; Engert, Florian; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-06-01

    The Mauthner cell (M-cell) is a command-like neuron in teleost fish whose firing in response to aversive stimuli is correlated with short-latency escapes [1-3]. M-cells have been proposed as evolutionary ancestors of startle response neurons of the mammalian reticular formation [4], and studies of this circuit have uncovered important principles in neurobiology that generalize to more complex vertebrate models [3]. The main excitatory input was thought to originate from multisensory afferents synapsing directly onto the M-cell dendrites [3]. Here, we describe an additional, convergent pathway that is essential for the M-cell-mediated startle behavior in larval zebrafish. It is composed of excitatory interneurons called spiral fiber neurons, which project to the M-cell axon hillock. By in vivo calcium imaging, we found that spiral fiber neurons are active in response to aversive stimuli capable of eliciting escapes. Like M-cell ablations, bilateral ablations of spiral fiber neurons largely eliminate short-latency escapes. Unilateral spiral fiber neuron ablations shift the directionality of escapes and indicate that spiral fiber neurons excite the M-cell in a lateralized manner. Their optogenetic activation increases the probability of short-latency escapes, supporting the notion that spiral fiber neurons help activate M-cell-mediated startle behavior. These results reveal that spiral fiber neurons are essential for the function of the M-cell in response to sensory cues and suggest that convergent excitatory inputs that differ in their input location and timing ensure reliable activation of the M-cell, a feedforward excitatory motif that may extend to other neural circuits.

  4. Childhood adversity and cell-mediated immunity in young adulthood: does type and timing matter?

    PubMed

    Slopen, Natalie; McLaughlin, Katie A; Dunn, Erin C; Koenen, Karestan C

    2013-02-01

    Childhood adversity can have powerful effects on health over the life course. Persistent changes in cell-mediated immune function may be one pathway linking adverse childhood experiences with later disease risk. However, limited research has examined childhood adversity in relation to cell-mediated immune function, and in particular, immune response to latent viruses in adulthood. The present study investigated the association of two types of childhood adversity, socioeconomic disadvantage during adolescence and abuse prior to age 18, with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) antibody titers in a large nationally representative sample of young adults aged 24-32years. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health, Wave 4 (n=13,162). We examined the associations of three indicators of adolescent SES (parental education, household income, and occupational status) and frequency and timing of physical and sexual abuse with EBV antibodies, controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and presence of a smoker in the household during adolescence. Lower parental occupational status and some categories of lower education were associated with elevated EBV antibodies (p<.05), and individuals who reported sexual abuse that occurred more than 10times had elevated EBV antibodies relative to individuals who were not sexually abused (p=0.03). Among individuals exposed to physical abuse, those who were first abused at age 3-5years had heightened EBV antibodies relative to those first abused during adolescence (p=0.004). This study extends prior research linking early adversity and immune function, and provides initial evidence that childhood adversity has a persistent influence on immune responses to latent infection in adulthood.

  5. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies.

  6. Cell-Mediated Immunity to AAV Vectors, Evolving Concepts and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Basner-Tschakarjan, Etiena; Mingozzi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are one of the most efficient in vivo gene delivery platforms. Over the past decade, clinical trials of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer led to some of the most exciting results in the field of gene therapy and, recently, to the market approval of an AAV-based drug in Europe. With clinical development, however, it became obvious that the host immune system represents an important obstacle to successful gene transfer with AAV vectors. In this review article, we will discuss the issue of cytotoxic T cell responses directed against the AAV capsid encountered on human studies. While over the past several years the field has acquired a tremendous amount of information on the interactions of AAV vectors with the immune system, a lot of questions are still unanswered. Novel concepts are emerging, such as the relationship between the total capsid dose and the T cell-mediated clearance of transduced cells, the potential role of innate immunity in vector immunogenicity highlighted in preclinical studies, and the cross talk between regulatory and effector T cells in the determination of the outcome of gene transfer. There is still a lot to learn about immune responses in AAV gene transfer, for example, it is not well understood what are the determinants of the kinetics of activation of T cells in response to vector administration, why not all subjects develop detrimental T cell responses following gene transfer, and whether the intervention strategies currently in use to block T cell-mediated clearance of transduced cells will be safe and effective for all gene therapy indications. Results from novel preclinical models and clinical studies will help to address these points and to reach the important goal of developing safe and effective gene therapy protocols to treat human diseases.

  7. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  8. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  9. NLRP3 suppresses NK cell-mediated responses to carcinogen-induced tumors and metastases.

    PubMed

    Chow, Melvyn T; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Paget, Christophe; Wong, Christina S F; Duret, Helene; Tschopp, Jürg; Möller, Andreas; Smyth, Mark J

    2012-11-15

    The NLRP3 inflammasome acts as a danger signal sensor that triggers and coordinates the inflammatory response upon infectious insults or tissue injury and damage. However, the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in natural killer (NK) cell-mediated control of tumor immunity is poorly understood. Here, we show in a model of chemical-induced carcinogenesis and a series of experimental and spontaneous metastases models that mice lacking NLRP3 display significantly reduced tumor burden than control wild-type (WT) mice. The suppression of spontaneous and experimental tumor metastases and methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced sarcomas in mice deficient for NLRP3 was NK cell and IFN-γ-dependent. Focusing on the amenable B16F10 experimental lung metastases model, we determined that expression of NLRP3 in bone marrow-derived cells was necessary for optimal tumor metastasis. Tumor-driven expansion of CD11b(+)Gr-1(intermediate) (Gr-1(int)) myeloid cells within the lung tumor microenvironment of NLRP3(-/-) mice was coincident with increased lung infiltrating activated NK cells and an enhanced antimetastatic response. The CD11b(+)Gr-1(int) myeloid cells displayed a unique cell surface phenotype and were characterized by their elevated production of CCL5 and CXCL9 chemokines. Adoptive transfer of this population into WT mice enhanced NK cell numbers in, and suppression of, B16F10 lung metastases. Together, these data suggested that NLRP3 is an important suppressor of NK cell-mediated control of carcinogenesis and metastases and identify CD11b(+)Gr-1(int) myeloid cells that promote NK cell antimetastatic function.

  10. Hypoxia simultaneously alters satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis and hepatocyte growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Flann, K L; Rathbone, C R; Cole, L C; Liu, X; Allen, R E; Rhoads, R P

    2014-05-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is a multifaceted process requiring the spatial and temporal coordination of myogenesis as well as angiogenesis. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) plays a pivotal role in myogenesis by activating satellite cells (SC) in regenerating muscle and likely plays a role as a contributor to revascularization. Moreover, repair of a functional blood supply is critical to ameliorate tissue ischemia and restore skeletal muscle function, however effects of hypoxia on satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis remain unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the role of HGF and effect of hypoxia on the capacity of satellite cells to promote angiogenesis. To characterize the role of HGF, a microvascular fragment (MVF) culture model coupled with satellite cell conditioned media (CM) was employed. The activity of HGF was specifically blocked in SC CM reducing sprout length compared to control CM. In contrast, MVF sprout number did not differ between control or HGF-deficient SC CM media. Next, we cultured MVF in the presence of CM from satellite cells exposed to normoxic (20% O2 ) or hypoxic (1% O2 ) conditions. Hypoxic CM recapitulated a MVF angiogenic response identical to HGF deficient satellite cell CM. Hypoxic conditions increased satellite cell HIF-1α protein abundance and VEGF mRNA abundance but decreased HGF mRNA abundance compared to normoxic satellite cells. Consistent with reduced HGF gene expression, HGF promoter activity decreased during hypoxia. Taken together, this data indicates that hypoxic modulation of satellite cell-mediated angiogenesis involves a reduction in satellite cell HGF expression.

  11. Lyophilized allografts without pre-treatment with glutaraldehyde are more suitable than cryopreserved allografts for pulmonary artery reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Olmos-Zúãiga, J.R.; Jasso-Victoria, R.; Díaz-Martínez, N.E.; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M.O.; Sotres-Vega, A.; Heras-Romero, Y.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.; Baltazares-Lipp, M.E.; Santillán-Doherty, P.; Hernández-Jiménez, C.

    2015-01-01

    Various methods are available for preservation of vascular grafts for pulmonary artery (PA) replacement. Lyophilization and cryopreservation reduce antigenicity and prevent thrombosis and calcification in vascular grafts, so both methods can be used to obtain vascular bioprostheses. We evaluated the hemodynamic, gasometric, imaging, and macroscopic and microscopic findings produced by PA reconstruction with lyophilized (LyoPA) grafts and cryopreserved (CryoPA) grafts in dogs. Eighteen healthy crossbred adult dogs of both sexes weighing between 18 and 20 kg were used and divided into three groups of six: group I, PA section and reanastomosis; group II, PA resection and reconstruction with LyoPA allograft; group III, PA resection and reconstruction with CryoPA allograft. Dogs were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery, and the status of the graft and vascular anastomosis were examined macroscopically and microscopically. No clinical, radiologic, or blood-gas abnormalities were observed during the study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in group III increased significantly at the end of the study compared with baseline (P=0.02) and final [P=0.007, two-way repeat-measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA)] values. Pulmonary vascular resistance of groups II and III increased immediately after reperfusion and also at the end of the study compared to baseline. The increase shown by group III vs group I was significant only if compared with after surgery and study end (P=0.016 and P=0.005, respectively, two-way RM ANOVA). Microscopically, permeability was reduced by ≤75% in group III. In conclusion, substitution of PAs with LyoPA grafts is technically feasible and clinically promising. PMID:26648092

  12. Lyophilized allografts without pre-treatment with glutaraldehyde are more suitable than cryopreserved allografts for pulmonary artery reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Olmos-Zúñiga, J R; Jasso-Victoria, R; Díaz-Martínez, N E; Gaxiola-Gaxiola, M O; Sotres-Vega, A; Heras-Romero, Y; Baltazares-Lipp, M; Baltazares-Lipp, M E; Santillán-Doherty, P; Hernández-Jiménez, C

    2016-02-01

    Various methods are available for preservation of vascular grafts for pulmonary artery (PA) replacement. Lyophilization and cryopreservation reduce antigenicity and prevent thrombosis and calcification in vascular grafts, so both methods can be used to obtain vascular bioprostheses. We evaluated the hemodynamic, gasometric, imaging, and macroscopic and microscopic findings produced by PA reconstruction with lyophilized (LyoPA) grafts and cryopreserved (CryoPA) grafts in dogs. Eighteen healthy crossbred adult dogs of both sexes weighing between 18 and 20 kg were used and divided into three groups of six: group I, PA section and reanastomosis; group II, PA resection and reconstruction with LyoPA allograft; group III, PA resection and reconstruction with CryoPA allograft. Dogs were evaluated 4 weeks after surgery, and the status of the graft and vascular anastomosis were examined macroscopically and microscopically. No clinical, radiologic, or blood-gas abnormalities were observed during the study. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) in group III increased significantly at the end of the study compared with baseline (P=0.02) and final [P=0.007, two-way repeat-measures analysis of variance (RM ANOVA)] values. Pulmonary vascular resistance of groups II and III increased immediately after reperfusion and also at the end of the study compared to baseline. The increase shown by group III vs group I was significant only if compared with after surgery and study end (P=0.016 and P=0.005, respectively, two-way RM ANOVA). Microscopically, permeability was reduced by ≤75% in group III. In conclusion, substitution of PAs with LyoPA grafts is technically feasible and clinically promising.

  13. Structural bone allograft combined with genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells as a novel platform for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chao; Reynolds, David; Awad, Hani; Rubery, Paul T; Pelled, Gadi; Gazit, Dan; Guldberg, Robert E; Schwarz, Edward M; O'Keefe, Regis J; Zhang, Xinping

    2007-03-01

    The presence of live periosteal progenitor cells on the surface of bone autografts confers better healing than devitalized allograft. We have previously demonstrated in a murine 4 mm segmental femoral bone-grafting model that live periosteum produces robust endochondral and intramembraneous bone formation that is essential for effective healing and neovascularization of structural bone grafts. To the end of engineering a live pseudo-periosteum that could induce a similar response onto devitalized bone allograft, we seeded a mesenchymal stem cell line stably transfected with human bone morphogenic protein-2/beta-galactosidase (C9) onto devitalized bone allografts or onto a membranous small intestinal submucosa scaffold that was wrapped around the allograft. Histology showed that C9-coated allografts displayed early cartilaginous tissue formation at day 7. By 6 and 9 weeks, a new cortical shell was found bridging the segmental defect that united the host bones. Biomechanical testing showed that C9-coated allografts displayed torsional strength and stiffness equivalent to intact femurs at 6 weeks and superior to live isografts at 9 weeks. Volumetric and histomorphometric micro-computed tomography analyses demonstrated a 2-fold increase in new bone formation around C9-coated allografts, which resulted in a substantial increase in polar moment of inertia (pMOI) due to the formation of new cortical shell around the allografts. Positive correlations between biomechanics and new bone volume and pMOI were found, suggesting that the biomechanical function of the grafted femur relates to both morphological parameters. C9-coated allograft also exhibited slower resorption of the graft cortex at 9 weeks than live isograft. Both new bone formation and the persistent allograft likely contributed to the improved biomechanics of C9-coated allograft. Taken together, we propose a novel strategy to combine structural bone allograft with genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells as

  14. Trafficking of donor-derived bone marrow correlates with chimerism and extension of composite allograft survival across MHC barrier.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, S; Ulusal, B G; Ulusal, A E; Izycki, D; Yoder, B; Siemionow, M

    2006-06-01

    We proposed to evaluate differences between recipient's immune response to vascularized skin and combined vascularized skin/bone allografts, under a 7-day alphabeta-TCR plus cyclosporine (CsA) treatment protocol. Thirty-six transplantations were performed in six groups: group I (isograft control-vascularized skin graft; n=6); group II (isograft control-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6); group III (allograft rejection control group-vascularized skin graft; n=6); group IV (allograft rejection control-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6); group V (allograft treatment-vascularized skin graft; n=6); and group VI (allograft treatment-combined vascularized skin/bone graft; n=6). Isograft transplantations were performed between Lewis rats and allografts were transplanted across the MHC barrier from Brown Norway to Lewis rats. In the allograft treatment group, a combined alphabeta-TCR+CsA protocol was applied for 7 days. All groups were compared clinically, immunologically and histologically. Statistical significance was determined with two-tailed Student's t test. Indefinite graft survival was achieved in the isograft control group (>300 days). Allograft rejection controls rejected within 5 to 9 days posttransplant; chimerism levels were undetectable (<.5%). Allografts under the alphabeta-TCR+CsA protocol had significantly extended survival when skin was combined with bone (61-125 days) compared to vascularized skin allografts (43-61 days). Lymphoid macrochimerism was significantly higher in group VI than group V. Histology confirmed skin and bone viability. Combined vascularized skin/bone allografts had higher and sustained levels of donor-specific chimerism and extended allograft survival.

  15. A Novel Cardioprotective Agent in Cardiac Transplantation: Metformin Activation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Decreases Acute Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury and Chronic Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jocelyn T.; Troke, Joshua J.; Kimura, Naoyuki; Itoh, Satoshi; Wang, Xi; Palmer, Owen P.; Robbins, Robert C.; Fischbein, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    The main cause of mortality after the first year from cardiac transplantation is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which leads to chronic rejection of the heart. To improve long-term outcomes in cardiac transplantation, treatments to prevent or diminish CAV are actively being researched. Ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury has been shown to be the strongest alloantigen-independent factor in the development of CAV. Here, we investigate the use of metformin in murine cardiac transplantation models as a novel cardioprotective agent to limit acute I-R injury and subsequent chronic rejection. We show that metformin treatment activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in vitro and in vivo. In the acute transplantation model, metformin activation of AMPK resulted in significantly decreased apoptosis in cardiac allografts on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 8. In the chronic transplantation model, metformin pretreatment of allografts led to significantly improved graft function and significantly decreased CAV, as measured on POD 52. Taken together, our results in the acute and chronic rejection studies suggest a potential cardioprotective mechanism for metformin; we demonstrate a correlation between metformin-induced decrease in acute I-R injury and metformin-related decrease in chronic rejection. Thus, one of the ways by which metformin and AMPK activation may protect the transplanted heart from chronic rejection is by decreasing initial I-R injury inherent in donor organ preservation and implantation. Our findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing chronic cardiac rejection via the use of metformin- and AMPK-mediated pathways to suppress acute I-R injury. PMID:22180679

  16. A novel cardioprotective agent in cardiac transplantation: metformin activation of AMP-activated protein kinase decreases acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic rejection.

