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Sample records for cell-penetrating peptides decreases

  1. [Cell penetrating peptides in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Jiang, Yong

    2007-10-01

    The genomic information obtained through the human genome project has been accelerating the analysis of the functions of various disease relevant genes. The high molecular weight biomolecules becomes increasingly important for the development of molecular therapies. However, the usage of such therapeutic macromolecules has been limited by the poor permeability across the lipid bilayer of the cellular plasma membrane. In order to overcome this barrier, several chemical and physical methods have been developed, such as electroporation and cationic lipids/liposomes. The drawbacks of these methods are the unwanted cellular effects and their limitation to in vitro applications. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) is a group of oligopeptides that could penetrate the cell membrane via a receptor-independent and non-endocytotic process with various conjungated bioactive molecules. Such ability makes them outstanding transmembrane vectors for various therapuetic biomolecules. In this review, we will introduce several representative strategies to develop antitumor macromolecules using CPPs.

  2. Cell-penetrating peptides transport therapeutics into cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joshua D; Flynn, Nicholas H

    2015-10-01

    Nearly 30years ago, certain small, relatively nontoxic peptides were discovered to be capable of traversing the cell membrane. These cell-penetrating peptides, as they are now called, have been shown to not only be capable of crossing the cell membrane themselves but can also carry many different therapeutic agents into cells, including small molecules, plasmid DNA, siRNA, therapeutic proteins, viruses, imaging agents, and other various nanoparticles. Many cell-penetrating peptides have been derived from natural proteins, but several other cell-penetrating peptides have been developed that are either chimeric or completely synthetic. How cell-penetrating peptides are internalized into cells has been a topic of debate, with some peptides seemingly entering cells through an endocytic mechanism and others by directly penetrating the cell membrane. Although the entry mechanism is still not entirely understood, it seems to be dependent on the peptide type, the peptide concentration, the cargo the peptide transports, and the cell type tested. With new intracellular disease targets being discovered, cell-penetrating peptides offer an exciting approach for delivering drugs to these intracellular targets. There are hundreds of cell-penetrating peptides being studied for drug delivery, and ongoing studies are demonstrating their success both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Rational design of a biomimetic cell penetrating peptide library.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Sahay, Gaurav; Pelet, Jeisa M; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-10-22

    Cell penetrating peptides have demonstrated potential to facilitate the cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. Here we develop a set of 50 cell penetrating peptide based formulations with potential to deliver small interfering RNAs intercellularly. The transfection efficacy of siRNA containing lipid-like nanoparticles decorated with different peptides was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo and correlated with the peptide physical and chemical properties. In vitro, these particles were internalized primarily through macropinocytosis. When the peptides were presented to bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, they induce low immunoactivation relative to control cell penetrating peptides including the antennapedia homeodomain and TAT, as quantified by the expression of activation specific surface proteins like CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex class II. In vivo, peptide decorated nanoparticles primarily accumulated in the lungs and the liver. Three human peptides derived from surfactant protein B (a lung surfactant protein), orexin (a neuropeptide hormone, and lactoferricin (a globular glycoprotein) that exist in many physiological fluids facilitated the in vivo delivery of siRNA and induce significant knock down (90%) of a hepatocyte expressed protein, coagulation Factor VII.

  4. Cell-penetrating peptides: strategies for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Raucher, Drazen; Ryu, Jung Su

    2015-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) provide an efficient strategy for the intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules in various biomedical applications. This review focuses on recent advances in the use of CPPs to deliver anticancer therapeutics and imaging reagents to cancer cells, along with CPP contributions to novel tumor-targeting techniques. CPPs are now used extensively to deliver a variety of therapeutics, despite lacking cell specificity and having a short duration of action. Resolution of these shortcomings to enable increased cancer cell and/or tumor specificity could improve CPP-based drug delivery strategies, expand combined drug delivery possibilities, and strengthen future clinical applications of these peptides.

  5. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  6. Investigation of the Sequence and Length Dependence for Cell-Penetrating Prenylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Barany, George; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful delivery tools for introducing molecules of interest into cells. A new class of cell penetrating molecules has been recently reported--cell penetrating, prenylated peptides. In this study a series of such peptides was synthesized to examine the relationship between peptide sequence and level of peptide internalization and to probe their mechanism of internalization. This study revealed that prenylated peptides internalize via a non-endocytotic pathway regardless of sequence. Sequence length and identity was found to play a role in peptide uptake but prenylated sequences as short as two amino acids were found to exhibit significant cell penetrating properties. PMID:20004573

  7. Mechanism Matters: A Taxonomy of Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, W. Berkeley; Fuselier, Taylor; He, Jing; Wimley, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The permeability barrier imposed by cellular membranes limits the access of exogenous compounds to the interior of cells. Researchers and patients alike would benefit from efficient methods for intracellular delivery of a wide range of membrane-impermeant molecules, including biochemically active small molecules, imaging agents, peptides, peptide nucleic acids, proteins, RNA, DNA, and nanoparticles. There has been a sustained effort to exploit cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the delivery of such useful cargoes in vitro and in vivo because of their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis, and controllable physical chemistry. Here, we discuss the many mechanisms by which CPPs can function, and describe a taxonomy of mechanisms that could be help organize future efforts in the field. PMID:26545486

  8. Quality control of cationic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-05

    During fundamental research, it is recommended to evaluate the test compound identity and purity in order to obtain reliable study outcomes. For peptides, quality control (QC) analyses are routinely performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet (UV) detector system. These traditional QC methods, using a C18 column and a linear gradient with formic acid (FA) as acidic modifier in the mobile phase, might not result in optimal chromatographic performance for basic peptides due to their cationic nature and hence may lead to erroneous results. Therefore, the influence of the used chromatographic system on the final QC results of basic peptides was evaluated using five cationic cell-penetrating peptides and five C18-chromatographic systems, differing in the column particle size (high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) versus ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)), the acidic modifier (FA versus trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)), and the column temperature (30 °C versus 60 °C). Our results indicate that a UHPLC system with the C18 column thermostated at 30 °C and a mobile phase containing TFA, provides the most suitable routine QC analysis method for cationic peptides, outperforming in sensitivity and resolution compared to the other systems. We also demonstrate the use of a single quad mass spectrometry (MS) detector system during QC analysis of (cationic) peptides, allowing identification of the peptide and its impurities, as well as the evaluation of the peak purity.

  9. The Antimicrobial and Antiviral Applications of Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Kalle; Eriste, Elo; Langel, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have become increasingly popular both in research and in application. There have been numerous studies on the physiochemical characteristics and behavior of CPPs in various environments; likewise, the mechanisms of entry and delivery capabilities of these peptides have also been extensively researched. Besides the fundamental issues, there is an enormous interest in the delivery capabilities of the peptides as the family of CPPs is a promising and mostly non-toxic delivery vector candidate for numerous medical applications such as gene silencing, transgene delivery, and splice correction. Lately, however, there has been an emerging field of study besides the high-profile gene therapy applications-the use of peptides and CPPs to combat various infections caused by harmful bacteria, fungi, and viruses.In this chapter, we aim to provide a short overview of the history and properties of CPPs which is followed by more thorough descriptions of antimicrobial and antiviral peptides. To achieve this, we analyze the origin of such peptides, give an overview of the mechanisms of action and discuss the various practical applications which are ongoing or have been suggested based on research.

  10. Oral biodrug delivery using cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Morishita, Mariko

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, the novel biotherapeutic agents such as peptides and proteins have been contributed to the treatment of several diseases. However, their oral absorption is significantly limited due to their poor delivery through the intestinal mucosa. Therefore, the feasible approaches are needed for improving the oral bioavailability of biodrugs. Recently, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as HIV-1 Tat, penetratin and oligoarginine are considered as a useful tool for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules. Hence, it was expected that the ability of CPPs may be applicable to enhance the absorption of biodrugs through intestinal epithelial membrane. CPPs are likely to become powerful tools for overcoming the low permeability of therapeutic peptides and proteins through the intestinal membrane, the major barrier to their oral delivery. Further advantage of this promising strategy is that this successful intestinal absorption could be achieved by more convenient methodology, coadministration of CPP with drugs via intermolecular interaction among them. Hereafter, the further establishment of delivery system based on CPPs is required to realize the development of the oral forms of therapeutic peptides and proteins. The aim here is to introduce our vision focusing on oral biodrug delivery by the use of CPPs as potential peptide carrier in order to provide new information in the design and development of new oral delivery systems for novel biotherapeutics.

  11. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; ...

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess lowmore » cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.« less

  12. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.

  13. Protein transduction: cell penetrating peptides and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2006-01-01

    Cell penetrating proteins or peptides (CPPs) have the ability to cross the plasma membranes of mammalian cells in an apparently energy- and receptor-independent fashion. Although there is much debate over the mechanism by which this "protein transduction" occurs, the ability of CPPs to translocate rapidly into cells is being exploited to deliver a broad range of therapeutics including proteins, DNA, antibodies, oligonucleotides, imaging agents and liposomes in a variety of situations and biological systems. The current review looks at the delivery of many such molecules by various CPPs, and their potential therapeutic application in a wide range of areas. CPP ability to deliver different cargoes in a relatively efficient and non-invasive manner has implications as far reaching as drug delivery, gene transfer, DNA vaccination and beyond. Although many questions remain to be answered and limitations on the use of CPPs exist, it is clear that this emerging technology has much to offer in a clinical setting.

  14. Reinventing Cell Penetrating Peptides Using Glycosylated Methionine Sulfonium Ion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs. PMID:27162954

  15. Cell penetrating peptide inhibitors of Nuclear Factor-kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J. S.; May, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors are activated by a range of stimuli including pro-inflammatory cytokines. Active NF-κB regulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell survival and aberrant NF-κB activity plays pathological roles in certain types of cancer and diseases characterized by chronic inflammation. NF-κB signaling is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory or anti-cancer drugs and we discuss here how the method of peptide transduction has been used to specifically target NF-κB. Peptide transduction relies on the ability of certain small cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to enter cells, and a panel of CPP-linked inhibitors (CPP-Is) has been developed to directly inhibit NF-κB signaling. Remarkably, several of these NF-κB-targeting CPP-Is are effective in vivo and therefore offer exciting potential in the clinical setting. PMID:18668204

  16. Methods to follow intracellular trafficking of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärnaste, Ly; Arukuusk, Piret; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient vehicles to transport bioactive molecules into the cells. Despite numerous studies the exact mechanism by which CPPs facilitate delivery of cargo to its intracellular target is still debated. The current work presents methods that can be used for tracking CPP/pDNA complexes through endosomal transport and show the role of endosomal transport in the delivery of cargo. Separation of endosomal vesicles by differential centrifugation enables to pinpoint the localization of delivered cargo without labeling it and gives important quantitative information about pDNA trafficing in certain endosomal compartments. Single particle tracking (SPT) allows following individual CPP/cargo complex through endosomal path in live cells, using fluoresently labled cargo and green fluoresent protein expressing cells. These two different methods show similar results about tested NickFect/pDNA complexes intracellular trafficing. NF51 facilitates rapid internalization of complexes into the cells, prolongs their stay in early endosomes and promotes release to cytosol. NF1 is less capable to induce endosomal release and higher amount of complexes are routed to lysosomes for degradation. Our findings offer potential delivery vector for in vivo applications, NF51, where endosomal entrapment has been allayed. Furthermore, these methods are valuable tools to study other CPP-based delivery systems.

  17. Antibacterial activity and dual mechanisms of peptide analog derived from cell-penetrating peptide against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Shi, Yonghui; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Su, Guanfang; Le, Guowei

    2013-02-01

    A number of research have proven that antimicrobial peptides are of greatest potential as a new class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides share some similar structure characteristics. In our study, a new peptide analog, APP (GLARALTRLLRQLTRQLTRA) from the cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 (GLFRALLRLLRSLWRLLLRA), was identified simultaneously with the antibacterial mechanism of APP against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes. APP displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 2 to 4 μM. APP displayed higher cell selectivity (about 42-fold increase) as compared to the parent peptide for it decreased hemolytic activity and increased antimicrobial activity. The calcein leakage from egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk L-α-phosphatidyl-DL-glycerol and EYPC/cholesterol vesicles demonstrated that APP exhibited high selectivity. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that APP induced membrane permeabilization in a kinetic manner for membrane lesions allowing O-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside uptake into cells and potassium release from APP-treated cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that APP induced bacterial live cell membrane damage. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and gel retardation analysis confirmed that APP interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs after penetrating the cell membrane. Cell cycle assay showed that APP affected DNA synthesis in the cell. Our results suggested that peptides derived from the cell-penetrating peptide have the potential for antimicrobial agent development, and APP exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging bacterial cell membranes and binding to bacterial DNA to inhibit cellular functions, ultimately leading to cell death.

  18. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is

  19. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics.

  20. Cell-penetrating recombinant peptides for potential use in agricultural pest control applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes ...

  1. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  2. Membrane-active peptides from marine organisms--antimicrobials, cell-penetrating peptides and peptide toxins: applications and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ponnappan, Nisha; Budagavi, Deepthi Poornima; Yadav, Bhoopesh Kumar; Chugh, Archana

    2015-03-01

    Marine organisms are known to be a rich and unique source of bioactive compounds as they are exposed to extreme conditions in the oceans. The present study is an attempt to briefly describe some of the important membrane-active peptides (MAPs) such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and peptide toxins from marine organisms. Since both AMPs and CPPs play a role in membrane perturbation and exhibit interchangeable role, they can speculatively fall under the broad umbrella of MAPs. The study focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of different classes of marine MAPs. Further, AMPs are considered as a potential remedy to antibiotic resistance acquired by several pathogens. Peptides from marine organisms show novel post-translational modifications such as cysteine knots, halogenation and histidino-alanine bridge that enable these peptides to withstand harsh marine environmental conditions. These unusual modifications of AMPs from marine organisms are expected to increase their half-life in living systems, contributing to their increased bioavailability and stability when administered as drug in in vivo systems. Apart from AMPs, marine toxins with membrane-perturbing properties could be essentially investigated for their cytotoxic effect on various pathogens and their cell-penetrating activity across various mammalian cells. The current review will help in identifying the MAPs from marine organisms with crucial post-translational modifications that can be used as template for designing novel therapeutic agents and drug-delivery vehicles for treatment of human diseases.

  3. Evaluation of a cell penetrating prenylated peptide lacking an intrinsic fluorophore via in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Ochocki, Joshua D; Mullen, Daniel G; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Protein prenylation involves the addition of either a farnesyl (C(15)) or geranylgeranyl (C(20)) isoprenoid moiety onto the C-terminus of many proteins. This natural modification serves to direct a protein to the plasma membrane of the cell. A recently discovered application of prenylated peptides is that they have inherent cell-penetrating ability, and are hence termed cell penetrating prenylated peptides. These peptides are able to efficiently cross the cell membrane in an ATP independent, non-endocytotic manner and it was found that the sequence of the peptide does not affect uptake, so long as the geranylgeranyl group is still present [Wollack, J. W.; Zeliadt, N. A.; Mullen, D. G.; Amundson, G.; Geier, S.; Falkum, S.; Wattenberg, E. V.; Barany, G.; Distefano, M. D. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131, 7293-7303]. The present study investigates the effect of removing the fluorophore from the peptides and investigating the uptake by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Our results show that the fluorophore is not necessary for uptake of these peptides. This information is significant because it indicates that the prenyl group is the major determinant in allowing these peptides to enter cells; the hydrophobic fluorophore has little effect. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the utility of the Cu-catalyzed click reaction for monitoring the entry of nonfluorescent peptides into cells.

  4. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering.

    PubMed

    Neree, Armelle Tchoumi; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-11-16

    Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  5. Evaluation of a Cell Penetrating Prenylated Peptide Lacking an Intrinsic Fluorophore via in situ Click Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Protein prenylation involves the addition of either a farnesyl (C15) or geranylgeranyl (C20) isoprenoid moiety onto the C-terminus of many proteins. This natural modification serves to direct a protein to the plasma membrane of the cell. A recently discovered application of prenylated peptides is that they have inherent cell-penetrating ability, and are hence termed cell penetrating prenylated peptides. These peptides are able to efficiently cross the cell membrane in an ATP independent, non-endocytotic manner and it was found that the sequence of the peptide does not affect uptake, so long as the geranylgeranyl group is still present. The present study investigates the effect of removing the fluorophore from the peptides and investigating the uptake by confocal microsopy and flow cytometry. Our results show that the fluorophore is not necessary for uptake of these peptides. This information is significant because it indicates that the prenyl group is the major determinant in allowing these peptides to enter cells; the hydrophobic fluorophore has little effect. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the utility of the Cu-catalyzed click reaction for monitoring the entry of nonfluorescent peptides into cells. PMID:21632248

  6. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  7. Mechanism of the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 Permeation of Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Florén, Anders; Knoelke, Kristina; Langel, Ülo; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction between the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10) and phospholipid membranes was investigated. Tp10 induces graded release of the contents of phospholipid vesicles. The kinetics of peptide association with vesicles and peptide-induced dye efflux from the vesicle lumen were examined experimentally by stopped-flow fluorescence. The experimental kinetics were analyzed by directly fitting to the data the numerical solution of mathematical kinetic models. A very good global fit was obtained using a model in which tp10 binds to the membrane surface and perturbs it because of the mass imbalance thus created across the bilayer. The perturbed bilayer state allows peptide monomers to insert transiently into its hydrophobic core and cross the membrane, until the peptide mass imbalance is dissipated. In that transient state tp10 “catalyzes” dye efflux from the vesicle lumen. These conclusions are consistent with recent reports that used molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between peptide antimicrobials and phospholipid bilayers. A thermodynamic analysis of tp10 binding and insertion in the bilayer using water-membrane transfer hydrophobicity scales is entirely consistent with the model proposed. A small bilayer perturbation is both necessary and sufficient to achieve very good agreement with the model, indicating that the role of the lipids must be included to understand the mechanism of cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:17218466

  8. Cell-penetrating TAT peptide in drug delivery systems: Proteolytic stability requirements

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Erez; Apte, Anjali; Sawant, Rupa R.; Grunwald, Jacob; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    The stability and activity of the HIV cell-penetrating TAT peptide (TATp) on the surface of TATp-modified micelles and liposomes in relation to its proteolytic cleavage was investigated. TATp moieties were attached to the surface of these nanocarriers using TATp modified with a conjugate of phosphatidyl ethanolamine with a ‘short’ PEG (PEG-PE). Following pre-incubation with trypsin, elastase, or collagenase, the proteolytic stability of TATp on the surface of these modified carriers was studied by HPLC with fluorescence detection using fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC) labeling. All tested enzymes produced a dose-dependent cleavage of TATp as shown by the presence of TATp Arg-Arg fragments. Inhibition of TATp cleavage occurred when these TATp-micelles were modified by the addition of longer PEG-PE blocks, indicating an effective shielding of TATp from proteolysis by these blocks. TATp-modified carriers were also tested for their ability to accumulate in EL-4, HeLa, and B16-F10 cells. Trypsin treatment of TATp-modified liposomes and micelles resulted in decreased uptake and cell interaction, as measured by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting techniques. Furthermore, a decrease in the cytotoxicity of TATp-modified liposomes loaded with doxorubicin (Doxil) was observed following trypsin treatment. In conclusion, steric shielding of TATp is essential to ensure its in vivo therapeutic function. PMID:21438724

  9. DNA nanopore functionalized with aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide for tumor cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi-Lin; Yuan, Dan-Dan; Song, Ting; Li, Xue-Mei

    2017-04-03

    In the present work, DNA nanopore was composed of a bundle of six DNA duplexes folded from six DNA strands and functionalized with Ramos cell aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). Herein, we present a unique dually conjugated molecule with an aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide for targeting and recognition of Ramos cells. The aptamer sequence was specific bound to Ramos cell, at the meanwhile the nanopore assembly was taken onto the surface of cell membrane and then got into the cells with the help of CPP. Specific targeting and increased intracellular uptake of nanostructures by Ramos cells were aimed. The intracellular uptake of the structure was determined using confocal microscopy. This study is the first to describe the recognition of tumor cells with functional DNA nanopores, establishing the foundation for the tumor cell detection with low cytotoxic agents. Graphical abstract DNA nanopore was composed of a bundle of six DNA duplexes folded from six DNA strands and functionalized with Ramos cell aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide. The dually conjugated molecule was found to show both improved cellular uptake and effective Ramos cell targeting.

  10. Photodamage of Lipid Bilayers by Irradiation of a Fluorescently Labeled Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptides can translocate into cells by endocytosis and upon light irradiation, lyse the endocytic vesicles. This photo-inducible endosomolytic activity of Fl-CPPs can be used to efficiently deliver macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids and other small organic molecules into the cytosol of live cells. The requirement of a light trigger to induce photolysis provides a more spatial and temporal control to the intracellular delivery process. Methods In this report, we examine the molecular level mechanisms by which cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT when labeled with small organic fluorophore molecules acquire a photo-induced lytic activity using a simplified model of lipid vesicles. Results The peptide TAT labeled with 5(6)-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine binds to negatively charged phospholipids, thereby bringing the fluorophore in close proximity to the membrane of liposomes. Upon light irradiation, the excited fluorophore produces reactive oxygen species at the lipid bilayer and oxidation of the membrane is achieved. In addition, the fluorescent peptide causes aggregation of photo-oxidized lipids, an activity that requires the presence of arginine residues in the peptide sequence. Conclusions These results suggest that the cell penetrating peptide plays a dual role. On one hand, TAT targets a conjugated fluorophore to membranes. On the other hand, TAT participates directly in the destabilization of photosensitized membranes. Peptide and fluorophore therefore appear to act in synergy to destroy membranes efficiently. General Significance Understanding the mechanism behind Fl-CPP mediated membrane photodamage will help to design optimally photo-endosomolytic compounds. PMID:24135456

  11. A pH-responsive α-helical cell penetrating peptide-mediated liposomal delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianyu; Tang, Jie; Fu, Ling; Ran, Rui; Liu, Yayuan; Yuan, Mingqing; He, Qin

    2013-10-01

    Tumor-oriented nanocarrier drug delivery approaches with pH-sensitivity have been drawing considerable attentions over the years. Here we described a liposomal delivery system modified with pH-responsive cell penetrating peptide TH (TH-Lip). Conventional cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-related drug delivery tactics sometimes seemed limited due to the extensive in vivo penetration and the lack of proper selectivity of conventional CPPs. In this study, TH (AGYLLGHINLHHLAHL(Aib)HHIL-NH₂), an engineered α-helical cell penetrating peptide originated from peptide TK (AGYLLGKINLKKLAKL(Aib)LLIL-NH₂), was endowed pH-responsiveness after complete replacement of all lysines in the sequence of TK into histidines, and was introduced onto the surface of liposomes. Accordingly, TH-Lip could benefit from the unique property of TH, as the cell penetrating capacity of TH was concealed during the blood circulation and in normal tissues because of the neutral pH under those conditions. However, when TH-Lip reached the tumor, and as pH declined, histidines in TH peptide protonated and the surface charge of TH-Lip converted from negative to positive, initiating activated cell penetrating capacity and leading to enhanced cellular and tumor spheroid uptake. The endocytosis inhibition assay demonstrated that the endocytosis of TH-Lip was influenced by the positively charged surface of the liposomes in acidic environment and was mediated by clathrin, and the intracellular trafficking study suggested that the liposomes were mainly accumulated in endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. After systemic administration in mice, TH-Lip could be internalized into tumor cells efficaciously. When it comes to the delivery of paclitaxel (PTX), the pH-responsiveness of TH-Lip led to strong inhibition against tumor cell growth which occurred both in vitro (under pH 6.3) and in vivo, and the tumor inhibition rate reached 86.3% on C26 tumor-bearing mice for PTX-loaded TH-Lip. Therefore, TH

  12. Viral and other cell-penetrating peptides as vectors of therapeutic agents in medicine.

    PubMed

    Durzyńska, Julia; Przysiecka, Łucja; Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Warowicka, Alicja; Musidlak, Oskar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2015-07-01

    Efficient delivery of heterologous molecules for treatment of cells is a great challenge in modern medicine and pharmacology. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) may improve efficient delivery of a wide range of macromolecular cargos, including plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, drugs, nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers, and anticancer drugs. In this paper, we present the history of CPPs' discovery with special attention drawn to sequences of viral origin. We also describe different CPP families with regard to their physicochemical properties and numerous mechanisms of CPP cell uptake by direct penetration and endocytotic pathways. A detailed description is focused on formation of carrier-cargo complexes, which are needed for practical use of CPPs in medicine and biotechnology. Examples of successful application of CPPs in treatment of human diseases are also presented, including decreased tumor growth and induction of cancer cell death. Finally, we review modern design approaches to novel CPPs and prediction of their activity. To sum up, the current review presents a thorough and up-to-date knowledge of CPPs and may be a valuable source of information for researchers in pharmacology designing new therapeutic agents.

  13. Cell-Penetrating Cross-β Peptide Assemblies with Controlled Biodegradable Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghun; Lee, Mun-Kyung; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-01-09

    Although self-assembled peptide nanostructures (SPNs) have shown potential as promising biomaterials, there is a potential problem associated with the extremely slow hydrolysis rate of amide bonds. Here, we report the development of cell-penetrating cross-β SPNs with a controllable biodegradation rate. The designed self-assembling β-sheet peptide incorporating a hydrolyzable ester bond (self-assembling depsipeptide; SADP) can be assembled into bilayer β-sandwich one-dimensional (1D) fibers similarly to conventional β-sheet peptides. The rate of hydrolysis can be controlled by the pH, temperature, and structural characteristics of the ester unit. The 1D fiber of the SADP transforms into vesicle-like 3D structures when the hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptide segment is attached to the SADP segment. Efficient cell internalization of the 3D nanostructures was observed, and we verified the intracellular degradation and disassembly of the biodegradable nanostructures. This study illustrates the potential of biodegradable cross-β SPNs and provides a valuable toolkit that can be used with self-assembling peptides.

  14. Screening of cell-penetrating peptides using mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Song, Hyun Seok; Park, Tai Hyun; Park, Tae Hyun; Lee, Sun-Gu; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2012-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are attractive vectors for in vivo and in vitro cellular uptake. Their use is, however, limited by insufficient understanding of their preference for a target cell. Here, a new CPP screening method is presented that uses mRNA display. After incubating the target cell lines, such as human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) and HeLa cells, with an mRNA display library for 3 h at 37°C, the CPP-mRNA nucleotide conjugates were harvested. These were amplified with PCR and subsequently sequenced. The screened CPPs for each cell line were identified after four rounds of selection. Among them, two peptides, MAMPGEPRRANVMAHKLEPASLQLR NSCA (CPPK) and MAPQRDTVGGRTTPPSWGPAKAQLRNSCA (CPPL) were selected, and the FITC-labeled peptides were evaluated for their ability to penetrate cells. The screened CPPs were superior to polyarginine (R(11) ), which is widely used as a standard peptide and shows good cell penetration efficiency. Our method can be applied to other target cells for which CPPs have not yet been elucidated.

  15. Hexokinase II–derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D.; Vogel, Maria C.; Rabeh, Wael M.; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane–binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c. Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.—Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II–derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells.

  16. Mechanisms of antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides: from kinetics to thermodynamics†

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Paulo F.; Pokorny, Antje

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of six different antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides, including some of their variants, are discussed and compared. The specificity of these polypeptides varies, but they all form amphipathic α-helices when bound to membranes, and there are no striking differences in their sequences. We have examined the thermodynamics and kinetics of their interaction with phospholipid vesicles, namely binding and peptide-induced dye efflux. The thermodynamics of binding calculated using the Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity scale are in good agreement with the values derived from experiment. The generally accepted view that binding affinity determines functional specificity is also supported by experiment in model membranes. We now propose the hypothesis that it is the thermodynamics of peptide insertion into the membrane, from a surface-bound state, that determines the mechanism. PMID:19655791

  17. In vitro and in vivo delivery of therapeutic proteins using cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam; Jafarzade, Behnaz Sadat; Mardani, Golnaz

    2017-01-01

    The failure of proteins to penetrate mammalian cells or target tumor cells restricts their value as therapeutic tools in a variety of diseases such as cancers. Recently, protein transduction domains (PTDs) or cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to promote the delivery of therapeutic proteins or peptides into live cells. The successful delivery of proteins mainly depends on their physicochemical properties. Although, linear cell penetrating peptides are one of the most effective delivery vehicles; but currently, cyclic CPPs has been developed to potently transport bioactive full-length proteins into cells. Up to now, several small protein transduction domains from viral proteins including Tat or VP22 could be fused to other peptides or proteins to entry them in various cell types at a dose-dependent approach. A major disadvantage of PTD-fusion proteins is primary uptake into endosomal vesicles leading to inefficient release of the fusion proteins into the cytosol. Recently, non-covalent complex formation (Chariot) between proteins and CPPs has attracted a special interest to overcome some delivery limitations (e.g., toxicity). Many preclinical and clinical trials of CPP-based delivery are currently under evaluation. Generally, development of more efficient protein transduction domains would significantly increase the potency of protein therapeutics. Moreover, the synergistic or combined effects of CPPs with other delivery systems for protein/peptide drug delivery would promote their therapeutic effects in cancer and other diseases. In this review, we will describe the functions and implications of CPPs for delivering the therapeutic proteins or peptides in preclinical and clinical studies.

  18. Antiprion properties of prion protein-derived cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Kajsa; Wahlström, Anna; Lundberg, Pontus; Langel, Ulo; Gräslund, Astrid; Bedecs, Katarina

    2008-07-01

    In prion diseases, the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) becomes misfolded into the pathogenic scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)) responsible for prion infectivity. We show here that peptides derived from the prion protein N terminus have potent antiprion effects. These peptides are composed of a hydrophobic sequence followed by a basic segment. They are known to have cell-penetrating ability like regular cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), short peptides that can penetrate cellular membranes. Healthy (GT1-1) and scrapie-infected (ScGT1-1) mouse neuronal hypothalamic cells were treated with various CPPs, including the prion protein-derived CPPs. Lysates were analyzed for altered protein levels of PrP(C) or PrP(Sc). Treatment with the prion protein-derived CPPs mouse mPrP(1-28) or bovine bPrP(1-30) significantly reduced PrP(Sc) levels in prion-infected cells but had no effect on PrP(C) levels in noninfected cells. Further, presence of prion protein-derived CPPs significantly prolonged the time before infection was manifested when infecting GT1-1 cells with scrapie. Treatment with other CPPs (penetratin, transportan-10, or poly-L-arginine) or prion protein-derived peptides lacking CPP function (mPrP(23-28,) mPrP(19-30,) or mPrP(23-50)) had no effect on PrP(Sc) levels. The results suggest a mechanism by which the signal sequence guides the prion protein-derived CPP into a cellular compartment, where the basic segment binds specifically to PrP(Sc) and disables formation of prions.

  19. Nose-to-brain delivery of macromolecules mediated by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Liu, Ergang; He, Huining; Shin, Meong Cheol; Moon, Cheol; Yang, Victor C; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2016-07-01

    Brain delivery of macromolecular therapeutics (e.g., proteins) remains an unsolved problem because of the formidable blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although a direct pathway of nose-to-brain transfer provides an answer to circumventing the BBB and has already been intensively investigated for brain delivery of small drugs, new challenges arise for intranasal delivery of proteins because of their larger size and hydrophilicity. In order to overcome the barriers and take advantage of available pathways (e.g., epithelial tight junctions, uptake by olfactory neurons, transport into brain tissues, and intra-brain diffusion), a low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) cell-penetrating peptide was utilized to facilitate nose-to-brain transport. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely used to mediate macromolecular delivery through many kinds of biobarriers. Our results show that conjugates of LMWP-proteins are able to effectively penetrate into the brain after intranasal administration. The CPP-based intranasal method highlights a promising solution for protein therapy of brain diseases.

  20. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T

    2016-02-22

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects.

  1. Improving the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides and Their Cargos: Strategies and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Baker, Ryan; Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) can deliver cell-impermeable therapeutic cargos into cells. In particular, CPP-cargo conjugates tend to accumulate inside cells by endocytosis. However, they often remain trapped inside endocytic organelles and fail to reach the cytosolic space of cells efficiently. In this review, the evidence for CPP-mediated endosomal escape is discussed. In addition, several strategies that have been utilized to enhance the endosomal escape of CPP-cargos are described. The recent development of branched systems that display multiple copies of a CPP is presented. The use of viral or synthetic peptides that can disrupt the endosomal membrane upon activation by the low pH of endosomes is also discussed. Finally, we survey how CPPs labeled with chromophores can be used in combination with light to stimulate endosomal lysis. The mechanisms and challenges associated with these intracellular delivery methodologies are discussed. PMID:24223492

  2. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  3. Cell penetrating peptide-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide to improve stability and gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyu; Liu, Yajie; Du, Jianwei; Ren, Kefeng; Wang, Youxiang

    2015-04-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid-labile imine bonds (Az-I-Dex). The supramolecular polymer CDR/Az-I-Dex with high a C/A molar ratio (molar ratio of CD on CDR to Az on Az-I-Dex) was unfavorable for DNA condensation. The dextran shell of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes improved the stability under physiological conditions. However, once treated with acetate buffer (pH 5.4) for 3 h, large aggregates formed rapidly due to the cleavage of the dextran shell. As expected, the vector had cell viability of 80% even when the CDR concentration increased to 100 μg mL-1. Moreover, due to the effective cellular uptake efficiency, CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes had 6-300 times higher transfection efficiency than CDR/DNA polyplexes. It was even higher than high molecular weight PLL-based polyplexes of HEK293 T cells. Importantly, chloroquine as an endosomal escape agent could not improve the transfection of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes, which indicated that the CDR/Az-I-Dex supramolecular polymer had its own ability for endosomal escape. These results suggested that the CPP-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide can be promising non-viral gene delivery carriers.Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid

  4. Characterization of the cell penetrating properties of a human salivary proline-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Radicioni, Giorgia; Stringaro, Annarita; Molinari, Agnese; Nocca, Giuseppina; Longhi, Renato; Pirolli, Davide; Scarano, Emanuele; Iavarone, Federica; Manconi, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Castagnola, Massimo; Vitali, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Saliva contains hundreds of small proline-rich peptides most of which derive from the post-translational and post-secretory processing of the acidic and basic salivary proline-rich proteins. Among these peptides we found that a 20 residue proline-rich peptide (p1932), commonly present in human saliva and patented for its antiviral activity, was internalized within cells of the oral mucosa. The cell-penetrating properties of p1932 have been studied in a primary gingival fibroblast cell line and in a squamous cancer cell line, and compared to its retro-inverso form. We observed by mass-spectrometry, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy that both peptides were internalized in the two cell lines on a time scale of minutes, being the natural form more efficient than the retro-inverso one. The cytosolic localization was dependent on the cell type: both peptide forms were able to localize within nuclei of tumoral cells, but not in the nuclei of gingival fibroblasts. The uptake was shown to be dependent on the culture conditions used: peptide internalization was indeed effective in a complete medium than in a serum-free one allowing the hypothesis that the internalization could be dependent on the cell cycle. Both peptides were internalized likely by a lipid raft-mediated endocytosis mechanism as suggested by the reduced uptake in the presence of methyl-ß-cyclodextrin. These results suggest that the natural peptide may play a role within the cells of the oral mucosa after its secretion and subsequent internalization. Furthermore, lack of cytotoxicity of both peptide forms highlights their possible application as novel drug delivery agents.

  5. Antibacterial Effects of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Isolated from Kefir.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Guo, Haoxian; Chen, Feilong; Zhao, Lichao; He, Liping; Ou, Yangwen; Huang, Manman; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Baoyan; Cao, Yong; Huang, Qingrong

    2016-04-27

    Kefir is a traditional fermented milk beverage used throughout the world for centuries. A cell-penetrating peptide, F3, was isolated from kefir by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, DEAE-52 ion exchange, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. F3 was determined to be a low molecular weight peptide containing one leucine and one tyrosine with two phosphate radicals. This peptide displayed antimicrobial activity across a broad spectrum of organisms including several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 125 to 500 μg/mL. Cellular penetration and accumulation of F3 were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The peptide was able to penetrate the cellular membrane of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Changes in cell morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that peptide F3 may be a good candidate for use as an effective biological preservative in agriculture and the food industry.

  6. Wasp mastoparans follow the same mechanism as the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10.

    PubMed

    Yandek, Lindsay E; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F F

    2009-08-04

    We have been examining the mechanism and kinetics of the interactions of a selected set of peptides with phospholipid membranes in a quantitative manner. This set was chosen to cover a broad range of physical-chemical properties and cell specificities. Mastoparan (masL) and mastoparan X (masX) are two similar peptides from the venoms of the wasps Vespula lewisii and Vespa xanthoptera, respectively, and were chosen to complete the set. The rate constants for masX association with and dissociation from membranes are reported here for the first time. The kinetics of dye efflux induced by both mastoparans from phospholipid vesicles were also examined and quantitatively analyzed. We find that masL and masX follow the same graded kinetic model that we previously proposed for the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10), but with different parameters. This comparison is relevant because tp10 is derived from masL by addition of a mostly nonpolar segment of seven residues at the N-terminus. Tp10 is more active than the mastoparans toward phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but the mastoparans are more sensitive to the effect of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion of the peptides calculated using the Wimley-White transfer scales are in good agreement with the values derived from our experimental data and are useful for understanding peptide behavior.

  7. Wasp Mastoparans Follow the Same Mechanism as the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10†

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2009-01-01

    We have been examining the mechanism and kinetics of the interactions of a selected set of peptides with phospholipid membranes, in a quantitative manner. This set was chosen to cover a broad range of physical-chemical properties and cell specificities. Mastoparan (masL) and mastoparan X (masX) are two similar peptides from the venoms of the wasps Vespula lewisii and Vespa xanthoptera, respectively, and were chosen to complete the set. The rate constants for masX association with, and dissociation from membranes are reported here for the first time. The kinetics of dye efflux induced by both mastoparans from phospholipid vesicles were also examined and quantitatively analyzed. We find that masL and masX follow the same graded kinetic model that we previously proposed for the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10), but with different parameters. This comparison is relevant because tp10 is derived from masL by addition of a mostly nonpolar segment of 7 residues at the N-terminus. Tp10 is more active than the mastoparans toward phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but the mastoparans are more sensitive to the effect of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion of the peptides calculated using the Wimley-White transfer scales are in good agreement with the values derived from our experimental data, and are useful for understanding peptide behavior. PMID:19594111

  8. Cell penetrating peptides from agglutinin protein of Abrus precatorius facilitate the uptake of Imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Behera, Birendra; Mukherjee, Devdeep; Agarwal, Tarun; Das, Joyjyoti; Ghosh, Sudip K; Maiti, Tapas K

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery is of paramount importance for cancer patients. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as potent vehicles for this purpose. Herein, we demonstrate CPP- like properties of two peptides: NH2-SGASDDEEIAR-COOH (SR11) and NH2-ICSSHYEPTVRIGGR-COOH (IR15), derived from the tryptic digest of Abrus precatorius agglutinin. Both IR15 and SR11 were found to be non-toxic at lower doses (up to 50 μg/ml). These two peptides entered into HeLa cells through lipid raft-mediated endocytosis within 15 min and penetrated the nuclear membrane in 60 min of incubation. Co-treatment of peptides (20 μg/ml) and Imatinib (5 μM) in HeLa cells increased uptake of the drug by ∼ 55% and lowered the IC50 value to one-third in comparison to the drug added exclusively. However, co-treatment of TAT peptide (standard CPP) did not alter the Imatinib uptake significantly. In summary, we have identified two novel CPPs from tryptic digest of Abrus agglutinin which increased the cellular uptake of Imatinib upon co-administration. Further studies may result in deciphering a novel mode of drug delivery.

  9. Trends in the Binding of Cell Penetrating Peptides to siRNA: A Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Gunathunge, B. G. C. M.; Wimalasiri, P. N.; Karunaratne, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gene therapeutics, including short interfering RNA (siRNA), is limited by the lack of efficient delivery systems. An appealing approach to deliver gene therapeutics involves noncovalent complexation with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which are able to penetrate the cell membranes of mammals. Although a number of CPPs have been discovered, our understanding of their complexation and translocation of siRNA is as yet insufficient. Here, we report on computational studies comparing the binding affinities of CPPs with siRNA, considering a variety of CPPs. Specifically, seventeen CPPs from three different categories, cationic, amphipathic, and hydrophobic CPPs, were studied. Molecular mechanics were used to minimize structures, while molecular docking calculations were used to predict the orientation and favorability of sequentially binding multiple peptides to siRNA. Binding scores from docking calculations were highest for amphipathic peptides over cationic and hydrophobic peptides. Results indicate that initial complexation of peptides will likely occur along the major groove of the siRNA, driven by electrostatic interactions. Subsequent binding of CPPs is likely to occur in the minor groove and later on bind randomly, to siRNA or previously bound CPPs, through hydrophobic interactions. However, hydrophobic CPPs do not show this binding pattern. Ultimately binding yields a positively charged nanoparticle capable of noninvasive cellular import of therapeutic molecules. PMID:28321253

  10. Cargo self-assembly rescues affinity of cell-penetrating peptides to lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Andreas; Walter, Vivien; MacEwan, Sarah R.; Schmatko, Tatiana; Muller, Pierre; Schroder, André P.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Marques, Carlos M.

    2017-03-01

    Although cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to bind to cell membranes, thus promoting cell internalization by active pathways, attachment of cargo molecules to CPPs invariably reduces their cellular uptake. We show here that CPP binding to lipid bilayers, a simple model of the cell membrane, can be recovered by designing cargo molecules that self-assemble into spherical micelles and increase the local interfacial density of CPP on the surface of the cargo. Experiments performed on model giant unilamellar vesicles under a confocal laser scanning microscope show that a family of thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptides that exhibit temperature-triggered micellization can promote temperature triggered attachment of the micelles to membranes, thus rescuing by self-assembly the cargo-induced loss of the CPP affinity to bio-membranes.

  11. Interaction of nanoparticles and cell-penetrating peptides with skin for transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinaki; Patlolla, Ram R.; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    Topical or transdermal drug delivery is challenging because the skin acts as a natural and protective barrier. Therefore, several methods have been examined to increase the permeation of therapeutic molecules into and through the skin. One approach is to use the nanoparticulate delivery system. Starting with liposomes and other vesicular systems, several other types of nanosized drug carriers have been developed such as solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, polymer-based nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles for dermatological applications. This review article discusses how different particulate systems can interact and penetrate into the skin barrier. In this review, the effectiveness of nanoparticles, as well as possible mode of actions of nanoparticles, is presented. In addition to nanoparticles, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated drug delivery into the skin and the possible mechanism of CPP-derived delivery into the skin is discussed. Lastly, the effectiveness and possible mechanism of CPP-modified nanocarriers into the skin are addressed. PMID:21028936

  12. Cell-penetrating peptides-based strategies for the delivery of splice redirecting antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    El Andaloussi, Samir; Said Hassane, Fatouma; Boisguerin, Prisca; Sillard, Rannar; Langel, Ulo; Lebleu, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of human malignancies has provided therapeutic targets amenable to oligonucleotide (ON)-based strategies. Antisense ON-mediated splicing regulation in particular offers promising prospects since the majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing and since splicing defects have been found in many diseases. However, their implementation has been hampered so far by the poor bioavailability of nucleic acids-based drugs. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) now appear as promising non-viral delivery vector for non-permeant biomolecules. We describe here new CPPs allowing the delivery of splice redirecting steric-block ON using either chemical conjugation or non-covalent complexation. We also describe a convenient and robust splice redirecting assay which allows the quantitative assessment of ON nuclear delivery.

  13. Synthesis of cell-penetrating peptides and their application in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Gunnar P H; Bähr, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Short basic amino acid sequences, often called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), allow the delivery of proteins and other molecules into cells and across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although the ability of basic proteins to facilitate such trafficking is known for a long time, only the application of genetic methods and overexpression of fusion proteins in Escherichia coli has lead to a wide application of CPP in many research areas, including signal transduction, cancer, angiogenesis, apoptosis, bone development, cardioprotection, cell cycle, neurobiology, and many others. For the neuroscientist, CPPs are particularly attractive, as a number of articles in the last 5 years have reported their use for neuronal rescue in a number of models for neurodegenerative diseases in vitro and in vivo in rats, mice, or gerbils. Here, we give a detailed description of the protein purification methodology and applications in neuroscience.

  14. Emerging landscape of cell penetrating peptide in reprogramming and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiting; Zeng, Fanhui; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Fajun; Wang, Jiajun; Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Changbai; Wang, Hu

    2016-03-28

    The plasma membrane remains a major barrier for intracellular drug delivery, to overcome this issue, a variety of approaches have been developed and used to deliver therapeutic cargos. Among these approaches, cell penetrating peptide (CPP) is promising and affords widely used vector for efficient intracellular delivery of cargos. Moreover, the latter findings including iPS reprogramming and direct transdifferentiation as well as gene editing have gradually become hot research topic; because their application in tissue engineering and disease modeling have great potential to advance innovation in precision medicine. Since the beginning, research on these approaches is mainly based on virus transduction system, while, under the consideration for obviating the risk of mutagenic insertion and enables more accurate controlling, CPP-based efficient virus-free delivery strategy has been used recently. In this review, we summarize the existing CPP-based delivery system, emerging landscape of CPP application in stem cell manipulation and reprogramming, along with CPP contributions to gene editing techniques.

  15. Cargo self-assembly rescues affinity of cell-penetrating peptides to lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Andreas; Walter, Vivien; MacEwan, Sarah R.; Schmatko, Tatiana; Muller, Pierre; Schroder, André P.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Marques, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    Although cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to bind to cell membranes, thus promoting cell internalization by active pathways, attachment of cargo molecules to CPPs invariably reduces their cellular uptake. We show here that CPP binding to lipid bilayers, a simple model of the cell membrane, can be recovered by designing cargo molecules that self-assemble into spherical micelles and increase the local interfacial density of CPP on the surface of the cargo. Experiments performed on model giant unilamellar vesicles under a confocal laser scanning microscope show that a family of thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptides that exhibit temperature-triggered micellization can promote temperature triggered attachment of the micelles to membranes, thus rescuing by self-assembly the cargo-induced loss of the CPP affinity to bio-membranes. PMID:28262825

  16. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  17. Intracellular Delivery of Molecular Cargo Using Cell-Penetrating Peptides and the Combination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Tsui, Tung Yu; Ma, Wenxue

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can cross cellular membranes in a non-toxic fashion, improving the intracellular delivery of various molecular cargos such as nanoparticles, small molecules and plasmid DNA. Because CPPs provide a safe, efficient, and non-invasive mode of transport for various cargos into cells, they have been developed as vectors for the delivery of genetic and biologic products in recent years. Most common CPPs are positively charged peptides. While delivering negatively charged molecules (e.g., nucleic acids) to target cells, the internalization efficiency of CPPs is reduced and inhibited because the cationic charges on the CPPs are neutralized through the covering of CPPs by cargos on the structure. Even under these circumstances, the CPPs can still be non-covalently complexed with the negatively charged molecules. To address this issue, combination strategies of CPPs with other typical carriers provide a promising and novel delivery system. This review summarizes the latest research work in using CPPs combined with molecular cargos including liposomes, polymers, cationic peptides, nanoparticles, adeno-associated virus (AAV) and calcium for the delivery of genetic products, especially for small interfering RNA (siRNA). This combination strategy remedies the reduced internalization efficiency caused by neutralization. PMID:26295227

  18. Brain delivery of insulin boosted by intranasal coadministration with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-01-10

    Intranasal administration is considered as an alternative route to enable effective drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Several reports have proved that macromolecules can be transferred directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, strategies to enhance the delivery of macromolecules from the nasal cavity to CNS are needed because of their low delivery efficiencies via this route in general. We hypothesized that the delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain parenchyma can be facilitated by increasing the uptake of drugs by the nasal epithelium including supporting and neuronal cells to maximize the potentiality of the intranasal pathway. To test this hypothesis, the CNS-related model peptide insulin was intranasally coadministered with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin to mice. As a result, insulin coadministered with l- or d-penetratin reached the distal regions of the brain from the nasal cavity, including the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. In particular, d-penetratin could intranasally deliver insulin to the brain with a reduced risk of systemic insulin exposure. Thus, the results obtained in this study suggested that CPPs are potential tools for the brain delivery of peptide- and protein-based pharmaceuticals via intranasal administration.

  19. Investigation on cellular uptake and pharmacodynamics of DOCK2-inhibitory peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Umemoto, Tadashi; Fukuda, Yasunori; Tani, Akiyoshi; Asami, Taiji

    2017-04-01

    Protein-protein interaction between dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is an attractive intracellular target for transplant rejection and inflammatory diseases. Recently, DOCK2-selective inhibitory peptides have been discovered, and conjugation with oligoarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) improved inhibitory activity in a cell migration assay. Although a number of CPPs have been reported, oligoarginine was only one example introduced to the inhibitory peptides. In this study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility of CPP-conjugation approach for DOCK2-inhibitory peptides, and select preferable sequences as CPP moiety. First, we evaluated cell permeability of thirteen known CPPs and partial sequences of influenza A viral protein PB1-F2 using an internalization assay system based on luciferin-luciferase reaction, and then selected four CPPs with efficient cellular uptake. Among four conjugates of these CPPs and a DOCK2-inhibitory peptide, the inhibitory activity of a novel CPP, PB1-F2 fragment 5 (PF5), conjugate was comparable to oligoarginine conjugate and higher than that of the non-conjugated peptide. Finally, internalization assay revealed that oligoarginine and PF5 increased the cellular uptake of inhibitory peptides to the same extent. Hence, we demonstrated that CPP-conjugation approach is applicable to the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs based on DOCK2 inhibition by investigating both cellular uptake and bioactivity.

  20. Cell-penetrating peptide TP10 shows broad-spectrum activity against both Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Romanico B G; Ebikeme, Charles; Jiang, Yang; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa; Barrett, Michael P; Langel, Ulo; Faye, Ingrid

    2008-09-01

    Malaria and trypanosomiasis are diseases which afflict millions and for which novel therapies are urgently required. We have tested two well-characterized cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for antiparasitic activity. One CPP, designated TP10, has broad-spectrum antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum, both blood and mosquito stages, and against blood-stage Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

  1. Cell penetrating peptide conjugated liposomes as transdermal delivery system of Polygonum aviculare L. extract.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Sik; Kim, Sun Young; Kong, Bong Ju; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Noh, Geun Young; Im, Na Ri; Lim, Ji Won; Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Junoh; Park, Soo Nam

    2015-04-10

    In this study, Polygonum aviculare L. extract, which has superior antioxidative and cellular membrane protective activity, was loaded onto cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated liposomes to enhance transdermal delivery. The physical characteristics of typical liposomes and CPP-conjugated liposomes containing P. aviculare extract were evaluated. The particle sizes of both liposomes were approximately 150 nm. Whereas the zeta potential of typical liposomes was -45 mV, that of CPP-conjugated liposomes was +42 mV. The loading efficiency of P. aviculare extract in both liposomes was calculated to be about 83%. Fluorescent-labeled liposomes were prepared to evaluate cellular uptake and skin permeation efficiency. Using flow cytometry, we found that CPP-conjugated liposomes improved cellular uptake of the fluorescent dye as compared with the typical liposomes. In addition, the skin permeation of CPP-conjugated liposomes was proved higher than that of typical liposomes by confocal laser scanning microscopy studies and Franz diffusion cell experiments. The improved cellular uptake and skin permeation of the CPP-conjugated liposomes were due to the cationic arginine-rich peptide. In vivo studies also determined that the CPP-conjugated liposomes were more effective in depigmentation and anti-wrinkle studies than typical liposomes. These results indicate that the CPP-conjugated liposomes could be effective for transdermal drug delivery of antioxidant and anti-aging therapeutics.

  2. Cell-penetrating peptides: achievements and challenges in application for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Byun, Youngro; David, Allan E.; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major hurdles to cure cancer lies in the low potency of currently available drugs, which could eventually be solved by using more potent therapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins or genes. However, although these macromolecules possess greater potency inside the cancer cells, the barely permeable cell membrane remains a formidable barrier to exert their efficacy. A widely used strategy is to use cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to improve their intracellular uptake. Since the discovery of the first CPP, numerous CPPs have been derived from natural or synthesized products. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that those CPPs are highly efficient in transducing cargoes into almost all cell types. Therefore, to date, CPPs have been widely used for intracellular delivery of various cargoes, including peptides, proteins, genes, and even nanoparticles. In addition, recently, based on the successes of CPPs in cellular studies, their applications in vivo have been actively pursued. This review will focus on the advanced applications of CPP-based in vivo delivery of therapeutics (e.g., small molecule drugs, proteins, and genes). In addition, we will highlight certain updated applications of CPPs for intracellular delivery of nanoparticulate drug carriers, as well as several ‘smart’ strategies for tumor targeted delivery of CPP-cargoes. PMID:23852939

  3. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Iltzsche, Anne; Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  4. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles and CdS quantum dots with cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Catherine C.; de la Fuente, Jesus M.

    2009-02-01

    During the last decade, there has been great deal of interest in the self-assembly fabrication of hybrid materials from inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules. Nanoparticles are similar in size range to many common biomolecules, thus, nanoparticles appear to be natural companions in hybrid systems. At present, it is straightforward to control and modify properties of nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems; for example, controlling their size, modifying their surface layer for enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, or biorecognition. A particularly desirable target for therapeutic uses is the cell nucleus, because the genetic information is there. We review in this article the synthesis developed by our research group of water-soluble gold nanoparticles and CdS nanocrystals functionalized with a Tat protein-derived peptide sequence by straightforward and economical methodologies. The particles were subsequently tested in vitro with a human fibroblast cell line using optical and transmission electron microscopy to determine the biocompatibility of these nanoparticles and whether the functionalization with the cell penetrating peptide allowed particles to transfer across the cell membrane and locate into the nucleus.

  5. Impact of different cell penetrating peptides on the efficacy of antisense therapeutics for targeting intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Mohammad, Haroon; Thangamani, Shankar; Hussein, Asmaa A. A.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need for novel and innovative therapeutic strategies to address infections caused by intracellular pathogens. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) present a novel method to target intracellular pathogens due to their unique mechanism of action and their ability to be conjugated to cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to overcome challenging delivery barriers. In this study, we targeted the RNA polymerase α subunit (rpoA) using a PNA that was covalently conjugated to five different CPPs. Changing the conjugated CPP resulted in a pronounced improvement in the antibacterial activity observed against Listeria monocytogenes in vitro, in cell culture, and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) infection model. Additionally, a time-kill assay revealed three conjugated CPPs rapidly kill Listeria within 20 minutes without disrupting the bacterial cell membrane. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of other critical virulence genes (Listeriolysin O, and two phospholipases plcA and plcB) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PNA-inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis was selective and did not adversely affect mitochondrial protein synthesis. This study provides a foundation for improving and developing PNAs conjugated to CPPs to better target intracellular pathogens. PMID:26860980

  6. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  7. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  8. Cell-penetrating peptides: achievements and challenges in application for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Byun, Youngro; David, Allan E; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C

    2014-02-01

    One of the major hurdles to cure cancer lies in the low potency of currently available drugs, which could eventually be solved by using more potent therapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins or genes. However, although these macromolecules possess greater potency inside the cancer cells, the barely permeable cell membrane remains a formidable barrier to exert their efficacy. A widely used strategy is to use cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to improve their intracellular uptake. Since the discovery of the first CPP, numerous CPPs have been derived from natural or synthesized products. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that those CPPs are highly efficient in transducing cargoes into almost all cell types. Therefore, to date, CPPs have been widely used for intracellular delivery of various cargoes, including peptides, proteins, genes, and even nanoparticles. In addition, recently, based on the successes of CPPs in cellular studies, their applications in vivo have been actively pursued. This review will focus on the advanced applications of CPP-based in vivo delivery of therapeutics (e.g., small molecule drugs, proteins, and genes). In addition, we will highlight certain updated applications of CPPs for intracellular delivery of nanoparticulate drug carriers, as well as several "smart" strategies for tumor targeted delivery of CPP-cargoes.

  9. Targeting the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway in the Retina With a Gene-Delivered Secretable and Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J.; Jaime, Henrique; Brown, Emily E.; Iwata, Ryo L.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Massengill, Michael T.; Biswal, Manas R.; Boye, Shannon E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ash, John D.; Li, Qiuhong; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress has been linked to several ocular diseases, initiating an inflammatory response that increases tissue injury. The Nrf2 transcription factor regulates expression of antioxidant genes and is tightly regulated by Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (Keap-1). We evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector delivering an Nrf2-derived peptide that binds Keap-1. Methods The sequence of the Nrf2 peptide was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (Tat-peptide) sequence (TatNrf2mer). The effects of lentiviral-delivered TatNrf2mer were studied in vitro. Transcript (quantitative [q] RT-PCR) and protein levels (ELISA and immunofluorescence) were quantified. Cell viability was measured by MTT and Cell Titer assays. The AAV vectors were packaged with the TatNrf2mer fused to secretable green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the small chicken β actin promoter. The protective effects of this vector were evaluated in a model of RPE oxidative injury and in a mouse model of uveitis after intravitreal injection. Results Expression of TatNrf2mer peptide induced antioxidant gene expression, blocked IL-1β secretion, and protected cells from oxidative injury. In mice, TatNrf2mer expression partially protected photoreceptor function based on ERG responses and optical coherence tomography measurements in the sodium iodate (NaIO3) model. Furthermore, sGFP-TatNrf2mer expression decreased IL-1β and IL-6 in the NaIO3-treated mice, and resulted in a 54% decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in the vitreous body of the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model. Conclusions The intravitreally delivered AAV-TatNrf2mer has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in widely-used models of ocular injury, suggesting it also could be useful in ocular diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammasome activation. PMID:26842755

  10. Cell Penetrating Peptide-Modified Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) Nanoparticles with Enhanced Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Jill M.; Seo, Young-Eun; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The surface modification of nanoparticles (NPs) can enhance the intracellular delivery of drugs, proteins, and genetic agents. Here we studied the effect of different surface ligands, including cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), on the cell binding and internalization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) NPs. Relative to unmodified NPs, we observed that surface-modified NPs greatly enhanced cell internalization. Using one CPP, MPG (unabbreviated notation), that achieved the highest degree of internalization at both low and high surface modification densities, we evaluated the effect of two different NP surface chemistries on cell internalization. After 2 hr, avidin-MPG NPs enhanced cellular internalization by 5 to 26-fold relative to DSPE-MPG NP formulations. Yet, despite a 5-fold increase in MPG density on DSPE- relative to Avidin-NPs, after 24 hr., both formulations resulted in similar internalization levels (48 and 64-fold, respectively). Regardless of surface modification, all NPs were internalized through an energy-dependent, clathrin-mediated process, and became dispersed throughout the cell. Overall both Avidin- and DSPE-CPP modified NPs significantly increased internalization and offer promising delivery options for applications in which internalization presents challenges to efficacious delivery. PMID:26602822

  11. The uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides: putting the puzzle together.

    PubMed

    Brock, Roland

    2014-05-21

    Over the past 20 years, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have captured the attention of biomedical researchers, biophysicists, and (bio)organic chemists. These molecules efficiently enter cells and mediate entry of (macro)molecules that by themselves do not cross the plasma membrane. Since their discovery, models on the mechanism by which uptake occurs have seen major revisions. Starting from direct penetration across the plasma membrane, it later became apparent that for large molecular weight cargos in particular, endocytosis plays a role in uptake and furthermore that the route of uptake is a function of CPP, cell-type, cargo, and concentration. For the class of arginine-rich CPPs, this dependence on conditions has been elucidated in particular. As I will discuss here for this class of CPPs, a downside of this multitude of possibilities has been a lack of attention for commonalities in the observation of apparently distinct phenomena. At the same time, differences of apparently similar observations were not appreciated sufficiently. In addition, there has been insufficient acknowledgment of observations that are incompatible with the proposed models. Nevertheless, a considerable amount of data can be assembled into a quite coherent picture and the data that is left creates the basis for concrete future lines of research to resolve the questions that remain. Moreover, any uptake mechanism has its distinct structure-activity relationship for uptake giving room for the molecular design of molecules to preferentially direct uptake to either of them.

  12. Cell Penetrating Peptide Conjugated Chitosan for Enhanced Delivery of Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Layek, Buddhadev; Lipp, Lindsey; Singh, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is an emerging therapeutic strategy for the cure or treatment of a spectrum of genetic disorders. Nevertheless, advances in gene therapy are immensely reliant upon design of an efficient gene carrier that can deliver genetic cargoes into the desired cell populations. Among various nonviral gene delivery systems, chitosan-based carriers have gained increasing attention because of their high cationic charge density, excellent biocompatibility, nearly nonexistent cytotoxicity, negligible immune response, and ideal ability to undergo chemical conjugation. However, a major shortcoming of chitosan-based carriers is their poor cellular uptake, leading to inadequate transfection efficiency. The intrinsic feature of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) for transporting diverse cargoes into multiple cell and tissue types in a safe manner suggests that they can be conjugated to chitosan for improving its transfection efficiency. In this review, we briefly discuss CPPs and their classification, and also the major mechanisms contributing to the cellular uptake of CPPs and cargo conjugates. We also discuss immense improvements for the delivery of nucleic acids using CPP-conjugated chitosan-based carriers with special emphasis on plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA. PMID:26690119

  13. Cell penetrating peptide-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles with enhanced cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Jill M; Seo, Young-Eun; Saltzman, W Mark

    2016-01-01

    The surface modification of nanoparticles (NPs) can enhance the intracellular delivery of drugs, proteins, and genetic agents. Here we studied the effect of different surface ligands, including cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), on the cell binding and internalization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) NPs. Relative to unmodified NPs, we observed that surface-modified NPs greatly enhanced cell internalization. Using one CPP, MPG (unabbreviated notation), that achieved the highest degree of internalization at both low and high surface modification densities, we evaluated the effect of two different NP surface chemistries on cell internalization. After 2h, avidin-MPG NPs enhanced cellular internalization by 5 to 26-fold relative to DSPE-MPG NP formulations. Yet, despite a 5-fold increase in MPG density on DSPE compared to Avidin NPs, both formulations resulted in similar internalization levels (48 and 64-fold, respectively) after 24h. Regardless of surface modification, all NPs were internalized through an energy-dependent, clathrin-mediated process, and became dispersed throughout the cell. Overall both Avidin- and DSPE-CPP modified NPs significantly increased internalization and offer promising delivery options for applications in which internalization presents challenges to efficacious delivery.

  14. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Therapeutic Molecule Delivery into the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Li; Ma, Jie-Lan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Tang-Bin; Liu, Chang-Bai

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a dynamic and complex barrier formed by endothelial cells, can impede the entry of unwanted substances – pathogens and therapeutic molecules alike – into the central nervous system (CNS) from the blood circulation. Taking into account the fact that CNS-related diseases are the largest and fastest growing unmet medical concern, many potential protein- and nucleic acid-based medicines have been developed for therapeutic purposes. However, due to their poor ability to cross the BBB and the plasma membrane, the above-mentioned bio-macromolecules have limited use in treating neurological diseases. Finding effective, safe, and convenient ways to deliver therapeutic molecules into the CNS is thus urgently required. In recent decades, much effort has been expended in the development of drug delivery technologies, of which cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have the most promising potential. The present review covers the latest advances in CPP delivery technology, and provides an update on their use in CNS-targeted drug delivery. PMID:23997754

  15. The Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptide and Transferrin on Enhanced Delivery of Drug to Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gitanjali; Lakkadwala, Sushant; Modgil, Amit; Singh, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to brain has led to an entire field of active research devoted to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver drugs to brain. This review focusses on exploring the facets of a novel platform designed for the delivery of drugs to brain. The platform was constructed based on the hypothesis that a combination of receptor-targeting agent, like transferrin protein, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB. The combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle has shown significantly improved (p < 0.05) translocation of small molecules and genes into brain as compared to the vehicle with only receptor-targeting agents. The comprehensive details of the uptake mechanisms and properties of various CPPs are illustrated here. The application of this technology, in conjunction with nanotechnology, can potentially open new horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27231900

  16. When cationic cell-penetrating peptides meet hydrocarbons to enhance in-cell cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Chassaing, Gérard; Swiecicki, Jean-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short sequences often rich in cationic residues with the remarkable ability to cross cell membranes. In the past 20 years, CPPs have gained wide interest and have found numerous applications in the delivery of bioactive cargoes to the cytosol and even the nucleus of living cells. The covalent or non-covalent addition of hydrocarbon moieties to cationic CPPs alters the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity balance in their sequence. Such perturbation dramatically influences their interaction with the cell membrane, might induce self-assembling properties and modifies their intracellular trafficking. In particular, the introduction of lipophilic moieties changes the subcellular distribution of CPPs and might result in a dramatically increase of the internalization yield of the co-transported cargoes. Herein, we offer an overview of different aspects of the recent findings concerning the properties of CPPs covalently or non-covalently associated to hydrocarbons. We will focus on the impact of the hydrocarbon moieties on the delivery of various cargoes, either covalently or non-covalently bound to the modified CPPs. We will also provide some key elements to rationalize the influence of the hydrocarbons moieties on the cellular uptake. Furthermore, the recent in vitro and in vivo successful applications of acylated CPPs will be summarized to provide a broad view of the versatility of these modified CPPs as small-molecules and oligonucleotides vectors.

  17. Translocation mechanism(s) of cell-penetrating peptides: biophysical studies using artificial membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Chassaing, Gérard; Swiecicki, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-20

    The ability of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to cross cell membranes has found numerous applications in the delivery of bioactive compounds to the cytosol of living cells. Their internalization mechanisms have been questioned many times, and after 20 years of intense debate, it is now widely accepted that both energy-dependent and energy-independent mechanisms account for their penetration properties. However, the energy-independent mechanisms, named "direct translocation", occurring without the requirement of the cell internalization machinery, remain to be fully rationalized at the molecular level. Using artificial membrane bilayers, recent progress has been made toward the comprehension of the direct translocation event. This review summarizes our current understanding of the translocation process, starting from the adsorption of the CPP on the membrane to the membrane crossing itself. We describe the different key steps occurring before direct translocation, because each of them can promote and/or hamper translocation of the CPP through the membrane. We then dissect the modification to the membranes induced by the presence of the CPPs. Finally, we focus on the latest studies describing the direct translocation mechanisms. These results provide an important framework within which to design new CPPs and to rationalize an eventual selectivity of CPPs in their penetration ability.

  18. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomarasca, Marta; F C Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens.

  19. Sodium diclofenac and cell-penetrating peptides embedded in H(II) mesophases: physical characterization and delivery.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-09-01

    Glycerol monooleate (GMO)-based mesophases offer extensive prospects for incorporation of various bioactive molecules. This work deals with the solubilization of selected cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) together with sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) within the H(II) mesophase for transdermal applications. The effect of CPPs such as RALA (an amphipatic CPP), penetratin (PEN), and oligoarginine (NONA) on Na-DFC skin permeation kinetics to provide controlled release and tune the drug transdermal diffusion was studied. The location of the drug and the CPPs within the mesophase was probed by DSC and FTIR. Na-DFC was found to be located at the interfacial region between the surfactant chains, leading to denser H(II) mesophase. The hydrophilic NONA was intercalated into the aqueous cylinders and caused their swelling. It induced a significant decrease in the hydrogen binding between the GMO carbonyls and their surrounding. The amphiphilic PEN was entrapped within two different regions, depending on its concentration. PEN and NONA improved Na-DFC permeation by 100%, whereas RALA enhanced permeation by 50%. When estimating Na-DFC migration rate out of the mesophase toward surrounding aqueous media, it appeared to be slower with the CPPs. The peptides were not involved at this diffusion-controlled step. It seems that their effect on skin permeation is based on their specific interaction with the skin.

  20. Visualizing Actin Architectures in Cells Incubated with Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    He, Lin; Watson, Peter D; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    Defining the exact role of the actin cytoskeleton in mediating endocytosis through different pathways is a significant challenge. The general consensus is that actin has an important role in organizing the early stages of endocytosis but there is still much to learn. Actin has also been implicated in cell internalization of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). It is suggested that CPP variants such as octaarginine (R8) and the HIV Tat peptide induce actin-dependent plasma membrane perturbation and enter via macropinocytosis. Here, we describe confocal microscopy techniques that allow for high-resolution spatial characterization of the actin cytoskeleton in untreated mammalian cells and those incubated with actin-disrupting agents and CPPs. By performing X-Y-Z projection images through different regions of cells to show basal and apical profiles, we initially highlight how these techniques can be used to reveal major differences in cortical and filamentous actin organization between different cell lines. Using these techniques, we demonstrate that the actin-disrupting agent cytochalasin D rapidly changes this framework at concentrations significantly lower than is normally used. Experiments are also performed to highlight that serum starvation significantly sensitizes cells to the effects of R8 on actin-induced ruffling and lamellapodia formation. The techniques described here can be used to gain a higher level of knowledge of the organization of the actin network in individual model cell systems, how this is perturbed using commonly used actin inhibitors, and how plasma membrane reorganization can be induced by the addition of drug delivery vectors such as CPPs.

  1. The effect of dexamethasone/cell-penetrating peptide nanoparticles on gene delivery for inner ear therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yang, Keum-Jin; Park, Shi-Nae; Kim, Dong-Kee; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex)-loaded PHEA-g-C18-Arg8 (PCA) nanoparticles (PCA/Dex) were developed for the delivery of genes to determine the synergistic effect of Dex on gene expression. The cationic PCA nanoparticles were self-assembled to create cationic micelles containing an octadecylamine (C18) core with Dex and an arginine 8 (Arg8) peptide shell for electrostatic complexation with nucleic acids (connexin 26 [Cx26] siRNA, green fluorescent protein [GFP] DNA or brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] pDNA). The PCA/Dex nanoparticles conjugated with Arg8, a cell-penetrating peptide that enhances permeability through a round window membrane in the inner ear for gene delivery, exhibited high uptake efficiency in HEI-OC1 cells. This potential carrier co-delivering Dex and the gene into inner ear cells has a diameter of 120–140 nm and a zeta potential of 20–25 mV. Different types of genes were complexed with the Dex-loaded PCA nanoparticle (PCA/Dex/gene) for gene expression to induce additional anti-inflammatory effects. PCA/Dex showed mildly increased expression of GFP and lower mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL1b, IL12, and INFr) than did Dex-free PCA nanoparticles and Lipofectamine® reagent in HEI-OC1 cells. In addition, after loading Cx26 siRNA onto the surface of PCA/Dex, Cx26 gene expression was downregulated according to real-time polymerase chain reaction for 24 h, compared with that using Lipofectamine reagent. After loading BDNF DNA into PCA/Dex, increased expression of BDNF was observed for 30 h, and its signaling pathway resulted in an increase in phosphorylation of Akt, observed by Western blotting. Thus, Dex within PCA/Dex/gene nanoparticles created an anti-inflammatory effect and enhanced gene expression. PMID:27895484

  2. S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide forms nanoparticle-like structures to gain entry into cells.

    PubMed

    Padari, Kärt; Koppel, Kaida; Lorents, Annely; Hällbrink, Mattias; Mano, Miguel; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Pooga, Margus

    2010-04-21

    Despite increasing interest in cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as carriers for drugs and in gene therapy, the current understanding of their exact internalization mechanism is still far from complete. The cellular translocation of CPPs and their payloads has been mostly described by fluorescence- and activity-based methods, leaving the more detailed characterization at the ultrastructural level almost out of attention. Herein, we used transmission electron microscopy to characterize the membrane interaction and internalization of a cell-penetrating peptide S4(13)-PV. We demonstrate that S4(13)-PV peptide forms spherical nanoparticle-like regular structures upon association with cell surface glycosaminoglycans on the plasma membrane. Insertion of S4(13)-PV particles into plasma membrane induces disturbances and leads to the vesicular uptake of peptides by cells. We propose that for efficient cellular translocation S4(13)-PV peptides have to assemble into particles of specific size and shape. The spherical peptide particles are not dissociated in intracellular vesicles but often retain their organization and remain associated with the membrane of vesicles, destabilizing them and promoting the escape of peptides into cytosol. Lowering the temperature and inhibition of dynamins' activity reduce the internalization of S4(13)-PV peptides, but do not block it completely. Our results provide an ultrastructural insight into the interaction mode of CPPs with the plasma membrane and the distribution in cells, which might help to better understand how CPPs cross the biological membranes and gain access into cells.

  3. Molecular Targeting of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma With Fluorescently Labeled Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptides in a Transgenic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    OROSCO, RYAN K.; SAVARIAR, ELAMPRAKASH N.; WEISSBROD, PHILIP A.; DIAZ-PEREZ, JULIO A.; BOUVET, MICHAEL; TSIEN, ROGER Y.; NGUYEN, QUYEN T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Molecularly targeted fluorescent molecules may help detect tumors that are unseen by traditional white-light surgical techniques. We sought to evaluate a fluorescent ratiometric activatable cell penetrating peptide (RACPP) for tumor detection in a transgenic model of PTC. Methods Thirteen BRAFV600E mice with PTC were studied—seven injected intravenously with RACPP, four controls with saline. Total thyroidectomy was performed with microscopic white-light visualization. Fluorescent imaging of post-thyroidectomy fields was performed, and tissue with increased signal was removed and evaluated for PTC. Final samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to conditions. Vocal cord function was evaluated postoperatively with video laryngoscopy. Results The average in situ ratiometric (Cy5/Cy7) thyroid tumor-to-background contrast ratio was 2.27 +/−0.91. Fluorescence-guided clean-up following thyroidectomy identified additional tumor in 2 of 7 RACPP animals (smallest dimension 1.2 mm), and decreased the number of animals with residual tumor from 4 to 3. All retained tumor foci on final pathology were smaller than 0.76 mm. Intact vocal abduction was present in all of the RACPP animals. Conclusions RACPPs successfully targeted PTC in a transgenic thyroidectomy model, and allowed for residual tumor detection that reduced positive margins beyond what was possible with white-light surgery alone. PMID:26799257

  4. Cyclization of a cell-penetrating peptide via click-chemistry increases proteolytic resistance and improves drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Reichart, Florian; Horn, Mareike; Neundorf, Ines

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report synthesis and biological evaluation of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), that is partly cyclized via a triazole bridge. Recently, beneficious properties have been reported for cyclized peptides concerning their metabolic stability and intracellular uptake. A CPP based on human calcitonin was used in this study, and side chain cyclization was achieved via copper catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction. Cell viability studies in several cell-lines revealed no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, efficient uptake in breast cancer MCF-7 cells could be determined. Moreover, preliminary studies using this novel peptide as drug transporter for daunorubicin were performed. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Delivery of Antisense Peptide Nucleic Acids to Cells by Conjugation with Small Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide (R/W)9

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, Céline; Boutimah, Fatima; Bourdeloux, Mathilde; Dupuy, Florian; Met, Elisabeth; Alberti, Patrizia; Loll, François; Chassaing, Gérard; Burlina, Fabienne; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are very attractive antisense and antigene agents, but these molecules are not passively taken into cells. Here, using a functional cell assay and fluorescent-based methods, we investigated cell uptake and antisense activity of a tridecamer PNA that targets the HIV-1 polypurine tract sequence delivered using the arginine-rich (R/W)9 peptide (RRWWRRWRR). At micromolar concentrations, without use of any transfection agents, almost 80% inhibition of the target gene expression was obtained with the conjugate in the presence of the endosomolytic agent chloroquine. We show that chloroquine not only induced escape from endosomes but also enhanced the cellular uptake of the conjugate. Mechanistic studies revealed that (R/W)9-PNA conjugates were internalized via pinocytosis. Replacement of arginines with lysines reduced the uptake of the conjugate by six-fold, resulting in the abolition of intracellular target inhibition. Our results show that the arginines play a crucial role in the conjugate uptake and antisense activity. To determine whether specificity of the interactions of arginines with cell surface proteoglycans result in the internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich conjugates in wild-type CHO-K1 and proteoglycan-deficient A745 cells. The uptake of both conjugates was decreased by four fold in CHO-745 cells; therefore proteoglycans promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Our results show that arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, especially (R/W)9, are a promising tool for PNA internalization. PMID:25127364

  6. Intracellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-transcriptional factor fusion protein and its role in selective osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jin Sook; Lee, Jue Yeon; Choi, Yoon Jung; You, Hyung Keun; Hong, Seong-Doo; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Protein-transduction technology has been attempted to deliver macromolecular materials, including protein, nucleic acids, and polymeric drugs, for either diagnosis or therapeutic purposes. Herein, fusion protein composed of an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide, termed low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP), and a transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) protein was prepared and applied in combination with biomaterials to increase bone-forming capacity. TAZ has been recently identified as a specific osteogenic stimulating transcriptional coactivator in human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation, while simultaneously blocking adipogenic differentiation. However, TAZ by itself cannot penetrate the cells, and thus needs a transfection tool for translocalization. The LMWP-TAZ fusion proteins were efficiently translocalized into the cytosol of hMSCs. The hMSCs treated with cell-penetrating LMWP-TAZ exhibited increased expression of osteoblastic genes and protein, producing significantly higher quantities of mineralized matrix compared to free TAZ. In contrast, adipogenic differentiation of the hMSCs was blocked by treatment of LMWP-TAZ fusion protein, as reflected by reduced marker-protein expression, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ messenger ribonucleic acid levels. LMWP-TAZ was applied in alginate gel for the purpose of localization and controlled release. The LMWP-TAZ fusion protein-loaded alginate gel matrix significantly increased bone formation in rabbit calvarial defects compared with alginate gel matrix mixed with free TAZ protein. The protein transduction of TAZ fused with cell-penetrating LMWP peptide was able selectively to stimulate osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, this fusion protein-transduction technology for osteogenic protein can thus be applied in combination with biomaterials for tissue regeneration and controlled release for tissue

  7. An unexpected cell-penetrating peptide from Bothrops jararaca venom identified through a novel size exclusion chromatography screening.

    PubMed

    Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Vigerelli, Hugo; Costa, André Santos; Câmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Junior, Paulo Luiz-de-Sá; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Efficient drug delivery systems are currently one of the greatest challenges in pharmacokinetics, and the transposition of the gap between in vitro candidate molecule and in vivo test drug is, sometimes, poles apart. In this sense, the cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) may be the bridge uniting these worlds. Here, we describe a technique to rapidly identify unlabeled CPPs after incubation with liposomes, based on commercial desalting (size exclusion) columns and liquid chromatography-MS/MS, for peptide de novo sequencing. Using this approach, we found it possible to identify one new CPP - interestingly, a classical bradykinin-potentiating peptide - in the peptide-rich low molecular mass fraction of the Bothrops jararaca venom, which was also able to penetrate live cell membranes, as confirmed by classical approaches employing fluorescence-labeled analogues of this CPP. Moreover, both the labeled and unlabeled CPPs caused no metabolic, cell-cycle or morphologic alterations, proving to be unmistakably cargo deliverers and not drugs themselves. In sum, we have developed and validated a method for screening label-free peptides for CPP activity, regardless of their biological origin, which could lead to the identification of new and more efficient drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Full membrane spanning self-assembled monolayers as model systems for UHV-based studies of cell-penetrating peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Johannes; Graham, Daniel J.; Baio, Joe E.; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Müllen, Klaus; Castner, David G.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Biophysical studies of the interaction of peptides with model membranes provide a simple yet effective approach to understand the transport of peptides and peptide based drug carriers across the cell membrane. Therein, the authors discuss the use of self-assembled monolayers fabricated from the full membrane-spanning thiol (FMST) 3-((14-((4'-((5-methyl-1-phenyl-35-(phytanyl)oxy-6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30,33,37-undecaoxa-2,3-dithiahenpentacontan-51-yl)oxy)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)oxy)tetradecyl)oxy)-2-(phytanyl)oxy glycerol for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) based experiments. UHV-based methods such as electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide important information about how peptides bind and interact with membranes, especially with the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer. Moreover, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data showed that FMST forms UHV-stable and ordered films on gold. XPS and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles indicated that a proline-rich amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, known as sweet arrow peptide is located at the outer perimeter of the model membrane.

  9. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-11-01

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of

  10. Accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in large unilamellar vesicles: A straightforward screening assay for investigating the internalization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Di Pisa, Margherita; Burlina, Fabienne; Lécorché, Pascaline; Mansuy, Christelle; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2015-09-01

    The internalization of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) into liposomes (large unilamellar vesicles, LUVs) was studied with a rapid and robust procedure based on the quenching of a small fluorescent probe, 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD). Quenching can be achieved by reduction with dithionite or by pH jump. LUVs with different compositions of phospholipids (PLs) were used to screen the efficacy of different CPPs. In order to "validate" the composition of the membrane models, a control cationic peptide, which does not enter eukaryotic cells, was included in the study. It was found that pure DOPG or DOPG within ternary mixtures with cholesterol are the most appropriate models for studying CPP translocation. An anionic lipid, such as DOPG, is required for the adsorption of the basic peptides on the surface of LUVs. In addition, it acts as transfer agent through the lipid bilayer. A fluid phase and/or the presence of phase defects also appear mandatory for the internalization to occur. The neutralization of charges within an inverted micelle demonstrated in the case of DOPG and also proposed for a ternary mixture of PLs might not be the only mechanism for the CPP translocation. Finally, it is shown that oleic acid facilitates the entry inside LUVs in gel phase of a series of cationic peptides including CPPs and also the negative control peptide PKCi.

  11. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  12. Massive glycosaminoglycan-dependent entry of Trp-containing cell-penetrating peptides induced by exogenous sphingomyelinase or cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Pallerla, Manjula; Burlina, Fabienne; Illien, Françoise; Cribier, Sophie; Sagan, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Among non-invasive cell delivery strategies, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) vectors represent interesting new tools. To get fundamental knowledge about the still debated internalisation mechanisms of these peptides, we modified the membrane content of cells, typically by hydrolysis of sphingomyelin or depletion of cholesterol from the membrane outer leaflet. We quantified and visualised the effect of these viable cell surface treatments on the internalisation efficiency of different CPPs, among which the most studied Tat, R9, penetratin and analogues, that all carry the N-terminal biotin-Gly4 tag cargo. Under these cell membrane treatments, only penetratin and R6W3 underwent a massive glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent entry in cells. Internalisation of the other peptides was only slightly increased, similarly in the absence or the presence of GAGs for R9, and only in the presence of GAGs for Tat and R6L3. Ceramide formation (or cholesterol depletion) is known to lead to the reorganisation of membrane lipid domains into larger platforms, which can serve as a trap and cluster receptors. These results show that GAG clustering, enhanced by formation of ceramide, is efficiently exploited by penetratin and R6W3, which contains Trp residues in their sequence but not Tat, R9 and R6L3. Hence, these data shed new lights on the differences in the internalisation mechanism and pathway of these peptides that are widely used in delivery of cargo molecules.

  13. Development of helix-stabilized cell-penetrating peptides containing cationic α,α-disubstituted amino acids as helical promoters.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Misawa, Takashi; Oba, Makoto; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2017-03-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have attracted many scientists' attention as intracellular delivery tools due to their high cargo molecule transportation efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Therefore, in many research fields CPP, such as HIV-Tat and oligoarginine (Rn), are used to deliver hydrophilic drugs and biomolecules, including proteins, DNA, and RNA. We designed four types of CPP that contained cationic α,α-disubstituted amino acids (Api(C2Gu) and Api(C4Gu)) as helical promoters; i.e., 1-4 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-Xaa)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1: Xaa=Api(C2Gu), 2: Xaa=Api(C4Gu)), 3: FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)8-Api(C2Gu)-(Gly)3-NH2, and 4: FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)5-Api(C2Gu)-(l-Arg)2-Api(C2Gu)-(Gly)3-NH2], and investigated their preferred secondary structures and cell membrane-penetrating ability. As a result, we found that the permeation efficiency of the CPP was affected by the number of helical promoters in their sequences. Specially, peptide 1, which contained three Api(C2Gu) residues, formed a stable helical structure and passed through the cell membrane more efficiently than the other peptides. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the spatial arrangement of the peptides' side chains also influenced their permeability and the helical stabilization of their main chains.

  14. Thermo-Responsive Collagen/Cell Penetrating Hybrid Peptide as Nanocarrier in Targeting-Free Cell Selection and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Myungeun; Hu, Chloe; Urfano, Selina F.; Arostegui, Merlyn; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The effective delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents to a selected group of cells has been at the forefront of biomedical research. Unfortunately, the identification of the unique cell surface targets for cell selection remains a major challenge, particularly if cells within the selected group are not identical. Here we demonstrate a novel approach to cell section relying on a thermo-responsive peptide-based nanocarrier. The hybrid peptide containing cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and collagen (COLL) domains is designed to undergo coil-to-helix transition (folding) below physiological temperature. Since only helical form undergoes effective internalization by the cells, this approach allows effective temperature-discriminate cellular uptake. The cells selected for uptake are locally cooled down thus enabling the carrier to fold and subsequently internalize. Our approach demonstrates a generic method as selected cells could differ from the adjacent cells or could belong to the same cell population. The method is fast (< 15 min) and selective; over 99.6% of cells in vitro internalized the peptide carrier at low temperatures (15°C), while less than 0.2% internalized at 37°C. In vivo results confirm the high selectivity of the method. The potential clinical applications in mixed cell differentiation carcinoma, most frequently encountered in breast and ovarian cancer, are envisioned. PMID:27603918

  15. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-12-21

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.

  16. Binding of oligoarginine to membrane lipids and heparan sulfate: structural and thermodynamic characterization of a cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Elisabete; Kitas, Eric; Seelig, Joachim

    2005-02-22

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) comprise a group of arginine-rich oligopeptides that are able to deliver exogenous cargo into cells. A first step in the internalization of CPPs is their binding to the cell surface, a reaction likely to involve membrane phospholipids and/or heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). The present work characterizes the interaction of R(9), one of the most efficient CPPs, with either heparan sulfate (HS) or lipid vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG). Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that R(9) binds to HS with high affinity. Assuming that HS has n independent and equivalent binding sites for R(9), we find an association constant of 3.1 x 10(6) M(-1) at 28 degrees C. At this temperature, the reaction enthalpy is DeltaH(degrees)pep = - 5.5 kcal/mol and approximately 7 R(9) molecules bind per HS chain, which is equivalent to approximately 0.95 cationic/anionic charge ratio. Delta decreases in magnitude upon an increase in temperature, and the reaction becomes entropy-driven at higher temperatures (>or=37 degrees C). The positive heat-capacity change entailed by this reaction (DeltaC(degrees)P = +167 cal mol(-1) K(-1)) indicates the loss of polar residues on R(9)-HS binding, suggesting that hydrophobic forces play no major role on binding. Calorimetric analysis of the interaction of R(9) with POPC/POPG (75:25) vesicles reveals an association constant of 8.2 x 10(4) M(-1) at 28 degrees C. Using a surface partition equilibrium model to correct for electrostatic effects, we find an intrinsic partition constant of approximately 900 M(-1), a value that is also confirmed by electrophoretic mobility measurements. This corresponds to an electrostatic contribution of approximately 33% to the total free energy of binding. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shows no change in the headgroup conformation of POPC and POPG, suggesting

  17. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane.

  18. Cell-penetrating peptides meditated encapsulation of protein therapeutics into intact red blood cells and its application.

    PubMed

    He, Huining; Ye, Junxiao; Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Quan; Chung, Hee Sun; Kwon, Young Min; Shin, Meong Cheol; Lee, Kyuri; Yang, Victor C

    2014-02-28

    Red blood cells (RBCs) based drug carrier appears to be the most appealing for protein drugs due to their unmatched biocompatability, biodegradability, and long lifespan in the circulation. Numerous methods for encapsulating protein drugs into RBCs were developed, however, most of them induce partial disruption of the cell membrane, resulting in irreversible alterations in both physical and chemical properties of RBCs. Herein, we introduce a novel method for encapsulating proteins into intact RBCs, which was meditated by a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) developed in our lab-low molecular weight protamine (LMWP). l-asparaginase, one of the primary drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was chosen as a model protein to illustrate the encapsulation into erythrocytes mediated by CPPs. In addition current treatment of ALL using different l-asparaginase delivery and encapsulation methods as well as their associated problems were also reviewed.

  19. The influence of cell penetrating peptide branching on cellular uptake of QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James; Susumu, Kimihiro; Anderson, George; Muttenhaler, Markus; Dawson, Philip; Medintz, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) serve as a valuable platform for understating the intricacies of nanoparticle cellular uptake and fate for the development of theranostics. Developing novel internalization peptides that maximize cellular uptake while minimizing the amount of peptide is important to allow space on the nanoparticle for other cargo (e.g. drugs). We have designed a range of branched, dendritic internalization peptides composed of polyarginine (Arg9) branches (1 to 16 repeats) attached a dendritic wedge based on the sequence WP9G2H6. By attaching these branched dendritic peptides to QD's, we can study the influence of branching on cellular uptake as a function of time, ratio, and degree of branching.

  20. H(II) mesophase and peptide cell-penetrating enhancers for improved transdermal delivery of sodium diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2010-06-01

    This study develops a novel transdermal delivery vehicle for the enhanced delivery of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC). The system utilizes the advantages of reversed hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystals (H(II)LC), combined with a peptide cell penetration enhancer (CPE), creating together an adaptable system that provides versatile options in the field of transdermal delivery. This enhancer peptide is based on a family of amphipatic peptides that exhibit improved membrane permeability. Franz permeation cell experiments revealed that the peptide enhancer (RALA) improved Na-DFC skin penetration of the liquid crystal 2.2-fold. We studied the structural effects of RALA solubilization on the H(II) mesophase. RALA acts as a chaotropic agent, interfering in the structure of the water, and causes a measurable swelling of the aqueous cylinders by 5A. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurements reveal enhanced hydration of the glycerol monooleate (GMO) headgroups and a 6.5% increase in the fraction of non-freezable water resulting from RALA incorporation. RALA caused a gradual increase in the GMO effective headgroup area due to the hydration, leading eventually to a transform of the hexagonal structure towards a lamellar one. Circular dichroism and ATR-FTIR measurements showed a conservation of the peptide structure when incorporated into the H(II) mesophase. The combined H(II)LC-CPE systems can serve as high potential vehicles for a variety of drugs, as they can easily be modified by varying the composition and temperature, according to the required dose and delivery features.

  1. Solid formulation of cell-penetrating peptide nanocomplexes with siRNA and their stability in simulated gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Zaghloul, Eman M; El Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; El-Sayed, Ramy; Magdy, Tarek; Smith, C I Edvard; Langel, Ulo

    2012-08-20

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic peptides that have been extensively studied as drug delivery vehicles for proteins, nucleic acids and nanoparticles. However, the formulation of CPP-based therapeutics into different pharmaceutical formulations and their stability in relevant biological environments have not been given the same attention. Here, we show that a newly developed CPP, PepFect 14 (PF14), forms non-covalent nanocomplexes with short interfering RNA (siRNA), which are able to elicit efficient RNA-interference (RNAi) response in different cell-lines. RNAi effect is obtained at low siRNA doses with a unique kinetic profile. Furthermore, the solid dispersion technique is utilized to formulate PF14/siRNA nanocomplexes into solid formulations that are as active as the freshly prepared nanocomplexes in solution. Importantly, the nanocomplexes are stable and active in mediating RNAi response after incubation with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) that is highly acidic. These results demonstrate the activity of PF14 in delivering and protecting siRNA in different pharmaceutical forms and biological environments.

  2. The acceleration of boron neutron capture therapy using multi-linked mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) fused cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kondo, Natsuko; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Bin, Feng; Nakajima, Kiichiro; Hirota, Yuki; Kawabata, Shinji; Nishiki, Tei-ichi; Ohmori, Iori; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Ono, Koji; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    New anti-cancer therapy with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction of boron-10 with neutron irradiation. The median survival of BNCT patients with glioblastoma was almost twice as long as those receiving standard therapy in a Japanese BNCT clinical trial. In this clinical trial, two boron compounds, BPA (boronophenylalanine) and BSH (sodium borocaptate), were used for BNCT. BPA is taken up into cells through amino acid transporters that are expressed highly in almost all malignant cells, but BSH cannot pass through the cell membrane and remains outside the cell. We simulated the energy transfer against the nucleus at different locations of boron from outside the cell to the nuclear region with neutron irradiation and concluded that there was a marked difference between inside and outside the cell in boron localization. To overcome this disadvantage of BSH in BNCT, we used a cell-penetrating peptide system for transduction of BSH. CPP (cell-membrane penetrating peptide) is very common peptide domains that transduce many physiologically active substances into cells in vitro and in vivo. BSH-fused CPPs can penetrate the cell membrane and localize inside a cell. To increase the boron ratio in one BSH-peptide molecule, 8BSH fused to 11R with a dendritic lysine structure was synthesized and administrated to malignant glioma cells and a brain tumor mouse model. 8BSH-11R localized at the cell nucleus and showed a very high boron value in ICP results. With neutron irradiation, the 8BSH-11R administrated group showed a significant cancer killing effect compared to the 100 times higher concentration of BSH-administrated group. We concluded that BSH-fused CPPs were one of the most improved and potential boron compounds in the next-stage BNCT trial and 8BSH-11R may be applied in the clinical setting.

  3. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  4. Limiting angiotensin II signaling with a cell penetrating peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of the angiotensin II type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Mierke, Dale; Berg, Eric; Shia, Michael; Fishman, Jordan; Sallum, Christine; Polgar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide consisting of the second intracellular loop (IC2) of the Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) linked to the HIV transactivating regulatory protein (TAT) domain was used to identify the role of this motif for intracellular signal transduction. HEK-293 cells stably transfected with AT1R cDNA and primary cultures of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressing endogenous AT1 receptor were exposed to the cell-penetrating peptide construct and the effect on angiotensin II signaling determined. The AT1 IC2 peptide effectively inhibited AngII stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover and calcium influx. It also limited the activation of Akt/PKB as determined by an inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and completely abolished the AngII dependent activation of the transcriptional factor NFκB. In contrast, the AT1 IC2 peptide had no effect on AngII/AT1 receptor activation of ERK. These results illustrate the potential of using cell penetrating peptides to both delineate receptor-mediated signal transduction as well as to selectively regulate G protein coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20492449

  5. Synergistic Enhancement of Antitumor Efficacy by PEGylated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Modified with Cell-Penetrating Peptide TAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shanshan; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Cai, He; Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Xin; Wan, Qianbing; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a cell-penetrating peptide, the transactivating transcriptional factor (TAT) domain from HIV, was linked to PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to develop a highly effective antitumor drug delivery system. FITC was conjugated on MWCNTs-polyethylene glycol (PEG) and MWCNTs-PEG-TAT to provide fluorescence signal for tracing the cellular uptake of the nanocarrier. After loaded with an anticancer agent, doxorubicin (DOX) via π - π stacking interaction, the physicochemical characteristics, release profile and biological evaluation of the obtained nano-sized drug carrier were investigated. The DOX loaded MWCNTs-PEG and MWCNTs-PEG-TAT drug carriers both displayed appropriate particle size, excellent stability, high drug loading, and pH-dependent drug release profile. Nevertheless, compared with DOX-MWCNTs-PEG, DOX-MWCNTs-PEG-TAT showed improved cell internalization, intracellular distribution and potentiated anticancer efficacy due to the TAT-mediated membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear targeting. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of DOX was not compromised after being conjugated with MWCNTs-PEG-TAT and the proposed nanocarrier was also confirmed to have a good biocompatibility. In conclusion, our results suggested that the unique combination of TAT and MWCNTs as a multifunctional drug delivery system might be a powerful tool for improved anticancer drug development.

  6. pH-Responsive Triblock Copolymeric Micelles Decorated with a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Provide Efficient Doxorubicin Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Khen Eng; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Katas, Haliza; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Butt, Adeel Masood; Kesharwani, Prashant; Iyer, Arun K.

    2016-12-01

    This study developed novel triblock pH-responsive polymeric micelles (PMs) using cholic acid-polyethyleneimine-poly- l-arginine (CA-PEI-pArg) copolymers. PEI provided pH sensitivity, while the hydrophilic cell-penetrating pArg peptide promoted cellular PM internalization. The copolymers self-assembled into PMs in aqueous solution at above the critical micelle concentration (2.98 × 10-7 M) and encapsulated doxorubicin in the core region, with a 34.2% ( w/ w) entrapment efficiency. PMs showed pH-dependent swelling, increasing in size by almost sevenfold from pH 7.4 to 5.0. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent, with about 65% released at pH 5.0, and 32% at pH 7.4. Cellular uptake, assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, was enhanced by using doxorubicin-loaded CA-PEI-pArg PMs, as compared to free doxorubicin and DOX-loaded CA-PEI PMs. Moreover, 24-h incubation of these PMs with a human breast cancer cell line produced greater cytotoxicity than free doxorubicin. These results indicate that pH-responsive CA-PEI-pArg micelles could provide a versatile delivery system for targeted cancer therapy using hydrophobic drugs.

  7. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA+ tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy PMID:26954374

  8. Surgical molecular navigation with a Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide improves intraoperative identification and resection of small salivary gland cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the use of intraoperative fluorescence guidance by enzymatically cleavable ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptide (RACPPPLGC(Me)AG) containing Cy5 as a fluorescent donor and Cy7 as a fluorescent acceptor for salivary gland cancer surgery in a mouse model. Methods Surgical resection of small parotid gland cancers in mice was performed with fluorescence guidance or white light (WL) imaging alone. Tumor identification accuracy, operating time and tumor free survival were compared. Results RACPP guidance aided tumor detection (positive histology in 90% (27/30) vs. 48% (15/31) for WL, p<0.001). A ~25% ratiometric signal increase as the threshold to distinguish between tumor and adjacent tissue, yielded >90% detection sensitivity and specificity. Operating time was reduced by 54% (p<0.001), tumor free survival was increased with RACPP guidance (p=0.025). Conclusions RACPP provides real-time intraoperative guidance leading to improved survival. Ratiometric signal thresholds can be set according to desired detection accuracy levels for future RACPP applications. PMID:25521629

  9. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area.

  10. The Potential Role of Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Proteins for Therapy of Erythroid Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C.; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S.

    2013-01-01

    The erythroid related disorders (ERDs) represent a large group of hematological diseases, which in most cases are attributed either to the deficiency or malfunction of biosynthetic enzymes or oxygen transport proteins. Current treatments for these disorders include histo-compatible erythrocyte transfusions or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Gene therapy delivered via suitable viral vectors or genetically modified HSCs have been under way. Protein Transduction Domain (PTD) technology has allowed the production and intracellular delivery of recombinant therapeutic proteins, bearing Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs), into a variety of mammalian cells. Remarkable progress in the field of protein transduction leads to the development of novel protein therapeutics (CPP-mediated PTs) for the treatment of monogenetic and/or metabolic disorders. The “concept” developed in this paper is the intracellular protein delivery made possible via the PTD technology as a novel therapeutic intervention for treatment of ERDs. This can be achieved via four stages including: (i) the production of genetically engineered human CPP-mediated PT of interest, since the corresponding native protein either is missing or is mutated in the erythroid progenitor cell (ErPCs) or mature erythrocytes of patients; (ii) isolation of target cells from the peripheral blood of the selected patients; (iii) ex vivo transduction of cells with the CPP-mediated PT of interest; and (iv) re-administration of the successfully transduced cells back into the same patients. PMID:24275786

  11. Harnessing the power of cell-penetrating peptides: activatable carriers for targeting systemic delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents aims to enhance the accumulation of these molecules in a solid tumor while avoiding uptake in healthy tissues. Tumor-specific accumulation has been pursued with passive targeting by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, as well as with active targeting strategies. Active targeting is achieved by functionalization of carriers to allow specific interactions between the carrier and the tumor environment. Functionalization of carriers with ligands that specifically interact with overexpressed receptors on cancer cells represents a classic approach to active tumor targeting. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a non-specific and receptor-independent mechanism to enhance cellular uptake that offers an exciting alternative to traditional active targeting approaches. While the non-specificity of CPP-mediated internalization has the intriguing potential to make this approach applicable to a wide range of tumor types, their promiscuity is, however, a significant barrier to their clinical utility for systemically administered applications. Many approaches have been investigated to selectively turn on the function of systemically delivered CPP-functionalized carriers specifically in tumors to achieve targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

  12. PepFect 14, a novel cell-penetrating peptide for oligonucleotide delivery in solution and as solid formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Kariem; EL Andaloussi, Samir; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Lehto, Taavi; Lindberg, Staffan; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Viola, Joana R.; Magdy, Tarek; Abdo, Rania; Guterstam, Peter; Sillard, Rannar; Hammond, Suzan M.; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Hällbrink, Mattias; Langel, Ülo

    2011-01-01

    Numerous human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that give rise to aberrant alternative splicing. Recently, several of these debilitating disorders have been shown to be amenable for splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) that modify splicing patterns and restore the phenotype in experimental models. However, translational approaches are required to transform SCOs into usable drug products. In this study, we present a new cell-penetrating peptide, PepFect14 (PF14), which efficiently delivers SCOs to different cell models including HeLa pLuc705 and mdx mouse myotubes; a cell culture model of Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-covalent PF14-SCO nanocomplexes induce splice-correction at rates higher than the commercially available lipid-based vector Lipofectamine™ 2000 (LF2000) and remain active in the presence of serum. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating this delivery system into solid formulations that could be suitable for several therapeutic applications. Solid dispersion technique is utilized and the formed solid formulations are as active as the freshly prepared nanocomplexes in solution even when stored at an elevated temperatures for several weeks. In contrast, LF2000 drastically loses activity after being subjected to same procedure. This shows that using PF14 is a very promising translational approach for the delivery of SCOs in different pharmaceutical forms. PMID:21345932

  13. PepFect 14, a novel cell-penetrating peptide for oligonucleotide delivery in solution and as solid formulation.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Andaloussi, Samir E L; Zaghloul, Eman M; Lehto, Taavi; Lindberg, Staffan; Moreno, Pedro M D; Viola, Joana R; Magdy, Tarek; Abdo, Rania; Guterstam, Peter; Sillard, Rannar; Hammond, Suzan M; Wood, Matthew J A; Arzumanov, Andrey A; Gait, Michael J; Smith, C I Edvard; Hällbrink, Mattias; Langel, Ülo

    2011-07-01

    Numerous human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that give rise to aberrant alternative splicing. Recently, several of these debilitating disorders have been shown to be amenable for splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) that modify splicing patterns and restore the phenotype in experimental models. However, translational approaches are required to transform SCOs into usable drug products. In this study, we present a new cell-penetrating peptide, PepFect14 (PF14), which efficiently delivers SCOs to different cell models including HeLa pLuc705 and mdx mouse myotubes; a cell culture model of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-covalent PF14-SCO nanocomplexes induce splice-correction at rates higher than the commercially available lipid-based vector Lipofectamine 2000 (LF2000) and remain active in the presence of serum. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating this delivery system into solid formulations that could be suitable for several therapeutic applications. Solid dispersion technique is utilized and the formed solid formulations are as active as the freshly prepared nanocomplexes in solution even when stored at an elevated temperatures for several weeks. In contrast, LF2000 drastically loses activity after being subjected to same procedure. This shows that using PF14 is a very promising translational approach for the delivery of SCOs in different pharmaceutical forms.

  14. A novel cell penetrating peptide carrier for the delivery of nematocidal proteins drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jea Hyun

    Nematodes have recently become a primary source of harmful diseases to the environment that inflict harsh damages to pine trees and marine species. However, nematodes cannot be killed by normal pesticides or chemicals due to their thick outer protective layer mainly composed of collagen and cuticles. Thus, a novel approach to trigger intracellular delivery of chemicals through the layers of nematodes is required. In this study, the selection of the novel CPP was carefully progressed through protein database and serial digested fragmentation, internalization of each amino sequence was analyzed through flow cytometry and confocal microscope. As one of the most effective CPP material, JH 1.6 was compared with other major CPPs and its cellular toxicity was investigated. Furthermore, JH 1.6 was attached to various RNA, DNA, and proteins and internalization efficiency was evaluated for mammalian cells. To examine its effects on nematodes in vivo, JH 1.6 was conjugated with nematocidal protein - botulinum neurotoxin (BnT) and treated in C.elegans as a model animal. The results showed that JH 1.6 had high relative internalization rate and low cellular toxicity compared to other major CPP such as TAT and GV1001 peptides.

  15. The structural HCV genes delivered by MPG cell penetrating peptide are directed to enhance immune responses in mice model.

    PubMed

    Mehrlatifan, Saloume; Mirnurollahi, Seyyedeh Masumeh; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Pooneh; Soleymani, Sepehr; Bolhassani, Azam

    2016-10-01

    One of the significant problems in vaccination projects is the lack of an effective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV). The goal of the current study is to evaluate and compare two DNA constructs encoding HCV core and coreE1E2 genes alone or complexed with MPG peptide as a delivery system for stimulation of antibody responses and IFN-γ secretion in Balb/c mice model. Indeed, MPG cell penetrating peptide was used to improve DNA immunization in mice. Our results demonstrated that MPG forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with pcDNA-core and pcDNA-coreE1E2 at an N/P ratio of 10:1. The in vitro transfection efficiency of core or coreE1E2 DNA using MPG and TurboFect delivery systems was confirmed by western blot analysis. The results indicated the expression of the full-length core (∼21 kDa), and coreE1E2 (∼83 kDa) proteins using an anti-His monoclonal antibody. In addition, the expression of HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins was performed in bacteria and the purified recombinant proteins were injected to mice with Montanide 720 adjuvant. Our data showed that the immunized mice with HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins generated the mixture of sera IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes considerably higher than other groups. Furthermore, DNA constructs encoding core and coreE1E2 complexed with MPG could significantly induce IFN-γ secretion in lower concentrations than the naked core and coreE1E2 DNAs. Taken together, the DNA formulations as well as protein regimens used in this study triggered high-level IFN-γ production in mice, an important feature for the development of Th1 immune responses.

  16. S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide induces physical and morphological changes in membrane-mimetic lipid systems and cell membranes: implications for cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M S; Trabulo, Sara; Cardoso, Ana L; Lorents, Annely; Morais, Catarina M; Gomes, Paula; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Padari, Kärt; Pooga, Margus; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2012-03-01

    The present work aims to gain insights into the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cellular internalization and endosomal escape of the S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide, which has been successfully used in our laboratory as a nucleic acid delivery system. A S4(13)-PV analogue, S4(13)-PVscr, displaying a scrambled amino acid sequence, deficient cell internalization and drug delivery inability, was used in this study for comparative purposes. Differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence polarization and X-ray diffraction at small and wide angles techniques showed that both peptides interacted with anionic membranes composed of phosphatidylglycerol or a mixture of this lipid with phosphatidylethanolamine, increasing the lipid order, shifting the phase transition to higher temperatures and raising the correlation length between the bilayers. However, S4(13)-PVscr, in contrast to the wild-type peptide, did not promote lipid domain segregation and induced the formation of an inverted hexagonal lipid phase instead of a cubic phase in the lipid systems assayed. Electron microscopy showed that, as opposed to S4(13)-PVscr, the wild-type peptide induced the formation of a non-lamellar organization in membranes of HeLa cells. We concluded that lateral phase separation and destabilization of membrane lamellar structure without compromising membrane integrity are on the basis of the lipid-driven and receptor-independent mechanism of cell entry of S4(13)-PV peptide. Overall, our results can contribute to a better understanding of the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cell-penetrating peptide membrane translocation, helping in the future design of more efficient cell-penetrating peptide-based drug delivery systems.