    PubMed

    Chin, Jocelyn T; Troke, Joshua J; Kimura, Naoyuki; Itoh, Satoshi; Wang, Xi; Palmer, Owen P; Robbins, Robert C; Fischbein, Michael P

    2011-12-01

    The main cause of mortality after the first year from cardiac transplantation is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), which leads to chronic rejection of the heart. To improve long-term outcomes in cardiac transplantation, treatments to prevent or diminish CAV are actively being researched. Ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury has been shown to be the strongest alloantigen-independent factor in the development of CAV. Here, we investigate the use of metformin in murine cardiac transplantation models as a novel cardioprotective agent to limit acute I-R injury and subsequent chronic rejection. We show that metformin treatment activates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) in vitro and in vivo. In the acute transplantation model, metformin activation of AMPK resulted in significantly decreased apoptosis in cardiac allografts on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 8. In the chronic transplantation model, metformin pretreatment of allografts led to significantly improved graft function and significantly decreased CAV, as measured on POD 52. Taken together, our results in the acute and chronic rejection studies suggest a potential cardioprotective mechanism for metformin; we demonstrate a correlation between metformin-induced decrease in acute I-R injury and metformin-related decrease in chronic rejection. Thus, one of the ways by which metformin and AMPK activation may protect the transplanted heart from chronic rejection is by decreasing initial I-R injury inherent in donor organ preservation and implantation. Our findings suggest novel therapeutic strategies for minimizing chronic cardiac rejection via the use of metformin- and AMPK-mediated pathways to suppress acute I-R injury.

  17. Sirolimus use and incidence of venous thromboembolism in cardiac transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Jennifer T; Mishkin, Joseph D; Patel, Parag C; Kaiser, Patricia A; Ayers, Colby R; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Markham, David W; Ring, W Steves; Peltz, Matthias; Drazner, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosuppressive agent increasingly used in cardiac transplant recipients in the setting of allograft vasculopathy or worsening renal function. Recently, sirolimus has been associated with increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in lung transplant recipients. To investigate whether this association is also present in cardiac transplant recipients, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 67 cardiac transplant recipients whose immunosuppressive regimen included sirolimus and 134 matched cardiac transplant recipients whose regimen did not include sirolimus. Rates of VTE were compared. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models tested the association of sirolimus use with VTE. A higher incidence of VTE was seen in patients treated with vs. without sirolimus (8/67 [12%] vs. 9/134 [7%], log-rank statistic: 4.66, p=0.03). Lower body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol levels were also associated with VTE (p<0.05). The association of sirolimus with VTE persisted when adjusting for BMI (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]: 2.96 [1.13, 7.75], p=0.03) but not when adjusting for total cholesterol (p=0.08). These data suggest that sirolimus is associated with an increased risk of VTE in cardiac transplant recipients, a risk possibly mediated through comorbid conditions. Larger, more conclusive studies are needed. Until such studies are completed, a heightened level of awareness for VTE in cardiac transplant recipients treated with sirolimus appears warranted.

  18. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  19. Use of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution for sterilisation and preservation improves mechanical properties and osteogenesis of allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yantao; Hu, Xiantong; Li, Zhonghai; Wang, Fuli; Xia, Yang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Zhang, Feimin; Gu, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Allografts eliminate the disadvantages associated with autografts and synthetic scaffolds but are associated with a disease-transmission risk. Therefore, allograft sterilisation is crucial. We aimed to determine whether polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) can be used for sterilisation and as a new wet-preservation method. PVP-I–sterilised and preserved allografts demonstrated improved mechanical property, osteogenesis, and excellent microbial inhibition. A thigh muscle pouch model of nude mice showed that PVP-I–preserved allografts demonstrated better ectopic formation than Co60-sterilised allografts (control) in vivo (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the PVP-I–preserved group showed no difference between 24 h and 12 weeks of allograft preservation (P > 0.05). PVP-I–preserved allografts showed more hydrophilic surfaces and PVP-I–sterilised tendons showed higher mechanical strength than Co60-sterilised tendons (P < 0.05). The level of residual PVP-I was higher without washing and with prolonged preservation (P < 0.05). In vitro cellular tests showed that appropriate PVP-I concentration was nontoxic to preosteoblast cells, and cellular differentiation measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene markers was enhanced (P < 0.05). Therefore, the improved biological performance of implanted allografts may be attributable to better surface properties and residual PVP-I, and PVP-I immersion can be a simple, easy method for allograft sterilisation and preservation.

  20. [Neurologic complications induced by the treatment of the acute renal allograft rejection with the monoclonal antibody OKT3].

    PubMed

    Fernández, O; Romero, F; Bravo, M; Burgos, D; Cabello, M; González-Molina, M

    1993-10-01

    The treatment of the acute renal allograft rejection with the monoclonal antibody orthoclone OKT3 produces both systemic and neurologic alterations. In a series of 21 patients with an acute renal allograft rejection treated with this monoclonal antibody, 20 with a renal allograft transplantation and one with a renal and pancreatic allograft transplantation, 29% referred headache associated with fever and vomiting, and 14.2% presented severe neurological alterations induced by the treatment. We stress the need to know these secondary effects to differentiate them from other central nervous system disorders, particularly those of infectious origin.

  1. Use of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution for sterilisation and preservation improves mechanical properties and osteogenesis of allografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Hu, Xiantong; Li, Zhonghai; Wang, Fuli; Xia, Yang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Zhang, Feimin; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Allografts eliminate the disadvantages associated with autografts and synthetic scaffolds but are associated with a disease-transmission risk. Therefore, allograft sterilisation is crucial. We aimed to determine whether polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) can be used for sterilisation and as a new wet-preservation method. PVP-I–sterilised and preserved allografts demonstrated improved mechanical property, osteogenesis, and excellent microbial inhibition. A thigh muscle pouch model of nude mice showed that PVP-I–preserved allografts demonstrated better ectopic formation than Co60-sterilised allografts (control) in vivo (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the PVP-I–preserved group showed no difference between 24 h and 12 weeks of allograft preservation (P > 0.05). PVP-I–preserved allografts showed more hydrophilic surfaces and PVP-I–sterilised tendons showed higher mechanical strength than Co60-sterilised tendons (P < 0.05). The level of residual PVP-I was higher without washing and with prolonged preservation (P < 0.05). In vitro cellular tests showed that appropriate PVP-I concentration was nontoxic to preosteoblast cells, and cellular differentiation measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene markers was enhanced (P < 0.05). Therefore, the improved biological performance of implanted allografts may be attributable to better surface properties and residual PVP-I, and PVP-I immersion can be a simple, easy method for allograft sterilisation and preservation. PMID:27934929

  2. Comparative study of the role of professional versus semiprofessional or nonprofessional antigen presenting cells in the rejection of vascularized organ allografts.

    PubMed

    Sundstrom, J B; Ansari, A A

    1995-12-01

    The immune systems of transplant recipients are progressively challenged with exposure to the multiple lineages of donor cells that comprise the vascularized organ allograft. Each lineage of such donor tissue constitutively expresses or can be induced to express varying densities of MHC antigens ranging from no expression of MHC to MHC class I only to both MHC class I and class II. In addition, the cell surface expression of a diverse assortment of costimulatory and cell adhesion molecules also varies in density in a tissue specific fashion within the allograft. The MHC class I/II molecules displayed on the donor cells contain within their clefts a constellation of processed protein antigens in the form of peptides derived from intracellular and to some extent extracellular sources. Therefore, the potential for each cell lineage to induce alloactivation and serve as a target for allospecific immune responses is dependent on the diversity and density of peptide-bearing MHC molecules, costimulatory molecules, and cell adhesion molecules. In addition, the T cell receptor repertoire of the recipient also contributes to the magnitude of the allogeneic response. Consequently, the variety of clinical outcomes following organ transplantation even with the institution of potent immunosuppressive (drug) therapies is not surprising, as it appears reasonable for such therapies to influence the allogeneic response against distinct lineages differentially. Our failure to prevent chronic human allograft rejection may therefore be due to our limited appreciation of the full spectrum of alloactivating experiences encountered by host T cells as they interact with donor cells of diverse tissue lineages. Investigations by our laboratory of the immunopathogenesis of chronic cardiac allograft rejection have revealed an intrinsic inability of human cardiac myocytes to process and present antigens, not only for primary but also for secondary alloimmune responses. One obvious explanation

  3. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suc...

  4. Osteoinductive effect of bone bank allografts on human osteoblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    de la Piedra, Concepción; Vicario, Carlos; de Acuña, Lucrecia Rodríguez; García-Moreno, Carmen; Traba, Maria Luisa; Arlandis, Santiago; Marco, Fernando; López-Durán, Luis

    2008-02-01

    Incorporation of a human bone allograft requires osteoclast activity and growth of recipient osteoblasts. The aim of this work was to study the effects produced by autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts on osteoblast proliferation and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL6), activator of bone resorption, aminoterminal propeptide of procollagen I (PINP), marker of bone matrix formation, and osteoprotegerin (OPG), inhibitor of osteoclast activity and differentiation. Allografts were obtained from human femoral heads. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence (problem group) or in the absence (control group) of allografts during 15 days. Allografts produced a decrease in osteoblast proliferation in the first week of the experiment, and an increase in IL6 mRNA, both at 3 h and 2 days, and an increase in the IL6 released to the culture medium the second day of the experiment. We found a decrease in OPG released to the culture on the 2nd and fourth days. These results suggest an increase in bone resorption and a decrease in bone formation in the first week of the experiment. In the second week, allografts produced an increase in osteoblast proliferation and PINP release to the culture medium, indicating an increase in bone formation; an increase in OPG released to the culture medium, which would indicate a decrease in bone resorption; and a decrease in IL6, indicating a decrease in bone resorption stimulation. These results demonstrate that autoclavated and -80 degrees C frozen bone allografts produce in bone environment changes that regulate their own incorporation to the recipient bone.

  5. Mechanoreceptor Reinnervation of Autografts Versus Allografts After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Valladares, Roberto D.; Loi, Florence; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of proprioceptive function occurs after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. Clinical, motor, and proprioceptive function is known to improve after ACL reconstruction but does not return to normal. While histological studies of human ACL allografts have been unable to demonstrate mechanoreceptor reinnervation, animal data suggest that reinnervation may occur when an autograft is used. Purpose: To compare the presence or absence of mechanoreceptors between allograft versus autograft after ACL reconstruction in humans. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Ten patients with previous ACL reconstruction presenting for either revision ACL surgery or knee arthroscopy for other reasons were enrolled in a prospective, comparative study. Five patients had a previous autograft ACL and 5 patients had an allograft. Biopsies, either from intact or ruptured grafts, were taken from identical locations as close to the femoral and tibial insertions as possible. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H-E) and monoclonal antibodies against neurofilament protein (NFP), known to be present in mechanoreceptor tissue. Immunohistochemical examination was carried out, and the number of NFP+ neural tissue analogs was counted and compared with that of native ACL tissue. Results: The mean time between original graft and biopsy was 6.9 years (range, 0.5-15 years). Histological examination showed significantly less NFP+ neural analogs in allograft and autograft patients than control tissue (mean number of NFP+ analogs per high-power field, 0.7 ± 0.9 [allograft] and 0.5 ± 0.8 [autograft] vs 4.7 ± 0.9 [controls]; P < .0001). There was no significant difference in NFP analogs between autograft and allograft tissue. Conclusion: We found a reduced concentration of NFP+ neural analogs in ACL grafts compared with native ACL tissue. This deficit exists irrespective of whether allograft or autograft is used. These findings may explain the continued

  6. An audit of consent for allograft use in elective orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Mullan, C J; Pagoti, R; Davison, H; McAlinden, M G

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Patients receiving musculoskeletal allografts may be at risk of postoperative infection. The General Medical Council guidelines on consent highlight the importance of providing patients with the information they want or need on any proposed investigation or treatment, including any potential adverse outcomes. With the increased cost of defending medicolegal claims, it is paramount that adequate, clear informed patient consent be documented. Methods We retrospectively examined the patterns of informed consent for allograft bone use during elective orthopaedic procedures in a large unit with an onsite bone bank. The initial audit included patients operated over the course of 1 year. Following a feedback session, a re-audit was performed to identify improvements in practice. Results The case mix of both studies was very similar. Revision hip arthroplasty surgery constituted the major subgroup requiring allograft (48%), followed by foot and ankle surgery (16.3%) and revision knee arthroplasty surgery (11.4%) .On the initial audit, 17/45 cases (38%) had either adequate preoperative documentation of the outpatient discussion or an appropriately completed consent form on the planned use of allograft. On the re-audit, 44/78 cases (56%) had adequate pre-operative documentation. There was little correlation between how frequently a surgeon used allograft and the adequacy of consent (Correlation coefficient -0.12). Conclusions Although the risk of disease transmission with allograft may be variable, informed consent for allograft should be a routine part of preoperative discussions in elective orthopaedic surgery. Regular audit and feedback sessions may further improve consent documentation, alongside the targeting of high volume/low compliance surgeons.

  7. Infrequency of cytomegalovirus genome in coronary arteriopathy of human heart allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Kandolf, R.; Kendall, T. J.; Thieszen, S. L.; Wilson, J. E.; Radio, S. J.; Costanzo, M. R.; Winters, G. L.; Miller, L. L.; McManus, B. M.

    1995-01-01

    In heart transplantation, long-term engraftment success is severely limited by the rapid development of obliterative disease of the coronary arteries. Data from various groups have been suggestive of a pathogenetic role of herpesviruses, particularly human cytomegalovirus, in accelerated allograft coronary artery disease; however, results are not yet conclusive. This study examines the hypothesis that human cytomegalovirus infection of allograft tissues is related pathogenetically and directly to accelerated coronary artery disease. Using in situ DNA hybridization and polymerase chain reaction, we examined particular coronary artery segments from 41 human heart allografts (ranging from 4 days to greater than 4 years after transplantation; mean, 457 days) and 22 donor age- and gender-comparable, coronary site-matched trauma victims for presence of human cytomegalovirus DNA. Human cytomegalovirus genome was detected in 8 of 41 (19.5%) allografts and in 1 of 22 (4.5%) control hearts. This difference in positivity was not statistically significant (P = 0.10). In the human cytomegalovirus-positive hearts, viral genome was localized to perivascular myocardium or coronary artery media or adventitia. Human cytomegalovirus genome was not detected in arterial intima of any allograft or control heart, although human cytomegalovirus genome was readily identified within intima of small pulmonary arteries from lung tissue with human cytomegalovirus pneumonitis. By statistical analyses, the presence of human cytomegalovirus genome was not associated with the nature or digitized extent of transplant arteriopathy, evidence of rejection, allograft recipient or donor serological data suggestive of human cytomegalovirus infection, duration of allograft implantation, or causes of death or retransplantation. Thus, our data indicate a low frequency of detectable human cytomegalovirus genome in accelerated coronary artery disease and do not support a direct role for human cytomegalovirus

  8. The protective effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage: a systematic review of animal studies.

    PubMed

    Rongen, J J; Hannink, G; van Tienen, T G; van Luijk, J; Hooijmans, C R

    2015-08-01

    Despite widespread reporting on clinical results, the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on the development of osteoarthritis is still unclear. The aim of this study was to systematically review all studies on the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage in animals. Pubmed and Embase were searched for original articles concerning the effect of meniscus allograft transplantation on articular cartilage compared with both its positive (meniscectomy) and negative (either sham or non-operated) control in healthy animals. Outcome measures related to assessment of damage to articular cartilage were divided in five principal outcome categories. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were calculated and pooled to obtain an overall SMD and 95% confidence interval. 17 articles were identified, representing 14 original animal cohorts with an average timing of data collection of 24 weeks [range 4 weeks; 30 months]. Compared to a negative control, meniscus allograft transplantation caused gross macroscopic (1.45 [0.95; 1.95]), histological (3.43 [2.25; 4.61]) damage to articular cartilage, and osteoarthritic changes on radiographs (3.12 [1.42; 4.82]). Moreover, results on histomorphometrics and cartilage biomechanics are supportive of this detrimental effect on cartilage. On the other hand, meniscus allograft transplantation caused significantly less gross macroscopic (-1.19 [-1.84; -0.54]) and histological (-1.70 [-2.67; -0.74]) damage to articular cartilage when compared to meniscectomy. However, there was no difference in osteoarthritic changes on plain radiographs (0.04 [-0.48; 0.57]), and results on histomorphometrics and biomechanics did neither show a difference in effect between meniscus allograft transplantation and meniscectomy. In conclusion, although meniscus allograft transplantation does not protect articular cartilage from damage, it reduces the extent of it when compared with meniscectomy.