  17. Enhanced oral bioavailability of insulin using PLGA nanoparticles co-modified with cell-penetrating peptides and Engrailed secretion peptide (Sec).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siqi; Chen, Shuangxi; Gao, Yuan; Guo, Feng; Li, Fengying; Xie, Baogang; Zhou, Jianliang; Zhong, Haijun

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticle drug carriers are an attractive strategy for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs. However, their ability to cross the intestinal epithelium membrane is largely limited. Therefore, in the present study, cell-penetrating peptides (R8, Tat, penetratin) and a secretion peptide (Sec) with N-terminal stearylation were introduced to modify nanoparticles (NPs) on the surface to improve oral bioavailability of peptide and protein drugs. In vitro studies conducted in Caco-2 cells showed the value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of the nanoparticles co-modified with Sec and penetratin (Sec-Pen-NPs) was about two-times greater than that of the nanoparticles modified with only penetratin (Pen-NPs), while the increase of transcellular transport of nanoparticles modified together with Sec and R8 (Sec-R8-NPs), or Sec and Tat (Sec-Tat-NPs), was not significant compared with nanoparticles modified with only R8 (R8-NPs) or Tat (Tat-NPs). Using insulin as the model drug, in vivo studies performed on rats indicated that compared to Pen-NPs, the relative bioavailability of insulin for Sec-Pen-NPs was 1.71-times increased after ileal segments administration, and stronger hypoglycemic effects was also observed. Therefore, the nanoparticles co-modified with penetratin and Sec could act as attractive carriers for oral delivery of insulin.

  18. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa FN; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  19. The Telomerase-Derived Anticancer Peptide Vaccine GV1001 as an Extracellular Heat Shock Protein-Mediated Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Seo, Eun-Hye; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can facilitate the transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular delivery of macromolecules. GV1001, a peptide derived from a reverse-transcriptase subunit of telomerase (hTERT) and developed as a vaccine against various cancers, reportedly has unexpected CPP properties. Unlike typical CPPs, such as the HIV-1 TAT peptide, GV1001 enabled the cytosolic delivery of macromolecules such as proteins, DNA and siRNA via extracellular heat shock protein 90 (eHSP90) and 70 (eHSP70) complexes. The eHSP-GV1001 interaction may have biological effects in addition to its cytosolic delivery function. GV1001 was originally designed as a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding cancer epitope, but its CPP properties may contribute to its strong anti-cancer immune response relative to other telomerase peptide-based vaccines. Cell signaling via eHSP-GV1001 binding may lead to unexpected biological effects, such as direct anticancer or antiviral effects. In this review, we focus on the CPP effects of GV1001 bound to eHSP90 and eHSP70. PMID:27941629

  20. Effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers on the oral absorption of tripterine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Yuan, Ling; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Cao, Wei; Wu, Qingqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop nanostructured-lipid carriers (NLCs) coated with cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) for improving the oral bioavailability of tripterine. Methods We prepared CPP-coated tripterine-loaded NLCs (CT-NLCs) by using a solvent evaporation method, and determined their physical properties. In vitro drug release was determined by using a dialysis bag diffusion technique, and intestinal toxicity was evaluated by performing MTT assay using Caco-2 cells. In vivo absorption was studied in an in situ rat intestinal perfusion model, and oral bioavailability was examined in beagles. Results The average particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency of the optimized CT-NLCs were 126.7 ± 9.2 nm, 28.7 ± 3.4 mV, and 72.64% ± 1.37%, respectively. The CT-NLCs showed a controlled release profile in vitro and had significantly lower intestinal cytotoxicity than the tripterine solution (P < 0.05). The absorption levels of tripterine from the CT-NLCs in the rat duodenum and jejunum were markedly higher than with tripterine-loaded NLCs without the CPP coating (T-NLCs), and with tripterine solution. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs was greater than that of the T-NLCs and tripterine suspension, and that the time to maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs as well as the T-NLCs, was longer than that of the tripterine suspension. The relative oral bioavailability of the CT-NLCs compared to that of tripterine suspension and T-NLCs were 484.75% and 149.91% respectively. Conclusion The oral bioavailability of tripterine is dramatically increased by CT-NLCs. Therefore, CT-NLCs seem to be a promising carrier for oral delivery of tripterine. PMID:22942642

  1. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  2. Performance of cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymers physically mixed with poorly membrane-permeable molecules on cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Suita, Masaya; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Yoshie; Kataoka, Makoto; Yamashita, Shinji; Nakajima, Noriko; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Hashizume, Akio; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Yuki; Kasai, Atsushi; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2012-05-01

    We are investigating a new class of penetration enhancers that enable poorly membrane-permeable molecules physically mixed with them to effectively penetrate cell membranes without their concomitant cellular uptake. Since we previously revealed that poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) modified with d-octaarginine, which is a typical cell-penetrating peptide, significantly enhanced the nasal absorption of insulin, we examined the performance of the polymers on cell membranes. When Caco-2 cells were incubated with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) for 30 min, approximately 0.1% of applied CF was internalized into the cells. This poor membrane permeability was dramatically enhanced by d-octaarginine-linked polymers; a 25-fold increase in the cellular uptake of CF was observed when the polymer concentration was adjusted to 0.2mg/mL. None of the individual components, for example, d-octaarginine, had any influence on CF uptake, demonstrating that only d-octaarginine anchored chemically to the polymeric platform enhanced the membrane permeation of CF. The polymer-induced CF uptake was consistently high even when the incubation time was extended to 120 min. Confocal laser scanning microphotographs of cells incubated with d-octaarginine-linked polymers bearing rhodamine red demonstrated that the cell outline was stained with red fluorescence. The polymer-induced CF uptake was significantly suppressed by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride, which is an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Results indicated that d-octaarginine-linked polymers remained on the cell membrane and poorly membrane-permeable CF was continuously internalized into cells mainly via macropinocytosis repeated for the individual peptidyl branches in the polymer backbone.

  3. Membrane Surface-Associated Helices Promote Lipid Interactions and Cellular Uptake of Human Calcitonin-Derived Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Herbig, Michael E.; Weller, Kathrin; Krauss, Ulrike; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Merkle, Hans P.; Zerbe, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    hCT(9-32) is a human calcitonin (hCT)-derived cell-penetrating peptide that has been shown to translocate the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. It has been suggested as a cellular carrier for drugs, green fluorescent protein, and plasmid DNA. Because of its temperature-dependent cellular translocation resulting in punctuated cytoplasmatic distribution, its uptake is likely to follow an endocytic pathway. To gain insight into the molecular orientation of hCT(9-32) when interacting with lipid models, and to learn more about its mode of action, various biophysical techniques from liposome partitioning to high-resolution NMR spectroscopy were utilized. Moreover, to establish the role of individual residues for the topology of its association with the lipid membrane, two mutants of hCT(9-32), i.e., W30-hCT(9-32) and A23-hCT(9-32), were also investigated. Although unstructured in aqueous solution, hCT(9-32) adopted two short helical stretches when bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles, extending from Thr10 to Asn17 and from Gln24 to Val29. A23-hCT(9-32), in which the helix-breaking Pro23 was replaced by Ala, displayed a continuous α-helix extending from residue 12 to 26. Probing with the spin label 5-doxylstearate revealed that association with dodecylphosphocholine micelles was such that the helix engaged in parallel orientation to the micelle surface. Moreover, the Gly to Trp exchange in W30-hCT(9-32) resulted in a more stable anchoring of the C-terminal segment close to the interface, as reflected by a twofold increase in the partition coefficient in liposomes. Interestingly, tighter binding to model membranes was associated with an increase in the in vitro uptake in human cervix epithelial andenocarcinoma cell line cells. Liposome leakage studies excluded pore formation, and the punctuated fluorescence pattern of internalized peptide indicated vesicular localization and, in conclusion, strongly suggested an endocytic pathway of translocation. PMID:16183886

  4. Design and mechanism of action of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide from the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.L.; Lan Hongliang; Park, Il-Seon; Kim, Jae Il; Jin, H.Z.; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, S.Y. . E-mail: syshin@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-10-20

    Here, we report the successful design of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide, Pep-1-K (KKTWWKTWWTKWSQPKKKRKV). Pep-1-K was designed by replacing Glu-2, Glu-6, and Glu-11 in the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 with Lys. Pep-1-K showed strong antibacterial activity against reference strains (MIC = 1-2 {mu}M) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as against clinical isolates (MIC = 1-8 {mu}M) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast, Pep-1-K did not cause hemolysis of human erythrocytes even at 200 {mu}M. These results indicate that Pep-1-K may be a good candidate for antimicrobial drug development, especially as a topical agent against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated that the lack of hemolytic activity of Pep-1-K correlated with its weak ability to penetrate zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (10:1, w/w) vesicles, which mimic eukaryotic membranes. Furthermore, Pep-1-K caused little or no dye leakage from negatively charged phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylglycerol (7:3, w/w) vesicles, which mimic bacterial membranes but had a potent ability to cause depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane potential of intact S. aureus cells. These results suggested that Pep-1-K kills microorganisms by not the membrane-disrupting mode but the formation of small channels that permit transit of ions or protons but not molecules as large as calcein.

  5. Antitumor activity of tripterine via cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers in a prostate cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ling; Liu, Congyan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhou, Lei; Qu, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (CT-NLC) on prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods CT-NLC were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of tripterine. The antiproliferative effects of CT-NLC, tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (T-NLC), and free tripterine in a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3) and a mouse prostate carcinoma cell line (RM-1) were evaluated using an MTT assay. The advantage of CT-NLC over T-NLC and free tripterine with regard to antitumor activity in vivo was evaluated in a prostate tumor-bearing mouse model. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the effect of CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine on immune responses. Histologic and TUNEL assays were carried out to investigate the mechanisms of tumor necrosis and apoptosis. Results CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine showed high antiproliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 0.60, 0.81, and 1.02 μg/mL in the PC-3 cell line and 0.41, 0.54, and 0.89 μg/mL in the RM-1 cell line after 36 hours. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rates for cyclophosphamide, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) tripterine, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) T-NLC, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) CT-NLC were 76.51%, 37.07%, 29.53%, 63.56%, 48.25%, 72.68%, and 54.50%, respectively, showing a dose-dependent pattern. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content after treatment with CT-NLC and T-NLC was significantly higher than that of high-dose tripterine. Moreover, CT-NLC showed the expected advantage of inducing necrosis and apoptosis in prostate tumor cells. Conclusion CT-NLC noticeably enhanced antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and showed dramatically improved cytotoxicity in normal cells

  6. Quantification of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Associated with Polymeric Nanoparticles Using Isobaric-Tagging and MALDI-TOF MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jasper Z. S.; Tucker, Ian G.; McDowell, Arlene

    2016-11-01

    High sensitivity quantification of the putative cell-penetrating peptide di-arginine-histidine (RRH) associated with poly (ethyl-cyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanoparticles was achieved without analyte separation, using a novel application of isobaric-tagging and high matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled to time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Isobaric-tagging reaction equilibrium was reached after 5 min, with 90% or greater RRH peptide successfully isobaric-tagged after 60 min. The accuracy was greater than 90%, which indicates good reliability of using isobaric-tagged RRH as an internal standard for RRH quantification. The sample intra- and inter-spot coefficients of variations were less than 11%, which indicate good repeatability. The majority of RRH peptides in the nanoparticle formulation were physically associated with the nanoparticles (46.6%), whereas only a small fraction remained unassociated (13.7%). The unrecovered RRH peptide (~40%) was assumed to be covalently associated with PECA nanoparticles.

  7. Intracellular Toxicity of Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptides Shuttled into Mammalian Cells by the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Penetratin

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne; Schäfer, Ingo; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The health threat caused by multiresistant bacteria has continuously increased and recently peaked with pathogens resistant to all current drugs. This has triggered intense research efforts to develop novel compounds to overcome the resistance mechanisms. Thus, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been intensively studied, especially the family of proline-rich AMPs (PrAMPs) that was successfully tested very recently in murine infection models. PrAMPs enter bacteria and inhibit chaperone DnaK. Here, we studied the toxicity of intracellular PrAMPs in HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells. As PrAMPs cannot enter most mammalian cells, we coupled the PrAMPs with penetratin (residues 43 to 58 in the antennapedia homeodomain) via a C-terminally added cysteine utilizing a thioether bridge. The resulting construct could transport the covalently linked PrAMP into mammalian cells. Penetratin ligation reduced the MIC for Gram-negative Escherichia coli only slightly (1 to 8 μmol/liter) but increased the activity against the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus up to 32-fold (MIC ≈ 1 μmol/liter), most likely due to more effective penetration through the bacterial membrane. In contrast to native PrAMPs, the penetratin-PrAMP constructs entered the mammalian cells, aligned around the nucleus, and associated with the Golgi apparatus. At higher concentrations, the constructs reduced the cell viability (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ≈ 40 μmol/liter) and changed the morphology of the cells. No toxic effects or morphological changes were observed at concentrations of 10 μmol/liter or below. Thus, the IC50 values were around 5 to 40 times higher than the MIC values. In conclusion, PrAMPs are in general not toxic to mammalian cells, as they do not pass through the membrane. When shuttled into mammalian cells, however, PrAMPs are only slightly cross-reactive to mammalian chaperones or other intracellular mammalian proteins, providing a second layer of safety for in vivo applications, even if they

  8. Using the peptide BP100 as a cell-penetrating tool for the chemical engineering of actin filaments within living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Eggenberger, Kai; Mink, Christian; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S; Nick, Peter

    2011-01-03

    The delivery of externally applied macromolecules or nanoparticles into living cells still represents a critically limiting step before the full capabilities of chemical engineering can be explored. Molecular transporters such as cell-penetrating peptides, peptoids, and other mimetics can be used to carry cargo across the cellular membrane, but it is still difficult to find suitable sequences that operate efficiently for any particular type of cell. Here we report that BP100 (KKLFKKILKYL-amide), originally designed as an antimicrobial peptide against plant pathogens, can be employed as a fast and efficient cell-penetrating agent to transport fluorescent test cargoes into the cytosol of walled plant cells. The uptake of BP100 proceeds slightly more slowly than the endocytosis of fluorescent dextranes, but BP100 accumulates more efficiently and to much higher levels (by an order of magnitude). The entry of BP100 can be efficiently blocked by latrunculin B; this suggests that actin filaments are essential to the uptake mechanism. To test whether this novel transporter can also be used to deliver functional cargoes, we designed a fusion construct of BP100 with the actin-binding Lifeact peptide (MGVADLIKKFESISKEE). We demonstrated that the short BP100 could transport the attached 17-residue sequence quickly and efficiently into tobacco cells. The Lifeact construct retained its functionality as it successfully labeled the actin bundles that tether the nucleus in the cell center.

  9. Overcoming drug resistance by cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of a doxorubicin dimer with high DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Freidel, Christoph; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Tabujew, Ilja; Schramm, Alexander; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Müllen, Klaus; Peneva, Kalina

    2017-04-21

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of a novel bioconjugate, consisting of an octaarginine cell-penetrating peptide and a highly DNA-affine doxorubicin dimer. The linkage between the two components is composed of a cleavable disulfide bond, which enables the efficient intracellular delivery of the cytotoxic payload within the reductive environment of the cytosol, mediated through glutathione. To determine the DNA-binding affinity of the dimeric drug molecule, microscale thermophoresis was applied. This is the first utilization of this method to assess the binding interactions of an anthracycline drug with nucleic acids. The cytotoxic effect of the peptide-drug conjugate, studied with drug-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant cancer cells, demonstrates that the bioconjugate can successfully overcome drug resistance in neuroblastoma cells.

  10. Single-Cell Resolution Imaging of Retinal Ganglion Cell Apoptosis In Vivo Using a Cell-Penetrating Caspase-Activatable Peptide Probe

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xudong; Johnson, James R.; Wilson, Bradley S.; Gammon, Seth T.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Barnett, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide probes for imaging retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis consist of a cell-penetrating peptide targeting moiety and a fluorophore-quencher pair flanking an effector caspase consensus sequence. Using ex vivo fluorescence imaging, we previously validated the capacity of these probes to identify apoptotic RGCs in cell culture and in an in vivo rat model of N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurotoxicity. Herein, using TcapQ488, a new probe designed and synthesized for compatibility with clinically-relevant imaging instruments, and real time imaging of a live rat RGC degeneration model, we fully characterized time- and dose-dependent probe activation, signal-to-noise ratios, and probe safety profiles in vivo. Adult rats received intravitreal injections of four NMDA concentrations followed by varying TcapQ488 doses. Fluorescence fundus imaging was performed sequentially in vivo using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and individual RGCs displaying activated probe were counted and analyzed. Rats also underwent electroretinography following intravitreal injection of probe. In vivo fluorescence fundus imaging revealed distinct single-cell probe activation as an indicator of RGC apoptosis induced by intravitreal NMDA injection that corresponded to the identical cells observed in retinal flat mounts of the same eye. Peak activation of probe in vivo was detected 12 hours post probe injection. Detectable fluorescent RGCs increased with increasing NMDA concentration; sensitivity of detection generally increased with increasing TcapQ488 dose until saturating at 0.387 nmol. Electroretinography following intravitreal injections of TcapQ488 showed no significant difference compared with control injections. We optimized the signal-to-noise ratio of a caspase-activatable cell penetrating peptide probe for quantitative non-invasive detection of RGC apoptosis in vivo. Full characterization of probe performance in this setting creates an important in vivo imaging

  11. Enhancing siRNA-based cancer therapy using a new pH-responsive activatable cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomal system

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bai; Jia, Xue-Li; Qi, Jin-Long; Yang, Li-Ping; Sun, Wei-Hong; Yan, Xiao; Yang, Shao-Kun; Cao, De-Ying; Du, Qing; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-01-01

    As a potent therapeutic agent, small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been exploited to silence critical genes involved in tumor initiation and progression. However, development of a desirable delivery system is required to overcome the unfavorable properties of siRNA such as its high degradability, molecular size, and negative charge to help increase its accumulation in tumor tissues and promote efficient cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of the nucleic acids. In this study, we developed a new activatable cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) that is responsive to an acidic tumor microenvironment, which was then used to modify the surfaces of siRNA-loaded liposomes. The ACPP is composed of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), an acid-labile linker (hydrazone), and a polyanionic domain, including glutamic acid and histidine. In the systemic circulation (pH 7.4), the surface polycationic moieties of the CPP (polyarginine) are “shielded” by the intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the inhibitory domain. When exposed to a lower pH, a common property of solid tumors, the ACPP undergoes acid-catalyzed breakage at the hydrazone site, and the consequent protonation of histidine residues promotes detachment of the inhibitory peptide. Subsequently, the unshielded CPP would facilitate the cellular membrane penetration and efficient endosomal/lysosomal evasion of liposomal siRNA. A series of investigations demonstrated that once exposed to an acidic pH, the ACPP-modified liposomes showed elevated cellular uptake, downregulated expression of polo-like kinase 1, and augmented cell apoptosis. In addition, favorable siRNA avoidance of the endosome/lysosome was observed in both MCF-7 and A549 cells, followed by effective cytoplasmic release. In view of its acid sensitivity and therapeutic potency, this newly developed pH-responsive and ACPP-mediated liposome system represents a potential platform for siRNA-based cancer treatment.

  12. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Chung, Chong-Pyoung

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  13. The single GUV method for revealing the functions of antimicrobial, pore-forming toxin, and cell-penetrating peptides or proteins.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Zahidul; Alam, Jahangir Md; Tamba, Yukihiro; Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2014-08-14

    We recently developed the single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) method for investigating the functions and dynamics of biomembranes. The single GUV method can provide detailed information on the elementary processes of physiological phenomena in biomembranes, such as their rate constants. Here we describe the process of pore formation induced by the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), magainin 2, and the pore-forming toxin (PFT), lysenin, as revealed by the single GUV method. We obtained the rate constants of several elementary steps, such as peptide/protein-induced pore formation in lipid membranes and the membrane permeation of fluorescent probes through the pores. Information on the entry of the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), transportan 10 (TP10), into a single GUV and its induced pore formation in lipid membranes was also obtained. We compare the single GUV method with other methods for investigating the interaction of peptides/proteins with lipid membranes (i.e., the large unilamellar vesicle (LUV) suspension method, the GUV suspension method, and single channel recording), and discuss the pros and cons of the single GUV method. On the basis of these data, we discuss the advantages of the single GUV method.

  14. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Mechanisms of cell penetration and cytotoxicity of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles conjugated to doxorubicin and/or targeting peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    The goals of this work were to determine whether conjugation of any of four selected peptides to Au nanoparticles improved their delivery to B16 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, peptides and conjugates were endocytosed but did not escape from endosomes. None of the peptides showed any cytotoxicity, with or without conjugation to the nanoparticles. The combination of peptides and doxorubicin did not improve upon the cytotoxicity of gold-doxorubicin alone. We then tested targeting in vivo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentration of Au in the organs of B16 tumor-bearing mice 4, 24, and 72 h after intravenous Au nanoparticle injection. These experiments showed that in some cases, peptide conjugation improved upon the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A peptide based upon the myxoma virus and the cyclic RGD peptide were both effective at tumor targeting; myxoma was more effective with un-PEGylated particles, and cRGD with PEGylated particles. The FREG and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) peptides did not improve targeting. These results suggest that these peptides may improve delivery of Au particles to tumors, but also may prevent entry of particles into cell nuclei.

  16. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  17. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream signaling with cell-penetrating peptides in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Wilson, Jamie L; Taylor, Linda; Rahimi, Nader; Mierke, Dale; Polgar, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) intracellular delivery of receptor signaling motifs provides an opportunity to regulate specific receptor tyrosine kinase signal transductions. We targeted tyrosine residues Y740 and Y751 of the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) and Y1175 of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The Y740 and Y751 motifs activated ERK and Akt, while the Y1175 motif activated ERK. Targeting either Y740 or Y751 of the PDGFRβ in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) effectively inhibited PDGF activation of ERK or Akt. Interfering with the Y751 region of the PDGFRβ proved more effective than targeting the Y740 region. The phosphorylation of Y751 of the CPP and the length and exact sequence of the mimicking peptide proved crucial. On the other hand, in human pulmonary artery endothelial cell phosphorylation of the VEGFR2 Y1175 CPP was not a determinant in blockage of ERK activation. Likewise, the length of the peptide mimic was not crucial with a very small sequence containing the Y1175 remaining effective. Physiologic proof of concept for the effectiveness of the CPP was confirmed by blockage of HPASMC migration in response to PDGF following culture injury. Thus targeted blockage of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling can be very effective.

  18. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  19. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification.

    PubMed

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-14

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.10(8) for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  20. Imperatoxin A, a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Scorpion Venom, as a Probe of Ca2+-Release Channels/Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gurrola, Georgina B.; Capes, E. Michelle; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Possani, Lourival D.; Valdivia, Héctor H.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms are rich in ion channel-modifying peptides, which have proven to be invaluable probes of ion channel structure-function relationship. We previously isolated imperatoxin A (IpTxa), a 3.7 kDa peptide activator of Ca2+-release channels/ryanodine receptors (RyRs) [1,2,3] and founding member of the calcin family of scorpion peptides. IpTxa folds into a compact, mostly hydrophobic molecule with a cluster of positively-charged, basic residues polarized on one side of the molecule that possibly interacts with the phospholipids of cell membranes. To investigate whether IpTxa permeates external cellular membranes and targets RyRs in vivo, we perfused IpTxa on intact cardiomyocytes while recording field-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ transients. To further investigate the cell-penetrating capabilities of the toxin, we prepared thiolated, fluorescent derivatives of IpTxa. Biological activity and spectroscopic properties indicate that these derivatives retain high affinity for RyRs and are only 5- to 10-fold less active than native IpTxa. Our results demonstrate that IpTxa is capable of crossing cell membranes to alter the release of Ca2+ in vivo, and has the capacity to carry a large, membrane-impermeable cargo across the plasma membrane, a finding with exciting implications for novel drug delivery. PMID:20668646

  1. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    PubMed Central

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells. PMID:27841303

  2. Enlarging the scope of cell penetrating prenylated peptides to include farnesylated “CAAX” box sequences and diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Igbavboa, Urule; Wood, W. Gibson; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that is present in a large number of proteins; it has been proposed to be responsible for membrane association and protein-protein interactions which contribute to its role in signal transduction pathways. Research has been aimed at inhibiting prenylation with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) based on the finding that the farnesylated protein Ras is implicated in 30% of human cancers. Despite numerous studies on the enzymology of prenylation in vitro, many questions remain about the process of prenylation as it occurs in living cells. Here we describe the preparation of a series of farnesylated peptides that contain sequences recognized by protein farnesyltransferase. Using a combination of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we show that these peptides enter a variety of different cell types. A related peptide where the farnesyl group has been replaced by a disulfide-linked decyl group is also shown to be able to efficiently enter cells. These results highlight the applicability of these peptides as a platform for further study of protein prenylation and subsequent processing in live cells. PMID:20584014

  3. Visualization and Quantitative Assessment of the Brain Distribution of Insulin through Nose-to-Brain Delivery Based on the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Noncovalent Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Kanayama, Yousuke; Tanaka, Misa; Zochi, Riyo; Hasegawa, Koki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-03-07

    Our recent work suggested that intranasal coadministration with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin increased the brain distribution of the peptide drug insulin. The present study aimed to distinctly certify the ability of penetratin to facilitate the nose-to-brain delivery of insulin by quantitatively evaluating the distribution characteristics in brain using radioactive (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin. Autoradiography and analysis using a gamma counter of brain areas demonstrated that the accumulation of radioactivity was greatest in the olfactory bulb, the anterior part of the brain closest to the administration site, at 15 min after intranasal administration of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with l- or d-penetratin. The brain accumulation of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with penetratin was confirmed by ELISA using unlabeled insulin in which intact insulin was delivered to the brain after intranasal coadministration with l- or d-penetratin. By contrast, quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples showed increased insulin concentration in only the anterior portion of the CSF at 15 min after intranasal coadministration with l-penetratin. This study gives the first concrete proof that penetratin can accelerate the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity to the brain parenchyma. Further optimization of intranasal administration with CPP may increase the efficacy of delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain while reducing the risk of systemic drug exposure.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and applications of carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolated bifunctionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots in cellular internalization mediated by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Winiarz, Jeffrey G; Moon, Jong-Sik; Lo, Shih-Yen; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots (QDs), are widely used in biomedical imaging studies and pharmaceutical research. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of small peptides that are able to traverse cell membrane and deliver a variety of cargoes into living cells. CPPs deliver QDs into cells with minimal nonspecific absorption and toxic effect. In this study, water-soluble, monodisperse, carboxyl-functionalized indium phosphide (InP)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) QDs coated with polyethylene glycol lipids (designated QInP) were synthesized for the first time. The physicochemical properties (optical absorption, fluorescence and charging state) and cellular internalization of QInP and CPP/QInP complexes were characterized. CPPs noncovalently interact with QInP in vitro to form stable CPP/QInP complexes, which can then efficiently deliver QInP into human A549 cells. The introduction of 500nM of CPP/QInP complexes and QInP at concentrations of less than 1μM did not reduce cell viability. These results indicate that carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolylated (PEGylated) bifunctionalized QInP are biocompatible nanoparticles with potential for use in biomedical imaging studies and drug delivery applications.

  5. Identification of a Short Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Bovine Lactoferricin for Intracellular Delivery of DNA in Human A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to deliver cargos, including protein, DNA, RNA, and nanomaterials, in fully active forms into live cells. Most of the CPP sequences in use today are based on non-native proteins that may be immunogenic. Here we demonstrate that the L5a CPP (RRWQW) from bovine lactoferricin (LFcin), stably and noncovalently complexed with plasmid DNA and prepared at an optimal nitrogen/phosphate ratio of 12, is able to efficiently enter into human lung cancer A549 cells. The L5a CPP delivered a plasmid containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence that was subsequently expressed in cells, as revealed by real-time PCR and fluorescent microscopy at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Treatment with calcium chloride increased the level of gene expression, without affecting CPP-mediated transfection efficiency. Zeta-potential analysis revealed that positively electrostatic interactions of CPP/DNA complexes correlated with CPP-mediated transport. The L5a and L5a/DNA complexes were not cytotoxic. This biomimetic LFcin L5a represents one of the shortest effective CPPs and could be a promising lead peptide with less immunogenic for DNA delivery in gene therapy.

  6. Determination of the optimal cell-penetrating peptide sequence for intestinal insulin delivery based on molecular orbital analysis with self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Kikuchi, Shingo; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Terasawa, Yoshiaki; Yasuda, Akihito; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Ida, Nobuo; Nishio, Reiji; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Our recent work has shown that the intestinal absorption of insulin can be improved significantly by coadministration of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), especially penetratin. However, a relatively high dose of penetratin is required to adequately stimulate the intestinal absorption of insulin. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the CPP that most effectively enhanced intestinal insulin absorption. An in situ loop absorption study using 26 penetratin analogues suggested that the chain length, hydrophobicity, and amphipathicity of the CPPs, as well as their basicity, contribute to their absorption-enhancing efficiency. Moreover, a molecular orbital method with self-organizing maps (SOMs) classification suggested that multiple factors, including the molecular weight, basicity, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, absolute hardness, and chemical potential of CPPs, are associated with their effects on intestinal insulin absorption. Furthermore, the new CPPs proposed by SOM clustering had a marked capacity to interact with insulin, and their ability to enhance insulin absorption was much stronger than that of the original penetratin. Therefore, the peptide sequence that optimally enhances intestinal insulin absorption could be defined by SOM with the molecular orbital method, and our present work emphasizes the utility of such methodologies in the development of effective drug delivery systems.

  7. Electrochemical investigation of cellular uptake of quantum dots decorated with a proline-rich cell penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Marín, Sergio; Pujals, Sílvia; Giralt, Ernest; Merkoçi, Arben

    2011-02-16

    The use of square wave voltammetry to monitor the cellular uptake, in HeLa cells, of quantum dots (QD) decorated with sweet arrow peptide (SAP) is reported. A SAP derivative containing an additional N-terminal cysteine residue (C-SAP) was synthesized using the solid-phase method and conjugated to QDs. The obtained results show that QDs-SAP either interact with the extracellular cell membrane matrix or translocate the bilayer. The first situation, membrane adsorption, is probably a transient state before cellular uptake. Both confocal microscopy and SWV results support the detection of this cellular internalization process. The developed electrochemical investigation technique can provide valuable insights into the study of peptide-mediated delivery, as well as the design and development of nanoparticle probes for intracellular imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. In addition, the described electrochemical interrogation is low cost, is easy to use, and offers future interest for diagnostics including cell analysis.

  8. Targeting heat shock proteins on cancer cells: selection, characterization, and cell-penetrating properties of a peptidic GRP78 ligand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Lillo, Antonietta M; Steiniger, Sebastian C J; Liu, Ying; Ballatore, Carlo; Anichini, Andrea; Mortarini, Roberta; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Zhou, Bin; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Janda, Kim D

    2006-08-08

    Peptidic ligands can be used for specific cell targeting and the delivery of payloads into the target cell. Here we describe the screening of a pool of cyclic peptide phage display libraries using whole-cell panning against human melanoma cell line Me6652/4. This strategy resulted in the selection of the cyclic 13-mer Pep42, CTVALPGGYVRVC, which showed preferential internalization into melanoma cell line Me6652/4 versus the reference cell line Me6652/56. This translocation is a receptor-mediated process that does not require electrostatic interactions nor does it involve transfer to the lysosomal compartment. The cellular receptor for Pep42 was identified as the surface membrane form of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a member of the heat shock protein family and a marker on malignant cancer cells. The cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of Pep42-Quantum Dot conjugates was monitored by confocal laser microscopy, and colocalization within the endoplasmic reticulum was observed. The uptake of Pep42 could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody against the identified receptor. Furthermore, Pep42 was shown to target specifically GRP78-expressing cancer cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of a Pep42-Taxol conjugate was evaluated by flow cytometry wherein the conjugate was shown to induce apoptosis and was more effective in promoting programmed cell death in Me6652/4 cells. In summary, the data presented suggest that cyclic peptide Pep42 might be a powerful tool in the construction of drug conjugates designed to selectively kill malignant cancer cells.

  9. Delivery of siRNA to the brain using a combination of nose-to-brain delivery and cell-penetrating peptide-modified nano-micelles.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, T; Akiyama, F; Kakizaki, S; Takashima, Y; Seta, Y

    2013-12-01

    The potential for RNA-based agents to serve as effective therapeutics for central nerve systems (CNS) disorders has been successfully demonstrated in vitro. However, the blood-brain barrier limits the distribution of systemically administered therapeutics to the CNS, posing a major challenge for drug development aimed at combatting CNS disorders. Therefore, the development of effective strategies to enhance siRNA delivery to the brain is of great interest in clinical and pharmaceutical fields. To improve the efficiency of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the brain, we developed a nose-to-brain delivery system combined with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) modified nano-micelles comprising polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (PEG-PCL) copolymers conjugated with the CPP, Tat (MPEG-PCL-Tat). In this study, we describe intranasal brain delivery of siRNA or dextran (Mw: 10,000 Da) as a model siRNA, by using MPEG-PCL-Tat. Intranasal delivery of dextran with MPEG-PCL-Tat improved brain delivery compared to intravenous delivery of dextran either with or without MPEG-PCL-Tat. We also studied the intranasal transfer of MPEG-PCL-Tat to the brain via the olfactory and trigeminal nerves, the putative pathways to the brain from the nasal cavity. We found that MPEG-PCL-Tat accelerated transport along the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathway because of its high permeation across the nasal mucosa.

  10. Attachment of cell-binding ligands to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides enables cytosolic translocation of complexed siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Skye; Choi, Changseon; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Ban, Hongseok; Siefert, Alyssa; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Mothes, Walther; Lee, Sang Kyung; Kumar, Priti

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) like nona-arginine (9R) poorly translocate siRNA into cells. Our studies demonstrate that attaching 9R to ligands that bind cell-surface receptors quantitatively increases siRNA uptake and importantly, allows functional delivery of complexed siRNA. The mechanism involved accumulation of ligand-9R:siRNA microparticles on the cell membrane, which induced transient membrane inversion at the site of ligand-9R binding and rapid siRNA translocation into the cytoplasm. siRNA release also occurred late after endocytosis when the ligand was attached to the L isoform of 9R, but not the protease-resistant 9DR, prolonging mRNA knockdown. This critically depended on endosomal proteolytic activity implying partial CPP degradation is required for endosome to cytosol translocation. The data demonstrate that ligand attachment renders simple polycationic CPPs effective for siRNA delivery by restoring their intrinsic property of translocation. PMID:25544044

  11. Novel Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Based Vaccine Induces Robust CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Derouazi, Madiha; Di Berardino-Besson, Wilma; Belnoue, Elodie; Hoepner, Sabine; Walther, Romy; Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Teta, Patrick; Dufour, Yannick; Yacoub Maroun, Céline; Salazar, Andres M; Martinvalet, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Walker, Paul R

    2015-08-01

    Vaccines that can coordinately induce multi-epitope T cell-mediated immunity, T helper functions, and immunologic memory may offer effective tools for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we report the development of a new class of recombinant protein cancer vaccines that deliver different CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell epitopes presented by MHC class I and class II alleles, respectively. In these vaccines, the recombinant protein is fused with Z12, a novel cell-penetrating peptide that promotes efficient protein loading into the antigen-processing machinery of dendritic cells. Z12 elicited an integrated and multi-epitopic immune response with persistent effector T cells. Therapy with Z12-formulated vaccines prolonged survival in three robust tumor models, with the longest survival in an orthotopic model of aggressive brain cancer. Analysis of the tumor sites showed antigen-specific T-cell accumulation with favorable modulation of the balance of the immune infiltrate. Taken together, the results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of Z12-formulated vaccines as a versatile platform for the development of effective cancer vaccines.

  12. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, James E.; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E.; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J.; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  13. A pH-responsive cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomes with active recognizing of integrin αvβ3 for the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kairong; Li, Jianping; Cao, Zhonglian; Yang, Ping; Qiu, Yue; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yang; Long, Yang; Liu, Yayuan; Zhang, Qianyu; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gao, Huile; He, Qin

    2015-11-10

    The use of pH-responsive cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is an attractive strategy for drug delivery in vivo, however, they still could not actively target to the desired sites. Here, we designed a pH-responsive CPP (TR) with the ability of active targeting to integrin αvβ3, which was a tandem peptide consisted of active targeting ligand peptide (c(RGDfK)) and pH-responsive CPP (TH). The targeting efficiency of TR with integrin was evaluated by molecular simulation and docking studies. The affinity assays of TR peptide modified liposomes (TR-Lip) at pH7.4 and pH6.5 demonstrated adequately the pH-responsive binding efficacy of TR-Lip with integrin αvβ3. The cellular uptake of CFPE-labeled TR-Lip on integrin αvβ3-overexpressing B16F10 cells was 41.67-, 30.67-, and 11.90-fold higher than that of CFPE-labeled PEG-, RGD-, and TH-modified liposomes at pH6.5, respectively, suggesting that TR-Lip could not only actively target to αvβ3-overexpressing cells compared to TH-Lip, but also significantly increased cellular uptake compared to RGD-Lip. At the concentration of 20μg/mL paclitaxel (PTX), the killing activity of PTX-loaded TR-Lip (PTX-TR-Lip) against B16F10 cells was 1.80-, 1.45-, 1.30-, 1.15-time higher than that of PTX-loaded PEG-, RGD-, TH-modified liposomes and free PTX at pH6.5, respectively. In vivo imaging displayed the maximum accumulation of DiD-labeled TR-Lip at tumor sites compared to the other groups. Tumor inhibition rate of B16F10 tumor-bearing mice treated with PTX-TR-Lip was 85.04%, relative to that of PBS. In B16F10 tumor-bearing mice, PTX-TR-Lip showed significantly higher survival rate compared with the other groups. Collectively, all the results in vitro and in vivo suggested that TR-Lip would be a potential delivery system for PTX to treat integrin αvβ3-overexpressing tumor-bearing mice.

  14. siRNA-cell-penetrating peptides complexes as a combinatorial therapy against chronic myeloid leukemia using BV173 cell line as model.

    PubMed

    Freire, João Miguel; Rego de Figueiredo, Inês; Valle, Javier; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David; Enguita, Francisco J; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2017-01-10

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by a single gene mutation, a reciprocal translocation that originates the Bcr-Abl gene with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. As a monogenic disease, it is an optimum target for RNA silencing therapy. We developed a siRNA-based therapeutic approach in which the siRNA is delivered by pepM or pepR, two cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) derived from the dengue virus capsid protein. These peptides have a dual role: siRNA delivery into cells and direct action as bioportides, i.e. intracellularly bioactive CPPs, targetting cancer-related signaling processes. Both pepM and pepR penetrate the positive Bcr-Abl(+) Cell Line (BV173). Five in silico designed anti-Bcr-Abl siRNA were selected for in vitro analysis after thorough screening. The Bcr-Abl downregulation kinetics (48h to 168h) was followed by quantitative PCR. The bioportide action of the peptide vectors was evaluated by genome-wide microarray analysis and further validated by testing BV173 cell cycle and cell proliferation monitoring different genes involved in housekeeping/cell stress (RPL13A, HPRT1), cell proliferation (ki67), cell apoptosis (Caspase 3 and Caspase 9) and cell cycle steps (CDK2, CCDN2, CDKN1A). Assays with a commercial transfection agent were carried out for comparison purposes. Maximal Bcr-Abl gene knockdown was observed for one of the siRNA when delivered by pepM at 120h. Both pepM and pepR showed downregulation effects on proliferative CML-related signaling pathways having direct impact on BV173 cell cycle and proliferation, thus reinforcing the siRNA effect by acting as anticancer molecules. With this work we show the therapeutic potential of a CPP shuttle that combines intrinsic anticancer properties with the ability to deliver functional siRNA into CML cell models. By such combination, the pepM-siRNA conjugates lowered Bcr-Abl gene expression levels more extensively than conventional siRNA delivery technologies and

  15. Transfection of infectious RNA and DNA/RNA layered vectors of semliki forest virus by the cell-penetrating peptide based reagent PepFect6.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Kalle; Viru, Liane; Lehto, Taavi; Oskolkov, Nikita; Langel, Ülo; Merits, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors have a wide variety of applications ranging from fundamental studies of viruses to therapeutics. Recombinant viral vectors are usually constructed using methods of reverse genetics to obtain the genetic material of the viral vector. The physicochemical properties of DNA and RNA make them unable to access cells by themselves, and they require assistance to achieve intracellular delivery. Non-viral delivery vectors can be used for this purpose if they enable efficient intracellular delivery without interfering with the viral life cycle. In this report, we utilize Semliki Forest virus (genus alphavirus) based RNA and DNA vectors to study the transfection efficiency of the non-viral cell-penetrating peptide-based delivery vector PepFect6 in comparison with that of the cationic liposome-based Lipofectamine 2000, and assess their impact on viral replication. The optimal conditions for transfection were determined for both reagents. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of PepFect6 to transport large (13-19 kbp) constructs across the cell membrane. Curiously, DNA molecules delivered using the PepFect6 reagent were found to be transported to the cell nucleus approximately 1.5 hours later than DNA molecules delivered using the Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. Finally, although both PepFect6 and Lipofectamine 2000 reagents can be used for alphavirus research, PepFect6 is preferred because it does not induce changes in the normal cellular phenotype and it does not affect the normal replication-infection cycle of viruses in previously transfected cells.

  16. Blocking hepatic metastases of colon cancer cells using an shRNA against Rac1 delivered by activatable cell-penetrating peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongliang; Feng, Wenming; Sun, Xinrong; Tang, Chengwu; Wang, Xiang; Shen, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic metastasis is one of the critical progressions of colon cancer. Blocking this process is key to prolonging survival time in cancer patients. Studies on activatable cell-penetrating peptides (dtACPPs) have demonstrated their potential as gene carriers. It showed high tumor cell-targeting specificity and transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity in the in vitro settings of drug delivery. However, using this system to silence target genes to inhibit metastasis in colorectal cancer cells has not been widely reported and requires further investigation. In this study, we observed that expression of Rac1, a key molecule for cytoskeletal reorganization, was higher in hepatic metastatic tumor tissue compared with prime colon cancer tissue and that patients with high Rac1-expressing colon cancer showed shorter survival time. Base on these findings, we created dtACPP-PEG-DGL (dtACPPD)/shRac1 nanoparticles and demonstrated that they downregulated Rac1 expression in colon cancer cells. Moreover, we observed inhibitory effects on migration, invasion and adhesion in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells in vitro, and our results showed that Rac1 regulated colon cancer cell matrix adhesion through the regulation of cytofilament dynamics. Moreover, mechanically, repression of Rac1 inhibiting cells migration and invasion by enhancing cell to cell adhesion and reducing cell to extracellular matrix adhesion. Furthermore, when atCDPPD/shRac1 nanoparticles were administered intravenously to a HCT116 xenograft model, significant tumor metastasis to the liver was inhibited. Our results suggest that atCDPP/shRac1 nanoparticles may enable the blockade of hepatic metastasis in colon cancer. PMID:27791203

  17. Selective Intracellular Delivery of Recombinant Arginine Deiminase (ADI) Using pH-Sensitive Cell Penetrating Peptides To Overcome ADI Resistance in Hypoxic Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzyy-Harn; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Szu-Ying; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Ann, David K; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-04

    Arginine depletion strategies, such as pegylated recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), offer a promising anticancer treatment. Many tumor cells have suppressed expression of a key enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), which converts citrulline to arginine. These tumor cells become arginine auxotrophic, as they can no longer synthesize endogenous arginine intracellularly from citrulline, and are therefore sensitive to arginine depletion therapy. However, since ADI-PEG20 only depletes extracellular arginine due to low internalization, ASS1-expressing cells are not susceptible to treatment since they can synthesize arginine intracellularly. Recent studies have found that several factors influence ASS1 expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hypoxia, frequently encountered in many solid tumors, on ASS1 expression and its relationship to ADI-resistance in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231 cells developed ADI resistance in hypoxic conditions with increased ASS1 expression. To restore ADI sensitivity as well as achieve tumor-selective delivery under hypoxia, we constructed a pH-sensitive cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-based delivery system to carry ADI inside cells to deplete both intra- and extracellular arginine. The delivery system was designed to activate the CPP-mediated internalization only at the mildly acidic pH (6.5-7) associated with the microenvironment of hypoxic tumors, thus achieving better selectivity toward tumor cells. The pH sensitivity of the CPP HBHAc was controlled by recombinant fusion to a histidine-glutamine (HE) oligopeptide, generating HBHAc-HE-ADI. The tumor distribution of HBHAc-HE-ADI was comparable to ADI-PEG20 in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer cells in vivo. In addition, HBHAc-HE-ADI showed increased in vitro cellular uptake in cells incubated in a mildly acidic pH (hypoxic conditions) compared to normal pH (normoxic conditions), which correlated with p

  18. Membrane adsorption and binding, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone: effects of hydrogen bonding and α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaona; Yang, Mingjun; Kasimova, Marina R; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Jorgensen, Lene; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2012-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a promising approach for enhancing intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomacromolecules by increasing transport through membrane barriers. Here, proteolytically stable cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone were studied to evaluate the effect of α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues and the presence of guanidinium groups in the α-amino acid residues on membrane interaction. The molecular properties of the peptidomimetics in solution (surface and intramolecular hydrogen bonding, aqueous diffusion rate and molecular size) were studied along with their adsorption to lipid bilayers, cellular uptake, and toxicity. The surface hydrogen bonding ability of the peptidomimetics reflected their adsorbed amounts onto lipid bilayers as well as with their cellular uptake, indicating the importance of hydrogen bonding for their membrane interaction and cellular uptake. Ellipsometry studies further demonstrated that the presence of chiral centers in the β-peptoid residues promotes a higher adsorption to anionic lipid bilayers, whereas circular dichroism results showed that α-chirality influences their overall mean residue ellipticity. The presence of guanidinium groups and α-chiral β-peptoid residues was also found to have a significant positive effect on uptake in living cells. Together, the findings provide an improved understanding on the behavior of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics in the presence of lipid bilayers and live cells.

  19. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  20. Tumor Detection at 3 Tesla with an Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide Dendrimer (ACPPD-Gd), a T1 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Molecular Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Christopher D.; Olson, Emilia S.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Jiang, Tao; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect small malignant lesions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited by inadequate accumulations of Gd with standard chelate agents. To date, no T1-targeted agents have proven superiority to Gd chelates in their ability to detect small tumors at clinically relevant field strengths. Activatable cell-penetrating peptides and their Gd-loaded dendrimeric form (ACPPD-Gd) have been shown to selectively accumulate in tumors. In this study we compared the performance of ACPPD-Gd vs. untargeted Gd chelates to detect small tumors in rodent models using a clinical 3T-MR system. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional-Animal Care-and-Use Committee. 2 of 4 inguinal breast fat pads of 16 albino-C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with tumor Py8119 cells and the other 2 with saline at random. MRI at 3T was performed at 4, 9, and 14 days after inoculation on 8 mice 24-hours after injection of 0.036mmol Gd/kg (ACPPD-Gd), and before and 2–3 minutes after 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol on the other 8 mice. T1-weighted (T1w) tumor signal normalized to muscle, was compared among the non-contrast, gadobutrol, and ACPPD-Gd groups using ANOVA. Experienced and trainee readers blinded to experimental conditions assessed for the presence of tumor in each of the 4 breast regions. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and area-under-curve (AUC) values were constructed and analyzed. Results Tumors ≥1mm3 were iso-intense to muscle without contrast on T1w sequences. They enhanced diffusely and homogeneously by 57±20% (p<0.001) 24 hours after ACPPD-Gd and by 25±13% (p<0.001) immediately after gadobutrol. The nearly 2-fold difference was similar for small tumors (1-5mm3) (45±19% vs. 19±18%, p = 0.03). ACPPD-Gd tended to improve tumor detection by an experienced reader (AUC 0.98 vs 0.91) and significantly more for a trainee (0.93 vs. 0.82, p = 0.02) compared to gadobutrol. This improvement was more pronounced when obvious tumors (>5mm3

  1. Membrane damage as first and DNA as the secondary target for anti-candidal activity of antimicrobial peptide P7 derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Song, Fengxia; Sun, Jin; Tian, Xu; Xia, Shufang; Le, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    P7, a peptide analogue derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20, possesses antibacterial and antitumor activities without significant hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated the antifungal effect of P7 and its anti-Candida acting mode in Candida albicans. P7 displayed antifungal activity against the reference C. albicans (MIC = 4 μM), Aspergilla niger (MIC = 32 μM), Aspergillus flavus (MIC = 8 μM), and Trichopyton rubrum (MIC = 16 μM). The effect of P7 on the C. albicans cell membrane was examined by investigating the calcein leakage from fungal membrane models made of egg yolk l-phosphatidylcholine/ergosterol (10 : 1, w/w) liposomes. P7 showed potent leakage effects against fungal liposomes similar to Melittin-treated cells. C. albicans protoplast regeneration assay demonstrated that P7 interacted with the C. albicans plasma membrane. Flow cytometry of the plasma membrane potential and integrity of C. albicans showed that P7 caused 60.9 ± 1.8% depolarization of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells and caused 58.1 ± 3.2% C. albicans cell membrane damage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that part of FITC-P7 accumulated in the cytoplasm. DNA retardation analysis was also performed, which showed that P7 interacted with C. albicans genomic DNA after penetrating the cell membrane, completely inhibiting the migration of genomic DNA above the weight ratio (peptide : DNA) of 6. Our results indicated that the plasma membrane was the primary target, and DNA was the secondary intracellular target of the mode of action of P7 against C. albicans. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Superior cell penetration by a rigid and anisotropic synthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Osada, Yoshihito; Sano, Ken-Ichi

    2015-03-10

    Molecules with structural anisotropy and rigidity, such as asbestos, demonstrate high cell-penetrating activity but also high toxicity. Here we synthesize a biodegradable, rigid, and fibrous artificial protein, CCPC 140, as a potential vehicle for cellular delivery. CCPC 140 penetrated 100% of cells tested in vitro, even at a concentration of 3.1 nM-superior to previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. The effects of cell-strain-dependency and aspect ratio on the cell-penetrating activity of CCPC 140 were also investigated.

  3. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood–Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s). PMID:27916828

  4. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood-Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-11-29

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s).

  5. Effect of inserted spacer in hepatic cell-penetrating multifunctional peptide component on the DNA intracellular delivery of quaternary complexes based on modular design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luchen; Li, Zhenbo; Sun, Fangli; Xu, Yuhong; Du, Zixiu

    2016-01-01

    A safe and efficient quaternary gene delivery system (named Q-complexes) was constructed based on self-assembly of molecules through noncovalent bonds. This system was formulated through the cooperation and competing interactions of cationic liposomes, multifunctional peptides, and DNA, followed by coating hyaluronic acid on the surface of the ternary complexes. The multifunctional peptide was composed of two functional domains: penetrating hepatic tumor-targeted cell moiety (KRPTMRFRYTWNPMK) and a wrapping gene sequence (polyarginine 16). The effect of spacer insertion between the two domains of multifunctional peptide on the intracellular transfection of Q-complexes was further studied. Experimental results showed that the formulations assembled with various peptides in the spacer elements possessed different intercellular pathways and transfection efficiencies. The Q-complexes containing peptide in the absence of spacer element (Pa) showed the highest gene expression among all samples. The Q-complexes containing peptides with a noncleavable spacer GA (Pc) had no ability of intracellular nucleic acid delivery, whereas those with a cleavable spacer RVRR (Pd) showed moderate transfection activity. These results demonstrated that the different spacers inserted in the multifunctional peptide played an important role in in vitro DNA transfection efficiency. Atomic force microscopy images showed that the morphologies of ternary complexes (LPcD) and Q-complexes (HLcPD) were crystal lamellas, whereas those of other nanocomplexes were spheres. Circular dichroism showed the changed configuration of peptide with spacer GA in nanocomplexes compared with that of its free state, whereas the Pa configuration without spacer in nanocomplexes was consistent with that of its free state. The present study contributed to the structural understanding of Q-complexes, and further effective modification is in progress. PMID:27920533

  6. PEGylation of the peptide Bac7(1-35) reduces renal clearance while retaining antibacterial activity and bacterial cell penetration capacity.

    PubMed

    Benincasa, Monica; Zahariev, Sotir; Pelillo, Chiara; Milan, Annalisa; Gennaro, Renato; Scocchi, Marco

    2015-05-05

    The proline-rich antibacterial peptide Bac7(1-35) protects mice against Salmonella typhimurium infection, despite its rapid clearance. To overcome this problem the peptide was linked to a polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule either via a cleavable ester bond or via a non-hydrolysable amide bond. Both the PEGylated conjugates retained most of the in vitro activity against S. typhimurium. In addition, the ester bond was cleaved in human serum or plasma, releasing a carboxymethyl derivative of Bac7(1-35) which accounts for a higher activity of this peptide with relative to the other, non-hydrolysable form. Both PEGylated peptides maintained the capacity of the unconjugated form to kill bacteria without permeabilizing the bacterial membranes, by penetrating into cells. They exploited the same transporter as unmodified Bac7(1-35), suggesting it has the capacity to internalize quite sizeable cargo if this is linked to Bac7 fragment. PEGylation allows the peptide to have a wide distribution in mice, and a slow renal clearance, indicating that this strategy would improve the bioavailability of Bac7, and in principle of other antimicrobial peptides. This can be an equally important issue to reducing cytotoxicity for therapeutic use of these antibacterials.

  7. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery.

  8. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen’s egg test–chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery. PMID:25670897

  9. Intranasal delivery of cell-penetrating anti-NF-κB peptides (Tat-NBD) alleviates infection-sensitized hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dianer; Sun, Yu-Yo; Lin, Xiaoyi; Baumann, Jessica M; Dunn, R Scott; Lindquist, Diana M; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2013-09-01

    Perinatal infection aggravates neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury and may interfere with therapeutic hypothermia. While the NF-κB signaling pathway has been implicated in microglia activation in infection-sensitized HI, the current therapeutic strategies rely on systemic intervention, which could impair neonatal immunity and increase the risk of severe infection. To devise a brain-targeted anti-NF-κB strategy, we examined the effects of intranasal delivery of tat-NBD peptides in two animal models of neonatal infection-sensitized HI. Kinetic experiments showed that tat-NBD peptides entered the olfactory bulbs rapidly (10-30 min) and peaked in the cerebral cortex around 60 min after intranasal application in P7 rats. Further, intranasal delivery of 1.4 mg/kg tat-NBD, which is only 7% of the intravenous dose in past studies, markedly attenuated NF-κB signaling, microglia activation, and brain damage triggered by HI with 4 or 72 h pre-exposure to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, intranasal delivery of mutant tat-NBD peptides or systemic application of minocycline failed to block LPS-sensitized HI injury. Yet, intranasal delivery of up to 5.6 mg/kg tat-NBD peptides immediately after pure-HI insult showed little protection, likely due to its rapid clearance from the brain and inability to inhibit parenchymal plasminogen activators. Together, these results suggest a novel therapy of infection-sensitized HI brain injury in newborns.

  10. The neuroprotective efficacy of cell-penetrating peptides TAT, penetratin, Arg-9, and Pep-1 in glutamic acid, kainic acid, and in vitro ischemia injury models using primary cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Craig, Amanda J; Milech, Nadia; Hopkins, Richard M; Watt, Paul M; Knuckey, Neville W

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides (typically 5-25 amino acids), which are used to facilitate the delivery of normally non-permeable cargos such as other peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, or drugs into cells. However, several recent studies have demonstrated that the TAT CPP has neuroprotective properties. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the TAT and three other CPPs (penetratin, Arg-9, Pep-1) for their neuroprotective properties in cortical neuronal cultures following exposure to glutamic acid, kainic acid, or in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation). Arg-9, penetratin, and TAT-D displayed consistent and high level neuroprotective activity in both the glutamic acid (IC50: 0.78, 3.4, 13.9 μM) and kainic acid (IC50: 0.81, 2.0, 6.2 μM) injury models, while Pep-1 was ineffective. The TAT-D isoform displayed similar efficacy to the TAT-L isoform in the glutamic acid model. Interestingly, Arg-9 was the only CPP that displayed efficacy when washed-out prior to glutamic acid exposure. Neuroprotection following in vitro ischemia was more variable with all peptides providing some level of neuroprotection (IC50; Arg-9: 6.0 μM, TAT-D: 7.1 μM, penetratin/Pep-1: >10 μM). The positive control peptides JNKI-1D-TAT (JNK inhibitory peptide) and/or PYC36L-TAT (AP-1 inhibitory peptide) were neuroprotective in all models. Finally, in a post-glutamic acid treatment experiment, Arg-9 was highly effective when added immediately after, and mildly effective when added 15 min post-insult, while the JNKI-1D-TAT control peptide was ineffective when added post-insult. These findings demonstrate that different CPPs have the ability to inhibit neurodamaging events/pathways associated with excitotoxic and ischemic injuries. More importantly, they highlight the need to interpret neuroprotection studies when using CPPs as delivery agents with caution. On a positive note, the cytoprotective properties of CPPs suggests they are ideal carrier molecules to

  11. Enzyme-responsive cell-penetrating peptide conjugated mesoporous silica quantum dot nanocarriers for controlled release of nucleus-targeted drug molecules and real-time intracellular fluorescence imaging of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinming; Liu, Fang; Shao, Qing; Min, Yuanzeng; Costa, Marianne; Yeow, Edwin K L; Xing, Bengang

    2014-08-01

    Here, a set of novel and personalized nanocarriers are presented for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging of intracellular drug molecule trafficking by integrating an enzyme activatable cell penetrating peptide (CPP) with mesoporous silica coated quantum dots nanoparticles. Upon loading of antitumor drug, doxorubicin (DOX) and further exposure to proteases in tumor cell environment, the enzymatic cleavage of peptide sequence activates oligocationic TAT residues on the QDs@mSiO2 surface and direct the DOX delivery into cellular nucleus. The systematic cell imaging and cytotoxicity studies confirm that the enzyme responsive DOX-loaded CPP-QDs@mSiO2 nanoparticles can selectively release DOX in the tumor cells with high cathepsin B enzyme expression and greatly facilitate DOX accumulation in targeted nucleus, thus exhibiting enhanced antitumor activity in these cells. As contrast, there is limited nuclear-targeted drug accumulation and lower tumor cytotoxicity observed in the cells without enzyme expression. More importantly, significant antitumor DOX accumulation and higher tumor inactivation is also found in the drug resistant tumor cells with targeted enzyme expression. Such simple and specific enzyme responsive mesoporous silica-QDs nanoconjugates provide great promise for rational design of targeted drug delivery into biological system, and may thus greatly facilitate the medical theranostics in the near future.

  12. Novel miR-122 delivery system based on MS2 virus like particle surface displaying cell-penetrating peptide TAT for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guojing; Jia, Tingting; Xu, Xixia; Chang, Le; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Yu; Li, Yulong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Kuo; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have shown inadequate. MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) mediated RNA interference brings new prospects. A safe, efficient miRNA delivery system is an indispensable assurance. Previously, we developed an MS2 bacteriophage virus-like particle (VLP)-based microRNA delivery system crosslinked with the HIV TAT peptide, which served as an effective inhibitor in the treatments of systemic lupus erythematosus and osteoporosis. However, defects, such as low crosslinking efficiency, high cost, and potential toxicity of the crosslinking agent, needed to be confronted. Therefore, TAT peptide was designed to display on the surface of MS2 VLPs, instead of being chemically crosslinked, using the platform of phage surface display. The results reflected that MS2 VLPs displaying TAT could effectively penetrate the cytomembrane and deliver miR-122. Additionally, its inhibitory effects on HCC were significant in Hep3B, HepG2, and Huh7 cells and Hep3B related animal models. Thus, we have established a novel miR-122 delivery system based on MS2 VLPs surface displaying TAT peptide, which could effectively perform the function of penetrating cytomembrane and the inhibition of HCC. PMID:27449085

  13. Noncationic Rigid and Anisotropic Coiled-Coil Proteins Exhibit Cell-Penetration Activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Osada, Yoshihito; Sano, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-04

    Numerous cationic peptides that penetrate cells have been studied intensively as drug delivery system carriers for cellular delivery. However, cationic molecules tend to be cytotoxic and cause inflammation, and their stability in the blood is usually low. We have previously demonstrated that a rigid and fibrous cationic coiled-coil protein exhibited cell-penetrating ability superior to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. Making use of structural properties, here we describe the cell-penetrating activity of a rigid and fibrous coiled-coil protein with a noncationic surface. A fibrous coiled-coil protein of pI 6.5 penetrated 100% of the cells tested in vitro at a concentration of 500 nM, which is comparable to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. We also investigated the effect of cell-strain dependency and short-term cytotoxicity.

  14. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  15. A Synthetic Strategy for Conjugation of Paromomycin to Cell-Penetrating Tat(48-60) for Delivery and Visualization into Leishmania Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Defaus, Sira; Gallo, Maria; Abengózar, María A.

    2017-01-01

    A successful approach to deliver paromomycin, a poorly absorbed aminoglycoside antibiotic, to parasite cells is reported, based on selective protection of amino and hydroxyl groups followed by conjugation to a fluorolabeled, PEG-functionalized cell-penetrating Tat(48-60) peptide. The resulting construct is efficiently internalized into Leishmania cells, evidencing the fitness of cell-penetrating peptides as vectors for efficiently transporting low-bioavailability drugs into cells. PMID:28286529

  16. Cellular Reprogramming Using Protein and Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bong Jong; Hong, Yean Ju; Do, Jeong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Recently, stem cells have been suggested as invaluable tools for cell therapy because of their self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential. Thus, scientists have developed a variety of methods to generate pluripotent stem cells, from nuclear transfer technology to direct reprogramming using defined factors, or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Considering the ethical issues and efficiency, iPSCs are thought to be one of the most promising stem cells for cell therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated by transduction with a virus, plasmid, RNA, or protein. Herein, we provide an overview of the current technology for iPSC generation and describe protein-based transduction technology in detail. PMID:28273812

  17. Cell-penetrating conjugates of pentaglutamylated methotrexate as potential anticancer drugs against resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Ildikó; Orbán, Erika; Schlosser, Gitta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bánóczi, Zoltán

    2016-06-10

    The emerging resistance of tumor cells against methotrexate (MTX) is one of the major limitations of the MTX treatment of tumorous diseases. The disturbance in the polyglutamation which is a main step in the mechanism of methotrexate action is often the reason of the resistance. Delivery of polyglutamylated MTX into cells may evade the mechanisms that are responsible for drug resistance. In this study conjugates of methotrexate and its pentaglutamylated derivatives with cell-penetrating peptides - penetratin and octaarginine - were investigated. The cellular-uptake and in vitro cytostatic activity of conjugates were examined on breast cancer cell cultures (MDA-MB-231 as resistant and MCF-7 as sensitive cell culture). These cell cultures showed very different behaviour towards the conjugates. Although the presence of pentaglutamyl moiety significantly decreased the internalisation of conjugates, some of them were significantly active in vitro. All of the conjugates were able to penetrate in some extent into both cell types, but only the conjugates of penetratin showed in vitro cytostatic activity. The most effective conjugates were the MTX-Glu5-Penetratin(desMet) and MTX-Glu5-GFLG-Penetratin(desMet). The latter was effective on both cell cultures while the former was active only on the resistant tumor cells. Our results suggest that the translocation of polyglutamylated MTX may be a new way to treat sensitive and more importantly resistant tumors. While both penetratin and octaarginine peptides were successfully used to deliver several kinds of cargos earlier in our case the activity of penetratin conjugates was more pronounced.

  18. Human neutrophil peptide-1 decreases during ageing in selected Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; de Haro-Acosta, Jeny; Torres-Juarez, Flor; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; González-Amaro, Roberto; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptide innate immunity plays a central role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases, as has been described extensively in different settings. However, the role that these molecules play in the immunity mediated by polymorphonuclear phagocytes as part of the innate immunity of ageing individuals has not been described. In the present study, we addressed the question whether antimicrobial activity in polymorphonuclear cells from elderly individuals was altered in comparison with young adults. We compared phagocytosis index, bacterial killing efficiency, myeloperoxidase activity and cathelicidin expression. Results showed that there were no statistical differences among groups. However, human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) was decreased in the elderly individuals group. Results suggest that the decreased HNP-1 production in the polymorphonuclear phagocytes form elderly individuals might have an important participation in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  19. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

  20. A single cell penetration system by ultrasonic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiao, Mingfei; Yang, Xing; Wu, Ting

    2008-12-01

    The researches of single cell's control and operation are the hotspots in whole world. Among the various technologies, the transmission of ectogenic genetic materials between cell membrane is very significant. Imitating the Chinese traditional acupuncture therapy, a new ultrasonic resonance driving method, is imported to drive a cell's penetration probe. A set of the single cell penetration system was established to perform this function. This system includes four subsystems: driving part, micromanipulation part, observation and measurement part, and actuation part. Some fish egg experiments indicate that this system is workable and effective.

  1. SAP(E) - A cell-penetrating polyproline helix at lipid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Franz, Johannes; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short membrane-permeating amino acid sequences that can be used to deliver cargoes, e.g. drugs, into cells. The mechanism for CPP internalization is still subject of ongoing research. An interesting family of CPPs is the sweet arrow peptides - SAP(E) - which are known to adopt a polyproline II helical secondary structure. SAP(E) peptides stand out among CPPs because they carry a net negative charge while most CPPs are positively charged, the latter being conducive to electrostatic interaction with generally negatively charged membranes. For SAP(E)s, an internalization mechanism has been proposed, based on polypeptide aggregation on the cell surface, followed by an endocytic uptake. However, this process has not yet been observed directly - since peptide-membrane interactions are inherently difficult to monitor on a molecular scale. Here, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to investigate molecular interactions of SAP(E) with differently charged model membranes, in both mono- and bi-layer configurations. The data suggest that the initial binding mechanism is accompanied by structural changes of the peptide. Also, the peptide-model membrane interaction depends on the charge of the lipid headgroup with phosphocholine being a favorable binding site. Moreover, while direct penetration has also been observed for some CPPs, the spectroscopy reveals that for SAP(E), its interaction with model membranes remains limited to the headgroup region, and insertion into the hydrophobic core of the lipid layer does not occur.

  2. Interaction of β(3) /β(2) -peptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu segments, with POPC giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and white blood cancer cells (U937)--a new type of cell-penetrating peptides, and a surprising chain-length dependence of their vesicle- and cell-lysing activity.

    PubMed

    Kolesinska, Beata; Eyer, Klaus; Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S; Beck, Albert K; Seebach, Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many years ago, β(2) /β(3) -peptides, consisting of alternatively arranged β(2) - and β(3) h-amino-acid residues, have been found to undergo folding to a unique type of helix, the 10/12-helix, and to exhibit non-polar, lipophilic properties (Helv. Chim. Acta 1997, 80, 2033). We have now synthesized such 'mixed' hexa-, nona-, dodeca-, and octadecapeptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu triads, with N-terminal fluorescein (FAM) labels, i.e., 1-4, and studied their interactions with POPC (=1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and with human white blood cancer cells U937. The methods used were microfluidic technology, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a flow-cytometry assay, a membrane-toxicity assay with the dehydrogenase G6PDH as enzymatic reporter, and visual microscopy observations. All β(3) /β(2) -peptide derivatives penetrate the GUVs and/or the cells. As shown with the isomeric β(3) /β(2) -, β(3) -, and β(2) -nonamers, 2, 5, and 6, respectively, the derivatives 5 and 6 consisting exclusively of β(3) - or β(2) -amino-acid residues, respectively, interact neither with the vesicles nor with the cells. Depending on the method of investigation and on the pretreatment of the cells, the β(3) /β(2) -nonamer and/or the β(3) /β(2) -dodecamer derivative, 2 and/or 3, respectively, cause a surprising disintegration or lysis of the GUVs and cells, comparable with the action of tensides, viral fusion peptides, and host-defense antimicrobial peptides. Possible sources of the chain-length-dependent destructive potential of the β(3) /β(2) -nona- and β(3) /β(2) -dodecapeptide derivatives, and a possible relationship with the phosphate-to-phosphate and hydrocarbon thicknesses of GUVs, and eukaryotic cells are discussed. Further investigations with other types of GUVs and of eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism(s) of interaction of 'mixed' β(3) /β(2) -peptides with

  3. Cell Penetrating Peptoids (CPPos): Synthesis of a Small Combinatorial Library by Using IRORI MiniKans

    PubMed Central

    Kölmel, Dominik K.; Fürniss, Daniel; Susanto, Steven; Lauer, Andrea; Grabher, Clemens; Bräse, Stefan; Schepers, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptoids (CPPos) are potent mimics of the corresponding cell penetrating peptides (CPPs). The synthesis of diverse oligomeric libraries that display a variety of backbone scaffolds and side-chain appendages are a very promising source of novel CPPos, which can be used to either target different cellular organelles or even different tissues and organs. In this study we established the submonomer-based solid phase synthesis of a “proof of principle” peptoid library in IRORI MiniKans to expand the amount for phenotypic high throughput screens of CPPos. The library consisting of tetrameric peptoids [oligo(N-alkylglycines)] was established on Rink amide resin in a split and mix approach with hydrophilic and hydrophobic peptoid side chains. All CPPos of the presented library were labeled with rhodamine B to allow for the monitoring of cellular uptake by fluorescent confocal microscopy. Eventually, all the purified peptoids were subjected to live cell imaging to screen for CPPos with organelle specificity. While highly charged CPPos enter the cells by endocytosis with subsequent endosomal release, critical levels of lipophilicity allow other CPPos to specifically localize to mitochondria once a certain lipophilicity threshold is reached. PMID:24281336

  4. Cell-penetrating compounds preferentially bind glycosaminoglycans over plasma membrane lipids in a charge density- and stereochemistry-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Prevette, Lisa E; Benish, Nicolas C; Schoenecker, Amber R; Braden, Kristin J

    2015-12-01

    Cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) are often conjugated to drugs and genes to facilitate cellular uptake. We hypothesize that the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged amines of the cell-penetrating compounds and the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) extending from cell surfaces is the initiating step in the internalization process. The interactions of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer, Tat peptide and 25 kDa linear PEI with four different GAGs have been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry to elucidate structure-function relationships that could lead to improved drug and gene delivery methods to a wide variety of cell types. Detailed thermodynamic analysis has determined that CPC-GAG binding constants range from 8.7×10(3) to 2.4×10(6)M(-1) and that affinity is dependent upon GAG charge density and stereochemistry and CPC molecular weight. The effect of GAG composition on affinity is likely due to hydrogen bonding between CPC amines and amides and GAG hydroxyl and amine groups. These results were compared to the association of CPCs with lipid vesicles of varying composition as model plasma membranes to finally clarify the relative importance of each cell surface component in initial cell recognition. CPC-lipid affinity increases with anionic lipid content, but GAG affinity is higher for all cell-penetrating compounds, confirming the role these heterogeneous polysaccharides play in cellular association and clustering.

  5. Activatable and Cell-Penetrable Multiplex FRET Nanosensor for Profiling MT1-MMP Activity in Single Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eddie Y.; Ochs, Christopher J.; Wang, Yi; Lei, Lei; Qin, Qin; Smith, Andrew M.; Strongin, Alex Y.; Kamm, Roger; Qi, Ying-Xin; Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    We developed a quantum-dot-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) nanosensor to visualize the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) at cell membrane. A bended peptide with multiple motifs was engineered to position the FRET pair at a close proximity to allow energy transfer, which can be cleaved by active MT1-MMP to result in FRET changes and the exposure of cell penetrating sequence. Via FRET and penetrated QD signals, the nanosensor can profile cancer cells. PMID:26203778

  6. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian C; Hocking, Kyle M; Kilchrist, Kameron V; Wise, Eric S; Brophy, Colleen M; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-06-23

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides.

  7. Improved affinity at the cost of decreased specificity: a recurring theme in PDZ-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, O Andreas; Sundell, Gustav N; Andersson, Eva; Ivarsson, Ylva; Jemth, Per

    2016-10-03

    The E6 protein from human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role during productive infection and is a potential drug target. We have previously designed a high affinity bivalent protein binder for the E6 protein, a fusion between a helix from the E6 associated protein and PDZØ9, an engineered variant (L391F/K392M) of the second PDZ domain from synapse associated protein 97 (SAP97 PDZ2). How the substitutions improve the affinity of SAP97 PDZ2 for HPV E6 is not clear and it is not known to what extent they affect the specificity for cellular targets. Here, we explore the specificity of wild type SAP97 PDZ2 and PDZØ9 through proteomic peptide phage display. In addition, we employ a double mutant cycle of SAP97 PDZ2 in which the binding kinetics for nine identified potential cellular peptide ligands are measured and compared with those for the C-terminal E6 peptide. The results demonstrate that PDZØ9 has an increased affinity for all peptides, but at the cost of specificity. Furthermore, there is a peptide dependent coupling free energy between the side chains at positions 391 and 392. This corroborates our previous allosteric model for PDZ domains, involving sampling of intramolecular energetic pathways.

  8. p75NTR antagonistic cyclic peptide decreases the size of beta amyloid-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L; Stewart, Kenneth B; Qureshi, Nazer H; Kowall, Neil W; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2008-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75(NTR) antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Abeta and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75(NTR). In vivo injections of Abeta into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Abeta and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Abeta to p75(NTR) may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  9. p75NTR Antagonistic Cyclic Peptide Decreases the Size of β Amyloid-Induced Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L.; Stewart, Kenneth B.; Qureshi, Nazer H.; Kowall, Neil W.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75NTR antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Aβ and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75NTR. In vivo injections of Aβ into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Aβ and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Aβ to p75NTR may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18807174

  10. Discovery and Characterization of a New Cell-Penetrating Protein

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Rudo L.; Chamoun, Ana Maria; McMillin, Thomas; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new cell-penetrating protein, B1, capable of delivering conjugated proteins and nucleic acids into mammalian cells. B1 is a 244-amino-acid product of a single-base frameshift in the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The molecule has a net positive charge of 43 and a very high charge-to-mass ratio of 1.5. eGFP-fused B1 potently penetrates both adherent and suspension cells with >80% of cells taking up the protein when exposed to concentrations as low as 1 μM. The protein was found to cluster in the paranuclear region of TZM-bl cells. Most importantly, we show that B1 not only facilitates cellular uptake, but allows biomolecular cargo to reach sites of biological relevance. For example, baby hamster kidney cells underwent DNA recombination when exposed to B1-tagged Cre recombinase at protein concentrations as low as 2.5 μM, indicating potent nuclear delivery of functional protein cargos. Additionally, B1 delivers non-covalently conjugated RNA and DNA across the cell membrane to cytosolic and nuclear sites accessible to the cellular translation and transcription machinery, as gauged by detection of encoded reporter functions, with efficiency comparable to commercially available cationic lipid reagents. B1 appears to utilize cell-surface glycans and multiple competing endocytic pathways to enter and traffic through cells. These studies provide both a new tool for intracellular delivery of biomolecules and insights that could aid in the design of more effective cell penetrating proteins. PMID:24047285

  11. Determining the Time Window for Dynamic Nanowire Cell Penetration Processes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Aalipour, Amin; Gupta, Sneha V; Melosh, Nicholas A

    2015-12-22

    Nanowire (NW) arrays offer opportunities for parallel, nondestructive intracellular access for biomolecule delivery, intracellular recording, and sensing. Spontaneous cell membrane penetration by vertical nanowires is essential for these applications, yet the time- and geometry-dependent penetration process is still poorly understood. In this work, the dynamic NW-cell interface during cell spreading was examined through experimental cell penetration measurements combined with two mechanical models based on substrate adhesion force or cell traction forces. Penetration was determined by comparing the induced tension at a series of given membrane configurations to the critical membrane failure tension. The adhesion model predicts that penetration occurs within a finite window shortly after initial cell contact and adhesion, while the traction model predicts increasing penetration over a longer period. NW penetration rates determined from a cobalt ion delivery assay are compared to the predicted results from the two models. In addition, the effects of NW geometry and cell properties are systematically evaluated to identify the key factors for penetration.

  12. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  13. HIV-1 fusion peptide decreases bending energy and promotes curved fusion intermediates.

    PubMed

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F

    2007-09-15

    A crucial step in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is fusion between the viral envelope and the T-cell membrane, which must involve intermediate membrane states with high curvature. Our main result from diffuse x-ray scattering is that the bending modulus K(C) is greatly reduced upon addition of the HIV fusion peptide FP-23 to lipid bilayers. A smaller bending modulus reduces the free energy barriers required to achieve and pass through the highly curved intermediate states and thereby facilitates fusion and HIV infection. The reduction in K(C) is by a factor of 13 for the thicker, stiffer 1,2-sn-dierucoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and by a factor of 3 for 1,2-sn-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. The reduction in K(C) decays exponentially with concentration of FP-23, and the 1/e concentration is <1 mol % peptide/lipid, which is well within the physiological range for a fusion site. A secondary result is, when FP-23 is added to the samples which consist of stacks of membranes, that the distance between membranes increases and eventually becomes infinite at full hydration (unbinding); we attribute this both to electrostatic repulsion of the positively charged arginine in the FP-23 and to an increase in the repulsive fluctuation interaction brought about by the smaller K(C). Although this latter interaction works against membrane fusion, our results show that the energy that it requires of the fusion protein machinery to bring the HIV envelope membrane and the target T-cell membrane into close contact is negligible.

  14. Proteasome Inhibitors Decrease AAV2 Capsid derived Peptide Epitope Presentation on MHC Class I Following Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Jonathan D; Hui, Daniel; Downey, Harre D; Dunn, Danielle; Pien, Gary C; Mingozzi, Federico; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are an extensively studied and highly used vector platform for gene therapy applications. We hypothesize that in the first clinical trial using AAV to treat hemophilia B, AAV capsid proteins were presented on the surface of transduced hepatocytes, resulting in clearance by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and consequent loss of therapeutic transgene expression. It has been previously shown that proteasome inhibitors can have a dramatic effect on AAV transduction in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, to decrease capsid antigen presentation on hepatocytes in vitro, whereas at the same time, enhancing gene expression in vivo. Using an AAV capsid-specific T-cell reporter (TCR) line to analyze the effect of proteasome inhibitors on antigen presentation, we demonstrate capsid antigen presentation at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs), and inhibition of antigen presentation at pharmacologic levels of bortezomib. We also demonstrate that bortezomib can enhance Factor IX (FIX) expression from an AAV2 vector in mice, although the same effect was not observed for AAV8 vectors. A pharmacological agent that can enhance AAV transduction, decrease T-cell activation/proliferation, and decrease capsid antigen presentation would be a promising solution to obstacles to successful AAV-mediated, liver-directed gene transfer in humans. PMID:19904235

  15. Statins decrease expression of the proinflammatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bucelli, Robert C; Gonsiorek, Eugene A; Kim, Woo-Yang; Bruun, Donald; Rabin, Richard A; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2008-03-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that statins may be useful for treating diseases presenting with predominant neurogenic inflammation, but the mechanism(s) mediating this potential therapeutic effect are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that statins act directly on sensory neurons to decrease expression of proinflammatory neuropeptides that trigger neurogenic inflammation, specifically calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, radioimmunoassay, and immunocytochemistry were used to quantify CGRP and substance P expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harvested from adult male rats and in primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat DRG. Systemic administration of statins at pharmacologically relevant doses significantly reduced CGRP and substance P levels in DRG in vivo. In cultured sensory neurons, statins blocked bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced CGRP and substance P expression and decreased expression of these neuropeptides in sensory neurons pretreated with BMPs. These effects were concentration-dependent and occurred independent of effects on cell survival or axon growth. Statin inhibition of neuropeptide expression was reversed by supplementation with mevalonate and cholesterol, but not isoprenoid precursors. BMPs signal via Smad activation, and cholesterol depletion by statins inhibited Smad1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. These findings identify a novel action of statins involving down-regulation of proinflammatory neuropeptide expression in sensory ganglia via cholesterol depletion and decreased Smad1 activation and suggest that statins may be effective in attenuating neurogenic inflammation.

  16. Effective capture of proteins inside living cells by antibodies indirectly linked to a novel cell-penetrating polymer-modified protein A derivative.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Shoko; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Hisafumi; Mitsuhashi, Naoto; Majima, Eiji; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cytoplasmic proteins are useful tools that can control cellular function and clarify signaling mechanisms. However, it is difficult to capture proteins inside living cells, and thus appropriate methods for antibody delivery to the cytoplasm of living cells are required. Cell-penetrating materials, such as the TAT-peptide, have received attention for their ability to deliver various cargos into living cells. However, the direct modification of cargos with cell-penetrating materials is time-consuming and lacks versatility. Therefore, we conceived that protein A, which can bind to the fragment crystallizable region of an antibody, could indirectly link antibodies with cell-penetrating materials, creating an efficient and simple antibody delivery system. Here, we constructed a novel antibody delivery system using a cell-penetrating polymer-modified protein A derivative (CPP-pAd). Living cells treated with CPP-pAd/antibody complexes showed significantly higher antibody levels than those achieved with the commercially available reagent HVJ-E. Pre-treatment with sucrose prevented cellular uptake of the CPP-pAd/antibody complex, suggesting that the CPP-pAd/antibody internalization mechanism occurs through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellularly delivered antibodies did not colocalize with endosome/lysosome markers, further suggesting that antibodies were delivered to the cytoplasm by escape from endosome/lysosome. Moreover, we observed that anti-nuclear pore complex antibodies, delivered to cells using CPP-pAd, localized to the nuclear membrane and inhibited nuclear factor κB dependent luciferase activity. Together, these results suggest that the antibodies delivered by CPP-pAd captured functional proteins, making CPP-pAd a promising strategy for effective capture of proteins inside living cells.

  17. Weight loss during oligofructose supplementation is associated with decreased ghrelin and increased peptide YY in overweight and obese adults2

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Jill A; Reimer, Raylene A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rodent studies show that oligofructose promotes weight loss, stimulates satiety hormone secretion, reduces energy intake, and improves lipid profiles. Objective Our objective was to examine the effects of oligofructose supplementation on body weight and satiety hormone concentrations in overweight and obese adults. Design This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-eight otherwise healthy adults with a body mass index (in kg/m2) > 25 were randomly assigned to receive 21 g oligo-fructose/d or a placebo (maltodextrin) for 12 wk. Body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); meal tolerance tests, including satiety hormone response; food intake; and subjective appetite ratings were determined. Results There was a reduction in body weight of 1.03 ±0.43 kg with oligofructose supplementation, whereas the control group experienced an increase in body weight of 0.45 ± 0.31 kg over 12 wk (P = 0.01). A lower area under the curve (AUC) for ghrelin (P = 0.004) and a higher AUC for peptide YY (PYY) with oligofructose (P = 0.03) coincided with a reduction in self-reported caloric intake (P ≤ 0.05). Glucose decreased in the oligofructose group and increased in the control group between initial and final tests (P ≤ 0.05). Insulin concentrations mirrored this pattern (P ≤ 0.05). Oligofructose supplementation did not affect plasma active glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion. According to a visual analog scale designed to assess side effects, oligofructose was well tolerated. Conclusions Independent of other lifestyle changes, oligofructose supplementation has the potential to promote weight loss and improve glucose regulation in overweight adults. Suppressed ghrelin and enhanced PYY may contribute in part to the reduction in energy intake. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00522353. PMID:19386741

  18. Decreased ghrelin-induced GH release in thyrotoxicosis: comparison with GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH.

    PubMed

    Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Silva, Marcos Roberto; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2007-01-01

    In thyrotoxicosis GH response to several stimuli is impaired, but there is no data on ghrelin-induced GH release in these patients. Ghrelin is a potent GH secretagogue and it also increases glucose levels in men. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ghrelin (1 microg/kg), GHRP-6 (1 mug/kg) and GHRH (100 microg), i.v., on GH levels in 10 hyperthyroid patients and in 8 controls. Glucose levels were also measured during ghrelin and GHRP-6 administration. In control subjects and hyperthyroid patients peak GH (microg/l; mean +/- SE) values after ghrelin injection (controls: 66.7 +/- 13.6; hyper: 19.3 +/- 2.4) were significantly higher than those obtained after GHRP-6 (controls: 26.7 +/- 5.1; hyper: 12.6 +/- 1.3) and GHRH (controls: 13.5 +/- 4.3; hyper: 5.3 +/- 1.3). There was a significant decrease in GH responsiveness to ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH in the hyperthyroid group compared to controls. In control subjects and hyperthyroid patients basal glucose (mmol/l) values were 4.5 +/- 0.1 and 4.7 +/- 0.2, respectively. There was a significant increase in glucose levels 30 min after ghrelin injection (controls: 4.9 +/- 0.1; hyper: 5.2 +/- 0.2), which remained elevated up to 120 min. When the two groups were compared no differences in glucose values were observed. GHRP-6 administration was not able to increase glucose levels in both groups. Our data shows that GH release after ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH administration is decreased in thyrotoxicosis. This suggests that thyroid hormone excess interferes with GH-releasing pathways activated by these peptides. Our results also suggest that ghrelin's ability to increase glucose levels is not altered in thyrotoxicosis.

  19. Design and Use of Peptide-Based Antibodies Decreasing Superoxide Production by Mitochondrial Complex I and Complex II

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Yun, June; Kaumaya, Pravin P.T.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of reactive oxygen species. Both complex I and complex II mediate O2•− production in mitochondria and host reactive protein thiols. To explore the functions of the specific domains involved in the redox modifications of complexes I and II, various peptide-based antibodies were generated against these complexes, and their inhibitory effects were subsequently measured. The redox domains involved in S-glutathionylation and nitration, as well as the binding motif of the iron-sulfur cluster (N1a) of the complexes I and II were utilized to design B cell epitopes for generating antibodies. The effect of antibody binding on enzyme-mediated O2•− generation was measured by EPR spin trapping. Binding of either antibody AbGSCA206 or AbGSCB367 against glutathione (GS)-binding domain to complex I inhibits its O2•− generation, but does not affect electron transfer efficiency. Binding of antibody (Ab24N1a) against the binding motif of N1a to complex I modestly suppresses both O2•− generation and electron transfer efficiency. Binding of either antibody Ab75 or Ab24 against non-redox domain decreases electron leakage for O2•− production. In complex II, binding of antibody AbGSC90 against GS-binding domain to complex II marginally decreases both O2•− generation and electron transfer activity. Binding of antibody AbY142 to complex II against the nitrated domain modestly inhibits electron leakage, but does not affect the electron transfer activity of complex II. In conclusion, mediation of O2•− generation by complexes I and II can be regulated by specific redox and non-redox domains. PMID:20564035

  20. A cell-penetrating bispecific antibody for therapeutic regulation of intracellular targets.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Gera, Joseph F; Chan, Grace; Hansen, James E; Li, Erica; Cloninger, Cheri; Levine, Arnold J; Nishimura, Robert N

    2012-10-01

    The therapeutic use of antibodies is restricted by the limited access of antibodies to intracellular compartments. To overcome this limitation, we developed a cell-penetrating monoclonal antibody, mAb 3E10, as an intracellular delivery vehicle for the intracellular and intranuclear delivery of antibodies constructed as bispecific single-chain Fv fragments. Because MDM2 is an important target in cancer therapy, we selected monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3G5 for intracellular transport. mAb 3G5 binds MDM2 and blocks binding of MDM2 to p53. Here, we show that the resulting 3E10-3G5 bispecific antibody retains cell-penetrating and MDM2-binding activity, increases tumor p53 levels, and inhibits growth of MDM2-addicted tumors. The use of cell-penetrating bispecific antibodies in targeted molecular therapy will significantly broaden the spectrum of accessible intracellular targets and may have a profound impact in cancer therapy.

  1. Glucocorticoids decrease body weight and food intake and inhibit appetite regulatory peptide expression in the hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Jian-Hua; DU, Wen-Hua; Fan, Yan-Ping; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Chen-Chen; Xu, Huan-Bai; Miao, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Xiang, Ping; Chen, Feng-Ling

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on appetite and gene expression of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AGRP) and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), in non-obese and obese rats. Both non-obese and obese rats were randomly assigned to three groups: normal saline, low- and high-dose GC groups (NSG, LDG and HDG, respectively), which received an intraperitoneal injection with normal saline (0.2 ml/100 g) or hydrocortisone sodium succinate at 5 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, for 20 days. The expression levels of NPY, AGRP and CART mRNA in the hypothalamus were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Non-obese and obese rats were found to undergo weight loss after GC injection, and a higher degree of weight loss was observed in the HDG rats. The average and cumulative food intakes in the obese and non-obese rats injected with high-dose GC were lower compared to that in the NSG (p<0.05). mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and the anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, were significantly lower in the HDG than levels in the NSG for both the obese and non-obese rats (p<0.05). GC treatment decreased appetite and body weight, induced apparent glucolipid metabolic disturbances and hyperinsulinemia, while down-regulated mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, in the hypothalamus in the rats. The mechanism which induces this neuropeptide expression requires further study.

  2. Predictors of Left Ventricle Remodeling: Combined Plasma B-type Natriuretic Peptide Decreasing Ratio and Peak Creatine Kinase-MB.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Chung, Chang-Min; Chu, Chi-Ming; Lin, Yu-Shen; Pan, Kuo-Li; Chang, Jung-Jung; Wang, Po-Chang; Chang, Shih-Tai; Yang, Teng-Yao; Jang, Shih-Jung; Yang, Tsung-Han; Hsiao, Ju-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported that patients who had an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have found that measuring B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) during the subacute phase of left ventricular (LV) remodeling can predict the possible course of LV remodeling. This study assessed the use of serial BNP serum levels combined with early creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) to predict the development of significant LV remodeling in AMI patients. Methods: Nighty-seven patients with new onset AMI were assessed using serial echocardiographic studies and serial measurements of BNP levels, both performed on day-2 (BNP1), day-7 (BNP2), day-90 (BNP3), and day-180 (BNP4) after admission. LV remodeling was defined as >20% increase in biplane LV end-diastolic volume on day-180 compared to baseline (day-2). Results: Patients were divided into LV remodeling [LVR(+)] and non LV remodeling [LVR(-)] groups. No first-week BNP level was found to predict remodeling. However, the two groups had significantly different day-90 BNP level (208.1 ± 263.7 pg/ml vs. 82.4 ± 153.7 pg/ml, P = 0.039) and significantly different 3-month BNP decrease ratios ( R BNP13) (14.4 ± 92.2% vs. 69.4 ± 25.9%, P < 0.001). The appropriate cut-off value for R BNP13 was 53.2% (AUC = 0.764, P < 0.001). Early peak CK-MB (cut-off 48.2 ng/ml; AUC = 0.672; P = 0.014) was another independent predictor of remodeling. Additionally, combining peak CK-MB and R BNP13 offered an excellent discrimination for half-year remodeling when assessed by ROC curve (AUC = 0.818, P < 0.001). Conclusion: R BNP13 is a significant independent predictor of 6-month LV remodeling. The early peak CK-MB additionally offered an incremental power to the predictions derived from serial BNP examinations.

  3. Predictors of Left Ventricle Remodeling: Combined Plasma B-type Natriuretic Peptide Decreasing Ratio and Peak Creatine Kinase-MB

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Chung, Chang-Min; Chu, Chi-Ming; Lin, Yu-Shen; Pan, Kuo-Li; Chang, Jung-Jung; Wang, Po-Chang; Chang, Shih-Tai; Yang, Teng-Yao; Jang, Shih-Jung; Yang, Tsung-Han; Hsiao, Ju-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported that patients who had an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have found that measuring B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) during the subacute phase of left ventricular (LV) remodeling can predict the possible course of LV remodeling. This study assessed the use of serial BNP serum levels combined with early creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) to predict the development of significant LV remodeling in AMI patients. Methods: Nighty-seven patients with new onset AMI were assessed using serial echocardiographic studies and serial measurements of BNP levels, both performed on day-2 (BNP1), day-7 (BNP2), day-90 (BNP3), and day-180 (BNP4) after admission. LV remodeling was defined as >20% increase in biplane LV end-diastolic volume on day-180 compared to baseline (day-2). Results: Patients were divided into LV remodeling [LVR(+)] and non LV remodeling [LVR(-)] groups. No first-week BNP level was found to predict remodeling. However, the two groups had significantly different day-90 BNP level (208.1 ± 263.7 pg/ml vs. 82.4 ± 153.7 pg/ml, P = 0.039) and significantly different 3-month BNP decrease ratios (RBNP13) (14.4 ± 92.2% vs. 69.4 ± 25.9%, P < 0.001). The appropriate cut-off value for RBNP13 was 53.2% (AUC = 0.764, P < 0.001). Early peak CK-MB (cut-off 48.2 ng/ml; AUC = 0.672; P = 0.014) was another independent predictor of remodeling. Additionally, combining peak CK-MB and RBNP13 offered an excellent discrimination for half-year remodeling when assessed by ROC curve (AUC = 0.818, P < 0.001). Conclusion: RBNP13 is a significant independent predictor of 6-month LV remodeling. The early peak CK-MB additionally offered an incremental power to the predictions derived from serial BNP examinations. PMID:28138312

  4. Cell Penetrable Human scFv Specific to Middle Domain of Matrix Protein-1 Protects Mice from Lethal Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dong-din-on, Fonthip; Songserm, Thaweesak; Pissawong, Tippawan; Srimanote, Potjanee; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Moonjit, Pattra; Lertwatcharasarakul, Preeda; Seesuay, Watee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2015-01-01

    A new anti-influenza remedy that can tolerate the virus antigenic variation is needed. Influenza virus matrix protein-1 (M1) is highly conserved and pivotal for the virus replication cycle: virus uncoating, assembly and budding. An agent that blocks the M1 functions should be an effective anti-influenza agent. In this study, human scFv that bound to recombinant M1 middle domain (MD) and native M1 of A/H5N1 was produced. Phage mimotope search and computerized molecular docking revealed that the scFv bound to the MD conformational epitope formed by juxtaposed helices 7 and 9 of the M1. The scFv was linked molecularly to a cell penetrable peptide, penetratin (PEN). The PEN-scFv (transbody), when used to treat the cells pre-infected with the heterologous clade/subclade A/H5N1 reduced the viral mRNA intracellularly and in the cell culture fluids. The transbody mitigated symptom severity and lung histopathology of the H5N1 infected mice and caused reduction of virus antigen in the tissues as well as extricated the animals from the lethal challenge in a dose dependent manner. The transbody specific to the M1 MD, either alone or in combination with the cognate human scFvs specific to other influenza virus proteins, should be an effective, safe and mutation tolerable anti-influenza agent. PMID:25594836

  5. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  6. Discovery of the cell-penetrating function of A2 domain derived from LTA subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Guo, Hua; Zheng, Wenyun; Zhang, Na; Wang, Tianwen; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is a protein toxin produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). As a bacterial toxin, LT holotoxin can enter intestinal epithelial cells and cause diarrhea. In addition, LT is also a powerful mucosal adjuvant capable of enhancing the strong immune responses to co-administered antigens. However, the LT immunological mechanism is still not clear in some aspects, especially with the respect to how the LTA subunit functions alone. Here, we discovered that the A2 domain of LTA could carry a fluorescent protein into cells, whose function is similar to a cell-penetrating peptide. The transmembrane-transporting ability of the A2 domain is non-specific in its cell-penetrating function, which was shown through testing with different cell types. Moreover, the LTA2 fusion protein penetrated a fluorescently labeled cell membrane that identified LTA2 internalization through membrane transport pathways, and showed it finally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, low-temperature stress and pharmacological agent treatments showed that the LTA2 internalization route is a temperature-dependent process involving the clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the macropinocytosis pathways. These results could explain the internalization of the LTA subunit alone without the LTB pentamer, contributing to a better understanding of LTA working as a mucosal adjuvant; they also suggest that the A2 domain could be used as a novel transport vehicle for research and treatment of disease.

  7. Astrocytes protect neurons from Aβ1-42 peptide-induced neurotoxicity increasing TFAM and PGC-1 and decreasing PPAR-γ and SIRT-1.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Ortega, Angel; Mauricio, M Dolores; Vila, Jose Ma; Valles, Soraya L

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of astrocytes at sites of Aβ1-42 depositions. Our results indicate that Aβ1-42 toxic peptide increases lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and cell death in neurons but not in astrocytes in primary culture. Aβ1-42-induced deleterious neuronal effects are not present when neurons and astrocytes are mixed cultured. Stimulation of astrocytes with toxic Aβ1-42 peptide increased p-65 and decreased IκB resulting in inflammatory process. In astrocytes Aβ1-42 decreases protein expressions of sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and over-expresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), protecting mitochondria against Aβ1-42-induced damage and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. In summary our data suggest that astrocytes may have a key role in protecting neurons, increasing neural viability and mitochondrial biogenesis, acquiring better oxidative stress protection and perhaps modulating inflammatory processes against Aβ1-42 toxic peptide. This might be a sign of a complex epigenetic process in Alzheimer's disease development.

  8. Astrocytes Protect Neurons from Aβ1-42 Peptide-Induced Neurotoxicity Increasing TFAM and PGC-1 and Decreasing PPAR-γ and SIRT-1

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Ortega, Angel; Mauricio, M. Dolores; Vila, Jose Mª; Valles, Soraya L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of astrocytes at sites of Aβ1-42 depositions. Our results indicate that Aβ1-42 toxic peptide increases lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and cell death in neurons but not in astrocytes in primary culture. Aβ1-42-induced deleterious neuronal effects are not present when neurons and astrocytes are mixed cultured. Stimulation of astrocytes with toxic Aβ1-42 peptide increased p-65 and decreased IκB resulting in inflammatory process. In astrocytes Aβ1-42 decreases protein expressions of sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and over-expresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), protecting mitochondria against Aβ1-42-induced damage and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. In summary our data suggest that astrocytes may have a key role in protecting neurons, increasing neural viability and mitochondrial biogenesis, acquiring better oxidative stress protection and perhaps modulating inflammatory processes against Aβ1-42 toxic peptide. This might be a sign of a complex epigenetic process in Alzheimer's disease development. PMID:25552918

  9. Central pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) decrease the baroreflex sensitivity in trout.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Conlon, J Michael; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2011-04-01

    Although PACAP and VIP exert diverse actions on heart and blood vessels along the vertebrate phylum, no information is currently available concerning the potential role of these peptides on the regulation of the baroreflex response, a major mechanism for blood pressure homeostasis. Consequently, the goal of this study was to examine in our experimental model, the unanesthetized rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, whether PACAP and VIP are involved in the regulation of the cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Cross-spectral analysis techniques using a fast Fourier transform algorithm were employed to calculate the coherence, phase and gain of the transfer function between spontaneous fluctuations of systolic arterial blood pressure and R-R intervals of the electrocardiogram. The BRS was estimated as the mean of the gain of the transfer function when the coherence between the two signals was high and the phase negative. Compared with vehicle, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of trout PACAP-27 and trout VIP (25-100 pmol) dose-dependently reduced the cardiac BRS to the same extent with a threshold dose of 50 pmol for a significant effect. When injected intra-arterially at the same doses as for i.c.v. injections, only the highest dose of VIP (100 pmol) significantly attenuated the BRS. These results suggest that the endogenous peptides PACAP and VIP might be implicated in the central control of cardiac baroreflex functions in trout.

  10. Characterization of a possible uptake mechanism of selective antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Sordo, Marili Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Selective antibacterial peptides containing less than 30 amino acid residues, cationic, with amphipathic properties, have been the subject of several studies due to their active participation and beneficial effects in strengthening the immune system of all living organisms. This manuscript reports the results of a comparison between the group of selective antibacterial peptides and another group called "cell penetrating peptides". An important number of the selective antibacterial peptides are cell penetrating peptides, suggesting that their toxicity is related to their uptake mechanism. The verification of this observation also includes the adaptation of a method previously published, called Polarity index, which reproduces and confirms the action of this new set of peptides. The efficiency of this method was verified based on four different databases, yielding a high score. The verification was based exclusively on the peptides already reported in the databases which have been experimentally verified.

  11. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide is decreased in insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is elevated in gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. This trial aimed to generate data for gestational diabetes mellitus patients, who are at risk to develop these complications. Methods We have measured NT-proBNP in 223 otherwise healthy women between gestational week 24 and 32 referred to the outpatient diabetes unit in a cross-sectional study. Results 88 control subjects, 45 patients with indication for medical nutrition therapy (MNT) alone and 90 patients who required insulin therapy were included. Groups of women were comparable regarding gestational week. Body mass index before pregnancy and at blood draw was significantly higher in subjects with insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus compared to MNT controlled gestational diabetes mellitus. NT-proBNP was significantly lower in patients with insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus (35 ± 25 pg/ml) compared to controls (53 ± 43 pg/ml, p = 0.012). Conclusions NT-proBNP is within the reference range of normal subjects in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Differences in body mass index, changes in glomerular filtration rate and haemodynamics may explain lower NT-proBNP concentrations in insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus. A false negative interpretation needs to be considered in these women. PMID:21489265

  12. Feeding rumen-inert fats differing in their degree of saturation decreases intake and increases plasma concentrations of gut peptides in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Relling, A E; Reynolds, C K

    2007-03-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of feeding rumen-inert fats differing in their degree of saturation on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and plasma concentrations of insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36) amide (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and cholecystokinin (CCK) in lactating dairy cows. Four midlactation, primiparous Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment with 2-wk periods. Cows were fed a control mixed ration ad libitum, and treatments were the dietary addition (3.5% of ration dry matter) of 3 rumen-inert fats as sources of mostly saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Daily DMI, milk yield, and composition were measured on the last 4 d of each period. Jugular vein blood was collected every 30 min over a 7-h period on d 12 and 14 of each period for analysis of plasma concentrations of hormones, glucose, and nonesterified fatty acids. Feeding fat decreased DMI, and the decrease tended to be greater for MUFA and PUFA compared with SFA. Plasma concentration of GLP-1 increased when fat was fed and was greater for MUFA and PUFA. Feeding fat increased plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and CCK concentrations and decreased plasma insulin concentration. Plasma CCK concentration was greater for MUFA and PUFA than for SFA and was greater for MUFA than PUFA. Decreases in DMI in cows fed fat were associated with increased plasma concentrations of GLP-1 and CCK and a decreased insulin concentration. The role of these peptides in regulating DMI in cattle fed fat requires further investigation.

  13. Synthetic Human TLR9-LRR11 Peptide Attenuates TLR9 Signaling by Binding to and thus Decreasing Internalization of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xichun; Li, Bin; Kuang, Mei; Liu, Xin; Cen, Yanyan; Qin, Rongxin; Ding, Guofu; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-02-22

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 is an endosomal receptor recognizing bacterial DNA/CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN). Blocking CpG ODN/TLR9 activity represents a strategy for therapeutic prevention of immune system overactivation. Herein, we report that a synthetic peptide (SP) representing the leucine-rich repeat 11 subdomain of the human TLR9 extracellular domain could attenuate CpG ODN/TLR9 activity in RAW264.7 cells by binding to CpG ODN and decreasing its internalization. Our results demonstrate that preincubation with SP specifically inhibited CpG ODN- but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and lipopeptide (PAM3CSK4)-stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 release. Preincubation of SP with CpG ODN dose-dependently decreased TLR9-driven phosphorylation of IκBα and ERK and activation of NF-κB/p65. Moreover, SP dose-dependently decreased FAM-labeled CpG ODN internalization, whereas non-labeled CpG ODN reversed the inhibition. The KD value of SP-CpG ODN binding was within the micromolar range. Our results demonstrated that SP was a specific inhibitor of CpG ODN/TLR9 activity via binding to CpG ODN, leading to reduced ODN internalization and decreased activation of subsequent pathways within cells. Thus, SP could be used as a potential CpG ODN antagonist to block TLR9 signaling.

  14. Short peptides interfering with signaling pathways as new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ellert-Miklaszewska, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Katarzyna; Kaminska, Bozena

    2017-01-01

    Short peptides have many advantages, such as low molecular weight, selectivity for a specific target, organelles or cells with minimal toxicity. We describe properties of short peptides, which interfere with communication networks in tumor cells and within microenvironment of malignant gliomas, the most common brain tumors. We focus on ligand/receptor axes and intracellular signaling pathways critical for gliomagenesis that could be targeted with interfering peptides. We review structures and efficacy of organelle-specific and cell-penetrating peptides and describe diverse chemical modifications increasing proteolytic stability and protecting synthetic peptides against degradation. We report results of application of short peptides in glioma therapy clinical trials, their rises and falls. The most advanced examples of therapeutics such as short interfering peptides combined with cell-penetrating peptides that show good effectiveness in disease models are presented. It is foreseen that identification of peptides with better clinical properties may improve their success rates in clinical trials.

  15. Modifications of Natural Peptides for Nanoparticle and Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Jallouk, Andrew P.; Palekar, Rohun U.; Pan, Hua; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural products serve as an important source of novel compounds for drug development. Recently, peptides have emerged as a new class of therapeutic agents due to their versatility and specificity for biological targets. Yet, their effective application often requires use of a nanoparticle delivery system. In this chapter, we review the role of natural peptides in the design and creation of nanomedicines, with a particular focus on cell-penetrating peptides, antimicrobial peptides, and peptide toxins. The use of natural peptides in conjunction with nanoparticle delivery systems holds great promise for the development of new therapeutic formulations as well as novel platforms for the delivery of various cargoes. PMID:25819276

  16. Effective Design of Multifunctional Peptides by Combining Compatible Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Christian; Garza Ramos Martínez, Georgina; Moreno Blas, Daniel; Castillo González, David A.; Corzo, Gerardo; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctionality is a common trait of many natural proteins and peptides, yet the rules to generate such multifunctionality remain unclear. We propose that the rules defining some protein/peptide functions are compatible. To explore this hypothesis, we trained a computational method to predict cell-penetrating peptides at the sequence level and learned that antimicrobial peptides and DNA-binding proteins are compatible with the rules of our predictor. Based on this finding, we expected that designing peptides for CPP activity may render AMP and DNA-binding activities. To test this prediction, we designed peptides that embedded two independent functional domains (nuclear localization and yeast pheromone activity), linked by optimizing their composition to fit the rules characterizing cell-penetrating peptides. These peptides presented effective cell penetration, DNA-binding, pheromone and antimicrobial activities, thus confirming the effectiveness of our computational approach to design multifunctional peptides with potential therapeutic uses. Our computational implementation is available at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/dcf. PMID:27096600

  17. Enhanced cytotoxicity and decreased CD8 dependence of human cancer-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes after vaccination with low peptide dose.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Tanja; Baumgaertner, Petra; Wieckowski, Sébastien; Devêvre, Estelle; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E

    2012-06-01

    In mice, vaccination with high peptide doses generates higher frequencies of specific CD8+ T cells, but with lower avidity compared to vaccination with lower peptide doses. To investigate the impact of peptide dose on CD8+ T cell responses in humans, melanoma patients were vaccinated with 0.1 or 0.5 mg Melan-A/MART-1 peptide, mixed with CpG 7909 and Incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Neither the kinetics nor the amplitude of the Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cell responses differed between the two vaccination groups. Also, CD8+ T cell differentiation and cytokine production ex vivo were similar in the two groups. Interestingly, after low peptide dose vaccination, Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cells showed enhanced degranulation upon peptide stimulation, as assessed by CD107a upregulation and perforin release ex vivo. In accordance, CD8+ T cell clones derived from low peptide dose-vaccinated patients showed significantly increased degranulation and stronger cytotoxicity. In parallel, Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cells and clones from low peptide dose-vaccinated patients expressed lower CD8 levels, despite similar or even stronger binding to tetramers. Furthermore, CD8+ T cell clones from low peptide dose-vaccinated patients bound CD8 binding-deficient tetramers more efficiently, suggesting that they may express higher affinity TCRs. We conclude that low peptide dose vaccination generated CD8+ T cell responses with stronger cytotoxicity and lower CD8 dependence.