  9. Return of Viable Cardiac Function After Sonographic Cardiac Standstill in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Katherine; Thompson, W Reid; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Su, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Sonographic cardiac standstill during adult cardiac arrest is associated with failure to get return to spontaneous circulation. This report documents 3 children whose cardiac function returned after standstill with extracorporeal membranous oxygenation. Sonographic cardiac standstill may not predict cardiac death in children.

  10. Arsenic Exposure and Cell-Mediated Immunity in Pre-School Children in Rural Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sultan; Moore, Sophie E.; Kippler, Maria; Gardner, Renee; Hawlader, M. D. H.; Wagatsuma, Yukiko; Raqib, Rubhana; Vahter, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal arsenic exposure has been associated with reduced thymic index and increased morbidity in infants, indicating arsenic-related impaired immune function. We aimed at elucidating potential effects of pre- and postnatal arsenic exposure on cell-mediated immune function in pre-school aged children. Children born in a prospective mother-child cohort in rural Bangladesh were followed up at 4.5 years of age (n = 577). Arsenic exposure was assessed by concentrations of arsenic metabolites (U-As) in child urine and maternal urine during pregnancy, using high-performance liquid chromatography online with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. For assessment of delayed type hypersensitivity response, an intradermal injection of purified protein derivative (PPD) was given to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccinated children. The diameter (mm) of induration was measured after 48–72 h. Plasma concentrations of 27 cytokines were analyzed by a multiplex cytokine assay. Children's concurrent, but not prenatal, arsenic exposure was associated with a weaker response to the injected PPD. The risk ratio (RR) of not responding to PPD (induration <5 mm) was 1.37 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.74) in children in the highest quartile of U-As (range 126–1228 μg/l), compared with the lowest (range 12–34 μg/l). The p for trend across the quartiles was 0.003. The association was stronger in undernourished children. Children's U-As in tertiles was inversely associated with two out of 27 cytokines only, i.e., IL-2 and TNF-α, both Th1 cytokines (in the highest tertile, regression coefficients (95% CI): −1.57 (−2.56, −0.57) and −4.53 (−8.62, −0.42), respectively), but not with Th2 cytokines. These associations were particularly strong in children with recent infections. In conclusion, elevated childhood arsenic exposure appeared to reduce cell-mediated immunity, possibly linked to reduced concentrations of Th1 cytokines. PMID:24924402

  11. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nageswari, K. Sri; Sarma, K. R.; Rajvanshi, V. S.; Sharan, R.; Sharma, Manju; Barathwal, Vinita; Singh, Vinod

    1991-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoicchambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months ( P<0.01, Δ% 21.5%) and during follow-up ( P<0.01, Δ% 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (Δ mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (Δ%+12.4 vs.+7.54). The animals were sacrified and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed. No significant variation was observed in the tissue T lymphocyte counts of microwave-irradiated rabbits. From these results it is speculated that the T lymphocytes are sequestered to various lymphoid organs under the influence of microwaves. A sub-population of T cells known as T helper cells (mediating DTH response) are

  12. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  13. The Ebola Interferon Inhibiting Domains Attenuate and Dysregulate Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Michelle; Koup, Richard A.; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are characterized by deficient T-lymphocyte responses, T-lymphocyte apoptosis and lymphopenia. We previously showed that disabling of interferon-inhibiting domains (IIDs) in the VP24 and VP35 proteins effectively unblocks maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and increases the secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Here, we investigated the role of IIDs in adaptive and innate cell-mediated responses using recombinant viruses carrying point mutations, which disabled IIDs in VP24 (EBOV/VP24m), VP35 (EBOV/VP35m) or both (EBOV/VP35m/VP24m). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive donors were inoculated with the panel of viruses and stimulated with CMV pp65 peptides. Disabling of the VP35 IID resulted in increased proliferation and higher percentages of CD4+ T cells secreting IFNγ and/or TNFα. To address the role of aberrant DC maturation in the IID-mediated suppression of T cell responses, CMV-stimulated DCs were infected with the panel of viruses and co-cultured with autologous T-lymphocytes. Infection with EBOV/VP35m infection resulted in a significant increase, as compared to wt EBOV, in proliferating CD4+ cells secreting IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Experiments with expanded CMV-specific T cells demonstrated their increased activation following co-cultivation with CMV-pulsed DCs pre-infected with EBOV/VP24m, EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m, as compared to wt EBOV. Both IIDs were found to block phosphorylation of TCR complex-associated adaptors and downstream signaling molecules. Next, we examined the effects of IIDs on the function of B cells in infected PBMC. Infection with EBOV/VP35m and EBOV/VP35m/VP24m resulted in significant increases in the percentages of phenotypically distinct B-cell subsets and plasma cells, as compared to wt EBOV, suggesting inhibition of B cell function and differentiation by VP35 IID. Finally, infection with EBOV/VP35m increased activation of NK cells, as compared to wt

  14. The Role of Cell-Mediated Immunity in the Induction of Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stanley

    1977-01-01

    Reactions of cell-mediated immunity fall into two broad categories: those that involve direct participation of intact lymphocytes in the effector mechanism of the reaction and those that involve mediation by soluble lymphocyte-derived factors known as lymphokines. The first kind of reaction is essentially limited to lymphocyte-dependent cytotoxicity, although certain aspects of T cell-B cell cooperation may fall into this category as well. The second category appears to comprise the bulk of the so-called cell-mediated immune response and provides a link between this system and the inflammatory system. Various lymphokines have been shown to exert profound influence upon inflammatory cell metabolism, cell surface properties, patterns of cell migration, and the activation of cells for various biologic activities involved in host defense. Although substantial information is now available about various physicochemical as well as biologic properties of lymphokines, purification and characterization data are as yet too incomplete to allow us to ascribe all of these activities to discrete mediator molecules. Current work involving the development of antibody-based techniques for mediator assay may shed light on this issue. Information on the kinds of cells capable of lymphokine production is now available. Contrary to prior expectation, T cells are not unique in their capacity for lymphokine production. Under appropriate circumstances, B cells and even nonlymphoid cells can do so as well. The unique property of lymphocytes in this regard appears to relate to their ability to respond to certain specialized signals such as specific antigen or an appropriate mitogen. Mediator production per se may represent a general biologic phenomenon. Although lymphokines have been defined mainly in terms of in vitro assays, early speculations about their in vivo importance are proving correct. Evidence for the role of lymphokines comes from studies involving detection of lymphokines in

  15. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  16. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  17. Role of Memory T Cells in Allograft Rejection and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Benichou, Gilles; Gonzalez, Bruno; Marino, Jose; Ayasoufi, Katayoun; Valujskikh, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Memory T cells are characterized by their low activation threshold, robust effector functions, and resistance to conventional immunosuppression and costimulation blockade. Unlike their naïve counterparts, memory T cells reside in and recirculate through peripheral non-lymphoid tissues. Alloreactive memory T cells are subdivided into different categories based on their origins, phenotypes, and functions. Recipients whose immune systems have been directly exposed to allogeneic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display high affinity alloreactive memory T cells. In the absence of any prior exposure to allogeneic MHC molecules, endogenous alloreactive memory T cells are regularly generated through microbial infections (heterologous immunity). Regardless of their origin, alloreactive memory T cells represent an essential element of the allograft rejection process and a major barrier to tolerance induction in clinical transplantation. This article describes the different subsets of alloreactive memory T cells involved in transplant rejection and examine their generation, functional properties, and mechanisms of action. In addition, we discuss strategies developed to target deleterious allospecific memory T cells in experimental animal models and clinical settings. PMID:28293238

  18. Mycobacteria and allograft heart valve banking: an international survey.

    PubMed

    Warwick, R M; Magee, J G; Leeming, J P; Graham, J C; Hannan, M M; Chadwick, M; Crook, D W; Yearsley, C P; Rayner, A; Parker, R

    2008-03-01

    Since the 1970s many tissue banks have been testing allograft heart valves (HVs) for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). Donor selection for low risk of tuberculosis (TB) was introduced in the 1980s and appears to have reduced the risk of TB transmission. Regulatory guidance does not specify testing for TB, but does exclude donors with a recent history of TB. This survey of HV international bank practices revealed variations in donor selection, testing and processing of valves. Participant banks (from Europe and the USA) reported that over a period of 15 years, HV tissues from 38,413 donors were banked and 32,289 donors were tested for TB, none being positive. HV-associated tissue from 27,840 donors was stained and underwent microscopy; none of these were positive for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). Non-tuberculosis mycobacteria (NTBM) were detected by culture on 24 HVs. It is recommended that HV banks employ donor selection to exclude donors at risk of TB, to culture material for mycobacteria, and to investigate potential sources when clusters of NTBM are found to facilitate corrective and preventative actions.

  19. Alveolar Ridge Preservation Using Xenogeneic Collagen Matrix and Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Parashis, Andreas O.; Kalaitzakis, Charalampos J.; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Tosios, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Alveolar ridge preservation (ARP) has been shown to prevent postextraction bone loss. The aim of this report is to highlight the clinical, radiographic, and histological outcomes following use of a bilayer xenogeneic collagen matrix (XCM) in combination with freeze-dried bone allograft (FDBA) for ARP. Nine patients were treated after extraction of 18 teeth. Following minimal flap elevation and atraumatic extraction, sockets were filled with FDBA. The XCM was adapted to cover the defect and 2-3 mm of adjacent bone and flaps were repositioned. Healing was uneventful in all cases, the XCM remained in place, and any matrix exposure was devoid of further complications. Exposed matrix portions were slowly vascularized and replaced by mature keratinized tissue within 2-3 months. Radiographic and clinical assessment indicated adequate volume of bone for implant placement, with all planned implants placed in acceptable positions. When fixed partial dentures were placed, restorations fulfilled aesthetic demands without requiring further augmentation procedures. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis from 9 sites (4 patients) indicated normal mucosa with complete incorporation of the matrix and absence of inflammatory response. The XCM + FDBA combination resulted in minimal complications and desirable soft and hard tissue therapeutic outcomes, suggesting the feasibility of this approach for ARP. PMID:25328523

  20. Effect of early allograft dysfunction on outcomes following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hudcova, Jana; Scopa, Caitlin; Rashid, Jawad; Waqas, Ahsan; Ruthazer, Robin; Schumann, Roman

    2017-02-01

    Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) following liver transplantation (LT) remains a challenge for patients and clinicians. We retrospectively analyzed the effect of pre-defined EAD on outcomes in a 10-year cohort of deceased-donor LT recipients with clearly defined exclusion criteria. EAD was defined by at least one of the following: AST or ALT >2000 IU/L within first-week post-LT, total bilirubin ≥10 mg/dL, and/or INR ≥1.6 on post-operative day 7. Ten patients developed primary graft failure and were analyzed separately. EAD occurred in 86 (36%) recipients in a final cohort of 239 patients. In univariate and multivariate analyses, EAD was significantly associated with mechanical ventilation ≥2 days or death on days 0, 1, PACU/SICU stay >2 days or death on days 0-2 and renal failure (RF) at time of hospital discharge (all P<.05). EAD was also significantly associated with higher one-year graft loss in both uni- and multivariate Cox hazard analyses (P=.0203 and .0248, respectively). There was no difference in patient mortality between groups in either of the Cox proportional hazard models. In conclusion, we observed significant effects of EAD on short-term post-LT outcomes and lower graft survival.

  1. Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants in deceased organ donors are associated with renal allograft failure

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Barry I.; Julian, Bruce A.; Pastan, Stephen O.; Israni, Ajay K.; Schladt, David; Gautreaux, Michael D.; Hauptfeld, Vera; Bray, Robert A.; Gebel, Howard M.; Kirk, Allan D.; Gaston, Robert S.; Rogers, Jeffrey; Farney, Alan C.; Orlando, Giuseppe; Stratta, Robert J.; Mohan, Sumit; Ma, Lijun; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Adams, Patricia L.; Palanisamy, Amudha; Reeves-Daniel, Amber M.; Divers, Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy variants in African American deceased kidney donors were associated with shorter renal allograft survival in a prior single-center report. APOL1 G1 and G2 variants were genotyped in newly accrued DNA samples from African American deceased donors of kidneys recovered and/or transplanted in Alabama and North Carolina. APOL1 genotypes and allograft outcomes in subsequent transplants from 55 U.S. centers were linked, adjusting for age, sex and race/ethnicity of recipients, HLA match, cold ischemia time, panel reactive antibody levels, and donor type. For 221 transplantations from kidneys recovered in Alabama, there was a statistical trend toward shorter allograft survival in recipients of two-APOL1-nephropathy-variant kidneys (hazard ratio [HR] 2.71; p=0.06). For all 675 kidneys transplanted from donors at both centers, APOL1 genotype (HR 2.26; p=0.001) and African American recipient race/ethnicity (HR 1.60; p=0.03) were associated with allograft failure. Kidneys from African American deceased donors with two APOL1 nephropathy variants reproducibly associate with higher risk for allograft failure after transplantation. These findings warrant consideration of rapidly genotyping deceased African American kidney donors for APOL1 risk variants at organ recovery and incorporation of results into allocation and informed-consent processes. PMID:25809272

  2. Analysis of predisposing factors for contamination of bone and tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Thomas; Bigaré, Elisa; Van Isacker, Tom; Gigi, Jacques; Delloye, Christian; Cornu, Olivier

    2012-08-01

    Bone and tissue allografts are widely used in transplantation. The increasing demand for safe allografts must be met, while minimizing disease transmission. We analysed the incidence and potential risk factors of allograft contamination and the effectiveness of disinfection, by reviewing 22 years of tissue bank activity and 474 donor procurements. We also compared different disinfection procedures used over the 22 years. The overall contamination rate was 10.1%. Risk factors were related to the donor or procurement method. Immediate culture at the tissue recovery site diminished the rate of false positives by reducing later sample manipulation. High-virulence allograft contamination was mainly related to donor factors, while low-virulence contamination was related to procurement methods. Analysis of donor-related risk factors showed no statistical differences for age, sex, or cause of death. An intensive care unit stay was associated with less contamination with high-virulence microbes. Procurement in a setting other than an operating theatre was associated with higher contamination rate. Team experience reduced contamination. Pelvic and tendon allografts were most frequently contaminated. Proper disinfection considerably reduced the contamination rate to 3.6%. We conclude that procurement must be performed under aseptic conditions, with short delays, and by trained personnel. Grafts should be disinfected and packed as soon as possible.

  3. Effect of two cleaning processes for bone allografts on gentamicin impregnation and in vitro antibiotic release.

    PubMed

    Coraça-Huber, D C; Hausdorfer, J; Fille, M; Steidl, M; Nogler, M

    2013-06-01

    Bone allografts are a useful and sometimes indispensable tool for the surgeon to repair bone defects. Microbial contamination is a major reason for discarding allografts from bone banks. To improve the number of safe allografts, we suggest chemical cleaning of the grafts followed by antibiotic impregnation. Comparison of two chemical cleaning processes for bone allografts aiming for antibiotic impregnation and consequently delivery rates in vitro. Bone chips of 5-10 mm were prepared from human femoral heads. Two cleaning methods (cleaning A and cleaning B) based on solutions containing hydrogen peroxide, paracetic acid, ethanol and biological detergent were carried out and compared. After the cleaning processes, the bone chips were impregnated with gentamicin. Bacillus subtilis bioassay was used to determine the gentamicin release after intervals of 1-7 days. Differences were compared with non-parametric Mann-Whitney U tests. The zones of inhibition obtained from the bone grafts cleaned with both cleaning processes were similar between the groups. The concentration of the released antibiotic was decreasing gradually over time, following a similar pattern for both groups. The cleaning procedure A as well as the cleaning procedure B for bone allografts allowed the impregnation with gentamicin powder in the same concentrations in both groups. The delivery of gentamicin was similar for both groups. Both cleaning procedures were easy to be carried out, making them suitable for routine use at the bone banks.