  18. The incretin hormone glucagon‐like peptide 1 increases mitral cell excitability by decreasing conductance of a voltage‐dependent potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn‐Smith, Ida J.; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2016-01-01

    Key points The gut hormone called glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1) is a strong moderator of energy homeostasis and communication between the peripheral organs and the brain.GLP‐1 signalling occurs in the brain; using a newly developed genetic reporter line of mice, we have discovered GLP‐synthesizing cells in the olfactory bulb.GLP‐1 increases the firing frequency of neurons (mitral cells) that encode olfactory information by decreasing activity of voltage‐dependent K channels (Kv1.3).Modifying GLP‐1 levels, either therapeutically or following the ingestion of food, could alter the excitability of neurons in the olfactory bulb in a nutrition or energy state‐dependent manner to influence olfactory detection or metabolic sensing.The results of the present study uncover a new function for an olfactory bulb neuron (deep short axon cells, Cajal cells) that could be capable of modifying mitral cell activity through the release of GLP‐1. This might be of relevance for the action of GLP‐1 mimetics now widely used in the treatment of diabetes. Abstract The olfactory system is intricately linked with the endocrine system where it may serve as a detector of the internal metabolic state or energy homeostasis in addition to its classical function as a sensor of external olfactory information. The recent development of transgenic mGLU‐yellow fluorescent protein mice that express a genetic reporter under the control of the preproglucagon reporter suggested the presence of the gut hormone, glucagon‐like peptide (GLP‐1), in deep short axon cells (Cajal cells) of the olfactory bulb and its neuromodulatory effect on mitral cell (MC) first‐order neurons. A MC target for the peptide was determined using GLP‐1 receptor binding assays, immunocytochemistry for the receptor and injection of fluorescence‐labelled GLP‐1 analogue exendin‐4. Using patch clamp recording of olfactory bulb slices in the whole‐cell configuration, we report that GLP‐1 and its

  19. Impact of decreased serum albumin levels on acute kidney injury in patients with acute decompensated heart failure: a potential association of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Goto, Yoichi; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kawano, Yuhei; Kangawa, Kenji

    2017-02-07

    Although hypoalbuminemia at admission is a risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), the clinical significance of decreased serum albumin levels (DAL) during ADHF therapy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether DAL was associated with AKI, and whether intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) administration, which provides an effective treatment for ADHF but promotes albumin extravasation, was associated with DAL and AKI. A total of 231 consecutive patients with ADHF were enrolled. AKI was defined as ≥0.3 mg/dl absolute or 1.5-fold increase in serum creatinine levels within 48 h. AKI occurred in 73 (32%) of the 231 patients during ADHF therapy. The median value of decreases in serum albumin levels was 0.3 g/dl at 7 days after admission. When DAL was defined as ≥0.3 g/dl decrease in serum albumin levels, DAL occurred in 113 patients, and was independently associated with AKI. Of the 231 patients, 73 (32%) were treated with intravenous ANP. DAL occurred more frequently in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (77 vs. 36%, p < 0.001), and ANP was independently associated with DAL. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (48 vs. 24%, p < 0.001). ANP was independently associated with AKI. In conclusion, DAL is associated with AKI. Intravenous ANP administration may be one of the promoting factors of DAL, which leads to AKI, indicating a possible novel mechanism of AKI.

  20. Purification and characterization of a novel cell-penetrating carrier similar to cholera toxin chimeric protein.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiping; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Huaqian; Yu, Lin; Zhou, Xiaofen; Sun, Yunxiao; Zhao, Suqing; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Developing a recombinant vector for noninvasively delivering biological macromolecules into the brain is important. This study constructed and purified a protein complex based on the cholera toxin (CT) molecular structure. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-modified A2 subunits of CT (CTA2) were used as tracer molecules for introduction of transactivator of transcription (TAT) through the A subunit into cells. The protein complex EGFP-CTA2-TAT/(CTB)5 (CTB: B subunit of CT) was obtained using an in vitro recombination method and verified by monosialoganglioside-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high performance liquid chromatography assay. The protein complexes bound more strongly to monosialoganglioside (GM1) than (CTB)5 at low concentrations (0.625-1.25 μg/mL). In vitro assays revealed that the transmembrane function of TAT was also maintained. The GM1-binding activity and cell membrane-penetrating ability suggested that a CT structure-based protein complexes could be used to design a delivery carrier for intranasal administration through GM1 binding. The expression vector introduced in this study provides a feasible expression frame for constructing several new macromolecular protein drugs for effective cell penetration.

  1. Biofunctionalized nanoparticles with pH-responsive and cell penetrating blocks for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, V. M.; Marques, J. G.; Sousa, F.; Louro, R. O.; Queiroz, J. A.; Correia, I. J.

    2013-07-01

    Bridging the gap between nanoparticulate delivery systems and translational gene therapy is a long sought after requirement in nanomedicine-based applications. However, recent developments regarding nanoparticle functionalization have brought forward the ability to synthesize materials with biofunctional moieties that mimic the evolved features of viral particles. Herein we report the versatile conjugation of both cell penetrating arginine and pH-responsive histidine moieties into the chitosan polymeric backbone, to improve the physicochemical characteristics of the native material. Amino acid coupling was confirmed by 2D TOCSY NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The synthesized chitosan-histidine-arginine (CH-H-R) polymer complexed plasmid DNA biopharmaceuticals, and spontaneously assembled into stable 105 nm nanoparticles with spherical morphology and positive surface charge. The functionalized delivery systems were efficiently internalized into the intracellular compartment, and exhibited remarkably higher transfection efficiency than unmodified chitosan without causing any cytotoxic effect. Additional findings regarding intracellular trafficking events reveal their preferential escape from degradative lysosomal pathways and nuclear localization. Overall, this assembly of nanocarriers with bioinspired moieties provides the foundations for the design of efficient and customizable materials for cancer gene therapy.

  2. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  3. TOE1 is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication with cell-penetrating capability

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Sabina; Barat, Corinne; Cabrita, Miguel A.; Gargaun, Ana; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Tremblay, Michel J.; de Belle, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Target of Egr1 (TOE1) is a nuclear protein localized primarily in nucleoli and Cajal bodies that was identified as a downstream target of the immediate early gene Egr1. TOE1 displays a functional deadenylation domain and has been shown to participate in spliceosome assembly. We report here that TOE1 can function as an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and show evidence that supports a direct interaction of TOE1 with the viral specific transactivator response element as part of the inhibitory mechanism. In addition, we show that TOE1 can be secreted by activated CD8+ T lymphocytes and can be cleaved by the serine protease granzyme B, one of the main components of cytotoxic granules. Both full-length and cleaved TOE1 can spontaneously cross the plasma membrane and penetrate cells in culture, retaining HIV-1 inhibitory activity. Antiviral potency of TOE1 and its cell-penetrating capability have been identified to lie within a 35-amino-acid region containing the nuclear localization sequence. PMID:26056259

  4. Site-Specific Polymer Attachment to HR2 Peptide Fusion Inhibitors against HIV-1 Decreases Binding Association Rates and Dissociation Rates Rather Than Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Stauffer, Angela N; Wurm, Frederik R; Root, Michael J; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2017-03-15

    A popular strategy for overcoming the limited plasma half-life of peptide heptad repeat 2 (HR2) fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 is conjugation with biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). However, despite improved resistance to proteolysis and reduced renal elimination, covalent attachment of polymers often causes a loss in therapeutic potency. In this study, we investigated the molecular origins of the loss in potency upon conjugation of linear, midfunctional, and hyperbranched PEG-like polymers to peptides that inhibit HIV-1-host cell membrane fusion. Fluorescence binding assays revealed that polymer conjugation imparted mass transport limitations that manifested as coexistent slower association and dissociation rates from the gp41 target on HIV-1. Furthermore, reduced association kinetics rather than affinity disruption was responsible for the loss in antiviral potency. Finally, the binding assays indicated that the unmodified HR2-derived peptide demonstrated diffusion-limited binding. The observed high potency of the unmodified peptide in HIV-1 inhibition assays was therefore attributed to rapid peptide conformational changes upon binding to the gp41 prehairpin structure. This study emphasizes that the view in which polymer ligation to therapeutic peptides inadvertently leads to loss in potency due to a loss in binding affinity requires scientific verification on a case-by-case basis and that high peptide potency may be due to rapid target-binding events.

  5. VDAC1-based peptides: novel pro-apoptotic agents and potential therapeutics for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prezma, T; Shteinfer, A; Admoni, L; Raviv, Z; Sela, I; Levi, I; Shoshan-Barmatz, V

    2013-09-19

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane, mediates metabolic cross-talk between the mitochondrion and the cytoplasm and thus serves a fundamental role in cell energy metabolism. VDAC1 also plays a key role in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, interacting with anti-apoptotic proteins. Resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis involves quenching the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by over-expression of anti-apoptotic/pro-survival hexokinase (HK) and Bcl-2 family proteins, proteins that mediate their anti-apoptotic activities via interaction with VDAC1. Using specifically designed VDAC1-based cell-penetrating peptides, we targeted these anti-apoptotic proteins to prevent their pro-survival/anti-apoptotic activities. Anti-apoptotic proteins are expressed at high levels in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), an incurable disease requiring innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. CLL is characterized by a clonal accumulation of mature neoplastic B cells that are resistant to apoptosis. Specifically, we demonstrate that the VDAC1-based peptides (Antp-LP4 and N-Terminal-Antp) selectively kill peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from CLL patients, yet spare those obtained from healthy donors. The cell death induction competence of the peptides was well correlated with the amount of double positive CD19/CD5 cancerous CLL PBMCs, further illustrating their selectivity toward cancer cells. Moreover, these VDAC1-based peptides induced apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-mediated pathway, reflected in membrane blebbing, condensation of nuclei, DNA fragmentation, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased cellular ATP levels and detachment of HK, all leading to apoptotic cell death. Thus, the mode of action of the peptides involves decreasing energy production and inducing apoptosis. Over 27 versions of cell-penetrating VDAC1-based peptides

  6. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue, exendin-4, decreases the rewarding value of food: a new role for mesolimbic GLP-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Suzanne L; Shirazi, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Bergquist, Filip; Nissbrandt, Hans; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2012-04-04

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) system is a recently established target for type 2 diabetes treatment. In addition to regulating glucose homeostasis, GLP-1 also reduces food intake. Previous studies demonstrate that the anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 can be mediated through hypothalamic and brainstem circuits which regulate homeostatic feeding. Here, we demonstrate an entirely novel neurobiological mechanism for GLP-1-induced anorexia in rats, involving direct effects of a GLP-1 agonist, Exendin-4 (EX4) on food reward that are exerted at the level of the mesolimbic reward system. We assessed the impact of peripheral, central, and intramesolimbic EX4 on two models of food reward: conditioned place preference (CPP) and progressive ratio operant-conditioning. Food-reward behavior was reduced in the CPP test by EX4, as rats no longer preferred an environment previously paired to chocolate pellets. EX4 also decreased motivated behavior for sucrose in a progressive ratio operant-conditioning paradigm when administered peripherally. We show that this effect is mediated centrally, via GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs). GLP-1Rs are expressed in several key nodes of the mesolimbic reward system; however, their function remains unexplored. Thus we sought to determine the neurobiological substrates underlying the food-reward effect. We found that the EX4-mediated inhibition of food reward could be driven from two key mesolimbic structures-ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens-without inducing concurrent malaise or locomotor impairment. The current findings, that activation of central GLP-1Rs strikingly suppresses food reward/motivation by interacting with the mesolimbic system, indicate an entirely novel mechanism by which the GLP-1R stimulation affects feeding-oriented behavior.

  7. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  8. A Cell-Permeable Phospholipase C[gamma]1-Binding Peptide Transduces Neurons and Impairs Long-Term Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Sonja; Dash, Pramod K.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factor-mediated signaling has emerged as an essential component of memory formation. In this study, we used a phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC[gamma]1) binding, cell-penetrating peptide to sequester PLC[gamma]1 away from its target, the phosphotyrosine residues within the activated growth factor receptor. Peptides appear to transduce neurons…

  9. Thermally Targeted Delivery of a c-Myc Inhibitory Peptide In Vivo Using Elastin-Like Polypeptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), bactenecin (Bac), penetratin ( Pen ), or Tat, is conjugated to the ELP to enhance delivery of the polypeptide across the...CPPs are short peptides known to enhance the cellular uptake of large cargo. The three CPPs proposed for this study are the penetratin ( Pen ...we conjugated the c-Myc inhibitory peptide and the Pen peptide to ELP for thermally targeted delivery ( Pen -ELP-H1) (1). Uptake of Pen -ELP-H1 in MCF-7

  10. Decrease in formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV) enhanced disease with RSV G glycoprotein peptide immunization in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rey, Gertrud U; Miao, Congrong; Caidi, Hayat; Trivedi, Suvang U; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Tripp, Ralph A; Anderson, Larry J; Haynes, Lia M

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a high priority target for vaccine development. One concern in RSV vaccine development is that a non-live virus vaccine would predispose for enhanced disease similar to that seen with the formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccine. Since a mAb specific to RSV G protein can reduce pulmonary inflammation and eosinophilia seen after RSV infection of FI-RSV vaccinated mice, we hypothesized that RSV G peptides that induce antibodies with similar reactivity may limit enhanced disease after subunit or other non-live RSV vaccines. In support of this hypothesis, we show that FI-RSV vaccinated mice administered RSV G peptide vaccines had a significant reduction in enhanced disease after RSV challenge. These data support the importance of RSV G during infection to RSV disease pathogenesis and suggest that use of appropriately designed G peptide vaccines to reduce the risk of enhanced disease with non-live RSV vaccines merits further study.

  11. Oxysterols decrease apical-to-basolateral transport of Aß peptides via an ABCB1-mediated process in an in vitro Blood-brain barrier model constituted of bovine brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pol, Julien; Candela, Pietra; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Fenart, Laurence; Gosselet, Fabien

    2013-06-23

    It is known that activation of the liver X receptors (LXRs) by natural or synthetic agonists decreases the amyloid burden and enhances cognitive function in transgenic murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that LXR activation may affect the transport of amyloid ß (Aß) peptides across the blood-brain barrier (the BBB, which isolates the brain from the peripheral circulation). By using a well-characterized in vitro BBB model, we demonstrated that LXR agonists (24S-hydroxycholesterol, 27-hydroxycholesterol and T0901317) modulated the expression of target genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis (such as ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1)) and promoted cellular cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and high density lipoproteins. Interestingly, we also observed a decrease in Aß peptide influx across brain capillary endothelial cells, although ABCA1 did not appear to be directly involved in this process. By focusing on others receptors and transporters that are thought to have major roles in Aß peptide entry into the brain, we then demonstrated that LXR stimulation provoked an increase in expression of the ABCB1 transporter (also named P-glycoprotein (P-gp)). Further investigations confirmed ABCB1's involvement in the restriction of Aß peptide influx. Taken as a whole, our results not only reinforce the BBB's key role in cerebral cholesterol homeostasis but also demonstrate the importance of the LXR/ABCB1 axis in Aß peptide influx-highlighting an attractive new therapeutic approach whereby the brain could be protected from peripheral Aß peptide entry.

  12. Versatile pH-response Micelles with High Cell-Penetrating Helical Diblock Copolymers for Photoacoustic Imaging Guided Synergistic Chemo-Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shengyu; Liu, Yajing; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Zhihuang; Ding, Yunsheng; Wu, Zongquan; Yin, Jun; Nie, Liming

    2016-01-01

    With high optical absorption efficiency, near infrared (NIR) dyes have been proposed as theranostic agents for fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, inherent hydrophobicity and short circulation time of small molecule hinder the further biomedical application. Herein smart amphiphilic copolymer was synthesized containing IR780/camptothecin@poly(ε-caprolactone) (IR780/CPT@PCL) as core, helical poly(phenyl isocyanide) (PPI) blocks as shell with the pH-responsive rhodamine B (RhB) moieties in the core-shell interface. With hydrophilic helical PPI coronas, these micelles present significantly enhanced cell-penetrating capacity that plays a key role in facilitating intracellular delivery of various cargos. By encapsulating CPT and IR780 molecules, the multifunctional self-assemble probe has huge potential to realize functional cooperativity and adaptability for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The in vitro and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that the pH-triggered fluorescent responsiveness and strong acoustic generation permit them efficient fluorescent and PA signal sensing for cancer diagnosis. Moreover, with 808 nm laser irradiation, the generated heat significantly improves the drug release from PCL core, leading to synergetic chemo-photothermal therapy and decreases tumor recurrence rates in mice. Overall, the biocompatible multifunctional micelles with these combined advantages can potentially be utilized for PAI guided disease diagnosis and tumor ablation. PMID:27924155

  13. Increasing Growth Yield and Decreasing Acetylation in Escherichia coli by Optimizing the Carbon-to-Magnesium Ratio in Peptide-Based Media.

    PubMed

    Christensen, David G; Orr, James S; Rao, Christopher V; Wolfe, Alan J

    2017-03-15

    Complex media are routinely used to cultivate diverse bacteria. However, this complexity can obscure the factors that govern cell growth. While studying protein acetylation in buffered tryptone broth supplemented with glucose (TB7-glucose), we observed that Escherichia coli did not fully consume glucose prior to stationary phase. However, when we supplemented this medium with magnesium, the glucose was completely consumed during exponential growth, with concomitant increases in cell number and biomass but reduced cell size. Similar results were observed with other sugars and other peptide-based media, including lysogeny broth. Magnesium also limited cell growth for Vibrio fischeri and Bacillus subtilis in TB7-glucose. Finally, magnesium supplementation reduced protein acetylation. Based on these results, we conclude that growth in peptide-based media is magnesium limited. We further conclude that magnesium supplementation can be used to tune protein acetylation without genetic manipulation. These results have the potential to reduce potentially deleterious acetylated isoforms of recombinant proteins without negatively affecting cell growth.IMPORTANCE Bacteria are often grown in complex media. These media are thought to provide the nutrients necessary to grow bacteria to high cell densities. In this work, we found that peptide-based media containing a sugar are magnesium limited for bacterial growth. In particular, magnesium supplementation is necessary for the bacteria to use the sugar for cell growth. Interestingly, in the absence of magnesium supplementation, the bacteria still consume the sugar. However, rather than use it for cell growth, the bacteria instead use the sugar to acetylate lysines on proteins. As lysine acetylation may alter the activity of proteins, this work demonstrates how lysine acetylation can be tuned through magnesium supplementation. These findings may be useful for recombinant protein production, when acetylated isoforms are to be avoided

  14. Design of antiviral stapled peptides containing a biphenyl cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Muppidi, Avinash; Zhang, Hongtao; Curreli, Francesca; Li, Nan; Debnath, Asim K; Lin, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Here we report the design and synthesis of a panel of stapled peptides containing a distance-matching biphenyl cross-linker based upon a peptide capsid assembly inhibitor reported previously. Compared with the linear peptide, the biphenyl-stapled peptides exhibited significantly enhanced cell penetration and potent antiviral activity in the cell-based infection assays. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that the most active stapled CAI peptide binds to the C-terminal domain of HIV capsid protein as well as envelop glycoprotein gp120 with low micromolar binding affinities, and as a result, inhibits both the HIV-1 virus entry and the virus assembly.

  15. The fusogenic peptide HA2 impairs selectivity of CXCR4-targeted protein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Serna, N; Mattanovich, M; Cazzanelli, P; Sánchez-Chardi, A; Conchillo-Solé, O; Cortés, F; Daura, X; Unzueta, U; Mangues, R; Villaverde, A; Vázquez, E

    2017-03-21

    We demonstrate here that the genetic incorporation of the fusogenic peptide HA2 into a CXCR4-targeted protein nanoparticle dramatically reduces the specificity of the interaction between nanoparticles and cell receptors, a factor to be considered when designing tumor-homing drug vehicles displaying endosomal-escape agents. The loss of specificity is concomitant with enhanced cell penetrability.

  16. The Antitumor Peptide CIGB-552 Increases COMMD1 and Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández Massó, Julio R; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Tejeda, Yelaine; Astrada, Soledad; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Delgado-Roche, Livan; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Vallespí, Maribel G

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the peptide L-2 designed from an alanine scanning of the Limulus-derived LALF32-51 region is a potential candidate for the anticancer therapy and its cell-penetrating capacity is an associated useful property. By the modification in the primary structure of L-2, a second-generation peptide (CIGB-552) was developed. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κB, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 decreases the antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in the tumor cells. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the mechanism of action of the peptide CIGB-552, which could be relevant in the design of future anticancer therapies.

  17. Short polyhistidine peptides penetrate effectively into Nicotiana tabacum-cultured cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Sayaka; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The polyhistidine peptides (PHPs) have been previously reported as novel cell-penetrating peptides and are efficiently internalized into mammal cells; however, penetration of PHPs into other cell types is unknown. In this study, the cellular uptake of PHPs in plant and yeast cells was found to be dependent on the number of histidines, and short PHPs (H6-H10 peptides) showed effective internalization. The H8 peptide showed the highest cell-penetrating capacity and localized to vacuoles in plant and yeast cells. Low-temperature conditions inhibited significantly the cellular uptake of short PHPs by both cells. However, net charge neutralization of PHPs also completely inhibited cellular uptake by plant cells, but not by yeast cells. These results indicate that short PHPs penetrate effectively into plant and yeast cells by similar mechanism with the exception of net charge dependency. The findings show the short PHPs are promising candidates for new delivery tools into plant and yeast cells.

  18. Structure-Function Analysis of the Glioma Targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 Peptide Corresponding to the Tubulin-Binding Site on the Light Neurofilament Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Takahashi, Masayuki; Prevost, Chantal; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that a 24 amino acid peptide (NFL-TBS.40-63) corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, selectively enters in glioblastoma cells where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. Here, we analyzed the structure-function relationships using an alanine-scanning strategy, in order to identify residues essential for these biological activities. We showed that the majority of modified peptides present a decreased or total loss to penetrate in these cells, or to alter microtubules. Correspondingly, circular dichroism measurements showed that this peptide forms either β-sheet or α-helix structures according to the solvent and that alanine substitution modified or destabilized the structure, in relation with changes in the biological activities. Moreover, substitution of serine residues by phosphoserine or aspartic acid concomitantly decreased the cell penetrating activity and the structure stability. These results indicate the importance of structure for the activities, including selectivity to glioblastoma cells of this peptide, and its regulation by phosphorylation. PMID:23152907

  19. pH-Dependent In-Cell Self-Assembly of Peptide Inhibitors Increases the Anti-Prion Activity While Decreasing the Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Lee, Young-Joo; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Ryou, Chongsuk; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-02-13

    The first step in the conventional approach to self-assembled biomaterials is to develop well-defined nanostructures in vitro, which is followed by disruption of the preformed nanostructures at the inside of the cell to achieve bioactivity. Here, we propose an inverse strategy to develop in-cell gain-of-function self-assembled nanostructures. In this approach, the supramolecular building blocks exist in a unimolecular/unordered state in vitro or at the outside of the cell and assemble into well-defined nanostructures after cell internalization. We used block copolypeptides of an oligoarginine and a self-assembling peptide as building blocks and investigated correlations among the nanostructural state, antiprion bioactivity, and cytotoxicity. The optimal bioactivity (i.e., the highest antiprion activity and lowest cytotoxicity) was obtained when the building blocks existed in a unimolecular/unordered state in vitro and during the cell internalization process, exerting minimal cytotoxic damage to cell membranes, and were subsequently converted into high-charge-density vesicles in the low pH endosome/lysosomes in vivo, thus, resulting in the significantly enhanced antiprion activity. In particular, the in-cell self-assembly concept presents a feasible approach to developing therapeutics against protein misfolding diseases. In general, the in-cell self-assembly provides a novel inverse methodology to supramolecular bionanomaterials.

  20. Decreased glycation and structural protection properties of γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-cysteine peptide isolated from fresh garlic scales (Allium sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Tan, Dehong; Zhang, Yao; Chen, Lulu; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Xuan; Wu, Zhaoxia; Bai, Bing; Ji, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    The antiglycative effect of γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-cysteine (GSAC) peptide isolated from fresh garlic scales was investigated in the bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose system. GSAC inhibited the increase of fluorescence intensity at about 440 nm in a concentration-dependent manner and reduced reacted free lysine side chains by 10.9%, 24.7% and 37.7%, as the GSAC concentrations increased from 0.1 to 2.5 mg mL(-1). Glycation-specific decline in BSA α-helix content (from 61.3% to 55.6%) and increase in β-sheet (from 2.1% to 5.4%) were prevented by GSAC (2.5 mg mL(-1)) in vitro, implying its stabilisation effect. GSAC treatment (2.5 mg mL(-1)) suppressed protein crosslinking to form polymers. Additionally, GSAC (10, 40, and 160 μg mL(-1)) showed radical-scavenging and metal-chelating capacities. In conclusion, GSAC has an antiglycative effect, which may involve its radical-scavenging and metal-chelating capacities.

  1. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improves reference memory performance and decreases immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Isacson, Ruben; Nielsen, Elisabet; Dannaeus, Karin; Bertilsson, Göran; Patrone, Cesare; Zachrisson, Olof; Wikström, Lilian

    2011-01-10

    We have earlier shown that the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 stimulates neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and excerts anti-parkinsonian behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exendin-4 treatment on hippocampus-associated cognitive and mood-related behavior in adult rodents. To investigate potential effects of exendin-4 on hippocampal function, radial maze and forced swim test were employed. The time necessary to solve a radial maze task and the duration of immobility in the forced swim test were significantly reduced compared to respective vehicle groups if the animals had received exendin-4 during 1-2weeks before testing. In contrast to the positive control imipramine, single administration of exendin-4 1h before the challenge in the forced swim test had no effect. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for DNA synthesis, as well as doublecortin expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following chronic treatment with exendin-4 compared to vehicle-treated controls. The neurogenic effect of exendin-4 on hippocampus was confirmed by quantitative PCR showing an upregulation of mRNA expression for Ki-67, doublecortin and Mash-1. Since exendin-4 significantly improves hippocampus-associated behavior in adult rodents, it may be a candidate for alleviation of mood and cognitive disorders.

  2. Vitamin B12 conjugation of peptide-YY(3-36) decreases food intake compared to native peptide-YY(3-36) upon subcutaneous administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelly E; Elfers, Clinton T; Burke, Rachael M; Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Blevins, James E; Roth, Christian L; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-05-01

    Challenges to peptide-based therapies include rapid clearance, ready degradation by hydrolysis/proteolysis, and poor intestinal uptake and/or a need for blood brain barrier transport. This work evaluates the efficacy of conjugation of vitamin B12 (B12) on sc administered peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY)(3-36) function. In the current experiments, a B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate was tested against native PYY(3-36), and an inactive conjugate B12-PYYC36 (null control) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments demonstrated similar agonism for the neuropeptide Y2 receptor by the B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate (EC50 26.5 nM) compared with native PYY(3-36) (EC50 16.0 nM), with the null control having an EC50 of 1.8 μM. In vivo experiments were performed in young adult male Sprague Dawley rats (9 wk). Daily treatments were delivered sc in five 1-hour pulses, each pulse delivering 5-10 nmol/kg, by implanted microinfusion pumps. Increases in hindbrain Fos expression were comparable 90 minutes after B12-PYY(3-36) or PYY3-36 injection relative to saline or B12-PYYC36. Food intake was reduced during a 5-day treatment for both B12-PYY(3-36)- (24%, P = .001) and PYY(3-36)-(13%, P = .008) treated groups relative to baseline. In addition, reduction of food intake after the three dark cycle treatment pulses was more consistent with B12-PYY(3-36) treatment (-26%, -29%, -27%) compared with the PYY(3-36) treatment (-3%, -21%, -16%), and B12-PYY(3-36) generated a significantly longer inhibition of food intake vs. PYY(3-36) treatment after the first two pulses (P = .041 and P = .036, respectively). These findings demonstrate a stronger, more consistent, and longer inhibition of food intake after the pulses of B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate compared with the native PYY(3-36).

  3. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of peptide-lipid interactions using the mouse paneth cell α-defensin cryptdin-4.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhijit; Tai, Kenneth P; Schmidt, Nathan W; Ouellette, André J; Wong, Gerard C L

    2011-01-01

    In the presence of specialized proteins or peptides, a biological membrane can spontaneously restructure itself to allow communication between the intracellular and the extracellular sides. Examples of these proteins include cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which interact with cell membranes in complex ways. We briefly review cell-penetrating peptides and AMPs, and describe in detail how recombinant AMPs are made and their activity evaluated, using α-defensins as a specific example. We also review X-ray scattering methods used in studying peptide-membrane interactions, focusing on the procedures for small-angle X-ray scattering experiments on peptide-membrane interactions at realistic solution conditions, using both laboratory and synchrotron sources.

  4. Combination treatment with Grb7 peptide and Doxorubicin or Trastuzumab (Herceptin) results in cooperative cell growth inhibition in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pero, S C; Shukla, G S; Cookson, M M; Flemer, S; Krag, D N

    2007-05-21

    Grb7 has potential importance in the progression of cancer. We have previously identified a novel peptide that binds to the SH2 domain of Grb7 and inhibits its association with several different receptor tyrosine kinases. We have synthesised the Grb7 peptide, G7-18NATE, with two different cell penetrating peptides, Penetratin and Tat. In this study, we have shown that both Penetratin- and Tat-conjugated G7-18NATE peptides are able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. There was no significant effects on breast cancer MCF-7cells, non-malignant MCF 10A or 3T3 cells. In addition, there was no significant inhibition of proliferation by Penetratin or Tat alone or by their conjugates with arbitrary peptide sequence in any of the cell lines tested. We determined the EC50 of G7-18NATE-P peptide for SK-BR-3 cell proliferation to be 7.663 x 10(-6) M. Co-treatment of G7-18NATE-P peptide plus Doxorubicin in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells resulted in an additional inhibition of proliferation, resulting in 56 and 84% decreases in the Doxorubicin EC50 value in the presence of 5 x 10(-6) and 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide, respectively. Importantly, the co-treatment with Doxorubicin and the delivery peptide did not change the Doxorubicin EC50. Since Grb7 associates with ErbB2, we assessed whether the peptide inhibitor would have a combined effect with a molecule that targets ErbB2, Herceptin. Co-treatment of Herceptin plus 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide in SK-BR-3 cells resulted in a 46% decrease in the Herceptin EC50 value and no decrease following the co-treatment with Herceptin and penetratin alone. This Grb7 peptide has potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent alone, in combination with traditional chemotherapy, or in combination with other targeting molecules.

  5. Stapled peptides for intracellular drug targets.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Gregory L; Hilinski, Gerard J

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that engage in intracellular interactions with other proteins are widely considered among the most biologically appealing yet chemically intractable targets for drug discovery. The critical interaction surfaces of these proteins typically lack the deep hydrophobic involutions that enable potent, selective targeting by small organic molecules, and their localization within the cell puts them beyond the reach of protein therapeutics. Considerable interest has therefore arisen in next-generation targeting molecules that combine the broad target recognition capabilities of protein therapeutics with the robust cell-penetrating ability of small molecules. One type that has shown promise in early-stage studies is hydrocarbon-stapled α-helical peptides, a novel class of synthetic miniproteins locked into their bioactive α-helical fold through the site-specific introduction of a chemical brace, an all-hydrocarbon staple. Stapling can greatly improve the pharmacologic performance of peptides, increasing their target affinity, proteolytic resistance, and serum half-life while conferring on them high levels of cell penetration through endocytic vesicle trafficking. Here, we discuss considerations crucial to the successful design and evaluation of potent stapled peptide interactions, our intention being to facilitate the broad application of this technology to intractable targets of both basic biologic interest and potential therapeutic value.

  6. Increased peptide YY blood concentrations, not decreased acyl-ghrelin, are associated with reduced hunger and food intake in healthy older women: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary; Moss, Charlotte; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bottin, Jeanne; Frost, Gary

    2016-10-01

    With ageing there is frequently a loss of appetite, termed anorexia of ageing, which can result in under-nutrition. We do not know how appetite control alters with ageing. The objective of this study was to investigate whether differences in the release of, and response to, gastrointestinal appetite hormones is altered in young compared to old healthy volunteers. We hypothesised that an increase in PYY and GLP-1 or a decrease ghrelin may result in a decreased appetite. A comparative experimental design, using a cross-sectional sample of ages from a healthy population, matched for sex and BMI was used. The study compared total ghrelin, acyl-ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1 and subjective appetite responses to ingestion of a standardised 2781kj (660 kcal) test meal. 31 female volunteers aged between 21 and 92yrs took part. Multiple linear regression showed that both age and sex had an independent effect on energy intake. Subjective appetite scores showed that hunger, pleasantness to eat, and prospective food intake were significantly lower in the older age groups. PYY incremental area under the curve (IAUC) was greater in the oldest old compared to younger ages f(3,27) = 2.9, p = 0.05. No differences in GLP-1, ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin were observed in the older compared to younger age groups. Our data suggest that there may be increases in postprandial PYY(3-36) levels in female octogenarians, potentially resulting in reduced appetite. There does not appear to be any change in ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin concentrations with ageing.

  7. How to address CPP and AMP translocation? Methods to detect and quantify peptide internalization in vitro and in vivo (Review).

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2007-01-01

    Membrane translocation is a crucial issue when addressing the activity of both cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides. Translocation is responsible for the therapeutic potential of cell-penetrating peptides as drug carriers and can dictate the killing mechanisms, selectivity and efficiency of antimicrobial peptides. It is essential to evaluate if the internalization of cell-penetrating peptides is mediated by endocytosis and if it is able to internalize attached cargoes. The mode of action of an antimicrobial peptide cannot be fully understood if it is not known whether the peptide acts exclusively at the membrane level or also at the cytoplasm. Therefore, experimental methods to evaluate and quantify translocation processes are of first importance. In this work, over 20 methods described in the literature for the assessment of peptide translocation in vivo and in vitro, with and without attached macromolecular cargoes, are discussed and their applicability, advantages and disadvantages reviewed. In addition, a classification of these methods is proposed, based on common approaches to detect translocation.

  8. Phospholipid conjugate for intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gang; Fang, Huafeng; Song, Yinyin; Bielska, Agata A.; Wang, Zhenghui; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have a number of attractive features that have made them an ideal choice for antisense and antigene-based tools, probes and drugs, but their poor membrane permeability has limited their application as therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Herein we report a general method for the synthesis of phospholipid-PNAs (LP-PNAs), and compare the effect of non-cleavable lipids and bioreductively cleavable lipids (L and LSS) and phospholipid (LP) on the splice-correcting bioactivity of a PNA bearing the cell penetrating Arg9 group (PNA-R9). While the three constructs show similar and increasing bioactivity at 1–3 μM, the activity of LP-PNA-R9 continues to increase from 4–6 μM while the activity of L-PNA-R9 remains constant and LSS-PNA-R9 decreases rapidly in parallel with their relative cytotoxicity. The activity of both LP-PNA-R9 and L-PNA-R9 were found to dramatically increase with chloroquine, as expected for an endocytotic entry mechanism. Both constructs were also found to have CMC values of 1.0 and 4.5 μM in 150 mM NaCl, pH 7 water, suggesting that micelle formation may play a hitherto unrecognized role in modulating toxicity and/or facilitating endocytosis. PMID:19678628

  9. The non-peptide neurokinin-1 antagonist, RPR 100893, decreases c-fos expression in trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious chemical meningeal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutrer, F M; Moussaoui, S; Garret, C; Moskowitz, M A

    1995-02-01

    The effect of RPR 100893, a selective and specific neurokinin-1 antagonist, or its enantiomer RPR 103253 was examined on c-fos antigen expression in brain stem and upper cervical cord 2 h after intracisternal capsaicin injection (30.5 micrograms/ml) in pentobarbital-anesthetized Hartley guinea-pigs. Positive cells were counted at three levels corresponding to obex, -2.25 mm and -6.75 mm in 18 sections (50 microns). Immunoreactivity was strongly expressed within laminae I and IIo of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, area postrema and the leptomeninges. Moderate labeling was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the medullary lateral reticular nucleus, whereas few positive cells were found in the ventral portion of the medullary reticular nucleus and Rexed laminae III-V and X. The distribution of labeled cells was consistent with previously reported results following subarachnoid placement of the noxious agents, blood or carrageenin. Pretreatment with RPR 100893 (1, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) but not its enantiomer (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) 30 min prior to capsaicin injection significantly reduced the number of positive cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner, but not within area postrema or nucleus of the solitary tract. These results indicate that (i) the instillation of capsaicin into the subarachnoid space is an effective stimulus for the induction of c-fos antigen within trigeminal nucleus caudalis, presumably through activation of trigeminovascular afferents, and (ii) the neurokinin-1 antagonist RPR 100893 reduces the number of positive cells selectively within this nucleus. The findings are significant because drugs which alleviate vascular headaches decrease the number of c-fos-positive cells within trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious meningeal stimulation. Hence, strategies aimed at blocking the neurokinin-1 receptor may be useful for treating migraine and cluster headache.

  10. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L.; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state 2H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of a

  11. Subcutaneous inverse vaccination with PLGA particles loaded with a MOG peptide and IL-10 decreases the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Woldetsadik, Abiy Demeke; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Shivakumar, Yogesh; Rizzi, Manuela; Carniato, Fabio; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Boggio, Elena; Clemente, Nausicaa; Comi, Cristoforo; Dianzani, Chiara; Boldorini, Renzo; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Renò, Filippo; Dianzani, Umberto

    2014-09-29

    "Inverse vaccination" refers to antigen-specific tolerogenic immunization treatments that are capable of inhibiting autoimmune responses. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), initial trials using purified myelin antigens required repeated injections because of the rapid clearance of the antigens. This problem has been overcome by DNA-based vaccines encoding for myelin autoantigens alone or in combination with "adjuvant" molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-4 or IL-10, that support regulatory immune responses. Phase I and II clinical trials with myelin basic protein (MBP)-based DNA vaccines showed positive results in reducing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-measured lesions and inducing tolerance to myelin antigens in subsets of MS patients. However, DNA vaccination has potential risks that limit its use in humans. An alternative approach could be the use of protein-based inverse vaccines loaded in polymeric biodegradable lactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) nano/microparticles (NP) to obtain the sustained release of antigens and regulatory adjuvants. The aim of this work was to test the effectiveness of PLGA-NP loaded with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 autoantigen and recombinant (r) IL-10 to inverse vaccinate mice with EAE. In vitro experiments showed that upon encapsulation in PLGA-NP, both MOG35-55 and rIL-10 were released for several weeks into the supernatant. PLGA-NP did not display cytotoxic or proinflammatory activity and were partially endocytosed by phagocytes. In vivo experiments showed that subcutaneous prophylactic and therapeutic inverse vaccination with PLGA-NP loaded with MOG35-55 and rIL-10 significantly ameliorated the course of EAE induced with MOG35-55 in C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, they decreased the histopathologic lesions in the central nervous tissue and the secretion of IL-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ induced by MOG35-55 in splenic T cells in vitro. These data suggest that

  12. Liposomes Combined an Integrin αvβ3-Specific Vector with pH-Responsible Cell-Penetrating Property for Highly Effective Antiglioma Therapy through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kairong; Long, Yang; Xu, Chaoqun; Wang, Yang; Qiu, Yue; Yu, Qianwen; Liu, Yayuan; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2015-09-30

    Glioma, one of the most common aggressive malignancies, has the highest mortality in the present world. Delivery of nanocarriers from the systemic circulation to the glioma sites would encounter multiple physiological and biological barriers, such as blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the poor penetration of nanocarriers into the tumor. To circumvent these hurdles, the paclitaxel-loaded liposomes were developed by conjugating with a TR peptide (PTX-TR-Lip), integrin αvβ3-specific vector with pH-responsible cell-penetrating property, for transporting drug across the BBB and then delivering into glioma. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies confirmed the very high affinity of TR-Lip and integrin αvβ3. In vitro results showed that TR-Lip exhibited strong transport ability across BBB, killed glioma cells and brain cancer stem cells (CSCs), and destroyed the vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels. In vivo results demonstrated that TR-Lip could better target glioma, and eliminated brain CSCs and the VM channels in tumor tissues. The median survival time of tumor-bearing mice after administering PTX-TR-Lip (45 days) was significantly longer than that after giving free PTX (25.5 days, p < 0.001) or other controls. In conclusion, PTX-TR-Lip would improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  14. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Amundson, Gregg; Geier, Suzanne; Falkum, Stacy; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a common post-translational modification present in eukaryotic cells. Many key proteins involved in signal transduction pathways are prenylated and inhibition of prenylation can be useful as a therapeutic intervention. While significant progress has been made in understanding protein prenylation in vitro, we have been interested in studying this process in living cells, including the question of where prenylated molecules localize. Here, we describe the synthesis and live cell analysis of a series of fluorescently labeled multifunctional peptides, based on the C-terminus of the naturally prenylated protein CDC42. A synthetic route was developed that features a key Acm to Scm protecting group conversion. This strategy was compatible with acid-sensitive isoprenoid moieties, and allowed incorporation of an appropriate fluorophore as well as a cell-penetrating sequence (penetratin). These peptides are able to enter cells through different mechanisms, depending on the presence or absence of the penetratin vehicle and the nature of the prenyl group attached. Interestingly, prenylated peptides lacking penetratin are able to enter cells freely through an energy-independent process, and localize in a perinuclear fashion. This effect extends to a prenylated peptide that includes a full “CAAX box” sequence (specifically, CVLL). Hence, these peptides open the door for studies of protein prenylation in living cells, including enzymatic processing and intracellular peptide trafficking. Moreover, the synthetic strategy developed here should be useful for the assembly of other types of peptides that contain acid sensitive functionalities. PMID:19425596

  15. CIGB-300, a proapoptotic peptide, inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farina, Hernán G; Benavent Acero, Fernando; Perera, Yasser; Rodríguez, Arielis; Perea, Silvio E; Castro, Boris Acevedo; Gomez, Roberto; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E

    2011-07-15

    We have previously demonstrated that a proapoptotic cyclic peptide CIGB-300, formerly known as P15-Tat delivered into the cells by the cell-penetrating peptide Tat, was able to abrogate the CK2-mediated phosphorylation and induce tumor regression when injected directly into solid tumors in mice or by systemic administration. In this work, we studied the role of CIGB-300 on the main events that take place in angiogenesis. At non-cytotoxic doses, CIGB-300 was able to inhibit adhesion, migration, and tubular network formation induced by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) growing upon Matrigel in vitro. Likewise, we evaluated the cellular penetration and localization into the HUVEC cells of CIGB-300. Our results confirmed a quick cellular penetration and a cytoplasmic accumulation in the early minutes of incubation and a translocation into the nuclei beginning at 12h of treatment, with a strong presence in the perinuclear area. A microarray analysis was used to determine the genes affected by the treatment. We observed that CIGB-300 significantly decreased four genes strongly associated with tubulogenesis, growth, and differentiation of endothelial cells. The CIGB-300 was tested in vivo on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes (CAM), and a large number of newly formed blood vessels were significantly regressed. The results suggested that CIGB-300 has a potential as an antiangiogenic treatment. The mechanism of action may be associated with partial inhibition of VEGF and Notch pathways.

  16. Taming the Wildness of "Trojan-Horse" Peptides by Charge-Guided Masking and Protease-Triggered Demasking for the Controlled Delivery of Antitumor Agents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nian-Qiu; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-03-14

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), also called "Trojan Horse" peptide, has become a successful approach to deliver various payloads into cells for achieving the intracellular access. However, the "Trojan Horse" peptide is too wild, not just to "Troy", but rather widely distributed in the body. Thus, there is an urgent need to tame the wildness of "Trojan Horse" peptide for targeted delivery of antineoplastic agents to the tumor site. To achieve this goal, we exploit a masked CPP-doxorubicin conjugate platform for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs using charge-guided masking and protease-triggered demasking strategies. In this platform, the cell-penetrating function of the positively CPP (d-form nonaarginine) is abrogated by a negatively shielding peptide (masked CPP), and between them is a cleavable substrate peptide by the protease (MMP-2/9). Protease-triggered demasking would occur when the masked CPP reached the MMP-2/9-riched tumor. The CPP-doxorubicin conjugate (CPP-Dox) and the masked CPP-Dox conjugate (mCPP-Dox) were used as models for the evaluation of masking and demasking processes. It was found that exogenous MMP-2/9 could effectively trigger the reversion of CPP-cargo in this conjugate, and this trigger adhered to the Michaelis-Menten kinetics profile. This conjugate was sensitive to the trigger of endogenous MMP-2/9 and could induce enhanced cytotoxicity toward MMP-2/9-rich tumor cells. In vivo antitumor efficacy revealed that this masked conjugate had considerable antitumor activity and could inhibit the tumor growth at a higher level relative to CPP-cargo. Low toxicity in vivo showed the noticeably decreased wildness of this conjugate toward normal tissues and more controllable entry of antitumor agents into "Troy". On the basis of analyses in vitro and in vivo, this mCPP-cargo conjugate delivery system held an improved selectivity toward MMP-2/9-rich tumors and would be a promising strategy for tumor-targeted treatment.

  17. Stitched α-helical peptides via bis ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Hilinski, Gerard J; Kim, Young-Woo; Hong, Jooyeon; Kutchukian, Peter S; Crenshaw, Charisse M; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Chang, Andrew; Ham, Sihyun; Verdine, Gregory L

    2014-09-03

    Conformationally stabilized α-helical peptides are capable of inhibiting disease-relevant intracellular or extracellular protein-protein interactions in vivo. We have previously reported that the employment of ring-closing metathesis to introduce a single all-hydrocarbon staple along one face of an α-helical peptide greatly increases α-helical content, binding affinity to a target protein, cell penetration through active transport, and resistance to proteolytic degradation. In an effort to improve upon this technology for stabilizing a peptide in a bioactive α-helical conformation, we report the discovery of an efficient and selective bis ring-closing metathesis reaction leading to peptides bearing multiple contiguous staples connected by a central spiro ring junction. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, NMR, and computational analyses have been used to investigate the conformation of these "stitched" peptides, which are shown to exhibit remarkable thermal stabilities. Likewise, trypsin proteolysis assays confirm the achievement of a structural rigidity unmatched by peptides bearing a single staple. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal microscopy assays demonstrate that stitched peptides display superior cell penetrating ability compared to their stapled counterparts, suggesting that this technology may be useful not only in the context of enhancing the drug-like properties of α-helical peptides but also in producing potent agents for the intracellular delivery of proteins and oligonucleotides.

  18. Clickable Cγ-azido(methylene/butylene) peptide nucleic acids and their clicked fluorescent derivatives: synthesis, DNA hybridization properties, and cell penetration studies.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak R; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2014-07-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and DNA complementation studies of clickable C(γ)-substituted methylene (azm)/butylene (azb) azido PNAs show that these analogues enhance the stability of the derived PNA:DNA duplexes. The fluorescent PNA oligomers synthesized by their click reaction with propyne carboxyfluorescein are seen to accumulate around the nuclear membrane in 3T3 cells.

  19. Characterisation of the membrane affinity of an isoniazide peptide conjugate by tensiometry, atomic force microscopy and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, using a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer model.

    PubMed

    Hill, Katalin; Pénzes, Csanád Botond; Schnöller, Donát; Horváti, Kata; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc; Keszthelyi, Tamás; Kiss, Eva

    2010-10-07

    Tensiometry, sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed to assess the cell penetration ability of a peptide conjugate of the antituberculotic agent isoniazide. Isoniazide was conjugated to peptide (91)SEFAYGSFVRTVSLPV(106), a functional T-cell epitope of the immunodominant 16 kDa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a simple but versatile model of the cell membrane a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer at the liquid/air interface was used. Changes induced in the structure of the phospholipid monolayer by injection of the peptide conjugate into the subphase were followed by tensiometry and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The drug penetrated lipid films were transferred to a solid support by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and their structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Peptide conjugation was found to strongly enhance the cell penetration ability of isoniazide.

  20. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    PubMed Central

    Last, Nicholas B; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes. Cell-penetrating peptides are natural or engineered short sequences that can spontaneously translocate across a membrane. Despite these differences in classification, many similarities in sequence, structure, and activity suggest that peptides from all three classes act through a small, common set of physical principles. Namely, these peptides alter the Brownian properties of phospholipid bilayers, enhancing the sampling of intrinsic fluctuations that include membrane defects. A complete energy landscape for such systems can be described by the innate membrane properties, differential partition, and the associated kinetics of peptides dividing between surface and defect regions of the bilayer. The goal of this review is to argue that the activities of these membrane-active families of peptides simply represent different facets of what is a shared energy landscape. PMID:23649542

  1. Appetite - decreased

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Ovarian cancer Stomach cancer Pancreatic cancer Other causes of decreased appetite include: Chronic liver disease Chronic kidney disease Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) Dementia Heart failure ...

  2. A viral peptide for intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Cantisani, Marco; Della Pepa, Maria Elena; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2012-10-01

    Biological membranes represent a critical hindrance for administering active molecules which are often unable to reach their designated intracellular target sites. In order to overcome this barrier-like behavior not easily circumvented by many pharmacologically-active molecules, synthetic transporters have been exploited to promote cellular uptake. Linking or complexing therapeutic molecules to peptides that can translocate through the cellular membranes could enhance their internal delivery, and consequently, a higher amount of active compound would reach the site of action. Use of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) is one of the most promising strategy to efficiently translocate macromolecules through the plasma membrane, and have attracted a lot of attention. New translocating peptides are continuously described and in the present review, we will focus on viral derived peptides, and in particular a peptide (gH625) derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein H (gH) that has proved to be a useful delivery vehicle due to its intrinsic properties of inducing membrane perturbation.

  3. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation by a cell cycle inhibitory peptide fused to a thermally responsive polypeptide carrier

    PubMed Central

    Massodi, Iqbal; Moktan, Shama; Rawat, Aruna; Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by normal tissue tolerance, resulting in a narrow therapeutic index. To increase drug specificity and efficacy and to reduce toxicity in normal tissues, we have developed a polypeptide carrier for a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, which has the potential to be thermally targeted to the tumor site. The design of this polypeptide is based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). The coding sequence of ELP was modified by the addition of the cell penetrating peptide Bac-7 at the N-terminus and a 23 amino acid peptide derived from p21 at the C-terminus (Bac-ELP1-p21). Bac-ELP1-p21 is soluble in aqueous solutions below physiological temperature (37°C) but aggregates when the temperature is raised above 39°C, making it a promising thermally responsive therapeutic carrier that may be actively targeted to solid tumors by application of focused hyperthermia. While Bac-ELP1-p21 at 37°C did not have any effect on SKOV-3 cell proliferation, the use of hyperthermia increased the antiproliferative effect of Bac-ELP1-p21 compared with a thermally unresponsive control polypeptide. Bac-ELP1-p21 displayed both a cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution in the SKOV-3 cells, with nuclear-localized polypeptide enriched in the heated cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Using Western blotting, we show that Bac-ELP1-p21 caused a decrease in Rb phosphorylation levels in cells treated at 42°C. The polypeptide also induced caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and cell cycle arrest in S-phase and G2/M-phase. These studies indicate that ELP is a promising macromolecular carrier for the delivery of cell cycle inhibitory peptides to solid tumors. PMID:19588502

  4. Discovery of a Direct Ras Inhibitor by Screening a Combinatorial Library of Cell-Permeable Bicyclic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic peptides have great potential as therapeutic agents and research tools. However, their applications against intracellular targets have been limited, because cyclic peptides are generally impermeable to the cell membrane. It was previously shown that fusion of cyclic peptides with a cyclic cell-penetrating peptide resulted in cell-permeable bicyclic peptides that are proteolytically stable and biologically active in cellular assays. In this work, we tested the generality of the bicyclic approach by synthesizing a combinatorial library of 5.7 × 106 bicyclic peptides featuring a degenerate sequence in the first ring and an invariant cell-penetrating peptide in the second ring. Screening of the library against oncoprotein K-Ras G12V followed by hit optimization produced a moderately potent and cell-permeable K-Ras inhibitor, which physically blocks the Ras-effector interactions in vitro, inhibits the signaling events downstream of Ras in cancer cells, and induces apoptosis of the cancer cells. Our approach should be generally applicable to developing cell-permeable bicyclic peptide inhibitors against other intracellular proteins. PMID:26645887

  5. DNA-histone complexes as ligands amplify cell penetration and nuclear targeting of anti-DNA antibodies via energy-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zannikou, Markella; Bellou, Sofia; Eliades, Petros; Hatzioannou, Aikaterini; Mantzaris, Michael D; Carayanniotis, George; Avrameas, Stratis; Lymberi, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    We have generated three monoclonal cell-penetrating antibodies (CPAbs) from a non-immunized lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 mouse that exhibited high anti-DNA serum titres. These CPAbs are polyreactive because they bind to DNA and other cellular components, and localize mainly in the nucleus of HeLa cells, albeit with a distinct nuclear labelling profile. Herein, we have examined whether DNA-histone complexes (DHC) binding to CPAbs, before cell entry, could modify the cell penetration of CPAbs or their nuclear staining properties. By applying confocal microscopy and image analysis, we found that extracellular binding of purified CPAbs to DHC significantly enhanced their subsequent cell-entry, both in terms of percentages of positively labelled cells and fluorescence intensity (internalized CPAb amount), whereas there was a variable effect on their nuclear staining profile. Internalization of CPAbs, either alone or bound to DHC, remained unaltered after the addition of endocytosis-specific inhibitors at 37° or assay performance at 4°, suggesting the involvement of energy-independent mechanisms in the internalization process. These findings assign to CPAbs a more complex pathogenetic role in systemic lupus erythematosus where both CPAbs and nuclear components are abundant.

  6. Synthetic mimic of antimicrobial peptide with nonmembrane-disrupting antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Gregory J; Madkour, Ahmad E; Dabkowski, Jeffrey M; Nelson, Christopher F; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N

    2008-11-01

    Polyguanidinium oxanorbornene ( PGON) was synthesized from norbornene monomers via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. This polymer was observed to be strongly antibacterial against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as nonhemolytic against human red blood cells. Time-kill studies indicated that this polymer is lethal and not just bacteriostatic. In sharp contrast to previously reported SMAMPs (synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides), PGON did not disrupt membranes in vesicle-dye leakage assays and microscopy experiments. The unique biological properties of PGON, in same ways similar to cell-penetrating peptides, strongly encourage the examination of other novel guanidino containing macromolecules as powerful and selective antimicrobial agents.

  7. Synthetic Mimic of Antimicrobial Peptide with Nonmembrane-Disrupting Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Polyguanidinium oxanorbornene (PGON) was synthesized from norbornene monomers via ring-opening metathesis polymerization. This polymer was observed to be strongly antibacterial against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as well as nonhemolytic against human red blood cells. Time-kill studies indicated that this polymer is lethal and not just bacteriostatic. In sharp contrast to previously reported SMAMPs (synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides), PGON did not disrupt membranes in vesicle-dye leakage assays and microscopy experiments. The unique biological properties of PGON, in same ways similar to cell-penetrating peptides, strongly encourage the examination of other novel guanidino containing macromolecules as powerful and selective antimicrobial agents. PMID:18850741

  8. Role of Arginine and Lysine in the Antimicrobial Mechanism of Histone-derived Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Cutrona, Kara J.; Kaufman, Bethany A.; Figueroa, Dania M.; Elmore, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides is often promoted by increased content of arginine or other guanidinum groups. However, relatively little research has considered the role of these functional groups on antimicrobial peptide activity. This study compared the activity of three histone-derived antimicrobial peptides—buforin II, DesHDAP1, and parasin— with variants that contain only lysine or arginine cationic residues. These peptides operate via different mechanisms as parasin causes membrane permeabilization while buforin II and DesHDAP1 translocate into bacteria. For all peptides, antibacterial activity increased with increased arginine content. Higher arginine content increased permeabilization for parasin while it improved translocation for buforin II and DesHDAP1. These observations provide insight into the relative importance of arginine and lysine in these antimicrobial peptides. PMID:26555191

  9. Peptides Displayed as High Density Brush Polymers Resist Proteolysis and Retain Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe a strategy for rendering peptides resistant to proteolysis by formulating them as high-density brush polymers. The utility of this approach is demonstrated by polymerizing well-established cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and showing that the resulting polymers are not only resistant to proteolysis but also maintain their ability to enter cells. The scope of this design concept is explored by studying the proteolytic resistance of brush polymers composed of peptides that are substrates for either thrombin or a metalloprotease. Finally, we demonstrate that the proteolytic susceptibility of peptide brush polymers can be tuned by adjusting the density of the polymer brush and offer in silico models to rationalize this finding. We contend that this strategy offers a plausible method of preparing peptides for in vivo use, where rapid digestion by proteases has traditionally restricted their utility. PMID:25314576

  10. Biological activity of Tat (47-58) peptide on human pathogenic fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyun Jun; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Dong Gun . E-mail: dglee222@knu.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Tat (47-58) peptide, a positively charged Arginine-rich peptide derived from HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, is known for a peptidic delivery factor as a cell-penetrating peptide on mammalian cells. In this study, antifungal effect and its mode of action of Tat peptide were investigated on fungal cells. The results indicate that Tat peptide exhibits antifungal activity against pathogenic fungal cells without hemolytic effect on human erythrocytes. To understand the mechanism(s) of Tat peptide, the cellular distribution of the peptide was investigated. Tat peptide internalized in the fungal cells without any damage to cell membrane when examined using an artificial liposome (PC/cholesterol; 10:1, w/w). Moreover, flow cytometry analysis exhibited the uptake of Tat peptide by energy- and salt-independent pathway, and confocal scanning microscopy displayed that this peptide accumulated in the nucleus of fungal cells rapidly without any impediment by time or temperature, which generally influence on the viral infections. After penetration into the nuclear, the peptide affected the process of cell cycle of Candida albicans through the arrest at G1 phase.

  11. Vesicular Galectin-3 levels decrease with donor age and contribute to the reduced osteo-inductive potential of human plasma derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Weilner, Sylvia; Keider, Verena; Winter, Melanie; Harreither, Eva; Salzer, Benjamin; Weiss, Florian; Schraml, Elisabeth; Messner, Paul; Pietschmann, Peter; Hildner, Florian; Gabriel, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Grillari, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a decline of physiological functions and in reduced repair capacities, in part due to impaired regenerative power of stem cells, influenced by the systemic environment. In particular osteogenic differentiation capacity (ODC) of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to decrease with age, thereby contributing to reduced bone formation and an increased fracture risk. Searching for systemic factors that might contribute to this age related decline of regenerative capacity led us to investigate plasma-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs of the elderly were found to inhibit osteogenesis compared to those of young individuals. By analyzing the differences in the vesicular content Galectin-3 was shown to be reduced in elderly-derived vesicles. While overexpression of Galectin-3 resulted in an enhanced ODC of MSCs, siRNA against Galectin-3 reduced osteogenesis. Modulation of intravesicular Galectin-3 levels correlated with an altered osteo-inductive potential indicating that vesicular Galectin-3 contributes to the biological response of MSCs to EVs. By site-directed mutagenesis we identified a phosphorylation-site on Galectin-3 mediating this effect. Finally, we showed that cell penetrating peptides comprising this phosphorylation-site are sufficient to increase ODC in MSCs. Therefore, we suggest that decrease of Galectin-3 in the plasma of elderly contributes to the age-related loss of ODC.

  12. Antibacterial and cell penetrating effects of LFcin17-30, LFampin265-284, and LF chimera on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Cortes, Ruth; Acosta-Smith, Erika; Mondragón-Flores, Ricardo; Nazmi, Kamran; Bolscher, Jan G M; Canizalez-Roman, Adrian; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a protein with antimicrobial activity, which is conferred in part by 2 regions contained in its N-terminal lobe. These regions have been used to develop the following synthetic peptides: lactoferricin17-30, lactoferrampin265-284, and LF chimera (a fusion of lactoferricin17-30 and lactoferrampin265-284). We have reported that these LF peptides have antibacterial activity against several pathogenic bacteria; however, the exact mechanism of action has not been established. Here, we report the effects of LF peptides on the viability of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) and the ability of these peptides to penetrate into the bacteria cytoplasm. The viability of EAEC treated with LF peptides was determined via enumeration of colony-forming units, and the binding and internalization of the LF peptides was followed via immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. Treatment of EAEC with 20 and 40 μmol/L LF peptides reduced bacterial growth compared with untreated bacteria. Initially the peptides associated with the plasma membrane, but after 5 to 30 min of incubation, the peptides were found in the cytoplasm. Remarkably, bacteria treated with LF chimera developed cytosolic electron-dense structures that contained the antimicrobial peptide. Our results suggest that the antibacterial mechanism of LF peptides on EAEC involves their interaction with and penetration into the bacteria.

  13. Novel polymeric nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of peptide cargos: antitumor efficacy of the Bcl-2 conversion peptide NuBCP-9

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Gupta, Dikshi; Singh, Gurpal; Sharma, Sapna; Bhatt, Madhusudan; Prashant, C.K.; Dinda, A.K.; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald; Singh, Harpal

    2014-01-01

    The preclinical development of peptidyl drugs for cancer treatment is hampered by their poor pharmacological properties and cell penetrative capabilities in vivo. In this study, we report a nanoparticle-based formulation that overcomes these limitations, illustrating their utility in studies of the anti-cancer peptide NuBCP-9 which converts BCL-2 from a cell protector to a cell killer. NuBCP-9 was encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) comprised of a polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified polylactic acid diblock copolymer (NuBCP-9/PLA-PEG), or PEG-polypropylene glycol-PEG-modified PLA - tetrablock copolymer (NuBCP-9/PLA-PEG-PPG-PEG). We found that peptide encapsulation was enhanced by increasing the PEG chain length in the block copolymers. NuBCP-9 release from the NPs was controlled by both PEG chain length and the PLA molecular weight, permitting time-release over sustained periods. Treatment of human cancer cells with these NPs in vitro triggered apoptosis by NuBCP-9-mediated mechanism, with a potency similar to NuBCP-9 linked to a cell-penetrating poly-Arg peptide. Strikingly, in vivo administration of NuBCP-9/NPs triggered complete regressions in the Ehrlich syngeneic mouse model of solid tumor. Our results illustrate an effective method for sustained delivery of anticancer peptides, highlighting the superior qualities of the novel PLA-PEG-PPG-PEG tetrablock copolymer formulation as a tool to target intracellular proteins. PMID:24741005

  14. Substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala linker dramatically decreased the renal uptake of 99mTc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptides.

    PubMed

    Flook, Adam M; Yang, Jianquan; Miao, Yubin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the substitution of the Lys linker with the β-Ala could reduce the renal uptake of (99m)Tc-labeled Arg-X-Asp-conjugated and X-Ala-Asp-conjugated α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) peptides. RSD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (1) {c[Arg-Ser-Asp-dTyr-Asp]-β-Ala-Cys-Cys-Glu-His-dPhe-Arg-Trp-Cys-Arg-Pro-Val-NH2}, RTD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (2), RVD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (3), RAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (4), NAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (5), and EAD-β-Ala-(Arg(11))CCMSH (6) peptides were synthesized and evaluated for their melanocortin 1 (MC1) receptor binding affinities in B16/F1 melanoma cells. The biodistribution of their (99m)Tc-conjugates were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The substitution of the Lys linker with β-Ala linker dramatically reduced the renal uptake of all six (99m)Tc-peptides. (99m)Tc-4 exhibited the highest melanoma uptake (15.66 ± 6.19% ID/g) and the lowest kidney uptake (20.18 ± 3.86% ID/g) among these (99m)Tc-peptides at 2 h postinjection. The B16/F1 melanoma lesions could be clearly visualized by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT using (99m)Tc-4 as an imaging probe.

  15. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for probing the relative abundance of cyclin-dependent kinases in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kurzawa, Laetitia; Pellerano, Morgan; Coppolani, J B; Morris, May C

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependant kinases play a central role in coordinating cell growth and division, and in sustaining proliferation of cancer cells, thereby constituting attractive pharmacological targets. However, there are no direct means of assessing their relative abundance in living cells, current approaches being limited to antigenic and proteomic analysis of fixed cells. In order to probe the relative abundance of these kinases directly in living cells, we have developed a fluorescent peptide biosensor with biligand affinity for CDKs and cyclins in vitro, that retains endogenous CDK/cyclin complexes from cell extracts, and that bears an environmentally-sensitive probe, whose fluorescence increases in a sensitive fashion upon recognition of its targets. CDKSENS was introduced into living cells, through complexation with the cell-penetrating carrier CADY2 and applied to assess the relative abundance of CDK/Cyclins through fluorescence imaging and ratiometric quantification. This peptide biosensor technology affords direct and sensitive readout of CDK/cyclin complex levels, and reports on differences in complex formation when tampering with a single CDK or cyclin. CDKSENS further allows for detection of differences between different healthy and cancer cell lines, thereby enabling to distinguish cells that express high levels of these heterodimeric kinases, from cells that present decreased or defective assemblies. This fluorescent biosensor technology provides information on the overall status of CDK/Cyclin complexes which cannot be obtained through antigenic detection of individual subunits, in a non-invasive fashion which does not require cell fixation or extraction procedures. As such it provides promising perspectives for monitoring the response to therapeutics that affect CDK/Cyclin abundance, for cell-based drug discovery strategies and fluorescence-based cancer diagnostics.

  16. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  17. Peptides Used in the Delivery of Small Noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous process in which small noncoding RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions. In general, siRNA and miRNA/miRNA mimics are similar in nature and activity except their origin and specificity. Although both siRNAs and miRNAs have been extensively studied as novel therapeutics for a wide range of diseases, the large molecular weight, anionic surface charges, instability in blood circulation, and intracellular trafficking to the RISC after cellular uptake have hindered the translation of these RNAs from bench to clinic. As a result, a great variety of delivery systems have been investigated for safe and effective delivery of small noncoding RNAs. Among these systems, peptides, especially cationic peptides, have emerged as a promising type of carrier due to their inherent ability to condense negatively charged RNAs, ease of synthesis, controllable size, and tunable structure. In this review, we will focus on three major types of cationic peptides, including poly(l-lysine) (PLL), protamine, and cell penetrating peptides (CPP), as well as peptide targeting ligands that have been extensively used in RNA delivery. The delivery strategies, applications, and limitations of these cationic peptides in siRNA/miRNA delivery will be discussed. PMID:25157701

  18. Hyperosmotic treatment synergistically boost efficiency of cell-permeable peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Ming; Zeng, Fanhui; Liu, Changbai

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutics delivery into cells has been hurdled due to the barrier of cytoplasmic membrane. Although cell penetrating peptide (CPP) can potentially serve as an intracellular drug delivery vehicle, the application of CPP-based delivery is limited because the unsatisfactory delivery efficiency of CPP conjugated potent cargos is challenging their applications in present. Thus, the development of strategies for enhancing the penetrating efficiency of CPP would therefore urgent need to be explored to increase the scope of potential applications. We report here the effects of glucose, sucrose and manntiol (abbreviated as GSM) combination facilitating the penetration efficiency of CPP peptide alone or CPP-GFP (green fluorescence protein) conjugation in cultured cell lines or primary cells. Moreover, osmoprotectants glycerol and glycine supplementation help cells cope with the stress from GSM combination. Thus, our present study suggests that GSM combination in the presence of osmoprotectant can work as a new strategy for CPP penetration enhancement. PMID:27213591

  19. Gene introduction into the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana via peptide-based carriers.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Jo-Ann; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Kodama, Yutaka; Numata, Keiji

    2015-01-13

    Available methods in plant genetic transformation are nuclear and plastid transformations because similar procedures have not yet been established for the mitochondria. The double membrane and small size of the organelle, in addition to its large population in cells, are major obstacles in mitochondrial transfection. Here we report the intracellular delivery of exogenous DNA localized to the mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana using a combination of mitochondria-targeting peptide and cell-penetrating peptide. Low concentrations of peptides were sufficient to deliver DNA into the mitochondria and expression of imported DNA reached detectable levels within a short incubation period (12 h). We found that electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane is not a critical factor for complex internalization, instead, improved intracellular penetration of mitochondria-targeted complexes significantly enhanced gene transfer efficiency. Our results delineate a simple and effective peptide-based method, as a starting point for the development of more sophisticated plant mitochondrial transfection strategies.

  20. A cell-penetrating ester of the neural metabolite lanthionine ketimine stimulates autophagy through the mTORC1 pathway: Evidence for a mechanism of action with pharmacological implications for neurodegenerative pathologies.

    PubMed

    Harris-White, Marni E; Ferbas, Kathie G; Johnson, Ming F; Eslami, Pirooz; Poteshkina, Aleksandra; Venkova, Kalina; Christov, Alexandar; Hensley, Kenneth

    2015-12-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental cellular recycling process vulnerable to compromise in neurodegeneration. We now report that a cell-penetrating neurotrophic and neuroprotective derivative of the central nervous system (CNS) metabolite, lanthionine ketimine (LK), stimulates autophagy in RG2 glioma and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells at concentrations within or below pharmacological levels reported in previous mouse studies. Autophagy stimulation was evidenced by increased lipidation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) both in the absence and presence of bafilomycin-A1 which discriminates between effects on autophagic flux versus blockage of autophagy clearance. LKE treatment caused changes in protein level or phosphorylation state of multiple autophagy pathway proteins including mTOR; p70S6 kinase; unc-51-like-kinase-1 (ULK1); beclin-1 and LC3 in a manner essentially identical to effects observed after rapamycin treatment. The LKE site of action was near mTOR because neither LKE nor the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin affected tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) phosphorylation status upstream from mTOR. Confocal immunofluorescence imaging revealed that LKE specifically decreased mTOR (but not TSC2) colocalization with LAMP2(+) lysosomes in RG2 cells, a necessary event for mTORC1-mediated autophagy suppression, whereas rapamycin had no effect. Suppression of the LK-binding adaptor protein CRMP2 (collapsin response mediator protein-2) by means of shRNA resulted in diminished autophagy flux, suggesting that the LKE action on mTOR localization may occur through a novel mechanism involving CRMP2-mediated intracellular trafficking. These findings clarify the mechanism-of-action for LKE in preclinical models of CNS disease, while suggesting possible roles for natural lanthionine metabolites in regulating CNS autophagy.

  1. Antibiotic gold: tethering of antimicrobial peptides to gold nanoparticles maintains conformational flexibility of peptides and improves trypsin susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Parvesh; Heidenreich, Nico; Podeyn, Benjamin; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-03-09

    Peptide-coated nanoparticles are valuable tools for diverse biological applications, such as drug delivery, molecular recognition, and antimicrobial action. The functionalization of pre-fabricated nanoparticles with free peptides in solution is inefficient either due to aggregation of the particles or due to the poor ligand exchange reaction. Here, we present a one-pot synthesis for preparing gold nanoparticles with a homogeneous distribution that are covered in situ with cationic peptides in a site-selective manner via Cys-residue at the N-terminus. Five representative peptides were selected, which are known to perturb cellular membranes and exert their antimicrobial and/or cell penetrating activity by folding into amphiphilic α-helical structures. When tethered to the nanoparticles at a single site, all peptides were found to switch their conformation from unordered state (in aqueous buffers) to their functionally relevant α-helical conformation in the presence of model membranes, as shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The conjugated peptides also maintained the same antibacterial activity as in the free form. Most importantly, when tethered to the gold nanoparticles the peptides showed an enormous increase in stability against trypsin digestion compared to the free forms, leading to a dramatic improvement of their lifetimes and activities. These findings suggest that site-selective surface tethering of peptides to gold nanoparticles has several advantages: (i) it does not prevent the peptides from folding into their biologically active conformation, (ii) such conjugation protects the peptides against protease digestion, and (iii) this way it is possible to prepare stable, water soluble antimicrobial nanoparticles as promising antibacterial agents.

  2. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy reveals highly efficient cytosolic delivery of certain penta-arg proteins and stapled peptides.

    PubMed

    LaRochelle, Jonathan R; Cobb, Garrett B; Steinauer, Angela; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Schepartz, Alanna

    2015-02-25

    We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to accurately and precisely determine the relative efficiencies with which three families of "cell-penetrating peptides" traffic to the cytosol of mammalian cells. We find that certain molecules containing a "penta-arg" motif reach the cytosol, intact, with efficiencies greater than 50%. This value is at least 10-fold higher than that observed for the widely studied cationic sequence derived from HIV Tat or polyarginine Arg8, and equals that of hydrocarbon-stapled peptides that are active in cells and animals. Moreover, we show that the efficiency with which stapled peptides reach the cytosol, as determined by FCS, correlates directly with their efficacy in cell-based assays. We expect that these findings and the associated technology will aid the design of peptides, proteins, and peptide mimetics that predictably and efficiently reach the interior of mammalian cells.

  3. Cell-penetrable mouse forkhead box protein 3 alleviates experimental arthritis in mice by up-regulating regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Ji, Baoju; Sun, Mengyi; Wu, Weijiang; Huang, Lili; Sun, Aihua; Zong, Yangyong; Xia, Sheng; Shi, Liyun; Qian, Hui; Xu, Wenrong; Shao, Qixiang

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(regs)) have potential applications in clinical disease therapy, such as autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. However, their numbers are limited. Forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) is a key transcription factor that controls T(reg) development and function. Here, we generated a cell-permeable fusion protein, protein transduction domain (PTD)-conjugated mouse FoxP3 protein (PTD-mFoxP3), and evaluated whether PTD-mFoxp3 can alleviate rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model. As expected, PTD-mFoxP3 was transduced into cells effectively, and inhibited T cell activation and attenuated the cell proliferation. It decreased interleukin (IL) 2 and interferon (IFN)-γ expression, and increased IL-10 expression in activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. PTD-mFoxP3-transduced CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells attenuated proliferation of activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. In addition, PTD-mFoxP3 blocked the Th17 differentiation programme in vitro and down-regulated IL-17 production from T cells by modulating induction and levels of retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt). Intra-articular delivery of PTD-mFoxP3 delayed disease incidence remarkably and alleviated autoimmune symptoms of CIA mice. Moreover, protective effects of PTD-mFoxP3 were associated with regulating the balance of T helper type 17 (Th17) and T(regs). These results suggest that PTD-mFoxP3 may be a candidate for RA therapy.

  4. Blockade of PAR1 signaling with cell-penetrating pepducins inhibits Akt-survival pathways in breast cancer cells and suppresses tumor survival and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eric; Boire, Adrienne; Agarwal, Anika; Nguyen, Nga; O'Callaghan, Katie; Tu, Powen; Kuliopulos, Athan; Covic, Lidija

    2009-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is not expressed in normal breast epithelia, but is up-regulated in invasive breast carcinomas. In the present study, we found that matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) robustly activates the PAR1-Akt survival pathway in breast carcinoma cells. This process is blocked by a cell-penetrating lipopeptide ‘pepducin’, P1pal-7, which is a potent inhibitor of cell viability in breast carcinoma cells expressing PAR1. Both a MMP-1 inhibitor and P1pal-7 significantly promote apoptosis in breast tumor xenografts and inhibit metastasis to the lungs by up to 88%. Dual therapy with P1pal-7 and taxotere inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenografts by 95%. Consistently, biochemical analysis of xenograft tumors treated with P1pal-7 or MMP-1 inhibitor demonstrated attenuated Akt activity. Ectopic expression of constitutively active Akt rescues breast cancer cells from the synergistic cytotoxicity of P1pal-7 and taxotere, suggesting that Akt is a critical component of PAR1-dependent cancer cell viability. Together, these findings indicate that blockade of MMP1-PAR1 signaling may provide a benefit beyond treatment with taxotere alone in advanced, metastatic breast cancer. PMID:19622769

  5. Discovery of Novel Bacterial Cell-Penetrating Phylloseptins in Defensive Skin Secretions of the South American Hylid Frogs, Phyllomedusa duellmani and Phyllomedusa coelestis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nan; Li, Lei; Wu, Di; Gao, Yitian; Xi, Xinping; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Phylloseptin (PS) peptides, derived from South American hylid frogs (subfamily Phyllomedusinae), have been found to have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and relatively low haemolytic activities. Although PS peptides have been identified from several well-known and widely-distributed species of the Phyllomedusinae, there remains merit in their study in additional, more obscure and specialised members of this taxon. Here, we report the discovery of two novel PS peptides, named PS-Du and PS-Co, which were respectively identified for the first time and isolated from the skin secretions of Phyllomedusa duellmani and Phyllomedusa coelestis. Their encoding cDNAs were cloned, from which it was possible to deduce the entire primary structures of their biosynthetic precursors. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses were employed to isolate and structurally-characterise respective encoded PS peptides from skin secretions. The peptides had molecular masses of 2049.7 Da (PS-Du) and 1972.8 Da (PS-Co). They shared typical N-terminal sequences and C-terminal amidation with other known phylloseptins. The two peptides exhibited growth inhibitory activity against E. coli (NCTC 10418), as a standard Gram-negative bacterium, S. aureus (NCTC 10788), as a standard Gram-positive bacterium and C. albicans (NCPF 1467), as a standard pathogenic yeast, all as planktonic cultures. Moreover, both peptides demonstrated the capability of eliminating S. aureus biofilm. PMID:27589802

  6. Discovery of Novel Bacterial Cell-Penetrating Phylloseptins in Defensive Skin Secretions of the South American Hylid Frogs, Phyllomedusa duellmani and Phyllomedusa coelestis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Li, Lei; Wu, Di; Gao, Yitian; Xi, Xinping; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris

    2016-08-31

    Phylloseptin (PS) peptides, derived from South American hylid frogs (subfamily Phyllomedusinae), have been found to have broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and relatively low haemolytic activities. Although PS peptides have been identified from several well-known and widely-distributed species of the Phyllomedusinae, there remains merit in their study in additional, more obscure and specialised members of this taxon. Here, we report the discovery of two novel PS peptides, named PS-Du and PS-Co, which were respectively identified for the first time and isolated from the skin secretions of Phyllomedusa duellmani and Phyllomedusa coelestis. Their encoding cDNAs were cloned, from which it was possible to deduce the entire primary structures of their biosynthetic precursors. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses were employed to isolate and structurally-characterise respective encoded PS peptides from skin secretions. The peptides had molecular masses of 2049.7 Da (PS-Du) and 1972.8 Da (PS-Co). They shared typical N-terminal sequences and C-terminal amidation with other known phylloseptins. The two peptides exhibited growth inhibitory activity against E. coli (NCTC 10418), as a standard Gram-negative bacterium, S. aureus (NCTC 10788), as a standard Gram-positive bacterium and C. albicans (NCPF 1467), as a standard pathogenic yeast, all as planktonic cultures. Moreover, both peptides demonstrated the capability of eliminating S. aureus biofilm.

  7. Peptidic tools applied to redirect alternative splicing events.

    PubMed

    Nancy, Martínez-Montiel; Nora, Rosas-Murrieta; Rebeca, Martínez-Contreras

    2015-05-01

    Peptides are versatile and attractive biomolecules that can be applied to modulate genetic mechanisms like alternative splicing. In this process, a single transcript yields different mature RNAs leading to the production of protein isoforms with diverse or even antagonistic functions. During splicing events, errors can be caused either by mutations present in the genome or by defects or imbalances in regulatory protein factors. In any case, defects in alternative splicing have been related to several genetic diseases including muscular dystrophy, Alzheimer's disease and cancer from almost every origin. One of the most effective approaches to redirect alternative splicing events has been to attach cell-penetrating peptides to oligonucleotides that can modulate a single splicing event and restore correct gene expression. Here, we summarize how natural existing and bioengineered peptides have been applied over the last few years to regulate alternative splicing and genetic expression. Under different genetic and cellular backgrounds, peptides have been shown to function as potent vehicles for splice correction, and their therapeutic benefits have reached clinical trials and patenting stages, emphasizing the use of regulatory peptides as an exciting therapeutic tool for the treatment of different genetic diseases.

  8. Stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles for cancerous cells intracellular drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Mengfei; Yuan, Zhefan; Wu, Dan; Chen, Jia-da; Feng, Jie

    2016-10-01

    A novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for cancerous cells intracellular drug release. Deca-lysine sequence (K10), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, was synthesized and terminated with azido-glycine. Then a new kind of molecule, alkyne modified doxorubicin (DOX) connecting through disulfide bond (DOX-SS-alkyne), was synthesized. After coupling via Cu-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry reaction, reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug was obtained. Due to the amphiphilic property of the prodrug, it can assemble to form micelles. To prevent the nanocarriers from unspecific cellular uptake, the prodrug micelles were subsequently modified with 2,3-dimethyl maleic anhydride to obtain MPPM with a negatively charged outer shell. In vitro studies showed that MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would be activated by charge reversal of the micelles via hydrolysis of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides and regeneration of K10, which enabled efficient internalization of MPPM by tumor cells as well as following glutathione- and protease-induced drug release inside the cancerous cells. Furthermore, since the guide peptide sequences can be accurately designed and synthesized, it can be easily changed for various functions, such as targeting peptide, apoptotic peptide, even aptamers, only need to be terminated with azido-glycine. This method can be used as a template for reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug for cancer therapy.

  9. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  10. Octaarginine-modified liposomes enhance cross-presentation by promoting the C-terminal trimming of antigen peptide.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takashi; Ono, Kouhei; Suzuki, Yoshiteru; Moriguchi, Rumiko; Kogure, Kentaro; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-08-04

    Exogenous antigen proteolysis by proteasomes and amino peptidases is essential for the production of mature major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) peptides to induce cross-presentation. We report here that when liposomes are modified with octaarginine (R8-Lip), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, the production of the mature MHC-I peptide is enhanced by promoting the C-terminal trimming of the antigen peptide. The efficiency of cross-presentation of ovalbumin (OVA) using the R8-Lip was dramatically higher than that by octalysine modified liposomes (K8-Lip) in mouse bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), although the physical characters of both liposomes were comparable. In this study, we investigated the mechanism responsible for the enhancement in cross-presentation by R8-Lip. Although the efficiencies of cellular uptake, endosomal escape, proteolysis of OVA and DC maturation between the two systems were essentially the same, an analysis of peptide trimming to SIINFEKL (mature MHC-I peptide of OVA) by using R8-Lip and K8-Lip encapsulating peptides of various length clearly indicates that the use of R8-Lip enhances the efficiency of the C-terminal cleavage of antigen-derived peptides. This finding provides a new strategy for achieving efficient cross-presentation by using R8 peptide and arginine-rich peptides. Moreover, this result may contribute to the development of a new paradigm regarding the machinery associated with antigen peptide production.

  11. Accessible Synthetic Probes for Staining Actin inside Platelets and Megakaryocytes by Employing Lifeact Peptide.

    PubMed

    Cardo, Lucia; Thomas, Steve G; Mazharian, Alexandra; Pikramenou, Zoe; Rappoport, Joshua Z; Hannon, Michael J; Watson, Stephen P

    2015-07-27

    Lifeact is a 17-residue peptide that can be employed in cell microscopy as a probe for F-actin when fused to fluorescent proteins, but therefore is not suitable for all cell types. We have conjugated fluorescently labelled Lifeact to three different cell-penetrating systems (a myristoylated carrier (myr), the pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP) and the cationic peptide TAT) as a strategy to deliver Lifeact into cells and developed new tools for actin staining with improved synthetic accessibility and low toxicity, focusing on their suitability in platelets and megakaryocytes. Using confocal microscopy, we characterised the cell distribution of the new hybrids in fixed cells, and found that both myr- and pHLIP-Lifeact conjugates provide efficient actin staining upon cleavage of Lifeact from the carriers, without affecting cell spreading. This new approach could facilitate the design of new tools for actin visualisation.

  12. Novel trihydroxamate-containing peptides: design, synthesis, and metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yunpeng; Liu, Min; Kao, Jeff L-F; Marshall, Garland R

    2006-01-01

    detected by ESI-MS, P2 was distinguished from both P1 and DFO by solvation of its Ga(III) and Fe(III) complexes (such as acetonitrile or water), thereby stabilizing the resulting complexes in the gas phase. Noteworthy, P2 led to 69% death rate in Hela cells at a concentration of 50 microM, exhibiting higher cytotoxicity than DFO in vitro despite its much lower affinity for iron. This enhanced toxicity may simply reflect the increased lipophilicity of the cyclic trihydroxamate (P2) together with the improvements in its cell penetration, and/or subsequent intracellular molecular recognition of both side chains and hydroxamate groups. The cytotoxicity was significantly suppressed by precoordination with Ga(III) or Fe(III), suggesting a mechanism of toxicity via sequestration of essential metal ions as well as the importance of curbing the metal coordination before targeting. The potential of such siderophore-mimicking peptides in oncology needs further exploration.

  13. Cationic Membrane Peptides: Atomic-Level Insight of Structure-Activity Relationships from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Li, Shenhui; Hong, Mei

    2012-01-01

    Many membrane-active peptides, such as cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), conduct their biological functions by interacting with the cell membrane. The interactions of charged residues with lipids and water facilitate membrane insertion, translocation or disruption of these highly hydrophobic species. In this mini-review we will summarize high-resolution structural and dynamic findings towards the understanding of the structure-activity relationship of lipid membrane-bound CPPs and AMPs, as examples of the current development of solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for studying membrane peptides. We will present the most recent atomic-resolution structure of the guanidinium-phosphate complex, as constrained from experimentally measured site-specific distances. These SSNMR results will be valuable specifically for understanding the intracellular translocation pathway of CPPs and antimicrobial mechanism of AMPs, and more generally broaden our insight into how cationic macromolecules interact with and cross the lipid membrane. PMID:23108593

  14. Assessment of SYBR green I dye-based fluorescence assay for screening antimalarial activity of cationic peptides and DNA intercalating agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Rakesh; Gautam, Ankur; Gautam, Shailendra K; Mehta, Divya; Kumar, Vinod; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Varshney, Grish C

    2015-05-01

    The SYBR green I (SG) dye-based fluorescence assay for screening antimalarial compounds is based on direct quantitation of parasite DNA. We show that DNA-interacting cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and intercalating agents compete with SG dye to bind to DNA. Therefore, readouts of this assay, unlike those of the [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay, for the antimalarial activity of the above DNA binding agents may be erroneous. In the case of CPPs, false readouts can be improved by the removal of excess peptides.

  15. Antibacterial activity of novel cationic peptides against clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed F; Hammac, G Kenitra; Guptill, Lynn; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections in companion animals and has zoonotic potential. Additionally, methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has emerged with resistance to virtually all classes of antimicrobials. Thus, novel treatment options with new modes of action are required. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of six synthetic short peptides against clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible and MRSP isolated from infected dogs. All six peptides demonstrated potent anti-staphylococcal activity regardless of existing resistance phenotype. The most effective peptides were RRIKA (with modified C terminus to increase amphipathicity and hydrophobicity) and WR-12 (α-helical peptide consisting exclusively of arginine and tryptophan) with minimum inhibitory concentration50 (MIC50) of 1 µM and MIC90 of 2 µM. RR (short anti-inflammatory peptide) and IK8 "D isoform" demonstrated good antimicrobial activity with MIC50 of 4 µM and MIC90 of 8 µM. Penetratin and (KFF)3K (two cell penetrating peptides) were the least effective with MIC50 of 8 µM and MIC90 of 16 µM. Killing kinetics revealed a major advantage of peptides over conventional antibiotics, demonstrating potent bactericidal activity within minutes. Studies with propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy revealed that peptides damaged the bacterial membrane leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents and consequently, cell death. A potent synergistic increase in the antibacterial effect of the cell penetrating peptide (KFF)3K was noticed when combined with other peptides and with antibiotics. In addition, all peptides displayed synergistic interactions when combined together. Furthermore, peptides demonstrated good therapeutic indices with minimal toxicity toward mammalian cells. Resistance to peptides did not evolve after 10 passages of S. pseudintermedius at sub-inhibitory concentration. However, the MICs of amikacin and

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Novel Cationic Peptides against Clinical Isolates of Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed F.; Hammac, G. Kenitra; Guptill, Lynn; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections in companion animals and has zoonotic potential. Additionally, methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has emerged with resistance to virtually all classes of antimicrobials. Thus, novel treatment options with new modes of action are required. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of six synthetic short peptides against clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible and MRSP isolated from infected dogs. All six peptides demonstrated potent anti-staphylococcal activity regardless of existing resistance phenotype. The most effective peptides were RRIKA (with modified C terminus to increase amphipathicity and hydrophobicity) and WR-12 (α-helical peptide consisting exclusively of arginine and tryptophan) with minimum inhibitory concentration50 (MIC50) of 1 µM and MIC90 of 2 µM. RR (short anti-inflammatory peptide) and IK8 “D isoform” demonstrated good antimicrobial activity with MIC50 of 4 µM and MIC90 of 8 µM. Penetratin and (KFF)3K (two cell penetrating peptides) were the least effective with MIC50 of 8 µM and MIC90 of 16 µM. Killing kinetics revealed a major advantage of peptides over conventional antibiotics, demonstrating potent bactericidal activity within minutes. Studies with propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy revealed that peptides damaged the bacterial membrane leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents and consequently, cell death. A potent synergistic increase in the antibacterial effect of the cell penetrating peptide (KFF)3K was noticed when combined with other peptides and with antibiotics. In addition, all peptides displayed synergistic interactions when combined together. Furthermore, peptides demonstrated good therapeutic indices with minimal toxicity toward mammalian cells. Resistance to peptides did not evolve after 10 passages of S. pseudintermedius at sub-inhibitory concentration. However, the MICs of amikacin and

  17. Action of the multifunctional peptide BP100 on native biomembranes examined by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Misiewicz, Julia; Afonin, Sergii; Grage, Stephan L; van den Berg, Jonas; Strandberg, Erik; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S

    2015-04-01

    Membrane composition is a key factor that regulates the destructive activity of antimicrobial peptides and the non-leaky permeation of cell penetrating peptides in vivo. Hence, the choice of model membrane is a crucial aspect in NMR studies and should reflect the biological situation as closely as possible. Here, we explore the structure and dynamics of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 using a multinuclear solid-state NMR approach. The membrane alignment and mobility of this 11 amino acid peptide was studied in various synthetic lipid bilayers with different net charge, fluidity, and thickness, as well as in native biomembranes harvested from prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. (19)F-NMR provided the high sensitivity and lack of natural abundance background that are necessary to observe a labelled peptide even in protoplast membranes from Micrococcus luteus and in erythrocyte ghosts. Six selectively (19)F-labeled BP100 analogues gave remarkably similar spectra in all of the macroscopically oriented membrane systems, which were studied under quasi-native conditions of ambient temperature and full hydration. This similarity suggests that BP100 has the same surface-bound helical structure and high mobility in the different biomembranes and model membranes alike, independent of charge, thickness or cholesterol content of the system. (31)P-NMR spectra of the phospholipid components did not indicate any bilayer perturbation, so the formation of toroidal wormholes or micellarization can be excluded as a mechanism of its antimicrobial or cell penetrating action. However, (2)H-NMR analysis of the acyl chain order parameter profiles showed that BP100 leads to considerable membrane thinning and thereby local destabilization.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  19. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts.

  20. Tenidap decreases IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1) mRNA expression in the synovial tissue of rabbits with antigen arthritis and in cultured synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, I; Lopez-Armada, M J; Hernandez, P; Sanchez-Pernaute, O; Gutierrez, S; Miguelez, R; Martinez, J; Egido, J; Herrero-Beaumont, G

    1998-01-01

    Since IL-8 and MCP-1 are chemoattractant proteins that participate in the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the arthritic joint, we examined the effects of tenidap, a new anti-inflammatory drug of the oxindole family, on IL-8 and MCP-1 expression in the joints of rabbits with acute antigen arthritis. The model was induced by injecting 5 mg/ml ovalbumin into the knees of 20 preimmunized rabbits. Animals were randomized into two groups: treated with tenidap (15 mg/kg per 12 h), or untreated. The effect of tenidap treatment was evaluated on chemokine production in synovial membranes of rabbits with arthritis and in cultured monocytic and synovial cells (SC). By immunoperoxidase staining, chemokines were localized in the synovial tissue. Chemokine messenger RNA levels in the synovial membranes and in cultured cells were analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). At the end of the study, tenidap significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration into the joint cavity (27 ± 4 × 106 cells/ml versus 45 ± 6 × 106 cells/ml in untreated; P < 0.05), and synovial effusion (134 ± 15 μl versus 236 ± 19 μl in untreated; P < 0.005). Untreated rabbits showed synovial membrane up-regulation in mRNA expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 (11- and seven-fold versus healthy rabbits, respectively) that was markedly decreased by tenidap (two- and three-fold versus healthy rabbits, respectively). IL-8 and MCP-1 were localized in the synovial tissue in a perivascular pattern and areas of the interstitium and lining, mostly coinciding with cell infiltration. Tenidap also reduced the accumulation of IL-8 and MCP-1 proteins. In cultured synovial and monocytic cells, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) elicited an increase in gene expression of IL-8 (four- and nine-fold, respectively) and MCP-1 (nine- and four-fold, respectively) that was significantly reversed in both cell types by 10 μm tenidap. These results suggest that the beneficial effect of tenidap in acute

  1. Development of polymeric-cationic peptide composite nanoparticles, a nanoparticle-in-nanoparticle system for controlled gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arvind K; Massey, Ashley; Yusuf, Helmy; McDonald, Denise M; McCarthy, Helen O; Kett, Vicky L

    2015-01-01

    We report the formulation of novel composite nanoparticles that combine the high transfection efficiency of cationic peptide-DNA nanoparticles with the biocompatibility and prolonged delivery of polylactic acid-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG). The cationic cell-penetrating peptide RALA was used to condense DNA into nanoparticles that were encapsulated within a range of PLA-PEG copolymers. The composite nanoparticles produced exhibited excellent physicochemical properties including size <200 nm and encapsulation efficiency >80%. Images of the composite nanoparticles obtained with a new transmission electron microscopy staining method revealed the peptide-DNA nanoparticles within the PLA-PEG matrix. Varying the copolymers modulated the DNA release rate >6 weeks in vitro. The best formulation was selected and was able to transfect cells while maintaining viability. The effect of transferrin-appended composite nanoparticles was also studied. Thus, we have demonstrated the manufacture of composite nanoparticles for the controlled delivery of DNA.

  2. Peptide aptamers: The versatile role of specific protein function inhibitors in plant biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Monica; Mizzotti, Chiara; Masiero, Simona; Kater, Martin M; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, peptide aptamers have emerged as novel molecular tools that have attracted the attention of researchers in various fields of basic and applied science, ranging from medicine to analytical chemistry. These artificial short peptides are able to specifically bind, track, and inhibit a given target molecule with high affinity, even molecules with poor immunogenicity or high toxicity, and represent a remarkable alternative to antibodies in many different applications. Their use is on the rise, driven mainly by the medical and pharmaceutical sector. Here we discuss the enormous potential of peptide aptamers in both basic and applied aspects of plant biotechnology and food safety. The different peptide aptamer selection methods available both in vivo and in vitro are introduced, and the most important possible applications in plant biotechnology are illustrated. In particular, we discuss the generation of broad-based virus resistance in crops, "reverse genetics" and aptasensors in bioassays for detecting contaminations in food and feed. Furthermore, we suggest an alternative to the transfer of peptide aptamers into plant cells via genetic transformation, based on the use of cell-penetrating peptides that overcome the limits imposed by both crop transformation and Genetically Modified Organism commercialization.

  3. A New Coarse-Grained Force Field for Membrane-Peptide Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Cui, Qiang; Yethiraj, Arun

    2011-11-08

    We present a new coarse-grained (CG) model for simulations of lipids and peptides. The model follows the same topology and parametrization strategy as the MARTINI force field but is based on our recently developed big multipole water (BMW) model for water (J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 10524-10529). The new BMW-MARTINI force field reproduces many fundamental membrane properties and also yields improved energetics (when compared to the original MARTINI force-field) for the interactions between charged amino acids with lipid membranes, especially at the membrane-water interface. A stable attachment of cationic peptides (e.g., Arg8) to the membrane surface is predicted, consistent with experiment and in contrast to the MARTINI model. The model predicts electroporation when there is a charge imbalance across the lipid bilayer, an improvement over the original MARTINI. Moreover, the pore formed during electroporation is toroidal in nature, similar to the prediction of atomistic simulations but distinct from results of polarizable MARTINI for small charge imbalances. The simulations emphasize the importance of a reasonable description of the electrostatic properties of water in CG simulations. The BMW-MARTINI model is particularly suitable for describing interactions between highly charged peptides with lipid membranes, which is crucial to the study of antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, and other proteins/peptides involved in the remodeling of biomembranes.

  4. pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles induces apoptosis via reduced fatty acid synthesis in MDA-MB-231 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaliaperumal, Jagatheesh; Hari, Natarajan; Pavankumar, Padarthi; Elangovan, Namasivayam

    2016-06-01

    The development of formulations with therapeutic peptides has been restricted to poor cell penetration and in this attempt; we developed pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized with FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TEM. In addition, the suitable formulation was evaluated for hemocompatibility, plasma stability and embryo toxicity using Danio rerio embryo model. The results showed that pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles were compatible with plasma. They possess sustained release pattern and also found to be safe up to 300 mg/L in embryo toxicity tests. Cytotoxicity assays with MDA-MB-231 cell lines suggested that, pACC1 peptide loaded chitosan nanoparticles were capable of enhanced cellular penetration and reduced palmitic acid content, which was confirmed by H1 NMR. Hence, these nanoparticles could be employed as excellent adjuvant therapeutics while treating solid tumors with multi-drug resistance.

  5. Synthesis and Splice-Redirecting Activity of Branched, Arginine-Rich Peptide Dendrimer Conjugates of Peptide Nucleic Acid Oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides have found excellent utility in cell and in vivo models for enhancement of delivery of attached charge-neutral PNA or PMO oligonucleotides. We report the synthesis of dendrimeric peptides containing 2- or 4-branched arms each having one or more R-Ahx-R motifs and their disulfide conjugation to a PNA705 splice-redirecting oligonucleotide. Conjugates were assayed in a HeLa pLuc705 cell assay for luciferase up-regulation and splicing redirection. Whereas 8-Arg branched peptide−PNA conjugates showed poor activity compared to a linear (R-Ahx-R)4−PNA conjugate, 2-branched and some 4-branched 12 and 16 Arg peptide−PNA conjugates showed activity similar to that of the corresponding linear peptide−PNA conjugates. Many of the 12- and 16-Arg conjugates retained significant activity in the presence of serum. Evidence showed that biological activity in HeLa pLuc705 cells of the PNA conjugates of branched and linear (R-Ahx-R) peptides is associated with an energy-dependent uptake pathway, predominantly clathrin-dependent, but also with some caveolae dependence. PMID:20879728

  6. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  7. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of quorum sensing peptides and Peptide analogues against oral biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    LoVetri, Karen; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is a major incentive for the investigation of novel ways to treat or prevent infections. Much effort has been put into the discovery of peptides in nature accompanied by manipulation of natural peptides to improve activity and decrease toxicity. The ever increasing knowledge about bacteria and the discovery of quorum sensing have presented itself as another mechanism to disrupt the infection process. We have shown that the natural quorum sensing (QS) peptide, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), used by the caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans when used in higher than normally present concentrations can actually contribute to cell death in S. mutans. Using an analogue of this quorum sensing peptide (KBI-3221), we have shown it to be beneficial at decreasing biofilm of various Streptococcus species. This chapter looks at a number of assay methods to test the inhibitory effects of quorum sensing peptides and their analogues on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

  8. Fusogenic-oligoarginine peptide-mediated silencing of the CIP2A oncogene suppresses oral cancer tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alexander-Bryant, Angela A; Dumitriu, Anca; Attaway, Christopher C; Yu, Hong; Jakymiw, Andrew

    2015-11-28

    Intracellular delivery and endosomal escape of functional small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) remain major barriers limiting the clinical translation of RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutics. Recently, we demonstrated that a cell-penetrating endosome-disruptive peptide we synthesized, termed 599, enhanced the intracellular delivery and bioavailability of siRNAs designed to target the CIP2A oncoprotein (siCIP2A) into oral cancer cells and consequently inhibited oral cancer cell invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Thus, to further assess the therapeutic potential of the 599 peptide in mediating RNAi-based therapeutics for oral cancer and its prospective applicability in clinical settings, the objective of the current study was to determine whether intratumoral dosing of the 599 peptide-siCIP2A complex could induce silencing of CIP2A and consequently impair tumor growth using a xenograft oral cancer mouse model. Our results demonstrate that the 599 peptide is able to protect siRNAs from degradation by serum and ribonucleases in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo, confirming the stability of the 599 peptide-siRNA complex and its potential for therapeutic utility. Moreover, 599 peptide-mediated delivery of siCIP2A to tumor tissue induces CIP2A silencing without any associated toxicity, consequently resulting in reduction of the mitotic index and significant inhibition of tumor growth. Together, these data suggest that the 599 peptide carrier is a clinically effective mediator of RNAi-based cancer therapeutics.

  9. Combinatorial Library Screening with Liposomes for Discovery of Membrane Active Peptides.

    PubMed

    Carney, Randy P; Thillier, Yann; Kiss, Zsofia; Sahabi, Amir; Heleno Campos, Jean Carlos; Knudson, Alisha; Liu, Ruiwu; Olivos, David; Saunders, Mary; Tian, Lin; Lam, Kit S

    2017-04-05

    Membrane active peptides (MAPs) represent a class of short biomolecules that have shown great promise in facilitating intracellular delivery without disrupting cellular plasma membranes. Yet their clinical application has been stalled by numerous factors: off-target delivery, a requirement for high local concentration near cells of interest, degradation en route to the target site, and, in the case of cell-penetrating peptides, eventual entrapment in endolysosomal compartments. The current method of deriving MAPs from naturally occurring proteins has restricted the discovery of new peptides that may overcome these limitations. Here we describe a new branch of assays featuring high-throughput functional screening capable of discovering new peptides with tailored cell uptake and endosomal escape capabilities. The one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) combinatorial method is used to screen libraries containing millions of potential MAPs for binding to synthetic liposomes, which can be adapted to mimic various aspects of limiting membranes. By incorporating unnatural and D-amino acids in the library, in addition to varying buffer conditions and liposome compositions, we have identified several new highly potent MAPs that improve on current standards and introduce motifs that were previously unknown or considered unsuitable. Since small variations in pH and lipid composition can be controlled during screening, peptides discovered using this methodology could aid researchers building drug delivery platforms with unique requirements, such as targeted intracellular localization.

  10. Aromatic amino acids providing characteristic motifs in the Raman and SERS spectroscopy of peptides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Dongmao; Halas, Naomi J; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-07-31

    Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopies (SERS) are potentially important tools in the characterization of biomolecules such as proteins and DNA. In this work, SERS spectra of three cysteine-containing aromatic peptides: tryptophan-cysteine, tyrosine-cysteine, and phenylalanine-cysteine, bound to Au nanoshell substrates, were obtained, and compared to their respective normal Raman spectra. While the linewidths of the SERS peaks are significantly broadened (up to 70%), no significant spectral shifts (<6 cm (-1)) of the major Stokes modes were observed between the two modalities. We show that the Raman and SERS spectra of penetratin, a cell-penetrating peptide oligomer, can be comprised quite reliably from the spectra of its constituent aromatic amino acids except in the backbone regions where the spectral intensities are critically dependent on the length and conformations of the probed molecules. From this study we conclude that, together with protein backbone groups, aromatic amino acid residues provide the overwhelmingly dominant features in the Raman and SERS spectra of peptides and proteins when present. It follows that the Raman modes of these three small constructed peptides may likely apply to the assignment of Raman and SERS features in the spectra of other peptides and proteins.

  11. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  13. pH-sensitive membrane peptides (pHLIPs) as a novel class of delivery agents

    PubMed Central

    Andreev, Oleg A.; Engelman, Donald M.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.

    2015-01-01

    Here we review a novel class of delivery vehicles based on pH-sensitive, moderately polar membrane peptides, which we call pH (Low) Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs), that target cells located in the acidic environment found in many diseased tissues, including tumors. SpecificAcidity targeting by pHLIPs is achieved as a result of helix formation and transmembrane insertion. In contrast to the earlier technologies based on cell-penetrating peptides, pHLIPs act as monomeric membrane-inserting peptides that translocate one terminus across a membrane into the cytoplasm, while the other terminus remains in the extracellular space, locating the peptide in the membrane lipid bilayer. Therefore,This geometry gives pHLIP has a dual delivery capability: it can tether cargo molecules or nanoparticles to the surfaces of cells in diseased tissues and/or it can move a cell-impermeable cargo molecule across the membrane into the cytoplasm. The source of energy for moving polar molecules attached to pHLIP through the hydrophobic layer of a membrane bilayer is the membrane-associated folding of the polypeptide. A drop in pH leads to the protonation of negatively charged residues (Asp or Glu), which enhances peptide hydrophobicity, increasing the affinity of the peptide for the lipid bilayer and triggering peptide folding and subsequent membrane insertion. The process is accompanied by the release of energy that can be utilized to move cell-impermeable cargo across a membrane. That the mechanism is now understood, and that targeting of tumors in mice has been shown, suggest a number of future applications of the pHLIP technology in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. PMID:20939768

  14. The Application of Ligand-Mapping Molecular Dynamics Simulations to the Rational Design of Peptidic Modulators of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yaw Sing; Spring, David R; Abell, Chris; Verma, Chandra S

    2015-07-14

    A computational ligand-mapping approach to detect protein surface pockets that interact with hydrophobic moieties is presented. In this method, we incorporated benzene molecules into explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of various protein targets. The benzene molecules successfully identified the binding locations of hydrophobic hot-spot residues and all-hydrocarbon cross-links from known peptidic ligands. They also unveiled cryptic binding sites that are occluded by side chains and the protein backbone. Our results demonstrate that ligand-mapping molecular dynamics simulations hold immense promise to guide the rational design of peptidic modulators of protein-protein interactions, including that of stapled peptides, which show promise as an exciting new class of cell-penetrating therapeutic molecules.

  15. Taurine Boosts Cellular Uptake of Small D-Peptides for Enzyme-Instructed Intracellular Molecular Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Li, Jie; Yamagata, Natsuko; Xu, Bing

    2015-08-19

    Due to their biostability, D-peptides are emerging as an important molecular platform for biomedical applications. Being proteolytically resistant, D-peptides lack interactions with endogenous transporters and hardly enter cells. Here we show that taurine, a natural amino acid, drastically boosts the cellular uptake of small D-peptides in mammalian cells by >10-fold, from 118 μM (without conjugating taurine) to >1.6 mM (after conjugating taurine). The uptake of a large amount of the ester conjugate of taurine and D-peptide allows intracellular esterase to trigger intracellular self-assembly of the D-peptide derivative, further enhancing their cellular accumulation. The study on the mechanism of the uptake reveals that the conjugates enter cells via both dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis, but likely not relying on taurine transporters. Differing fundamentally from the positively charged cell-penetrating peptides, the biocompatibility, stability, and simplicity of the enzyme-cleavable taurine motif promise new ways to promote the uptake of bioactive molecules for countering the action of efflux pump and contributing to intracellular molecular self-assembly.