  4. Allograft stapes surgery for conductive hearing loss in patients with ossicular chain anomalies.

    PubMed

    Minatogawa, T; Iritani, H; Ishida, K; Node, M N

    1996-01-01

    An allograft stapes was used during surgical intervention for conductive hearing loss due to ossicular malformations in 11 ears of seven patients. The external auditory canal and tympanic membrane were normal in all ears. The surgical findings for the ossicles were stapes fixation (7 ears), stapes fixation with discontinuity of the incudostapedial joint (in both ears of one patient), a deformed incus and stapes crura compressed by the facial nerve (one ear in which the stapes was not fixed) and an anomaly of the incus and stapes combined with a dermoid cyst (in one ear in which the stapes was also not fixed). In all ears, the following procedures were performed: stapedectomy followed by sealing the oval window with a vein graft and placing an allograft stapes between the oval window and the lenticular process of the incus or the handle of the malleus. The allograft stapes was placed with its capitulum on the oval window in all cases, and fibrin glue was used for stabilizing the seal and the allograft stapes. The indications for stapedectomy for conductive hearing loss due to ossicular chain anomalies and the utility of allograft stapes are discussed.

  5. Massive bone allografts in large skeletal defects after tumor surgery: a clinical and microradiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; de Nayer, P; Allington, N; Munting, E; Coutelier, L; Vincent, A

    1988-01-01

    Massive deep-frozen bone allografts were implanted in 13 patients after en bloc tumor resection. Patients were followed up for 14 months to 17 years. Most of the reconstructive procedures included a segmental bone allograft with knee or ankle fusion. Graft infections were the most critical complications in regard to the end results, finally requiring amputation in two cases. There were three stress fractures; two of which were successfully treated without further complication. Graft incorporation was assessed by bone scintimetry in four cases. Isotope uptake by the center of the graft was found to be superior to control bone segments at only 15 years after surgery. Two recovered allograft specimens were available for a microradiographic study. Creeping substitution was a very slow process, initiated at the outer surface of the graft and characterized at 2-3 years after implantation by large, incompletely filled osteons. The present investigation demonstrates that massive bone allografts are very slowly revascularized and are intimately anchored by the host bone. Provided that tumor control is effective and graft infection is avoided, reconstructive surgery with massive bone allografts represents a successful alternative to prosthetic implants in young adult with a long life expectancy.

  6. Evidence-Based Rationale for Ankle Cartilage Allograft Replacement: A Systematic Review of Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pierce; Lee, Daniel K

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of ankle arthritis remains controversial. Ankle cartilage allograft replacement is a novel and complex procedure. Many clinical studies have shown some level of promise, as well complications. We performed a systematic review of the clinical outcomes to describe and assess the different techniques and clinical outcomes for ankle cartilage allograft replacement. We performed a review of the published studies using MEDLINE(®) by way of PubMed(®) and Google Scholar(®) from January 2000 through October 2014, ranging from case reports to clinical studies. The inclusion criteria consisted of ankle cartilage allograft procedures with objective findings and clinical outcome scoring and complication and fusion rates and excluded nonallograft synthetic graft techniques, bone substitutes or expanders, review reports, and technique instructional manuals. Evidence with the combination of objective findings and clinical outcomes for all 3 type of allograft replacement (osteochondral, unipolar, and bipolar) is lacking. Several techniques for cartilage fixation have been described, including absorbable and metallic fixation. Most of the studies reported many occurrences and a variety of complications. A myriad of techniques for ankle cartilage allograft replacement exists. The results from the present systematic review of the published studies appear promising; however, the lack of statistical power and inconsistent documentation made it difficult to determine the superiority of any one intervention compared with another for the treatment of ankle arthritis.

  7. Long-term results of allograft composite total hip prostheses for tumors.

    PubMed

    Langlais, F; Lambotte, J C; Collin, P; Thomazeau, H

    2003-09-01

    The functional results of standard reconstruction prostheses are impaired by instability because of poor muscular reinsertion, especially of the gluteal muscles. In 21 patients, composite hip prostheses including proximal femoral allografts were used after primary malignant tumor resection. Ten reconstructions used combined bone-tendon allografts that allowed reinsertion of the gluteal muscles to the allograft tendons. None of the 21 patients had dislocation or infection. Ten patients died within 2 years of surgery without complications requiring reoperations. The mean followup in the 11 other patients was 10 years. Eight patients had reoperation: four for loosening (two at 3 years, two at 11 and 12 years), and four had autologous graftings for nonunion of the trochanter or of the distal graft-bone interface. Evaluation of function in the 11 patients with follow-ups ranging from 4 to 15 years showed an average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 77%. Satisfactory strength of the abductor muscles was achieved by reinsertion of the trochanter or by suture of the patients gluteal muscles with the combined tendon-bone allograft. At long-term, radiologically, the bony allograft showed no change in five patients, very mild resorption in five, and severe resorption in one. Stem fixation was excellent in 10 patients and fair in one. Comparison between the functional results of reconstruction prostheses versus composite prostheses showed a significant improvement with the composite prosthesis. In the authors' institution, at 10 years, the mechanical survival of composite prostheses was 81%, as compared with only 65% for reconstruction prostheses.

  8. Simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation with concurrent allograft nephrectomy for recipients with prior renal transplants lost to BK virus nephropathy: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Kubal, S; Powelson, J A; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2010-01-01

    Candidacy for retransplantation after allograft loss due to BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVN) with or without allograft nephrectomy is controversial. This report describes 2 renal transplant recipients who lost their grafts to BKVN and subsequently underwent simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation with allograft nephrectomy.

  9. Paper-based bioactive scaffolds for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Ji; Yu, Seung Jung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Cho, Ann-Na; Kim, Jin; Lee, Bora; Yang, Hee Seok; Im, Sung Gap; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Bioactive, functional scaffolds are required to improve the regenerative potential of stem cells for tissue reconstruction and functional recovery of damaged tissues. Here, we report a paper-based bioactive scaffold platform for stem cell culture and transplantation for bone reconstruction. The paper scaffolds are surface-engineered by an initiated chemical vapor deposition process for serial coating of a water-repellent and cell-adhesive polymer film, which ensures the long-term stability in cell culture medium and induces efficient cell attachment. The prepared paper scaffolds are compatible with general stem cell culture and manipulation techniques. An optimal paper type is found to provide structural, physical, and mechanical cues to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). A bioactive paper scaffold significantly enhances in vivo bone regeneration of hADSCs in a critical-sized calvarial bone defect. Stacking the paper scaffolds with osteogenically differentiated hADSCs and human endothelial cells resulted in vascularized bone formation in vivo. Our study suggests that paper possesses great potential as a bioactive, functional, and cost-effective scaffold platform for stem cell-mediated bone tissue engineering. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the feasibility of a paper material for stem cell application to repair tissue defects.

  10. Crosstalk between PKCζ and the IL4/Stat6 pathway during T-cell-mediated hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Durán, Angeles; Rodriguez, Angelina; Martin, Pilar; Serrano, Manuel; Flores, Juana Maria; Leitges, Michael; Diaz-Meco, María T; Moscat, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    PKCζ is required for nuclear factor κ-B (NF-κB) activation in several cell systems. NF-κB is a suppressor of liver apoptosis during development and in concanavalin A (ConA)-induced T-cell-mediated hepatitis. Here we show that PKCζ−/− mice display inhibited ConA-induced NF-κB activation and reduced damage in liver. As the IL-4/Stat6 pathway is necessary for ConA-induced hepatitis, we addressed here the potential role of PKCζ in this cascade. Interestingly, the loss of PKCζ severely attenuated serum IL-5 and liver eotaxin-1 levels, two critical mediators of liver damage. Stat6 tyrosine phosphorylation and Jak1 activation were ablated in the liver of ConA-injected PKCζ−/− mice and in IL-4-stimulated PKCζ−/− fibroblasts. PKCζ interacts with and phosphorylates Jak1 and PKCζ activity is required for Jak1 function. In contrast, Par-4−/− mice have increased sensitivity to ConA-induced liver damage and IL-4 signaling. This unveils a novel and critical involvement of PKCζ in the IL-4/Stat6 signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15526032

  11. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  12. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  13. New gene expressed in prostate: a potential target for T cell-mediated prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cereda, Vittore; Poole, Diane J; Palena, Claudia; Das, Sudipto; Bera, Tapan K; Remondo, Cinzia; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Yokokawa, Junko; Pastan, Ira; Schlom, Jeffrey; Tsang, Kwong Y

    2010-01-01

    New gene expressed in prostate (NGEP) is a prostate-specific gene encoding either a small cytoplasmic protein (NGEP-S) or a larger polytopic membrane protein (NGEP-L). NGEP-L expression is detectable only in prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and normal prostate. We have identified an HLA-A2 binding NGEP epitope (designated P703) which was used to generate T cell lines from several patients with localized and metastatic prostate cancer. These T cell lines were able to specifically lyse HLA-A2 and NGEP-expressing human tumor cells. NGEP-P703 tetramer binding assays demonstrated that metastatic prostate cancer patients had a higher frequency of NGEP-specific T cells when compared with healthy donors. Moreover, an increased frequency of NGEP-specific T cells was detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of prostate cancer patients post-vaccination with a PSA-based vaccine, further indicating the immunogenicity of NGEP. These studies thus identify NGEP as a potential target for T cell-mediated immunotherapy of prostate cancer.

  14. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  15. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  16. Inhibitory effect of Moutan Cortex aqueous fraction on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kee, Ji-Ye; Inujima, Akiko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Tanaka, Ken; Li, Feng; Kuraishi, Yasushi; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Shibahara, Naotoshi; Saiki, Ikuo; Koizumi, Keiichi

    2015-04-01

    Moutan Cortex and its major compounds have been shown to possess various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of Moutan Cortex aqueous fraction (MCA) and its molecular mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of MCA on mast cell-mediated allergy inflammation in vitro and in vivo compared with major Moutan Cortex compounds. Thus, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of a water extract of Moutan Cortex by comparing the inhibition of β-hexosaminadase and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release in an aqueous fraction with other major compounds of Moutan Cortex. The inhibitory mechanism of MCA was investigated by western blotting in IgE-mediated DNP-BSA-stimulated RBL-2H3 cells. We confirmed the pharmacological effects of MCA on compound 48/80-induced allergic reactions in a mouse model by assessing scratching behavior and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA)-like reaction. Consequently, MCA inhibited IgE-mediated DNP-BSA-induced β-hexosaminadase and TNF-α release via inactivation of p38, ERK, Akt, and NF-κB in RBL-2H3 cells. MCA reduced compound 48/80-induced PCA reaction and scratching behavior in mice. This inhibitory effect of MCA is more potent than major compounds of Moutan Cortex. In conclusion, our results suggest that MCA has more potential in the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases compared to other major compounds of Moutan Cortex.

  17. Cell mediated immune response of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus after PAMPs stimulation.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2016-09-01

    The Mediterranean sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) is of great ecological and economic importance for the European aquaculture. Yet, most of the studies regarding echinoderm's immunological defense mechanisms reported so far have used the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as a model, and information on the immunological defense mechanisms of Paracentrotus lividus and other sea urchins, is scarce. To remedy this gap in information, in this study, flow cytometry was used to evaluate several cellular immune mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, cell cooperation, and ROS production in P. lividus coelomocytes after PAMP stimulation. Two cell populations were described. Of the two, the amoeboid-phagocytes were responsible for the phagocytosis and ROS production. Cooperation between amoeboid-phagocytes and non-adherent cells resulted in an increased phagocytic response. Stimulation with several PAMPs modified the phagocytic activity and the production of ROS. The premise that the coelomocytes were activated by the bacterial components was confirmed by the expression levels of two cell mediated immune genes: LPS-Induced TNF-alpha Factor (LITAF) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). These results have helped us understand the cellular immune mechanisms in P. lividus and their modulation after PAMP stimulation.

  18. Xanthohumol attenuates tumour cell-mediated breaching of the lymphendothelial barrier and prevents intravasation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Viola, Katharina; Kopf, Sabine; Rarova, Lucie; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Kretschy, Nicole; Teichmann, Mathias; Vonach, Caroline; Atanasov, Atanas G; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Huttary, Nicole; Raab, Ingrid; Krieger, Sigurd; Strnad, Miroslav; de Martin, Rainer; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Dirsch, Verena M; Jäger, Walter; Grusch, Michael; Dolznig, Helmut; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Krupitza, Georg

    2013-07-01

    Health beneficial effects of xanthohumol have been reported, and basic research provided evidence for anti-cancer effects. Furthermore, xanthohumol was shown to inhibit the migration of endothelial cells. Therefore, this study investigated the anti-metastatic potential of xanthohumol. MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids which are placed on lymphendothelial cells (LECs) induce "circular chemorepellent-induced defects" (CCIDs) in the LEC monolayer resembling gates for intravasating tumour bulks at an early step of lymph node colonisation. NF-κB reporter-, EROD-, SELE-, 12(S)-HETE- and adhesion assays were performed to investigate the anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol. Western blot analyses were used to elucidate the mechanisms inhibiting CCID formation. Xanthohumol inhibited the activity of CYP, SELE and NF-kB and consequently, the formation of CCIDs at low micromolar concentrations. More specifically, xanthohumol affected ICAM-1 expression and adherence of MCF-7 cells to LECs, which is a prerequisite for CCID formation. Furthermore, markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and of cell mobility such as paxillin, MCL2 and S100A4 were suppressed by xanthohumol. Xanthohumol attenuated tumour cell-mediated defects at the lymphendothelial barrier and inhibited EMT-like effects thereby providing a mechanistic explanation for the anti-intravasative/anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol.

  19. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell-Mediated Treatment for Periodontitis in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Zheng, Ying; Ding, Gang; Fang, Dianji; Zhang, Chunmei; Bartold, Peter Mark; Gronthos, Stan; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is a periodontal tissue infectious disease and the most common cause for tooth loss in adults. It has been linked to many systemic disorders, such as coronary artery disease, stroke, and diabetes. At present, there is no ideal therapeutic approach to cure periodontitis and achieve optimal periodontal tissue regeneration. In this study, we explored the potential of using autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to treat periodontal defects in a porcine model of periodontitis. The periodontal lesion was generated in the first molars area of miniature pigs by the surgical removal of bone and subsequent silk ligament suture around the cervical portion of the tooth. Autologous PDLSCs were obtained from extracted teeth of the miniature pigs and then expanded ex vivo to enrich PDLSC numbers. When transplanted into the surgically created periodontal defect areas, PDLSCs were capable of regenerating periodontal tissues, leading to a favorable treatment for periodontitis. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using stem cell-mediated tissue engineering to treat periodontal diseases. PMID:18238856

  20. Changes in cell-mediated immune response after lung resection surgery for MDR-TB patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung-Kyu; Hong, Sunghee; Eum, Seok-Yong; Lee, In Hee; Shin, Donk Ok; Cho, Jang Eun; Cho, Sungae; Cho, Sang-Nae

    2011-07-01

    The immune responses of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) patients undergoing lung resection surgery were investigated in order to understand the mechanism of strong immune suppression in MDR-TB. We examined changes in cell-mediated immune response (CMI) of a total of sixteen MDR-TB patients, three of them extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients, after the removal of the heavily diseased lung section. The IFN-γ response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate proteins (Mtb-CFP), one of the most important CMI to defend TB, showed a statistically significant elevation in 2-4 months after operation when compared to the preoperative CMI in patients who were converted into AFB negative and cured in two years' follow-up, suggesting that the recovery of CMI may be one of the key factors in the successful treatment of MDR-TB. Interestingly, IL-10 response to Mtb-CFP was also elevated in 2-4 months after surgery in cured patients although both proliferative response and PBMC composition were not significantly changed. Infection with first- or second-line drugs resistant Mtb reduces the efficiency of chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB to about 50%. Thus, this study suggests that chemotherapeutic treatment of MDR-TB may be more effective when combined with accompanying therapy that increases CMI, includes lung resection surgery.

  1. Laminin: a possible role as a mediator of natural cell-mediated functions

    SciTech Connect

    Laybourn, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    Natural Cell-mediated cytotoxicity is clearly important in regulating host response during tumorgenicity. Natural killer (NK), and Natural Cytotoxic (NC) lymphocytes responsible for mediating cytolysis, are subpopulations of non-B, non-T, nonphagocytic, nonadherent lymphocytes capable of spontaneously lysing a variety of tumor targets. Evidence is presented that laminin, a high molecular weight glycoprotein, is present on the surface of murine NK cells. In addition, NK sensitive tumor targets are able to bind laminin. This suggest that laminin participates as a ligand in the binding of NK cells to their tumor targets. The saturable binding of laminin by NK and NC sensitive tumor targets was shown by laminin-induced cell-cell aggregation/adherence, and /sup 125/I-laminin binding studies. Exogenous laminin inhibited NK cytotoxicity but not CTL cytotoxicity in vitro. In comparison, NK-resistant tumor cells bound little, if any exogenous laminin. Modulating NK activity in vivo prior to challenging mice with an inoculation of a murine fibrosarcoma, showed that elimination or activation of NK activity resulted in an increase or decrease in pulmonary metastases, respectively.

  2. Human mast cell mediator cocktail excites neurons in human and guinea-pig enteric nervous system.

    PubMed

    Schemann, M; Michel, K; Ceregrzyn, M; Zeller, F; Seidl, S; Bischoff, S C

    2005-04-01

    Neuroimmune interactions are an integral part of gut physiology and involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and functional bowel disorders. Mast cells and their mediators are important conveyors in the communication from the innate enteric immune system to the enteric nervous system (ENS). However, it is not known whether a mediator cocktail released from activated human mast cells affects neural activity in the ENS. We used the Multi-Site Optical Recording Technique to image single cell activity in guinea-pig and human ENS after application of a mast cell mediator cocktail (MCMC) that was released from isolated human intestinal mucosa mast cells stimulated by IgE-receptor cross-linking. Local application of MCMC onto individual ganglia evoked an excitatory response consisting of action potential discharge. This excitatory response occurred in 31%, 38% or 11% neurons of guinea-pig submucous plexus, human submucous plexus, or guinea-pig myenteric plexus, respectively. Compound action potentials from nerve fibres or fast excitatory synaptic inputs were not affected by MCMC. This study demonstrates immunoneural signalling in the human gut and revealed for the first time that an MCMC released from stimulated human intestinal mast cells induces excitatory actions in the human and guinea-pig ENS.

  3. Effects of endosulfan on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, B.D.; Hussain, Q.Z.

    1987-03-01

    Endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10a-hexa-chloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro, 6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin-3-oxide), a polycyclic chlorinated hydrocarbon of cyclodien group, is a well known insecticide. Food is the main source of exposure of the general population to endosulfan. The physical, chemical as well as toxicological effects of endosulfan in experimental animals have been reported by various workers. However, the reports regarding the effect of endosulfan on immune system are not available. In view of its widespread use there is an urgent need to investigate the immunotoxicological effect of endosulfan in mammals for the safety evaluation of this insecticide. This has, therefore, prompted the authors to investigate the effect of endosulfan on immune system employing albino rats as the experimental animals. Included in this report are their preliminary findings on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in rats exposed to sub-chronic doses of endosulfan.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  5. Triphasic mixture model of cell-mediated enzymatic degradation of hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Greenwald, Eric C.; Bryant, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    In order to engineer living tissue equivalents, a critical component is designing scaffolds, such as hydrogels, whose degradation kinetics can match that of matrix production by cells. However, cell-mediated enzymatic degradation of a hydrogel is highly complex and nonlinear process that is challenging to comprehend based solely on experimental observations. To address this issue, this study presents a triphasic mixture model of the enzyme/hydrogel system, that consists of a solid polymer network, water and enzyme. Based on mixture theory, rubber elasticity theory and the Michaelis-Menton kinetics for degradation, the model naturally incorporates a strong coupling between gel mechanical properties, the kinetics of degradation and the transport of enzyme through the gel. The model is then used to investigate the particular problem of a single spherical enzyme-producing cell, embedded in a spherical hydrogel domain, for which the governing equations can be cast within the cento-symmetric assumptions. The governing equations are subsequently solved using an implicit nonlinear finite element procedure in order to obtain the evolution of enzyme concentration and gel degradation through time and space. The model shows that two regimes of degradation behavior exist, whereby degradation is dominated either by diffusion or dominated by reaction kinetics. Depending on the enzyme properties and the initial hydrogel design, the temporal and spatial changes in gel cross-linking are dramatically impacted, a feature that is likely to strongly affect new tissue development. PMID:21809945

  6. Inhibitory effects of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions by cell cultured Siberian Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Koo, H N; Myung, N I; Shin, M K; Kim, J W; Kim, D K; Kim, K S; Kim, H M; Lee, Y M

    2001-02-01

    The crude drug "Siberian Ginseng (SG)" has long been used in empirical Oriental medicine for the nonspecific enhancement of resistance in humans and animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of cell cultured SG by oral administration in mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. SG dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic allergy with doses of 10(-2) to 1 g/kg 1 h before oral administration. Of special note, SG inhibited systemic allergy with the dose of 1 g/kg by 25%. SG (1 g/kg) also inhibited passive cutaneous allergic reaction by 51%. SG dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. When SG (0.01 mg/ml) was added, the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in antidinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody-stimulated mast cells was inhibited 39.5% and 23.3%, respectively. In addition, SG inhibited anti-DNP IgE antibody-stimulated TNF-alpha protein expression in mast cells. Our studies provide evidence that SG may be beneficial in the treatment of various types of allergic diseases.

  7. CXCR5⁺ T helper cells mediate protective immunity against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Slight, Samantha R; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Gopal, Radha; Lin, Yinyao; Fallert Junecko, Beth A; Mehra, Smriti; Selman, Moises; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Pavon, Lenin; Kaushal, Deepak; Reinhart, Todd A; Randall, Troy D; Khader, Shabaana A

    2013-02-01

    One third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Although most infected people remain asymptomatic, they have a 10% lifetime risk of developing active tuberculosis (TB). Thus, the current challenge is to identify immune parameters that distinguish individuals with latent TB from those with active TB. Using human and experimental models of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that organized ectopic lymphoid structures containing CXCR5+ T cells were present in Mtb-infected lungs. In addition, we found that in experimental Mtb infection models, the presence of CXCR5+ T cells within ectopic lymphoid structures was associated with immune control. Furthermore, in a mouse model of Mtb infection, we showed that activated CD4+CXCR5+ T cells accumulated in Mtb-infected lungs and produced proinflammatory cytokines. Mice deficient in Cxcr5 had increased susceptibility to TB due to defective T cell localization within the lung parenchyma. We demonstrated that CXCR5 expression in T cells mediated correct T cell localization within TB granulomas, promoted efficient macrophage activation, protected against Mtb infection, and facilitated lymphoid follicle formation. These data demonstrate that CD4+CXCR5+ T cells play a protective role in the immune response against TB and highlight their potential use for future TB vaccine design and therapy.

  8. Dynamics of an HIV-1 infection model with cell mediated immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pei; Huang, Jianing; Jiang, Jiao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of an improved mathematical model on HIV-1 virus with cell mediated immunity. This new 5-dimensional model is based on the combination of a basic 3-dimensional HIV-1 model and a 4-dimensional immunity response model, which more realistically describes dynamics between the uninfected cells, infected cells, virus, the CTL response cells and CTL effector cells. Our 5-dimensional model may be reduced to the 4-dimensional model by applying a quasi-steady state assumption on the variable of virus. However, it is shown in this paper that virus is necessary to be involved in the modeling, and that a quasi-steady state assumption should be applied carefully, which may miss some important dynamical behavior of the system. Detailed bifurcation analysis is given to show that the system has three equilibrium solutions, namely the infection-free equilibrium, the infectious equilibrium without CTL, and the infectious equilibrium with CTL, and a series of bifurcations including two transcritical bifurcations and one or two possible Hopf bifurcations occur from these three equilibria as the basic reproduction number is varied. The mathematical methods applied in this paper include characteristic equations, Routh-Hurwitz condition, fluctuation lemma, Lyapunov function and computation of normal forms. Numerical simulation is also presented to demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical predictions.

  9. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity: possible role of N-linked glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Oeltmann, T.N.; Chambers, W.H.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the role of N-linked glycoproteins in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) by treating effector cells or target cells with swainsonine, a specific inhibitor of golgi mannosidase II which is critical for N-linked glycoprotein processing. They have also examined the effects of alpha-mannosidase, an exoglycosidase specific for alpha-linked mannose residues, on both target and effector cells. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with swainsonine (18 hr) resulted in an inhibition of lysis of K-562 target cells as measured by LDH release. Protein synthesis was not inhibited as measured by incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acids. However, oligosaccharide processing was altered as measured by incorporation of 2(/sup 3/H)-mannose. Similar treatment did not inhibit target cell-effector cell conjugation. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with alpha-mannosidase (1 hr) did not result in a reduction in NK cell function. However, alpha-mannosidase did cause a release of mannose from treated cells. These results suggest that N-linked glycoproteins may play a role in NCMC, but not at the level of recognition and binding.

  10. Natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity: possible role of N-linked glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, W.H.; Oeltmann, T.N.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the role of N-linked glycoproteins in natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) by treating effector cells or target cells with swainsonine, a specific inhibitor of golgi mannosidase II which is critical for N-linked glycoprotein processing. They have also examined the effects of alpha-mannosidase, an exoglycosidase specific for alpha-linked mannose residues, on both target and effector cells. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with swainsonine (18 hr) resulted in an inhibition of lysis of K-562 target cells as measured by LDH release. Protein synthesis was not inhibited as measured by incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acids. However, oligosaccharide processing was altered as measured by incorporation of 2(/sup 3/H)-mannose. Similar treatment did not inhibit target cell-effector cell conjugation. Pretreatment of nonadherent mononuclear cells with alpha-mannosidase (1 hr) did not result in a reduction in NK cell function. However, alpha-mannosidase did cause a release of mannose from treated cells. These results suggest that N-linked glycoproteins may play a role in NCMC, but not at the level of recognition and binding.

  11. Srf-dependent paracrine signals produced by myofibers control satellite cell-mediated skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Guerci, Aline; Lahoute, Charlotte; Hébrard, Sophie; Collard, Laura; Graindorge, Dany; Favier, Maryline; Cagnard, Nicolas; Batonnet-Pichon, Sabrina; Précigout, Guillaume; Garcia, Luis; Tuil, David; Daegelen, Dominique; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia

    2012-01-04

    Adult skeletal muscles adapt their fiber size to workload. We show that serum response factor (Srf) is required for satellite cell-mediated hypertrophic muscle growth. Deletion of Srf from myofibers and not satellite cells blunts overload-induced hypertrophy, and impairs satellite cell proliferation and recruitment to pre-existing fibers. We reveal a gene network in which Srf within myofibers modulates interleukin-6 and cyclooxygenase-2/interleukin-4 expressions and therefore exerts a paracrine control of satellite cell functions. In Srf-deleted muscles, in vivo overexpression of interleukin-6 is sufficient to restore satellite cell proliferation but not satellite cell fusion and overall growth. In contrast cyclooxygenase-2/interleukin-4 overexpression rescue satellite cell recruitment and muscle growth without affecting satellite cell proliferation, identifying altered fusion as the limiting cellular event. These findings unravel a role for Srf in the translation of mechanical cues applied to myofibers into paracrine signals, which in turn will modulate satellite cell functions and support muscle growth.

  12. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases.

  13. Neonatal Fc receptor expression in dendritic cells mediates protective immunity against colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kristi; Rath, Timo; Flak, Magdalena B; Arthur, Janelle C; Chen, Zhangguo; Glickman, Jonathan N; Zlobec, Inti; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Stachler, Matthew D; Odze, Robert D; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobin, Christian; Blumberg, Richard S

    2013-12-12

    Cancers arising in mucosal tissues account for a disproportionately large fraction of malignancies. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) have an important function in the mucosal immune system that we have now shown extends to the induction of CD8(+) T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. We demonstrate that FcRn within dendritic cells (DCs) was critical for homeostatic activation of mucosal CD8(+) T cells that drove protection against the development of colorectal cancers and lung metastases. FcRn-mediated tumor protection was driven by DCs activation of endogenous tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells via the cross-presentation of IgG complexed antigens (IgG IC), as well as the induction of cytotoxicity-promoting cytokine secretion, particularly interleukin-12, both of which were independently triggered by the FcRn-IgG IC interaction in murine and human DCs. FcRn thus has a primary role within mucosal tissues in activating local immune responses that are critical for priming efficient anti-tumor immunosurveillance.

  14. Is cell-mediated immunity related to the evolution of life-history strategies in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L; Scheuerlein, Alex; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    According to life-history theory, the development of immune function should be balanced through evolutionary optimization of the allocation of resources to reproduction and through mechanisms that promote survival. We investigated interspecific variability in cell-mediated immune response (CMI), as measured by the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) assay, in relation to clutch size, longevity and other life-history traits in 50 species of birds. CMI exhibited significant repeatability within species, and PHA responses in chicks were consistently stronger than in adults. Univariate tests showed a variety of significant relationships between the CMI of both chicks and adults with respect to size, development period and lifespan, but not clutch size or prevalence of blood parasites in adults. Multivariate analyses confirmed these patterns but independent variables were too highly correlated to isolate unique influences on CMI. The positive relationship of chick CMI to nestling period is further complicated by a parallel relationship of chick CMI to the age at testing. However, multivariate analysis showed that chick CMI varies uniquely with length of the nestling period. Adult CMI was associated with a strong life-history axis of body size, development rate and longevity. Therefore, adult CMI may be associated with prevention and repair mechanisms related to long lifespan, but it also may be allometrically related to body size through other pathways. Neither chick CMI nor adult CMI was related to clutch size, contradicting previous results linking parasite-related mortality to CMI and the evolution of clutch size (reproductive investment) in birds. PMID:12028764

  15. Tumor immunogenicity determines the effect of B7 costimulation on T cell-mediated tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A costimulatory signal through B7 to its counter-receptor CD28 on T cells enhances T cell activation. We have generated recombinant retroviruses containing cDNA for murine B7 and transduced a panel of murine tumor lines with varying immunogenicity to study the effect of B7 costimulation on antitumor immunity. In contrast to the progressive outgrowth of all wild-type (B7-) tumors in unimmunized syngeneic mice, four immunogenic tumors, lymphoma RMA, EL4, mastocytoma P815, and melanoma E6B2, regressed completely when transduced with the B7 gene. In contrast, four nonimmunogenic tumors, sarcomas MCA101, MCA102, and Ag104, and melanoma B16, remained tumorigenic after transduction of the B7 gene. Immunization with B7-transduced immunogenic tumors enhanced protective immunity and increased specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against the respective wild-type tumors as compared to immunization with nontransduced or mock-transduced tumors. Moreover, cocultivation of CTL with B7-transduced EL4 cells augmented the specificity of tumor-reactive CTL in long-term cultures. Treatment by injection of B7-transduced tumor cells cured 60% of mice with established wild-type EL4 lymphoma. In contrast, immunization with nonimmunogenic tumors transduced with B7 did not provide protective immunity and did not increase specific CTL activity. Our results show that tumor immunogenicity is critical to the outcome of costimulation of T cell-mediated tumor immunity by B7. PMID:7507508

  16. Activation by SLAM Family Receptors Contributes to NK Cell Mediated "Missing-Self" Recognition.

    PubMed

    Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; Grandclément, Camille; Jeevan-Raj, Beena; Leclercq, Georges; Veillette, André; Held, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells attack normal hematopoietic cells that do not express inhibitory MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules, but the ligands that activate NK cells remain incompletely defined. Here we show that the expression of the Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecule (SLAM) family members CD48 and Ly9 (CD229) by MHC-I-deficient tumor cells significantly contributes to NK cell activation. When NK cells develop in the presence of T cells or B cells that lack inhibitory MHC-I but express activating CD48 and Ly9 ligands, the NK cells' ability to respond to MHC-I-deficient tumor cells is severely compromised. In this situation, NK cells express normal levels of the corresponding activation receptors 2B4 (CD244) and Ly9 but these receptors are non-functional. This provides a partial explanation for the tolerance of NK cells to MHC-I-deficient cells in vivo. Activating signaling via 2B4 is restored when MHC-I-deficient T cells are removed, indicating that interactions with MHC-I-deficient T cells dominantly, but not permanently, impair the function of the 2B4 NK cell activation receptor. These data identify an important role of SLAM family receptors for NK cell mediated "missing-self" reactivity and suggest that NK cell tolerance in MHC-I mosaic mice is in part explained by an acquired dysfunction of SLAM family receptors.

  17. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  18. IL-9 regulates intestinal barrier function in experimental T cell-mediated colitis

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Katharina; McKenzie, Andrew N; Neurath, Markus F; Weigmann, Benno

    2015-01-01

    As previous studies suggested that IL-9 may control intestinal barrier function, we tested the role of IL-9 in experimental T cell-mediated colitis induced by the hapten reagent 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The deficiency of IL-9 suppressed TNBS-induced colitis and led to lower numbers of PU.1 expressing T cells in the lamia propria, suggesting a regulatory role for Th9 cells in the experimental TNBS colitis model. Since IL-9 is known to functionally alter intestinal barrier function in colonic inflammation, we assessed the expression of tight junction molecules in intestinal epithelial cells of TNBS-inflamed mice. Therefore we made real-time PCR analyses for tight junction molecules in the inflamed colon from wild-type and IL-9 KO mice, immunofluorescent stainings and investigated the expression of junctional proteins directly in intestinal epithelial cells of TNBS-inflamed mice by Western blot studies. The results demonstrated that sealing proteins like occludin were up regulated in the colon of inflamed IL-9 KO mice. In contrast, the tight junction protein Claudin1 showed lower expression levels when IL-9 is absent. Surprisingly, the pore-forming molecule Claudin2 revealed equal expression in TNBS-treated wild-type and IL-9-deficient animals. These results illustrate the pleiotropic functions of IL-9 in changing intestinal permeability in experimental colitis. Thus, modulation of IL-9 function emerges as a new approach for regulating barrier function in intestinal inflammation. PMID:25838986

  19. Micro-RNA dysregulation in multiple sclerosis favours pro-inflammatory T-cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Smith, Kristen M; Godlewski, Jakub; Liu, Yue; Winger, Ryan; Lawler, Sean E; Whitacre, Caroline C; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2011-12-01

    Pro-inflammatory T cells mediate autoimmune demyelination in multiple sclerosis. However, the factors driving their development and multiple sclerosis susceptibility are incompletely understood. We investigated how micro-RNAs, newly described as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, contribute to pathogenic T-cell differentiation in multiple sclerosis. miR-128 and miR-27b were increased in naïve and miR-340 in memory CD4(+) T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis, inhibiting Th2 cell development and favouring pro-inflammatory Th1 responses. These effects were mediated by direct suppression of B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (BMI1) and interleukin-4 (IL4) expression, resulting in decreased GATA3 levels, and a Th2 to Th1 cytokine shift. Gain-of-function experiments with these micro-RNAs enhanced the encephalitogenic potential of myelin-specific T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In addition, treatment of multiple sclerosis patient T cells with oligonucleotide micro-RNA inhibitors led to the restoration of Th2 responses. These data illustrate the biological significance and therapeutic potential of these micro-RNAs in regulating T-cell phenotypes in multiple sclerosis.

  20. Cardiac Hegemony of Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqi, Sailay; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac senescence and age-related disease development have gained general attention and recognition in the past decades due to increased accessibility and quality of health care. The advancement in global civilization is complementary to concerns regarding population aging and development of chronic degenerative diseases. Cardiac degeneration has been rigorously studied. The molecular mechanisms of cardiac senescence are on multiple cellular levels and hold a multilayer complexity level, thereby hampering development of unambiguous treatment protocols. In particular, the synergistic exchange of the senescence phenotype through a senescence secretome between myocytes and stem cells appears complicated and is of great future therapeutic value. The current review article will highlight hallmarks of senescence, cardiac myocyte and stem cell senescence, and the mutual exchange of senescent secretome. Future cardiac cell therapy approaches require a comprehensive understanding of myocardial senescence to improve therapeutic efficiency as well as efficacy. PMID:24349878

  1. Regulation of endothelial VCAM-1 expression in murine cardiac grafts. Roles for TNF and IL4.

    PubMed Central

    Bergese, S.; Pelletier, R.; Vallera, D.; Widmer, M.; Orosz, C.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo mechanisms of vascular endothelial activation and VCAM-1 expression were studied in murine heterotopic cardiac grafts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that cardiac allograft endothelia develop reactivity with MECA-32 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and M/K-2 (anti-VCAM-1) MAb within 3 days of transplantation, whereas cardiac isografts develop MECA-32 reactivity but no M/K-2 reactivity. Additional studies demonstrated that a single treatment of cardiac isograft recipients with the anti-CD3 MAb 145-2C11 induces VCAM-1 expression on isograft microvascular endothelia within 24 hours. We have used this experimental system to identify the cytokines responsible for expression of VCAM-1 and MECA-32 MAb reactivity on graft vascular endothelia. We report that the expression of VCAM-1 on isograft endothelia that was induced with anti-CD3 MAb was blocked by simultaneous treatment with either pentoxifylline, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR-Fc), anti-IL4 MAb, or soluble IL4R, but not by anti-IFN-gamma MAb. Alternatively, a similar pattern of isograft endothelial VCAM-1 expression was stimulated in the absence of anti-CD3 MAbs with a single injection of human recombinant TNF-alpha, or with recombinant murine IL4 provided as IL4/anti-IL4 MAb complexes. In addition, the IL4-induced VCAM-1 expression was completely blocked by a single intravenous treatment of the isograft recipients with TNFR:Fc. This suggests that high concentrations of TNF-alpha can stimulate endothelial VCAM-1 expression, but these concentrations are apparently not achieved in cardiac isografts. In the absence of an inducing agent such as anti-CD3 MAb, the stimulation of VCAM-1 expression with exogenous IL4 may reflect functional interaction between endogenous TNF and exogenous IL4, as suggested by the blocking experiments with TNFR:Fc. Although cardiac isograft endothelia normally develop reactivity with MECA-32 MAb within 3 days of transplantation, treatment of cardiac isograft

  2. Interleukin 1 and Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibit Cardiac Myocyte β -adrenergic Responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, Tod; Chung, Mina K.; Pieper, Stephen J.; Lange, Louis G.; Schreiner, George F.

    1989-09-01

    Reversible congestive heart failure can accompany cardiac allograft rejection and inflammatory myocarditis, conditions associated with an immune cell infiltrate of the myocardium. To determine whether immune cell secretory products alter cardiac muscle metabolism without cytotoxicity, we cultured cardiac myocytes in the presence of culture supernatants from activated immune cells. We observed that these culture supernatants inhibit β -adrenergic agonist-mediated increases in cultured cardiac myocyte contractility and intracellular cAMP accumulation. The myocyte contractile response to increased extracellular Ca2+ concentration is unaltered by prior exposure to these culture supernatants, as is the increase in myocyte intracellular cAMP concentration in response to stimulation with forskolin, a direct adenyl cyclase activator. Inhibition occurs in the absence of alteration in β -adrenergic receptor density or ligand binding affinity. Suppressive activity is attributable to the macrophage-derived cytokines interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor. Thus, these observations describe a role for defined cytokines in regulating the hormonal responsiveness and function of contractile cells. The effects of interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor on intracellular cAMP accumulation may be a model for immune modulation of other cellular functions dependent upon cyclic nucleotide metabolism. The uncoupling of agonist-occupied receptors from adenyl cyclase suggests that β -receptor or guanine nucleotide binding protein function is altered by the direct or indirect action of cytokines on cardiac muscle cells.

  3. 2016 Comprehensive Update of the Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology: Introduction of Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C; Hübscher, S G; O'Leary, J; Randhawa, P S; Feng, S; Neil, D; Colvin, R B; McCaughan, G; Fung, J J; Del Bello, A; Reinholt, F P; Haga, H; Adeyi, O; Czaja, A J; Schiano, T; Fiel, M I; Smith, M L; Sebagh, M; Tanigawa, R Y; Yilmaz, F; Alexander, G; Baiocchi, L; Balasubramanian, M; Batal, I; Bhan, A K; Bucuvalas, J; Cerski, C T S; Charlotte, F; de Vera, M E; ElMonayeri, M; Fontes, P; Furth, E E; Gouw, A S H; Hafezi-Bakhtiari, S; Hart, J; Honsova, E; Ismail, W; Itoh, T; Jhala, N C; Khettry, U; Klintmalm, G B; Knechtle, S; Koshiba, T; Kozlowski, T; Lassman, C R; Lerut, J; Levitsky, J; Licini, L; Liotta, R; Mazariegos, G; Minervini, M I; Misdraji, J; Mohanakumar, T; Mölne, J; Nasser, I; Neuberger, J; O'Neil, M; Pappo, O; Petrovic, L; Ruiz, P; Sağol, Ö; Sanchez Fueyo, A; Sasatomi, E; Shaked, A; Shiller, M; Shimizu, T; Sis, B; Sonzogni, A; Stevenson, H L; Thung, S N; Tisone, G; Tsamandas, A C; Wernerson, A; Wu, T; Zeevi, A; Zen, Y

    2016-06-07

    The Banff Working Group on Liver Allograft Pathology reviewed and discussed literature evidence regarding antibody-mediated liver allograft rejection at the 11th (Paris, France, June 5-10, 2011), 12th (Comandatuba, Brazil, August 19-23, 2013), and 13th (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, October 5-10, 2015) meetings of the Banff Conference on Allograft Pathology. Discussion continued online. The primary goal was to introduce guidelines and consensus criteria for the diagnosis of liver allograft antibody-mediated rejection and provide a comprehensive update of all Banff Schema recommendations. Included are new recommendations for complement component 4d tissue staining and interpretation, staging liver allograft fibrosis, and findings related to immunosuppression minimization. In an effort to create a single reference document, previous unchanged criteria are also included.

  4. CXCL4 Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Chronic Liver Allograft Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Shi, Yuan; Xie, Ke-Liang; Yin, Hai-Fang; Yan, Lu-nan; Lau, Wan-yee; Wang, Guo-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver allograft dysfunction (CLAD) remains the most common cause of patient morbidity and allograft loss in liver transplant patients. However, the pathogenesis of CLAD has not been completely elucidated. By establishing rat CLAD models, in this study, we identified the informative CLAD-associated genes using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) proteomics analysis and validated these results in recipient rat liver allografts. CXCL4, CXCR3, EGFR, JAK2, STAT3, and Collagen IV were associated with CLAD pathogenesis. We validated that CXCL4 is upstream of these informative genes in the isolated hepatic stellate cells (HSC). Blocking CXCL4 protects against CLAD by reducing liver fibrosis. Therefore, our results indicated that therapeutic approaches that neutralize CXCL4, a newly identified target of fibrosis, may represent a novel strategy for preventing and treating CLAD after liver transplantation. PMID:28053995

  5. Acute Page kidney following renal allograft biopsy: a complication requiring early recognition and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chung, J; Caumartin, Y; Warren, J; Luke, P P W

    2008-06-01

    The acute Page kidney phenomenon occurs as a consequence of external compression of the renal parenchyma leading to renal ischemia and hypertension. Between January 2000 and September 2007, 550 kidney transplants and 518 ultrasound-guided kidney biopsies were performed. During that time, four recipients developed acute oligo-anuria following ultrasound-guided allograft biopsy. Emergent doppler-ultrasounds were performed demonstrating absence of diastolic flow as well as a sub-capsular hematoma of the kidney. Prompt surgical exploration with allograft capsulotomy was performed in all cases. Immediately after capsulotomy, intraoperative Doppler study demonstrated robust return of diastolic flow. Three patients maintained good graft function, and one kidney was lost due to acute antibody-mediated rejection. We conclude that postbiopsy anuria associated with a subcapsular hematoma and acute absence of diastolic flow on doppler ultrasound should be considered pathognomonic of APK. All renal transplant specialists should be able to recognize this complication, because immediate surgical decompression can salvage the allograft.

  6. Allograft tolerance induced by donor apoptotic lymphocytes requires phagocytosis in the recipient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, E.; Gao, Y.; Chen, J.; Roberts, A. I.; Wang, X.; Chen, Z.; Shi, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Cell death through apoptosis plays a critical role in regulating cellular homeostasis. Whether the disposal of apoptotic cells through phagocytosis can actively induce immune tolerance in vivo, however, remains controversial. Here, we report in a rat model that without using immunosuppressants, transfusion of apoptotic splenocytes from the donor strain prior to transplant dramatically prolonged survival of heart allografts. Histological analysis verified that rejection signs were significantly ameliorated. Splenocytes from rats transfused with donor apoptotic cells showed a dramatically decreased response to donor lymphocyte stimulation. Most importantly, blockade of phagocytosis in vivo, either with gadolinium chloride to disrupt phagocyte function or with annexin V to block binding of exposed phosphotidylserine to its receptor on phagocytes, abolished the beneficial effect of transfused apoptotic cells on heart allograft survival. Our results demonstrate that donor apoptotic cells promote specific allograft acceptance and that phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo plays a crucial role in maintaining immune tolerance.

  7. Evaluation of an Osseous Allograft Membrane for Guided Tissue Regeneration in the Dog.

    PubMed

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Clinical application of a demineralized freeze-dried cortical bone membrane allograft (DFBMA) for treatment of intra(infra)bony periodontal pockets in dogs was evaluated. The mean pre-treatment periodontal probing depth equaled 7.2-mm. Post-treatment probing depths in all 11 cases were normal, with a mean periodontal probing gain of 5.4-mm. Guided tissue regeneration using a commercially available veterinary canine DFBMA and canine demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) resulted in clinically significant periodontal attachment gains. The gain of new periodontal tissue attachment was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The commercially available veterinary allograft products predictably increased new periodontal attachment without any identified membrane sequelae in these 11 cases.

  8. Overview of procurement, processing, and sterilization of soft tissue allografts for sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Luis Sierra; Richmond, John C

    2007-09-01

    Musculoskeletal allografts are commonly used in orthopedic surgery and have become increasingly popular. Their indications have widened as an alternatives to autografts. A tissue processing industry has secondarily evolved. An increasing number of accredited tissue banks are providing donor screening, procurement, processing, storage, and distribution of tissue. Multiple factors play a role for a graft to be successfully implanted: sterility, reduction of antigenicity, and preservation of its biologic and biomechanical properties. A rare but catastrophic complication that has raised concern is disease transmission. Controversies exist on which is the best way to produce a strong, disease-free graft. There is no current standard, but as allograft technology evolves, surgeons need to be aware of the regulations and policies surrounding allograft tissue procurement and processing to provide the best outcomes in transplanted patients.

  9. Robotic trans-abdominal transplant nephrectomy for a failed renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Mulloy, M R; Tan, M; Wolf, J H; D'Annunzio, S H; Pollinger, H S

    2014-12-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for removal of a failed renal allograft has not previously been reported. Herein, we report the first robotic trans-abdominal transplant nephrectomy (TN). A 34-year-old male with Alport's syndrome lost function of his deceased donor allograft after 12 years and presented with fever, pain over his allograft and hematuria. The operation was performed intra-abdominally using the Da Vinci Robotic Surgical System with four trocars. The total operative time was 235 min and the estimated blood loss was less than 25 cm(3). There were no peri-operative complications observed and the patient was discharged to home less than 24 h postoperatively. The utilization of robotic technology facilitated the successful performance of a minimally invasive, trans-abdominal TN.

  10. Skin, subcutaneous tissue, and allograft infection with Mycobacterium fortuitum in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Raees F; Bappa, Adamu; Ahmad, Mustafa; AlShaebi, Fuad

    2014-11-01

    Different types of skin disorders are prevalent among kidney transplant recipients. The development of nodular skin lesions in these patients would usually raise a suspicion of Kaposi's sarcoma. We report a patient, who presented with nodular skin lesions one year post transplant, but the biopsy revealed a rare diagnosis - Mycobacterium fortuitum (M. fortuitum) infection of the skin, subcutaneous, and renal allograft. He was treated successfully with an initial two-week course of intravenous cefoxitin, followed by a six-month course of ciprofloxacin, clarithromycin, and co-trimoxazole. There are a few reported cases of M. fortuitum infection in renal transplant recipients in the literature - notably urinary tract infection, allograft infection, and psoas abscess, but to the best of our knowledge this is the first case demonstrating extensive infection involving the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and renal allograft. Physicians vested with the care of renal transplant patients should be aware of this rare infection in these patients.

  11. Inguinal Herniation Containing Bladder, Causing Contralateral Allograft Hydroureteronephrosis-A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    du Toit, T; Kaestner, L; Muller, E; Kahn, D

    2017-02-01

    We report the first documented case of an inguinal hernia containing bladder, resulting in contralateral allograft hydroureteronephrosis. A 39-year-old male patient presented with allograft dysfunction, a contralateral inguinoscrotal hernia, and marked hydroureteronephrosis on ultrasound (US). Percutaneous nephrostogram and a retrograde cystogram suggested bladder herniation with incorporation of the contralateral ureteroneocystostomy into the hernia. Paraperitoneal bladder herniation was confirmed at surgery and hernioplasty was performed. Six-week follow-up revealed normal renal function with no sign of hernia recurrence. Despite occurring rarely, transplant ureter or bladder herniation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hydroureteronephrosis. This case illustrates that the contralateral position of hernia to allograft does not necessarily preclude the hernia as the source of ureteric obstruction.

  12. Current Safety of Renal Allograft Biopsy With Indication in Adult Recipients: An Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shang-Feng; Chen, Cheng-Hsu; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Cheng, Chi-Hung; Yu, Tung-Min; Chuang, Ya-Wen; Huang, Shih-Ting; Tsai, Jun-Li; Wu, Ming-Ju

    2016-02-01

    Renal biopsy remains the golden standard diagnosis of renal function deterioration. The safety in native kidney biopsy is well defined. However, it is a different story in allograft kidney biopsy. We conduct this retrospective study to clarify the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication.All variables were grouped by the year of biopsy and they were compared by Mann-Whitney U test (for continuous variables) or Chi-square test (for categorical variables). We collected possible factors associated with complications, including age, gender, body weight, renal function, cause of uremia, status of coagulation, hepatitis, size of needle, and immunosuppressants.We recruited all renal transplant recipients undergoing allograft biopsy between January of 2009 and December of 2014. This is the largest database for allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Of all the 269 biopsies, there was no difference in occurrence among the total 14 complications (5.2%) over these 6 years. There were only 3 cases of hematomas (1.11%), 6 gross hematuria (2.23%), 1 hydronephrosis (0.37%), and 2 hemoglobin decline (0.74%). The outcome of this cohort is the best compared to all other studies, and it is even better than the allograft protocol kidney biopsy. Among all possible factors, patients with pathological report containing "medullary tissue only" were susceptible to complications (P < 0.001, 1.8 of relative risk).In modern era, this study demonstrates the safety of allograft kidney biopsy with indication. Identifying the renal capsule before biopsy to avoid puncture into medulla is the most important element to prevent complications.

  13. Ankle arthrodesis fusion rates for mesenchymal stem cell bone allograft versus proximal tibia autograft.

    PubMed

    Anderson, John J; Boone, Joshua J; Hansen, Myron; Brady, Chad; Gough, Adam; Swayzee, Zflan

    2014-01-01

    Ankle arthrodesis is commonly used in the treatment of ankle arthritis. The present study compared mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) bone allografts and proximal tibia autografts as adjuncts in performing ankle arthrodesis. A total of 109 consecutive ankle fusions performed from 2002 to 2008 were evaluated retrospectively. Of the 109 fusions, 24 were excluded from the present study, leaving 85 patients who had undergone ankle arthrodesis. Of the 85 patients, 41 had received a proximal tibia autograft and 44, an MSC bone allograft. These 2 groups were reviewed and compared retrospectively at least 2 years postoperatively for the overall fusion rate, interval to radiographic fusion, and interval to clinical fusion. A modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale was used to measure patient satisfaction. The overall fusion rate was 84.1% in the MSC bone allograft group and 95.1% in the proximal tibia autograft group (p = .158). The corresponding mean intervals to radiographic fusion were 13.0 ± 2.5 weeks and 11.3 ± 2.8 weeks (p ≤ .001). The interval to clinical fusion was 13.1 ± 2.1 weeks and 11.0 ± 1.5 weeks (p ≤ .001) in the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft group, respectively. No statistically significant difference was found in the fusion rates between the MSC bone allograft and proximal tibia autograft groups. Also, no statistically significant difference was found between the preoperative and postoperative scores using a modified and adjusted American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons ankle scale between the 2 groups (p = .41 and p = .44, respectively). A statistically significant delay to radiographic and clinical fusion was present in the MSC bone allograft group compared with the proximal tibia autograft group; however, no difference was found in patient satisfaction.

  14. Penetrating Blast Injury to the Knee of a United States Soldier Treated with Allograft Mosaicplasty

    PubMed Central

    Eichinger, Maj. Josef K.; Bluman, Eric M.; Arrington, Col. Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This is the first report of successful allograft mosaicplasty treatment of a large osteochondral lesion of the knee caused by a blast fragment sustained during combat operations. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. Methods: An active-duty infantryman sustained an osteochondral lesion of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic fragment of an explosively formed projectile. Initial treatment consisted of removal of the foreign body and primary closure. The patient continued to experience pain, mechanical symptoms, and repeated effusions after initial nonoperative treatment. Allograft mosaicplasty of the lesion utilizing two 18-mm-diameter fresh allograft osteochondral plugs was performed at 6 months post-injury. Results: At 2-year follow-up, the patient remains on active duty with marked improvement in symptoms. Two years postoperatively, his outcome scores are 72 of 100 on the Western Ontario and McMaster University osteoarthritis scoring index (WOMAC) and 60 of 100 on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). His follow-up x-rays and MRI demonstrate intact articular cartilage and subchondral bone incorporation. Conclusion: Penetrating injuries to joints are commonplace in the battlefield environment. Combat injuries to the knee are frequently associated with articular cartilage injury. While numerous cartilage restoration techniques have been used with success for the treatment of osteochondral injuries to the femoral condyles, no published reports describe the use of allograft mosaicplasty in this location for open, penetrating injuries with focal cartilage loss. This is the first documented use of allograft mosaicplasty for a traumatic osteochondral defect of the medial femoral condyle caused by a metallic projectile. The patient was able to return to active duty following rehabilitation. We demonstrate a high level of functioning is possible following allograft mosaicplasty of a large

  15. Proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal immunoglobulin G deposits complicated by immunoglobulin A nephropathy in the renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Anri; Kawanishi, Kunio; Horita, Shigeru; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Ochi, Ayami; Komoda, Mizuki; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Unagami, Kohei; Okumi, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-07-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) A nephropathy (IgAN) is a known autoimmune disease due to abnormal glycosylation of IgA1, and occasionally, IgG co-deposition occurs. The prognosis of IgG co-deposition with IgAN is adverse, as shown in the previous studies. However, in the clinical setting, monoclonality of IgG co-deposition with IgAN has not been observed. We describe a case of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits (PGNMID) combined with IgAN in a renal allograft. A-21-year-old man developed end-stage renal failure with unknown aetiology and underwent living-donor kidney transplantation from his mother 2 years after being diagnosed. One year after kidney transplantation, proteinuria 2+ and haematuria 2+ were detected; allograft biopsy revealed mesangial IgA and C3 deposits, indicating a diagnosis of IgAN. After tonsillectomy and steroid pulse therapy, proteinuria and haematuria resolved. However, 4 years after transplantation, pedal oedema, proteinuria (6.89 g/day) and allograft dysfunction (serum creatinine (sCr) 203.3 µmol/L) appeared. A second allograft biopsy showed mesangial expansion and focal segmental proliferative endocapillary lesions with IgA1λ and monoclonal IgG1κ depositions. Electron microscopic analysis revealed a massive amount of deposits, located in the mesangial and subendothelial lesions. A diagnosis of PGNMID complicated with IgAN was made, and rituximab and plasmapheresis were added to steroid pulse therapy. With this treatment, proteinuria was alleviated to 0.5 g/day, and the allograft dysfunction recovered to sCr 132.6 µmol/L. This case suggests a necessity for investigation of PGNMID and IgA nephropathy in renal allografts to detect monoclonal Ig deposition disease.

  16. Radial Head and Neck Allograft for Comminute Irreparable Fracture-Dislocations of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Tudisco, Cosimo

    2016-11-01

    Fracture-dislocations of the elbow can be difficult to treat, with unsatisfactory results in some cases. In general, it is preferable to preserve the fractured radial head when possible, but some patients present a unique treatment challenge because of extremely comminuted fractures and bone loss. In these cases, the only options available are radial head prosthesis or allograft. The authors present a case of a 45-year-old man with a fracture-dislocation of the left elbow that was treated with an allograft of the radial head and neck because of extreme comminution of the fracture. There have been a few reports about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the radial head, and they all included traumatic or posttraumatic cases treated with a frozen allograft. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the use of osteochondral allograft in the acute setting for the treatment of a comminuted fracture of the radius involving the whole head and neck. The clinical results were satisfactory at the final follow-up, although mild degenerative changes were present, the screws were coming loose, and the radial head had a slight valgus deformity. Radial head allograft can be an option in selected cases of acute fractures with severe comminution and bone loss that are not amenable to a stable internal fixation; for the young and active patient, who is not the best candidate for radial head resection; or in cases in which radial head arthroplasty is not feasible because of severe bone loss. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1205-e1208.].

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using cryopreserved irradiated bone-ACL-bone-allograft transplants.

    PubMed

    Goertzen, M J; Clahsen, H; Schulitz, K P

    1994-01-01

    Bone-ACL-bone allograft transplantation has been investigated as a potential solution to reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). To minimize disease transmission (e.g. the acquired immuno deficiency syndrome), bony and collagenous tissues should be sterilized. Recent animal studies indicate that gamma irradiation and ethylene oxide sterilization result in diminished histological and biomechanical properties. The purpose of the present study was biomechanical and histological determination of the fate of deep-frozen gamma-irradiated (2.5 Mrad) canine bone-ACL-bone allografts with argon gas protection. Particular attention was paid to collagenous and neuroanatomical morphology 3, 6 and 12 months after implantation, by comparison to a non-irradiated control group. Sixty skeletally mature foxhounds were operated on in this study, divided up in two groups of 30 dogs each. In group A animals the ACL was replaced by a deep-frozen (-80 degrees C) bone-ACL-bone LAD-augmented allograft subjected to 2.5 Mrad gamma irradiation with argon gas protection. The animals in group B received an LAD-augmented ACL-allograft transplant without gamma irradiation. All knees from both groups were evaluated 3, 6 and 12 months after implantation in regard to biomechanical properties, collagen morphology and routine histology (haematoxylin and eosin stain, polarization microscopy), neuroanatomical morphology (silver and gold chloride stain) and microvasculature (modified Spalteholz technique). The irradiated ACL allografts withstood a maximum load that was 63.8% (718.3 N) of the maximum load of normal ACLs after 12 months. By contrast, the non-irradiated allografts failed at 69.1% (780.1 N) of the maximum load of normal control ACLs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Comparison of allograft and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage subsidence rates in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).

    PubMed

    Yson, Sharon C; Sembrano, Jonathan N; Santos, Edward Rainier G

    2017-04-01

    Structural allografts and PEEK cages are commonly used interbody fusion devices in ACDF. The subsidence rates of these two spacers have not yet been directly compared. The primary aim of this study was to compare the subsidence rate of allograft and PEEK cage in ACDF. The secondary aim was to determine if the presence of subsidence affects the clinical outcome. We reviewed 67 cases (117 levels) of ACDF with either structural allograft or PEEK cages. There were 85 levels (48 cases) with PEEK and 32 levels (19 cases) with allograft spacers. Anterior and posterior disc heights at each operative level were measured at immediate and 6months post-op. Subsidence was defined as a decrease in anterior or posterior disc heights >2mm. NDI of the subsidence (SG) and non-subsidence group (NSG) were recorded. Chi-square test was used to analyze subsidence rates. T-test was used to analyze clinical outcomes (α=0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between subsidence rates of the PEEK (29%; 25/85) and allograft group (28%; 9/32) (p=0.69). Overall mean subsidence was 2.3±1.7mm anteriorly and 2.6±1.2mm posteriorly. Mean NDI improvement was 11.7 (from 47.1 to 35.4; average follow-up: 12mos) for the SG and 14.0 (from 45.8 to 31.8; average follow-up: 13mos) for the NSG (p=0.74). Subsidence rate does not seem to be affected by the use of either PEEK or allograft as spacers in ACDF. Furthermore, subsidence alone does not seem to be predictive of clinical outcomes of ACDF.

  19. Renal allograft granulomatous interstitial nephritis: observations of an uncommon injury pattern in 22 transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Carla L.; Rogers, Thomas E.; James Chon, W.; Chang, Anthony; Meehan, Shane M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is uncommon in native kidneys, and descriptions in allografts are few. We report clinical and pathologic findings in 22 allograft recipients with GIN identified in renal allograft biopsies and nephrectomies. Methods: Renal allografts with GIN were retrieved from the pathology files of two academic medical centers. Available clinical and pathologic data were compiled retrospectively for a 23-year period. Results: GIN was present in 23 specimens from 22 patients (15 males and 7 females) with allograft dysfunction [serum creatinine averaged 3.3 mg/dL (range 1.4–7.8)], at a mean age of 48 years (range 22–77). GIN was identified in 0.3% of biopsies at a mean of 552 days post transplantation (range 10–5898). GIN was due to viral (5), bacterial (5) and fungal (2) infections in 12 (54.5%), and drug exposure was the likely cause in 5 cases (22.7%). One had recurrent granulomatosis with polyangiitis. In 4 cases, no firm etiology of GIN was established. Of 18 patients with follow up data, 33.3% had a complete response to therapy, 44.5% had a partial response and 22.2% developed graft loss due to fungal and E. coli infections. All responders had graft survival for more than 1 year after diagnosis of GIN. Conclusions: Allograft GIN is associated with a spectrum of etiologic agents and was identified in 0.3% of biopsies. Graft failure occurred in 22% of this series, due to fungal and bacterial GIN; however, most had complete or partial dysfunction reversal and long–term graft survival after appropriate therapy.

  20. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment.

    PubMed

    Mankad, Rekha; Herrmann, Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001-0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses.

  1. Cardiac tumors: echo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mankad, Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are exceedingly rare (0.001–0.03% in most autopsy series). They can be present anywhere within the heart and can be attached to any surface or be embedded in the myocardium or pericardial space. Signs and symptoms are nonspecific and highly variable related to the localization, size and composition of the cardiac mass. Echocardiography, typically performed for another indication, may be the first imaging modality alerting the clinician to the presence of a cardiac mass. Although echocardiography cannot give the histopathology, certain imaging features and adjunctive tools such as contrast imaging may aid in the differential diagnosis as do the adjunctive clinical data and the following principles: (1) thrombus or vegetations are the most likely etiology, (2) cardiac tumors are mostly secondary and (3) primary cardiac tumors are mostly benign. Although the finding of a cardiac mass on echocardiography may generate confusion, a stepwise approach may serve well practically. Herein, we will review such an approach and the role of echocardiography in the assessment of cardiac masses. PMID:27600455

  2. The feasibility and applications of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring, thromboelastography and transit-time flow measurement in living-related renal transplantation surgery: results of a prospective pilot observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a significant and detrimental postoperative phenomenon following living-related renal allograft transplantation, with a published incidence of up to 15%. Early therapeutic vasodilatory interventions have been shown to improve DGF, and modifications to immunosuppressive regimens may subsequently lessen its impact. This pilot study assesses the potential applicability of perioperative non-invasive cardiac output monitoring (NICOM), transit-time flow monitoring (TTFM) of the transplant renal artery and pre-/perioperative thromboelastography (TEG) in the early prediction of DGF and perioperative complications. Methods Ten consecutive living-related renal allograft recipients were studied. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring commenced immediately following induction of anaesthesia and was maintained throughout the perioperative period. Doppler-based TTFM was performed during natural haemostatic pauses in the transplant surgery: immediately following graft reperfusion and following ureteric implantation. Central venous blood sampling for TEG was performed following induction of anaesthesia and during abdominal closure. Results A single incidence of DGF was seen within the studied cohort and one intra-operative (thrombotic) complication noted. NICOM confirmed a predictable trend of increased cardiac index (CI) following allograft reperfusion (mean CI - clamped: 3.17 ± 0.29 L/min/m2, post-reperfusion: 3.50 ± 0.35 L/min/m2; P < 0.05) mediated by a significant reduction in total peripheral resistance. Reduced TTFM at the point of allograft reperfusion (227 ml/min c.f. mean; 411 ml/min (95% CI: 358 to 465)) was identified in a subject who experienced intra-operative transplant renal artery thrombosis. TEG data exhibited significant reductions in clot lysis (LY30 (%): pre-op: 1.0 (0.29 to 1.71), post reperfusion 0.33 (0.15 to 0.80); P = 0.02) and a trend towards increased clot initiation following

  3. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  4. Receptor binding and cell-mediated metabolism of (/sup 125/I)monoiodoglucagon by isolated canine hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagopian, W.A.; Tager, H.S.

    1984-07-25

    A reverse-phase HPLC method has been developed to purify /sup 125/I-labeled products resulting from the chloramine-T-based iodination of glucagon. In addition the products ((/sup 125/I)iodoTyr/sup 10/ /sup 13/)glucagon, ((/sup 125/I)iodoTyr/sup 13/)glucagon, and ((/sup 125/I)iodoTyr/sup 10/)glucagon) have been used to study the receptor binding of glucagon and the cell-mediated metabolism of the hormone by isolated canine hepatocytes. It was concluded that (a) not withstanding apparent differences in affinities exhibited by the three peptides, the interactions with the glucagon receptor are functionally equivalent, and (b) the cell-mediated metabolism of receptor-bound glucagon involves the formation of hormone-derived peptides in which the biologically important NH/sub 2/-terminal region of the hormone has been modified by limited proteolytic cleavage.

  5. Influence of brachytherapy ( sup 192 Ir afterloading) on cell-mediated immune reactions in patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstner, G.J.; Kucera, H.; Kudlacek, S.; Micksche, M. )

    1989-11-01

    The influence of radiation therapy on cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients seems to depend on source, dose, and area of irradiation, as well as on the variables reflected by the patient population investigated. In the present study we demonstrated that brachytherapy ({sup 192}Ir afterloading), applied to patients with inoperable stage I endometrial cancer, has no immediate or sustained effect on lymphocyte function. Both lymphocyte mitogen response and natural killer cell (NK) activity are not significantly changed in terms of baseline values compared with test results during and after therapy. Brachytherapy, as used in this study, has no influence on cell-mediated immunity in patients with endometrial cancer stage I.

  6. Successful treatment of verruca vulgaris with Thuja occidentalis in a renal allograft recipient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, R; Pulimood, S A; Abraham, P; John, G T

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomavirus-driven verruca vulgaris infection is common in solid organ transplant recipients and increases the risk for squamous cell carcinoma. The available treatment modalities have limited response. We report a renal allograft recipient who presented with multiple warts not responding to cryotherapy and radiosurgery with one turning malignant, needing amputation of the finger. An extract from Thuja occidentalis (White cedar tree) cured the resistant warts on the other fingers, leaving only superficial scars and without affecting allograft function. We have reviewed the pharmacological and clinical properties of T. occidentalis.

  7. Preclinical Evaluation of Zoledronate to Maintain Bone Allograft and Improve Implant Fixation in Revision Joint Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Mette; Barckman, Jeppe; Bechtold, Joan E.; Søballe, Kjeld; Baas, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Revision arthroplasty surgery is often complicated by loss of bone stock that can be managed by the use of bone allograft. The allograft provides immediate stability for the revision implant but may be resorbed, impairing subsequent implant stability. Bisphosphonates can delay allograft resorption. We hypothesized that zoledronate-impregnated allograft impacted around revision implants would improve implant fixation as characterized by mechanical push-out testing and histomorphometry. Methods: Twenty-four axially pistoning micromotion devices were inserted bilaterally into the knees of twelve dogs according to our revision protocol. This produced a standardized revision cavity with a loose implant, fibrous tissue, and a sclerotic bone rim. Revision surgery was performed eight weeks later; after stable titanium revision components were implanted, saline solution-soaked allograft was impacted around the component on the control side and allograft soaked in 0.005 mg/mL zoledronate was impacted on the intervention side. The results were evaluated after four weeks. Results: The zoledronate treatment resulted in a 30% increase in ultimate shear strength (p = 0.023), a 54% increase in apparent shear stiffness (p = 0.002), and a 12% increase in total energy absorption (p = 0.444). The quantity of allograft in the gap was three times greater in the zoledronate group compared with the control group (p < 0.001). The volume fraction of new bone in the zoledronate group (25%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 22% to 28%) was similar to that in the control group (23%; 95% CI, 19% to 26%) (p = 0.311). Conclusions: The data obtained in this canine model suggest that pretreating allograft with zoledronate may be beneficial for early stability of grafted revision arthroplasty implants, without any adverse effect on bone formation. Clinical studies are warranted. Clinical Relevance: The zoledronate treatment is simple to apply in the clinical setting. The treatment could

  8. Raised serum levels of cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha in renal allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay was used for monitoring serum levels of endogenous cachectin/tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) in 10 renal transplant recipients. Acute allograft rejections were associated with marked elevations of circulating TNF. The peak levels of TNF (median 140 pg/ml) were in the same concentration range as previously reported in parasitic infections. The results show that the release of TNF into circulation is an early event in renal allograft rejection and that raised levels of TNF in man can also be induced by noninfectious stimuli. PMID:3309124

  9. Renal allograft recovery subsequent to apparent hyperacute rejection based on clinical, scintigraphic, and pathologic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sacks, G.A.; Sandler, M.P.; Partain, C.L.

    1983-02-01

    An unusual case is described in which in spite of clinical, scintigraphic and histologic findings strongly supportive of a diagnosis of hyperacute rejection, recovery of renal function occurred. These findings are in contrast to the current literature in which it is generally accepted that a renal allograft showing neither pertechnetate transit nor hippurate concentration warrants allograft nephrectomy irrespective of the etiology. Scintigraphic evaluation included both dynamic studies after a bolus administration of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate and serial renogram collections after the intravenous administration of /sup 131/I Hippuran.

  10. The Murine Femoral Allograft Model and a Semi-automated Histomorphometric Analysis Tool

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Robinder S.; Zhang, Longze; Schwarz, Edward M.; Boyce, Brendan F.; Xie, Chao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Preclinical studies on bone repair remain a high priority due to the unresolved clinical problems associated with treating critical segmental defects and complications of fracture healing. Over the last decade the murine femoral allograft model has gained popularity due to its standardized surgery and potential for examining a vast array of radiographic, biomechanical and histological outcome measures. Here, we describe these methods and a novel semi-automated histomorphometric approach to quantify the amount of bone, cartilage and undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue in demineralized paraffin sections of allografted murine femurs using the VisioPharm Image Analysis Software System. PMID:24482164

  11. High-risk corneal allografts: A therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Rajendran, Vijayalakshmi; Griffith, May; Forrester, John V; Kuffová, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Corneal transplantation is the most common surgical procedure amongst solid organ transplants with a high survival rate of 86% at 1-year post-grafting. This high success rate has been attributed to the immune privilege of the eye. However, mechanisms originally thought to promote immune privilege, such as the lack of antigen presenting cells and vessels in the cornea, are challenged by recent studies. Nevertheless, the immunological and physiological features of the cornea promoting a relatively weak alloimmune response is likely responsible for the high survival rate in “low-risk” settings. Furthermore, although corneal graft survival in “low-risk” recipients is favourable, the prognosis in “high-risk” recipients for corneal graft is poor. In “high-risk” grafts, the process of indirect allorecognition is accelerated by the enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses due to pre-existing inflammation and neovascularization of the host bed. This leads to the irreversible rejection of the allograft and ultimately graft failure. Many therapeutic measures are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical studies to counter the immunological challenge of “high-risk” recipients. Despite the prevailing dogma, recent data suggest that tissue matching together with use of systemic immunosuppression may increase the likelihood of graft acceptance in “high-risk” recipients. However, immunosuppressive drugs are accompanied with intolerance/side effects and toxicity, and therefore, novel cell-based therapies are in development which target host immune cells and restore immune homeostasis without significant side effect of treatment. In addition, developments in regenerative medicine may be able to solve both important short comings of allotransplantation: (1) graft rejection and ultimate graft failure; and (2) the lack of suitable donor corneas. The advances in technology and research indicate that wider therapeutic choices for patients may be available to

  12. Detection and measurement of tubulitis in renal allograft rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, John B.; Chen, Qi; Jin, Jesse S.; Wang, Yung; Yong, James L. C.

    1997-04-01

    Tubulitis is one of the most reliable signs of acute renal allograft rejection. It occurs when mononuclear cells are localized between the lining tubular epithelial cells with or without disruption of the tubular basement membrane. It has been found that tubulitis takes place predominantly in the regions of the distal convoluted tubules and the cortical collecting system. The image processing tasks are to find the tubule boundaries and to find the relative location of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells and tubule boundaries. The requirement for accuracy applies to determining the relative locations of the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries. This paper will show how the different sizes and grey values of the lymphocytes and epithelial cells simplify their identification and location. Difficulties in finding the tubule boundaries image processing will be illustrated. It will be shown how proximate location of epithelial cells and the tubule boundary leads to distortion in determination of the calculated boundary. However, in tubulitis the lymphocytes and the tubule boundaries are proximate.In these cases the tubule boundary is adequately resolved and the image processing is satisfactory to determining relativity in location. An adaptive non-linear anisotropic diffusion process is presented for image filtering and segmentation. Multi-layer analysis is used to extract lymphocytes and tubulitis from images. This paper will discuss grading of tissue using the Banff system. The ability to use computer to use computer processing will be argued as obviating problems of reproducability of values for this classification. This paper will also feature discussion of alternative approaches to image processing and provide an assessment of their capability for improving the identification of the tubule boundaries.

  13. Intrapancreatic Splenule in a Pancreas Allograft: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, K; Serrano, O K; Kandaswamy, R

    2016-11-01

    A 16-year-old white man was involved in a motor vehicle collision and suffered head, chest, and abdominal trauma. Despite initial resuscitative efforts, he progressed to brain death and was designated to be an organ donor by his family. He had no earlier medical or surgical history and no high-risk behaviors. Blood work revealed normal creatinine, liver function tests, lipase, and amylase. Viral serologies were negative except for cytomegalovirus IgG and Epstein-Barr virus nucleic acid. Imaging revealed a right kidney contusion, a manubrial fracture, and fractures of right first rib and bilateral scapulae. No other abdominal trauma was identified, specifically to the pancreas, duodenum, or spleen. Our transplant center accepted the pancreas from this donor. During back-table inspection of the pancreas, a 1.5 × 1.5 cm dark purple rubbery mass was identified within the parenchyma of the pancreas in the tail. An incisional biopsy of the lesion was sent for frozen section, which yielded a mixed inflammatory infiltrate consisting of neutrophils and lymphocytes and an overlying fibrous capsule. The diagnosis of lymphoma or another neoplasm could not be definitely ruled out. Owing to uncertainty in diagnosis, the entire lesion was excised along with the distal pancreas with the use of a linear stapler. The staple line was oversewn with running 4-0 polypropylene suture, and the pancreas was transplanted. After surgery, the pancreas allograft functioned well with a small pancreatic leak, which had resolved by the first postoperative outpatient visit.

  14. Comparison of aortic valve allograft decellularization techniques in the rat.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Steven R; Chiu, Brian; Churchill, Thomas A; Zhu, Linfu; Lakey, Jonathan R T; Ross, David B

    2006-11-01

    Rodent models have been essential to understanding the immune-mediated failure of aortic valve allografts (AVAs). Decellularization has been proposed to reduce the immunogenicity of AVAs. The objective of this study was to determine the most effective method to decellularize AVAs for use in a rat model. Three different decellularization techniques were compared in Lewis aortic valves. Detergent decellularization involved a series of hypotonic and hypertonic Tris buffers at 4 degrees C for 48 h/buffer containing 0.5% Triton X-100 followed by a 72 h washout in phosphate-buffered saline. Osmotic decellularization was performed in similar manner to the detergent-based technique except without the addition of Triton X-100. Enzymatic decellularization consisted of trypsin/EDTA at 37 degrees C for 48 h. Assessment was performed with light microscopy (H&E, Movat's pentachrome), immunohistochemistry for residual cellular elements, and hydroxyproline assays. Detergent-based methodology effected near-complete decellularization of both the leaflets and aortic wall in addition to preservation of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Osmotic lysis was associated with preservation of ECM and moderate decellularization. Enzymatic decellularization resulted in complete decellularization but extensive degeneration and fragmentation of the ECM. When implanted into the infrarenal aorta of allogeneic rats for 1 week, valves decellularized with detergent-based and osmotic methodology failed to stimulate an allogeneic immune response as evidenced by an absence of T cell infiltrates. Osmotic lysis protocols with low dose detergent appear to be most effective at both removing antigenic cellular elements and preserving ECM.

  15. Asymptomatic Pulmonary Allograft Kaposi Sarcoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Nazarena; Rebusso, Alessandro; Lunardi, Francesca; Loy, Monica; Calabrese, Francesca; Battistella, Lucia; Schiavon, Marco; Rea, Federico; Calabrese, Fiorella

    2016-01-14

    Solid-organ transplant recipients are at high risk of developing malignancies. A greater risk of Kaposi sarcoma has been reported in lung recipients in our country, particularly in those from Southern Italy, probably due to the high prevalence of Human herpes virus 8 infection. Kaposi sarcoma affecting only the lung allograft is extremely rare. We describe a case of a lung recipient who developed Kaposi sarcoma only in the graft, 22 months after transplant. The patient, a 65-year-old man from Southern Italy, underwent bilateral lung transplant for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in January 2009. He developed mild/moderate acute cellular rejection (≥A2) in 4 of 6 scheduled transbronchial biopsies thus was treated with increased immunosuppressive therapy, shifting from cyclosporine to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. In July 2010, a high-resolution computed tomography scan showed small bilateral lung nodules, despite a generally good condition. After 2 months, his condition worsened with a severe weight loss. A positron emission tomography scan showed mild metabolic activity in the lesions with no other localizations. In October 2010, a lung biopsy was performed, with results showing typical histologic and immunohistochemical features of Kaposi sarcoma. Molecular tissue evaluations and serologic analyses were positive for Human herpes virus 8. The patient's immunosuppressive therapy was suspended, and he started liposomal doxorubicin treatment; however, after the first cycle, he developed severe respiratory dysfunction. The patient died 27 months after lung transplant for neoplasm. Our report highlights the importance of considering Kaposi sarcoma in the differential diagnosis for lung nodules in lung transplant recipients, even in the absence of any initial specific symptom or cutaneous lesion.

  16. Effect of Lactobacillus brevis KB290 on the cell-mediated cytotoxic activity of mouse splenocytes: a DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Erika; Fuke, Nobuo; Nakai, Yuji; Ishijima, Tomoko; Abe, Keiko; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2013-11-14

    Lactic acid bacteria confer a variety of health benefits. Here, we investigate the mechanisms by which Lactobacillus brevis KB290 (KB290) enhances cell-mediated cytotoxic activity. Female BALB/c mice aged 9 weeks were fed a diet containing KB290 (3 × 10(9) colony-forming units/g) or starch for 1 d. The resulting cytotoxic activity of splenocytes against YAC-1 cells was measured using flow cytometry and analysed for gene expression using DNA microarray technology. KB290 enhanced the cell-mediated cytotoxic activity of splenocytes. DNA microarray analysis identified 327 up-regulated and 347 down-regulated genes that characterised the KB290 diet group. The up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in Gene Ontology terms related to immunity, and, especially, a positive regulation of T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity existed among these terms. Almost all the genes included in the term encoded major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules involved in the presentation of antigen to CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells. Marco and Signr1 specific to marginal zone macrophages (MZM), antigen-presenting cells, were also up-regulated. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the proportion of MZM was significantly increased by KB290 ingestion. Additionally, the over-represented Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways among the up-regulated genes were those for natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antigen processing and presentation. The results for the selected genes associated with NK cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. These results suggest that enhanced cytotoxic activity could be caused by the activation of NK cells and/or of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells stimulated via MHC class I presentation.

  17. Seasonal trade-offs in cell-mediated immunosenescence in ruffs (Philomachus pugnax).

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, George A; Lank, David B

    2003-01-01

    The immune system is an energetically expensive self-maintenance complex that, given the risks of parasitism, cannot be carelessly compromised. Life-history theory posits that trade-offs between fitness components, such as self-maintenance and reproduction, vary between genders and age classes depending on their expected residual lifetime reproductive success, and seasonally as energetic requirements change. Using ruff (Philomachus pugnax), a bird with two genetically distinct male morphs, we demonstrate here a decrease in male immunocompetence during the breeding season, greater variance in immune response among males than females, immunosenescence in both sexes and male morphs, and a seasonal shift in the age range required to detect senescence. Using a phytohaemagglutinin delayed hypersensitivity assay, we assessed cell-mediated immunity (CMI) of males of typical breeding age during the breeding and nonbreeding seasons, and of a larger sample that included females and birds of a greater age range during the non-breeding period. CMI was higher for breeding-aged males in May than in November, but the increase was not related to age or male morph. In November, mean CMI did not differ between the sexes, but the variance was higher for males than for females, and there were no differences in mean or variance between the two male morphs. For both sexes and male morphs, CMI was lower for young birds than for birds of t