  16. Firefly luciferase inhibitor-conjugated peptide quenches bioluminescence: a versatile tool for real time monitoring cellular uptake of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Poutiainen, Pekka K; Rönkkö, Teemu; Hinkkanen, Ari E; Palvimo, Jorma J; Närvänen, Ale; Turhanen, Petri; Laatikainen, Reino; Weisell, Janne; Pulkkinen, Juha T

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, novel firefly luciferase-specific inhibitor compounds (FLICs) are evaluated as potential tools for cellular trafficking of transporter conjugates. As a proof-of-concept, we designed FLICs that were suitable for solid phase peptide synthesis and could be covalently conjugated to peptides via an amide bond. The spacer between inhibitor and peptide was optimized to gain efficient inhibition of recombinant firefly luciferase (FLuc) without compromising the activity of the model peptides. The hypothesis of using FLICs as tools for cellular trafficking studies was ensured with U87Fluc glioblastoma cells expressing firefly luciferase. Results show that cell penetrating peptide (penetratin) FLIC conjugate 9 inhibited FLuc penetrated cells efficiently (IC50 = 1.6 μM) and inhibited bioluminescence, without affecting the viability of the cells. Based on these results, peptide-FLIC conjugates can be used for the analysis of cellular uptake of biomolecules in a new way that can at the same time overcome some downsides seen with other methods. Thus, FLICs can be considered as versatile tools that broaden the plethora of methods that take advantage of the bioluminescence phenomena.

  17. How Membrane-Active Peptides Get into Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Marc-Antoine; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-21

    The structure-function relationship for a family of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) from the skin of Australian tree frogs is discussed and compared with that of peptide toxins from bee and Australian scorpion venoms. Although these membrane-active peptides induce a similar cellular fate by disrupting the lipid bilayer integrity, their lytic activity is achieved via different modes of action, which are investigated in relation to amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and membrane lipid composition. In order to better understand what structural features govern the interaction between peptides and lipid membranes, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which translocate through the membrane without compromising its integrity, are also discussed. AMPs possess membrane lytic activities that are naturally designed to target the cellular membrane of pathogens or competitors. They are extremely diverse in amino acid composition and often show specificity against a particular strain of microbe. Since our antibiotic arsenal is declining precariously in the face of the rise in multiantibiotic resistance, AMPs increasingly are seen as a promising alternative. In an effort to understand their molecular mechanism, biophysical studies of a myriad of AMPs have been reported, yet no unifying mechanism has emerged, rendering difficult the rational design of drug leads. Similarly, a wide variety of cytotoxic peptides are found in venoms, the best known being melittin, yet again, predicting their activity based on a particular amino acid composition or secondary structure remains elusive. A common feature of these membrane-active peptides is their preference for the lipid environment. Indeed, they are mainly unstructured in solution and, in the presence of lipid membranes, quickly adsorb onto the surface, change their secondary structure, eventually insert into the hydrophobic core of the membrane bilayer, and finally disrupt the bilayer integrity. These steps define the molecular

  18. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  19. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  20. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  1. A Novel Intracellular Peptide Derived from G1/S Cyclin D2 Induces Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, Christiane B.; Russo, Lilian C.; Castro, Leandro M.; Forti, Fábio L.; do Monte, Elisabete R.; Rioli, Vanessa; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Colquhoun, Alison; Ferro, Emer S.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular peptides are constantly produced by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and many are probably functional. Here, the peptide WELVVLGKL (pep5) from G1/S-specific cyclin D2 showed a 2-fold increase during the S phase of HeLa cell cycle. pep5 (25–100 μm) induced cell death in several tumor cells only when it was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (pep5-cpp), suggesting its intracellular function. In vivo, pep5-cpp reduced the volume of the rat C6 glioblastoma by almost 50%. The tryptophan at the N terminus of pep5 is essential for its cell death activity, and N terminus acetylation reduced the potency of pep5-cpp. WELVVL is the minimal active sequence of pep5, whereas Leu-Ala substitutions totally abolished pep5 cell death activity. Findings from the initial characterization of the cell death/signaling mechanism of pep5 include caspase 3/7 and 9 activation, inhibition of Akt2 phosphorylation, activation of p38α and -γ, and inhibition of proteasome activity. Further pharmacological analyses suggest that pep5 can trigger cell death by distinctive pathways, which can be blocked by IM-54 or a combination of necrostatin-1 and q-VD-OPh. These data further support the biological and pharmacological potential of intracellular peptides. PMID:24764300

  2. Cellular uptake of a cystine-knot peptide and modulation of its intracellular trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xinxin; Stanger, Karen; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Maurer, Till; Ciepla, Paulina; Chalouni, Cecile; Franke, Yvonne; Hannoush, Rami N.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclotides or cyclic cystine-knot peptides have emerged as a promising class of pharmacological ligands that modulate protein function. Interestingly, very few cyclotides have been shown to enter into cells. Yet, it remains unknown whether backbone cyclization is required for their cellular internalization. In this report, we studied the cellular behavior of EETI-II, a model acyclic cystine-knot peptide. Even though synthetic methods have been used to generate EETI-II, recombinant methods that allow efficient large scale biosynthesis of EETI-II have been lagging. Here, we describe a novel protocol for recombinant generation of folded EETI-II in high yields and to near homogeneity. We also uncover that EETI-II is efficiently uptaken via an active endocytic pathway to early endosomes in mammalian cells, eventually accumulating in late endosomes and lysosomes. Notably, co-incubation with a cell-penetrating peptide enhanced the cellular uptake and altered the trafficking of EETI-II, leading to its evasion of lysosomes. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of modulating the subcellular distribution and intracellular targeting of cystine-knot peptides, and hence enable future exploration of their utility in drug discovery and delivery. PMID:27734922

  3. Schur monotone decreasing sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganikhodjaev, Rasul; Saburov, Mansoor; Saburov, Khikmat

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce Schur monotone decreasing sequences in an n-dimensional space by considering a majorization pre-order. By means of down arrow mappings, we study omega limiting points of bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences. We provide convergence criteria for such kinds of sequences. We prove that a Cesaro mean (or an arithmetic mean) of any bounded Schur monotone decreasing sequences converges to a unique limiting point.

  4. Dynamical structure of the short multifunctional peptide BP100 in membranes.

    PubMed

    Wadhwani, Parvesh; Strandberg, Erik; van den Berg, Jonas; Mink, Christian; Bürck, Jochen; Ciriello, Raffaele A M; Ulrich, Anne S

    2014-03-01

    BP100 is a multifunctional membrane-active peptide of only 11 amino acids, with a high antimicrobial activity, an efficient cell-penetrating ability, and low hemolytic side-effects. It forms an amphiphilic α-helix, similar to other antimicrobial peptides like magainin. However, BP100 is very short and thus unlikely to form membrane-spanning pores as proposed for longer peptides as a mechanism of action. We thus studied the conformation, membrane alignment and dynamical behavior of BP100 in lipid bilayers (DMPC/DMPG), using oriented circular dichroism (OCD) and solid-state (19)F and (15)N NMR. According to OCD and (15)N NMR, the BP100 helix is oriented roughly parallel to the membrane surface, but these methods yield no information on the azimuthal alignment angle or the dynamics of the molecule. To address these questions, a systematic (19)F NMR analysis was performed, which was not straightforward for this short peptide. Only a limited number of positions could be (19)F-labeled, all of which are located on one face of the helix, which was found to lead to artifacts in the data analysis. It was nevertheless possible to reconcile the (19)F NMR data with the OCD and (15)N NMR data by using an advanced dynamical model, in which peptide mobility is described by fluctuating tilt and azimuthal angles with Gaussian distributions. (19)F NMR thus confirmed the regular α-helical conformation of BP100, revealed its azimuthal angle, and described its high mobility in the membrane. Furthermore, the very sensitive (19)F NMR experiments showed that the alignment of BP100 does not vary with peptide concentration over a peptide-to-lipid molar ratio from 1:10 to 1:3000.

  5. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  6. How to unveil self-quenched fluorophores and subsequently map the subcellular distribution of exogenous peptides

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Thiebaut, Frédéric; Di Pisa, Margherita; Gourdin -Bertin, Simon; Tailhades, Julien; Mansuy, Christelle; Burlina, Fabienne; Chwetzoff, Serge; Trugnan, Germain; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the most popular technique for mapping the subcellular distribution of a fluorescent molecule and is widely used to investigate the penetration properties of exogenous macromolecules, such as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), within cells. Despite the membrane-association propensity of all these CPPs, the signal of the fluorescently labeled CPPs did not colocalize with the plasma membrane. We studied the origin of this fluorescence extinction and the overall consequence on the interpretation of intracellular localizations from CLSM pictures. We demonstrated that this discrepancy originated from fluorescence self-quenching. The fluorescence was unveiled by a “dilution” protocol, i.e. by varying the ratio fluorescent/non-fluorescent CPP. This strategy allowed us to rank with confidence the subcellular distribution of several CPPs, contributing to the elucidation of the penetration mechanism. More generally, this study proposes a broadly applicable and reliable method to study the subcellular distribution of any fluorescently labeled molecules. PMID:26839211

  7. Antimicrobial Peptide Simulations and the Influence of Force Field on the Free Energy for Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Bennett, W F Drew; Hong, Chun Kit; Wang, Yi; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-09-13

    Due to antimicrobial resistance, the development of new drugs to combat bacterial and fungal infections is an important area of research. Nature uses short, charged, and amphipathic peptides for antimicrobial defense, many of which disrupt the lipid membrane in addition to other possible targets inside the cell. Computer simulations have revealed atomistic details for the interactions of antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides with lipid bilayers. Strong interactions between the polar interface and the charged peptides can induce bilayer deformations - including membrane rupture and peptide stabilization of a hydrophilic pore. Here, we performed microsecond-long simulations of the antimicrobial peptide CM15 in a POPC bilayer expecting to observe pore formation (based on previous molecular dynamics simulations). We show that caution is needed when interpreting results of equilibrium peptide-membrane simulations, given the length of time single trajectories can dwell in local energy minima for 100's of ns to microseconds. While we did record significant membrane perturbations from the CM15 peptide, pores were not observed. We explain this discrepancy by computing the free energy for pore formation with different force fields. Our results show a large difference in the free energy barrier (ca. 40 kJ/mol) against pore formation predicted by the different force fields that would result in orders of magnitude differences in the simulation time required to observe spontaneous pore formation. This explains why previous simulations using the Berger lipid parameters reported pores induced by charged peptides, while with CHARMM based models pores were not observed in our long time-scale simulations. We reconcile some of the differences in the distance dependent free energies by shifting the free energy profiles to account for thickness differences between force fields. The shifted curves show that all the models describe small defects in lipid bilayers in a

  8. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  9. Stratospheric ozone is decreasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-03-01

    The recent discovery that chlorofluorocarbons create the Antarctic ozone hole every October through reactions mediated by ice particles formed at the lowest temperatures of the stratosphere is discussed. A large-scale reanalysis of measurements reveals that protective stratospheric ozone has decreased during the past 17 yrs with some decreases greatly exceeding predictions. It is noted that standard models did not, and still do not, include the ice in their reaction schemes. A tendency toward larger losses at higher colder latitudes is seen.

  10. How does a hydrocarbon staple affect peptide hydrophobicity?

    PubMed

    Sim, Adelene Y L; Verma, Chandra

    2015-04-15

    Water is essential for the proper folding of proteins and the assembly of protein-protein/ligand complexes. How water regulates complex formation depends on the chemical and topological details of the interface. The dynamics of water in the interdomain region between an E3 ubiquitin ligase (MDM2) and three different peptides derived from the tumor suppressor protein p53 are studied using molecular dynamics. The peptides show bimodal distributions of interdomain water densities across a range of distances. The addition of a hydrocarbon chain to rigidify the peptides (in a process known as stapling) results in an increase in average hydrophobicity of the peptide-protein interface. Additionally, the hydrophobic staple shields a network of water molecules, kinetically stabilizing a water chain hydrogen-bonded between the peptide and MDM2. These properties could result in a decrease in the energy barrier associated with dehydrating the peptide-protein interface, thereby regulating the kinetics of peptide binding.

  11. Peptide-micelle hybrids containing fasudil for targeted delivery to the pulmonary arteries and arterioles to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nilesh; Ibrahim, Hany M; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2014-11-01

    This study investigates the respirability and efficacy of peptide-micelle hybrid nanoparticles as carriers for inhalational therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CARSKNKDC (CAR), a cell-penetrating and lung-homing peptide, conjugated polyethylene glycol-distearoyl-phosphoethanolamine micelles containing fasudil, an investigational anti-PAH drug, were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for various physicochemical properties. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacological efficacy of hybrid particles containing fasudil were evaluated in healthy rats and monocrotaline-induced PAH rats. CAR micelles containing fasudil had an entrapment efficiency of approximately 58%, showed controlled release of the drug, and were monodispersed with an average size of approximately 14 nm. Nuclear magnetic resonance scan confirmed the drug's presence in the core of peptide-micelle hybrid particles. Compared with plain micelles, CAR peptide increased the cellular uptake by approximately 1.7-fold and extended the drug half-life by approximately fivefold. The formulations were more prone to accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature than in the peripheral blood, which is evident from the ratio of the extent of reduction of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. On the whole, this study demonstrates that peptide-polymer hybrid micelles can serve as inhalational carriers for PAH therapy.

  12. A peptide targeted against phosphoprotein and leader RNA interaction inhibits growth of Chandipura virus -- an emerging rhabdovirus.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arunava; Chakraborty, Prasenjit; Polley, Smarajit; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Roy, Siddhartha

    2013-11-01

    The fatal illness caused by Chandipura virus (CHPV), an emerging pathogen, presently lacks any therapeutic option. Previous research suggested that interaction between the virally encoded phosphoprotein (P) and the positive sense leader RNA (le-RNA) may play an important role in the viral lifecycle. In this report, we have identified a β-sheet/loop motif in the C-terminal domain of the CHPV P protein as essential for this interaction. A synthetic peptide encompassing this motif and spanning a continuous stretch of 36 amino acids (Pep208-243) was found to bind the le-RNA in vitro and inhibit CHPV growth in infected cells. Furthermore, a stretch of three amino acid residues at position 217-219 was identified as essential for this interaction, both in vitro and in infected cells. siRNA knockdown-rescue experiments demonstrated that these three amino acid residues are crucial for the leader RNA binding function of P protein in the CHPV life cycle. Mutations of these three amino acid residues render the peptide completely ineffective against CHPV. Effect of inhibition of phosphoprotein-leader RNA interaction on viral replication was assayed. Peptide Pep208-243 tagged with a cell penetrating peptide was found to inhibit CHPV replication as ascertained by real time RT-PCR. The specific inhibition of viral growth observed using this peptide suggests a new possibility for designing of anti-viral agents against Mononegavirale group of human viruses.

  13. Peptide-micelle Hybrids Containing Fasudil for Targeted Delivery to the Pulmonary Arteries and Arterioles to Treat PAH

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilesh; Ibrahim, Hany M.; Ahsan, Fakhrul

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the respirability and efficacy of peptide-micelle hybrid nanoparticles as carriers for inhalational therapy of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). CARSKNKDC (CAR), a cell penetrating and lung homing peptide, conjugated DSPE-PEG micelles containing fasudil, an investigational anti-PAH drug, were prepared by solvent evaporation method and characterized for various physicochemical properties. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacological efficacy of hybrid particles containing fasudil were evaluated in healthy rats and monocrotaline induced PAH rats, respectively. CAR-micelles containing fasudil had an entrapment efficiency of ∼58%, showed controlled release of the drug, and were monodispersed with an average size of ∼14nm. NMR scan confirmed the drug's presence in the core of peptide-micelle hybrid particles. Compared with plain micelles, CAR peptide increased the cellular uptake by ∼1.7-fold and extended the drug half-life by ∼5-fold. The formulations were more prone to accumulate in the pulmonary vasculature than in the peripheral blood, which is evident from the ratio of the extent of reduction of pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures. On the whole, this study demonstrates that peptide-polymer hybrid micelles can serve as inhalational carriers for PAH therapy. PMID:25266507

  14. LL37 and Cationic Peptides Enhance TLR3 Signaling by Viral Double-stranded RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yvonne; Adhikarakunnathu, Sreedevi; Bhardwaj, Kanchan; Ranjith-Kumar, C. T.; Wen, Yahong; Jordan, Jarrat L.; Wu, Linda H.; Dragnea, Bogdan; Mateo, Lani San; Kao, C. Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Background Toll-like Receptor 3 (TLR3) detects viral dsRNA during viral infection. However, most natural viral dsRNAs are poor activators of TLR3 in cell-based systems, leading us to hypothesize that TLR3 needs additional factors to be activated by viral dsRNAs. The anti-microbial peptide LL37 is the only known human member of the cathelicidin family of anti-microbial peptides. LL37 complexes with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to prevent activation of TLR4, binds to ssDNA to modulate TLR9 and ssRNA to modulate TLR7 and 8. It synergizes with TLR2/1, TLR3 and TLR5 agonists to increase IL8 and IL6 production. This work seeks to determine whether LL37 enhances viral dsRNA recognition by TLR3. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS2B) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293T) transiently transfected with TLR3, we found that LL37 enhanced poly(I:C)-induced TLR3 signaling and enabled the recognition of viral dsRNAs by TLR3. The presence of LL37 also increased the cytokine response to rhinovirus infection in BEAS2B cells and in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Confocal microscopy determined that LL37 could co-localize with TLR3. Electron microscopy showed that LL37 and poly(I:C) individually formed globular structures, but a complex of the two formed filamentous structures. To separate the effects of LL37 on TLR3 and TLR4, other peptides that bind RNA and transport the complex into cells were tested and found to activate TLR3 signaling in response to dsRNAs, but had no effect on TLR4 signaling. This is the first demonstration that LL37 and other RNA-binding peptides with cell penetrating motifs can activate TLR3 signaling and facilitate the recognition of viral ligands. Conclusions/Significance LL37 and several cell-penetrating peptides can enhance signaling by TLR3 and enable TLR3 to respond to viral dsRNA. PMID:22039520

  15. Chemotactic peptide receptor modulation in polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The binding of the chemotactic peptide N- formylnorleucylleucylphenylalanine (FNLLP) to its receptor on rabbit polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) modulates the number of available peptide receptors. Incubation with FNLLP decreases subsequent binding capacity, a phenomenon that has been termed receptor down regulation. Down regulation of the chemotactic peptide receptor is concentration dependent in both the rate and extent of receptor loss. The dose response parallels that of FNLLP binding to the recptor. The time- course is rapid; even at concentrations of FNLLP as low as 3 x 10(-9) M, the new equilibrium concentration of receptors is reached within 15 min. Down regulation is temperature dependent, but does occur even at 4 degrees C. Concomitant with down regulation, some of the peptide becomes irreversibly cell associated. At 4 degrees C, there is a small accumulation of nondissociable peptide that rapidly reaches a plateau. At higher temperatures, accumulation of nondissociable peptide continues after the rceptor number has reached equilibrium, and the amount accumulated can exceed the initial number of receptors by as much as 300%. The dose response of peptide uptake at 37 degrees C reflects that of binding, suggesting that it is receptor mediated. This uptake may occur via a pinocytosis mechanism. Although PMNs have not been considered to be pinocytic, the addition of FNLLP causes a fourfold stimulation of the rate of pinocytosis as measured by the uptake of [3H]sucrose. PMID:7391138

  16. The interplay of T1- and T2-relaxation on T1-weighted MRI of hMSCs induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides.

    PubMed

    Cao, Limin; Li, Binbin; Yi, Peiwei; Zhang, Hailu; Dai, Jianwu; Tan, Bo; Deng, Zongwu

    2014-04-01

    Three Gd-DOTA-peptide complexes with different peptide sequence are synthesized and used as T1 contrast agent to label human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) for magnetic resonance imaging study. The peptides include a universal cell penetrating peptide TAT, a linear MSC-specific peptide EM7, and a cyclic MSC-specific peptide CC9. A significant difference in labeling efficacy is observed between the Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as a control Dotarem. All Gd-DOTA-peptides as well as Dotarem induce significant increase in T1 relaxation rate which is in favor of T1-weighted MR imaging. Gd-DOTA-CC9 yields the maximum labeling efficacy but poor T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-EM7 yields the minimum labeling efficacy but better T1 contrast enhancement. Gd-DOTA-TAT yields a similar labeling efficacy as Gd-DOTA-CC9 and similar T1 contrast enhancement as Gd-DOTA-EM7. The underlying mechanism that governs T1 contrast enhancement effect is discussed. Our results suggest that T1 contrast enhancement induced by Gd-DOTA-peptides depends not only on the introduced cellular Gd content, but more importantly on the effect that Gd-DOTA-peptides exert on the T1-relaxation and T2-relaxation processes/rates. Both T1 and particularly T2 relaxation rate have to be taken into account to interpret T1 contrast enhancement. In addition, the interpretation has to be based on cellular instead of aqueous longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of Gd-DOTA-peptides.

  17. Decreasing strabismus surgery

    PubMed Central

    Arora, A; Williams, B; Arora, A K; McNamara, R; Yates, J; Fielder, A

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether there has been a consistent change across countries and healthcare systems in the frequency of strabismus surgery in children over the past decade. Methods: Retrospective analysis of data on all strabismus surgery performed in NHS hospitals in England and Wales, on children aged 0–16 years between 1989 and 2000, and between 1994 and 2000 in Ontario (Canada) hospitals. These were compared with published data for Scotland, 1989–2000. Results: Between 1989 and 1999–2000 the number of strabismus procedures performed on children, 0–16 years, in England decreased by 41.2% from 15 083 to 8869. Combined medial rectus recession with lateral rectus resection decreased from 5538 to 3013 (45.6%) in the same period. Bimedial recessions increased from 489 to 762, oblique tenotomies from 43 to 121, and the use of adjustable sutures from 29 to 44, in 2000. In Ontario, operations for squint decreased from 2280 to 1685 (26.1%) among 0–16 year olds between 1994 and 2000. Conclusion: The clinical impression of decrease in the frequency of paediatric strabismus surgery is confirmed. In the authors’ opinion this cannot be fully explained by a decrease in births or by the method of healthcare funding. Two factors that might have contributed are better conservative strabismus management and increased subspecialisation that has improved the quality of surgery and the need for re-operation. This finding has a significant impact upon surgical services and also on the training of ophthalmologists. PMID:15774914

  18. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  19. Peptides Regulate Cortical Thymocytes Differentiation, Proliferation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Khavinson, V. Kh.; Polyakova, V. O.; Linkova, N. S.; Dudkov, A. V.; Kvetnoy, I. M.

    2011-01-01

    The processes of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis were studied in a cell culture of human cortical thymocytes under the influence of short peptides T-32 (Glu-Asp-Ala) and T-38 (Lys-Glu-Asp). Peptides T-32 and T-38 amplified cortical thymocytes differentiation towards regulatory T cells, increased their proliferative activity, and decreased the level of apoptosis. Moreover, peptides under study stimulated proliferative and antiapoptotic activity of the mature regulatory T cells. PMID:22312461

  20. Potent and Selective Peptide-based Inhibition of the G Protein Gαq.

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Thomas H; Waldo, Gary L; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; Krajewski, Krzysztof; Strahl, Brian D; Kash, Thomas L; Harden, T Kendall; Sondek, John

    2016-12-02

    In contrast to G protein-coupled receptors, for which chemical and peptidic inhibitors have been extensively explored, few compounds are available that directly modulate heterotrimeric G proteins. Active Gαq binds its two major classes of effectors, the phospholipase C (PLC)-β isozymes and Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) related to Trio, in a strikingly similar fashion: a continuous helix-turn-helix of the effectors engages Gαq within its canonical binding site consisting of a groove formed between switch II and helix α3. This information was exploited to synthesize peptides that bound active Gαq in vitro with affinities similar to full-length effectors and directly competed with effectors for engagement of Gαq A representative peptide was specific for active Gαq because it did not bind inactive Gαq or other classes of active Gα subunits and did not inhibit the activation of PLC-β3 by Gβ1γ2 In contrast, the peptide robustly prevented activation of PLC-β3 or p63RhoGEF by Gαq; it also prevented G protein-coupled receptor-promoted neuronal depolarization downstream of Gαq in the mouse prefrontal cortex. Moreover, a genetically encoded form of this peptide flanked by fluorescent proteins inhibited Gαq-dependent activation of PLC-β3 at least as effectively as a dominant-negative form of full-length PLC-β3. These attributes suggest that related, cell-penetrating peptides should effectively inhibit active Gαq in cells and that these and genetically encoded sequences may find application as molecular probes, drug leads, and biosensors to monitor the spatiotemporal activation of Gαq in cells.

  1. A Cell-Penetrant Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (MnSOD) Mimic Is Able To Complement MnSOD and Exerts an Antiinflammatory Effect on Cellular and Animal Models of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Emilie; Bernard, Anne-Sophie; Delsuc, Nicolas; Quévrain, Elodie; Gazzah, Géraldine; Lai, Barry; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bachelet, Maria; Masliah, Joelle; Seksik, Philippe; Policar, Clotilde

    2017-03-06

    Inorganic complexes are increasingly used for biological and medicinal applications, and the question of the cell penetration and distribution of metallodrugs is key to understanding their biological activity. Oxidative stress is known to be involved in inflammation and in inflammatory bowel diseases for which antioxidative defenses are weakened. We report here the study of the manganese complex Mn1 mimicking superoxide dismutase (SOD), a protein involved in cell protection against oxidative stress, using an approach in inorganic cellular chemistry combining the investigation of Mn1 intracellular speciation using mass spectrometry and of its quantification and distribution using electron paramagnetic resonance and spatially resolved X-ray fluorescence with evaluation of its biological activity. More precisely, we have looked for and found the MS signature of Mn1 in cell lysates and quantified the overall manganese content. Intestinal epithelial cells activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide were taken as a cellular model of oxidative stress and inflammation. DNBS-induced colitis in mice was used to investigate Mn1 activity in vivo. Mn1 exerts an intracellular antiinflammatory activity, remains at least partially coordinated, with diffuse distribution over the whole cell, and functionally complements mitochondrial MnSOD.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  3. Design and evaluation of solid lipid nanoparticles modified with peptide ligand for oral delivery of protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Fan, Tingting; Chen, Chunhui; Guo, Han; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Xi; Yang, Yang; Zhou, Zhou; Li, Lian; Huang, Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Designing feasible and effective peptide ligand modified solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) to improve oral bioavailability of protein drugs and evaluating the influence of mucus remains important. In the present work, two kinds of peptide ligand modified SLNs loaded with salmon calcitonin (sCT), namely, sCT CSK-SLNs and sCT IRQ-SLNs, were prepared by coupling the peptide ligand CSKSSDYQC (CSK) which was reported to show affinity with goblet cells, or IRQRRRR (IRQ), a cell penetrating peptide, to polyoxyethylene (40) stearate (SA-PEG2000). Compared with unmodified SLNs, CSK or IRQ modified SLNs with better drug protection ability could facilitate the internalization of drug on Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-cultured cells and permeation in excised rat duodenum mucosa. The internalization mechanism of two kinds of peptide ligand modified SLNs was mainly active transport via both clathrin- and caveolae-dependent endocytosis. Although mucus was an impediment to the transport of SLNs, the peptide ligand modified SLNs still showed improved drug absorption. The absolute bioavailability of sCT CSK-SLNs (12.41 ± 3.65%) and sCT IRQ-SLNs (10.05 ± 5.10%) raised to 2.45-fold and 1.98-fold compared with unmodified SLNs (5.07 ± 0.54%), implying the feasibility and effectiveness of CSK and IRQ peptide modification for the enhancement of the oral bioavailability of protein drugs. In summary, the nanoparticles modified with CSK or IRQ peptide ligand could be the potential carriers for the transport of protein drugs across intestinal barriers.

  4. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  6. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  7. Cre Fused with RVG Peptide Mediates Targeted Genome Editing in Mouse Brain Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhiyuan; Sun, Zhaolin; Li, Pan; Feng, Tao; Wu, Sen

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides that can pass through cell membranes. CPPs can facilitate the cellular entry of proteins, macromolecules, nanoparticles and drugs. RVG peptide (RVG hereinafter) is a 29-amino-acid CPP derived from a rabies virus glycoprotein that can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and enter brain cells. However, whether RVG can be used for genome editing in the brain has not been reported. In this work, we combined RVG with Cre recombinase for bacterial expression. The purified RVG-Cre protein cut plasmids in vitro and traversed cell membranes in cultured Neuro2a cells. By tail vein-injecting RVG-Cre into Cre reporter mouse lines mTmG and Rosa26lacZ, we demonstrated that RVG-Cre could target brain cells and achieve targeted somatic genome editing in adult mice. This direct delivery of the gene-editing enzyme protein into mouse brains with RVG is much safer than plasmid- or viral-based methods, holding promise for further applications in the treatment of various brain diseases. PMID:27983648

  8. N-terminal peptides from unprocessed prion proteins enter cells by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Magzoub, Mazin; Sandgren, Staffan; Lundberg, Pontus; Oglecka, Kamila; Lilja, Johanna; Wittrup, Anders; Goeran Eriksson, L.E.; Langel, Ulo; Belting, Mattias . E-mail: mattias.belting@med.lu.se; Graeslund, Astrid . E-mail: astrid@dbb.su.se

    2006-09-22

    A peptide derived from the N-terminus of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp), incorporating the hydrophobic signal sequence (residues 1-24) and a basic domain (KKRPKP, residues 25-30), internalizes into mammalian cells, even when coupled to a sizeable cargo, and therefore functions as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). Confocal microscopy and co-localization studies indicate that the internalization of bPrPp is mainly through macropinocytosis, a fluid-phase endocytosis process, initiated by binding to cell-surface proteoglycans. Electron microscopy studies show internalized bPrPp-DNA-gold complexes residing in endosomal vesicles. bPrPp induces expression of a complexed luciferase-encoding DNA plasmid, demonstrating the peptide's ability to transport the cargo across the endosomal membrane and into the cytosol and nucleus. The novel CPP activity of the unprocessed N-terminal domain of PrP could be important for the retrotranslocation of partly processed PrP and for PrP trafficking inside or between cells, with implications for the infectivity associated with prion diseases.

  9. Mechanism of action and specificity of antimicrobial peptides designed based on buforin IIb.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su A; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Ju Young; Shin, Ju Ri; Kim, Da Jung; Cho, Ju Hyun; Kim, Sun Chang

    2012-04-01

    Buforin IIb-a synthetic analog of buforin II that contains a proline hinge between the two α-helices and a model α-helical sequence at the C-terminus (3× RLLR)-is a potent cell-penetrating antimicrobial peptide. To develop novel antimicrobial peptides with enhanced activities and specificity/therapeutic index, we designed several analogs (Buf III analogs) by substitutions of amino acids in the proline hinge region and two α-helices of buforin IIb, and examined their antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action. The substitution of hydrophobic residues ([F(6)] and [V(8)]) in the proline hinge region with other hydrophobic residues ([W(6)] and [I(8)]) did not affect antimicrobial activity, while the substitution of the first four amino acids RAGL with a model α-helical sequence increased the antimicrobial activity up to 2-fold. Like buforin IIb, Buf III analogs penetrated the bacterial cell membranes without significantly permeabilizing them and were accumulated inside Escherichia coli. Buf III analogs were shown to bind DNA in vitro and the DNA binding affinity of the peptides correlated linearly with their antimicrobial potency. Among the Buf III analogs, the therapeutic index of Buf IIIb and IIIc (RVVRQWPIG[RVVR](3) and KLLKQWPIG[KLLK](3), respectively) were improved 7-fold compared to that of buforin IIb. These results indicate that Buf III analogs appear to be promising candidates for future development as novel antimicrobial agents.

  10. An anti-apoptotic peptide improves survival in lethal total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McDunn, Jonathan E.; Muenzer, Jared T.; Dunne, Benjamin; Zhou, Anthony; Yuan, Kevin; Hoekzema, Andrew; Hilliard, Carolyn; Chang, Katherine C.; Davis, Christopher G.; McDonough, Jacquelyn; Hunt, Clayton; Grigsby, Perry; Piwnica-Worms, David; Hotchkiss, Richard S.

    2009-05-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been used to deliver the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL-derived BH4 peptide to prevent injury-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) from the SV40 large T antigen has favorable properties for BH4 domain delivery to lymphocytes compared to sequences based on the HIV-1 TAT sequence. While both TAT-BH4 and NLS-BH4 protected primary human mononuclear cells from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death, TAT-BH4 caused persistent membrane damage and even cell death at the highest concentrations tested (5-10 {mu}M) and correlated with in vivo toxicity as intravenous administration of TAT-BH4 caused rapid death. The NLS-BH4 peptide has significantly attenuated toxicity compared to TAT-BH4 and we established a dosing regimen of NLS-BH4 that conferred a significant survival advantage in a post-exposure treatment model of LD90 total body irradiation.

  11. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  12. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function.

    PubMed

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-09-25

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  13. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  14. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  15. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  17. Structure of linkage region between chondroitin polysulfates and peptides.

    PubMed

    Seno, N; Sekizuka, E

    1978-04-01

    Three different types of chondroitin polysulfate-peptide, chondroitin sulfate D-peptide, chondroitin sulfate E-peptide, and chondroitin sulfate K-peptide, all contained xylose, galactose, and serine in a molar ratio of about 1 : 2 : 1. After treatment with alkali in the presence of NaBH4 and PdCl2, they produced alanine and xylitol in amounts equivalent to the decrease in the amount of serine. Consequently, it was proved that these chondroitin polysulfates are all linked to peptides by O-glycosidic bonds between xylose and serine, as in chondroitin sulfates A and C. It is suggested that the carbohydrate-peptide linkage regions have the same structure in all the chondroitin sulfates, regardless of differences in the structure of the polysaccharide chains, such as the position of sulfate groups and the degree of sulfation.

  18. De Novo Design of Potent Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frecer, V.; Ho, B.; Ding, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), shed by gram-negative bacteria during infection and antimicrobial therapy, may lead to lethal endotoxic shock syndrome. A rational design strategy based on the presumed mechanism of antibacterial effect was adopted to design cationic antimicrobial peptides capable of binding to LPS through tandemly repeated sequences of alternating cationic and nonpolar residues. The peptides were designed to achieve enhanced antimicrobial potency due to initial bacterial membrane binding with a reduced risk of endotoxic shock. The peptides designed displayed binding affinities to LPS and lipid A (LA) in the low micromolar range and by molecular modeling were predicted to form amphipathic β-hairpin-like structures when they bind to LPS or LA. They also exhibited strong effects against gram-negative bacteria, with MICs in the nanomolar range, and low cytotoxic and hemolytic activities at concentrations significantly exceeding their MICs. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of peptide sequences and their antimicrobial, cytotoxic, and hemolytic activities revealed that site-directed substitutions of residues in the hydrophobic face of the amphipathic peptides with less lipophilic residues selectively decrease the hemolytic effect without significantly affecting the antimicrobial or cytotoxic activity. On the other hand, the antimicrobial effect can be enhanced by substitutions in the polar face with more polar residues, which increase the amphipathicity of the peptide. On the basis of the QSARs, new analogs that have strong antimicrobial effects but that lack hemolytic activity can be proposed. The findings highlight the importance of peptide amphipathicity and allow a rational method that can be used to dissociate the antimicrobial and hemolytic effects of cationic peptides, which have potent antimicrobial properties, to be proposed. PMID:15328096

  19. Bioactive peptides released from Saccharomyces cerevisiae under accelerated autolysis in a wine model system.

    PubMed

    Alcaide-Hidalgo, J M; Pueyo, E; Polo, M C; Martínez-Rodríguez, A J

    2007-09-01

    The ACE inhibitory activity (IACE) and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC-FL) values of yeast peptides isolated from a model wine during accelerated autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been studied. Samples were taken at 6, 24, 48, 121, and 144 h of autolysis. Peptide concentration increased throughout autolysis process. Peptides were fractionated into 2 fractions: F1, constituted by hydrophilic peptides, and F2, containing hydrophobic peptides. Both IACE activity and ORAC-FL values increased during 121 h of autolysis, then decreased afterward. Peptide fraction F2 was the main fraction involved in IACE activity and ORAC-FL.

  20. Simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways in melanoma cells and tumor regression by a designed bidentate constrained helical peptide.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Mallick, Shampa; Ghosh, Piya; Maiti, Atanu; Ahmed, Israr; Bhattacharya, Seemana; Mandal, Tapashi; Manna, Asit; Roy, Koushik; Singh, Sandeep; Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Wilder, Paul T; Markowitz, Joseph; Weber, David; Ghosh, Mrinal K; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Guha, Rajdeep; Konar, Aditya; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Roy, Siddhartha

    2014-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions are part of a large number of signaling networks and potential targets for drug development. However, discovering molecules that can specifically inhibit such interactions is a major challenge. S100B, a calcium-regulated protein, plays a crucial role in the proliferation of melanoma cells through protein-protein interactions. In this article, we report the design and development of a bidentate conformationally constrained peptide against dimeric S100B based on a natural tight-binding peptide, TRTK-12. The helical conformation of the peptide was constrained by the substitution of α-amino isobutyric acid--an amino acid having high helical propensity--in positions which do not interact with S100B. A branched bidentate version of the peptide was bound to S100B tightly with a dissociation constant of 8 nM. When conjugated to a cell-penetrating peptide, it caused growth inhibition and rapid apoptosis in melanoma cells. The molecule exerts antiproliferative action through simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways, including reactivation of wild-type p53 and inhibition of Akt and STAT3 phosphorylation. The apoptosis induced by the bidentate constrained helix is caused by direct migration of p53 to mitochondria. At moderate intravenous dose, the peptide completely inhibits melanoma growth in a mouse model without any significant observable toxicity. The specificity was shown by lack of ability of a double mutant peptide to cause tumor regression at the same dose level. The methodology described here for direct protein-protein interaction inhibition may be effective for rapid development of inhibitors against relatively weak protein-protein interactions for de novo drug development.

  1. Peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for cancer therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Anastasia Kruse

    Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in the United States. Radiation and chemotherapy are conventional treatments, but they result in serious side effects and the probability of tumor recurrence remains high. Therefore, there is an increasing need to enhance the efficacy of conventional treatments. Magnetic nanoparticles have been previously studied for a variety of applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, anemia treatment, magnetic cell sorting and magnetically mediated hyperthermia (MMH). In this work, dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles were developed and functionalized with peptides to target the nanoparticles to either the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tumor tissue or to localize the nanoparticles in subcellular regions after cell uptake. The magnetic nanoparticles were utilized for a variety of applications. First, heating properties of the nanoparticles were utilized to administer hyperthermia treatments combined with chemotherapy. The nanoparticles were functionalized with peptides to target fibrinogen in the ECM and extensively characterized for their physicochemical properties, and MMH combined with chemotherapy was able to enhance the toxicity of chemotherapy. The second application of the nanoparticles was magnetically mediated energy delivery. This treatment does not result in a bulk temperature rise upon actuation of the nanoparticles by an alternating magnetic field (AMF) but rather results in intracellular damage via friction from Brownian rotation or nanoscale heating effects from Neel relaxations. The nanoparticles were functionalized with a cell penetrating peptide to facilitate cell uptake and lysosomal escape. The intracellular effects of the internalized nanoparticles alone and with activation by an AMF were evaluated. Iron concentrations in vivo are highly regulated as excess iron can catalyze the formation of the hydroxyl radical through Fenton chemistry. Although often a concern of using iron

  2. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  3. Depicting Binding-Mediated Translocation of HIV-1 Tat Peptides in Living Cells with Nanoscale Pens of Tat-Conjugated Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien Y.; Huang, Jung Y.; Lo, Leu-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can translocate across cell membranes, and thus have great potential for the cellular delivery of macromolecular cargoes. However, the mechanism of this cellular uptake process is not yet fully understood. In this study, a time-lapse single-particle light-sheet microscopy technique was implemented to obtain a parallel visualization of the translocating process of individual human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) transactivator of transcription (Tat) peptide conjugated quantum dots (TatP-QDs) in complex cellular terrains. Here, TatP-QDs served as nanoscale dynamic pens, which depict remarkable trajectory aggregates of TatP-QDs on the cell surface. Spectral-embedding analysis of the trajectory aggregates revealed a manifold formed by isotropic diffusion and a fraction of directed movement, possibly caused by interaction between the Tat peptides and heparan sulfate groups on the plasma membrane. Further analysis indicated that the membrane deformation induced by Tat-peptide attachment increased with the disruption of the actin framework in cytochalasin D (cyto D)-treated cells, yielding higher interactions on the TatP-QDs. In native cells, the Tat peptides can remodel the actin framework to reduce their interaction with the local membrane environment. Characteristic hot spots for interaction were detected on the membrane, suggesting that a funnel passage may have formed for the Tat-coated particles. This finding offers valuable insight into the cellular delivery of nanoscale cargo, suggesting an avenue for direct therapeutic delivery. PMID:28208588

  4. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  5. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  6. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Developing a Dissociative Nanocontainer for Peptide Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Patrick; Anand, Prachi; Uvaydov, Alexander; Chakravartula, Srinivas; Sherpa, Chhime; Pires, Elena; O’Neil, Alison; Douglas, Trevor; Holford, Mandë

    2015-01-01

    The potency, selectivity, and decreased side effects of bioactive peptides have propelled these agents to the forefront of pharmacological research. Peptides are especially promising for the treatment of neurological disorders and pain. However, delivery of peptide therapeutics often requires invasive techniques, which is a major obstacle to their widespread application. We have developed a tailored peptide drug delivery system in which the viral capsid of P22 bacteriophage is modified to serve as a tunable nanocontainer for the packaging and controlled release of bioactive peptides. Recent efforts have demonstrated that P22 nanocontainers can effectively encapsulate analgesic peptides and translocate them across blood-brain-barrier (BBB) models. However, release of encapsulated peptides at their target site remains a challenge. Here a Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) reaction is applied to trigger P22 nanocontainer disassembly under physiological conditions. Specifically, the ROMP substrate norbornene (5-Norbornene-2-carboxylic acid) is conjugated to the exterior of a loaded P22 nanocontainer and Grubbs II Catalyst is used to trigger the polymerization reaction leading to nanocontainer disassembly. Our results demonstrate initial attempts to characterize the ROMP-triggered release of cargo peptides from P22 nanocontainers. This work provides proof-of-concept for the construction of a triggerable peptide drug delivery system using viral nanocontainers. PMID:26473893

  8. Glycin-rich antimicrobial peptide YD1 from B. amyloliquefaciens, induced morphological alteration in and showed affinity for plasmid DNA of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Saifur; Choi, Yun Hee; Choi, Yoon Seok; Yoo, Jin Cheol

    2017-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), low-molecular-weight proteins with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, are the most promising candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials. A powerful cationic glycine-rich AMP YD1 (MW ~ 1.0 kDa) was purified from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens CBSYD1 isolated from traditional Korean fermented food kimchi, for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. Strain CBSYD1 was identified 99.79% similar to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum FZB42(T) by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The amino acid sequence residues of YD1 were determined to be Ala-Pro-Lys-Gly-Val-Gln-Gly-Pro-Asn-Gly by Edman degradation method. After the analysis and comparison of YD1 peptide sequence using several bioinformatic servers, peptide sequence has been considered to be unique. YD1 displayed antimicrobial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of YD1 for Escherichia coli KCTC1923 (E. coli), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus B15 (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) ranged from 8 to 64 µg/mL, representing greater potency than commercial reference antibiotics. The antimicrobial mechanism of YD1 was determined to involve cell-penetrating translocation inside the cell and interaction with the DNA leading ultimately to bacterial cell death. Analogously, Gly-Pro-Asn-Gly is the likely expected cell-penetrating motif for YD1. YD1 could be a promising antimicrobial agent for the clinical application.

  9. In Vivo Efficacy of Anuran Trypsin Inhibitory Peptides against Staphylococcal Skin Infection and the Impact of Peptide Cyclization

    PubMed Central

    Malik, U.; Silva, O. N.; Fensterseifer, I. C. M.; Chan, L. Y.; Clark, R. J.; Franco, O. L.; Daly, N. L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of superficial and invasive infections. Its resistance to existing antimicrobial drugs is a global problem, and the development of novel antimicrobial agents is crucial. Antimicrobial peptides from natural resources offer potential as new treatments against staphylococcal infections. In the current study, we have examined the antimicrobial properties of peptides isolated from anuran skin secretions and cyclized synthetic analogues of these peptides. The structures of the peptides were elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, revealing high structural and sequence similarity with each other and with sunflower trypsin inhibitor 1 (SFTI-1). SFTI-1 is an ultrastable cyclic peptide isolated from sunflower seeds that has subnanomolar trypsin inhibitory activity, and this scaffold offers pharmaceutically relevant characteristics. The five anuran peptides were nonhemolytic and noncytotoxic and had trypsin inhibitory activities similar to that of SFTI-1. They demonstrated weak in vitro inhibitory activities against S. aureus, but several had strong antibacterial activities against S. aureus in an in vivo murine wound infection model. pYR, an immunomodulatory peptide from Rana sevosa, was the most potent, with complete bacterial clearance at 3 mg · kg−1. Cyclization of the peptides improved their stability but was associated with a concomitant decrease in antimicrobial activity. In summary, these anuran peptides are promising as novel therapeutic agents for treating infections from a clinically resistant pathogen. PMID:25624332

  10. LXXLL peptide converts transportan 10 to a potent inducer of apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tints, Kairit; Prink, Madis; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2014-04-03

    Degenerate expression of transcription coregulator proteins is observed in most human cancers. Therefore, in targeted anti-cancer therapy development, intervention at the level of cancer-specific transcription is of high interest. The steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) is highly expressed in breast, endometrial, and prostate cancer. It is present in various transcription complexes, including those containing nuclear hormone receptors. We examined the effects of a peptide that contains the LXXLL-motif of the human SRC-1 nuclear receptor box 1 linked to the cell-penetrating transportan 10 (TP10), hereafter referred to as TP10-SRC1LXXLL, on proliferation and estrogen-mediated transcription of breast cancer cells in vitro. Our data show that TP10-SRC1LXXLL induced dose-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells, and that this effect was not affected by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Surprisingly TP10-SRC1LXXLL severely reduced the viability and proliferation of hormone-unresponsive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the regulation of the endogenous ERα direct target gene pS2 was not affected by TP10-SRC1LXXLL in estrogen-stimulated MCF-7 cells. Dermal fibroblasts were similarly affected by treatment with higher concentrations of TP10-SRC1LXXLL and this effect was significantly delayed. These results suggest that the TP10-SRC1LXXLL peptide may be an effective drug candidate in the treatment of cancers with minimal therapeutic options, for example ER-negative tumors.

  11. Smac therapeutic Peptide nanoparticles inducing apoptosis of cancer cells for combination chemotherapy with Doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingxing; Liu, Peng; Gao, Guanhui; Deng, Jizhe; Pan, Zhengyin; Wu, Xu; Xie, Gaofeng; Yue, Caixia; Cho, Chi Hin; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2015-04-22

    Smac-conjugated nanoparticle (Smac-NP) was designed to induce the apoptosis of cancer cells and as a drug carrier for combination therapy. It contained three parts, a SmacN7 peptide which could induce apoptosis of cancer cells by interacting with XIAPs, the cell penetrating domain rich in arginine, and four hydrophobic tails for self-assembled Smac-NP. We demonstrated that Smac-NPs exerted an antitumor effect in breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 and nonsmall lung cancer (NSCLC) cell H460, which efficiently inhibited cancer cells proliferation without influencing normal liver cell lines LO2. Smac-NPs also significantly induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 and H460 cells through activating pro-caspase-3, down-regulating the expression of antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and up-regulating the pro-apoptotic protein Bax. Furthermore, Smac-NPs could be explored as a drug delivery system to load hydrophobic drug such as DOX for combination therapy. The DOX-loaded nanoparticles (DOX-Smac-NPs) exhibited higher cellular uptake efficiency and antitumor effect. Our work provided a new insight into therapeutic peptides integrated with drug simultaneously in one system for cancer combination treatment.

  12. Mitochondria-penetrating peptides conjugated to desferrioxamine as chelators for mitochondrial labile iron

    PubMed Central

    Alta, Roxana Y. P.; Vitorino, Hector A.; Goswami, Dibakar; Liria, Cleber W.; Wisnovsky, Simon P.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2017-01-01

    Desferrioxamine (DFO) is a bacterial siderophore with a high affinity for iron, but low cell penetration. As part of our ongoing project focused on DFO-conjugates, we synthesized, purified, characterized and studied new mtDFOs (DFO conjugated to the Mitochondria Penetrating Peptides TAT49-57, 1A, SS02 and SS20) using a succinic linker. These new conjugates retained their strong iron binding ability and antioxidant capacity. They were relatively non toxic to A2780 cells (IC50 40–100 μM) and had good mitochondrial localization (Rr +0.45 –+0.68) as observed when labeled with carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) In general, mtDFO caused only modest levels of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. DFO-SS02 retained the antioxidant ability of the parent peptide, shown by the inhibition of mitochondrial superoxide formation. None of the compounds displayed cell cycle arrest or enhanced apoptosis. Taken together, these results indicate that mtDFO could be promising compounds for amelioration of the disease symptoms of iron overload in mitochondria. PMID:28178347

  13. Sensitivity of tumor cells towards CIGB-300 anticancer peptide relies on its nucleolar localization.

    PubMed

    Perera, Yasser; Costales, Heydi C; Diaz, Yakelin; Reyes, Osvaldo; Farina, Hernan G; Mendez, Lissandra; Gómez, Roberto E; Acevedo, Boris E; Gomez, Daniel E; Alonso, Daniel F; Perea, Silvio E

    2012-04-01

    CIGB-300 is a novel anticancer peptide that impairs the casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation by direct binding to the conserved phosphoacceptor site on their substrates. Previous findings indicated that CIGB-300 inhibits tumor cell proliferation in vitro and induces tumor growth delay in vivo in cancer animal models. Interestingly, we had previously demonstrated that the putative oncogene B23/nucleophosmin (NPM) is the major intracellular target for CIGB-300 in a sensitive human lung cancer cell line. However, the ability of this peptide to target B23/NPM in cancer cells with differential CIGB-300 response phenotype remained to be determined. Interestingly, in this work, we evidenced that CIGB-300's antiproliferative activity on tumor cells strongly correlates with its nucleolar localization, the main subcellular localization of the previously identified B23/NPM target. Likewise, using CIGB-300 equipotent doses (concentration that inhibits 50% of proliferation), we demonstrated that this peptide interacts and inhibits B23/NPM phosphorylation in different cancer cell lines as evidenced by in vivo pull-down and metabolic labeling experiments. Moreover, such inhibition was followed by a fast apoptosis on CIGB-300-treated cells and also an impairment of cell cycle progression mainly after 5 h of treatment. Altogether, our data not only validates B23/NPM as a main target for CIGB-300 in cancer cells but also provides the first experimental clues to explain their differential antiproliferative response. Importantly, our findings suggest that further improvements to this cell penetrating peptide-based drug should entail its more efficient intracellular delivery at such subcellular localization.

  14. Development of stapled helical peptides to perturb the Cdt1-Mcm6 interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghan Peter; Liu, Changdong; Li, Tianlu; Zhu, Guang; Li, Xuechen

    2015-07-01

    Six all-hydrocarbon-stapled Cdt1 MBD-derived peptides have been designed and synthesized to perturb the Cdt1-Mcm6 interaction, which is involved in DNA replication. Inconsistency between the helicity of the obtained peptidomimetics and their binding affinity has been observed. The helicity of 13-amino acid stapled peptides increased, while their binding to Mcm6 was decreased. On the other hand, the 30-amino acid stapled peptides exhibited decreased helicity but increased binding affinity.

  15. Visualizing the dynamics of viral replication in living cells via Tat peptide delivery of nuclease-resistant molecular beacons

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Hsiao-Yun; Yates, Marylynn V.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we describe the use of nuclease-resistant molecular beacons (MBs) for the real-time detection of coxsackievirus B6 replication in living Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cells via Tat peptide delivery. A nuclease-resistant MB containing 2′-O-methyl RNA bases with phosphorothioate internucleotide linkages was designed to specifically target an 18-bp 5′ noncoding region of the viral genome. For intracellular delivery, a cell-penetrating Tat peptide was conjugated to the MB by using a thiol–maleimide linkage. Presence of the Tat peptide enabled nearly 100% intracellular delivery within 15 min. When the conjugate was introduced into BGMK cell monolayers infected with coxsackievirus B6, a discernible fluorescence was observed at 30 min after infection, and as few as 1 infectious viral particle could be detected within 2 h. The stability and the intracellular delivery properties of the modified MBs enabled real-time monitoring of the cell-to-cell spreading of viral infection. These results suggest that the Tat-modified, nuclease-resistant MBs may be powerful tools for improving our understanding of the dynamic behavior of viral replication and for therapeutic studies of antiviral treatments. PMID:18988730

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  17. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  18. Effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of antimicrobial peptide Ctx-Ha.

    PubMed

    Lorenzón, E N; Cespedes, G F; Vicente, E F; Nogueira, L G; Bauab, T M; Castro, M S; Cilli, E M

    2012-06-01

    It is well known that cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs) are potential microbicidal agents for the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance. However, the physicochemical properties of each peptide need to be optimized for clinical use. To evaluate the effects of dimerization on the structure and biological activity of the antimicrobial peptide Ctx-Ha, we have synthesized the monomeric and three dimeric (Lys-branched) forms of the Ctx-Ha peptide by solid-phase peptide synthesis using a combination of 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) and t-butoxycarbonyl (Boc) chemical approaches. The antimicrobial activity assay showed that dimerization decreases the ability of the peptide to inhibit growth of bacteria or fungi; however, the dimeric analogs displayed a higher level of bactericidal activity. In addition, a dramatic increase (50 times) in hemolytic activity was achieved with these analogs. Permeabilization studies showed that the rate of carboxyfluorescein release was higher for the dimeric peptides than for the monomeric peptide, especially in vesicles that contained sphingomyelin. Despite different biological activities, the secondary structure and pore diameter were not significantly altered by dimerization. In contrast to the case for other dimeric cAMPs, we have shown that dimerization selectively decreases the antimicrobial activity of this peptide and increases the hemolytic activity. The results also show that the interaction between dimeric peptides and the cell wall could be responsible for the decrease of the antimicrobial activity of these peptides.

  19. α/β-Peptide Foldamers Targeting Intracellular Protein-Protein Interactions with Activity in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Checco, James W; Lee, Erinna F; Evangelista, Marco; Sleebs, Nerida J; Rogers, Kelly; Pettikiriarachchi, Anne; Kershaw, Nadia J; Eddinger, Geoffrey A; Belair, David G; Wilson, Julia L; Eller, Chelcie H; Raines, Ronald T; Murphy, William L; Smith, Brian J; Gellman, Samuel H; Fairlie, W Douglas

    2015-09-09

    Peptides can be developed as effective antagonists of protein-protein interactions, but conventional peptides (i.e., oligomers of l-α-amino acids) suffer from significant limitations in vivo. Short half-lives due to rapid proteolytic degradation and an inability to cross cell membranes often preclude biological applications of peptides. Oligomers that contain both α- and β-amino acid residues ("α/β-peptides") manifest decreased susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, and when properly designed these unnatural oligomers can mimic the protein-recognition properties of analogous "α-peptides". This report documents an extension of the α/β-peptide approach to target intracellular protein-protein interactions. Specifically, we have generated α/β-peptides based on a "stapled" Bim BH3 α-peptide, which contains a hydrocarbon cross-link to enhance α-helix stability. We show that a stapled α/β-peptide can structurally and functionally mimic the parent stapled α-peptide in its ability to enter certain types of cells and block protein-protein interactions associated with apoptotic signaling. However, the α/β-peptide is nearly 100-fold more resistant to proteolysis than is the parent stapled α-peptide. These results show that backbone modification, a strategy that has received relatively little attention in terms of peptide engineering for biomedical applications, can be combined with more commonly deployed peripheral modifications such as side chain cross-linking to produce synergistic benefits.

  20. Intravitreal injection or topical eye-drop application of a μ-calpain C2L domain peptide protects against photoreceptor cell death in Royal College of Surgeons' rats, a model of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Taku; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Hata, Shoji; Tomita, Hiroshi; Isago, Hitomi; Baba, Ayaka; Ishiguro, Sei-Ichi

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial μ-calpain initiates apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-dependent apoptosis in retinal photoreceptor degeneration. Mitochondrial μ-calpain inhibitors may represent therapeutic targets for the disease. Therefore, we sought to identify inhibitors of mitochondrial calpains and determine their effects in Royal College of Surgeons' (RCS) rats, an animal model of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We synthesized 20-mer peptides of the C2-like (C2L) domain of μ-calpain. Two μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 inhibited mitochondrial μ-calpain activity (IC(50); 892 and 498nM, respectively), but not other proteases. Western blotting showed that 50μM of both μ-calpain peptides caused specific degradation of mitochondrial μ-calpain. Three-dimensional structure of calpains suggested that the peptides N2 and N9 corresponded to the regions forming salt bridges between the protease core domain 2 and the C2L domain. We determined the inhibitory regions of μ-calpain peptides N2 and N9 using 10-mers, and one peptide, N2-10-2, inhibited the activity of mitochondrial μ-calpain (IC(50); 112nM). We next conjugated the peptide N2-10-2 to the C-terminal of HIV-1 tat (HIV), a cell-penetrating peptide. Using isolated rat liver mitochondria, 50μM HIV-conjugated μ-calpain N2-10-2 peptide (HIV-Nμ, IC(50); 285nM) significantly inhibited AIF truncation. The intravitreal injection of 20mM HIV-Nμ also prevented retinal photoreceptor apoptosis determined by TUNEL staining, and preserved retinal function assessed by electroretinography in RCS rats. Topical application of 40mM HIV-Nμ also prevented apoptosis of retinal photoreceptors in RCS rats. Our results demonstrate that HIV-Nμ, a peptide inhibitor of mitochondrial μ-calpain, offers a new modality for treating RP.

  1. Comparative study of modulatory effects of Semax and primary proline-containing peptides on hemostatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, K A; Lyapina, L A; Ashmarin, I P

    2001-07-01

    Intranasal administration of Semax, peptide Pro-Gly-Pro, and a mixture of peptides Pro-Gly+Gly-Pro to rats for 5 days enhanced anticoagulant and fibrinolytic potential of the plasma (total fibrinolytic activity and plasmin and plasminogen activator activities) and decreased antiplasmin concentration. Semax and Pro-Gly-Pro decreased the weight of thrombi during experimental thrombosis.

  2. Natriuretic peptide-guided management in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chioncel, Ovidiu; Collins, Sean P; Greene, Stephen J; Ambrosy, Andrew P; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Macarie, Cezar; Butler, Javed; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that manifests from various cardiac and noncardiac abnormalities. Accordingly, rapid and readily accessible methods for diagnosis and risk stratification are invaluable for providing clinical care, deciding allocation of scare resources, and designing selection criteria for clinical trials. Natriuretic peptides represent one of the most important diagnostic and prognostic tools available for the care of heart failure patients. Natriuretic peptide testing has the distinct advantage of objectivity, reproducibility, and widespread availability.The concept of tailoring heart failure management to achieve a target value of natriuretic peptides has been tested in various clinical trials and may be considered as an effective method for longitudinal biomonitoring and guiding escalation of heart failure therapies with overall favorable results.Although heart failure trials support efficacy and safety of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy as compared with usual care, the relationship between natriuretic peptide trajectory and clinical benefit has not been uniform across the trials, and certain subgroups have not shown robust benefit. Furthermore, the precise natriuretic peptide value ranges and time intervals of testing are still under investigation. If natriuretic peptides fail to decrease following intensification of therapy, further work is needed to clarify the optimal pharmacologic approach. Despite decreasing natriuretic peptide levels, some patients may present with other high-risk features (e.g. elevated troponin). A multimarker panel investigating multiple pathological processes will likely be an optimal alternative, but this will require prospective validation.Future research will be needed to clarify the type and magnitude of the target natriuretic peptide therapeutic response, as well as the duration of natriuretic peptide-guided therapy in heart failure patients.

  3. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  4. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  5. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides, Skin Infections and Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Tissa R.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    The innate immune system evolved over 2 billion years ago to first recognize pathogens then eradicate them. Several distinct defects in this ancient but rapidly responsive element of human immune defense account for the increased incidence of skin infections in atopics. These defects include abnormalities in the physical barrier of the epidermis, alterations in microbial pattern recognition receptors such as toll receptors and NOD, and a diminished capacity to increase the expression of antimicrobial peptides during inflammation. Several antimicrobial peptides are affected including; cathelicidin, HBD-2, and HBD-3, which are lower in lesional skin of atopics compared to other inflammatory skin diseases, and dermcidin, which is decreased in sweat. Other defects in the immune defense barrier of atopics include a relative deficiency in plasmacytoid dendritic cells. In the future, understanding the cause of these defects may allow therapeutic intervention to reduce the incidence of infection in atopic individuals and potentially decrease the severity of this disorder. PMID:18620136

  7. Blocking protein phosphatase 2A signaling prevents endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and renal fibrosis: a peptide-based drug therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yuanjun; Guo, Yanyan; Liu, Ping; Zeng, Rui; Ning, Yong; Pei, Guangchang; Li, Yueqiang; Chen, Meixue; Guo, Shuiming; Li, Xiaoqing; Han, Min; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to the emergence of fibroblasts and plays a significant role in renal interstitial fibrosis. Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a major serine/threonine protein phosphatase in eukaryotic cells and regulates many signaling pathways. However, the significance of PP2A in EndMT is poorly understood. In present study, the role of PP2A in EndMT was evaluated. We demonstrated that PP2A activated in endothelial cells (EC) during their EndMT phenotype acquisition and in the mouse model of obstructive nephropathy (i.e., UUO). Inhibition of PP2A activity by its specific inhibitor prevented EC undergoing EndMT. Importantly, PP2A activation was dependent on tyrosine nitration at 127 in the catalytic subunit of PP2A (PP2Ac). Our renal-protective strategy was to block tyrosine127 nitration to inhibit PP2A activation by using a mimic peptide derived from PP2Ac conjugating a cell penetrating peptide (CPP: TAT), termed TAT-Y127WT. Pretreatment withTAT-Y127WT was able to prevent TGF-β1-induced EndMT. Administration of the peptide to UUO mice significantly ameliorated renal EndMT level, with preserved density of peritubular capillaries and reduction in extracellular matrix deposition. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibiting PP2Ac nitration using a mimic peptide is a potential preventive strategy for EndMT in renal fibrosis.

  8. A fibronectin peptide redirects PDGF-BB/PDGFR complexes to macropinocytosis-like internalization and augments PDGF-BB survival signals

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jia; Lin, Fubao; Brown, Deborah A.; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Growth factor-binding domains identified in various extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins have been shown to regulate growth factor activity in many ways. Recently we identified a fibronectin peptide (P12) that can bind platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and promote adult human dermal fibroblast (AHDF) survival under stress. In vivo experiments in a porcine burn injury model showed that P12 limited burn injury progression, suggesting an active role in tissue survival. In this report, we explored the molecular mechanism of this peptide in ADHF under nutrient deprivation. Our results showed that P12 acted like some cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) in that it redirected ligand-bound PDGFR from the clathrin-dependent endocytic pathway to a slower, macropinocytosis-like pathway. P12 slowed internalization and degradation of PDGF-BB, augmented its survival signals, and promoted cell survival after nutrient-removal. Our findings demonstrate a mechanism for a potential therapeutic peptide that increases cell and tissue survival by acting as a cofactor to PDGF-BB. PMID:24304816

  9. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  10. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  11. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  12. Peptide Nanofilament Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    This laboratory studied four systems involving molecular self-assembly during this project period. Each system will open a new avenue of research in developing novel applications for use in biomedical engineering and materials science. These systems include self-assembling oligopeptides that form stable beta sheets in water, peptides that form inter- and

  13. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  14. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  15. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  16. [Anti-atherosclerotic effects of peptidic geroprotector].

    PubMed

    Ryzhak, A P; Kuznik, B I; Putkovskaia, V N; Ryzhak, G A

    2012-01-01

    The study of peptide geroprotector's biological activity was conducted on basis of calf aorta extract Slavinorm in experimental models of hiperlypidemia and acute myocardial infarction. The study results show that Slavinorm possesses the evident antiatherogenic effect. It appears in blood lipid spectrum parameters optimization, including atherogenic coefficient normalization at the expense of high density lipids level increase and other cholesterol fractions decrease. Slavinorm manifested antiischemic effects in the model of acute myocardial infarction, which was expressed in significant decrease of necrotic zone after 4-hours coronary artery occlusion in comparison with parameters in control animals and in low frequency of postobstructive arythmia.

  17. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  18. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  19. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  20. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  1. [New regulatory peptides in rat stomach secretion (amylin, PGP, semax)].

    PubMed

    Maev, I V; Dicheva, D T

    2003-01-01

    We showed antisecretory effects of peptides of PGP, semax and a new pancreatic hormone, amylin, on the model of continuous stomach perfusion with the registration of pH, PCO2 as well as the determination of the amount of pepsinogen in the stomach perfusate. The intraperitoneal introduction of these peptides in the doses that proved to have an apparent anti-ulcer effect caused a decrease of both basal production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach and production caused by the irritation of the vagus nerve. Semax and amylin also decreased basal and stimulated secretion of pepsinogen. Amylin and PGP did not have any effect on basal bicarbonate secretion of the stomach, and semax caused its short-time increase 35 minutes after the introduction. We made a conclusion that the decrease of aggressive factors in gastric juices can be a mechanism of the anti-ulcer action of all three peptides under study.

  2. Development and characterization of targeted poly(NIPAm) nanoparticles for delivery of anti-inflammatory peptides in peripheral artery disease and osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMasters, James F.

    Inflammation is the underlying cause of several severe diseases including cardiovascular disease and osteoarthritis. Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is characterized by atherosclerotic occlusions within the peripheral vasculature. Current treatment for severe PAD involves mechanical widening of the artery via percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. Unfortunately, deployment of the balloon damages the endothelial layer, exposing the underlying collagenous matrix. Circulating platelets can bind to this collagen and become activated, releasing proinflammatory cytokines that promote proliferation of local smooth muscle cells. These proliferating cells eventually reocclude the vessel, resulting in restenosis and necessitating the need for a second procedure to reopen the vessel. Current treatments for moderate osteoarthritis include local injection of anti-inflammatory compounds such as glucocorticoids. Unfortunately, prolonged treatment carries with it significant side effects including osteoporosis, and cardiovascular complications. Our lab has developed an anti-inflammatory cell-penetrating peptide that inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase activated protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 is implicated in the inflammatory cascade of atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis, making it a potentially effective strategy for reducing inflammation in both disease states. Unfortunately, these peptides are untargeted and quickly degraded in the presence of serum proteases, making the development of an effective delivery system of paramount importance. The overall goal of the research presented here is to detail the development of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticle that is able to effectively load and release anti-inflammatory peptides for the treatment of these inflammatory diseases. In this dissertation, I will discuss the development of a collagen-binding nanoparticle that is able to inhibit platelet binding following angioplasty, thereby halting the initial inflammatory cascade

  3. Oxidation of proline decreases immunoreactivity and alters structure of barley prolamin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula; Stoddard, Frederick L; Kato, Yoji

    2017-01-01

    Elimination of celiac-toxic prolamin peptides and proteins is essential for Triticeae products to be gluten-free. Instead of enzymatic hydrolysis, in this study we investigated metal-catalyzed oxidation of two model peptides, QQPFP, and PQPQLPY, together with a hordein isolate from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). We established a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) LC-MS method to detect and quantify proline oxidation fragments. In addition to fragmentation, aggregation and side chain modifications were identified, including free thiol loss, carbonyl formation, and dityrosine formation. The immunoreactivity of the oxidized hordein isolate was considerably decreased in all metal-catalyzed oxidation systems. Cleavage of peptides or protein fragments at the numerous proline residues partially accounts for the decrease. Metal-catalyzed oxidation can thus be used in the modification and elimination of celiac-toxic peptides and proteins.

  4. Early engineering approaches to improve peptide developability and manufacturability.

    PubMed

    Furman, Jennifer L; Chiu, Mark; Hunter, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Downstream success in Pharmaceutical Development requires thoughtful molecule design early in the lifetime of any potential therapeutic. Most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are quite similar with respect to their developability properties. However, the properties of therapeutic peptides tend to be as diverse as the molecules themselves. Analysis of the primary sequence reveals sites of potential adverse posttranslational modifications including asparagine deamidation, aspartic acid isomerization, methionine, tryptophan, and cysteine oxidation and, potentially, chemical and proteolytic degradation liabilities that can impact the developability and manufacturability of a potential therapeutic peptide. Assessing these liabilities, both biophysically and functionally, early in a molecule's lifetime can drive a more effective path forward in the drug discovery process. In addition to these potential liabilities, more complex peptides that contain multiple disulfide bonds can pose particular challenges with respect to production and manufacturability. Approaches to reducing the disulfide bond complexity of these peptides are often explored with mixed success. Proteolytic degradation is a major contributor to decreased half-life and efficacy. Addressing this aspect of peptide stability early in the discovery process increases downstream success. We will address aspects of peptide sequence analysis, molecule complexity, developability analysis, and manufacturing routes that drive the decision making processes during peptide therapeutic development.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  6. Immunosuppressive peptides and their therapeutic applications☆

    PubMed Central

    Thell, Kathrin; Hellinger, Roland; Schabbauer, Gernot; Gruber, Christian W.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is vital for detecting and evading endogenous and exogenous threats to the body. Failure to regulate this homeostasis leads to autoimmunity, which is often associated with malfunctioning T cell signaling. Several medications are available to suppress over-reactive T lymphocytes, but many of the currently marketed drugs produce severe and life-threatening side-effects. Ribosomally synthesized peptides are gaining recognition from the pharmaceutical industry for their enhanced selectivity and decreased toxicity compared with small molecules; in particular, circular peptides exhibit remarkable stability and increased oral administration properties. For example, plant cyclotides effectively inhibit T lymphocyte proliferation. They are composed of a head-to-tail cyclized backbone and a cystine-knot motif, which confers them with remarkable stability, thus making them attractive pharmaceutical tools. PMID:24333193

  7. Prediction and interpretation of the lipophilicity of small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visconti, Alessia; Ermondi, Giuseppe; Caron, Giulia; Esposito, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Peptide-based drug discovery has considerably expanded and solid in silico tools for the prediction of physico-chemical properties of peptides are urgently needed. In this work we tested some combinations of descriptors/algorithms to find the best model to predict log D_{ {oct}} of a series of peptides. To do that we evaluate the models statistical performances but also their skills in providing a reliable deconvolution of the balance of intermolecular forces governing the partitioning phenomenon. Results prove that a PLS model based on VolSurf+ descriptors is the best tool to predict log D_{ {oct}} of neutral and ionised peptides. The mechanistic interpretation also reveals that the inclusion in the chemical structure of a HBD group is more efficient in decreasing lipophilicity than the inclusion of a HBA group.

  8. Enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration and glioma therapy mediated by a new peptide modified gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hui; Wang, Kaiyuan; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shanshan; Li, Jianfeng; Lou, Jinning; Ye, Liya; Yan, Xueying; Lu, Weiyue; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Successful glioma gene therapy lays on two important factors, the therapeutic genes and efficient delivery vehicles to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reach gliomas. In this work, a new gene vector was constructed based on dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGL) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG), conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, the nucleolar translocation signal (NoLS) sequence of the LIM Kinase 2 (LIMK2) protein (LIMK2 NoLS peptide, LNP), yielding DGL-PEG-LNP. Plasmid DNA encoding inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) was applied as the therapeutic gene. DGL-PEG-LNP/DNA nanoparticles (NPs) were monodispersed, with a mean diameter of 90.6 ± 8.9 nm. The conjugation of LNP significantly enhanced the BBB-crossing efficiency, cellular uptake and gene expression within tumor cells. Mechanism studies suggested the involvement of energy, caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis in cellular uptake of LNP-modified NPs. MTT results showed that no apparent cytotoxicity was observed when cells were treated with synthesized vectors. Furthermore, LNP-modified NPs mediated strongest and most intensive apoptosis on the tumor site, and the longest median survival time of glioma-bearing mice. All the results demonstrated that LNP is a kind of efficient CPPs especially for BBB-crossing application, and DGL-PEG-LNP/DNA is a potential non-viral platform for glioma gene therapy via intravenous administration.

  9. Rapid Endolysosomal Escape and Controlled Intracellular Trafficking of Cell Surface Mimetic Quantum-Dots-Anchored Peptides and Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Tan, Roger S; Naruchi, Kentaro; Amano, Maho; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-09-18

    A novel strategy for the development of a high performance nanoparticules platform was established by means of cell surface mimetic quantum-dots (QDs)-anchored peptides/glycopeptides, which was developed as a model system for nanoparticle-based drug delivery (NDD) vehicles with defined functions helping the specific intracellular trafficking after initial endocytosis. In this paper, we proposed a standardized protocol for the preparation of multifunctional QDs that allows for efficient cellular uptake and rapid escaping from the endolysosomal system and subsequent cytoplasmic molecular delivery to the target cellular compartment. Chemoselective ligation of the ketone-functionalized hexahistidine derivative facilitated both efficient endocytic entry and rapid endolysosomal escape of the aminooxy/phosphorylcholine self-assembled monolayer-coated QDs (AO/PCSAM-QDs) to the cytosol in various cell lines such as human normal and cancer cells, while modifications of these QDs with cell-penetrating arginine-rich peptides showed poor cellular uptake and induced self-aggregation of AO/PCSAM-QDs. Combined use of hexahistidylated AO/PCSAM-QDs with serglycine-like glycopeptides, namely synthetic proteoglycan initiators (PGIs), elicited the entry and controlled intracellular trafficking, Golgi localization, and also excretion of these nanoparticles, which suggested that the present approach would provide an ideal platform for the design of high performance NDD systems.

  10. CXCR4-antagonist Peptide R-liposomes for combined therapy against lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ieranò, Caterina; Portella, Luigi; Lusa, Sara; Salzano, Giuseppina; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Napolitano, Maria; Buoncervello, Maria; Macchia, Daniele; Spada, Massimo; Barbieri, Antonio; Luciano, Antonio; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Gabriele, Lucia; Caraglia, Michele; Arra, Claudio; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2016-04-14

    The chemokine CXCL12 activates CXCR4, initiating multiple pathways that control immune cell trafficking, angiogenesis and embryogenesis; CXCR4 is also overexpressed in multiple tumors affecting metastatic dissemination. While there has been great enthusiasm for exploiting the CXCR4-CXCL12 axis as a target in cancer therapy, to date the promise has yet to be fulfilled. A new class of CXCR4-antagonist cyclic peptides was recently developed and the compound named Peptide R was identified as the most active. With the intent to improve the efficacy and biodistribution of Peptide R, stealth liposomes decorated with Peptide R were developed (PL-Peptide R). In vitro PL-Peptide R efficiently inhibited CXCR4-dependent migration and in vivo it significantly reduced lung metastases and increased overall survival in B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice. To evaluate if PL-Peptide R could also be a drug delivery system for CXCR4 expressing tumors, the PL-Peptide R was loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) (PL-Peptide R-DOX). PL-Peptide R-DOX efficiently delivered DOX to CXCR4 expressing cell lines with a consequent decrease in the DOX IC50 efficient dose. In vivo, B16-CXCR4 injected C57BL/6 mice treated with PL-Peptide R-DOX developed fewer lung metastases compared to PL-DOX treated mice. This work provides the proof-of-concept to prevent metastasis by using combined nanomedicine.

  11. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  12. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  13. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  14. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  15. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  16. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  17. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  18. Intracellular delivery of fluorescent protein into viable wheat microspores using cationic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bilichak, Andriy; Luu, Justin; Eudes, François

    2015-01-01

    Microspores are specialized generative cells with haploid genome that demonstrate the amenability toward embryogenesis under certain conditions. The induced microspore culture technique is largely exploited by the breeding programs of wheat and other crops due to its high efficiency for generation of the large number of haploid plants in the relatively short period of time. The ability to produce mature double haploid plant from a single cell has also attracted attention of the plant biotechnologists in the past few years. More importantly, the possibility to deliver proteins for improvement of embryogenesis and the genome modification purposes holds great potential for transgene-free wheat biotechnology. In the present study, we examined the ability of cationic and amphipathic cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to convey a covalently-linked mCherry protein inside the viable microspores. We demonstrate that the affinity of CPPs to the microspore cells dependents on their charge with the highest efficiency of CPP-mCherry binding to the cells achieved by cationic CPPs (penetratin and R9). Additionally, due to overall negative charge of the microspore cell wall, the successful uptake of the protein cargo by live microspore cells is attained by utilization of a reversible disulfide bond between the R9 CPP and mCherry protein. Overall, the approach proposed herein can be applied by the other biotechnology groups for the fast and efficient screening of the different CPP candidates for their ability to deliver proteins inside the viable plant cells. PMID:26379691

  19. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  20. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  1. Novel anti-inflammatory peptides as cosmeceutical peptides.

    PubMed

    Kang, Youn-A; Na, Jung-Im; Choi, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Jee-Woong; Kang, Hee-Young; Park, Kyoung-Chan

    2011-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induced inflammation plays an important role in the aging of human skin. Prostaglandin (PG) E(2) is the primary mediator of UVB induced photoinflammation. We screened an internal library for dipeptides that inhibited UVB induced PGE(2) synthesis but showed no cytotoxicity toward human keratinocytes. We identified three highly active inhibitory sequences, LE (Leu+Glu), MW (Met+Trp) and MY (Met+Tyr). To evaluate their efficacy in human skin, 24 sites of abdomen skin were irradiated with a 308 nm excimer laser (300 mJ/cm(2)), after which 2% LE, MW, MY or a control were applied to the irradiated sites for 24h. The erythema index (EI) was measured before and 24h after treatment. The results showed that LE and MW significantly decreased UVB induced erythema (p=0.041 and p=0.036, respectively), but ME did not. Overall, LE and MW are candidate cosmeceutical peptides that can protect skin from UVB induced photoinflammation.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation and conformational analysis of some catalytically active peptides.

    PubMed

    Honarparvar, Bahareh; Skelton, Adam A

    2015-04-01

    The design of stable and inexpensive artificial enzymes with potent catalytic activity is a growing field in peptide science. The first step in this design process is to understand the key factors that can affect the conformational preference of an enzyme and correlate them with its catalytic activity. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water of two catalytically active peptides (peptide 1: Fmoc-Phe1-Phe2-His-CONH2; peptide 2: Fmoc-Phe1-Phe2-Arg-CONH2) were performed at temperatures of 300, 400, and 500 K. Conformational analysis of these peptides using Ramachandran plots identified the secondary structures of the amino acid residues involved (Phe1, Phe2, His, Arg) and confirmed their conformational flexibility in solution. Furthermore, Ramachandran maps revealed the intrinsic preference of the constituent residues of these compounds for a helical conformation. Long-range interaction distances and radius of gyration (R g) values obtained during 20 ns MD simulations confirmed their tendency to form folded conformations. Results showed a decrease in side-chain (Phe1, Phe2, His ring, and Arg) contacts as the temperature was raised from 300 to 400 K and then to 500 K. Finally, the radial distribution functions (RDF) of the water molecules around the nitrogen atoms in the catalytically active His and Arg residues of peptide 1 and peptide 2 revealed that the strongest water-peptide interaction occurred with the arginine nitrogen atoms in peptide 2. Our results highlight differences in the secondary structures of the two peptides that can be explained by the different arrangement of water molecules around the nitrogen atoms of Arg in peptide 2 as compared to the arrangement of water molecules around the nitrogen atoms of His in peptide 1. The results of this work thus provide detailed insight into peptide conformations which can be exploited in the future design of peptide analogs.

  3. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element. PMID:25494332

  4. Importance of Tryptophan in Transforming an Amphipathic Peptide into a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Targeted Antimicrobial Peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xin; Ma, Zhi; Wang, Jiajun; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan

    2014-01-01

    Here, we found that simple substitution of amino acids in the middle position of the hydrophobic face of an amphipathic peptide RI16 with tryptophan (T9W) considerably transformed into an antimicrobial peptide specifically targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) results demonstrated that T9W had a strong and specifically antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa, including antibiotic-resistant strains, but was not active against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphyfococcus epidermidis. Fluorescent spectroscopic assays indicated that T9W interacted with the membrane of P. aeruginosa, depolarizing the outer and the inner membrane of bacterial cells. Salt susceptibility assay showed that T9W still maintained its strong anti-pseudomonas activity in the presence of salts at physiological concentrations, and in hemolytic and MTT assays T9W also showed no toxicity against human blood cells and macrophages. In vivo assay demonstrated that T9W also displayed no toxicity to Chinese Kun Ming (KM) mice. Furthermore, the strong antibiofilm activity was also observed with the peptide T9W, which decreased the percentage of biomass formation in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, these findings indicated that design of single-pathogen antimicrobial agents can be achieved by simple amino acid mutation in naturally occurring peptide sequences and this study suggested a model of optimization/design of anti-pseudomonas drugs in which the tryptophan residue was a conserved element.

  5. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  6. Rapid detergent removal from peptide samples with ethyl acetate for mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Yee-Guide; Stanley, E Richard

    2010-02-01

    Detergents are required for the extraction of hydrophobic proteins and for the maintenance of their solubility in solution. However, the presence of detergents in the peptide samples severely suppresses ionization in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis and decreases chromatographic resolution in LC-MS. Thus, detergents must be removed for sensitive detection of peptides by MS. This unit describes a rapid protocol in which ethyl acetate extraction is used to remove octylglucoside from protease digests without loss of peptides. This procedure can also be used to reduce interference by sodium dodecyl sulfate, Nonidet P-40, or Triton X-100 in peptide samples for MS analysis.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of spontaneous fibril formation by random-coil peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Hall, Carol K.

    2004-11-01

    Assembly of normally soluble proteins into amyloid fibrils is a cause or associated symptom of numerous human disorders, including Alzheimer's and the prion diseases. We report molecular-level simulation of spontaneous fibril formation. Systems containing 12-96 model polyalanine peptides form fibrils at temperatures greater than a critical temperature that decreases with peptide concentration and exceeds the peptide's folding temperature, consistent with experimental findings. Formation of small amorphous aggregates precedes ordered nucleus formation and subsequent rapid fibril growth through addition of -sheets laterally and monomeric peptides at fibril ends. The fibril's structure is similar to that observed experimentally. amyloid | protein aggregation

  8. Solar-wind velocity decreases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geranios, A.

    1980-08-01

    A model is developed to account for the solar wind electron and proton temperature decreases observed following the passage of an interplanetary shock wave and during the velocity decrease of a solar wind stream. The equations of mass and energy conservation are solved for a fully ionized, electrically neutral plasma expanding radially and spherically symmetrically, taking into account the heat flux from the solor corona to the plasma along the open magnetic field lines, and the electron thermal conductivity. An analytical relationship between the temperature and the velocity of the solar wind plasma is obtained which is found to be in agreement with experimental measurements made by the Vela 5 and 6 and IMP 6 satellites from August 1969-May 1974. It is thus proposed that the observed low plasma temperatures are due to the fact that the temperature decrease of the expanding plasma exceeds the heat gain due to thermal conduction from the corona.

  9. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  10. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  11. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-02-23

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin.

  12. Rapid peptide metabolism: A major component of soil nitrogen cycling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Mark; Hill, Paul W.; Wanniarachchi, Sudas D.; Farrar, John; Bardgett, Richard D.; Jones, Davey L.

    2011-09-01

    Proteinaceous and peptidic nitrogen is a potential direct nutrient source for both plants and microbes in the soil, without prior degradation to amino acids and mineralization. We used a series of five sites along an elevation gradient from 15 m a.s.l. to 710 m a.s.l. along which primary productivity decreases to investigate peptide utilization rates by soil microbes. Using 14C-labeled L-alanine, L-dialanine, and L-trialanine in a series of incubation experiments, we show that peptides are directly and rapidly assimilated by soil microbes, and that they are utilized for both biomass production and respiration. Alanine, dialanine, and trialanine were mineralized rapidly by soil microbes from the five sites along the gradient. Across all five sites, dialanine and trialanine were mineralized faster than alanine. In competition experiments, a 100-fold excess of alanine had no effect on the rate of trialanine mineralization in four of the five sites, and the same excess of trialanine had no effect on alanine mineralization. This is indicative of uptake of the intact peptide by the soil microbial community. Our findings have implications for understanding terrestrial nitrogen cycling because they point to a short-circuit whereby large peptides and proteins need only be extracellularly cleaved to short chain length peptides before direct assimilation by microbes.

  13. Discovery of 12-mer peptides that bind to wood lignin

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Asako; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Nakamura, Masaharu; Takaya, Hikaru; Watanabe, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lignin, an abundant terrestrial polymer, is the only large-volume renewable feedstock composed of an aromatic skeleton. Lignin has been used mostly as an energy source during paper production; however, recent interest in replacing fossil fuels with renewable resources has highlighted its potential value in providing aromatic chemicals. Highly selective degradation of lignin is pivotal for industrial production of paper, biofuels, chemicals, and materials. However, few studies have examined natural and synthetic molecular components recognizing the heterogeneous aromatic polymer. Here, we report the first identification of lignin-binding peptides possessing characteristic sequences using a phage display technique. The consensus sequence HFPSP was found in several lignin-binding peptides, and the outer amino acid sequence affected the binding affinity of the peptides. Substitution of phenylalanine7 with Ile in the lignin-binding peptide C416 (HFPSPIFQRHSH) decreased the affinity of the peptide for softwood lignin without changing its affinity for hardwood lignin, indicating that C416 recognised structural differences between the lignins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrated that this peptide adopted a highly flexible random coil structure, allowing key residues to be appropriately arranged in relation to the binding site in lignin. These results provide a useful platform for designing synthetic and biological catalysts selectively bind to lignin. PMID:26903196

  14. C-peptide, Na+,K+-ATPase, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Coste, T. C.; Jannot, M. F.; Raccah, D.; Tsimaratos, M.

    2004-01-01

    Na+,K+-ATPase is an ubiquitous membrane enzyme that allows the extrusion of three sodium ions from the cell and two potassium ions from the extracellular fluid. Its activity is decreased in many tissues of streptozotocin-induced diabetic animals. This impairment could be at least partly responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Na+,K+-ATPase activity is decreased in the red blood cell membranes of type 1 diabetic individuals, irrespective of the degree of diabetic control. It is less impaired or even normal in those of type 2 diabetic patients. The authors have shown that in the red blood cells of type 2 diabetic patients, Na+,K+-ATPase activity was strongly related to blood C-peptide levels in non–insulin-treated patients (in whom C-peptide concentration reflects that of insulin) as well as in insulin-treated patients. Furthermore, a gene-environment relationship has been observed. The alpha-1 isoform of the enzyme predominant in red blood cells and nerve tissue is encoded by the ATP1A1 gene.Apolymorphism in the intron 1 of this gene is associated with lower enzyme activity in patients with C-peptide deficiency either with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, but not in normal individuals. There are several lines of evidence for a low C-peptide level being responsible for low Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the red blood cells. Short-term C-peptide infusion to type 1 diabetic patients restores normal Na+,K+-ATPase activity. Islet transplantation, which restores endogenous C-peptide secretion, enhances Na+,K+-ATPase activity proportionally to the rise in C-peptide. This C-peptide effect is not indirect. In fact, incubation of diabetic red blood cells with C-peptide at physiological concentration leads to an increase of Na+,K+-ATPase activity. In isolated proximal tubules of rats or in the medullary thick ascending limb of the kidney, C-peptide stimulates in a dose-dependent manner Na+,K+-ATPase activity. This impairment in Na+,K+-ATPase activity, mainly

  15. Acute gastric pH changes alter intraluminal but not plasma peptide levels.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C R; Ure, T; O'Dorisio, T M; Barrie, R J; Woltering, E A

    1991-12-01

    Gastric acidity is influenced by systemic and local peptide effects. Previous work by others has shown that intraluminally secreted peptides may have a role in local control of gastric acidity; however, the response of these peptides to acute changes in gastric pH is unknown. To determine the effects of acute changes in pH on systemic and intraluminal peptide levels, 14 normal volunteers underwent placement of a nasogastric tube after an overnight fast. Blood and gastric fluid were analyzed on a control day, 2 hours after completion of 24 hours of aluminum-magnesium antacid therapy and after 24 hours of H2 blockade. Plasma and acid-alcohol-extracted gastric peptide levels were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. Specimens were subdivided into two groups: 28 gastric fluid specimens with a pH less than 4 and 10 specimens with a pH greater than 4. In the patients with a pH greater than 4, the luminal peptides, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, substance P, and gastrin, were decreased by 50% to 90% and gastrin-releasing peptide was decreased by 36% compared with specimens with a pH less than 4. Conversely, intraluminal vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and calcitonin levels were elevated by 60% and 27%, respectively, in the samples with a pH greater than 4. Intraluminal peptide concentrations are responsive to changes in intragastric pH; however, this response was not seen in plasma peptide levels.

  16. Unraveling the Mechanisms of Peptide-Mediated Delivery of Nucleic Acids Using Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Margus, Helerin; Juks, Carmen; Pooga, Margus

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient non-viral delivery vectors for bioactive cargos, both in vitro and in vivo. Cargo molecules can be attached to CPPs either via covalent conjugation or by complex formation using co-incubation, which is typically used for charged molecules such as nucleic acids. The latter technique is efficiently used in case of CADY, MPG, Pep peptides, NickFects and PepFects that condense oligonucleotides (ONs) into nanoparticles, which efficiently enter cells and induce biological effects. Despite being highly promising candidates for developing new-generation medicines, CPPs' internalization mechanisms and intracellular trafficking are still far from being well-understood, and obtained data are often controversial. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is an informative and valuable tool for examining the mechanisms of CPP-ON nanoparticles. TEM enables to visualize nanoparticles or single molecules labeled with Nanogold™ tag, and follow their association with cells and intracellular localization. In this chapter, we present methods for preparation of CPP-ON nanoparticles for TEM analysis and for examination of their interactions with the plasma membrane, and subsequent cellular uptake either by direct translocation or endocytosis. In case of endocytosis, ONs have to be released from endosomes and reach their target site in nucleus or cytoplasm to reveal their activity. TEM enables to estimate when the endosomal escape begins, from which type of endosomal vesicles it occurs, whether the vesicles are broken, or nanocomplexes translocate across the membrane into cytosol. Since single ONs could be followed, the time-frame that is necessary for the splice-switching nucleotides to translocate into cell nucleus can be analyzed by TEM.

  17. A near-infrared two-photon-sensitive peptide-mediated liposomal delivery system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Yang, YanFang; Xie, XiangYang; Cai, XingShi; Wang, ZhiYuan; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Li, Ying; Mei, XingGuo

    2015-04-01

    Tumour-oriented nanocarrier drug delivery approaches with photo-sensitivity have been drawing considerable attention over the years. However, due to its low penetrability and ability to induce tissue damage, the use of UV light for triggered nanocarrier release in in vivo applications has been limited. Compared with UV light, near-infrared (NIR) light deeply penetrates tissues and is less damaging to cells. Here, we report on the development of a novel method employing photo-sensitive cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can be used to trigger the transport of liposomes into cells following stimulation, which was irradiation with NIR light in this case. The positive charges of the lysine residues on the CPP were temporarily caged by a NIR two-photon excitation-responsive protective group (PG), thereby forming photo-sensitive peptides (PSPs). The PSP was connected with DSPE via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer to prepare the modified liposomes (PSP-L). Once illuminated by NIR light in tumour tissues, these PGs were cleaved, and the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the liposomes into cancer cells. The PSP-L carrying vinorelbine bitartrate prepared in this work possessed suitable physiochemical properties. In addition, strong cellular uptake and cytotoxic activity of PSP-L in MCF-7 cells were correlated with NIR illumination. Furthermore, triggered NIR activation of PSP-L led to higher antitumour efficacy in the MCF-7 tumour model in nude mice compared with the unmodified liposomes (N-L). In conclusion, the application of PSP modifications to drug-carrying liposomes may provide an approach for the targeted delivery of antitumour agents.

  18. LXXLL Peptide Converts Transportan 10 to a Potent Inducer of Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tints, Kairit; Prink, Madis; Neuman, Toomas; Palm, Kaia

    2014-01-01

    Degenerate expression of transcription coregulator proteins is observed in most human cancers. Therefore, in targeted anti-cancer therapy development, intervention at the level of cancer-specific transcription is of high interest. The steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) is highly expressed in breast, endometrial, and prostate cancer. It is present in various transcription complexes, including those containing nuclear hormone receptors. We examined the effects of a peptide that contains the LXXLL-motif of the human SRC-1 nuclear receptor box 1 linked to the cell-penetrating transportan 10 (TP10), hereafter referred to as TP10-SRC1LXXLL, on proliferation and estrogen-mediated transcription of breast cancer cells in vitro. Our data show that TP10-SRC1LXXLL induced dose-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells, and that this effect was not affected by estrogen receptor (ER) status. Surprisingly TP10-SRC1LXXLL severely reduced the viability and proliferation of hormone-unresponsive breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the regulation of the endogenous ERα direct target gene pS2 was not affected by TP10-SRC1LXXLL in estrogen-stimulated MCF-7 cells. Dermal fibroblasts were similarly affected by treatment with higher concentrations of TP10-SRC1LXXLL and this effect was significantly delayed. These results suggest that the TP10-SRC1LXXLL peptide may be an effective drug candidate in the treatment of cancers with minimal therapeutic options, for example ER-negative tumors. PMID:24705462

  19. Delivery and tracking of quantum dot peptide bioconjugates in an intact developing avian brain.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rishabh; Domowicz, Miriam S; Schwartz, Nancy B; Henry, Judy; Medintz, Igor; Delehanty, James B; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Dawson, Philip E; Palomo, Valle; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-03-18

    Luminescent semiconductor ∼9.5 nm nanoparticles (quantum dots: QDs) have intrinsic physiochemical and optical properties which enable us to begin to understand the mechanisms of nanoparticle mediated chemical/drug delivery. Here, we demonstrate the ability of CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs surface functionalized with a zwitterionic compact ligand to deliver a cell-penetrating lipopeptide to the developing chick embryo brain without any apparent toxicity. Functionalized QDs were conjugated to the palmitoylated peptide WGDap(Palmitoyl)VKIKKP9GGH6, previously shown to uniquely facilitate endosomal escape, and microinjected into the embryonic chick spinal cord canal at embryo day 4 (E4). We were subsequently able to follow the labeling of spinal cord extension into the ventricles, migratory neuroblasts, maturing brain cells, and complex structures such as the choroid plexus. QD intensity extended throughout the brain, and peaked between E8 and E11 when fluorescence was concentrated in the choroid plexus before declining to hatching (E21/P0). We observed no abnormalities in embryonic patterning or embryo survival, and mRNA in situ hybridization confirmed that, at key developmental stages, the expression pattern of genes associated with different brain cell types (brain lipid binding protein, Sox-2, proteolipid protein and Class III-β-Tubulin) all showed a normal labeling pattern and intensity. Our findings suggest that we can use chemically modified QDs to identify and track neural stem cells as they migrate, that the choroid plexus clears these injected QDs/nanoparticles from the brain after E15, and that they can deliver drugs and peptides to the developing brain.

  20. Novel peptide VIP-TAT with higher affinity for PAC1 inhibited scopolamine induced amnesia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rongjie; Yang, Yanxu; Cui, Zekai; Zheng, Lijun; Zeng, Zhixing; Zhang, Huahua

    2014-10-01

    A novel peptide VIP-TAT with a cell penetrating peptide TAT at the C-terminus of VIP was constructed and prepared using intein mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag (IMPACT) system to enhance the brain uptake efficiency for the medical application in central nervous system. It was found by labeling VIP-TAT and VIP with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) that the extension with TAT increased the brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT significantly. Then short-term and long-term treatment with scopolamine (Scop) was used to evaluate the effect of VIP-TAT or VIP on Scop induced amnesia. Both short-term and long-term administration of VIP-TAT inhibited the latent time reduction in step-through test induced by Scop significantly, but long-term administration of VIP aggravated the Scop induced amnesia. Long-term i.p. injection of VIP-TAT was shown to have positive effect by inhibiting the oxidative damage, apoptosis and the cholinergic system activity reduction that induced by Scop, while VIP exerted negative effect in brain opposite to that in periphery system. The in vitro data showed that VIP-TAT had not only protective but also proliferative effect on Neuro2a cells which was inhibited by PAC1 antagonist PACAP(6-38). Competition binding assay and cAMP assay confirmed that VIP-TAT had higher affinity and activation for PAC1 than VIP. So it was concluded that the significantly stronger protective effect of VIP-TAT against Scop induced amnesia than VIP was due to (1) the enhanced brain uptake efficiency of VIP-TAT and (2) the increased affinity and activation of VIP-TAT for receptor PAC1.

  1. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  2. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  3. Serum proteases alter the antigenicity of peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1992-01-01

    Any effect of serum on the antigenicity of peptides is potentially relevant to their use as immunogens in vivo. Here we demonstrate that serum contains distinct proteases that can increase or decrease the antigenicity of peptides. By using a functional assay, we show that a serum component other than beta 2-microglobulin enhances the presentation of ovalbumin peptides produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Three features of this serum activity implicate proteolysis: it is temperature dependent, it results in increased antigenicity in a low molecular weight peptide fraction, and it is inhibited by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. Conversely, presentation of the synthetic peptide OVA-(257-264) is inhibited by serum. This inhibition is unaffected by leupeptin but is blocked by bestatin, a protease inhibitor with distinct substrate specificities. Implications for peptide-based vaccine design and immunotherapy are discussed. PMID:1518868

  4. Ribosome-mediated synthesis of natural product-like peptides via cell-free translation.

    PubMed

    Maini, Rumit; Umemoto, Shiori; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-10-01

    Peptide natural products (PNPs) represent a unique class of compounds known for their fascinating structural motifs with important biological activities. Lately, PNPs have garnered a lot of interest for their application in drug discovery. Nevertheless, lack of diversity oriented synthetic/biosynthetic platforms to generate large natural product-like libraries has limited their development as peptide therapeutics. The promiscuity of cell-free translation has allowed for the synthesis of artificial PNPs having complex structural features. Modified cell-free translation systems coupled with the display technologies have generated diverse natural product-like peptide libraries and led to the discovery of several biologically active molecules. Such technologies have drastically decreased the time to obtain peptide drug leads and therefore, revolutionized the field of peptide drug discovery. In this account, we review recent developments in the synthesis of natural product-like peptides via cell-free translation.

  5. Microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis based on the Fmoc protecting group strategy (CEM).

    PubMed

    Vanier, Grace S

    2013-01-01

    Microwave-assisted peptide synthesis has become one of the most widely used tools by peptide chemists for the synthesis of both routine and difficult peptide sequences. Microwave technology significantly reduces the synthesis time while also improving the quality of the peptides produced. Microwave energy allows most amino acid couplings to be completed in just 5 min. The Fmoc removal can also be accelerated in the microwave decreasing the reaction time from at least 15 min to only 3 min in most cases. Common side reactions such as racemization and aspartimide formation are easily controllable with optimized methods that can be applied routinely. This protocol outlines the detailed procedure for performing both manual and automated microwave-assisted peptide synthesis of two difficult peptide sequences, ACP (65-74) and β-amyloid, in high purity and yield.

  6. Peptidomic analysis of HEK293T cells: Effect of the proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin on intracellular peptides

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Lloyd D.; Gelman, Julia S.; Castro, Leandro M.; Gozzo, Fabio C.; Ferro, Emer S.

    2012-01-01

    Peptides derived from cytosolic, mitochondrial, and nuclear proteins have been detected in extracts of animal tissues and cell lines. To test whether the proteasome is involved in their formation, HEK293T cells were treated with epoxomicin (0.2 μM or 2 μM) for 1 hour and quantitative peptidomics analysis was performed. Altogether, 147 unique peptides were identified by mass spectrometry sequence analysis. Epoxomicin treatment decreased the levels of the majority of intracellular peptides, consistent with inhibition of the proteasome beta-2 and beta-5 subunits. Treatment with the higher concentration of epoxomicin elevated the levels of some peptides. Most of the elevated peptides resulted from cleavages at acidic residues, suggesting that epoxomicin increased the processing of proteins through the beta-1 subunit. Interestingly, some of the peptides that were elevated by the epoxomicin treatment had hydrophobic residues in P1 cleavage sites. Taken together, these findings suggest that while the proteasome is the major source of intracellular peptides, other peptide-generating mechanisms exist. Because intracellular peptides are likely to perform intracellular functions, studies using proteasome inhibitors need to be interpreted with caution as it is possible that the effects of these inhibitors are due to a change in the peptide levels rather than inhibition of protein degradation. PMID:22304392

  7. Aptamer-functionalized peptide H3CR5C as a novel nanovehicle for codelivery of fasudil and miRNA-195 targeting hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Wu, Xin; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jigang; Zhang, Dandan; Gu, Shengying; Zhu, Guanhua; Liu, Gaolin; Li, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most commonly diagnosed malignancy, of which hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents the dominating histological subtype. Antiangiogenic therapy aimed at vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has shown promising but deficient clinical prospects on account of vasculogenic mimicry, a highly patterned vascular channel distinguished from the endothelium-dependent blood vessel, which may function as blood supply networks occurring in aggressive tumors including HCC. In this study, we used a new cationic peptide, disulfide cross-linked stearylated polyarginine peptide modified with histidine (H3R5), as a reducible vector, cell penetrating peptide-modified aptamer (ST21) with specific binding to HCC cells to conjugate to peptide H3R5 as the targeting probe, miRNA-195 (miR195) as a powerful gene drug to inhibit VEGF, and fasudil to suppress vasculogenic mimicry by blocking ROCK2, all of which were simultaneously encapsulated in the same nanoparticles. Fasudil was loaded by ammonium sulfate-induced transmembrane electrochemical gradient and miR195 was condensed through electrostatic interaction. ST21-H3R5-polyethylene glycol (PEG) exhibited excellent loading capacities for both fasudil and miR195 with adjustable dosing ratios. Western blot analysis showed that FasudilST21-H3R5-PEGmiR195 had strong silencing activity of ROCK2 and VEGF, as compared with FasudilH3R5-PEGmiR195. In vitro and in vivo experiments confirmed that ST21-modified nanoparticles showed significantly higher cellular uptake and therapeutic efficacy in tumor cells or tumor tissues than the unmodified counterparts. These findings suggest that aptamer-conjugated peptide holds great promise for delivering chemical drugs and gene drugs simultaneously to overcome HCC. PMID:27574422

  8. Secondary structure formation and LCST behavior of short elastin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nuhn, Harald; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2008-10-01

    This contribution investigates the effects of chain length and chemical composition on the secondary structure and LCST behavior of a library of short, elastin-like peptides based on the GVGVP motif. CD experiments revealed that most of the investigated peptides showed the typical elastin conformational behavior with a decrease in random coil and an increase in beta-turn character with increasing temperature. For several peptides, LCST behavior was observed in aqueous NaCl solutions containing 10 mg/mL peptide. By extrapolation of the LCSTs measured at different NaCl concentrations to zero-salt concentration, apparent LCSTs were determined. The apparent LCST was found to decrease with increasing peptide chain length, which correlated well with the trend in the predicted partition coefficients. The apparent LCST of the peptides could be manipulated by successive replacement of the valine residues by more hydrophobic isoleucine, leucine, or phenylalanine residues. Within a particular series of variants, the apparent LCST was found to decrease with an increasing number of valine replacements, which also correlated well with the predicted evolution of the partition coefficient. Although the relative importance of the overall peptide hydrophobicity and the conformational preferences of the constituent amino acids on the LCST behavior still remains an open question, the results described in this contribution clearly demonstrate that short, elastin-like peptides are potentially attractive building blocks for a range of materials applications in biomedicine and engineering.

  9. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic peptides as nanostructures and drug delivery tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeh, Naser Ali

    conjugates although one limitation lies in the effort of controlling the rate of drug release. The encapsulated or complexed drugs tend to be released rapidly (before reaching the target site) and in the dendrimer--drug conjugates, it is the chemical linkage that controls the drug release. Thus, future studies in this field are urgently required to create more efficient and stable biomaterials. Peptides are considered as efficient vectors for achieving optimal cellular uptake. The potential use of peptides as drug delivery vectors received much attention by the discovery of several cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The first CPPs discovered in 1988, that were sequences from HIV-1 encoded TAT protein, TAT (48--60), and penetrated very efficiently through cell membranes of cultured mammalian cells. CPPs are a class of diverse peptides, typically with 8--25 amino acids, and unlike most peptides, they can cross the cellular membrane with more efficiency. CPPs have also shown to undergo self-assembly and generate nanostructures. The generation of self-assembled peptides and nanostructures occur through various types of interactions between functional groups of amino acid residues, such as electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bonding. Appropriate design and functionalization of peptides are critical for generating nanostructures. Chemically CPPs are classified into two major groups: linear and cyclic peptides. It has been previously reported that linear peptides containing hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acids could act as membrane protein stabilizers. These compounds are short hydrophilic or amphiphilic peptides that have positively charged amino acids, such as arginine, lysine or histidine, which can interact with the negative charge phospholipids layer on the cell membrane and translocate the cargo into the cells. Conjugation to cationic linear CPPs, such as TAT, penetratin, or oligoarginine efficiently improves the cellular uptake of large hydrophilic molecules, but the

  12. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  13. Calbindins decreased after space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, I. N.; Rhoten, W. B.; Carney, M. D.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of the body to microgravity during space flight causes a series of well-documented changes in Ca2+ metabolism, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are poorly understood. Calbindins, vitamin D-dependent Ca2+ binding proteins, are believed to have a significant role in maintaining cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. In this study, we used biochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to analyze the expression of calbindin-D28k and calbindin-D9k in kidneys, small intestine, and pancreas of rats flown for 9 d aboard the space shuttle. The effects of microgravity on calbindins in rats from space were compared with synchronous Animal Enclosure Module controls, modeled weightlessness animals (tail suspension), and their controls. Exposure to microgravity resulted in a significant and sustained decrease in calbindin-D28k content in the kidney and calbindin-D9k in the small intestine of flight animals, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Modeled weightlessness animals exhibited a similar decrease in calbindins by ELISA. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) in combination with quantitative computer image analysis was used to measure in situ the expression of calbindins in the kidney and the small intestine, and the expression of insulin in pancreas. There was a large decrease of immunoreactivity in renal distal tubular cell-associated calbindin-D28k and in intestinal absorptive cell-associated calbindin-D9k of space flight and modeled weightlessness animals compared with matched controls. No consistent difference in pancreatic insulin immunoreactivity between space flight, modeled weightlessness, and controls was observed. Regression analysis of results obtained by quantitative ICC and ELISA for space flight, modeled weightlessness animals, and their controls demonstrated a significant correlation. These findings after a short-term exposure to microgravity or modeled weightlessness suggest that a decreased expression of calbindins

  14. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions the