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Sample records for cell-penetrating peptides decreases

  1. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  2. Novel cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Carmine Pasquale; Pirisinu, Marco; Vlachos, Efstathios Nikolaos; Langel, Ülo

    2015-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short, nontoxic peptides with cationic and/or amphipathic properties able to cross the cellular membrane. CPPs are used for the delivery of a wide variety of cargoes, such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and therapeutic molecules. The aim of the present study was to synthesize unusually small novel CPPs targeting mitochondria based on the Szeto-Schiller peptide (SS-31) to influence intramitochondrial processes and to improve the biologic effects. All the peptides used were synthesized manually using 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chemistry. In the first part of the study, HeLa 705, U87, and bEnd.3 cells were used as in vitro delivery model. Cells were incubated for 24 h at 37°C and 5% CO2 with different concentrations of our peptides. Cell proliferation assay was performed to evaluate cell viability. Biologic effects such as mitochondrial membrane potential and antioxidant activity were evaluated. H2O2 was used as positive control. Uptake studies were performed using peptides conjugated with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (FAM). Fluorescent microscopy was used to determine presence and localization of peptides into the cells. Isolated mitochondria from pretreated cells and mitochondria treated after isolation were used to confirm the targeting ability of the peptide. Uptake of FAM alone was used as negative control. Microscopy studies confirmed the ability of peptides to penetrate cell. Localization analysis showed increase in uptake by 35% compared with SS-31. Mitochondrial CPP 1 (mtCPP-1) had no effect on mitochondrial membrane potential and prevented reactive oxygen species formation in bEnd.3 cells by 2-fold compared with SS-31. No cytotoxicity was observed even at high concentration (100 µM). These data suggest that mtCPP-1 is a mitochondrial CPP and protect mitochondria from oxidative damage due to its own antioxidant activities. © FASEB.

  3. [Cell penetrating peptides in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Huang, Shao; Liu, Ya-Wei; Jiang, Yong

    2007-10-01

    The genomic information obtained through the human genome project has been accelerating the analysis of the functions of various disease relevant genes. The high molecular weight biomolecules becomes increasingly important for the development of molecular therapies. However, the usage of such therapeutic macromolecules has been limited by the poor permeability across the lipid bilayer of the cellular plasma membrane. In order to overcome this barrier, several chemical and physical methods have been developed, such as electroporation and cationic lipids/liposomes. The drawbacks of these methods are the unwanted cellular effects and their limitation to in vitro applications. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) is a group of oligopeptides that could penetrate the cell membrane via a receptor-independent and non-endocytotic process with various conjungated bioactive molecules. Such ability makes them outstanding transmembrane vectors for various therapuetic biomolecules. In this review, we will introduce several representative strategies to develop antitumor macromolecules using CPPs.

  4. Cell-penetrating peptides transport therapeutics into cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joshua D; Flynn, Nicholas H

    2015-10-01

    Nearly 30years ago, certain small, relatively nontoxic peptides were discovered to be capable of traversing the cell membrane. These cell-penetrating peptides, as they are now called, have been shown to not only be capable of crossing the cell membrane themselves but can also carry many different therapeutic agents into cells, including small molecules, plasmid DNA, siRNA, therapeutic proteins, viruses, imaging agents, and other various nanoparticles. Many cell-penetrating peptides have been derived from natural proteins, but several other cell-penetrating peptides have been developed that are either chimeric or completely synthetic. How cell-penetrating peptides are internalized into cells has been a topic of debate, with some peptides seemingly entering cells through an endocytic mechanism and others by directly penetrating the cell membrane. Although the entry mechanism is still not entirely understood, it seems to be dependent on the peptide type, the peptide concentration, the cargo the peptide transports, and the cell type tested. With new intracellular disease targets being discovered, cell-penetrating peptides offer an exciting approach for delivering drugs to these intracellular targets. There are hundreds of cell-penetrating peptides being studied for drug delivery, and ongoing studies are demonstrating their success both in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Rational design of a biomimetic cell penetrating peptide library.

    PubMed

    Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Sahay, Gaurav; Pelet, Jeisa M; Jhunjhunwala, Siddharth; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-10-22

    Cell penetrating peptides have demonstrated potential to facilitate the cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. Here we develop a set of 50 cell penetrating peptide based formulations with potential to deliver small interfering RNAs intercellularly. The transfection efficacy of siRNA containing lipid-like nanoparticles decorated with different peptides was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo and correlated with the peptide physical and chemical properties. In vitro, these particles were internalized primarily through macropinocytosis. When the peptides were presented to bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, they induce low immunoactivation relative to control cell penetrating peptides including the antennapedia homeodomain and TAT, as quantified by the expression of activation specific surface proteins like CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex class II. In vivo, peptide decorated nanoparticles primarily accumulated in the lungs and the liver. Three human peptides derived from surfactant protein B (a lung surfactant protein), orexin (a neuropeptide hormone, and lactoferricin (a globular glycoprotein) that exist in many physiological fluids facilitated the in vivo delivery of siRNA and induce significant knock down (90%) of a hepatocyte expressed protein, coagulation Factor VII.

  6. Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Delivery of Biopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Munyendo, Were LL; Lv, Huixia; Benza-Ingoula, Habiba; Baraza, Lilechi D.; Zhou, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    The cell membrane is a highly selective barrier. This limits the cellular uptake of molecules including DNA, oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins used as therapeutic agents. Different approaches have been employed to increase the membrane permeability and intracellular delivery of these therapeutic molecules. One such approach is the use of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs). CPPs represent a new and innovative concept, which bypasses the problem of bioavailability of drugs. The success of CPPs lies in their ability to unlock intracellular and even intranuclear targets for the delivery of agents ranging from peptides to antibodies and drug-loaded nanoparticles. This review highlights the development of cell penetrating peptides for cell-specific delivery strategies involving biomolecules that can be triggered spatially and temporally within a cell transport pathway by change in physiological conditions. The review also discusses conjugations of therapeutic agents to CPPs for enhanced intracellular delivery and bioavailability that are at the clinical stage of development. PMID:24970133

  7. Anti-cancer therapies that utilize cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bitler, Benjamin G; Schroeder, Joyce A

    2010-06-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are 9-35mer cationic and/or amphipathic peptides that are rapidly internalized across cell membranes. Importantly, they can be linked to a variety of cargo, including anti-cancer therapeutics, making CPPs an efficient, effective and non-toxic mechanism for drug delivery. In this review, we discuss a number of CPP conjugated therapies (CTTs) that are either patented are in the progress of patenting, and show strong promise for clinical efficacy. The CTTs discussed here target a number of different processes specific to cancer progression, including proliferation, survival and migration. In addition, many of these CTTs also increase sensitivity to current anti-cancer therapy modalities, including radiation and other DNA damaging chemotherapies, thereby decreasing the toxic dosage required for effective treatment. Mechanistically, these CTTs function in a dominant-negative manner by blocking tumor-specific protein-protein interactions with the CPP-conjugated peptide or protein. The treatment of both cell lines and mouse models demonstrates that this method of molecular targeting results in equal if not greater efficacy than current standards of care, including DNA damaging agents and topoisomerase inhibitors. For the treatment of invasive carcinoma, these CTTs have significant clinical potential to deliver highly targeted therapies without sacrificing the patient's quality of life.

  8. Dendritic Guanidines as Efficient Analogues of Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bonduelle, Colin V.; Gillies, Elizabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    The widespread application of cell penetrating agents to clinical therapeutics and imaging agents relies on the ability to prepare them on a large scale and to readily conjugate them to their cargos. Dendritic analogues of cell penetrating peptides, with multiple guanidine groups on their peripheries offer advantages as their high symmetry allows them to be efficiently synthesized, while orthogonal functionalities at their focal points allow them to be conjugated to cargo using simple synthetic methods. Their chemical structures and properties are also highly tunable as their flexibility and the number of guanidine groups can be tuned by altering the dendritic backbone or the linkages to the guanidine groups. This review describes the development of cell-penetrating dendrimers based on several different backbones, their structure-property relationships, and comparisons of their efficacies with those of known cell penetrating peptides. The toxicities of these dendritic guanidines are also reported as well as their application towards the intracellular delivery of biologically significant cargos including proteins and nanoparticles. PMID:27713272

  9. Cell-penetrating peptides: strategies for anticancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Raucher, Drazen; Ryu, Jung Su

    2015-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) provide an efficient strategy for the intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules in various biomedical applications. This review focuses on recent advances in the use of CPPs to deliver anticancer therapeutics and imaging reagents to cancer cells, along with CPP contributions to novel tumor-targeting techniques. CPPs are now used extensively to deliver a variety of therapeutics, despite lacking cell specificity and having a short duration of action. Resolution of these shortcomings to enable increased cancer cell and/or tumor specificity could improve CPP-based drug delivery strategies, expand combined drug delivery possibilities, and strengthen future clinical applications of these peptides.

  10. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  11. Investigation of the Sequence and Length Dependence for Cell-Penetrating Prenylated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Barany, George; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.

    2009-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides are useful delivery tools for introducing molecules of interest into cells. A new class of cell penetrating molecules has been recently reported--cell penetrating, prenylated peptides. In this study a series of such peptides was synthesized to examine the relationship between peptide sequence and level of peptide internalization and to probe their mechanism of internalization. This study revealed that prenylated peptides internalize via a non-endocytotic pathway regardless of sequence. Sequence length and identity was found to play a role in peptide uptake but prenylated sequences as short as two amino acids were found to exhibit significant cell penetrating properties. PMID:20004573

  12. Mechanism Matters: A Taxonomy of Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, W. Berkeley; Fuselier, Taylor; He, Jing; Wimley, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The permeability barrier imposed by cellular membranes limits the access of exogenous compounds to the interior of cells. Researchers and patients alike would benefit from efficient methods for intracellular delivery of a wide range of membrane-impermeant molecules, including biochemically active small molecules, imaging agents, peptides, peptide nucleic acids, proteins, RNA, DNA, and nanoparticles. There has been a sustained effort to exploit cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the delivery of such useful cargoes in vitro and in vivo because of their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis, and controllable physical chemistry. Here, we discuss the many mechanisms by which CPPs can function, and describe a taxonomy of mechanisms that could be help organize future efforts in the field. PMID:26545486

  13. Translocation and Endocytosis for Cell-penetrating Peptide Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Chen-Yu; Delaroche, Diane; Burlina, Fabienne; Alves, Isabel D.; Chassaing, Gérard; Sagan, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) share the property of cellular internalization. The question of how these peptides reach the cytoplasm of cells is still widely debated. Herein, we have used a mass spectrometry-based method that enables quantification of internalized and membrane-bound peptides. Internalization of the most used CPP was studied at 37 °C (endocytosis and translocation) and 4 °C (translocation) in wild type and proteoglycan-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. Both translocation and endocytosis are internalization pathways used by CPP. The choice of one pathway versus the other depends on the peptide sequence (not the number of positive changes), the extracellular peptide concentration, and the membrane components. There is no relationship between the high affinity of these peptides for the cell membrane and their internalization efficacy. Translocation occurs at low extracellular peptide concentration, whereas endocytosis, a saturable and cooperative phenomenon, is activated at higher concentrations. Translocation operates in a narrow time window, which implies a specific lipid/peptide co-import in cells. PMID:19833724

  14. Quality control of cationic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-05

    During fundamental research, it is recommended to evaluate the test compound identity and purity in order to obtain reliable study outcomes. For peptides, quality control (QC) analyses are routinely performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet (UV) detector system. These traditional QC methods, using a C18 column and a linear gradient with formic acid (FA) as acidic modifier in the mobile phase, might not result in optimal chromatographic performance for basic peptides due to their cationic nature and hence may lead to erroneous results. Therefore, the influence of the used chromatographic system on the final QC results of basic peptides was evaluated using five cationic cell-penetrating peptides and five C18-chromatographic systems, differing in the column particle size (high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) versus ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)), the acidic modifier (FA versus trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)), and the column temperature (30 °C versus 60 °C). Our results indicate that a UHPLC system with the C18 column thermostated at 30 °C and a mobile phase containing TFA, provides the most suitable routine QC analysis method for cationic peptides, outperforming in sensitivity and resolution compared to the other systems. We also demonstrate the use of a single quad mass spectrometry (MS) detector system during QC analysis of (cationic) peptides, allowing identification of the peptide and its impurities, as well as the evaluation of the peak purity.

  15. The Antimicrobial and Antiviral Applications of Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Kalle; Eriste, Elo; Langel, Ülo

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have become increasingly popular both in research and in application. There have been numerous studies on the physiochemical characteristics and behavior of CPPs in various environments; likewise, the mechanisms of entry and delivery capabilities of these peptides have also been extensively researched. Besides the fundamental issues, there is an enormous interest in the delivery capabilities of the peptides as the family of CPPs is a promising and mostly non-toxic delivery vector candidate for numerous medical applications such as gene silencing, transgene delivery, and splice correction. Lately, however, there has been an emerging field of study besides the high-profile gene therapy applications-the use of peptides and CPPs to combat various infections caused by harmful bacteria, fungi, and viruses.In this chapter, we aim to provide a short overview of the history and properties of CPPs which is followed by more thorough descriptions of antimicrobial and antiviral peptides. To achieve this, we analyze the origin of such peptides, give an overview of the mechanisms of action and discuss the various practical applications which are ongoing or have been suggested based on research.

  16. Oral biodrug delivery using cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Morishita, Mariko

    2012-05-01

    During the past few decades, the novel biotherapeutic agents such as peptides and proteins have been contributed to the treatment of several diseases. However, their oral absorption is significantly limited due to their poor delivery through the intestinal mucosa. Therefore, the feasible approaches are needed for improving the oral bioavailability of biodrugs. Recently, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as HIV-1 Tat, penetratin and oligoarginine are considered as a useful tool for the intracellular delivery of therapeutic macromolecules. Hence, it was expected that the ability of CPPs may be applicable to enhance the absorption of biodrugs through intestinal epithelial membrane. CPPs are likely to become powerful tools for overcoming the low permeability of therapeutic peptides and proteins through the intestinal membrane, the major barrier to their oral delivery. Further advantage of this promising strategy is that this successful intestinal absorption could be achieved by more convenient methodology, coadministration of CPP with drugs via intermolecular interaction among them. Hereafter, the further establishment of delivery system based on CPPs is required to realize the development of the oral forms of therapeutic peptides and proteins. The aim here is to introduce our vision focusing on oral biodrug delivery by the use of CPPs as potential peptide carrier in order to provide new information in the design and development of new oral delivery systems for novel biotherapeutics.

  17. Translocation of cell-penetrating peptides into Candida fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zifan; Karlsson, Amy J

    2017-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides capable of crossing cellular membranes while carrying molecular cargo. Although they have been widely studied for their ability to translocate nucleic acids, small molecules, and proteins into mammalian cells, studies of their interaction with fungal cells are limited. In this work, we evaluated the translocation of eleven fluorescently labeled peptides into the important human fungal pathogens Candida albicans and C. glabrata and explored the mechanisms of translocation. Seven of these peptides (cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, MAP, SynB, (KFF)3 K, and MPG) exhibited substantial translocation (>80% of cells) into both species in a concentration-dependent manner, and an additional peptide (TP-10) exhibiting strong translocation into only C. glabrata. Vacuoles were involved in translocation and intracellular trafficking of the peptides in the fungal cells and, for some peptides, escape from the vacuoles and localization in the cytosol were correlated to toxicity toward the fungal cells. Endocytosis was involved in the translocation of cecropin B, MAP, SynB, MPG, (KFF)3 K, and TP-10, and cecropin B, penetratin, pVEC, and MAP caused membrane permeabilization during translocation. These results indicate the involvement of multiple translocation mechanisms for some CPPs. Although high levels of translocation were typically associated with toxicity of the peptides toward the fungal cells, SynB was translocated efficiently into Candida cells at concentrations that led to minimal toxicity. Our work highlights the potential of CPPs in delivering antifungal molecules and other bioactive cargo to Candida pathogens. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.

  19. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; ...

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess lowmore » cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.« less

  20. Reinventing Cell Penetrating Peptides Using Glycosylated Methionine Sulfonium Ion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs. PMID:27162954

  1. Protein transduction: cell penetrating peptides and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Kylie M; Jans, David A

    2006-01-01

    Cell penetrating proteins or peptides (CPPs) have the ability to cross the plasma membranes of mammalian cells in an apparently energy- and receptor-independent fashion. Although there is much debate over the mechanism by which this "protein transduction" occurs, the ability of CPPs to translocate rapidly into cells is being exploited to deliver a broad range of therapeutics including proteins, DNA, antibodies, oligonucleotides, imaging agents and liposomes in a variety of situations and biological systems. The current review looks at the delivery of many such molecules by various CPPs, and their potential therapeutic application in a wide range of areas. CPP ability to deliver different cargoes in a relatively efficient and non-invasive manner has implications as far reaching as drug delivery, gene transfer, DNA vaccination and beyond. Although many questions remain to be answered and limitations on the use of CPPs exist, it is clear that this emerging technology has much to offer in a clinical setting.

  2. Cell penetrating peptide inhibitors of Nuclear Factor-kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Orange, J. S.; May, M. J.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors are activated by a range of stimuli including pro-inflammatory cytokines. Active NF-κB regulates the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell survival and aberrant NF-κB activity plays pathological roles in certain types of cancer and diseases characterized by chronic inflammation. NF-κB signaling is an attractive target for the development of novel anti-inflammatory or anti-cancer drugs and we discuss here how the method of peptide transduction has been used to specifically target NF-κB. Peptide transduction relies on the ability of certain small cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to enter cells, and a panel of CPP-linked inhibitors (CPP-Is) has been developed to directly inhibit NF-κB signaling. Remarkably, several of these NF-κB-targeting CPP-Is are effective in vivo and therefore offer exciting potential in the clinical setting. PMID:18668204

  3. Anionic activators for differential sensing with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Javier; Matile, Stefan

    2011-02-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of small peptides with one to three negative charges and one to three hydrazides as key components of membrane-based synthetic sensing systems are reported. Their spontaneous reaction with hydrophobic aldehydes or ketones gives rapid access to small collections of amphiphilic anions. These anionic amphiphiles can activate polycations as anion transporters in lipid-bilayer membranes. Odorants are used as representative hydrophobic aldehydes and ketones, and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as polycationic transporters in fluorogenic vesicles. Different activities obtained with different counterion activators are used to generate multidimensional patterns that can be recognized by principal component and hierarchical cluster analysis to extract unique "fingerprints" for individual analytes (including enantiomers, cis-trans isomers or perfumes as illustrative analyte mixtures). Comparison of the peptide activators reveals that carboxylates perform better than phosphonates. Gemini-like activators containing two carboxylates and two hydrophobic hydrazone tails are best, whereas excessive charges and tails give weaker activities. This result differs from cationic activators of polyanionic transporters such as DNA, which worked best with octopus amphiphiles with one cationic head and four hydrophobic tentacles. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Design, synthesis, and functional testing of recombinant cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyaningtyas, S. T.; Soebandrio, A.; Ibrahim, F.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are one of the most attractive DNA delivery systems currently in development. In this research, in silico CPP development was performed based on a literature study to look for peptides that induce endosome escape, have the ability to bind DNA, and pass through cell membranes and/or nuclear membranes with a final goal of creating a new CPP to be used as a DNA delivery system. We report herein the successful isolation of three candidate CPP molecules, which have all been successfully expressed and purified by NiNTA. One of the determinants of CPP success as a DNA carrier is the ability of the CPP to bind and protect DNA from the effects of nucleases. The DNA binding test results show that all three CPPs can bind to DNA and protect it from the effects of serum nucleases. These three CPP candidates designed in silico and synthesized in the prokaryote system are eligible candidates for further testing of their ability to deliver DNA in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Characteristics of Cell-Penetrating Peptide/Nucleic Acid Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Margus, Helerin; Arukuusk, Piret; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2016-01-04

    Nucleic acids are highly promising candidates for the treatment of various genetic diseases. However, due to the large size and negative charge, nucleic acids are not efficiently taken up by cells, and thus, their clinical potential remains limited so far. Therefore, various delivery vehicles have been designed to assist the cellular uptake of nucleic acids. Among these, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have gained increasing popularity as efficient and nontoxic delivery vectors. CPPs can be coupled to nucleic acids either by covalent or noncovalent association. Noncovalent coupling, which is based on the formation of nanoparticle-like nanocomplexes (NP), has received much attention in recent years, and the number of studies employing the strategy is explosively increasing due to the high therapeutic potential. However, the properties of CPP/nucleic acid NPs have not been characterized in sufficient detail yet. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the size and morphology of nucleic acid nanoparticles with novel transfection peptides, PepFects (PFs) and NickFects (NFs), using negative staining transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In addition, we examined whether the attachment of fluorescence or (nano)gold label to nucleic acid affects the nanocomplex formation or its morphology. We demonstrated that transportan-10-based new generation CPPs from PF and NF families condense nucleic acids to NPs of homogeneous size and shape. The size and shape of assembled nanoparticles depend on the type of the complexed nucleic acid and the sequence of the used peptide, whereas the label on the nucleic acid does not influence the gross characteristics of formed NPs.

  6. Translocation of Cell Penetrating Peptide Engrafted Nanoparticles Across Skin Layers

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Ram R; Desai, Pinaki; Belay, Kalayu; Singh, Mandip

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the ability of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to translocate the lipid payload into the skin layers. Fluorescent dye (DID-oil) encapsulated nano lipid crystal nanoparticles (FNLCN) were prepared using Compritol, Miglyol and DOGS-NTA-Ni lipids by hot melt homogenization technique. The FNLCN surface was coated with TAT peptide (FNLCNT) or control YKA peptide (FNLCNY) and in vitro rat skin permeation studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. Observation of lateral skin sections obtained using cryotome with a confocal microscope demonstrated that skin permeation of FNLCNT was time dependent and after 24 h, fluorescence was observed upto a depth of 120 µm which was localized in the hair follicles and epidermis. In case of FNLCN and FNLCNY formulations fluorescence was mainly observed in the hair follicles. This observation was further supported by confocal Raman spectroscopy where higher fluorescence signal intensity was observed at 80 and 120 µm depth with FNLCNT treated skin and intensity of fluorescence peaks was in the ratio of 2:1:1 and 5:3:1 for FNLCNT, FNLCN, and FNLCNY treated skin sections, respectively. Furthermore, replacement of DID-oil with celecoxib (Cxb), a model lipophilic drug showed similar results and after 24 h, the CXBNT formulation increased the Cxb concentration in SC by 3 and 6 fold and in epidermis by 2 and 3 fold as compared to CXBN and CXBNY formulations respectively. Our results strongly suggest that CPP can translocate nanoparticles with their payloads into deeper skin layers. PMID:20413152

  7. Methods to follow intracellular trafficking of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärnaste, Ly; Arukuusk, Piret; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient vehicles to transport bioactive molecules into the cells. Despite numerous studies the exact mechanism by which CPPs facilitate delivery of cargo to its intracellular target is still debated. The current work presents methods that can be used for tracking CPP/pDNA complexes through endosomal transport and show the role of endosomal transport in the delivery of cargo. Separation of endosomal vesicles by differential centrifugation enables to pinpoint the localization of delivered cargo without labeling it and gives important quantitative information about pDNA trafficing in certain endosomal compartments. Single particle tracking (SPT) allows following individual CPP/cargo complex through endosomal path in live cells, using fluoresently labled cargo and green fluoresent protein expressing cells. These two different methods show similar results about tested NickFect/pDNA complexes intracellular trafficing. NF51 facilitates rapid internalization of complexes into the cells, prolongs their stay in early endosomes and promotes release to cytosol. NF1 is less capable to induce endosomal release and higher amount of complexes are routed to lysosomes for degradation. Our findings offer potential delivery vector for in vivo applications, NF51, where endosomal entrapment has been allayed. Furthermore, these methods are valuable tools to study other CPP-based delivery systems.

  8. Cell-penetrating peptides with intracellular organelle targeting.

    PubMed

    Cerrato, Carmine Pasquale; Künnapuu, Kadri; Langel, Ülo

    2017-02-01

    One of the major limiting steps in order to have an effective drug is the passage through one or more cell membranes to reach its site of action. To reach the action-site, the specific macromolecules are required to be delivered specifically to the cell compartment/organelle in their (pre)active form. Areas covered: In this review, we will discuss cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) developed in the last decade to transport small RNA/DNA, plasmids, antibodies, and nanoparticles into specific sites of the cell. The article describes CPPs in complex with cargo molecules that target specific intracellular organelles and their potential for pharmacological or clinical use. Expert opinion: Organelle targeting is the ultimate goal to ensure selective delivery to the site of action in the cells. CPP technologies represent an important strategy to address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments by covalent conjugation to targeting sequences, potentially enabling strategies to combat genomic diseases as well as infections, cancer, neurodegenerative and hereditary diseases. They have proven to be successful in delivering various therapeutic agents into cells however, further in vivo experiments and clinical trials are required to demonstrate the efficacy of this technology.

  9. On the mechanisms of the internalization of S413-PV cell-penetrating peptide

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides have been shown to translocate across eukaryotic cell membranes through a temperature-insensitive and energy-independent mechanism that does not involve membrane receptors or transporters. Although cell-penetrating peptides have been successfully used to mediate the intracellular delivery of a wide variety of molecules of pharmacological interest both in vitro and in vivo, the mechanisms by which cellular uptake occurs remain unclear. In the face of recent reports demonstrating that uptake of cell-penetrating peptides occurs through previously described endocytic pathways, or is a consequence of fixation artifacts, we conducted a critical re-evaluation of the mechanism responsible for the cellular uptake of the S413-PV karyophilic cell-penetrating peptide. We report that the S413-PV peptide is able to accumulate inside live cells very efficiently through a rapid, dose-dependent and non-toxic process, providing clear evidence that the cellular uptake of this peptide cannot be attributed to fixation artifacts. Comparative analysis of peptide uptake into mutant cells lacking heparan sulphate proteoglycans demonstrates that their presence at the cell surface facilitates the cellular uptake of the S413-PV peptide, particularly at low peptide concentrations. Most importantly, our results clearly demonstrate that, in addition to endocytosis, which is only evident at low peptide concentrations, the efficient cellular uptake of the S413-PV cell-penetrating peptide occurs mainly through an alternative, non-endocytic mechanism, most likely involving direct penetration across cell membranes. PMID:15907190

  10. Antibacterial activity and dual mechanisms of peptide analog derived from cell-penetrating peptide against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Shi, Yonghui; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Su, Guanfang; Le, Guowei

    2013-02-01

    A number of research have proven that antimicrobial peptides are of greatest potential as a new class of antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides share some similar structure characteristics. In our study, a new peptide analog, APP (GLARALTRLLRQLTRQLTRA) from the cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 (GLFRALLRLLRSLWRLLLRA), was identified simultaneously with the antibacterial mechanism of APP against Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus pyogenes. APP displayed potent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains. The minimum inhibitory concentration was in the range of 2 to 4 μM. APP displayed higher cell selectivity (about 42-fold increase) as compared to the parent peptide for it decreased hemolytic activity and increased antimicrobial activity. The calcein leakage from egg yolk L-α-phosphatidylcholine (EYPC)/egg yolk L-α-phosphatidyl-DL-glycerol and EYPC/cholesterol vesicles demonstrated that APP exhibited high selectivity. The antibacterial mechanism analysis indicated that APP induced membrane permeabilization in a kinetic manner for membrane lesions allowing O-nitrophenyl-β-D-galactoside uptake into cells and potassium release from APP-treated cells. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that APP induced bacterial live cell membrane damage. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and gel retardation analysis confirmed that APP interacted with DNA and intercalated into the DNA base pairs after penetrating the cell membrane. Cell cycle assay showed that APP affected DNA synthesis in the cell. Our results suggested that peptides derived from the cell-penetrating peptide have the potential for antimicrobial agent development, and APP exerts its antibacterial activity by damaging bacterial cell membranes and binding to bacterial DNA to inhibit cellular functions, ultimately leading to cell death.

  11. Rational design of a series of novel amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Regberg, Jakob; Srimanee, Artita; Erlandsson, Mikael; Sillard, Rannar; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Karelson, Mati; Langel, Ulo

    2014-04-10

    A series of novel, amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides was developed based on a combination of the model amphipathic peptide sequence and modifications based on the strategies developed for PepFect and NickFect peptides. The aim was to study the role of amphipathicity for peptide uptake and to investigate if the modifications developed for PepFect peptides could be used to improve the uptake of another class of cell-penetrating peptides. The peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis and characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Non-covalent peptide-plasmid complexes were formed by co-incubation of the peptides and plasmids in water solution. The complexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering and cellular uptake of the complexes was studied in a luciferase-based plasmid transfection assay. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model of cellular uptake was developed using descriptors including hydrogen bonding, peptide charge and positions of nitrogen atoms. The peptides were found to be non-toxic and could efficiently transfect cells with plasmid DNA. Cellular uptake data was correlated to QSAR predictions and the predicted biological effects obtained from the model correlated well with experimental data. The QSAR model could improve the understanding of structural requirements for cell penetration, or could potentially be used to predict more efficient cell-penetrating peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is

  13. Distinct Behaviour of the Homeodomain Derived Cell Penetrating Peptide Penetratin in Interaction with Different Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Maniti, Ofelia; Alves, Isabel; Trugnan, Germain; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Background Penetratin is a protein transduction domain derived from the homeoprotein Antennapedia. Thereby it is currently used as a cell penetrating peptide to introduce diverse molecules into eukaryotic cells, and it could also be involved in the cellular export of transcription factors. Moreover, it has been shown that it is able to act as an antimicrobial agent. The mechanisms involved in all these processes are quite controversial. Methodology/Principal Findings In this article, we report spectroscopic, calorimetric and biochemical data on the penetratin interaction with three different phospholipids: phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to mimic respectively the outer and the inner leaflets of the eukaryotic plasma membrane and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) to mimic the bacterial membrane. We demonstrate that with PC, penetratin is able to form vesicle aggregates with no major change in membrane fluidity and presents no well defined secondary structure organization. With PE, penetratin aggregates vesicles, increases membrane rigidity and acquires an α-helical structure. With PG membranes, penetratin does not aggregate vesicles but decreases membrane fluidity and acquires a structure with both α-helical and β–sheet contributions. Conclusions/Significance These data from membrane models suggest that the different penetratin actions in eukaryotic cells (membrane translocation during export and import) and on prokaryotes may result from different peptide and lipid structural arrangements. The data suggest that, for eukaryotic cell penetration, penetratin does not acquire classical secondary structure but requires a different conformation compared to that in solution. PMID:21209890

  14. Cell-penetrating recombinant peptides for potential use in agricultural pest control applications

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes ...

  15. Inverted micelle formation of cell-penetrating peptide studied by coarse-grained simulation: Importance of attractive force between cell-penetrating peptides and lipid head group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Takasu, Masako; Miyakawa, Takeshi; Morikawa, Ryota; Oda, Tatsuki; Futaki, Shiroh; Nagao, Hidemi

    2011-03-01

    Arginine-rich peptide and Antennapedia are cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) which have the ability to permeate plasma membrane. Deformation of the plasma membrane with CPPs is the key to understand permeation mechanism. We investigate the dynamics of CPP and the lipid bilayer membrane by coarse-grained simulation. We found that the peptide makes inverted micelle in the lipid bilayer membrane, when the attractive potential between the peptide and lipid heads is strong. The inverted micelle is formed to minimize potential energy of the peptide. For vesicle membrane, the peptide moves from the outer vesicle to the inner vesicle through the membrane. The translocation of the peptide suggests inverted micelle model as a possible mechanism of CPPs.

  16. Cell penetrating peptide TAT can kill cancer cells via membrane disruption after attachment of camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Song, Jingjing; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaoli; Ma, Panpan; Zhang, Bangzhi; Liu, Beijun; Ni, Jingman; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Attachment of traditional anticancer drugs to cell penetrating peptides is an effective strategy to improve their application in cancer treatment. In this study, we designed and synthesized the conjugates TAT-CPT and TAT-2CPT by attaching camptothecin (CPT) to the N-terminus of the cell penetrating peptide TAT. Interestingly, we found that TAT-CPT and especially TAT-2CPT could kill cancer cells via membrane disruption, which is similar to antimicrobial peptides. This might be because that CPT could perform as a hydrophobic residue to increase the extent of membrane insertion of TAT and the stability of the pores. In addition, TAT-CPT and TAT-2CPT could also kill cancer cells by the released CPT after they entered cells. Taken together, attachment of CPT could turn cell penetrating peptide TAT into an antimicrobial peptide with a dual mechanism of anticancer action, which presents a new strategy to develop anticancer peptides based on cell penetrating peptides. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood pressure modulation following activation of mast cells by cationic cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Basheer, Maamoun; Schwalb, Herzl; Shefler, Irit; Levdansky, Lilia; Mekori, Yoseph A; Gorodetsky, Raphael

    2011-12-01

    Short cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are widely used in vitro to transduce agents into cells. But their systemic effect has not been yet studied in detail. We studied the systemic effect of the cell penetrating peptides, penetratin, transportan and pro-rich, on rat hemodynamic functions. Intra-arterial monitoring of blood pressure showed that injection of the positively charged penetratin and transportan in a wide range of concentrations (2.5-320 μg/kg) caused highly significant transient decrease in the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Pretreatment with histamine receptors blockers or with cromolyn, a mast cell stabilizing agent, significantly attenuated this effect. Furthermore, in vitro incubation of these both peptides with mast cells line, LAD2, caused a massive mast cell degranulation. In vitro studies showed that these CPP in a wide range of concentrations were not cytotoxic without any effect on the survival of LAD2 mast cell line. In contrast, the less positively charged and proline-rich CPP, pro-rich, had no systemic effects with no effect on mast cell degranulation. Our results indicate that intravenously administrated positively charged CPP may have deleterious consequences due to their induced BP drop, mediated by mast cell activation. Therefore, the major effect of mast cell activation on BP should be considered in developing possible future drug therapies based on the injection of membrane-permeable and positively charged CPP. Nevertheless, lower levels of such CPP may be considered as a treatment of systemic high BP through moderate systemic mast cell activation.

  18. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  19. Cell-penetrating peptides and their analogues as novel nanocarriers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Samira; Maleki Dizaj, Solmaz; Adibkia, Khosro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The impermeability of biological membranes is a major obstacle in drug delivery; however, some peptides have transition capabilities of biomembranes. In recent decades, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been introduced as novel biocarriers that are able to translocate into the cells. CPPs are biologically potent tools for non-invasive cellular internalization of cargo molecules. Nevertheless, the non-specificity of these peptides presents a restriction for targeting drug delivery; therefore, a peptidic nanocarrier sensitive to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) has been prepared, called activatable cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP). In addition to the cell-penetrating peptide dendrimer (DCPP), other analogues of CPPs have been synthesized. Methods: In this study, the most recent literature in the field of biomedical application of CPPs and their analogues, ACPP and DCCP, were reviewed. Results: This review focuses on CPP and its analogues, ACPP and DCPP, as novel nanocarriers for drug delivery. In addition, nanoconjugates and bioconjugates of these peptide sequences are discussed. Conclusion: DCCP, branched CPPs, compared to linear peptides have advantages such as resistance to rapid biodegradation, high loading capacities and large-scale production capability. PMID:26191505

  20. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. X-pep, a novel cell-penetrating peptide motif derived from the hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Krissansen, Geoffrey W

    2014-10-10

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to penetrate the plasma membrane and gain access to the interior of any replicating or non-replicating cell, and are being considered as drug delivery agents. Here we describe the serendipitous discovery of a novel CPP motif (MAARLCCQ), designated X-pep, located at the extreme N-terminus of the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. X-pep, and a C-terminally truncated form of the peptide (MAARL), readily penetrated HepG2 cells. Further truncation by removal of the terminal leucine residue impaired the cell-penetrating activity of peptide, indicating that MAARL is the active core of the peptide. X-pep is located adjacent to another CPP, namely Xentry, and like Xentry is unable to penetrate unactivated resting lymphocytes suggesting selective cell uptake. A D-isomeric form of the MAARL peptide was not cell-permeable, indicating that the cell-penetrating function of the peptide involves stereoselective interaction with a chiral receptor. The discovery of X-pep, which bears no resemblance to known CPPs, allows studies to be undertaken to determine additional characteristics of this novel CPP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Membrane Oxidation Enables the Cytosolic Entry of Polyarginine Cell-penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-Yi; Sun, Yusha; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Najjar, Kristina; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-08

    Arginine-rich peptides can penetrate cells and consequently be used as delivery agents in various cellular applications. The activity of these reagents is often context-dependent, and the parameters that impact cell entry are not fully understood, giving rise to variability and limiting progress toward their usage. Herein, we report that the cytosolic penetration of linear polyarginine peptides is dependent on the oxidation state of the cell. In particular, we find that hypoxia and cellular antioxidants inhibit cell penetration. In contrast, oxidants promote cytosolic cell entry with an efficiency proportional to the level of reactive oxygen species generated within membranes. Moreover, an antibody that binds to oxidized lipids inhibits cell penetration, whereas extracellularly administered pure oxidized lipids enhance peptide transport into cells. Overall, these data indicate that oxidized lipids are capable of mediating the transport of polyarginine peptides across membranes. These data may also explain variability in cell-penetrating peptide performance in different experimental conditions. These new findings therefore provide new opportunities for the rational design of future cell-permeable compounds and for the optimization of delivery protocols. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Membrane-active peptides from marine organisms--antimicrobials, cell-penetrating peptides and peptide toxins: applications and prospects.

    PubMed

    Ponnappan, Nisha; Budagavi, Deepthi Poornima; Yadav, Bhoopesh Kumar; Chugh, Archana

    2015-03-01

    Marine organisms are known to be a rich and unique source of bioactive compounds as they are exposed to extreme conditions in the oceans. The present study is an attempt to briefly describe some of the important membrane-active peptides (MAPs) such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and peptide toxins from marine organisms. Since both AMPs and CPPs play a role in membrane perturbation and exhibit interchangeable role, they can speculatively fall under the broad umbrella of MAPs. The study focuses on the structural and functional characteristics of different classes of marine MAPs. Further, AMPs are considered as a potential remedy to antibiotic resistance acquired by several pathogens. Peptides from marine organisms show novel post-translational modifications such as cysteine knots, halogenation and histidino-alanine bridge that enable these peptides to withstand harsh marine environmental conditions. These unusual modifications of AMPs from marine organisms are expected to increase their half-life in living systems, contributing to their increased bioavailability and stability when administered as drug in in vivo systems. Apart from AMPs, marine toxins with membrane-perturbing properties could be essentially investigated for their cytotoxic effect on various pathogens and their cell-penetrating activity across various mammalian cells. The current review will help in identifying the MAPs from marine organisms with crucial post-translational modifications that can be used as template for designing novel therapeutic agents and drug-delivery vehicles for treatment of human diseases.

  4. Evaluation of a cell penetrating prenylated peptide lacking an intrinsic fluorophore via in situ click reaction.

    PubMed

    Ochocki, Joshua D; Mullen, Daniel G; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Distefano, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Protein prenylation involves the addition of either a farnesyl (C(15)) or geranylgeranyl (C(20)) isoprenoid moiety onto the C-terminus of many proteins. This natural modification serves to direct a protein to the plasma membrane of the cell. A recently discovered application of prenylated peptides is that they have inherent cell-penetrating ability, and are hence termed cell penetrating prenylated peptides. These peptides are able to efficiently cross the cell membrane in an ATP independent, non-endocytotic manner and it was found that the sequence of the peptide does not affect uptake, so long as the geranylgeranyl group is still present [Wollack, J. W.; Zeliadt, N. A.; Mullen, D. G.; Amundson, G.; Geier, S.; Falkum, S.; Wattenberg, E. V.; Barany, G.; Distefano, M. D. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2009, 131, 7293-7303]. The present study investigates the effect of removing the fluorophore from the peptides and investigating the uptake by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Our results show that the fluorophore is not necessary for uptake of these peptides. This information is significant because it indicates that the prenyl group is the major determinant in allowing these peptides to enter cells; the hydrophobic fluorophore has little effect. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the utility of the Cu-catalyzed click reaction for monitoring the entry of nonfluorescent peptides into cells.

  5. Cell-Penetrating Ability of Peptide Hormones: Key Role of Glycosaminoglycans Clustering.

    PubMed

    Neree, Armelle Tchoumi; Nguyen, Phuong Trang; Bourgault, Steve

    2015-11-16

    Over the last two decades, the potential usage of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for the intracellular delivery of various molecules has prompted the identification of novel peptidic identities. However, cytotoxic effects and unpredicted immunological responses have often limited the use of various CPP sequences in the clinic. To overcome these issues, the usage of endogenous peptides appears as an appropriate alternative approach. The hormone pituitary adenylate-cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP38) has been recently identified as a novel and very efficient CPP. This 38-residue polycationic peptide is a member of the secretin/glucagon/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) superfamily, with which PACAP38 shares high structural and conformational homologies. In this study, we evaluated the cell-penetrating ability of cationic peptide hormones in the context of the expression of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Our results indicated that among all peptides evaluated, PACAP38 was unique for its potent efficiency of cellular uptake. Interestingly, the abilities of the peptides to reach the intracellular space did not correlate with their binding affinities to sulfated GAGs, but rather to their capacity to clustered heparin in vitro. This study demonstrates that the uptake efficiency of a given cationic CPP does not necessarily correlate with its affinity to sulfated GAGs and that its ability to cluster GAGs should be considered for the identification of novel peptidic sequences with potent cellular penetrating properties.

  6. Evaluation of a Cell Penetrating Prenylated Peptide Lacking an Intrinsic Fluorophore via in situ Click Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    Protein prenylation involves the addition of either a farnesyl (C15) or geranylgeranyl (C20) isoprenoid moiety onto the C-terminus of many proteins. This natural modification serves to direct a protein to the plasma membrane of the cell. A recently discovered application of prenylated peptides is that they have inherent cell-penetrating ability, and are hence termed cell penetrating prenylated peptides. These peptides are able to efficiently cross the cell membrane in an ATP independent, non-endocytotic manner and it was found that the sequence of the peptide does not affect uptake, so long as the geranylgeranyl group is still present. The present study investigates the effect of removing the fluorophore from the peptides and investigating the uptake by confocal microsopy and flow cytometry. Our results show that the fluorophore is not necessary for uptake of these peptides. This information is significant because it indicates that the prenyl group is the major determinant in allowing these peptides to enter cells; the hydrophobic fluorophore has little effect. Moreover, these studies demonstrate the utility of the Cu-catalyzed click reaction for monitoring the entry of nonfluorescent peptides into cells. PMID:21632248

  7. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  8. Mechanism of the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 Permeation of Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Florén, Anders; Knoelke, Kristina; Langel, Ülo; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction between the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10) and phospholipid membranes was investigated. Tp10 induces graded release of the contents of phospholipid vesicles. The kinetics of peptide association with vesicles and peptide-induced dye efflux from the vesicle lumen were examined experimentally by stopped-flow fluorescence. The experimental kinetics were analyzed by directly fitting to the data the numerical solution of mathematical kinetic models. A very good global fit was obtained using a model in which tp10 binds to the membrane surface and perturbs it because of the mass imbalance thus created across the bilayer. The perturbed bilayer state allows peptide monomers to insert transiently into its hydrophobic core and cross the membrane, until the peptide mass imbalance is dissipated. In that transient state tp10 “catalyzes” dye efflux from the vesicle lumen. These conclusions are consistent with recent reports that used molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between peptide antimicrobials and phospholipid bilayers. A thermodynamic analysis of tp10 binding and insertion in the bilayer using water-membrane transfer hydrophobicity scales is entirely consistent with the model proposed. A small bilayer perturbation is both necessary and sufficient to achieve very good agreement with the model, indicating that the role of the lipids must be included to understand the mechanism of cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:17218466

  9. Cell-penetrating TAT peptide in drug delivery systems: Proteolytic stability requirements

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Erez; Apte, Anjali; Sawant, Rupa R.; Grunwald, Jacob; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    The stability and activity of the HIV cell-penetrating TAT peptide (TATp) on the surface of TATp-modified micelles and liposomes in relation to its proteolytic cleavage was investigated. TATp moieties were attached to the surface of these nanocarriers using TATp modified with a conjugate of phosphatidyl ethanolamine with a ‘short’ PEG (PEG-PE). Following pre-incubation with trypsin, elastase, or collagenase, the proteolytic stability of TATp on the surface of these modified carriers was studied by HPLC with fluorescence detection using fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (FMOC) labeling. All tested enzymes produced a dose-dependent cleavage of TATp as shown by the presence of TATp Arg-Arg fragments. Inhibition of TATp cleavage occurred when these TATp-micelles were modified by the addition of longer PEG-PE blocks, indicating an effective shielding of TATp from proteolysis by these blocks. TATp-modified carriers were also tested for their ability to accumulate in EL-4, HeLa, and B16-F10 cells. Trypsin treatment of TATp-modified liposomes and micelles resulted in decreased uptake and cell interaction, as measured by fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting techniques. Furthermore, a decrease in the cytotoxicity of TATp-modified liposomes loaded with doxorubicin (Doxil) was observed following trypsin treatment. In conclusion, steric shielding of TATp is essential to ensure its in vivo therapeutic function. PMID:21438724

  10. DNA nanopore functionalized with aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide for tumor cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi-Lin; Yuan, Dan-Dan; Song, Ting; Li, Xue-Mei

    2017-04-03

    In the present work, DNA nanopore was composed of a bundle of six DNA duplexes folded from six DNA strands and functionalized with Ramos cell aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). Herein, we present a unique dually conjugated molecule with an aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide for targeting and recognition of Ramos cells. The aptamer sequence was specific bound to Ramos cell, at the meanwhile the nanopore assembly was taken onto the surface of cell membrane and then got into the cells with the help of CPP. Specific targeting and increased intracellular uptake of nanostructures by Ramos cells were aimed. The intracellular uptake of the structure was determined using confocal microscopy. This study is the first to describe the recognition of tumor cells with functional DNA nanopores, establishing the foundation for the tumor cell detection with low cytotoxic agents. Graphical abstract DNA nanopore was composed of a bundle of six DNA duplexes folded from six DNA strands and functionalized with Ramos cell aptamer and cell-penetrating peptide. The dually conjugated molecule was found to show both improved cellular uptake and effective Ramos cell targeting.

  11. Cell entry of cell penetrating peptides: tales of tails wagging dogs.

    PubMed

    Jones, Arwyn T; Sayers, Edward J

    2012-07-20

    Cell penetrating peptides hold considerable potential for academic and pharmaceutical remits with an interest in delivering macromolecules to the insides of cells. Hundreds of sequences now fall within the cell penetrating peptide classification and HIV-Tat, penetratin, transportan, and octaarginine represent extensively studied variants. The process by which membrane translocation is achieved has received significant interest in an aim to exploit new mechanistic knowledge to gain higher efficiency of penetration. There is evidence that many of the most well studied peptides are able to deliver themselves, relatively small cargo and possibly large macromolecular structures directly across the plasma membrane but there is also support for the involvement of an endocytic pathway or pathways. This review focuses on recent findings relating to experimental protocols and cell penetrating peptide modifications or extensions that yield significant effects on penetration capability. Relatively small changes in extracellular peptide concentrations, the inclusion or absence of serum from the incubation medium and the in vitro model exemplify variables that significantly influence the capacity of CPPs to penetrate membranes. Attachment of any type of cargo to these entities has the potential to affect their interaction with cells. There is increasing evidence to suggest that this is true for relatively small molecules such as fluorescent probes and hydrophobic adducts such as lipids and short peptide sequences designed as peptide therapeutics. Information gained from these findings will improve our knowledge of, and capacity to study the interactions of CPPs with cells, and this will accelerate their translation as efficient vectors from the in vitro setting into the clinical arena. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Photodamage of Lipid Bilayers by Irradiation of a Fluorescently Labeled Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptides can translocate into cells by endocytosis and upon light irradiation, lyse the endocytic vesicles. This photo-inducible endosomolytic activity of Fl-CPPs can be used to efficiently deliver macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids and other small organic molecules into the cytosol of live cells. The requirement of a light trigger to induce photolysis provides a more spatial and temporal control to the intracellular delivery process. Methods In this report, we examine the molecular level mechanisms by which cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT when labeled with small organic fluorophore molecules acquire a photo-induced lytic activity using a simplified model of lipid vesicles. Results The peptide TAT labeled with 5(6)-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine binds to negatively charged phospholipids, thereby bringing the fluorophore in close proximity to the membrane of liposomes. Upon light irradiation, the excited fluorophore produces reactive oxygen species at the lipid bilayer and oxidation of the membrane is achieved. In addition, the fluorescent peptide causes aggregation of photo-oxidized lipids, an activity that requires the presence of arginine residues in the peptide sequence. Conclusions These results suggest that the cell penetrating peptide plays a dual role. On one hand, TAT targets a conjugated fluorophore to membranes. On the other hand, TAT participates directly in the destabilization of photosensitized membranes. Peptide and fluorophore therefore appear to act in synergy to destroy membranes efficiently. General Significance Understanding the mechanism behind Fl-CPP mediated membrane photodamage will help to design optimally photo-endosomolytic compounds. PMID:24135456

  13. A pH-responsive α-helical cell penetrating peptide-mediated liposomal delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianyu; Tang, Jie; Fu, Ling; Ran, Rui; Liu, Yayuan; Yuan, Mingqing; He, Qin

    2013-10-01

    Tumor-oriented nanocarrier drug delivery approaches with pH-sensitivity have been drawing considerable attentions over the years. Here we described a liposomal delivery system modified with pH-responsive cell penetrating peptide TH (TH-Lip). Conventional cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-related drug delivery tactics sometimes seemed limited due to the extensive in vivo penetration and the lack of proper selectivity of conventional CPPs. In this study, TH (AGYLLGHINLHHLAHL(Aib)HHIL-NH₂), an engineered α-helical cell penetrating peptide originated from peptide TK (AGYLLGKINLKKLAKL(Aib)LLIL-NH₂), was endowed pH-responsiveness after complete replacement of all lysines in the sequence of TK into histidines, and was introduced onto the surface of liposomes. Accordingly, TH-Lip could benefit from the unique property of TH, as the cell penetrating capacity of TH was concealed during the blood circulation and in normal tissues because of the neutral pH under those conditions. However, when TH-Lip reached the tumor, and as pH declined, histidines in TH peptide protonated and the surface charge of TH-Lip converted from negative to positive, initiating activated cell penetrating capacity and leading to enhanced cellular and tumor spheroid uptake. The endocytosis inhibition assay demonstrated that the endocytosis of TH-Lip was influenced by the positively charged surface of the liposomes in acidic environment and was mediated by clathrin, and the intracellular trafficking study suggested that the liposomes were mainly accumulated in endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. After systemic administration in mice, TH-Lip could be internalized into tumor cells efficaciously. When it comes to the delivery of paclitaxel (PTX), the pH-responsiveness of TH-Lip led to strong inhibition against tumor cell growth which occurred both in vitro (under pH 6.3) and in vivo, and the tumor inhibition rate reached 86.3% on C26 tumor-bearing mice for PTX-loaded TH-Lip. Therefore, TH

  14. Viral and other cell-penetrating peptides as vectors of therapeutic agents in medicine.

    PubMed

    Durzyńska, Julia; Przysiecka, Łucja; Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Warowicka, Alicja; Musidlak, Oskar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2015-07-01

    Efficient delivery of heterologous molecules for treatment of cells is a great challenge in modern medicine and pharmacology. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) may improve efficient delivery of a wide range of macromolecular cargos, including plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, drugs, nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers, and anticancer drugs. In this paper, we present the history of CPPs' discovery with special attention drawn to sequences of viral origin. We also describe different CPP families with regard to their physicochemical properties and numerous mechanisms of CPP cell uptake by direct penetration and endocytotic pathways. A detailed description is focused on formation of carrier-cargo complexes, which are needed for practical use of CPPs in medicine and biotechnology. Examples of successful application of CPPs in treatment of human diseases are also presented, including decreased tumor growth and induction of cancer cell death. Finally, we review modern design approaches to novel CPPs and prediction of their activity. To sum up, the current review presents a thorough and up-to-date knowledge of CPPs and may be a valuable source of information for researchers in pharmacology designing new therapeutic agents.

  15. Design of a bioactive cell-penetrating peptide: when a transduction domain does more than transduce.

    PubMed

    Ward, Brian; Seal, Brandon L; Brophy, Colleen M; Panitch, Alyssa

    2009-10-01

    The discovery of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) has facilitated delivery of peptides into cells to affect cellular behavior. Previously, we were successful at developing a phosphopeptide mimetic of the small heat shock-like protein HSP20 . Building on this success we developed a cell-permeant peptide inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2). It is well documented that inhibition of MK2 may be beneficial for a myriad of human diseases including those involving inflammation and fibrosis. During the optimization of the activity and specificity of the MK2 inhibitor (MK2i) we closely examined the effect of cell-penetrating peptide identity. Surprisingly, the identity of the CPP dictated kinase specificity and functional activity to an extent that rivaled that of the therapeutic peptide. The results reported herein have wide implications for delivering therapeutics with CPPs and indicate that judicious choice of CPP is crucial to the ultimate therapeutic success. Published in 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Cell-Penetrating Cross-β Peptide Assemblies with Controlled Biodegradable Properties.

    PubMed

    Han, Sanghun; Lee, Mun-Kyung; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-01-09

    Although self-assembled peptide nanostructures (SPNs) have shown potential as promising biomaterials, there is a potential problem associated with the extremely slow hydrolysis rate of amide bonds. Here, we report the development of cell-penetrating cross-β SPNs with a controllable biodegradation rate. The designed self-assembling β-sheet peptide incorporating a hydrolyzable ester bond (self-assembling depsipeptide; SADP) can be assembled into bilayer β-sandwich one-dimensional (1D) fibers similarly to conventional β-sheet peptides. The rate of hydrolysis can be controlled by the pH, temperature, and structural characteristics of the ester unit. The 1D fiber of the SADP transforms into vesicle-like 3D structures when the hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptide segment is attached to the SADP segment. Efficient cell internalization of the 3D nanostructures was observed, and we verified the intracellular degradation and disassembly of the biodegradable nanostructures. This study illustrates the potential of biodegradable cross-β SPNs and provides a valuable toolkit that can be used with self-assembling peptides.

  17. Synergy between cell-penetrating peptides and singlet oxygen generators leads to efficient photolysis of membranes.

    PubMed

    Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT or R9 labeled with small organic fluorophores can lyse endosomes upon light irradiation. The photoendosomolytic activity of these compounds can in turn be used to deliver proteins and nucleic acids to the cytosol of live cells with spatial and temporal control. In this report, we examine the mechanisms by which such fluorescent peptides exert a photolytic activity using red blood cells as a membrane model. We show that the peptides TAT and R9 labeled with tetramethylrhodamine photolyze red blood cells by promoting the formation of singlet oxygen in the vicinity of the cells' membranes. In addition, unlabeled TAT and R9 accelerate the photolytic activity of the membrane-bound photosensitizer Rose bengal in trans, suggesting that the cell-penetrating peptides participate in the destabilization of photo-oxidized membranes. Peptides and singlet oxygen generators therefore act in synergy to destroy membranes upon irradiation. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Metabolic energy-independent mechanism of internalization for the cell penetrating peptide penetratin.

    PubMed

    Maniti, Ofelia; Blanchard, Elise; Trugnan, Germain; Lamazière, Antonin; Ayala-Sanmartin, Jesus

    2012-06-01

    Cellular uptake of vector peptides used for internalization of hydrophilic molecules into cells is known to follow two different pathways: direct translocation of the plasma membrane and internalization by endocytosis followed by release into the cytosol. These pathways differ in their energy dependence. The first does not need metabolic energy while the second requires metabolic energy. Herein we used erythrocytes and plasma membrane vesicles to study membrane perturbations induced by the cell penetrating peptide penetratin. The results show that cell penetrating peptides are able to be internalized by two metabolic energy-independent pathways: direct crossing of the plasma membrane and endocytosis-like mechanisms. The last mechanism involves the induction of membrane negative curvature resulting in invaginations that mimic the endosomal uptake in the absence of ATP. This new mechanism called "physical endocytosis" or "self-induced endocytosis" might explain different data concerning the independence or dependence on metabolic energy during cellular uptake and reveals the autonomous capacity of peptides to induce their internalization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hexokinase II–derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D.; Vogel, Maria C.; Rabeh, Wael M.; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane–binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c. Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.—Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II–derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. PMID:28183803

  20. Screening of cell-penetrating peptides using mRNA display.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Hun; Song, Hyun Seok; Park, Tai Hyun; Park, Tae Hyun; Lee, Sun-Gu; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2012-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are attractive vectors for in vivo and in vitro cellular uptake. Their use is, however, limited by insufficient understanding of their preference for a target cell. Here, a new CPP screening method is presented that uses mRNA display. After incubating the target cell lines, such as human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) and HeLa cells, with an mRNA display library for 3 h at 37°C, the CPP-mRNA nucleotide conjugates were harvested. These were amplified with PCR and subsequently sequenced. The screened CPPs for each cell line were identified after four rounds of selection. Among them, two peptides, MAMPGEPRRANVMAHKLEPASLQLR NSCA (CPPK) and MAPQRDTVGGRTTPPSWGPAKAQLRNSCA (CPPL) were selected, and the FITC-labeled peptides were evaluated for their ability to penetrate cells. The screened CPPs were superior to polyarginine (R(11) ), which is widely used as a standard peptide and shows good cell penetration efficiency. Our method can be applied to other target cells for which CPPs have not yet been elucidated.

  1. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Woldetsadik, Abiy D; Vogel, Maria C; Rabeh, Wael M; Magzoub, Mazin

    2017-05-01

    Overexpression of mitochondria-bound hexokinase II (HKII) in cancer cells plays an important role in their metabolic reprogramming and protects them against apoptosis, thereby facilitating their growth and proliferation. Here, we show that covalently coupling a peptide corresponding to the mitochondrial membrane-binding N-terminal 15 aa of HKII (pHK) to a short, penetration-accelerating sequence (PAS) enhances the cellular uptake, mitochondrial localization, and cytotoxicity of the peptide in HeLa cells. Further analysis revealed that pHK-PAS depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, and depleted intracellular ATP levels. The effects of pHK-PAS were correlated with dissociation of endogenous full-length HKII from mitochondria and release of cytochrome c Of significance, pHK-PAS treatment of noncancerous HEK293 cells resulted in substantially lower cytotoxicity. Thus, pHK-PAS effectively disrupted the mitochondria-HKII association in cancer cells, which led to mitochondrial dysfunction and, finally, apoptosis. Our results demonstrate the potential of the pHK-PAS cell-penetrating peptide as a novel therapeutic strategy in cancer.-Woldetsadik, A. D., Vogel, M. C., Rabeh, W. M., Magzoub, M. Hexokinase II-derived cell-penetrating peptide targets mitochondria and triggers apoptosis in cancer cells. © The Author(s).

  2. Differential neuroprotective potential of CRMP2 peptide aptamers conjugated to cationic, hydrophobic, and amphipathic cell penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Moutal, Aubin; François-Moutal, Liberty; Brittain, Joel M.; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-associated axonal specification collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) is a novel target for neuroprotection. A CRMP2 peptide (TAT-CBD3) conjugated to the HIV transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein’s cationic cell penetrating peptide (CPP) motif protected neurons in the face of toxic levels of Ca2+ influx leaked in via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hyperactivation. Here we tested whether replacing the hydrophilic TAT motif with alternative cationic (nona-arginine (R9)), hydrophobic (membrane transport sequence (MTS) of k-fibroblast growth factor) or amphipathic (model amphipathic peptide (MAP)) CPPs could be superior to the neuroprotection bestowed by TAT-CBD3. In giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) derived from cortical neurons, the peptides translocated across plasma membranes with similar efficiencies. Cortical neurons, acutely treated with peptides prior to a toxic glutamate challenge, demonstrated enhanced efflux of R9-CBD3 compared to others. R9-CBD3 inhibited N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked Ca2+ influx to a similar extent as TAT-CBD3 while MTS-CBD3 was ineffective which correlated with the ability of R9- and TAT-CBD3, but not MTS-CBD3, to block NMDAR interaction with CRMP2. Unrestricted Ca2+ influx through NMDARs leading to delayed calcium dysregulation and neuronal cell death was blocked by all peptides but MAP-CBD3. When applied acutely for 10 min, R9-CBD3 was more effective than TAT-CBD3 at neuroprotection while MTS- and MAP-CBD3 were ineffective. In contrast, long-term (>24 h) treatment with MTS-CBD3 conferred neuroprotection where TAT-CBD3 failed. Neither peptide altered surface trafficking of NMDARs. Neuroprotection conferred by MTS-CBD3 peptide is likely due to its increased uptake coupled with decreased efflux when compared to TAT-CBD3. Overall, our results demonstrate that altering CPPs can bestow differential neuroprotective potential onto the CBD3 cargo. PMID:25674050

  3. Cell-penetrating peptide-based intelligent liposomal systems for enhanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Zhang, Qianyu; Yu, Zhiqiang; He, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Liposomes are widely used as drug delivery systems and several liposome-based nanomedicines have been approved for clinical use. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been decorated onto nanoparticulated vesicle such as liposomes to further improve the intracellular delivery efficiency. However, the poor selectivity of CPPs hindered their application, especially in the in vivo application. To resolve this issue, several strategies have been developed, including shielding and environment-triggered deshielding of CPPs as well as designing of environment-responsive CPPs and specific- targeting CPPs and last but not least, combination strategy. In this review, the abovementioned strategies were discussed.

  4. Delivery of Nucleic Acids and Nanomaterials by Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yue-Wern; Lee, Han-Jung; Tolliver, Larry M.; Aronstam, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Many viral and nonviral systems have been developed to aid delivery of biologically active molecules into cells. Among these, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have received increasing attention in the past two decades for biomedical applications. In this review, we focus on opportunities and challenges associated with CPP delivery of nucleic acids and nanomaterials. We first describe the nature of versatile CPPs and their interactions with various types of cargoes. We then discuss in vivo and in vitro delivery of nucleic acids and nanomaterials by CPPs. Studies on the mechanisms of cellular entry and limitations in the methods used are detailed. PMID:25883975

  5. Mechanisms of antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides: from kinetics to thermodynamics†

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Paulo F.; Pokorny, Antje

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of six different antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides, including some of their variants, are discussed and compared. The specificity of these polypeptides varies, but they all form amphipathic α-helices when bound to membranes, and there are no striking differences in their sequences. We have examined the thermodynamics and kinetics of their interaction with phospholipid vesicles, namely binding and peptide-induced dye efflux. The thermodynamics of binding calculated using the Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity scale are in good agreement with the values derived from experiment. The generally accepted view that binding affinity determines functional specificity is also supported by experiment in model membranes. We now propose the hypothesis that it is the thermodynamics of peptide insertion into the membrane, from a surface-bound state, that determines the mechanism. PMID:19655791

  6. In vitro and in vivo delivery of therapeutic proteins using cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam; Jafarzade, Behnaz Sadat; Mardani, Golnaz

    2017-01-01

    The failure of proteins to penetrate mammalian cells or target tumor cells restricts their value as therapeutic tools in a variety of diseases such as cancers. Recently, protein transduction domains (PTDs) or cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to promote the delivery of therapeutic proteins or peptides into live cells. The successful delivery of proteins mainly depends on their physicochemical properties. Although, linear cell penetrating peptides are one of the most effective delivery vehicles; but currently, cyclic CPPs has been developed to potently transport bioactive full-length proteins into cells. Up to now, several small protein transduction domains from viral proteins including Tat or VP22 could be fused to other peptides or proteins to entry them in various cell types at a dose-dependent approach. A major disadvantage of PTD-fusion proteins is primary uptake into endosomal vesicles leading to inefficient release of the fusion proteins into the cytosol. Recently, non-covalent complex formation (Chariot) between proteins and CPPs has attracted a special interest to overcome some delivery limitations (e.g., toxicity). Many preclinical and clinical trials of CPP-based delivery are currently under evaluation. Generally, development of more efficient protein transduction domains would significantly increase the potency of protein therapeutics. Moreover, the synergistic or combined effects of CPPs with other delivery systems for protein/peptide drug delivery would promote their therapeutic effects in cancer and other diseases. In this review, we will describe the functions and implications of CPPs for delivering the therapeutic proteins or peptides in preclinical and clinical studies.

  7. A retro-inverso cell-penetrating peptide for siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaissière, Anaïs; Aldrian, Gudrun; Konate, Karidia; Lindberg, Mattias F; Jourdan, Carole; Telmar, Anthony; Seisel, Quentin; Fernandez, Frédéric; Viguier, Véronique; Genevois, Coralie; Couillaud, Franck; Boisguerin, Prisca; Deshayes, Sébastien

    2017-04-28

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are powerful tools to control gene expression. However, due to their poor cellular permeability and stability, their therapeutic development requires a specific delivery system. Among them, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been shown to transfer efficiently siRNA inside the cells. Recently we developed amphipathic peptides able to self-assemble with siRNAs as peptide-based nanoparticles and to transfect them into cells. However, despite the great potential of these drug delivery systems, most of them display a low resistance to proteases. Here, we report the development and characterization of a new CPP named RICK corresponding to the retro-inverso form of the CADY-K peptide. We show that RICK conserves the main biophysical features of its L-parental homologue and keeps the ability to associate with siRNA in stable peptide-based nanoparticles. Moreover the RICK:siRNA self-assembly prevents siRNA degradation and induces inhibition of gene expression. This new approach consists in a promising strategy for future in vivo application, especially for targeted anticancer treatment (e.g. knock-down of cell cycle proteins). Graphical abstract RICK-based nanoparticles: RICK peptides and siRNA self-assemble in peptide-based nanoparticles to penetrate into the cells and to induce target protein knock-down.

  8. Antiprion properties of prion protein-derived cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Löfgren, Kajsa; Wahlström, Anna; Lundberg, Pontus; Langel, Ulo; Gräslund, Astrid; Bedecs, Katarina

    2008-07-01

    In prion diseases, the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) becomes misfolded into the pathogenic scrapie isoform (PrP(Sc)) responsible for prion infectivity. We show here that peptides derived from the prion protein N terminus have potent antiprion effects. These peptides are composed of a hydrophobic sequence followed by a basic segment. They are known to have cell-penetrating ability like regular cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), short peptides that can penetrate cellular membranes. Healthy (GT1-1) and scrapie-infected (ScGT1-1) mouse neuronal hypothalamic cells were treated with various CPPs, including the prion protein-derived CPPs. Lysates were analyzed for altered protein levels of PrP(C) or PrP(Sc). Treatment with the prion protein-derived CPPs mouse mPrP(1-28) or bovine bPrP(1-30) significantly reduced PrP(Sc) levels in prion-infected cells but had no effect on PrP(C) levels in noninfected cells. Further, presence of prion protein-derived CPPs significantly prolonged the time before infection was manifested when infecting GT1-1 cells with scrapie. Treatment with other CPPs (penetratin, transportan-10, or poly-L-arginine) or prion protein-derived peptides lacking CPP function (mPrP(23-28,) mPrP(19-30,) or mPrP(23-50)) had no effect on PrP(Sc) levels. The results suggest a mechanism by which the signal sequence guides the prion protein-derived CPP into a cellular compartment, where the basic segment binds specifically to PrP(Sc) and disables formation of prions.

  9. Nose-to-brain delivery of macromolecules mediated by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tingting; Liu, Ergang; He, Huining; Shin, Meong Cheol; Moon, Cheol; Yang, Victor C; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2016-07-01

    Brain delivery of macromolecular therapeutics (e.g., proteins) remains an unsolved problem because of the formidable blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although a direct pathway of nose-to-brain transfer provides an answer to circumventing the BBB and has already been intensively investigated for brain delivery of small drugs, new challenges arise for intranasal delivery of proteins because of their larger size and hydrophilicity. In order to overcome the barriers and take advantage of available pathways (e.g., epithelial tight junctions, uptake by olfactory neurons, transport into brain tissues, and intra-brain diffusion), a low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) cell-penetrating peptide was utilized to facilitate nose-to-brain transport. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely used to mediate macromolecular delivery through many kinds of biobarriers. Our results show that conjugates of LMWP-proteins are able to effectively penetrate into the brain after intranasal administration. The CPP-based intranasal method highlights a promising solution for protein therapy of brain diseases.

  10. Improving the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides and Their Cargos: Strategies and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Baker, Ryan; Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) can deliver cell-impermeable therapeutic cargos into cells. In particular, CPP-cargo conjugates tend to accumulate inside cells by endocytosis. However, they often remain trapped inside endocytic organelles and fail to reach the cytosolic space of cells efficiently. In this review, the evidence for CPP-mediated endosomal escape is discussed. In addition, several strategies that have been utilized to enhance the endosomal escape of CPP-cargos are described. The recent development of branched systems that display multiple copies of a CPP is presented. The use of viral or synthetic peptides that can disrupt the endosomal membrane upon activation by the low pH of endosomes is also discussed. Finally, we survey how CPPs labeled with chromophores can be used in combination with light to stimulate endosomal lysis. The mechanisms and challenges associated with these intracellular delivery methodologies are discussed. PMID:24223492

  11. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  12. Xentry, a new class of cell-penetrating peptide uniquely equipped for delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Sun, Xueying; Wiles, Siouxsie; Krissansen, Geoffrey W

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe an entirely new class of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) represented by the short peptide Xentry (LCLRPVG) derived from an N-terminal region of the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. Xentry permeates adherent cells using syndecan-4 as a portal for entry, and is uniquely restricted from entering syndecan-deficient, non-adherent cells, such as resting blood cells. Intravenous injection of Xentry alone or conjugated to β-galactosidase led to its delivery to most tissues in mice, except circulating blood cells. There was a predilection for uptake by epithelia. Anti-B-raf antibodies and siRNAs linked to Xentry were capable of killing B-raf-dependent melanoma cells. Xentry represents a new class of CPP with properties that are potentially advantageous for life science and therapeutic applications.

  13. Xentry, a new class of cell-penetrating peptide uniquely equipped for delivery of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Sun, Xueying; Wiles, Siouxsie; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe an entirely new class of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) represented by the short peptide Xentry (LCLRPVG) derived from an N-terminal region of the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. Xentry permeates adherent cells using syndecan-4 as a portal for entry, and is uniquely restricted from entering syndecan-deficient, non-adherent cells, such as resting blood cells. Intravenous injection of Xentry alone or conjugated to β-galactosidase led to its delivery to most tissues in mice, except circulating blood cells. There was a predilection for uptake by epithelia. Anti-B-raf antibodies and siRNAs linked to Xentry were capable of killing B-raf-dependent melanoma cells. Xentry represents a new class of CPP with properties that are potentially advantageous for life science and therapeutic applications. PMID:23588666

  14. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T

    2016-02-22

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects.

  15. Cell-Penetrating Peptides Selectively Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stalmans, Sofie; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; Polis, Ingeborgh; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of peptides, which have the ability to cross cell membrane bilayers. CPPs themselves can exert biological activity and can be formed endogenously. Fragmentary studies demonstrate their ability to enhance transport of different cargoes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, comparative, quantitative data on the BBB permeability of different CPPs are currently lacking. Therefore, the in vivo BBB transport characteristics of five chemically diverse CPPs, i.e. pVEC, SynB3, Tat 47–57, transportan 10 (TP10) and TP10-2, were determined. The results of the multiple time regression (MTR) analysis revealed that CPPs show divergent BBB influx properties: Tat 47–57, SynB3, and especially pVEC showed very high unidirectional influx rates of 4.73 μl/(g × min), 5.63 μl/(g × min) and 6.02 μl/(g × min), respectively, while the transportan analogs showed a negligible to low brain influx. Using capillary depletion, it was found that 80% of the influxed peptides effectively reached the brain parenchyma. Except for pVEC, all peptides showed a significant efflux out of the brain. Co-injection of pVEC with radioiodinated bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not enhance the brain influx of radiodionated BSA, indicating that pVEC does not itself significantly alter the BBB properties. A saturable mechanism could not be demonstrated by co-injecting an excess dose of non-radiolabeled CPP. No significant regional differences in brain influx were observed, with the exception for pVEC, for which the regional variations were only marginal. The observed BBB influx transport properties cannot be correlated with their cell-penetrating ability, and therefore, good CPP properties do not imply efficient brain influx. PMID:26465925

  16. Cell penetrating peptide-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide to improve stability and gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyu; Liu, Yajie; Du, Jianwei; Ren, Kefeng; Wang, Youxiang

    2015-04-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid-labile imine bonds (Az-I-Dex). The supramolecular polymer CDR/Az-I-Dex with high a C/A molar ratio (molar ratio of CD on CDR to Az on Az-I-Dex) was unfavorable for DNA condensation. The dextran shell of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes improved the stability under physiological conditions. However, once treated with acetate buffer (pH 5.4) for 3 h, large aggregates formed rapidly due to the cleavage of the dextran shell. As expected, the vector had cell viability of 80% even when the CDR concentration increased to 100 μg mL-1. Moreover, due to the effective cellular uptake efficiency, CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes had 6-300 times higher transfection efficiency than CDR/DNA polyplexes. It was even higher than high molecular weight PLL-based polyplexes of HEK293 T cells. Importantly, chloroquine as an endosomal escape agent could not improve the transfection of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes, which indicated that the CDR/Az-I-Dex supramolecular polymer had its own ability for endosomal escape. These results suggested that the CPP-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide can be promising non-viral gene delivery carriers.Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid

  17. Characterization of the cell penetrating properties of a human salivary proline-rich peptide.

    PubMed

    Radicioni, Giorgia; Stringaro, Annarita; Molinari, Agnese; Nocca, Giuseppina; Longhi, Renato; Pirolli, Davide; Scarano, Emanuele; Iavarone, Federica; Manconi, Barbara; Cabras, Tiziana; Messana, Irene; Castagnola, Massimo; Vitali, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Saliva contains hundreds of small proline-rich peptides most of which derive from the post-translational and post-secretory processing of the acidic and basic salivary proline-rich proteins. Among these peptides we found that a 20 residue proline-rich peptide (p1932), commonly present in human saliva and patented for its antiviral activity, was internalized within cells of the oral mucosa. The cell-penetrating properties of p1932 have been studied in a primary gingival fibroblast cell line and in a squamous cancer cell line, and compared to its retro-inverso form. We observed by mass-spectrometry, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy that both peptides were internalized in the two cell lines on a time scale of minutes, being the natural form more efficient than the retro-inverso one. The cytosolic localization was dependent on the cell type: both peptide forms were able to localize within nuclei of tumoral cells, but not in the nuclei of gingival fibroblasts. The uptake was shown to be dependent on the culture conditions used: peptide internalization was indeed effective in a complete medium than in a serum-free one allowing the hypothesis that the internalization could be dependent on the cell cycle. Both peptides were internalized likely by a lipid raft-mediated endocytosis mechanism as suggested by the reduced uptake in the presence of methyl-ß-cyclodextrin. These results suggest that the natural peptide may play a role within the cells of the oral mucosa after its secretion and subsequent internalization. Furthermore, lack of cytotoxicity of both peptide forms highlights their possible application as novel drug delivery agents.

  18. Trends in the Binding of Cell Penetrating Peptides to siRNA: A Molecular Docking Study

    PubMed Central

    Gunathunge, B. G. C. M.; Wimalasiri, P. N.; Karunaratne, D. N.

    2017-01-01

    The use of gene therapeutics, including short interfering RNA (siRNA), is limited by the lack of efficient delivery systems. An appealing approach to deliver gene therapeutics involves noncovalent complexation with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which are able to penetrate the cell membranes of mammals. Although a number of CPPs have been discovered, our understanding of their complexation and translocation of siRNA is as yet insufficient. Here, we report on computational studies comparing the binding affinities of CPPs with siRNA, considering a variety of CPPs. Specifically, seventeen CPPs from three different categories, cationic, amphipathic, and hydrophobic CPPs, were studied. Molecular mechanics were used to minimize structures, while molecular docking calculations were used to predict the orientation and favorability of sequentially binding multiple peptides to siRNA. Binding scores from docking calculations were highest for amphipathic peptides over cationic and hydrophobic peptides. Results indicate that initial complexation of peptides will likely occur along the major groove of the siRNA, driven by electrostatic interactions. Subsequent binding of CPPs is likely to occur in the minor groove and later on bind randomly, to siRNA or previously bound CPPs, through hydrophobic interactions. However, hydrophobic CPPs do not show this binding pattern. Ultimately binding yields a positively charged nanoparticle capable of noninvasive cellular import of therapeutic molecules. PMID:28321253

  19. Antibacterial Effects of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Isolated from Kefir.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Guo, Haoxian; Chen, Feilong; Zhao, Lichao; He, Liping; Ou, Yangwen; Huang, Manman; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Baoyan; Cao, Yong; Huang, Qingrong

    2016-04-27

    Kefir is a traditional fermented milk beverage used throughout the world for centuries. A cell-penetrating peptide, F3, was isolated from kefir by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, DEAE-52 ion exchange, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. F3 was determined to be a low molecular weight peptide containing one leucine and one tyrosine with two phosphate radicals. This peptide displayed antimicrobial activity across a broad spectrum of organisms including several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 125 to 500 μg/mL. Cellular penetration and accumulation of F3 were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The peptide was able to penetrate the cellular membrane of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Changes in cell morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that peptide F3 may be a good candidate for use as an effective biological preservative in agriculture and the food industry.

  20. Wasp mastoparans follow the same mechanism as the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10.

    PubMed

    Yandek, Lindsay E; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F F

    2009-08-04

    We have been examining the mechanism and kinetics of the interactions of a selected set of peptides with phospholipid membranes in a quantitative manner. This set was chosen to cover a broad range of physical-chemical properties and cell specificities. Mastoparan (masL) and mastoparan X (masX) are two similar peptides from the venoms of the wasps Vespula lewisii and Vespa xanthoptera, respectively, and were chosen to complete the set. The rate constants for masX association with and dissociation from membranes are reported here for the first time. The kinetics of dye efflux induced by both mastoparans from phospholipid vesicles were also examined and quantitatively analyzed. We find that masL and masX follow the same graded kinetic model that we previously proposed for the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10), but with different parameters. This comparison is relevant because tp10 is derived from masL by addition of a mostly nonpolar segment of seven residues at the N-terminus. Tp10 is more active than the mastoparans toward phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but the mastoparans are more sensitive to the effect of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion of the peptides calculated using the Wimley-White transfer scales are in good agreement with the values derived from our experimental data and are useful for understanding peptide behavior.

  1. Wasp Mastoparans Follow the Same Mechanism as the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10†

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2009-01-01

    We have been examining the mechanism and kinetics of the interactions of a selected set of peptides with phospholipid membranes, in a quantitative manner. This set was chosen to cover a broad range of physical-chemical properties and cell specificities. Mastoparan (masL) and mastoparan X (masX) are two similar peptides from the venoms of the wasps Vespula lewisii and Vespa xanthoptera, respectively, and were chosen to complete the set. The rate constants for masX association with, and dissociation from membranes are reported here for the first time. The kinetics of dye efflux induced by both mastoparans from phospholipid vesicles were also examined and quantitatively analyzed. We find that masL and masX follow the same graded kinetic model that we previously proposed for the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10), but with different parameters. This comparison is relevant because tp10 is derived from masL by addition of a mostly nonpolar segment of 7 residues at the N-terminus. Tp10 is more active than the mastoparans toward phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but the mastoparans are more sensitive to the effect of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion of the peptides calculated using the Wimley-White transfer scales are in good agreement with the values derived from our experimental data, and are useful for understanding peptide behavior. PMID:19594111

  2. Cell penetrating peptides from agglutinin protein of Abrus precatorius facilitate the uptake of Imatinib mesylate.

    PubMed

    Behera, Birendra; Mukherjee, Devdeep; Agarwal, Tarun; Das, Joyjyoti; Ghosh, Sudip K; Maiti, Tapas K

    2016-04-01

    Targeted drug delivery is of paramount importance for cancer patients. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as potent vehicles for this purpose. Herein, we demonstrate CPP- like properties of two peptides: NH2-SGASDDEEIAR-COOH (SR11) and NH2-ICSSHYEPTVRIGGR-COOH (IR15), derived from the tryptic digest of Abrus precatorius agglutinin. Both IR15 and SR11 were found to be non-toxic at lower doses (up to 50 μg/ml). These two peptides entered into HeLa cells through lipid raft-mediated endocytosis within 15 min and penetrated the nuclear membrane in 60 min of incubation. Co-treatment of peptides (20 μg/ml) and Imatinib (5 μM) in HeLa cells increased uptake of the drug by ∼ 55% and lowered the IC50 value to one-third in comparison to the drug added exclusively. However, co-treatment of TAT peptide (standard CPP) did not alter the Imatinib uptake significantly. In summary, we have identified two novel CPPs from tryptic digest of Abrus agglutinin which increased the cellular uptake of Imatinib upon co-administration. Further studies may result in deciphering a novel mode of drug delivery.

  3. Cell-Penetrating Recombinant Peptides for Potential Use in Agricultural Pest Control Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stephen R.; Dowd, Patrick F.; Johnson, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes these peptides attractive candidates for delivery of therapeutic compounds, especially to the interior of cells. Compounds with characteristics similar to CPPs and that, in addition, have antimicrobial properties are being investigated as antibiotics with a reduced risk of causing resistance. These CPP-like membrane-acting antimicrobial peptides (MAMPs) are α-helical amphipathic peptides that interact with and perturb cell membranes to produce their antimicrobial effects. One source of MAMPs is spider venom. Because these compounds are toxic to insects, they also show promise for development as biological agents for control of insecticide-resistant agricultural pests. Spider venom is a potential source of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. One example is the small amphipathic α-helical peptide lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1 or LCTX) from the wolf spider (Lycosa carolinensis). One side of the α-helix has mostly hydrophilic and the other mainly hydrophobic amino acid residues. The positive charge of the hydrophilic side interacts with negatively charged prokaryotic membranes and the hydrophobic side associates with the membrane lipid bilayer to permeabilize it. Because the surface of the exoskeleton, or cuticle, of an insect is highly hydrophobic, to repel water and dirt, it would be expected that amphipathic compounds could permeabilize it. Mutagenized lycotoxin 1 peptides were produced and expressed in yeast cultures that were fed to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larvae to identify the most lethal mutants. Transgenic expression of spider venom toxins such as lycotoxin-1 in plants could provide durable insect resistance. PMID:24281256

  4. Human DMBT1-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Intracellular siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tuttolomondo, Martina; Casella, Cinzia; Hansen, Pernille Lund; Polo, Ester; Herda, Luciana M; Dawson, Kenneth A; Ditzel, Henrik J; Mollenhauer, Jan

    2017-09-15

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising molecule for gene therapy, but its therapeutic administration remains problematic. Among the recently proposed vectors, cell-penetrating peptides show great promise in in vivo trials for siRNA delivery. Human protein DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumor 1) is a pattern recognition molecule that interacts with polyanions and recognizes and aggregates bacteria. Taking advantage of these properties, we investigated whether specific synthetic DMBT1-derived peptides could be used to formulate nanoparticles for siRNA administration. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay and UV spectra, we identified two DMBT1 peptides that could encapsulate the siRNA with a self- and co-assembly mechanism. The complexes were stable for at least 2 hr in the presence of either fetal bovine serum (FBS) or RNase A, with peptide-dependent time span protection. ζ-potential, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy revealed negatively charged nanoparticles with an average diameter of 10-800 nm, depending on the reaction conditions, and a spherical or rice-shaped morphology, depending on the peptide and β-helix conformation. We successfully transfected human MCF7 cells with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-DMBT1-peptide-Cy3-siRNA complexes. Finally, DMBT1 peptides encapsulating an siRNA targeting a fluorescent reporter gene showed efficient gene silencing in MCF7-recombinant cells. These results lay the foundation for a new research line to exploit DMBT1-peptide nanocomplexes for therapeutic siRNA delivery. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Comparison of mechanisms and cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptide on different cell lines].

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong-xu; Qi, Xian-rong

    2010-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) can be used in pharmaceutics as a highly efficient drug delivery transporter. In this study, four tumor cell lines (MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, C6, and B16F10) were used to observe the uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled CPP and the effects of time and concentration of CPP on cell penetration was studied. The CPP exocytosis on C6 cell line was observed, and its exocytosis kinetics was described by zero order equation. In addition, low-temperature condition (4 degrees C) and endocytosis inhibitors were utilized to investigate the mechanism of CPP uptake by cells. Low-temperature condition did not show significantly inhibition on CPP uptake. Heparin, a membrane glycoprotein receptor inhibitor, showed strong inhibition effect (only 3%-10% of the control) on CPP uptake. Chlorpromazine, chloroquine and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA) showed little effect on CPP uptake. This study indicated that CPP penetration had little selectivity on cell type, but the amount and rate of CPP penetration into cells were related to the type of cell lines. The adsorption of CPP on cell membrane induced by sulfate proteoglycan plays an important role on CPP penetration.

  6. CPPsite 2.0: a repository of experimentally validated cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Piyush; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Gautam, Ankur

    2016-01-04

    CPPsite 2.0 (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cppsite/) is an updated version of manually curated database (CPPsite) of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The current version holds around 1850 peptide entries, which is nearly two times than the entries in the previous version. The updated data were curated from research papers and patents published in last three years. It was observed that most of the CPPs discovered/ tested, in last three years, have diverse chemical modifications (e.g. non-natural residues, linkers, lipid moieties, etc.). We have compiled this information on chemical modifications systematically in the updated version of the database. In order to understand the structure-function relationship of these peptides, we predicted tertiary structure of CPPs, possessing both modified and natural residues, using state-of-the-art techniques. CPPsite 2.0 also maintains information about model systems (in vitro/in vivo) used for CPP evaluation and different type of cargoes (e.g. nucleic acid, protein, nanoparticles, etc.) delivered by these peptides. In order to assist a wide range of users, we developed a user-friendly responsive website, with various tools, suitable for smartphone, tablet and desktop users. In conclusion, CPPsite 2.0 provides significant improvements over the previous version in terms of data content. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Emerging landscape of cell penetrating peptide in reprogramming and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiting; Zeng, Fanhui; Zhang, Ming; Huang, Fajun; Wang, Jiajun; Guo, Jingjing; Liu, Changbai; Wang, Hu

    2016-03-28

    The plasma membrane remains a major barrier for intracellular drug delivery, to overcome this issue, a variety of approaches have been developed and used to deliver therapeutic cargos. Among these approaches, cell penetrating peptide (CPP) is promising and affords widely used vector for efficient intracellular delivery of cargos. Moreover, the latter findings including iPS reprogramming and direct transdifferentiation as well as gene editing have gradually become hot research topic; because their application in tissue engineering and disease modeling have great potential to advance innovation in precision medicine. Since the beginning, research on these approaches is mainly based on virus transduction system, while, under the consideration for obviating the risk of mutagenic insertion and enables more accurate controlling, CPP-based efficient virus-free delivery strategy has been used recently. In this review, we summarize the existing CPP-based delivery system, emerging landscape of CPP application in stem cell manipulation and reprogramming, along with CPP contributions to gene editing techniques.

  8. Cargo self-assembly rescues affinity of cell-penetrating peptides to lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberger, Andreas; Walter, Vivien; MacEwan, Sarah R.; Schmatko, Tatiana; Muller, Pierre; Schroder, André P.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Marques, Carlos M.

    2017-03-01

    Although cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to bind to cell membranes, thus promoting cell internalization by active pathways, attachment of cargo molecules to CPPs invariably reduces their cellular uptake. We show here that CPP binding to lipid bilayers, a simple model of the cell membrane, can be recovered by designing cargo molecules that self-assemble into spherical micelles and increase the local interfacial density of CPP on the surface of the cargo. Experiments performed on model giant unilamellar vesicles under a confocal laser scanning microscope show that a family of thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptides that exhibit temperature-triggered micellization can promote temperature triggered attachment of the micelles to membranes, thus rescuing by self-assembly the cargo-induced loss of the CPP affinity to bio-membranes.

  9. Synthesis of cell-penetrating peptides and their application in neurobiology.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Gunnar P H; Bähr, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Short basic amino acid sequences, often called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), allow the delivery of proteins and other molecules into cells and across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Although the ability of basic proteins to facilitate such trafficking is known for a long time, only the application of genetic methods and overexpression of fusion proteins in Escherichia coli has lead to a wide application of CPP in many research areas, including signal transduction, cancer, angiogenesis, apoptosis, bone development, cardioprotection, cell cycle, neurobiology, and many others. For the neuroscientist, CPPs are particularly attractive, as a number of articles in the last 5 years have reported their use for neuronal rescue in a number of models for neurodegenerative diseases in vitro and in vivo in rats, mice, or gerbils. Here, we give a detailed description of the protein purification methodology and applications in neuroscience.

  10. Cell-penetrating peptides-based strategies for the delivery of splice redirecting antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    El Andaloussi, Samir; Said Hassane, Fatouma; Boisguerin, Prisca; Sillard, Rannar; Langel, Ulo; Lebleu, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of human malignancies has provided therapeutic targets amenable to oligonucleotide (ON)-based strategies. Antisense ON-mediated splicing regulation in particular offers promising prospects since the majority of human genes undergo alternative splicing and since splicing defects have been found in many diseases. However, their implementation has been hampered so far by the poor bioavailability of nucleic acids-based drugs. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) now appear as promising non-viral delivery vector for non-permeant biomolecules. We describe here new CPPs allowing the delivery of splice redirecting steric-block ON using either chemical conjugation or non-covalent complexation. We also describe a convenient and robust splice redirecting assay which allows the quantitative assessment of ON nuclear delivery.

  11. Cargo self-assembly rescues affinity of cell-penetrating peptides to lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Andreas; Walter, Vivien; MacEwan, Sarah R.; Schmatko, Tatiana; Muller, Pierre; Schroder, André P.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Marques, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    Although cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to bind to cell membranes, thus promoting cell internalization by active pathways, attachment of cargo molecules to CPPs invariably reduces their cellular uptake. We show here that CPP binding to lipid bilayers, a simple model of the cell membrane, can be recovered by designing cargo molecules that self-assemble into spherical micelles and increase the local interfacial density of CPP on the surface of the cargo. Experiments performed on model giant unilamellar vesicles under a confocal laser scanning microscope show that a family of thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptides that exhibit temperature-triggered micellization can promote temperature triggered attachment of the micelles to membranes, thus rescuing by self-assembly the cargo-induced loss of the CPP affinity to bio-membranes. PMID:28262825

  12. Interaction of nanoparticles and cell-penetrating peptides with skin for transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinaki; Patlolla, Ram R.; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    Topical or transdermal drug delivery is challenging because the skin acts as a natural and protective barrier. Therefore, several methods have been examined to increase the permeation of therapeutic molecules into and through the skin. One approach is to use the nanoparticulate delivery system. Starting with liposomes and other vesicular systems, several other types of nanosized drug carriers have been developed such as solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, polymer-based nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles for dermatological applications. This review article discusses how different particulate systems can interact and penetrate into the skin barrier. In this review, the effectiveness of nanoparticles, as well as possible mode of actions of nanoparticles, is presented. In addition to nanoparticles, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated drug delivery into the skin and the possible mechanism of CPP-derived delivery into the skin is discussed. Lastly, the effectiveness and possible mechanism of CPP-modified nanocarriers into the skin are addressed. PMID:21028936

  13. Enzyme-triggered, cell penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of anti-tumor agents.

    PubMed

    He, Huining; Sun, Lu; Ye, Junxiao; Liu, Ergang; Chen, Sunhui; Liang, Qiuling; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C

    2016-10-28

    Conventional chemotherapy has little or no specificity for cancer cells, normally resulting in low drug accumulation at the tumor region (inefficacy) and drug-induced severe side effects (toxicity). Nowadays, new strategies have been developed to improve both the targeting ability and cellular drug uptake using active targeting ligands and drug internalization agents, which could recognize and interact with specific receptors overexpressed on tumor cells and then trigger a drug internalization process by transporting the cargos into cells. Among those strategies, enzyme-triggered cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated systems seem to be a feasible approach. The expression level of specific enzymes like proteases, esterases or glycosidases is often higher in tumor cells than in normal tissues, and such concentration gradients can be exploited as a tool for targeted cancer therapy. CPPs are known to be effective in promoting membrane transportation of the drug cargos, rendering a deeper tumor permeation that could further enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the delivered drug. An enzyme-triggered, CPP-mediated system would combine these advantages to yield a system with the enhanced tumor targeting ability and internalization efficiency and so far many systems have been successfully exploited and applied to cancer therapy. In this review, typical enzymes applied in cancer theranostic systems were firstly reviewed, followed by analyzing pros and cons of cell penetrating peptides. Most importantly, different types of applications of enzyme-triggered CPP-mediated systems in tumor imaging were illustrated. Finally, the drug loaded applications, i.e. enzyme-triggered CPP-mediated systems in drug delivery were reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hemocompatible poly(NIPAm-MBA-AMPS) colloidal nanoparticles as carriers of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Rush L; Medow, Matthew R; Panitch, Alyssa; Seal, Brandon

    2012-04-09

    Anionic copolymer systems containing sulfated monomers have great potential for delivery of cationic therapeutics, but N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) copolymer nanoparticles have seen limited characterization to date with regard to physical properties relevant to loading and release of therapeutics. Characterization of polymeric nanoparticles incorporating AMPS showed an increased size and decreased thermodynamic swelling ratios of AMPS containing particles as compared to NIPAm nanoparticles lacking AMPS. Particles with increasing AMPS addition showed an increased propensity for uniformity, intraparticle colloidal stability, and drug loading capacity. Peptide encapsulated in particles was shielded from peptide degradation in serum. Particles were shown not impede blood coagulation or to cause hemolysis. This study has demonstrated that AMPS incorporation into traditional NIPAm nanoparticles presents a tunable parameter for changing particle LCST, size, swelling ratio, ζ potential, and cationic peptide loading potential. This one-pot synthesis results in a thermosensitive anionic nanoparticle system that is a potentially useful platform to deliver cationic cell penetrating peptides.

  15. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  16. Intracellular Delivery of Molecular Cargo Using Cell-Penetrating Peptides and the Combination Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Tsui, Tung Yu; Ma, Wenxue

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can cross cellular membranes in a non-toxic fashion, improving the intracellular delivery of various molecular cargos such as nanoparticles, small molecules and plasmid DNA. Because CPPs provide a safe, efficient, and non-invasive mode of transport for various cargos into cells, they have been developed as vectors for the delivery of genetic and biologic products in recent years. Most common CPPs are positively charged peptides. While delivering negatively charged molecules (e.g., nucleic acids) to target cells, the internalization efficiency of CPPs is reduced and inhibited because the cationic charges on the CPPs are neutralized through the covering of CPPs by cargos on the structure. Even under these circumstances, the CPPs can still be non-covalently complexed with the negatively charged molecules. To address this issue, combination strategies of CPPs with other typical carriers provide a promising and novel delivery system. This review summarizes the latest research work in using CPPs combined with molecular cargos including liposomes, polymers, cationic peptides, nanoparticles, adeno-associated virus (AAV) and calcium for the delivery of genetic products, especially for small interfering RNA (siRNA). This combination strategy remedies the reduced internalization efficiency caused by neutralization. PMID:26295227

  17. Brain delivery of insulin boosted by intranasal coadministration with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-01-10

    Intranasal administration is considered as an alternative route to enable effective drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Several reports have proved that macromolecules can be transferred directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, strategies to enhance the delivery of macromolecules from the nasal cavity to CNS are needed because of their low delivery efficiencies via this route in general. We hypothesized that the delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain parenchyma can be facilitated by increasing the uptake of drugs by the nasal epithelium including supporting and neuronal cells to maximize the potentiality of the intranasal pathway. To test this hypothesis, the CNS-related model peptide insulin was intranasally coadministered with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin to mice. As a result, insulin coadministered with l- or d-penetratin reached the distal regions of the brain from the nasal cavity, including the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. In particular, d-penetratin could intranasally deliver insulin to the brain with a reduced risk of systemic insulin exposure. Thus, the results obtained in this study suggested that CPPs are potential tools for the brain delivery of peptide- and protein-based pharmaceuticals via intranasal administration.

  18. Investigation on cellular uptake and pharmacodynamics of DOCK2-inhibitory peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Umemoto, Tadashi; Fukuda, Yasunori; Tani, Akiyoshi; Asami, Taiji

    2017-04-01

    Protein-protein interaction between dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) is an attractive intracellular target for transplant rejection and inflammatory diseases. Recently, DOCK2-selective inhibitory peptides have been discovered, and conjugation with oligoarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) improved inhibitory activity in a cell migration assay. Although a number of CPPs have been reported, oligoarginine was only one example introduced to the inhibitory peptides. In this study, we aimed to confirm the feasibility of CPP-conjugation approach for DOCK2-inhibitory peptides, and select preferable sequences as CPP moiety. First, we evaluated cell permeability of thirteen known CPPs and partial sequences of influenza A viral protein PB1-F2 using an internalization assay system based on luciferin-luciferase reaction, and then selected four CPPs with efficient cellular uptake. Among four conjugates of these CPPs and a DOCK2-inhibitory peptide, the inhibitory activity of a novel CPP, PB1-F2 fragment 5 (PF5), conjugate was comparable to oligoarginine conjugate and higher than that of the non-conjugated peptide. Finally, internalization assay revealed that oligoarginine and PF5 increased the cellular uptake of inhibitory peptides to the same extent. Hence, we demonstrated that CPP-conjugation approach is applicable to the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs based on DOCK2 inhibition by investigating both cellular uptake and bioactivity.

  19. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  20. Cell-penetrating peptide TP10 shows broad-spectrum activity against both Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Romanico B G; Ebikeme, Charles; Jiang, Yang; Ranford-Cartwright, Lisa; Barrett, Michael P; Langel, Ulo; Faye, Ingrid

    2008-09-01

    Malaria and trypanosomiasis are diseases which afflict millions and for which novel therapies are urgently required. We have tested two well-characterized cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) for antiparasitic activity. One CPP, designated TP10, has broad-spectrum antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum, both blood and mosquito stages, and against blood-stage Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

  1. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Min; Guo Youmin . E-mail: mikie0763@126.com; Wu Qifei; Yang Junle; Wang Peng; Wang Sicen; Guo Xiaojuan; Qiang Yongqian; Duan Xiaoyi

    2006-08-18

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate on 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance was 5.7311 {+-} 0.0122 mmol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, higher than that of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (p < 0.05). Fluorescein imaging confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Gadolinium was efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time- or concentration-dependent fashion, resulting in intercellular T1 relaxation enhancement, which was obviously detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability and membrane potential gradient. The research in vitro suggests that the newly constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking mesenchymal stem cells.

  2. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min; Guo, You-min; Wu, Qi-fei; Yang, Jun-le; Wang, Peng; Wang, Si-cen; Guo, Xiao-juan; Qiang, Yong-qian; Duan, Xiao-yi

    2006-08-18

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate on 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance was 5.7311 +/- 0.0122 m mol(-1) s(-1), higher than that of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (p < 0.05). Fluorescein imaging confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Gadolinium was efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time- or concentration-dependent fashion, resulting in intercellular T1 relaxation enhancement, which was obviously detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability and membrane potential gradient. The research in vitro suggests that the newly constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking mesenchymal stem cells.

  3. Cell-penetrating peptides as nucleic acid delivery systems: from biophysics to biological applications.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, Sara; Cardoso, Ana L; Cardoso, Ana M S; Morais, Catarina M; Jurado, Amalia S; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    The increasing knowledge on the genetic basis of disease has allowed the development of promising gene-targeted therapies that can be applied to numerous diseases. Such genetic-based approaches involve the use of nucleic acids as therapeutic agents, either for the insertion or repair and regulation of specific genes. However, the clinical application of these large and charged molecules remains highly dependent on the development of delivery systems capable of mediating efficient cellular uptake. Since the first observations, two decades ago, that some protein-derived domains can translocate across biological membranes, a wide group of peptides called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been considered one of the most promising tools to improve non-invasive cellular delivery of therapeutic molecules. The mechanistic basis of CPP and CPP conjugate cellular uptake remains controversial. However, biophysical studies on the interactions of CPPs with membrane models have contributed to unravel the mechanisms underlying CPP membrane translocation as well as to propose relationships between those mechanisms and CPP efficiency in mediating cargo delivery. In this review, representative examples of CPPs were gathered from the most recent literature in order to emphasize the contributions of chemists, biophysicists and cell biologists towards the rational design of increasingly more efficient delivery systems. In this context, the present review aims at giving an overview of some of the most significant CPP families and their biological applications as nucleic acid delivery systems.

  4. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  5. (31)P solid-state NMR based monitoring of permeation of cell penetrating peptides into skin.

    PubMed

    Desai, Pinaki R; Cormier, Ashley R; Shah, Punit P; Patlolla, Ram R; Paravastu, Anant K; Singh, Mandip

    2014-02-01

    The main objective of the current study was to investigate penetration of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs: TAT, R8, R11, and YKA) through skin intercellular lipids using (31)P magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR. In vitro skin permeation studies were performed on rat skin, and sections (0-60, 61-120, and 121-180μm) were collected and analyzed for (31)P NMR signal. The concentration-dependent shift of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200mg/ml of TAT on skin layers, diffusion of TAT, R8, R11, and YKA in the skin and time dependent permeation of R11 was measured on various skin sections using (31)P solid-state NMR. Further, CPPs and CPP-tagged fluorescent dye encapsulate liposomes (FLip) in skin layers were tagged using confocal microscopy. The change in (31)P NMR chemical shift was found to depend monotonically on the amount of CPP applied on skin, with saturation behavior above 100mg/ml CPP concentration. R11 and TAT caused more shift in solid-state NMR peaks compared to other peptides. Furthermore, NMR spectra showed R11 penetration up to 180μm within 30min. The results of the solid-state NMR study were in agreement with confocal microscopy studies. Thus, (31)P solid-state NMR can be used to track CPP penetration into different skin layers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-11-27

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter. E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  9. 31P Solid-state NMR based monitoring of permeation of cell penetrating peptides into skin

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinaki R.; Cormier, Ashley R.; Shah, Punit P.; Patlolla, Ram R.; Paravastu, Anant K.; Singh, Mandip

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of the current study was to investigate penetration of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs: TAT, R8, R11 and YKA) through skin intercellular lipids using 31P magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR. In vitro skin permeation studies were performed on rat skin, sections (0–60, 61–120 and 121–180 µm) were collected and analyzed for 31P NMR signal. The concentration dependent shift of 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/ml of TAT on skin layers, diffusion of TAT, R8, R11 and YKA in the skin and time dependent permeation of R11 was measured on various skin sections using 31P solid-state NMR. Further, CPPs and CPP-tagged fluorescent dye encapsulate liposomes (FLip) in skin layers were tagged using confocal microscopy. The change in 31P NMR chemical shift was found to depend monotonically on the amount of CPP applied on skin, with saturation behavior above 100 mg/ml CPP concentration. R11 and TAT caused more shift in solid-state NMR peaks compared to other peptides. Furthermore, NMR spectra showed R11 penetration up to 180 µm within 30 min. The results of the solid-state NMR study were in agreement with confocal microscopy studies. Thus, 31P solid-state NMR can be used to track CPP penetration into different skin layers. PMID:23702274

  10. Nanocarriers Conjugated with Cell Penetrating Peptides: New Trojan Horses by Modern Ulysses.

    PubMed

    Zappavigna, Silvia; Misso, Gabriella; Falanga, Annarita; Perillo, Emiliana; Novellino, Ettore; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Grieco, Paolo; Caraglia, Michele; Galdiero, Stefania

    Nanomedicine has opened the way to the design of more efficient diagnostics and therapeutics. Moreover, recent literature has illustrated the use of short cationic and/or amphipathic peptides, known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), for mediating advanced drug delivery. CPPs exploit their ability to enter cells and enhance the uptake of many cargoes ranging from small molecules to proteins. The distinctive properties of nanocarriers (NC) based systems provide unforeseen benefits over pure drugs for biomedical applications and constitute a challenging research field particularly focused on imaging and delivery; nonetheless, several problems have to be overcome to make them a viable option in clinic. The use of CPPs improves significantly their delivery to specific intracellular targets and thus readily contributes to their use both for effective tumor therapy and gene therapy. A key issue is related to their mechanism of uptake, because although classical CPPs enhance NCs' uptake, the entry mechanism involves the endocytic pathway, which means that the delivered material is sequestered within vesicles and only a small amount will escape from this environment and reach the desired target. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in the use of CPP for enhanced delivery of nanocarriers, nucleic acids, and drugs, we will discuss their uptake mechanisms and we will describe novel approaches to improve endosomal escape of internalized nanosystems.

  11. Drug delivery with nanospherical supramolecular cell penetrating peptide-taxol conjugates containing a high drug loading.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ran; Wang, Huaimin; Niu, Ruifang; Ding, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Supramolecular nanostructures via small molecule self-assembly hold great promise for controlled delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs. Particularly, taxol has recently been discovered to possess excellent self-assembly property, which may provide new opportunities to develop a new class of functional supramolecular nanomaterials for drug delivery application. A cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-taxol conjugate (Taxol-CPP) was designed and synthesized. The self-assembling property of Taxol-CPP was investigated and the resultant nanomaterials were well characterized. Subsequently, the cytotoxicity of the Taxol-CPP after self-assembly against HepG2 cancer cells was evaluated. It is found that the Taxol-CPP possesses a high drug loading of 26.4% in each molecule, which is able to self-assemble into supramolecular nanospheres. By taking advantages of the self-assembly ability of taxol, Taxol-CPP supramolecular nanospheres with a mean size of around 130 nm can be obtained, composed of only the functional peptide (CPP) and the drug (taxol). Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the Taxol-CPP nanospheres do not compromise the taxol's potency, which can also be utilized as the carriers for co-delivery of another anticancer drug (doxorubicin). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles and CdS quantum dots with cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Catherine C.; de la Fuente, Jesus M.

    2009-02-01

    During the last decade, there has been great deal of interest in the self-assembly fabrication of hybrid materials from inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules. Nanoparticles are similar in size range to many common biomolecules, thus, nanoparticles appear to be natural companions in hybrid systems. At present, it is straightforward to control and modify properties of nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems; for example, controlling their size, modifying their surface layer for enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, or biorecognition. A particularly desirable target for therapeutic uses is the cell nucleus, because the genetic information is there. We review in this article the synthesis developed by our research group of water-soluble gold nanoparticles and CdS nanocrystals functionalized with a Tat protein-derived peptide sequence by straightforward and economical methodologies. The particles were subsequently tested in vitro with a human fibroblast cell line using optical and transmission electron microscopy to determine the biocompatibility of these nanoparticles and whether the functionalization with the cell penetrating peptide allowed particles to transfer across the cell membrane and locate into the nucleus.

  13. Cell penetrating peptide conjugated liposomes as transdermal delivery system of Polygonum aviculare L. extract.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Sik; Kim, Sun Young; Kong, Bong Ju; Kim, Kyeong Jin; Noh, Geun Young; Im, Na Ri; Lim, Ji Won; Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Junoh; Park, Soo Nam

    2015-04-10

    In this study, Polygonum aviculare L. extract, which has superior antioxidative and cellular membrane protective activity, was loaded onto cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated liposomes to enhance transdermal delivery. The physical characteristics of typical liposomes and CPP-conjugated liposomes containing P. aviculare extract were evaluated. The particle sizes of both liposomes were approximately 150 nm. Whereas the zeta potential of typical liposomes was -45 mV, that of CPP-conjugated liposomes was +42 mV. The loading efficiency of P. aviculare extract in both liposomes was calculated to be about 83%. Fluorescent-labeled liposomes were prepared to evaluate cellular uptake and skin permeation efficiency. Using flow cytometry, we found that CPP-conjugated liposomes improved cellular uptake of the fluorescent dye as compared with the typical liposomes. In addition, the skin permeation of CPP-conjugated liposomes was proved higher than that of typical liposomes by confocal laser scanning microscopy studies and Franz diffusion cell experiments. The improved cellular uptake and skin permeation of the CPP-conjugated liposomes were due to the cationic arginine-rich peptide. In vivo studies also determined that the CPP-conjugated liposomes were more effective in depigmentation and anti-wrinkle studies than typical liposomes. These results indicate that the CPP-conjugated liposomes could be effective for transdermal drug delivery of antioxidant and anti-aging therapeutics.

  14. Cell-penetrating peptides: achievements and challenges in application for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Byun, Youngro; David, Allan E.; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major hurdles to cure cancer lies in the low potency of currently available drugs, which could eventually be solved by using more potent therapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins or genes. However, although these macromolecules possess greater potency inside the cancer cells, the barely permeable cell membrane remains a formidable barrier to exert their efficacy. A widely used strategy is to use cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to improve their intracellular uptake. Since the discovery of the first CPP, numerous CPPs have been derived from natural or synthesized products. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that those CPPs are highly efficient in transducing cargoes into almost all cell types. Therefore, to date, CPPs have been widely used for intracellular delivery of various cargoes, including peptides, proteins, genes, and even nanoparticles. In addition, recently, based on the successes of CPPs in cellular studies, their applications in vivo have been actively pursued. This review will focus on the advanced applications of CPP-based in vivo delivery of therapeutics (e.g., small molecule drugs, proteins, and genes). In addition, we will highlight certain updated applications of CPPs for intracellular delivery of nanoparticulate drug carriers, as well as several ‘smart’ strategies for tumor targeted delivery of CPP-cargoes. PMID:23852939

  15. Impact of different cell penetrating peptides on the efficacy of antisense therapeutics for targeting intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Mohammad, Haroon; Thangamani, Shankar; Hussein, Asmaa A. A.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need for novel and innovative therapeutic strategies to address infections caused by intracellular pathogens. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) present a novel method to target intracellular pathogens due to their unique mechanism of action and their ability to be conjugated to cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to overcome challenging delivery barriers. In this study, we targeted the RNA polymerase α subunit (rpoA) using a PNA that was covalently conjugated to five different CPPs. Changing the conjugated CPP resulted in a pronounced improvement in the antibacterial activity observed against Listeria monocytogenes in vitro, in cell culture, and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) infection model. Additionally, a time-kill assay revealed three conjugated CPPs rapidly kill Listeria within 20 minutes without disrupting the bacterial cell membrane. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of other critical virulence genes (Listeriolysin O, and two phospholipases plcA and plcB) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PNA-inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis was selective and did not adversely affect mitochondrial protein synthesis. This study provides a foundation for improving and developing PNAs conjugated to CPPs to better target intracellular pathogens. PMID:26860980

  16. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kizil, Caghan; Iltzsche, Anne; Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two- polyR and Trans - that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael's addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues.

  17. Cell-penetrating peptides: achievements and challenges in application for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Byun, Youngro; David, Allan E; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C

    2014-02-01

    One of the major hurdles to cure cancer lies in the low potency of currently available drugs, which could eventually be solved by using more potent therapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins or genes. However, although these macromolecules possess greater potency inside the cancer cells, the barely permeable cell membrane remains a formidable barrier to exert their efficacy. A widely used strategy is to use cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to improve their intracellular uptake. Since the discovery of the first CPP, numerous CPPs have been derived from natural or synthesized products. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that those CPPs are highly efficient in transducing cargoes into almost all cell types. Therefore, to date, CPPs have been widely used for intracellular delivery of various cargoes, including peptides, proteins, genes, and even nanoparticles. In addition, recently, based on the successes of CPPs in cellular studies, their applications in vivo have been actively pursued. This review will focus on the advanced applications of CPP-based in vivo delivery of therapeutics (e.g., small molecule drugs, proteins, and genes). In addition, we will highlight certain updated applications of CPPs for intracellular delivery of nanoparticulate drug carriers, as well as several "smart" strategies for tumor targeted delivery of CPP-cargoes.

  18. Potent Inhibition of Late Stages of Hepadnavirus Replication by a Modified Cell Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Abdul, Fabien; Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Buronfosse, Thierry; Zoulim, Fabien; Kann, Michael; Nielsen, Peter E.; Cova, Lucyna

    2012-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their lipid domain-conjugates (CatLip) are agents for the delivery of (uncharged) biologically active molecules into the cell. Using infection and transfection assays we surprisingly discovered that CatLip peptides were able to inhibit replication of Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV. Amongst twelve CatLip peptides we identified Deca-(Arg)8 having a particularly potent antiviral activity, leading to a drastic inhibition of viral particle secretion without detectable toxicity. Inhibition of virion secretion was correlated with a dose-dependent increase in intracellular viral DNA. Deca-(Arg)8 peptide did neither interfere with DHBV entry, nor with formation of mature nucleocapsids nor with their travelling to the nucleus. Instead, Deca-(Arg)8 caused envelope protein accumulation in large clusters as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicating severe structural changes of preS/S. Sucrose gradient analysis of supernatants from Deca-(Arg)8-treated cells showed unaffected naked viral nucleocapsids release, which was concomitant with a complete arrest of virion and surface protein-containing subviral particle secretion. This is the first report showing that a CPP is able to drastically block hepadnaviral release from infected cells by altering late stages of viral morphogenesis via interference with enveloped particle formation, without affecting naked nucleocapsid egress, thus giving a view inside the mode of inhibition. Deca-(Arg)8 may be a useful tool for elucidating the hepadnaviral secretory pathway, which is not yet fully understood. Moreover we provide the first evidence that a modified CPP displays a novel antiviral mechanism targeting another step of viral life cycle compared to what has been so far described for other enveloped viruses. PMID:23173037

  19. Potent inhibition of late stages of hepadnavirus replication by a modified cell penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Abdul, Fabien; Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Buronfosse, Thierry; Zoulim, Fabien; Kann, Michael; Nielsen, Peter E; Cova, Lucyna

    2012-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their lipid domain-conjugates (CatLip) are agents for the delivery of (uncharged) biologically active molecules into the cell. Using infection and transfection assays we surprisingly discovered that CatLip peptides were able to inhibit replication of Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV. Amongst twelve CatLip peptides we identified Deca-(Arg)₈ having a particularly potent antiviral activity, leading to a drastic inhibition of viral particle secretion without detectable toxicity. Inhibition of virion secretion was correlated with a dose-dependent increase in intracellular viral DNA. Deca-(Arg)₈ peptide did neither interfere with DHBV entry, nor with formation of mature nucleocapsids nor with their travelling to the nucleus. Instead, Deca-(Arg)₈ caused envelope protein accumulation in large clusters as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicating severe structural changes of preS/S. Sucrose gradient analysis of supernatants from Deca-(Arg)₈-treated cells showed unaffected naked viral nucleocapsids release, which was concomitant with a complete arrest of virion and surface protein-containing subviral particle secretion. This is the first report showing that a CPP is able to drastically block hepadnaviral release from infected cells by altering late stages of viral morphogenesis via interference with enveloped particle formation, without affecting naked nucleocapsid egress, thus giving a view inside the mode of inhibition. Deca-(Arg)₈ may be a useful tool for elucidating the hepadnaviral secretory pathway, which is not yet fully understood. Moreover we provide the first evidence that a modified CPP displays a novel antiviral mechanism targeting another step of viral life cycle compared to what has been so far described for other enveloped viruses.

  20. Targeting the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway in the Retina With a Gene-Delivered Secretable and Cell-Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J; Jaime, Henrique; Brown, Emily E; Iwata, Ryo L; Ahmed, Chulbul M; Massengill, Michael T; Biswal, Manas R; Boye, Shannon E; Hauswirth, William W; Ash, John D; Li, Qiuhong; Lewin, Alfred S

    2016-02-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked to several ocular diseases, initiating an inflammatory response that increases tissue injury. The Nrf2 transcription factor regulates expression of antioxidant genes and is tightly regulated by Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (Keap-1). We evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector delivering an Nrf2-derived peptide that binds Keap-1. The sequence of the Nrf2 peptide was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (Tat-peptide) sequence (TatNrf2mer). The effects of lentiviral-delivered TatNrf2mer were studied in vitro. Transcript (quantitative [q] RT-PCR) and protein levels (ELISA and immunofluorescence) were quantified. Cell viability was measured by MTT and Cell Titer assays. The AAV vectors were packaged with the TatNrf2mer fused to secretable green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the small chicken β actin promoter. The protective effects of this vector were evaluated in a model of RPE oxidative injury and in a mouse model of uveitis after intravitreal injection. Expression of TatNrf2mer peptide induced antioxidant gene expression, blocked IL-1β secretion, and protected cells from oxidative injury. In mice, TatNrf2mer expression partially protected photoreceptor function based on ERG responses and optical coherence tomography measurements in the sodium iodate (NaIO3) model. Furthermore, sGFP-TatNrf2mer expression decreased IL-1β and IL-6 in the NaIO3-treated mice, and resulted in a 54% decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in the vitreous body of the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model. The intravitreally delivered AAV-TatNrf2mer has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in widely-used models of ocular injury, suggesting it also could be useful in ocular diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammasome activation.

  1. Targeting the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway in the Retina With a Gene-Delivered Secretable and Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ildefonso, Cristhian J.; Jaime, Henrique; Brown, Emily E.; Iwata, Ryo L.; Ahmed, Chulbul M.; Massengill, Michael T.; Biswal, Manas R.; Boye, Shannon E.; Hauswirth, William W.; Ash, John D.; Li, Qiuhong; Lewin, Alfred S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress has been linked to several ocular diseases, initiating an inflammatory response that increases tissue injury. The Nrf2 transcription factor regulates expression of antioxidant genes and is tightly regulated by Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (Keap-1). We evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector delivering an Nrf2-derived peptide that binds Keap-1. Methods The sequence of the Nrf2 peptide was fused to a cell-penetrating peptide (Tat-peptide) sequence (TatNrf2mer). The effects of lentiviral-delivered TatNrf2mer were studied in vitro. Transcript (quantitative [q] RT-PCR) and protein levels (ELISA and immunofluorescence) were quantified. Cell viability was measured by MTT and Cell Titer assays. The AAV vectors were packaged with the TatNrf2mer fused to secretable green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the small chicken β actin promoter. The protective effects of this vector were evaluated in a model of RPE oxidative injury and in a mouse model of uveitis after intravitreal injection. Results Expression of TatNrf2mer peptide induced antioxidant gene expression, blocked IL-1β secretion, and protected cells from oxidative injury. In mice, TatNrf2mer expression partially protected photoreceptor function based on ERG responses and optical coherence tomography measurements in the sodium iodate (NaIO3) model. Furthermore, sGFP-TatNrf2mer expression decreased IL-1β and IL-6 in the NaIO3-treated mice, and resulted in a 54% decrease in the number of inflammatory cells in the vitreous body of the endotoxin-induced uveitis mouse model. Conclusions The intravitreally delivered AAV-TatNrf2mer has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in widely-used models of ocular injury, suggesting it also could be useful in ocular diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammasome activation. PMID:26842755

  2. Enhancing tumor-specific intracellular delivering efficiency of cell-penetrating peptide by fusion with a peptide targeting to EGFR.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long The; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Du, Xuan; Wang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun; Dong, Yang; Li, Peng-Fei

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are well known as intracellular delivery vectors. However, unsatisfactory delivery efficiency and poor specificity are challenging barriers to CPP applications at the clinical trial stage. Here, we showed that S3, an EGFR-binding domain derived from vaccinia virus growth factor, when fused to a CPP such as HBD or TAT can substantially enhance its internalization efficiency and tumor selectivity. The uptake of S3-HBD (S3H) recombinant molecule by tumor cells was nearly 80 folds increased compared to HBD alone. By contrast, the uptake of S3H by non-neoplastic cells still remained at a low level. The specific recognition between S3 and its receptor, EGFR, as well as between HBD and heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface was essential for these improvements, suggesting a syngeneic effect between the two functional domains in conjugation. This syngeneic effect is likely similar to that of the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, which is highly abundant particularly in metastatic tumors. The process that S3H entered cells was dependent on time, dosage, and energy, via macropinocytosis pathway. With excellent cell-penetrating efficacy and a novel tumor-targeting ability, S3H appears as a promising candidate vector for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery.

  3. The Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptide and Transferrin on Enhanced Delivery of Drug to Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gitanjali; Lakkadwala, Sushant; Modgil, Amit; Singh, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to brain has led to an entire field of active research devoted to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver drugs to brain. This review focusses on exploring the facets of a novel platform designed for the delivery of drugs to brain. The platform was constructed based on the hypothesis that a combination of receptor-targeting agent, like transferrin protein, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB. The combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle has shown significantly improved (p < 0.05) translocation of small molecules and genes into brain as compared to the vehicle with only receptor-targeting agents. The comprehensive details of the uptake mechanisms and properties of various CPPs are illustrated here. The application of this technology, in conjunction with nanotechnology, can potentially open new horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27231900

  4. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gomarasca, Marta; F. C. Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Schmidt, M. Alexander

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri. Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens. PMID:28096156

  5. When cationic cell-penetrating peptides meet hydrocarbons to enhance in-cell cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Chassaing, Gérard; Swiecicki, Jean-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short sequences often rich in cationic residues with the remarkable ability to cross cell membranes. In the past 20 years, CPPs have gained wide interest and have found numerous applications in the delivery of bioactive cargoes to the cytosol and even the nucleus of living cells. The covalent or non-covalent addition of hydrocarbon moieties to cationic CPPs alters the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity balance in their sequence. Such perturbation dramatically influences their interaction with the cell membrane, might induce self-assembling properties and modifies their intracellular trafficking. In particular, the introduction of lipophilic moieties changes the subcellular distribution of CPPs and might result in a dramatically increase of the internalization yield of the co-transported cargoes. Herein, we offer an overview of different aspects of the recent findings concerning the properties of CPPs covalently or non-covalently associated to hydrocarbons. We will focus on the impact of the hydrocarbon moieties on the delivery of various cargoes, either covalently or non-covalently bound to the modified CPPs. We will also provide some key elements to rationalize the influence of the hydrocarbons moieties on the cellular uptake. Furthermore, the recent in vitro and in vivo successful applications of acylated CPPs will be summarized to provide a broad view of the versatility of these modified CPPs as small-molecules and oligonucleotides vectors.

  6. Translocation mechanism(s) of cell-penetrating peptides: biophysical studies using artificial membrane bilayers.

    PubMed

    Di Pisa, Margherita; Chassaing, Gérard; Swiecicki, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-20

    The ability of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to cross cell membranes has found numerous applications in the delivery of bioactive compounds to the cytosol of living cells. Their internalization mechanisms have been questioned many times, and after 20 years of intense debate, it is now widely accepted that both energy-dependent and energy-independent mechanisms account for their penetration properties. However, the energy-independent mechanisms, named "direct translocation", occurring without the requirement of the cell internalization machinery, remain to be fully rationalized at the molecular level. Using artificial membrane bilayers, recent progress has been made toward the comprehension of the direct translocation event. This review summarizes our current understanding of the translocation process, starting from the adsorption of the CPP on the membrane to the membrane crossing itself. We describe the different key steps occurring before direct translocation, because each of them can promote and/or hamper translocation of the CPP through the membrane. We then dissect the modification to the membranes induced by the presence of the CPPs. Finally, we focus on the latest studies describing the direct translocation mechanisms. These results provide an important framework within which to design new CPPs and to rationalize an eventual selectivity of CPPs in their penetration ability.

  7. Cell Penetrating Peptide Conjugated Chitosan for Enhanced Delivery of Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Layek, Buddhadev; Lipp, Lindsey; Singh, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is an emerging therapeutic strategy for the cure or treatment of a spectrum of genetic disorders. Nevertheless, advances in gene therapy are immensely reliant upon design of an efficient gene carrier that can deliver genetic cargoes into the desired cell populations. Among various nonviral gene delivery systems, chitosan-based carriers have gained increasing attention because of their high cationic charge density, excellent biocompatibility, nearly nonexistent cytotoxicity, negligible immune response, and ideal ability to undergo chemical conjugation. However, a major shortcoming of chitosan-based carriers is their poor cellular uptake, leading to inadequate transfection efficiency. The intrinsic feature of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) for transporting diverse cargoes into multiple cell and tissue types in a safe manner suggests that they can be conjugated to chitosan for improving its transfection efficiency. In this review, we briefly discuss CPPs and their classification, and also the major mechanisms contributing to the cellular uptake of CPPs and cargo conjugates. We also discuss immense improvements for the delivery of nucleic acids using CPP-conjugated chitosan-based carriers with special emphasis on plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA. PMID:26690119

  8. Cell penetrating peptide-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles with enhanced cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Jill M; Seo, Young-Eun; Saltzman, W Mark

    2016-01-01

    The surface modification of nanoparticles (NPs) can enhance the intracellular delivery of drugs, proteins, and genetic agents. Here we studied the effect of different surface ligands, including cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), on the cell binding and internalization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) NPs. Relative to unmodified NPs, we observed that surface-modified NPs greatly enhanced cell internalization. Using one CPP, MPG (unabbreviated notation), that achieved the highest degree of internalization at both low and high surface modification densities, we evaluated the effect of two different NP surface chemistries on cell internalization. After 2h, avidin-MPG NPs enhanced cellular internalization by 5 to 26-fold relative to DSPE-MPG NP formulations. Yet, despite a 5-fold increase in MPG density on DSPE compared to Avidin NPs, both formulations resulted in similar internalization levels (48 and 64-fold, respectively) after 24h. Regardless of surface modification, all NPs were internalized through an energy-dependent, clathrin-mediated process, and became dispersed throughout the cell. Overall both Avidin- and DSPE-CPP modified NPs significantly increased internalization and offer promising delivery options for applications in which internalization presents challenges to efficacious delivery.

  9. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Therapeutic Molecule Delivery into the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Li; Ma, Jie-Lan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Tang-Bin; Liu, Chang-Bai

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a dynamic and complex barrier formed by endothelial cells, can impede the entry of unwanted substances – pathogens and therapeutic molecules alike – into the central nervous system (CNS) from the blood circulation. Taking into account the fact that CNS-related diseases are the largest and fastest growing unmet medical concern, many potential protein- and nucleic acid-based medicines have been developed for therapeutic purposes. However, due to their poor ability to cross the BBB and the plasma membrane, the above-mentioned bio-macromolecules have limited use in treating neurological diseases. Finding effective, safe, and convenient ways to deliver therapeutic molecules into the CNS is thus urgently required. In recent decades, much effort has been expended in the development of drug delivery technologies, of which cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have the most promising potential. The present review covers the latest advances in CPP delivery technology, and provides an update on their use in CNS-targeted drug delivery. PMID:23997754

  10. The uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides: putting the puzzle together.

    PubMed

    Brock, Roland

    2014-05-21

    Over the past 20 years, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have captured the attention of biomedical researchers, biophysicists, and (bio)organic chemists. These molecules efficiently enter cells and mediate entry of (macro)molecules that by themselves do not cross the plasma membrane. Since their discovery, models on the mechanism by which uptake occurs have seen major revisions. Starting from direct penetration across the plasma membrane, it later became apparent that for large molecular weight cargos in particular, endocytosis plays a role in uptake and furthermore that the route of uptake is a function of CPP, cell-type, cargo, and concentration. For the class of arginine-rich CPPs, this dependence on conditions has been elucidated in particular. As I will discuss here for this class of CPPs, a downside of this multitude of possibilities has been a lack of attention for commonalities in the observation of apparently distinct phenomena. At the same time, differences of apparently similar observations were not appreciated sufficiently. In addition, there has been insufficient acknowledgment of observations that are incompatible with the proposed models. Nevertheless, a considerable amount of data can be assembled into a quite coherent picture and the data that is left creates the basis for concrete future lines of research to resolve the questions that remain. Moreover, any uptake mechanism has its distinct structure-activity relationship for uptake giving room for the molecular design of molecules to preferentially direct uptake to either of them.

  11. Design of aromatic-containing cell-penetrating peptide mimics with structurally modified π electronics.

    PubMed

    deRonde, Brittany M; Birke, Alexander; Tew, Gregory N

    2015-02-09

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their synthetic mimics (CPPMs) represent a class of molecules that facilitate the intracellular delivery of various cargo. Previous studies indicated that the presence of aromatic functionalities improved CPPM activity. Given that aromatic functionalities play prominent roles in membrane biology and participate in various π interactions, we explored whether these interactions could be optimized for improved CPPM activity. CPPMs were synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization by using monomers that contained aromatic rings substituted with electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups and covered an electrostatic potential range from -29.69 to +15.57 kcal mol(-1) . These groups altered the quadrupole moments of the aromatic systems and were used to test if such structural modifications changed CPPM activity. CPPMs were added to dye-loaded vesicles and the release of carboxyfluorescein was monitored as a function of polymer concentration. Changes in the effective polymer concentration to release 50% of the dye (effective concentration, EC50 ) were monitored. Results from this assay showed that the strength of the electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups incorporated in the CPPMs did not alter polymer EC50 values or activity. This suggests that other design parameters may have a stronger impact on CPPM activity. In addition, these results indicate that a wide range of aromatic groups can be incorporated without negatively impacting polymer activity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cell Penetrating Peptide-Modified Poly(Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid) Nanoparticles with Enhanced Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, Jill M.; Seo, Young-Eun; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The surface modification of nanoparticles (NPs) can enhance the intracellular delivery of drugs, proteins, and genetic agents. Here we studied the effect of different surface ligands, including cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), on the cell binding and internalization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) NPs. Relative to unmodified NPs, we observed that surface-modified NPs greatly enhanced cell internalization. Using one CPP, MPG (unabbreviated notation), that achieved the highest degree of internalization at both low and high surface modification densities, we evaluated the effect of two different NP surface chemistries on cell internalization. After 2 hr, avidin-MPG NPs enhanced cellular internalization by 5 to 26-fold relative to DSPE-MPG NP formulations. Yet, despite a 5-fold increase in MPG density on DSPE- relative to Avidin-NPs, after 24 hr., both formulations resulted in similar internalization levels (48 and 64-fold, respectively). Regardless of surface modification, all NPs were internalized through an energy-dependent, clathrin-mediated process, and became dispersed throughout the cell. Overall both Avidin- and DSPE-CPP modified NPs significantly increased internalization and offer promising delivery options for applications in which internalization presents challenges to efficacious delivery. PMID:26602822

  13. Cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-conjugated desferrioxamine for enhanced neuroprotection: synthesis and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dibakar; Machini, M Teresa; Silvestre, Daniel M; Nomura, Cassiana S; Esposito, Breno Pannia

    2014-11-19

    Iron overload causes progressive and sometimes irreversible damage due to accelerated production of reactive oxygen species. Desferrioxamine (DFO), a siderophore, has been used clinically to remove excess iron. However, the applications of DFO are limited because of its inability to access intracellular labile iron. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have become an efficient delivery vector for the enhanced internalization of drugs into the cytosol. We describe, herein, an efficient method for covalently conjugating DFO to the CPPs TAT(47-57) and Penetratin. Both conjugates suppressed the redox activity of labile plasma iron in buffered solutions and in iron-overloaded sera. Enhanced access to intracellular labile iron compared to the parent siderophore was achieved in HeLa and RBE4 (a model of blood-brain-barrier) cell lines. Iron complexes of both conjugates also had better permeability in both cell models. DFO antioxidant and iron binding properties were preserved and its bioavailability was increased upon CPP conjugation, which opens new therapeutic possibilities for neurodegenerative processes associated with brain iron overload.

  14. Bacterium-Derived Cell-Penetrating Peptides Deliver Gentamicin To Kill Intracellular Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gomarasca, Marta; F C Martins, Thaynan; Greune, Lilo; Hardwidge, Philip R; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Commonly used antimicrobials show poor cellular uptake and often have limited access to intracellular targets, resulting in low antimicrobial activity against intracellular pathogens. An efficient delivery system to transport these drugs to the intracellular site of action is needed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) mediate the internalization of biologically active molecules into the cytoplasm. Here, we characterized two CPPs, α1H and α2H, derived from the Yersinia enterocolitica YopM effector protein. These CPPs, as well as Tat (trans-activator of transcription) from HIV-1, were used to deliver the antibiotic gentamicin to target intracellular bacteria. The YopM-derived CPPs penetrated different endothelial and epithelial cells to the same extent as Tat. CPPs were covalently conjugated to gentamicin, and CPP-gentamicin conjugates were used to target infected cells to kill multiple intracellular Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, including Escherichia coli K1, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Shigella flexneri Taken together, CPPs show great potential as delivery vehicles for antimicrobial agents and may contribute to the generation of new therapeutic tools to treat infectious diseases caused by intracellular pathogens.

  15. Sodium diclofenac and cell-penetrating peptides embedded in H(II) mesophases: physical characterization and delivery.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2011-09-01

    Glycerol monooleate (GMO)-based mesophases offer extensive prospects for incorporation of various bioactive molecules. This work deals with the solubilization of selected cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) together with sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC) within the H(II) mesophase for transdermal applications. The effect of CPPs such as RALA (an amphipatic CPP), penetratin (PEN), and oligoarginine (NONA) on Na-DFC skin permeation kinetics to provide controlled release and tune the drug transdermal diffusion was studied. The location of the drug and the CPPs within the mesophase was probed by DSC and FTIR. Na-DFC was found to be located at the interfacial region between the surfactant chains, leading to denser H(II) mesophase. The hydrophilic NONA was intercalated into the aqueous cylinders and caused their swelling. It induced a significant decrease in the hydrogen binding between the GMO carbonyls and their surrounding. The amphiphilic PEN was entrapped within two different regions, depending on its concentration. PEN and NONA improved Na-DFC permeation by 100%, whereas RALA enhanced permeation by 50%. When estimating Na-DFC migration rate out of the mesophase toward surrounding aqueous media, it appeared to be slower with the CPPs. The peptides were not involved at this diffusion-controlled step. It seems that their effect on skin permeation is based on their specific interaction with the skin.

  16. The effect of dexamethasone/cell-penetrating peptide nanoparticles on gene delivery for inner ear therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yang, Keum-Jin; Park, Shi-Nae; Kim, Dong-Kee; Kim, Jong-Duk

    Dexamethasone (Dex)-loaded PHEA-g-C18-Arg8 (PCA) nanoparticles (PCA/Dex) were developed for the delivery of genes to determine the synergistic effect of Dex on gene expression. The cationic PCA nanoparticles were self-assembled to create cationic micelles containing an octadecylamine (C18) core with Dex and an arginine 8 (Arg8) peptide shell for electrostatic complexation with nucleic acids (connexin 26 [Cx26] siRNA, green fluorescent protein [GFP] DNA or brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] pDNA). The PCA/Dex nanoparticles conjugated with Arg8, a cell-penetrating peptide that enhances permeability through a round window membrane in the inner ear for gene delivery, exhibited high uptake efficiency in HEI-OC1 cells. This potential carrier co-delivering Dex and the gene into inner ear cells has a diameter of 120-140 nm and a zeta potential of 20-25 mV. Different types of genes were complexed with the Dex-loaded PCA nanoparticle (PCA/Dex/gene) for gene expression to induce additional anti-inflammatory effects. PCA/Dex showed mildly increased expression of GFP and lower mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL1b, IL12, and INFr) than did Dex-free PCA nanoparticles and Lipofectamine(®) reagent in HEI-OC1 cells. In addition, after loading Cx26 siRNA onto the surface of PCA/Dex, Cx26 gene expression was downregulated according to real-time polymerase chain reaction for 24 h, compared with that using Lipofectamine reagent. After loading BDNF DNA into PCA/Dex, increased expression of BDNF was observed for 30 h, and its signaling pathway resulted in an increase in phosphorylation of Akt, observed by Western blotting. Thus, Dex within PCA/Dex/gene nanoparticles created an anti-inflammatory effect and enhanced gene expression.

  17. Visualizing Actin Architectures in Cells Incubated with Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    He, Lin; Watson, Peter D; Jones, Arwyn T

    2015-01-01

    Defining the exact role of the actin cytoskeleton in mediating endocytosis through different pathways is a significant challenge. The general consensus is that actin has an important role in organizing the early stages of endocytosis but there is still much to learn. Actin has also been implicated in cell internalization of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). It is suggested that CPP variants such as octaarginine (R8) and the HIV Tat peptide induce actin-dependent plasma membrane perturbation and enter via macropinocytosis. Here, we describe confocal microscopy techniques that allow for high-resolution spatial characterization of the actin cytoskeleton in untreated mammalian cells and those incubated with actin-disrupting agents and CPPs. By performing X-Y-Z projection images through different regions of cells to show basal and apical profiles, we initially highlight how these techniques can be used to reveal major differences in cortical and filamentous actin organization between different cell lines. Using these techniques, we demonstrate that the actin-disrupting agent cytochalasin D rapidly changes this framework at concentrations significantly lower than is normally used. Experiments are also performed to highlight that serum starvation significantly sensitizes cells to the effects of R8 on actin-induced ruffling and lamellapodia formation. The techniques described here can be used to gain a higher level of knowledge of the organization of the actin network in individual model cell systems, how this is perturbed using commonly used actin inhibitors, and how plasma membrane reorganization can be induced by the addition of drug delivery vectors such as CPPs.

  18. The effect of dexamethasone/cell-penetrating peptide nanoparticles on gene delivery for inner ear therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yang, Keum-Jin; Park, Shi-Nae; Kim, Dong-Kee; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2016-01-01

    Dexamethasone (Dex)-loaded PHEA-g-C18-Arg8 (PCA) nanoparticles (PCA/Dex) were developed for the delivery of genes to determine the synergistic effect of Dex on gene expression. The cationic PCA nanoparticles were self-assembled to create cationic micelles containing an octadecylamine (C18) core with Dex and an arginine 8 (Arg8) peptide shell for electrostatic complexation with nucleic acids (connexin 26 [Cx26] siRNA, green fluorescent protein [GFP] DNA or brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] pDNA). The PCA/Dex nanoparticles conjugated with Arg8, a cell-penetrating peptide that enhances permeability through a round window membrane in the inner ear for gene delivery, exhibited high uptake efficiency in HEI-OC1 cells. This potential carrier co-delivering Dex and the gene into inner ear cells has a diameter of 120–140 nm and a zeta potential of 20–25 mV. Different types of genes were complexed with the Dex-loaded PCA nanoparticle (PCA/Dex/gene) for gene expression to induce additional anti-inflammatory effects. PCA/Dex showed mildly increased expression of GFP and lower mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL1b, IL12, and INFr) than did Dex-free PCA nanoparticles and Lipofectamine® reagent in HEI-OC1 cells. In addition, after loading Cx26 siRNA onto the surface of PCA/Dex, Cx26 gene expression was downregulated according to real-time polymerase chain reaction for 24 h, compared with that using Lipofectamine reagent. After loading BDNF DNA into PCA/Dex, increased expression of BDNF was observed for 30 h, and its signaling pathway resulted in an increase in phosphorylation of Akt, observed by Western blotting. Thus, Dex within PCA/Dex/gene nanoparticles created an anti-inflammatory effect and enhanced gene expression. PMID:27895484

  19. S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide forms nanoparticle-like structures to gain entry into cells.

    PubMed

    Padari, Kärt; Koppel, Kaida; Lorents, Annely; Hällbrink, Mattias; Mano, Miguel; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Pooga, Margus

    2010-04-21

    Despite increasing interest in cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as carriers for drugs and in gene therapy, the current understanding of their exact internalization mechanism is still far from complete. The cellular translocation of CPPs and their payloads has been mostly described by fluorescence- and activity-based methods, leaving the more detailed characterization at the ultrastructural level almost out of attention. Herein, we used transmission electron microscopy to characterize the membrane interaction and internalization of a cell-penetrating peptide S4(13)-PV. We demonstrate that S4(13)-PV peptide forms spherical nanoparticle-like regular structures upon association with cell surface glycosaminoglycans on the plasma membrane. Insertion of S4(13)-PV particles into plasma membrane induces disturbances and leads to the vesicular uptake of peptides by cells. We propose that for efficient cellular translocation S4(13)-PV peptides have to assemble into particles of specific size and shape. The spherical peptide particles are not dissociated in intracellular vesicles but often retain their organization and remain associated with the membrane of vesicles, destabilizing them and promoting the escape of peptides into cytosol. Lowering the temperature and inhibition of dynamins' activity reduce the internalization of S4(13)-PV peptides, but do not block it completely. Our results provide an ultrastructural insight into the interaction mode of CPPs with the plasma membrane and the distribution in cells, which might help to better understand how CPPs cross the biological membranes and gain access into cells.

  20. Comparison of cationic and amphipathic cell penetrating peptides for siRNA delivery and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mo, Robert H; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2012-02-06

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short strands of arginine- and/or lysine-rich peptides (<30 amino acids) that use their cationic nature for efficient intracellular accumulation. CPPs have been used for small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery by direct complexation with the siRNA anionic phosphate backbone. During this process, however, part of the CPP cationic charges are neutralized, and the resultant loss of free positive charges may substantially compromise CPP's internalization capabilities and eventually reduce siRNA delivery efficiency. The purpose of this study was to design a novel type of polyplex for siRNA delivery to overcome the CPP neutralization issue. This novel polyplex consists of three components: siRNA, 21mer oligolysine (K21) chemically modified to incorporate CPP conjugation sites (K21-PDP), and CPP delivery moiety. The siRNA was first neutralized by cationic charges of K21-PDP to form a polyplex. Then a cationic (hexaarginine, R6) or an amphipathic (model amphipathic peptide, MAP) CPP was conjugated to the polyplex. Agarose gel shift assays indicated that the siRNA could be released from the polyplex after K21-PDP degradation or polyplex dilution. Furthermore, the total intracellular internalization of these two CPP-polyplexes was studied. Compared with R6-polyplex, MAP-polyplex exhibited 170- and 600-fold greater uptake of fluorescently labeled siRNA at 1 and 6 h post-transfection, respectively. MAP-polyplex also exhibited comparable GFP silencing effects as Lipofectamine 2000 complex in Huh7.5 cells stably transfected to express GFP-light chain 3 protein, whereas R6-polyplex did not demonstrate significant silencing activity. Further studies indicated that the K21-PDP-siRNA polyplex formation and conjugation of MAP to the polyplex were essential for siRNA polyplex uptake and gene silencing. MAP-polyplex was also shown to be unaffected by the presence of 10% FBS during transfection. In addition, MAP-polyplex uptake was dependent on

  1. Comparison of Cationic and Amphipathic Cell Penetrating Peptides for siRNA Delivery and Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Robert H.; Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen, Wei-Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short strands of arginine and/or lysine-rich peptides (<30 amino acids) that use their cationic nature for efficient intracellular accumulation. CPPs have been used for small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery by direct complexation with the siRNA anionic phosphate backbone. During this process, however, part of the CPP cationic charges are neutralized, and the resultant loss of free positive charges may substantially compromise CPP’s internalization capabilities and eventually reduce siRNA delivery efficiency. The purpose of this study was to design a novel type of polyplex for siRNA delivery to overcome the CPP neutralization issue. This novel polyplex consists of three components: siRNA, 21mer oligolysine (K21) chemically modified to incorporate CPP conjugation sites (K21-PDP), and CPP delivery moiety. The siRNA was first neutralized by cationic charges of K21-PDP to form a polyplex. Then a cationic (hexa-arginine – R6) or an amphipathic (model amphipathic peptide – MAP) CPP was conjugated to the polyplex. Agarose gel shift assays indicated that the siRNA could be released from the polyplex after K21-PDP degradation or polyplex dilution. Furthermore, the total intracellular internalization of these two CPP-polyplexes was studied. Compared with R6-polyplex, MAP-polyplex exhibited 170 and 600-fold greater uptake of fluorescently-labeled siRNA at 1 and 6 h post-transfection, respectively. MAP-polyplex also exhibited comparable GFP silencing effects as Lipofectamine 2000 complex in Huh7.5 cells stably transfected to express GFP-LC3, whereas R6-polyplex did not demonstrate significant silencing activity. Further studies indicated that the K21-PDP/siRNA polyplex formation and conjugation of MAP to the polyplex were essential for siRNA polyplex uptake and gene silencing. MAP-polyplex was also shown to be unaffected by the presence of 10% FBS during transfection. In addition, MAP-polyplex uptake was dependent on vesicle formation

  2. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides using a transmembrane pH gradient.

    PubMed

    Madani, Fatemeh; Abdo, Rania; Lindberg, Staffan; Hirose, Hisaaki; Futaki, Shiroh; Langel, Ulo; Gräslund, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can internalize into cells with covalently or non-covalently bound biologically active cargo molecules, which by themselves are not able to pass the cell membrane. Direct penetration and endocytosis are two main pathways suggested for the cellular uptake of CPPs. Cargo molecules which have entered the cell via an endocytotic pathway must be released from the endosome before degradation by enzymatic processes and endosomal acidification. Endosomal entrapment seems to be a major limitation in delivery of these molecules into the cytoplasm. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) asymmetrically introduced into large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) was used to induce a pH gradient across the lipid bilayer. By measuring pH outside the LUVs, we observed light-induced proton pumping mediated by BR from the outside to the inside of the LUVs, creating an acidic pH inside the LUVs, similar to the late endosomes in vivo. Here we studied the background mechanism(s) of endosomal escape. 20% negatively charged LUVs were used as model endosomes with incorporated BR into the membrane and fluorescein-labeled CPPs entrapped inside the LUVs, together with a fluorescence quencher. The translocation of different CPPs in the presence of a pH gradient across the membrane was studied. The results show that the light-induced pH gradient induced by BR facilitates vesicle membrane translocation, particularly for the intermediately hydrophobic CPPs, and much less for hydrophilic CPPs. The presence of chloroquine inside the LUVs or addition of pyrenebutyrate outside the LUVs destabilizes the vesicle membrane, resulting in significant changes of the pH gradient across the membrane. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The tetrapeptide core of the carrier peptide Xentry is cell-penetrating: novel activatable forms of Xentry.

    PubMed

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Krissansen, Geoffrey W

    2014-05-09

    Here we describe a structure-function analysis of the cell-penetrating peptide Xentry derived from the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. Remarkably, the tetrapeptide core LCLR retains the cell-penetrating ability of the parental peptide LCLRPVG, as either an L- or D-enantiomer. Substitution of the cysteine with leucine revealed that the cysteine is essential for activity. In contrast, the C-terminal arginine could be substituted in the L-isomer with lysine, histidine, glutamic acid, glutamine, and asparagine, though the resulting peptides displayed distinct cell-type-specific uptake. Substitution of the leucines in the D-isomer with other hydrophobic residues revealed that leucines are optimal for activity. Surprisingly, linear di- and tetra-peptide forms of Xentry are not cell-permeable. Protease-activatable forms of Xentry were created by fusing Xentry to itself via a protease-cleavable peptide, or by attaching a heparin mimic peptide to the N-terminus. These novel activatable forms of Xentry were only taken up by MCF-7 cells after cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase 9, and could be used to deliver drugs specifically to tumours.

  4. The tetrapeptide core of the carrier peptide Xentry is cell-penetrating: novel activatable forms of Xentry

    PubMed Central

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a structure-function analysis of the cell-penetrating peptide Xentry derived from the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. Remarkably, the tetrapeptide core LCLR retains the cell-penetrating ability of the parental peptide LCLRPVG, as either an L- or D-enantiomer. Substitution of the cysteine with leucine revealed that the cysteine is essential for activity. In contrast, the C-terminal arginine could be substituted in the L-isomer with lysine, histidine, glutamic acid, glutamine, and asparagine, though the resulting peptides displayed distinct cell-type-specific uptake. Substitution of the leucines in the D-isomer with other hydrophobic residues revealed that leucines are optimal for activity. Surprisingly, linear di- and tetra-peptide forms of Xentry are not cell-permeable. Protease-activatable forms of Xentry were created by fusing Xentry to itself via a protease-cleavable peptide, or by attaching a heparin mimic peptide to the N-terminus. These novel activatable forms of Xentry were only taken up by MCF-7 cells after cleavage by matrix metalloproteinase 9, and could be used to deliver drugs specifically to tumours. PMID:24811205

  5. Molecular Targeting of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma With Fluorescently Labeled Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptides in a Transgenic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    OROSCO, RYAN K.; SAVARIAR, ELAMPRAKASH N.; WEISSBROD, PHILIP A.; DIAZ-PEREZ, JULIO A.; BOUVET, MICHAEL; TSIEN, ROGER Y.; NGUYEN, QUYEN T.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Molecularly targeted fluorescent molecules may help detect tumors that are unseen by traditional white-light surgical techniques. We sought to evaluate a fluorescent ratiometric activatable cell penetrating peptide (RACPP) for tumor detection in a transgenic model of PTC. Methods Thirteen BRAFV600E mice with PTC were studied—seven injected intravenously with RACPP, four controls with saline. Total thyroidectomy was performed with microscopic white-light visualization. Fluorescent imaging of post-thyroidectomy fields was performed, and tissue with increased signal was removed and evaluated for PTC. Final samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to conditions. Vocal cord function was evaluated postoperatively with video laryngoscopy. Results The average in situ ratiometric (Cy5/Cy7) thyroid tumor-to-background contrast ratio was 2.27 +/−0.91. Fluorescence-guided clean-up following thyroidectomy identified additional tumor in 2 of 7 RACPP animals (smallest dimension 1.2 mm), and decreased the number of animals with residual tumor from 4 to 3. All retained tumor foci on final pathology were smaller than 0.76 mm. Intact vocal abduction was present in all of the RACPP animals. Conclusions RACPPs successfully targeted PTC in a transgenic thyroidectomy model, and allowed for residual tumor detection that reduced positive margins beyond what was possible with white-light surgery alone. PMID:26799257

  6. Free Energy of Translocating an Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide across a Lipid Bilayer Suggests Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism and energetics of the translocation of arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptides through membranes are still under debate. One possible mechanism involves the formation of a water pore in the membrane such that the hydrophilic residues of the peptide are solvated throughout the translocating process. In this work, employing two different order parameters, we calculate the free energies of translocating a cyclic Arg9 peptide into a lipid bilayer along one path that involves a water-pore formation and another path that does not form a separate pore. The free-energy barrier of translocating the peptide along a pore path is 80 kJ/mol lower than along a pore-free path. This suggests that the peptide translocation is more likely associated with a water-pore formation. PMID:23442863

  7. Heparin-Promoted Cellular Uptake of the Cell-Penetrating Glycosaminoglycan Binding Peptide, GBPECP, Depends on a Single Tryptophan.

    PubMed

    Hung, Li-Chun; Jiang, Ingjye; Chen, Chien-Jung; Lu, Jia-Yin; Hsieh, Yi-Fen; Kuo, Ping-Hsieh; Hung, Yi-Lin; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Sue, Shih-Che

    2017-02-17

    A 10-residue, glycosaminoglycan-binding peptide, GBPECP, derived from human eosinophil cationic protein has been recently designated as a potent cell-penetrating peptide. A model system containing peptide, glycan, and lipid was monitored by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the cell-penetrating mechanism. Heparin octasaccharide with dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) lipid micelle was titrated into the GBPECP solution. Our data revealed substantial roles for the charged residues Arg5 and Lys7 in recognizing heparin, whereas Arg3 had less effect. The aromatic residue Trp4 acted as an irreplaceable moiety for membrane insertion, as the replacement of Trp4 with Arg4 abolished cell penetration, although it significantly improved the heparin-binding ability. GBPECP bound either heparin or lipid in the presence or absence of the other ligand indicating that the peptide has two alternative binding sites: Trp4 is responsible for lipid insertion, and Arg5 and Lys7 are for GAG binding. We developed a molecular model showing that the two effects synergistically promote the penetration. The loss of either effect would abolish the penetration. GBPECP has been proven to enter cells through macropinocytosis. The GBPECP treatment inhibited A549 lung cancer cell migration and invasion, implying that the cellular microenvironment would be modulated by GBPECP internalization. The intracellular penetration of GBPECP leading to inhibition of epithelial cell migration and invasion depends on the presence of the tryptophan residue in its sequence compared with similar derivative peptides. Therefore, GBPECP shows substantial potential as a novel delivery therapeutic through rapid and effective internalization and interference with cell mobility.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, stability and toxicity of a cell-penetrating peptide-morpholino oligomer conjugate.

    PubMed

    Amantana, Adams; Moulton, Hong M; Cate, Melissa L; Reddy, Muralimohan T; Whitehead, Tom; Hassinger, Jed N; Youngblood, Derek S; Iversen, Patrick L

    2007-01-01

    Conjugation of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) to phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) has been shown to enhance cytosolic and nuclear delivery of PMO. However, the in vivo disposition of CPP-PMO is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, stability, and safety profile of an anti-c-myc PMO conjugated to the CPP, (RXR)4 (X = 6-aminohexanoic acid) in rats. The PMO and CPP-PMO were administrated intravenously into rats. The concentrations of the PMO and the CPP-PMO in plasma and tissues were monitored by HPLC. The stability of the CPP portion of the CPP-PMO conjugate in rat plasma and tissue lysates was determined by mass spectrometry. The safety profile of the CPP-PMO was assessed by body weight changes, serum chemistry, and animal behavior. CPP conjugation improved the kinetic behavior of PMO with a 2-fold increase in the estimated elimination half-life, a 4-fold increase in volume of distribution, and increased area under the plasma concentration vs time curve. Consistent with the improved pharmacokinetic profile, conjugation to CPP increased the uptake of PMO in all tissues except brain, varied between organ type with greater uptake enhancement occurring in liver, spleen, and lungs. The CPP-PMO conjugate had greater tissue retention than the corresponding PMO. Mass spectrometry data indicated no observable degradation of the PMO portion, while there was identifiable degradation of the CPP portion. Time-dependent CPP degradation was observed in plasma and tissue lysates, with the degradation in plasma being more rapid. The pattern of degraded products differed between the plasma and lysates. Safety evaluation data showed that the CPP-PMO was well-tolerated at the dose of 15 mg/kg with no apparent signs of toxicity. In contrast, at the dose of 150 mg/kg, adverse events such as lethargy, weight loss, and elevated BUN (p < 0.01) and serum creatinine (p < 0.001) levels were recorded

  9. Cyclization of a cell-penetrating peptide via click-chemistry increases proteolytic resistance and improves drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Reichart, Florian; Horn, Mareike; Neundorf, Ines

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report synthesis and biological evaluation of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), that is partly cyclized via a triazole bridge. Recently, beneficious properties have been reported for cyclized peptides concerning their metabolic stability and intracellular uptake. A CPP based on human calcitonin was used in this study, and side chain cyclization was achieved via copper catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction. Cell viability studies in several cell-lines revealed no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, efficient uptake in breast cancer MCF-7 cells could be determined. Moreover, preliminary studies using this novel peptide as drug transporter for daunorubicin were performed. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Delivery of Antisense Peptide Nucleic Acids to Cells by Conjugation with Small Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide (R/W)9

    PubMed Central

    Cordier, Céline; Boutimah, Fatima; Bourdeloux, Mathilde; Dupuy, Florian; Met, Elisabeth; Alberti, Patrizia; Loll, François; Chassaing, Gérard; Burlina, Fabienne; Saison-Behmoaras, Tula Ester

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are very attractive antisense and antigene agents, but these molecules are not passively taken into cells. Here, using a functional cell assay and fluorescent-based methods, we investigated cell uptake and antisense activity of a tridecamer PNA that targets the HIV-1 polypurine tract sequence delivered using the arginine-rich (R/W)9 peptide (RRWWRRWRR). At micromolar concentrations, without use of any transfection agents, almost 80% inhibition of the target gene expression was obtained with the conjugate in the presence of the endosomolytic agent chloroquine. We show that chloroquine not only induced escape from endosomes but also enhanced the cellular uptake of the conjugate. Mechanistic studies revealed that (R/W)9-PNA conjugates were internalized via pinocytosis. Replacement of arginines with lysines reduced the uptake of the conjugate by six-fold, resulting in the abolition of intracellular target inhibition. Our results show that the arginines play a crucial role in the conjugate uptake and antisense activity. To determine whether specificity of the interactions of arginines with cell surface proteoglycans result in the internalization, we used flow cytometry to examine uptake of arginine- and lysine-rich conjugates in wild-type CHO-K1 and proteoglycan-deficient A745 cells. The uptake of both conjugates was decreased by four fold in CHO-745 cells; therefore proteoglycans promote internalization of cationic peptides, irrespective of the chemical nature of their positive charges. Our results show that arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, especially (R/W)9, are a promising tool for PNA internalization. PMID:25127364

  11. An unexpected cell-penetrating peptide from Bothrops jararaca venom identified through a novel size exclusion chromatography screening.

    PubMed

    Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Vigerelli, Hugo; Costa, André Santos; Câmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Junior, Paulo Luiz-de-Sá; Pimenta, Daniel Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Efficient drug delivery systems are currently one of the greatest challenges in pharmacokinetics, and the transposition of the gap between in vitro candidate molecule and in vivo test drug is, sometimes, poles apart. In this sense, the cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) may be the bridge uniting these worlds. Here, we describe a technique to rapidly identify unlabeled CPPs after incubation with liposomes, based on commercial desalting (size exclusion) columns and liquid chromatography-MS/MS, for peptide de novo sequencing. Using this approach, we found it possible to identify one new CPP - interestingly, a classical bradykinin-potentiating peptide - in the peptide-rich low molecular mass fraction of the Bothrops jararaca venom, which was also able to penetrate live cell membranes, as confirmed by classical approaches employing fluorescence-labeled analogues of this CPP. Moreover, both the labeled and unlabeled CPPs caused no metabolic, cell-cycle or morphologic alterations, proving to be unmistakably cargo deliverers and not drugs themselves. In sum, we have developed and validated a method for screening label-free peptides for CPP activity, regardless of their biological origin, which could lead to the identification of new and more efficient drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Intracellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-transcriptional factor fusion protein and its role in selective osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jin Sook; Lee, Jue Yeon; Choi, Yoon Jung; You, Hyung Keun; Hong, Seong-Doo; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Protein-transduction technology has been attempted to deliver macromolecular materials, including protein, nucleic acids, and polymeric drugs, for either diagnosis or therapeutic purposes. Herein, fusion protein composed of an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide, termed low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP), and a transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) protein was prepared and applied in combination with biomaterials to increase bone-forming capacity. TAZ has been recently identified as a specific osteogenic stimulating transcriptional coactivator in human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation, while simultaneously blocking adipogenic differentiation. However, TAZ by itself cannot penetrate the cells, and thus needs a transfection tool for translocalization. The LMWP-TAZ fusion proteins were efficiently translocalized into the cytosol of hMSCs. The hMSCs treated with cell-penetrating LMWP-TAZ exhibited increased expression of osteoblastic genes and protein, producing significantly higher quantities of mineralized matrix compared to free TAZ. In contrast, adipogenic differentiation of the hMSCs was blocked by treatment of LMWP-TAZ fusion protein, as reflected by reduced marker-protein expression, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ messenger ribonucleic acid levels. LMWP-TAZ was applied in alginate gel for the purpose of localization and controlled release. The LMWP-TAZ fusion protein-loaded alginate gel matrix significantly increased bone formation in rabbit calvarial defects compared with alginate gel matrix mixed with free TAZ protein. The protein transduction of TAZ fused with cell-penetrating LMWP peptide was able selectively to stimulate osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, this fusion protein-transduction technology for osteogenic protein can thus be applied in combination with biomaterials for tissue regeneration and controlled release for tissue

  13. Delivery of nucleic acids, proteins, and nanoparticles by arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides in rotifers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Liou, Ji-Sing; Chen, Yung-Jen; Huang, Yue-Wern; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of short, membrane-permeable cationic peptides that represent a nonviral technology for delivering nanomaterials and macromolecules into live cells. In this study, two arginine-rich CPPs, HR9 and IR9, were found to be capable of entering rotifers. CPPs were able to efficiently deliver noncovalently associated with cargoes, including plasmid DNAs, red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), and semiconductor quantum dots, into rotifers. The functional reporter gene assay demonstrated that HR9-delivered plasmid DNAs containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein and RFP coding sequences could be actively expressed in rotifers. The 1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan assay further confirmed that CPP-mediated cargo delivery was not toxic to rotifers. Thus, these two CPPs hold a great potential for the delivery of exogenous genes, proteins, and nanoparticles in rotifers.

  14. Full membrane spanning self-assembled monolayers as model systems for UHV-based studies of cell-penetrating peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Johannes; Graham, Daniel J.; Baio, Joe E.; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Müllen, Klaus; Castner, David G.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Biophysical studies of the interaction of peptides with model membranes provide a simple yet effective approach to understand the transport of peptides and peptide based drug carriers across the cell membrane. Therein, the authors discuss the use of self-assembled monolayers fabricated from the full membrane-spanning thiol (FMST) 3-((14-((4'-((5-methyl-1-phenyl-35-(phytanyl)oxy-6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30,33,37-undecaoxa-2,3-dithiahenpentacontan-51-yl)oxy)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)oxy)tetradecyl)oxy)-2-(phytanyl)oxy glycerol for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) based experiments. UHV-based methods such as electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide important information about how peptides bind and interact with membranes, especially with the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer. Moreover, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data showed that FMST forms UHV-stable and ordered films on gold. XPS and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles indicated that a proline-rich amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, known as sweet arrow peptide is located at the outer perimeter of the model membrane.

  15. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-11-01

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of

  16. Modeling the endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides: transmembrane pH gradient driven translocation across phospholipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Magzoub, Mazin; Pramanik, Aladdin; Gräslund, Astrid

    2005-11-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are able to mediate the efficient cellular uptake of a wide range of cargoes. Internalization of a number of CPPs requires uptake by endocytosis, initiated by binding to anionic cell surface heparan sulfate (HS), followed by escape from endosomes. To elucidate the endosomal escape mechanism, we have modeled the process for two CPPs: penetratin (pAntp) and the N-terminal signal peptide of the unprocessed bovine prion protein (bPrPp). Large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) were produced encapsulating either peptide, and an ionophore, nigericin, was used to create a transmembrane pH gradient (DeltapH(mem), inside acidic) similar to the one arising in endosomes in vivo. In the absence of DeltapH(mem), no pAntp escape from the LUVs is observed, while a fraction of bPrPp escapes. In the presence of DeltapH(mem), a significant amount of pAntp escapes and an even higher degree of bPrPp escape takes place. These results, together with the differences in kinetics of escape, indicate different escape mechanisms for the two peptides. A minimum threshold peptide concentration exists for the escape of both peptides. Coupling of the peptides to a cargo reduces the fraction escaping, while complexation with HS significantly hinders the escape. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy results show that during the escape process the LUVs are intact. Taken together, these results suggest a model for endosomal escape of CPPs: DeltapH(mem)-mediated mechanism, following dissociation from HS of the peptides, above a minimum threshold peptide concentration, in a process that does not involve lysis of the vesicles.

  17. Accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in large unilamellar vesicles: A straightforward screening assay for investigating the internalization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Di Pisa, Margherita; Burlina, Fabienne; Lécorché, Pascaline; Mansuy, Christelle; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2015-09-01

    The internalization of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) into liposomes (large unilamellar vesicles, LUVs) was studied with a rapid and robust procedure based on the quenching of a small fluorescent probe, 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD). Quenching can be achieved by reduction with dithionite or by pH jump. LUVs with different compositions of phospholipids (PLs) were used to screen the efficacy of different CPPs. In order to "validate" the composition of the membrane models, a control cationic peptide, which does not enter eukaryotic cells, was included in the study. It was found that pure DOPG or DOPG within ternary mixtures with cholesterol are the most appropriate models for studying CPP translocation. An anionic lipid, such as DOPG, is required for the adsorption of the basic peptides on the surface of LUVs. In addition, it acts as transfer agent through the lipid bilayer. A fluid phase and/or the presence of phase defects also appear mandatory for the internalization to occur. The neutralization of charges within an inverted micelle demonstrated in the case of DOPG and also proposed for a ternary mixture of PLs might not be the only mechanism for the CPP translocation. Finally, it is shown that oleic acid facilitates the entry inside LUVs in gel phase of a series of cationic peptides including CPPs and also the negative control peptide PKCi.

  18. The thin line between cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides: the case of Pep-1 and Pep-1-K.

    PubMed

    Bobone, Sara; Piazzon, Alessandro; Orioni, Barbara; Pedersen, Jens Z; Nan, Yong Hai; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, Song Yub; Stella, Lorenzo

    2011-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are cationic oligopeptides able to translocate across biological membranes without perturbing them, while antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) kill bacteria mainly by disrupting their membranes. The two peptide classes share several characteristics (charge, amphipathicity, helicity, and length), and therefore the molecular properties discriminating between the two different bioactivities are not clear. Pep-1-K (KKTWWKTWWTKWSQPKKKRKV) is a new AMP derived from the widely studied CPP Pep-1 (KETWWETWWTEWSQPKKKRKV), or 'Chariot', known for its ability to carry large cargoes across biological membranes. Pep-1-K was obtained from Pep-1 by substituting the three Glu residues with Lys, to increase its cationic character. Previous studies showed that these modifications endow Pep-1-K with a potent antimicrobial activity, with MICs in the low micromolar range. Here, we characterized the interaction of Pep-1 and Pep-1-K with model membranes to understand the reason for the antimicrobial activity of Pep-1-K. The data show that this peptide causes vesicle aggregation, perturbs membrane order, and induces the leakage of ions, but not of larger solutes, while these effects were not observed for Pep-1. These differences are likely due, at least in part, to the higher affinity of Pep-1-K toward anionic bilayers, which mimick the composition of bacterial membranes. Copyright © 2011 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  20. Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans cooperate in cellular uptake of nanoparticles functionalized by cationic cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hong-Bo; Braun, Gary B.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been widely used to deliver nanomaterials and other types of macromolecules into mammalian cells for therapeutic and diagnostic use. Cationic CPPs that bind to heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on the cell surface induce potent endocytosis; however, the role of other surface receptors in this process is unclear. We describe the convergence of an HS-dependent pathway with the C-end rule (CendR) mechanism that enables peptide ligation with neuropilin-1 (NRP1), a cell surface receptor known to be involved in angiogenesis and vascular permeability. NRP1 binds peptides carrying a positive residue at the carboxyl terminus, a feature that is compatible with cationic CPPs, either intact or after proteolytic processing. We used CPP and CendR peptides, as well as HS- and NRP1-binding motifs from semaphorins, to explore the commonalities and differences of the HS and NRP1 pathways. We show that the CendR-NRP1 interaction determines the ability of CPPs to induce vascular permeability. We also show at the ultrastructural level, using a novel cell entry synchronization method, that both the HS and NRP1 pathways can initiate a macropinocytosis-like process and visualize these CPP-cargo complexes going through various endosomal compartments. Our results provide new insights into how CPPs exploit multiple surface receptor pathways for intracellular delivery. PMID:26601141

  1. Massive glycosaminoglycan-dependent entry of Trp-containing cell-penetrating peptides induced by exogenous sphingomyelinase or cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Pallerla, Manjula; Burlina, Fabienne; Illien, Françoise; Cribier, Sophie; Sagan, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Among non-invasive cell delivery strategies, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) vectors represent interesting new tools. To get fundamental knowledge about the still debated internalisation mechanisms of these peptides, we modified the membrane content of cells, typically by hydrolysis of sphingomyelin or depletion of cholesterol from the membrane outer leaflet. We quantified and visualised the effect of these viable cell surface treatments on the internalisation efficiency of different CPPs, among which the most studied Tat, R9, penetratin and analogues, that all carry the N-terminal biotin-Gly4 tag cargo. Under these cell membrane treatments, only penetratin and R6W3 underwent a massive glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent entry in cells. Internalisation of the other peptides was only slightly increased, similarly in the absence or the presence of GAGs for R9, and only in the presence of GAGs for Tat and R6L3. Ceramide formation (or cholesterol depletion) is known to lead to the reorganisation of membrane lipid domains into larger platforms, which can serve as a trap and cluster receptors. These results show that GAG clustering, enhanced by formation of ceramide, is efficiently exploited by penetratin and R6W3, which contains Trp residues in their sequence but not Tat, R9 and R6L3. Hence, these data shed new lights on the differences in the internalisation mechanism and pathway of these peptides that are widely used in delivery of cargo molecules.

  2. Development of helix-stabilized cell-penetrating peptides containing cationic α,α-disubstituted amino acids as helical promoters.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Misawa, Takashi; Oba, Makoto; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2017-03-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have attracted many scientists' attention as intracellular delivery tools due to their high cargo molecule transportation efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Therefore, in many research fields CPP, such as HIV-Tat and oligoarginine (Rn), are used to deliver hydrophilic drugs and biomolecules, including proteins, DNA, and RNA. We designed four types of CPP that contained cationic α,α-disubstituted amino acids (Api(C2Gu) and Api(C4Gu)) as helical promoters; i.e., 1-4 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-Xaa)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1: Xaa=Api(C2Gu), 2: Xaa=Api(C4Gu)), 3: FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)8-Api(C2Gu)-(Gly)3-NH2, and 4: FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)5-Api(C2Gu)-(l-Arg)2-Api(C2Gu)-(Gly)3-NH2], and investigated their preferred secondary structures and cell membrane-penetrating ability. As a result, we found that the permeation efficiency of the CPP was affected by the number of helical promoters in their sequences. Specially, peptide 1, which contained three Api(C2Gu) residues, formed a stable helical structure and passed through the cell membrane more efficiently than the other peptides. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the spatial arrangement of the peptides' side chains also influenced their permeability and the helical stabilization of their main chains.

  3. Thermo-Responsive Collagen/Cell Penetrating Hybrid Peptide as Nanocarrier in Targeting-Free Cell Selection and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Myungeun; Hu, Chloe; Urfano, Selina F.; Arostegui, Merlyn; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    The effective delivery of therapeutics and imaging agents to a selected group of cells has been at the forefront of biomedical research. Unfortunately, the identification of the unique cell surface targets for cell selection remains a major challenge, particularly if cells within the selected group are not identical. Here we demonstrate a novel approach to cell section relying on a thermo-responsive peptide-based nanocarrier. The hybrid peptide containing cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and collagen (COLL) domains is designed to undergo coil-to-helix transition (folding) below physiological temperature. Since only helical form undergoes effective internalization by the cells, this approach allows effective temperature-discriminate cellular uptake. The cells selected for uptake are locally cooled down thus enabling the carrier to fold and subsequently internalize. Our approach demonstrates a generic method as selected cells could differ from the adjacent cells or could belong to the same cell population. The method is fast (< 15 min) and selective; over 99.6% of cells in vitro internalized the peptide carrier at low temperatures (15°C), while less than 0.2% internalized at 37°C. In vivo results confirm the high selectivity of the method. The potential clinical applications in mixed cell differentiation carcinoma, most frequently encountered in breast and ovarian cancer, are envisioned. PMID:27603918

  4. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-12-21

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.

  5. Binding of oligoarginine to membrane lipids and heparan sulfate: structural and thermodynamic characterization of a cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Elisabete; Kitas, Eric; Seelig, Joachim

    2005-02-22

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) comprise a group of arginine-rich oligopeptides that are able to deliver exogenous cargo into cells. A first step in the internalization of CPPs is their binding to the cell surface, a reaction likely to involve membrane phospholipids and/or heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). The present work characterizes the interaction of R(9), one of the most efficient CPPs, with either heparan sulfate (HS) or lipid vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG). Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that R(9) binds to HS with high affinity. Assuming that HS has n independent and equivalent binding sites for R(9), we find an association constant of 3.1 x 10(6) M(-1) at 28 degrees C. At this temperature, the reaction enthalpy is DeltaH(degrees)pep = - 5.5 kcal/mol and approximately 7 R(9) molecules bind per HS chain, which is equivalent to approximately 0.95 cationic/anionic charge ratio. Delta decreases in magnitude upon an increase in temperature, and the reaction becomes entropy-driven at higher temperatures (>or=37 degrees C). The positive heat-capacity change entailed by this reaction (DeltaC(degrees)P = +167 cal mol(-1) K(-1)) indicates the loss of polar residues on R(9)-HS binding, suggesting that hydrophobic forces play no major role on binding. Calorimetric analysis of the interaction of R(9) with POPC/POPG (75:25) vesicles reveals an association constant of 8.2 x 10(4) M(-1) at 28 degrees C. Using a surface partition equilibrium model to correct for electrostatic effects, we find an intrinsic partition constant of approximately 900 M(-1), a value that is also confirmed by electrophoretic mobility measurements. This corresponds to an electrostatic contribution of approximately 33% to the total free energy of binding. Deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shows no change in the headgroup conformation of POPC and POPG, suggesting

  6. Cell-penetrating peptides meditated encapsulation of protein therapeutics into intact red blood cells and its application.

    PubMed

    He, Huining; Ye, Junxiao; Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Quan; Chung, Hee Sun; Kwon, Young Min; Shin, Meong Cheol; Lee, Kyuri; Yang, Victor C

    2014-02-28

    Red blood cells (RBCs) based drug carrier appears to be the most appealing for protein drugs due to their unmatched biocompatability, biodegradability, and long lifespan in the circulation. Numerous methods for encapsulating protein drugs into RBCs were developed, however, most of them induce partial disruption of the cell membrane, resulting in irreversible alterations in both physical and chemical properties of RBCs. Herein, we introduce a novel method for encapsulating proteins into intact RBCs, which was meditated by a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) developed in our lab-low molecular weight protamine (LMWP). l-asparaginase, one of the primary drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was chosen as a model protein to illustrate the encapsulation into erythrocytes mediated by CPPs. In addition current treatment of ALL using different l-asparaginase delivery and encapsulation methods as well as their associated problems were also reviewed.

  7. Combined effect of a peptide–morpholino oligonucleotide conjugate and a cell-penetrating peptide as an antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Wesolowski, Donna; Alonso, Dulce; Altman, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)–morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) conjugate (PMO) that has an antibiotic effect in culture had some contaminating CPPs in earlier preparations. The mixed conjugate had gene-specific and gene-nonspecific effects. An improved purification procedure separates the PMO from the free CPP and MO. The gene-specific effects are a result of the PMO, and the nonspecific effects are a result of the unlinked, unreacted CPP. The PMO and the CPP can be mixed together, as has been shown previously in earlier experiments, and have a combined effect as an antibiotic. Kinetic analysis of these effects confirm this observation. The effect of the CPP is bacteriostatic. The effect of the PMO appears to be bacteriocidal. An assay for mutations that would alter the ability of these agents to affect bacterial viability is negative. PMID:23650357

  8. Cell-penetrating peptides meditated encapsulation of protein therapeutics into intact red blood cells and its application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinsong; Liu, Quan; Chung, Hee Sun; Kwon, Young Min; Shin, Meong Cheol; Lee, Kyuri; Yang, Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) based drug carrier appears to be the most appealing for protein drugs due to their unmatched biocompatability, biodegradability, and long lifespan in the circulation. Numerous methods for encapsulating protein drugs into RBCs were developed, however, most of them induce partial disruption of the cell membrane, resulting in irreversible alterations in both physical and chemical properties of RBCs. Herein, we introduce a novel method for encapsulating proteins into intact RBCs, which was meditated by a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) developed in our lab—low molecular weight protamine (LMWP). L-asparaginase, one of the primary drugs used in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was chosen as a model protein to illustrate the encapsulation into erythrocytes mediated by CPPs. In addition current treatment of ALL using different L-asparaginase delivery and encapsulation methods as well as their associated problems were also reviewed. PMID:24374002

  9. The influence of cell penetrating peptide branching on cellular uptake of QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James; Susumu, Kimihiro; Anderson, George; Muttenhaler, Markus; Dawson, Philip; Medintz, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) serve as a valuable platform for understating the intricacies of nanoparticle cellular uptake and fate for the development of theranostics. Developing novel internalization peptides that maximize cellular uptake while minimizing the amount of peptide is important to allow space on the nanoparticle for other cargo (e.g. drugs). We have designed a range of branched, dendritic internalization peptides composed of polyarginine (Arg9) branches (1 to 16 repeats) attached a dendritic wedge based on the sequence WP9G2H6. By attaching these branched dendritic peptides to QD's, we can study the influence of branching on cellular uptake as a function of time, ratio, and degree of branching.

  10. H(II) mesophase and peptide cell-penetrating enhancers for improved transdermal delivery of sodium diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2010-06-01

    This study develops a novel transdermal delivery vehicle for the enhanced delivery of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC). The system utilizes the advantages of reversed hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystals (H(II)LC), combined with a peptide cell penetration enhancer (CPE), creating together an adaptable system that provides versatile options in the field of transdermal delivery. This enhancer peptide is based on a family of amphipatic peptides that exhibit improved membrane permeability. Franz permeation cell experiments revealed that the peptide enhancer (RALA) improved Na-DFC skin penetration of the liquid crystal 2.2-fold. We studied the structural effects of RALA solubilization on the H(II) mesophase. RALA acts as a chaotropic agent, interfering in the structure of the water, and causes a measurable swelling of the aqueous cylinders by 5A. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurements reveal enhanced hydration of the glycerol monooleate (GMO) headgroups and a 6.5% increase in the fraction of non-freezable water resulting from RALA incorporation. RALA caused a gradual increase in the GMO effective headgroup area due to the hydration, leading eventually to a transform of the hexagonal structure towards a lamellar one. Circular dichroism and ATR-FTIR measurements showed a conservation of the peptide structure when incorporated into the H(II) mesophase. The combined H(II)LC-CPE systems can serve as high potential vehicles for a variety of drugs, as they can easily be modified by varying the composition and temperature, according to the required dose and delivery features.

  11. Sticky water surfaces: Helix-coil transitions suppressed in a cell-penetrating peptide at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schach, Denise; Globisch, Christoph; Roeters, Steven J.; Woutersen, Sander; Fuchs, Adrian; Weiss, Clemens K.; Backus, Ellen H. G.; Landfester, Katharina; Bonn, Mischa; Peter, Christine; Weidner, Tobias

    2014-12-01

    GALA is a 30 amino acid synthetic peptide consisting of a Glu-Ala-Leu-Ala repeat and is known to undergo a reversible structural transition from a disordered to an α-helical structure when changing the pH from basic to acidic values. In its helical state GALA can insert into and disintegrate lipid membranes. This effect has generated much interest in GALA as a candidate for pH triggered, targeted drug delivery. GALA also serves as a well-defined model system to understand cell penetration mechanisms and protein folding triggered by external stimuli. Structural transitions of GALA in solution have been studied extensively. However, cell penetration is an interfacial effect and potential biomedical applications of GALA would involve a variety of surfaces, e.g., nanoparticles, lipid membranes, tubing, and liquid-gas interfaces. Despite the apparent importance of interfaces in the functioning of GALA, the effect of surfaces on the reversible folding of GALA has not yet been studied. Here, we use sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) to probe the structural response of GALA at the air-water interface and IR spectroscopy to follow GALA folding in bulk solution. We combine the SFG data with molecular dynamics simulations to obtain a molecular-level picture of the interaction of GALA with the air-water interface. Surprisingly, while the fully reversible structural transition was observed in solution, at the water-air interface, a large fraction of the GALA population remained helical at high pH. This "stickiness" of the air-water interface can be explained by the stabilizing interactions of hydrophobic leucine and alanine side chains with the water surface.

  12. Using Confocal Microscopy and Computational Modeling to Investigate the Cell-Penetrating Properties of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    PubMed

    Del Rio, Gabriel; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) may display the ability to penetrate cells, which may be relevant for their antibiotic activity. To investigate the relevance of the penetrating activity for the antibiotic activity of AMPs, here we describe a method based on the combined use of confocal microscopy and computational modeling coupled with cell death kinetics.

  13. Effect of Ala replacement with Aib in amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide on oligonucleotide delivery into cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Shun-Ichi; Hashimoto, Yuki; Kawai, Yui; Miyata, Kaori; Tsuda, Hirokazu; Nakagawa, Osamu; Urata, Hidehito

    2013-12-15

    A number of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been characterized and their usefulness as delivery tools has been clarified. As one of the CPPs, model amphipathic peptide (MAP) was developed by integrating both hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids in its sequence. In our previous work, we designed MAP(Aib) by replacing five alanine (Ala) residues on the hydrophobic face of the helix in the MAP sequence with α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues, and the replacement resulted in higher helix propensity, stronger resistance to protease, and higher cell membrane permeability than MAP. As a next step, we examined the efficiency of oligonucleotide (ODN) delivery into cells by MAP(Aib) in comparison with that by MAP. The electrostatically formed MAP(Aib)/ODN complex was more easily taken up by cells than the MAP/ODN complex, and the ODN delivery by MAP(Aib) was via an endocytic pathway. We demonstrated that the incorporation of Aib residues into CPPs enhances the delivery of hydrophilic molecules, such as ODN, into cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Solid formulation of cell-penetrating peptide nanocomplexes with siRNA and their stability in simulated gastric conditions.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Zaghloul, Eman M; El Andaloussi, Samir; Lehto, Taavi; El-Sayed, Ramy; Magdy, Tarek; Smith, C I Edvard; Langel, Ulo

    2012-08-20

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic peptides that have been extensively studied as drug delivery vehicles for proteins, nucleic acids and nanoparticles. However, the formulation of CPP-based therapeutics into different pharmaceutical formulations and their stability in relevant biological environments have not been given the same attention. Here, we show that a newly developed CPP, PepFect 14 (PF14), forms non-covalent nanocomplexes with short interfering RNA (siRNA), which are able to elicit efficient RNA-interference (RNAi) response in different cell-lines. RNAi effect is obtained at low siRNA doses with a unique kinetic profile. Furthermore, the solid dispersion technique is utilized to formulate PF14/siRNA nanocomplexes into solid formulations that are as active as the freshly prepared nanocomplexes in solution. Importantly, the nanocomplexes are stable and active in mediating RNAi response after incubation with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) that is highly acidic. These results demonstrate the activity of PF14 in delivering and protecting siRNA in different pharmaceutical forms and biological environments.

  15. The acceleration of boron neutron capture therapy using multi-linked mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) fused cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kondo, Natsuko; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Bin, Feng; Nakajima, Kiichiro; Hirota, Yuki; Kawabata, Shinji; Nishiki, Tei-ichi; Ohmori, Iori; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Ono, Koji; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    New anti-cancer therapy with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction of boron-10 with neutron irradiation. The median survival of BNCT patients with glioblastoma was almost twice as long as those receiving standard therapy in a Japanese BNCT clinical trial. In this clinical trial, two boron compounds, BPA (boronophenylalanine) and BSH (sodium borocaptate), were used for BNCT. BPA is taken up into cells through amino acid transporters that are expressed highly in almost all malignant cells, but BSH cannot pass through the cell membrane and remains outside the cell. We simulated the energy transfer against the nucleus at different locations of boron from outside the cell to the nuclear region with neutron irradiation and concluded that there was a marked difference between inside and outside the cell in boron localization. To overcome this disadvantage of BSH in BNCT, we used a cell-penetrating peptide system for transduction of BSH. CPP (cell-membrane penetrating peptide) is very common peptide domains that transduce many physiologically active substances into cells in vitro and in vivo. BSH-fused CPPs can penetrate the cell membrane and localize inside a cell. To increase the boron ratio in one BSH-peptide molecule, 8BSH fused to 11R with a dendritic lysine structure was synthesized and administrated to malignant glioma cells and a brain tumor mouse model. 8BSH-11R localized at the cell nucleus and showed a very high boron value in ICP results. With neutron irradiation, the 8BSH-11R administrated group showed a significant cancer killing effect compared to the 100 times higher concentration of BSH-administrated group. We concluded that BSH-fused CPPs were one of the most improved and potential boron compounds in the next-stage BNCT trial and 8BSH-11R may be applied in the clinical setting.

  16. The Primary Mechanism of Cellular Internalization for a Short CellPenetrating Peptide as a Nano-Scale Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Huang, Yue-Wern; Korivi, Mallikarjuna; Lo, Shih-Yen; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2017-08-22

    Development of effective drug delivery systems (DDS) is a critical issue in health care and medicine. Advances in molecular biology and nanotechnology have allowed the introduction of nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can form the basis of drug delivery systems by virtue of their ability to support the transport of cargoes into the cell. Potential cargoes include proteins, DNA, RNA, liposomes, and nanomaterials. These cargoes generally retain their bioactivities upon entering cells. In the present study, the smallest, fully-active lactoferricin-derived CPP, L5a is used to demonstrate the primary contributor of cellular internalization. The secondary helical structure of L5a encompasses symmetrical positive charges around the periphery. The contributions of cell-specificity, peptide length, concentration, zeta potential, particle size, and spatial structure of the peptides were examined, but only zeta potential and spatial structure affected protein transduction efficiency. FITC-labeled L5a appeared to enter cells via direct membrane translocation insofar as endocytic modulators did not block FITC-L5a entry. This is the same mechanism of protein transduction active in Cy5 labeled DNA delivery mediated by FITC-L5a. A significant reduction of transduction efficiency was observed with structurally incomplete FITC-L5a formed by tryptic destruction, in which case the mechanism of internalization switched to a classical energydependent endocytosis pathway. These results support the continued development of the non-cytotoxic L5a as an efficient tool for drug delivery. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  18. Structure Analysis and Conformational Transitions of the Cell Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 in the Membrane-Bound State

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Erik; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Bürck, Jochen; Ehni, Sebastian; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K.; Afonin, Sergii; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Komarov, Igor V.; Brock, Roland; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure analysis of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (TP10) revealed an exemplary range of different conformations in the membrane-bound state. The bipartite peptide (derived N-terminally from galanin and C-terminally from mastoparan) was found to exhibit prominent characteristics of (i) amphiphilic α-helices, (ii) intrinsically disordered peptides, as well as (iii) β-pleated amyloid fibrils, and these conformational states become interconverted as a function of concentration. We used a complementary approach of solid-state 19F-NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples to characterize the structural and dynamical behaviour of TP10 in its monomeric and aggregated forms. Nine different positions in the peptide were selectively substituted with either the L- or D-enantiomer of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-bicyclopent-[1.1.1]-1-ylglycine (CF3-Bpg) as a reporter group for 19F-NMR. Using the L-epimeric analogs, a comprehensive three-dimensional structure analysis was carried out in lipid bilayers at low peptide concentration, where TP10 is monomeric. While the N-terminal region is flexible and intrinsically unstructured within the plane of the lipid bilayer, the C-terminal α-helix is embedded in the membrane with an oblique tilt angle of ∼55° and in accordance with its amphiphilic profile. Incorporation of the sterically obstructive D-CF3-Bpg reporter group into the helical region leads to a local unfolding of the membrane-bound peptide. At high concentration, these helix-destabilizing C-terminal substitutions promote aggregation into immobile β-sheets, which resemble amyloid fibrils. On the other hand, the obstructive D-CF3-Bpg substitutions can be accommodated in the flexible N-terminus of TP10 where they do not promote aggregation at high concentration. The cross-talk between the two regions of TP10 thus exerts a delicate balance on its conformational switch, as the presence of the α-helix counteracts the tendency of the unfolded N

  19. Limiting angiotensin II signaling with a cell penetrating peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of the angiotensin II type I receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Taylor, Linda; Mierke, Dale; Berg, Eric; Shia, Michael; Fishman, Jordan; Sallum, Christine; Polgar, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A cell-penetrating peptide consisting of the second intracellular loop (IC2) of the Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1) linked to the HIV transactivating regulatory protein (TAT) domain was used to identify the role of this motif for intracellular signal transduction. HEK-293 cells stably transfected with AT1R cDNA and primary cultures of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressing endogenous AT1 receptor were exposed to the cell-penetrating peptide construct and the effect on angiotensin II signaling determined. The AT1 IC2 peptide effectively inhibited AngII stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover and calcium influx. It also limited the activation of Akt/PKB as determined by an inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and completely abolished the AngII dependent activation of the transcriptional factor NFκB. In contrast, the AT1 IC2 peptide had no effect on AngII/AT1 receptor activation of ERK. These results illustrate the potential of using cell penetrating peptides to both delineate receptor-mediated signal transduction as well as to selectively regulate G protein coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20492449

  20. Synergistic Enhancement of Antitumor Efficacy by PEGylated Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Modified with Cell-Penetrating Peptide TAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shanshan; Wang, Tong; Pei, Xibo; Cai, He; Chen, Junyu; Zhang, Xin; Wan, Qianbing; Wang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a cell-penetrating peptide, the transactivating transcriptional factor (TAT) domain from HIV, was linked to PEGylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to develop a highly effective antitumor drug delivery system. FITC was conjugated on MWCNTs-polyethylene glycol (PEG) and MWCNTs-PEG-TAT to provide fluorescence signal for tracing the cellular uptake of the nanocarrier. After loaded with an anticancer agent, doxorubicin (DOX) via π - π stacking interaction, the physicochemical characteristics, release profile and biological evaluation of the obtained nano-sized drug carrier were investigated. The DOX loaded MWCNTs-PEG and MWCNTs-PEG-TAT drug carriers both displayed appropriate particle size, excellent stability, high drug loading, and pH-dependent drug release profile. Nevertheless, compared with DOX-MWCNTs-PEG, DOX-MWCNTs-PEG-TAT showed improved cell internalization, intracellular distribution and potentiated anticancer efficacy due to the TAT-mediated membrane translocation, endosomal escape and nuclear targeting. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of DOX was not compromised after being conjugated with MWCNTs-PEG-TAT and the proposed nanocarrier was also confirmed to have a good biocompatibility. In conclusion, our results suggested that the unique combination of TAT and MWCNTs as a multifunctional drug delivery system might be a powerful tool for improved anticancer drug development.

  1. pH-Responsive Triblock Copolymeric Micelles Decorated with a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Provide Efficient Doxorubicin Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Khen Eng; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Katas, Haliza; Amjad, Muhammad Wahab; Butt, Adeel Masood; Kesharwani, Prashant; Iyer, Arun K.

    2016-12-01

    This study developed novel triblock pH-responsive polymeric micelles (PMs) using cholic acid-polyethyleneimine-poly- l-arginine (CA-PEI-pArg) copolymers. PEI provided pH sensitivity, while the hydrophilic cell-penetrating pArg peptide promoted cellular PM internalization. The copolymers self-assembled into PMs in aqueous solution at above the critical micelle concentration (2.98 × 10-7 M) and encapsulated doxorubicin in the core region, with a 34.2% ( w/ w) entrapment efficiency. PMs showed pH-dependent swelling, increasing in size by almost sevenfold from pH 7.4 to 5.0. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent, with about 65% released at pH 5.0, and 32% at pH 7.4. Cellular uptake, assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, was enhanced by using doxorubicin-loaded CA-PEI-pArg PMs, as compared to free doxorubicin and DOX-loaded CA-PEI PMs. Moreover, 24-h incubation of these PMs with a human breast cancer cell line produced greater cytotoxicity than free doxorubicin. These results indicate that pH-responsive CA-PEI-pArg micelles could provide a versatile delivery system for targeted cancer therapy using hydrophobic drugs.

  2. Harnessing the power of cell-penetrating peptides: activatable carriers for targeting systemic delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    MacEwan, Sarah R; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2013-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents aims to enhance the accumulation of these molecules in a solid tumor while avoiding uptake in healthy tissues. Tumor-specific accumulation has been pursued with passive targeting by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, as well as with active targeting strategies. Active targeting is achieved by functionalization of carriers to allow specific interactions between the carrier and the tumor environment. Functionalization of carriers with ligands that specifically interact with overexpressed receptors on cancer cells represents a classic approach to active tumor targeting. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a non-specific and receptor-independent mechanism to enhance cellular uptake that offers an exciting alternative to traditional active targeting approaches. While the non-specificity of CPP-mediated internalization has the intriguing potential to make this approach applicable to a wide range of tumor types, their promiscuity is, however, a significant barrier to their clinical utility for systemically administered applications. Many approaches have been investigated to selectively turn on the function of systemically delivered CPP-functionalized carriers specifically in tumors to achieve targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents.

  3. Harnessing the power of cell-penetrating peptides: Activatable carriers for targeting systemic delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, Sarah R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents aims to enhance the accumulation of these molecules in a solid tumor while avoiding uptake in healthy tissues. Tumor-specific accumulation has been pursued with passive targeting by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, as well as with active targeting strategies. Active targeting is achieved by functionalization of carriers to allow specific interactions between the carrier and the tumor environment. Functionalization of carriers with ligands that specifically interact with overexpressed receptors on cancer cells represents a classic approach to active tumor targeting. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a non-specific and receptor-independent mechanism to enhance cellular uptake that offers an exciting alternative to traditional active targeting approaches. While the non-specificity of CPP-mediated internalization has the intriguing potential to make this approach applicable to a wide range of tumor types, their promiscuity is, however, a significant barrier to their clinical utility for systemically administered applications. Many approaches have been investigated to selectively turn on the function of systemically delivered CPP-functionalized carriers specifically in tumors to achieve targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics and imaging agents. PMID:22977001

  4. Surgical molecular navigation with a Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide improves intraoperative identification and resection of small salivary gland cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the use of intraoperative fluorescence guidance by enzymatically cleavable ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptide (RACPPPLGC(Me)AG) containing Cy5 as a fluorescent donor and Cy7 as a fluorescent acceptor for salivary gland cancer surgery in a mouse model. Methods Surgical resection of small parotid gland cancers in mice was performed with fluorescence guidance or white light (WL) imaging alone. Tumor identification accuracy, operating time and tumor free survival were compared. Results RACPP guidance aided tumor detection (positive histology in 90% (27/30) vs. 48% (15/31) for WL, p<0.001). A ~25% ratiometric signal increase as the threshold to distinguish between tumor and adjacent tissue, yielded >90% detection sensitivity and specificity. Operating time was reduced by 54% (p<0.001), tumor free survival was increased with RACPP guidance (p=0.025). Conclusions RACPP provides real-time intraoperative guidance leading to improved survival. Ratiometric signal thresholds can be set according to desired detection accuracy levels for future RACPP applications. PMID:25521629

  5. The Potential Role of Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Proteins for Therapy of Erythroid Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C.; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S.

    2013-01-01

    The erythroid related disorders (ERDs) represent a large group of hematological diseases, which in most cases are attributed either to the deficiency or malfunction of biosynthetic enzymes or oxygen transport proteins. Current treatments for these disorders include histo-compatible erythrocyte transfusions or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Gene therapy delivered via suitable viral vectors or genetically modified HSCs have been under way. Protein Transduction Domain (PTD) technology has allowed the production and intracellular delivery of recombinant therapeutic proteins, bearing Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs), into a variety of mammalian cells. Remarkable progress in the field of protein transduction leads to the development of novel protein therapeutics (CPP-mediated PTs) for the treatment of monogenetic and/or metabolic disorders. The “concept” developed in this paper is the intracellular protein delivery made possible via the PTD technology as a novel therapeutic intervention for treatment of ERDs. This can be achieved via four stages including: (i) the production of genetically engineered human CPP-mediated PT of interest, since the corresponding native protein either is missing or is mutated in the erythroid progenitor cell (ErPCs) or mature erythrocytes of patients; (ii) isolation of target cells from the peripheral blood of the selected patients; (iii) ex vivo transduction of cells with the CPP-mediated PT of interest; and (iv) re-administration of the successfully transduced cells back into the same patients. PMID:24275786

  6. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA+ tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy PMID:26954374

  7. Dual Targeting of Intracellular Pathogenic Bacteria with a Cleavable Conjugate of Kanamycin and an Antibacterial Cell-Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Brezden, Anna; Mohamed, Mohamed F; Nepal, Manish; Harwood, John S; Kuriakose, Jerrin; Seleem, Mohamed N; Chmielewski, Jean

    2016-08-31

    Bacterial infection caused by intracellular pathogens, such as Mycobacterium, Salmonella, and Brucella, is a burgeoning global health epidemic that necessitates urgent action. However, the therapeutic value of a number of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, against intracellular pathogenic bacteria is compromised due to their inability to traverse eukaryotic membranes. For this significant problem to be addressed, a cleavable conjugate of the antibiotic kanamycin and a nonmembrane lytic, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide with efficient mammalian cell penetration, P14LRR, was prepared. This approach allows kanamycin to enter mammalian cells as a conjugate linked via a tether that breaks down in the reducing environment within cells. Potent antimicrobial activity of the P14KanS conjugate was demonstrated in vitro, and this reducible conjugate effectively cleared intracellular pathogenic bacteria within macrophages more potently than that of a conjugate lacking the disulfide moiety. Notably, successful clearance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within macrophages was observed with the dual antibiotic conjugate, and Salmonella levels were significantly reduced in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans model.

  8. PepFect 14, a novel cell-penetrating peptide for oligonucleotide delivery in solution and as solid formulation

    PubMed Central

    Ezzat, Kariem; EL Andaloussi, Samir; Zaghloul, Eman M.; Lehto, Taavi; Lindberg, Staffan; Moreno, Pedro M. D.; Viola, Joana R.; Magdy, Tarek; Abdo, Rania; Guterstam, Peter; Sillard, Rannar; Hammond, Suzan M.; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.; Smith, C. I. Edvard; Hällbrink, Mattias; Langel, Ülo

    2011-01-01

    Numerous human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that give rise to aberrant alternative splicing. Recently, several of these debilitating disorders have been shown to be amenable for splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) that modify splicing patterns and restore the phenotype in experimental models. However, translational approaches are required to transform SCOs into usable drug products. In this study, we present a new cell-penetrating peptide, PepFect14 (PF14), which efficiently delivers SCOs to different cell models including HeLa pLuc705 and mdx mouse myotubes; a cell culture model of Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-covalent PF14-SCO nanocomplexes induce splice-correction at rates higher than the commercially available lipid-based vector Lipofectamine™ 2000 (LF2000) and remain active in the presence of serum. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating this delivery system into solid formulations that could be suitable for several therapeutic applications. Solid dispersion technique is utilized and the formed solid formulations are as active as the freshly prepared nanocomplexes in solution even when stored at an elevated temperatures for several weeks. In contrast, LF2000 drastically loses activity after being subjected to same procedure. This shows that using PF14 is a very promising translational approach for the delivery of SCOs in different pharmaceutical forms. PMID:21345932

  9. PepFect 14, a novel cell-penetrating peptide for oligonucleotide delivery in solution and as solid formulation.

    PubMed

    Ezzat, Kariem; Andaloussi, Samir E L; Zaghloul, Eman M; Lehto, Taavi; Lindberg, Staffan; Moreno, Pedro M D; Viola, Joana R; Magdy, Tarek; Abdo, Rania; Guterstam, Peter; Sillard, Rannar; Hammond, Suzan M; Wood, Matthew J A; Arzumanov, Andrey A; Gait, Michael J; Smith, C I Edvard; Hällbrink, Mattias; Langel, Ülo

    2011-07-01

    Numerous human genetic diseases are caused by mutations that give rise to aberrant alternative splicing. Recently, several of these debilitating disorders have been shown to be amenable for splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) that modify splicing patterns and restore the phenotype in experimental models. However, translational approaches are required to transform SCOs into usable drug products. In this study, we present a new cell-penetrating peptide, PepFect14 (PF14), which efficiently delivers SCOs to different cell models including HeLa pLuc705 and mdx mouse myotubes; a cell culture model of Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-covalent PF14-SCO nanocomplexes induce splice-correction at rates higher than the commercially available lipid-based vector Lipofectamine 2000 (LF2000) and remain active in the presence of serum. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating this delivery system into solid formulations that could be suitable for several therapeutic applications. Solid dispersion technique is utilized and the formed solid formulations are as active as the freshly prepared nanocomplexes in solution even when stored at an elevated temperatures for several weeks. In contrast, LF2000 drastically loses activity after being subjected to same procedure. This shows that using PF14 is a very promising translational approach for the delivery of SCOs in different pharmaceutical forms.

  10. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel cell penetrating peptide carrier for the delivery of nematocidal proteins drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jea Hyun

    Nematodes have recently become a primary source of harmful diseases to the environment that inflict harsh damages to pine trees and marine species. However, nematodes cannot be killed by normal pesticides or chemicals due to their thick outer protective layer mainly composed of collagen and cuticles. Thus, a novel approach to trigger intracellular delivery of chemicals through the layers of nematodes is required. In this study, the selection of the novel CPP was carefully progressed through protein database and serial digested fragmentation, internalization of each amino sequence was analyzed through flow cytometry and confocal microscope. As one of the most effective CPP material, JH 1.6 was compared with other major CPPs and its cellular toxicity was investigated. Furthermore, JH 1.6 was attached to various RNA, DNA, and proteins and internalization efficiency was evaluated for mammalian cells. To examine its effects on nematodes in vivo, JH 1.6 was conjugated with nematocidal protein - botulinum neurotoxin (BnT) and treated in C.elegans as a model animal. The results showed that JH 1.6 had high relative internalization rate and low cellular toxicity compared to other major CPP such as TAT and GV1001 peptides.

  12. A cell-penetrating peptide from a novel pVII-pIX phage-displayed random peptide library.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changshou; Mao, Shenlan; Ditzel, Henrik J; Farnaes, Lauge; Wirsching, Peter; Lerner, Richard A; Janda, Kim D

    2002-12-01

    A novel random peptide library was constructed using a phage-display format on the coat proteins pVII and pIX of filamentous bacteriophage. Panning against B-lymphocyte WI-L2 cells yielded one unique peptide-phage, denoted CHL8, that specifically bound to and penetrated the cells. Studies of each peptide derived from CHL8, denoted pep7 and pep9, established that only pep7 mediated the observed activity and only as a homodimer. Peptide libraries displayed on pVII-pIX should serve as a novel source of bioactive ligands for a variety of applications.

  13. Arginine-Rich Peptides Destabilize the Plasma Membrane, Consistent with a Pore Formation Translocation Mechanism of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Herce, H.D.; Garcia, A.E.; Litt, J.; Kane, R.S.; Martin, P.; Enrique, N.; Rebolledo, A.; Milesi, V.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent molecular-dynamics simulations have suggested that the arginine-rich HIV Tat peptides translocate by destabilizing and inducing transient pores in phospholipid bilayers. In this pathway for peptide translocation, Arg residues play a fundamental role not only in the binding of the peptide to the surface of the membrane, but also in the destabilization and nucleation of transient pores across the bilayer. Here we present a molecular-dynamics simulation of a peptide composed of nine Args (Arg-9) that shows that this peptide follows the same translocation pathway previously found for the Tat peptide. We test experimentally the hypothesis that transient pores open by measuring ionic currents across phospholipid bilayers and cell membranes through the pores induced by Arg-9 peptides. We find that Arg-9 peptides, in the presence of an electrostatic potential gradient, induce ionic currents across planar phospholipid bilayers, as well as in cultured osteosarcoma cells and human smooth muscle cells. Our results suggest that the mechanism of action of Arg-9 peptides involves the creation of transient pores in lipid bilayers and cell membranes. PMID:19804722

  14. Enzyme-triggered delivery of chlorambucil from conjugates based on the cell-penetrating peptide BP16.

    PubMed

    Soler, Marta; González-Bártulos, Marta; Figueras, Eduard; Ribas, Xavi; Costas, Miquel; Massaguer, Anna; Planas, Marta; Feliu, Lidia

    2015-02-07

    The undecapeptide KKLFKKILKKL-NH2 (BP16) is a non-toxic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that is mainly internalized into cancer cells through a clathrin dependent endocytic mechanism and localizes in late endosomes. Moreover, this CPP is able to enhance the cellular uptake of chlorambucil (CLB) improving its cytotoxicity. In this work, we further explored the cell-penetrating properties of BP16 and those of its arginine analogue BP308. We investigated the influence on the cytotoxicity and on the cellular uptake of conjugating CLB at the N- or the C-terminal end of these undecapeptides. The effect of incorporating the cathepsin B-cleavable sequence Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly in CLB-BP16 and CLB-BP308 conjugates was also evaluated. The activity of CLB was significantly improved when conjugated at the N- or the C-terminus of BP16, or at the N-terminus of BP308. While CLB alone was not active (IC50 of 73.7 to >100 μM), the resulting conjugates displayed cytotoxic activity against CAPAN-1, MCF-7, PC-3, 1BR3G and SKMEL-28 cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 8.7 to 25.5 μM. These results were consistent with the internalization properties observed for the corresponding 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled conjugates. The presence of the tetrapeptide Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly at either the N- or the C-terminus of CLB-BP16 conjugates further increased the efficacy of CLB (IC50 of 3.6 to 16.2 μM), which could be attributed to its selective release in the lysosomal compartment. Enzymatic assays with cathepsin B showed the release of CLB-Gly-OH from these sequences within a short time. Therefore, the combination of BP16 with an enzymatic cleavable sequence can be used as a drug delivery system for the effective uptake and release of drugs in cancer cells.

  15. The structural HCV genes delivered by MPG cell penetrating peptide are directed to enhance immune responses in mice model.

    PubMed

    Mehrlatifan, Saloume; Mirnurollahi, Seyyedeh Masumeh; Motevalli, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Pooneh; Soleymani, Sepehr; Bolhassani, Azam

    2016-10-01

    One of the significant problems in vaccination projects is the lack of an effective vaccine against hepatitis C virus (HCV). The goal of the current study is to evaluate and compare two DNA constructs encoding HCV core and coreE1E2 genes alone or complexed with MPG peptide as a delivery system for stimulation of antibody responses and IFN-γ secretion in Balb/c mice model. Indeed, MPG cell penetrating peptide was used to improve DNA immunization in mice. Our results demonstrated that MPG forms stable non-covalent nanoparticles with pcDNA-core and pcDNA-coreE1E2 at an N/P ratio of 10:1. The in vitro transfection efficiency of core or coreE1E2 DNA using MPG and TurboFect delivery systems was confirmed by western blot analysis. The results indicated the expression of the full-length core (∼21 kDa), and coreE1E2 (∼83 kDa) proteins using an anti-His monoclonal antibody. In addition, the expression of HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins was performed in bacteria and the purified recombinant proteins were injected to mice with Montanide 720 adjuvant. Our data showed that the immunized mice with HCV core and coreE1E2 proteins generated the mixture of sera IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes considerably higher than other groups. Furthermore, DNA constructs encoding core and coreE1E2 complexed with MPG could significantly induce IFN-γ secretion in lower concentrations than the naked core and coreE1E2 DNAs. Taken together, the DNA formulations as well as protein regimens used in this study triggered high-level IFN-γ production in mice, an important feature for the development of Th1 immune responses.

  16. S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide induces physical and morphological changes in membrane-mimetic lipid systems and cell membranes: implications for cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M S; Trabulo, Sara; Cardoso, Ana L; Lorents, Annely; Morais, Catarina M; Gomes, Paula; Nunes, Cláudia; Lúcio, Marlene; Reis, Salette; Padari, Kärt; Pooga, Margus; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C; Jurado, Amália S

    2012-03-01

    The present work aims to gain insights into the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cellular internalization and endosomal escape of the S4(13)-PV cell-penetrating peptide, which has been successfully used in our laboratory as a nucleic acid delivery system. A S4(13)-PV analogue, S4(13)-PVscr, displaying a scrambled amino acid sequence, deficient cell internalization and drug delivery inability, was used in this study for comparative purposes. Differential scanning calorimetry, fluorescence polarization and X-ray diffraction at small and wide angles techniques showed that both peptides interacted with anionic membranes composed of phosphatidylglycerol or a mixture of this lipid with phosphatidylethanolamine, increasing the lipid order, shifting the phase transition to higher temperatures and raising the correlation length between the bilayers. However, S4(13)-PVscr, in contrast to the wild-type peptide, did not promote lipid domain segregation and induced the formation of an inverted hexagonal lipid phase instead of a cubic phase in the lipid systems assayed. Electron microscopy showed that, as opposed to S4(13)-PVscr, the wild-type peptide induced the formation of a non-lamellar organization in membranes of HeLa cells. We concluded that lateral phase separation and destabilization of membrane lamellar structure without compromising membrane integrity are on the basis of the lipid-driven and receptor-independent mechanism of cell entry of S4(13)-PV peptide. Overall, our results can contribute to a better understanding of the role of peptide-lipid interactions in the mechanisms of cell-penetrating peptide membrane translocation, helping in the future design of more efficient cell-penetrating peptide-based drug delivery systems.

  17. The Telomerase-Derived Anticancer Peptide Vaccine GV1001 as an Extracellular Heat Shock Protein-Mediated Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong; Seo, Eun-Hye; Lee, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can facilitate the transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular delivery of macromolecules. GV1001, a peptide derived from a reverse-transcriptase subunit of telomerase (hTERT) and developed as a vaccine against various cancers, reportedly has unexpected CPP properties. Unlike typical CPPs, such as the HIV-1 TAT peptide, GV1001 enabled the cytosolic delivery of macromolecules such as proteins, DNA and siRNA via extracellular heat shock protein 90 (eHSP90) and 70 (eHSP70) complexes. The eHSP-GV1001 interaction may have biological effects in addition to its cytosolic delivery function. GV1001 was originally designed as a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-binding cancer epitope, but its CPP properties may contribute to its strong anti-cancer immune response relative to other telomerase peptide-based vaccines. Cell signaling via eHSP-GV1001 binding may lead to unexpected biological effects, such as direct anticancer or antiviral effects. In this review, we focus on the CPP effects of GV1001 bound to eHSP90 and eHSP70. PMID:27941629

  18. Enhanced oral bioavailability of insulin using PLGA nanoparticles co-modified with cell-penetrating peptides and Engrailed secretion peptide (Sec).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siqi; Chen, Shuangxi; Gao, Yuan; Guo, Feng; Li, Fengying; Xie, Baogang; Zhou, Jianliang; Zhong, Haijun

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticle drug carriers are an attractive strategy for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs. However, their ability to cross the intestinal epithelium membrane is largely limited. Therefore, in the present study, cell-penetrating peptides (R8, Tat, penetratin) and a secretion peptide (Sec) with N-terminal stearylation were introduced to modify nanoparticles (NPs) on the surface to improve oral bioavailability of peptide and protein drugs. In vitro studies conducted in Caco-2 cells showed the value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of the nanoparticles co-modified with Sec and penetratin (Sec-Pen-NPs) was about two-times greater than that of the nanoparticles modified with only penetratin (Pen-NPs), while the increase of transcellular transport of nanoparticles modified together with Sec and R8 (Sec-R8-NPs), or Sec and Tat (Sec-Tat-NPs), was not significant compared with nanoparticles modified with only R8 (R8-NPs) or Tat (Tat-NPs). Using insulin as the model drug, in vivo studies performed on rats indicated that compared to Pen-NPs, the relative bioavailability of insulin for Sec-Pen-NPs was 1.71-times increased after ileal segments administration, and stronger hypoglycemic effects was also observed. Therefore, the nanoparticles co-modified with penetratin and Sec could act as attractive carriers for oral delivery of insulin.

  19. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa FN; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  20. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption.

  1. Performance of cell-penetrating peptide-linked polymers physically mixed with poorly membrane-permeable molecules on cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Suita, Masaya; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Masaoka, Yoshie; Kataoka, Makoto; Yamashita, Shinji; Nakajima, Noriko; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Hashizume, Akio; Tachikawa, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Ryoji; Ishimaru, Yuki; Kasai, Atsushi; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2012-05-01

    We are investigating a new class of penetration enhancers that enable poorly membrane-permeable molecules physically mixed with them to effectively penetrate cell membranes without their concomitant cellular uptake. Since we previously revealed that poly(N-vinylacetamide-co-acrylic acid) modified with d-octaarginine, which is a typical cell-penetrating peptide, significantly enhanced the nasal absorption of insulin, we examined the performance of the polymers on cell membranes. When Caco-2 cells were incubated with 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) for 30 min, approximately 0.1% of applied CF was internalized into the cells. This poor membrane permeability was dramatically enhanced by d-octaarginine-linked polymers; a 25-fold increase in the cellular uptake of CF was observed when the polymer concentration was adjusted to 0.2mg/mL. None of the individual components, for example, d-octaarginine, had any influence on CF uptake, demonstrating that only d-octaarginine anchored chemically to the polymeric platform enhanced the membrane permeation of CF. The polymer-induced CF uptake was consistently high even when the incubation time was extended to 120 min. Confocal laser scanning microphotographs of cells incubated with d-octaarginine-linked polymers bearing rhodamine red demonstrated that the cell outline was stained with red fluorescence. The polymer-induced CF uptake was significantly suppressed by 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride, which is an inhibitor of macropinocytosis. Results indicated that d-octaarginine-linked polymers remained on the cell membrane and poorly membrane-permeable CF was continuously internalized into cells mainly via macropinocytosis repeated for the individual peptidyl branches in the polymer backbone.

  2. Effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers on the oral absorption of tripterine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Yuan, Ling; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Cao, Wei; Wu, Qingqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop nanostructured-lipid carriers (NLCs) coated with cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) for improving the oral bioavailability of tripterine. Methods We prepared CPP-coated tripterine-loaded NLCs (CT-NLCs) by using a solvent evaporation method, and determined their physical properties. In vitro drug release was determined by using a dialysis bag diffusion technique, and intestinal toxicity was evaluated by performing MTT assay using Caco-2 cells. In vivo absorption was studied in an in situ rat intestinal perfusion model, and oral bioavailability was examined in beagles. Results The average particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency of the optimized CT-NLCs were 126.7 ± 9.2 nm, 28.7 ± 3.4 mV, and 72.64% ± 1.37%, respectively. The CT-NLCs showed a controlled release profile in vitro and had significantly lower intestinal cytotoxicity than the tripterine solution (P < 0.05). The absorption levels of tripterine from the CT-NLCs in the rat duodenum and jejunum were markedly higher than with tripterine-loaded NLCs without the CPP coating (T-NLCs), and with tripterine solution. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs was greater than that of the T-NLCs and tripterine suspension, and that the time to maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs as well as the T-NLCs, was longer than that of the tripterine suspension. The relative oral bioavailability of the CT-NLCs compared to that of tripterine suspension and T-NLCs were 484.75% and 149.91% respectively. Conclusion The oral bioavailability of tripterine is dramatically increased by CT-NLCs. Therefore, CT-NLCs seem to be a promising carrier for oral delivery of tripterine. PMID:22942642

  3. Cytoplasm-responsive nanocarriers conjugated with a functional cell-penetrating peptide for systemic siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ko; Kanazawa, Takanori; Horiuchi, Shogo; Ando, Taichi; Sugawara, Ken; Takashima, Yuuki; Seta, Yasuo; Okada, Hiroaki

    2013-10-15

    To develop a gene carrier for cancer therapy by systemic injection, we synthesized methoxypolyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (MPEG-PCL) diblock copolymers conjugated with a cytoplasm-responsive cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), CH2R4H2C (C, Cys; H, His; R, Arg). The carrier/small interfering RNA (siRNA) complexes (N/P ratio of 20) had a particle size of approximately 50 nm and stabilized the siRNA against RNase. The cellular uptake ability of the carrier/FAM-siRNA complexes with fetal bovine serum was significantly higher than that of naked FAM-siRNA. In addition, the carrier/anti-vascular endothelial growth factor siRNA (siVEGF) complexes attained a significantly greater silencing effect than naked siVEGF with low cytotoxicity, resulting from higher uptake, early endosomal escape, and efficient release from the complexes in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, intravenous injection of MPEG-PCL-CH2R4H2C/siVEGF complexes had a significantly higher anti-tumor effect in S-180 tumor-bearing mice, which could be attributed to the rigid compaction of siRNA by ionic interactions and disulfide linkages in the CPP polymer micelles in the blood, as well as higher release following cleavage of the disulfide bonds in the reductive cytosol. Taken together, our data demonstrated that these cytoplasm-responsive polymer micelles conjugated with multi-functional CPP, could facilitate siVEGF delivery to tumor tissues after systemic injection and could exert an extremely strong anti-tumor effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers on the oral absorption of tripterine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Yuan, Ling; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Cao, Wei; Wu, Qingqing

    2012-01-01

    To develop nanostructured-lipid carriers (NLCs) coated with cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) for improving the oral bioavailability of tripterine. We prepared CPP-coated tripterine-loaded NLCs (CT-NLCs) by using a solvent evaporation method, and determined their physical properties. In vitro drug release was determined by using a dialysis bag diffusion technique, and intestinal toxicity was evaluated by performing MTT assay using Caco-2 cells. In vivo absorption was studied in an in situ rat intestinal perfusion model, and oral bioavailability was examined in beagles. The average particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency of the optimized CT-NLCs were 126.7 ± 9.2 nm, 28.7 ± 3.4 mV, and 72.64% ± 1.37%, respectively. The CT-NLCs showed a controlled release profile in vitro and had significantly lower intestinal cytotoxicity than the tripterine solution (P < 0.05). The absorption levels of tripterine from the CT-NLCs in the rat duodenum and jejunum were markedly higher than with tripterine-loaded NLCs without the CPP coating (T-NLCs), and with tripterine solution. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs was greater than that of the T-NLCs and tripterine suspension, and that the time to maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs as well as the T-NLCs, was longer than that of the tripterine suspension. The relative oral bioavailability of the CT-NLCs compared to that of tripterine suspension and T-NLCs were 484.75% and 149.91% respectively. The oral bioavailability of tripterine is dramatically increased by CT-NLCs. Therefore, CT-NLCs seem to be a promising carrier for oral delivery of tripterine.

  5. Topical Delivery of Anti-VEGF Drugs to the Ocular Posterior Segment Using Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    de Cogan, Felicity; Hill, Lisa J; Lynch, Aisling; Morgan-Warren, Peter J; Lechner, Judith; Berwick, Matthew R; Peacock, Anna F A; Chen, Mei; Scott, Robert A H; Xu, Heping; Logan, Ann

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of anti-VEGF agents for treating choroidal neovascularization (CNV) when delivered topically using novel cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) compared with delivery by intravitreal (ivit) injection. CPP toxicity was investigated in cell cultures. Ivit concentrations of ranibizumab and bevacizumab after topical administration were measured using ELISA. The biological efficacy of topical anti-VEGF + CPP complexes was compared with ivit anti-VEGF injections using an established model of CNV. CPPs were nontoxic in vitro. In vivo, after topical eye drop delivery, CPPs were present in the rat anterior chamber within 6 minutes. A single application of CPP + bevacizumab eye drop delivered clinically relevant concentrations of bevacizumab to the posterior chamber of the rat eye in vivo. Similarly, clinically relevant levels of CPP + ranibizumab and CPP + bevacizumab were detected in the porcine vitreous and retina ex vivo. In an established model of CNV, mice treated with either a single ivit injection of anti-VEGF, twice daily CPP + anti-VEGF eye drops or daily dexamethasone gavage for 10 days all had significantly reduced areas of CNV when compared with lasered eyes without treatment. CPPs are nontoxic to ocular cells and can be used to deliver therapeutically relevant doses of ranibizumab and bevacizumab by eye drop to the posterior segment of mouse, rat, and pig eyes. The CPP + anti-VEGF drug complexes were cleared from the retina within 24 hours, suggesting a daily eye drop dosing regimen. Daily, topically delivered anti-VEGF with CPP was as efficacious as a single ivit injection of anti-VEGF in reducing areas of CNV in vivo.

  6. Molecular and Biocompatibility Characterization of Red Blood Cell Membrane Targeted and Cell-Penetrating-Peptide-Modified Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Kaustuv; Karumuri, Sriharsha; Hikkaduwa Koralege, Rangika S; Flynn, Nicholas H; Hartson, Steve; Liu, Jing; Ramsey, Joshua D; Kalkan, A Kaan; Pope, Carey; Ranjan, Ashish

    2017-07-03

    Red blood cells (RBCs) express a variety of immunomodulatory markers that enable the body to recognize them as self. We have shown that RBC membrane glycophorin A (GPA) receptor can mediate membrane attachment of protein therapeutics. A critical knowledge gap is whether attaching drug-encapsulated nanoparticles (NPs) to GPA and modification with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will impact binding, oxygenation, and the induction of cellular stress. The objective of this study was to formulate copolymer-based NPs containing model fluorescent-tagged bovine serum albumin (BSA) with GPA-specific targeting ligands such as ERY1 (ENPs), single-chain variable antibody (scFv TER-119, SNPs), and low-molecular-weight protamine-based CPP (LNPs) and to determine their biocompatibility using a variety of complementary high-throughput in vitro assays. Experiments were conducted by coincubating NPs with RBCs at body temperature, and biocompatibility was evaluated by Raman spectroscopy, hemolysis, complement lysis, and oxidative stress assays. Data suggested that LNPs effectively targeted RBCs, conferring 2-fold greater uptake in RBCs compared to ENPs and SNPs. Raman spectroscopy results indicated no adverse effect of NP attachment or internalization on the oxygenation status of RBCs. Cellular stress markers such as glutathione, malondialdehyde, and catalase were within normal limits, and complement-mediated lysis due to NPs was negligible in RBCs. Under the conditions tested, our data demonstrates that molecular targeting of the RBC membrane is a feasible translational strategy for improving drug pharmacokinetics and that the proposed high-throughput assays can prescreen diverse NPs for preclinical and clinical biocompatibility.

  7. Effective treatment of experimental ragweed-induced asthma with STAT-6-IP, a topically delivered cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Li, Y; Shan, J; Fixman, E; McCusker, C

    2011-11-01

    Treatment of allergic airways disease including asthma remains primarily local immunosuppression with topical corticosteroid and symptomatic management with antihistamines and anti-leucotrienes. We have developed a novel topical therapy designed to specifically inhibit the events associated with Th2 cell activation. We assessed the efficacy of our cell-penetrating STAT-6 inhibitory peptide (STAT-6-IP), a novel treatment for allergic airways disease, in a model of chronic ragweed-induced asthma. Six- to eight-week-old mice were sensitized over 5 weeks with intranasal (IN) exposures to whole ragweed allergen without adjuvant. Mice were then IN challenged with Amba 1 with and without treatment IN with STAT-6-IP and allergic responses assessed. Two weeks later, some animals were rechallenged with Amba 1 with or without STAT-6-IP. Animals exposed to IN ragweed developed significant airway hyperresponsiveness and airways inflammation upon challenge. Cell cultures showed increases in Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13. Topical STAT-6-IP treatment reduced production of Th2 cytokines, demonstrated increased expression of IL-10 and reduced frequency of cultured IL-4 positive CD4+ T cells derived from treated mice, suggesting that STAT-6-IP treatment may be immunomodulatory. Airway responsiveness to methacholine challenge in the treatment group was similarly reduced to that of the non-allergic PBS-exposed animals. Importantly, STAT-6-IP-treated mice remained hyporesponsive following second ragweed challenge 2 weeks after treatment. These data suggest that topical application of the STAT-6-IP is sufficient to inhibit allergic airways responses in animals chronically sensitized and challenged with ragweed. Data show that a single topical treatment course is sufficient to block signs of allergic responses to ragweed in the airways for at least 2 weeks. STAT-6-IP is a novel potential treatment for chronic allergic asthma. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Membrane Surface-Associated Helices Promote Lipid Interactions and Cellular Uptake of Human Calcitonin-Derived Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Herbig, Michael E.; Weller, Kathrin; Krauss, Ulrike; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Merkle, Hans P.; Zerbe, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    hCT(9-32) is a human calcitonin (hCT)-derived cell-penetrating peptide that has been shown to translocate the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. It has been suggested as a cellular carrier for drugs, green fluorescent protein, and plasmid DNA. Because of its temperature-dependent cellular translocation resulting in punctuated cytoplasmatic distribution, its uptake is likely to follow an endocytic pathway. To gain insight into the molecular orientation of hCT(9-32) when interacting with lipid models, and to learn more about its mode of action, various biophysical techniques from liposome partitioning to high-resolution NMR spectroscopy were utilized. Moreover, to establish the role of individual residues for the topology of its association with the lipid membrane, two mutants of hCT(9-32), i.e., W30-hCT(9-32) and A23-hCT(9-32), were also investigated. Although unstructured in aqueous solution, hCT(9-32) adopted two short helical stretches when bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles, extending from Thr10 to Asn17 and from Gln24 to Val29. A23-hCT(9-32), in which the helix-breaking Pro23 was replaced by Ala, displayed a continuous α-helix extending from residue 12 to 26. Probing with the spin label 5-doxylstearate revealed that association with dodecylphosphocholine micelles was such that the helix engaged in parallel orientation to the micelle surface. Moreover, the Gly to Trp exchange in W30-hCT(9-32) resulted in a more stable anchoring of the C-terminal segment close to the interface, as reflected by a twofold increase in the partition coefficient in liposomes. Interestingly, tighter binding to model membranes was associated with an increase in the in vitro uptake in human cervix epithelial andenocarcinoma cell line cells. Liposome leakage studies excluded pore formation, and the punctuated fluorescence pattern of internalized peptide indicated vesicular localization and, in conclusion, strongly suggested an endocytic pathway of translocation. PMID:16183886

  9. Antitumor activity of tripterine via cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers in a prostate cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ling; Liu, Congyan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhou, Lei; Qu, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (CT-NLC) on prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods CT-NLC were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of tripterine. The antiproliferative effects of CT-NLC, tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (T-NLC), and free tripterine in a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3) and a mouse prostate carcinoma cell line (RM-1) were evaluated using an MTT assay. The advantage of CT-NLC over T-NLC and free tripterine with regard to antitumor activity in vivo was evaluated in a prostate tumor-bearing mouse model. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the effect of CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine on immune responses. Histologic and TUNEL assays were carried out to investigate the mechanisms of tumor necrosis and apoptosis. Results CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine showed high antiproliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 0.60, 0.81, and 1.02 μg/mL in the PC-3 cell line and 0.41, 0.54, and 0.89 μg/mL in the RM-1 cell line after 36 hours. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rates for cyclophosphamide, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) tripterine, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) T-NLC, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) CT-NLC were 76.51%, 37.07%, 29.53%, 63.56%, 48.25%, 72.68%, and 54.50%, respectively, showing a dose-dependent pattern. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content after treatment with CT-NLC and T-NLC was significantly higher than that of high-dose tripterine. Moreover, CT-NLC showed the expected advantage of inducing necrosis and apoptosis in prostate tumor cells. Conclusion CT-NLC noticeably enhanced antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and showed dramatically improved cytotoxicity in normal cells

  10. Design and mechanism of action of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide from the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.L.; Lan Hongliang; Park, Il-Seon; Kim, Jae Il; Jin, H.Z.; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, S.Y. . E-mail: syshin@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-10-20

    Here, we report the successful design of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide, Pep-1-K (KKTWWKTWWTKWSQPKKKRKV). Pep-1-K was designed by replacing Glu-2, Glu-6, and Glu-11 in the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 with Lys. Pep-1-K showed strong antibacterial activity against reference strains (MIC = 1-2 {mu}M) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as against clinical isolates (MIC = 1-8 {mu}M) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast, Pep-1-K did not cause hemolysis of human erythrocytes even at 200 {mu}M. These results indicate that Pep-1-K may be a good candidate for antimicrobial drug development, especially as a topical agent against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated that the lack of hemolytic activity of Pep-1-K correlated with its weak ability to penetrate zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (10:1, w/w) vesicles, which mimic eukaryotic membranes. Furthermore, Pep-1-K caused little or no dye leakage from negatively charged phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylglycerol (7:3, w/w) vesicles, which mimic bacterial membranes but had a potent ability to cause depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane potential of intact S. aureus cells. These results suggested that Pep-1-K kills microorganisms by not the membrane-disrupting mode but the formation of small channels that permit transit of ions or protons but not molecules as large as calcein.

  11. Quantification of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Associated with Polymeric Nanoparticles Using Isobaric-Tagging and MALDI-TOF MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jasper Z. S.; Tucker, Ian G.; McDowell, Arlene

    2016-11-01

    High sensitivity quantification of the putative cell-penetrating peptide di-arginine-histidine (RRH) associated with poly (ethyl-cyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanoparticles was achieved without analyte separation, using a novel application of isobaric-tagging and high matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled to time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Isobaric-tagging reaction equilibrium was reached after 5 min, with 90% or greater RRH peptide successfully isobaric-tagged after 60 min. The accuracy was greater than 90%, which indicates good reliability of using isobaric-tagged RRH as an internal standard for RRH quantification. The sample intra- and inter-spot coefficients of variations were less than 11%, which indicate good repeatability. The majority of RRH peptides in the nanoparticle formulation were physically associated with the nanoparticles (46.6%), whereas only a small fraction remained unassociated (13.7%). The unrecovered RRH peptide (~40%) was assumed to be covalently associated with PECA nanoparticles.

  12. Intracellular Toxicity of Proline-Rich Antimicrobial Peptides Shuttled into Mammalian Cells by the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Penetratin

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne; Schäfer, Ingo; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The health threat caused by multiresistant bacteria has continuously increased and recently peaked with pathogens resistant to all current drugs. This has triggered intense research efforts to develop novel compounds to overcome the resistance mechanisms. Thus, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been intensively studied, especially the family of proline-rich AMPs (PrAMPs) that was successfully tested very recently in murine infection models. PrAMPs enter bacteria and inhibit chaperone DnaK. Here, we studied the toxicity of intracellular PrAMPs in HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells. As PrAMPs cannot enter most mammalian cells, we coupled the PrAMPs with penetratin (residues 43 to 58 in the antennapedia homeodomain) via a C-terminally added cysteine utilizing a thioether bridge. The resulting construct could transport the covalently linked PrAMP into mammalian cells. Penetratin ligation reduced the MIC for Gram-negative Escherichia coli only slightly (1 to 8 μmol/liter) but increased the activity against the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus up to 32-fold (MIC ≈ 1 μmol/liter), most likely due to more effective penetration through the bacterial membrane. In contrast to native PrAMPs, the penetratin-PrAMP constructs entered the mammalian cells, aligned around the nucleus, and associated with the Golgi apparatus. At higher concentrations, the constructs reduced the cell viability (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] ≈ 40 μmol/liter) and changed the morphology of the cells. No toxic effects or morphological changes were observed at concentrations of 10 μmol/liter or below. Thus, the IC50 values were around 5 to 40 times higher than the MIC values. In conclusion, PrAMPs are in general not toxic to mammalian cells, as they do not pass through the membrane. When shuttled into mammalian cells, however, PrAMPs are only slightly cross-reactive to mammalian chaperones or other intracellular mammalian proteins, providing a second layer of safety for in vivo applications, even if they

  13. Intracellular toxicity of proline-rich antimicrobial peptides shuttled into mammalian cells by the cell-penetrating peptide penetratin.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne; Schäfer, Ingo; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2012-10-01

    The health threat caused by multiresistant bacteria has continuously increased and recently peaked with pathogens resistant to all current drugs. This has triggered intense research efforts to develop novel compounds to overcome the resistance mechanisms. Thus, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been intensively studied, especially the family of proline-rich AMPs (PrAMPs) that was successfully tested very recently in murine infection models. PrAMPs enter bacteria and inhibit chaperone DnaK. Here, we studied the toxicity of intracellular PrAMPs in HeLa and SH-SY5Y cells. As PrAMPs cannot enter most mammalian cells, we coupled the PrAMPs with penetratin (residues 43 to 58 in the antennapedia homeodomain) via a C-terminally added cysteine utilizing a thioether bridge. The resulting construct could transport the covalently linked PrAMP into mammalian cells. Penetratin ligation reduced the MIC for Gram-negative Escherichia coli only slightly (1 to 8 μmol/liter) but increased the activity against the Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus up to 32-fold (MIC ≈ 1 μmol/liter), most likely due to more effective penetration through the bacterial membrane. In contrast to native PrAMPs, the penetratin-PrAMP constructs entered the mammalian cells, aligned around the nucleus, and associated with the Golgi apparatus. At higher concentrations, the constructs reduced the cell viability (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] ≈ 40 μmol/liter) and changed the morphology of the cells. No toxic effects or morphological changes were observed at concentrations of 10 μmol/liter or below. Thus, the IC(50) values were around 5 to 40 times higher than the MIC values. In conclusion, PrAMPs are in general not toxic to mammalian cells, as they do not pass through the membrane. When shuttled into mammalian cells, however, PrAMPs are only slightly cross-reactive to mammalian chaperones or other intracellular mammalian proteins, providing a second layer of safety for in vivo applications, even if

  14. Effects of pyrenebutyrate on the translocation of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides through artificial membranes: recruiting peptides to the membranes, dissipating liquid-ordered phases, and inducing curvature.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Sayaka; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Yano, Yoshiaki; Murayama, Tomo; Nakata, Yasushi; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Futaki, Shiroh

    2013-09-01

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, including octaarginine (R8) and HIV-1 TAT peptides, have the ability to translocate through cell membranes and transport exogenous bioactive molecules into cells. Hydrophobic counteranions such as pyrenebutyrate (PyB) have been reported to markedly promote the membrane translocation of these peptides. In this study, using model membranes having liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, we explored the effects of PyB on the promotion of R8 translocation. Confocal microscopic observations of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) showed that PyB significantly accelerated the accumulation of R8 on membranes containing negatively charged lipids, leading to the internalization of R8 without collapse of the GUV structures. PyB displayed an alternative activity, increasing the fluidity of the negatively charged membranes, which diminished the distinct Lo/Ld phase separation on GUVs. This was supported by the decrease in fluorescence anisotropy of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Additionally, PyB induced membrane curvature, which has been suggested as a possible mechanism of membrane translocation for R8. Taken together, our results indicate that PyB may have multiple effects that promote R8 translocation through cell membranes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Using the peptide BP100 as a cell-penetrating tool for the chemical engineering of actin filaments within living plant cells.

    PubMed

    Eggenberger, Kai; Mink, Christian; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Ulrich, Anne S; Nick, Peter

    2011-01-03

    The delivery of externally applied macromolecules or nanoparticles into living cells still represents a critically limiting step before the full capabilities of chemical engineering can be explored. Molecular transporters such as cell-penetrating peptides, peptoids, and other mimetics can be used to carry cargo across the cellular membrane, but it is still difficult to find suitable sequences that operate efficiently for any particular type of cell. Here we report that BP100 (KKLFKKILKYL-amide), originally designed as an antimicrobial peptide against plant pathogens, can be employed as a fast and efficient cell-penetrating agent to transport fluorescent test cargoes into the cytosol of walled plant cells. The uptake of BP100 proceeds slightly more slowly than the endocytosis of fluorescent dextranes, but BP100 accumulates more efficiently and to much higher levels (by an order of magnitude). The entry of BP100 can be efficiently blocked by latrunculin B; this suggests that actin filaments are essential to the uptake mechanism. To test whether this novel transporter can also be used to deliver functional cargoes, we designed a fusion construct of BP100 with the actin-binding Lifeact peptide (MGVADLIKKFESISKEE). We demonstrated that the short BP100 could transport the attached 17-residue sequence quickly and efficiently into tobacco cells. The Lifeact construct retained its functionality as it successfully labeled the actin bundles that tether the nucleus in the cell center.

  16. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Yvonne; Grez, Manuel; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21) which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2) within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21)-positive leukemia. PMID:23865046

  17. The potent antimicrobial properties of cell penetrating peptide-conjugated silver nanoparticles with excellent selectivity for Gram-positive bacteria over erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Yang, Jun; Xie, Jianping; Luo, Zhentao; Jiang, Jiang; Yang, Yi Yan; Liu, Shaomin

    2013-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles are of great interest for use as antimicrobial agents. Studies aimed at producing potent nano-silver biocides have focused on manipulation of particle size, shape, composition and surface charge. Here, we report the cell penetrating peptide catalyzed formation of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide. The novel nano-composite demonstrated a distinctly enhanced biocidal effect toward bacteria (Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli) and pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans), as compared to triangular and extremely small silver nanoparticles. In addition, a satisfactory biocompatibility was verified by a haemolysis test. Our results provide a paradigm in developing strategies that can maximize the silver nanoparticle application potentials while minimizing the toxic effects.Silver nanoparticles are of great interest for use as antimicrobial agents. Studies aimed at producing potent nano-silver biocides have focused on manipulation of particle size, shape, composition and surface charge. Here, we report the cell penetrating peptide catalyzed formation of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide. The novel nano-composite demonstrated a distinctly enhanced biocidal effect toward bacteria (Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli) and pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans), as compared to triangular and extremely small silver nanoparticles. In addition, a satisfactory biocompatibility was verified by a haemolysis test. Our results provide a paradigm in developing strategies that can maximize the silver nanoparticle application potentials while minimizing the toxic effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34254a

  18. Overcoming drug resistance by cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of a doxorubicin dimer with high DNA-binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Freidel, Christoph; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Tabujew, Ilja; Schramm, Alexander; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Müllen, Klaus; Peneva, Kalina

    2017-04-21

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of a novel bioconjugate, consisting of an octaarginine cell-penetrating peptide and a highly DNA-affine doxorubicin dimer. The linkage between the two components is composed of a cleavable disulfide bond, which enables the efficient intracellular delivery of the cytotoxic payload within the reductive environment of the cytosol, mediated through glutathione. To determine the DNA-binding affinity of the dimeric drug molecule, microscale thermophoresis was applied. This is the first utilization of this method to assess the binding interactions of an anthracycline drug with nucleic acids. The cytotoxic effect of the peptide-drug conjugate, studied with drug-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant cancer cells, demonstrates that the bioconjugate can successfully overcome drug resistance in neuroblastoma cells.

  19. Synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides--a versatile ring-opening metathesis polymerization based platform for the synthesis of selective antibacterial and cell-penetrating polymers.

    PubMed

    Lienkamp, Karen; Tew, Gregory N

    2009-11-09

    Natural macromolecules exhibit an extensive arsenal of properties, many of which have proven difficult to recapitulate in simpler synthetic systems. Over the last couple of years, foldamers have emerged as one important step toward increased functionality in synthetic systems. While the great majority of work in this area has focused on folded structures, hence the name, more recent progress has centered on polymers that mimic protein function. These efforts have resulted in the design of relatively simple macromolecules; one example are the synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs) that capture the central physicochemical features of their natural archetypes irrespective of the specific folded form. Here we present our recent efforts to create polymers which display biological activity similar to natural proteins, including antimicrobial and cell-penetrating peptides.

  20. Single-Cell Resolution Imaging of Retinal Ganglion Cell Apoptosis In Vivo Using a Cell-Penetrating Caspase-Activatable Peptide Probe

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xudong; Johnson, James R.; Wilson, Bradley S.; Gammon, Seth T.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Barnett, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide probes for imaging retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis consist of a cell-penetrating peptide targeting moiety and a fluorophore-quencher pair flanking an effector caspase consensus sequence. Using ex vivo fluorescence imaging, we previously validated the capacity of these probes to identify apoptotic RGCs in cell culture and in an in vivo rat model of N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurotoxicity. Herein, using TcapQ488, a new probe designed and synthesized for compatibility with clinically-relevant imaging instruments, and real time imaging of a live rat RGC degeneration model, we fully characterized time- and dose-dependent probe activation, signal-to-noise ratios, and probe safety profiles in vivo. Adult rats received intravitreal injections of four NMDA concentrations followed by varying TcapQ488 doses. Fluorescence fundus imaging was performed sequentially in vivo using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope and individual RGCs displaying activated probe were counted and analyzed. Rats also underwent electroretinography following intravitreal injection of probe. In vivo fluorescence fundus imaging revealed distinct single-cell probe activation as an indicator of RGC apoptosis induced by intravitreal NMDA injection that corresponded to the identical cells observed in retinal flat mounts of the same eye. Peak activation of probe in vivo was detected 12 hours post probe injection. Detectable fluorescent RGCs increased with increasing NMDA concentration; sensitivity of detection generally increased with increasing TcapQ488 dose until saturating at 0.387 nmol. Electroretinography following intravitreal injections of TcapQ488 showed no significant difference compared with control injections. We optimized the signal-to-noise ratio of a caspase-activatable cell penetrating peptide probe for quantitative non-invasive detection of RGC apoptosis in vivo. Full characterization of probe performance in this setting creates an important in vivo imaging

  1. Enhancing siRNA-based cancer therapy using a new pH-responsive activatable cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomal system

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Bai; Jia, Xue-Li; Qi, Jin-Long; Yang, Li-Ping; Sun, Wei-Hong; Yan, Xiao; Yang, Shao-Kun; Cao, De-Ying; Du, Qing; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-01-01

    As a potent therapeutic agent, small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been exploited to silence critical genes involved in tumor initiation and progression. However, development of a desirable delivery system is required to overcome the unfavorable properties of siRNA such as its high degradability, molecular size, and negative charge to help increase its accumulation in tumor tissues and promote efficient cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of the nucleic acids. In this study, we developed a new activatable cell-penetrating peptide (ACPP) that is responsive to an acidic tumor microenvironment, which was then used to modify the surfaces of siRNA-loaded liposomes. The ACPP is composed of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), an acid-labile linker (hydrazone), and a polyanionic domain, including glutamic acid and histidine. In the systemic circulation (pH 7.4), the surface polycationic moieties of the CPP (polyarginine) are “shielded” by the intramolecular electrostatic interaction of the inhibitory domain. When exposed to a lower pH, a common property of solid tumors, the ACPP undergoes acid-catalyzed breakage at the hydrazone site, and the consequent protonation of histidine residues promotes detachment of the inhibitory peptide. Subsequently, the unshielded CPP would facilitate the cellular membrane penetration and efficient endosomal/lysosomal evasion of liposomal siRNA. A series of investigations demonstrated that once exposed to an acidic pH, the ACPP-modified liposomes showed elevated cellular uptake, downregulated expression of polo-like kinase 1, and augmented cell apoptosis. In addition, favorable siRNA avoidance of the endosome/lysosome was observed in both MCF-7 and A549 cells, followed by effective cytoplasmic release. In view of its acid sensitivity and therapeutic potency, this newly developed pH-responsive and ACPP-mediated liposome system represents a potential platform for siRNA-based cancer treatment. PMID:28405163

  2. Conjugation of curcumin-loaded lipid nanoemulsions with cell-penetrating peptides increases their cellular uptake and enhances the anti-inflammatory effects in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Simion, Viorel; Stan, Daniela; Constantinescu, Cristina Ana; Deleanu, Mariana; Dragan, Emanuel; Tucureanu, Monica Madalina; Gan, Ana-Maria; Butoi, Elena; Constantin, Alina; Manduteanu, Ileana; Simionescu, Maya; Calin, Manuela

    2016-02-01

    To prepare and characterize in vitro and in vivo lipid nanoemulsions (LN) loaded with curcumin (Cm) and functionalized with a cell-penetrating peptide. Curcumin-loaded lipid nanoemulsions (CmLN) functionalized with a nona-arginine peptide (R9-CmLN) have been obtained, characterized and optimized for size, entrapment efficiency and in vitro Cm release. The interaction of R9-CmLN with human endothelial cells (HEC) was investigated using cultured EA.hy926 cells, and in vivo biodistribution studies were performed using C57BL6 mice. When used in therapeutically relevant concentration, R9-CmLN have low haemolytic activity, low cytotoxicity on HEC, and show anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the monocytes adhesion to TNF-α activated HEC. Moreover, HEC uptake and internalization of R9-CmLN was significantly higher compared to the non-functionalized CmLN. In vivo biodistribution studies in mice revealed a higher accumulation of R9-CmLN in the liver and the lungs compared to CmLN and the body clearance of the both nanoformulations after 72 h. Cell-penetrating peptides-functionalized CmLN have superior characteristics compared to their non-functionalized counterparts: are more efficiently internalized by the cells, produces anti-inflammatory effects in HEC and when administrated intravenously in mice exhibit increased accumulation in the liver and the lungs, suggesting their potential therapeutic applications in different inflammatory pathologies localized in the liver or the lungs. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Chung, Chong-Pyoung

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  4. Curb Challenges of the “Trojan Horse” Approach: Smart Strategies in Achieving Effective yet Safe Cell-penetrating Peptide-based Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongzhuo; Jiang, Yifan; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Jianxin; Shin, Meong Cheol; Byun, Youngro; He, Huining; Liang, Yanqin; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated intracellular drug delivery system, often specifically termed as “the Trojan horse approach”, has become the “holy grail” in achieving effective delivery of macromolecular compounds such as proteins, DNA, siRNAs, and drug carriers. It is characterized by the unique cell- (or receptor-), temperature-, and payload-independent mechanisms, therefore offering potent means to improve poor cellular uptake of a variety of macromolecular drugs. Nevertheless, this “Trojan horse” approach also acts like a double-edged sword, causing serious safety and toxicity concerns to normal tissues or organs for in vivo application, due to lack of target selectivity of the powerful cell penetrating activity. To overcome this problem of potent yet non-selective penetration vs. targeting delivery, a number of “smart” strategies have been developed in recent years, including controllable CPP-based drug delivery systems based on various stimuli-responsive mechanisms. This review article provides a fundamental understanding of these smart systems, as well as a discussion of their real-time in vivo applicability. PMID:23369828

  5. Structural Elucidation of the Cell-Penetrating Penetratin Peptide in Model Membranes at the Atomic Level: Probing Hydrophobic Interactions in the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Bera, Swapna; Kar, Rajiv K; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-09-06

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promise in nonpermeable therapeutic drug delivery, because of their ability to transport a variety of cargo molecules across the cell membranes and their noncytotoxicity. Drosophila antennapedia homeodomain-derived CPP penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), being rich in positively charged residues, has been increasingly used as a potential drug carrier for various purposes. Penetratin can breach the tight endothelial network known as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), permitting treatment of several neurodegenerative maladies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease. However, a detailed structural understanding of penetratin and its mechanism of action is lacking. This study defines structural features of the penetratin-derived peptide, DK17 (DRQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), in several model membranes and describes a membrane-induced conformational transition of the DK17 peptide in these environments. A series of biophysical experiments, including high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, provides the three-dimensional structure of DK17 in different membranes mimicking the BBB or total brain lipid extract. Molecular dynamics simulations support the experimental results showing preferential binding of DK17 to particular lipids at atomic resolution. The peptide conserves the structure of the subdomain spanning residues Ile6-Arg11, despite considerable conformational variation in different membrane models. In vivo data suggest that the wild type, not a mutated sequence, enters the central nervous system. Together, these data highlight important structural and functional attributes of DK17 that could be utilized in drug delivery for neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Quantification of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Associated with Polymeric Nanoparticles Using Isobaric-Tagging and MALDI-TOF MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Jasper Z S; Tucker, Ian G; McDowell, Arlene

    2016-11-01

    High sensitivity quantification of the putative cell-penetrating peptide di-arginine-histidine (RRH) associated with poly (ethyl-cyanoacrylate) (PECA) nanoparticles was achieved without analyte separation, using a novel application of isobaric-tagging and high matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization coupled to time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Isobaric-tagging reaction equilibrium was reached after 5 min, with 90% or greater RRH peptide successfully isobaric-tagged after 60 min. The accuracy was greater than 90%, which indicates good reliability of using isobaric-tagged RRH as an internal standard for RRH quantification. The sample intra- and inter-spot coefficients of variations were less than 11%, which indicate good repeatability. The majority of RRH peptides in the nanoparticle formulation were physically associated with the nanoparticles (46.6%), whereas only a small fraction remained unassociated (13.7%). The unrecovered RRH peptide (~40%) was assumed to be covalently associated with PECA nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Mechanisms of cell penetration and cytotoxicity of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles conjugated to doxorubicin and/or targeting peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    The goals of this work were to determine whether conjugation of any of four selected peptides to Au nanoparticles improved their delivery to B16 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, peptides and conjugates were endocytosed but did not escape from endosomes. None of the peptides showed any cytotoxicity, with or without conjugation to the nanoparticles. The combination of peptides and doxorubicin did not improve upon the cytotoxicity of gold-doxorubicin alone. We then tested targeting in vivo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentration of Au in the organs of B16 tumor-bearing mice 4, 24, and 72 h after intravenous Au nanoparticle injection. These experiments showed that in some cases, peptide conjugation improved upon the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A peptide based upon the myxoma virus and the cyclic RGD peptide were both effective at tumor targeting; myxoma was more effective with un-PEGylated particles, and cRGD with PEGylated particles. The FREG and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) peptides did not improve targeting. These results suggest that these peptides may improve delivery of Au particles to tumors, but also may prevent entry of particles into cell nuclei.

  8. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  9. Parallel Synthesis of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Conjugates of PMO Toward Exon Skipping Enhancement in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, Liz; Okamoto, Itaru; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Williams, Donna L.; Deuss, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe two new methods of parallel chemical synthesis of libraries of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) cargoes on a scale suitable for cell screening prior to in vivo analysis for therapeutic development. The methods represent an extension of the SELection of PEPtide CONjugates (SELPEPCON) approach previously developed for parallel peptide-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) synthesis. However, these new methods allow for the utilization of commercial PMO as cargo with both C- and N-termini unfunctionalized. The synthetic methods involve conjugation in solution phase, followed by rapid purification via biotin-streptavidin immobilization and subsequent reductive release into solution, avoiding the need for painstaking high-performance liquid chromatography purifications. The synthesis methods were applied for screening of PMO conjugates of a 16-member library of variants of a 10-residue ApoE peptide, which was suggested for blood-brain barrier crossing. In this work the conjugate library was tested in an exon skipping assay using skeletal mouse mdx cells, a model of Duchene's muscular dystrophy where higher activity peptide-PMO conjugates were identified compared with the starting peptide-PMO. The results demonstrate the power of the parallel synthesis methods for increasing the speed of optimization of peptide sequences in conjugates of PMO for therapeutic screening. PMID:25412073

  10. Parallel synthesis of cell-penetrating peptide conjugates of PMO toward exon skipping enhancement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Liz; Okamoto, Itaru; Arzumanov, Andrey A; Williams, Donna L; Deuss, Peter; Gait, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    We describe two new methods of parallel chemical synthesis of libraries of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) cargoes on a scale suitable for cell screening prior to in vivo analysis for therapeutic development. The methods represent an extension of the SELection of PEPtide CONjugates (SELPEPCON) approach previously developed for parallel peptide-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) synthesis. However, these new methods allow for the utilization of commercial PMO as cargo with both C- and N-termini unfunctionalized. The synthetic methods involve conjugation in solution phase, followed by rapid purification via biotin-streptavidin immobilization and subsequent reductive release into solution, avoiding the need for painstaking high-performance liquid chromatography purifications. The synthesis methods were applied for screening of PMO conjugates of a 16-member library of variants of a 10-residue ApoE peptide, which was suggested for blood-brain barrier crossing. In this work the conjugate library was tested in an exon skipping assay using skeletal mouse mdx cells, a model of Duchene's muscular dystrophy where higher activity peptide-PMO conjugates were identified compared with the starting peptide-PMO. The results demonstrate the power of the parallel synthesis methods for increasing the speed of optimization of peptide sequences in conjugates of PMO for therapeutic screening.

  11. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  12. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream signaling with cell-penetrating peptides in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Wilson, Jamie L; Taylor, Linda; Rahimi, Nader; Mierke, Dale; Polgar, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) intracellular delivery of receptor signaling motifs provides an opportunity to regulate specific receptor tyrosine kinase signal transductions. We targeted tyrosine residues Y740 and Y751 of the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) and Y1175 of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The Y740 and Y751 motifs activated ERK and Akt, while the Y1175 motif activated ERK. Targeting either Y740 or Y751 of the PDGFRβ in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) effectively inhibited PDGF activation of ERK or Akt. Interfering with the Y751 region of the PDGFRβ proved more effective than targeting the Y740 region. The phosphorylation of Y751 of the CPP and the length and exact sequence of the mimicking peptide proved crucial. On the other hand, in human pulmonary artery endothelial cell phosphorylation of the VEGFR2 Y1175 CPP was not a determinant in blockage of ERK activation. Likewise, the length of the peptide mimic was not crucial with a very small sequence containing the Y1175 remaining effective. Physiologic proof of concept for the effectiveness of the CPP was confirmed by blockage of HPASMC migration in response to PDGF following culture injury. Thus targeted blockage of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling can be very effective.

  13. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification.

    PubMed

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-11-14

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.10(8) for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells.

  14. Imperatoxin A, a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Scorpion Venom, as a Probe of Ca2+-Release Channels/Ryanodine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gurrola, Georgina B.; Capes, E. Michelle; Zamudio, Fernando Z.; Possani, Lourival D.; Valdivia, Héctor H.

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion venoms are rich in ion channel-modifying peptides, which have proven to be invaluable probes of ion channel structure-function relationship. We previously isolated imperatoxin A (IpTxa), a 3.7 kDa peptide activator of Ca2+-release channels/ryanodine receptors (RyRs) [1,2,3] and founding member of the calcin family of scorpion peptides. IpTxa folds into a compact, mostly hydrophobic molecule with a cluster of positively-charged, basic residues polarized on one side of the molecule that possibly interacts with the phospholipids of cell membranes. To investigate whether IpTxa permeates external cellular membranes and targets RyRs in vivo, we perfused IpTxa on intact cardiomyocytes while recording field-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ transients. To further investigate the cell-penetrating capabilities of the toxin, we prepared thiolated, fluorescent derivatives of IpTxa. Biological activity and spectroscopic properties indicate that these derivatives retain high affinity for RyRs and are only 5- to 10-fold less active than native IpTxa. Our results demonstrate that IpTxa is capable of crossing cell membranes to alter the release of Ca2+ in vivo, and has the capacity to carry a large, membrane-impermeable cargo across the plasma membrane, a finding with exciting implications for novel drug delivery. PMID:20668646

  15. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy and flow cytometry analyses of cell-penetrating peptides internalization pathways: optimization, pitfalls, comparison with mass spectrometry quantification

    PubMed Central

    Illien, Françoise; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Amoura, Mehdi; Joliot, Alain; Pallerla, Manjula; Cribier, Sophie; Burlina, Fabienne; Sagan, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides entry into cells is unclear, preventing the development of more efficient vectors for biotechnological or therapeutic purposes. Here, we developed a protocol relying on fluorometry to distinguish endocytosis from direct membrane translocation, using Penetratin, TAT and R9. The quantities of internalized CPPs measured by fluorometry in cell lysates converge with those obtained by our previously reported mass spectrometry quantification method. By contrast, flow cytometry quantification faces several limitations due to fluorescence quenching processes that depend on the cell line and occur at peptide/cell ratio >6.108 for CF-Penetratin. The analysis of cellular internalization of a doubly labeled fluorescent and biotinylated Penetratin analogue by the two independent techniques, fluorometry and mass spectrometry, gave consistent results at the quantitative and qualitative levels. Both techniques revealed the use of two alternative translocation and endocytosis pathways, whose relative efficacy depends on cell-surface sugars and peptide concentration. We confirmed that Penetratin translocates at low concentration and uses endocytosis at high μM concentrations. We further demonstrate that the hydrophobic/hydrophilic nature of the N-terminal extremity impacts on the internalization efficiency of CPPs. We expect these results and the associated protocols to help unraveling the translocation pathway to the cytosol of cells. PMID:27841303

  16. Enlarging the scope of cell penetrating prenylated peptides to include farnesylated “CAAX” box sequences and diverse cell types

    PubMed Central

    Ochocki, Joshua D.; Igbavboa, Urule; Wood, W. Gibson; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that is present in a large number of proteins; it has been proposed to be responsible for membrane association and protein-protein interactions which contribute to its role in signal transduction pathways. Research has been aimed at inhibiting prenylation with farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) based on the finding that the farnesylated protein Ras is implicated in 30% of human cancers. Despite numerous studies on the enzymology of prenylation in vitro, many questions remain about the process of prenylation as it occurs in living cells. Here we describe the preparation of a series of farnesylated peptides that contain sequences recognized by protein farnesyltransferase. Using a combination of flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, we show that these peptides enter a variety of different cell types. A related peptide where the farnesyl group has been replaced by a disulfide-linked decyl group is also shown to be able to efficiently enter cells. These results highlight the applicability of these peptides as a platform for further study of protein prenylation and subsequent processing in live cells. PMID:20584014

  17. Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides facilitate delivery of antisense oligomers into murine leukocytes and alter pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N B; Oda, S K; London, C A; Moulton, H M; Iversen, P L; Kerkvliet, N I; Mourich, D V

    2007-08-31

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO) are synthetic antisense molecules that interfere with translation, pre-mRNA splicing and RNA synthesis. Like other gene-silencing technologies, PMO are poorly taken up by primary leukocytes without the use of physical or chemical delivery techniques. We sought an alternative delivery mechanism of PMO into immune cells that eliminates the need for such manipulations. Here we demonstrate the first use of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to deliver PMO (P-PMO) directly into primary murine leukocytes for inhibition of gene expression and promotion of altered pre-mRNA splicing. We compared the P-PMO delivery efficacy of four arginine-rich CPPs including HIV Tat and penetratin, and one histidine rich CPP, and found that the (RXR)(4) peptide was the most efficacious for PMO delivery and targeted antisense effect. The delivery and antisense effects of P-PMO are time- and dose-dependent and influenced by the activation and maturation states of T cells and dendritic cells, respectively. Targeted expression of several genes using P-PMO is shown including surface signaling proteins (CD45 and OX-40), a cytokine (interleukin-2), and a nuclear transcription factor (Foxp3). Considering the abundance of naturally occurring alternatively spliced gene products involved in immune regulation, P-PMO offer an effective method for modulating gene activity for immunological research and applications beyond traditional antisense approaches.

  18. Identification of a Short Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Bovine Lactoferricin for Intracellular Delivery of DNA in Human A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to deliver cargos, including protein, DNA, RNA, and nanomaterials, in fully active forms into live cells. Most of the CPP sequences in use today are based on non-native proteins that may be immunogenic. Here we demonstrate that the L5a CPP (RRWQW) from bovine lactoferricin (LFcin), stably and noncovalently complexed with plasmid DNA and prepared at an optimal nitrogen/phosphate ratio of 12, is able to efficiently enter into human lung cancer A549 cells. The L5a CPP delivered a plasmid containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence that was subsequently expressed in cells, as revealed by real-time PCR and fluorescent microscopy at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Treatment with calcium chloride increased the level of gene expression, without affecting CPP-mediated transfection efficiency. Zeta-potential analysis revealed that positively electrostatic interactions of CPP/DNA complexes correlated with CPP-mediated transport. The L5a and L5a/DNA complexes were not cytotoxic. This biomimetic LFcin L5a represents one of the shortest effective CPPs and could be a promising lead peptide with less immunogenic for DNA delivery in gene therapy.

  19. Visualization and Quantitative Assessment of the Brain Distribution of Insulin through Nose-to-Brain Delivery Based on the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Noncovalent Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Kanayama, Yousuke; Tanaka, Misa; Zochi, Riyo; Hasegawa, Koki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-03-07

    Our recent work suggested that intranasal coadministration with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin increased the brain distribution of the peptide drug insulin. The present study aimed to distinctly certify the ability of penetratin to facilitate the nose-to-brain delivery of insulin by quantitatively evaluating the distribution characteristics in brain using radioactive (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin. Autoradiography and analysis using a gamma counter of brain areas demonstrated that the accumulation of radioactivity was greatest in the olfactory bulb, the anterior part of the brain closest to the administration site, at 15 min after intranasal administration of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with l- or d-penetratin. The brain accumulation of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with penetratin was confirmed by ELISA using unlabeled insulin in which intact insulin was delivered to the brain after intranasal coadministration with l- or d-penetratin. By contrast, quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples showed increased insulin concentration in only the anterior portion of the CSF at 15 min after intranasal coadministration with l-penetratin. This study gives the first concrete proof that penetratin can accelerate the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity to the brain parenchyma. Further optimization of intranasal administration with CPP may increase the efficacy of delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain while reducing the risk of systemic drug exposure.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and applications of carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolated bifunctionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots in cellular internalization mediated by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Winiarz, Jeffrey G; Moon, Jong-Sik; Lo, Shih-Yen; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots (QDs), are widely used in biomedical imaging studies and pharmaceutical research. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of small peptides that are able to traverse cell membrane and deliver a variety of cargoes into living cells. CPPs deliver QDs into cells with minimal nonspecific absorption and toxic effect. In this study, water-soluble, monodisperse, carboxyl-functionalized indium phosphide (InP)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) QDs coated with polyethylene glycol lipids (designated QInP) were synthesized for the first time. The physicochemical properties (optical absorption, fluorescence and charging state) and cellular internalization of QInP and CPP/QInP complexes were characterized. CPPs noncovalently interact with QInP in vitro to form stable CPP/QInP complexes, which can then efficiently deliver QInP into human A549 cells. The introduction of 500nM of CPP/QInP complexes and QInP at concentrations of less than 1μM did not reduce cell viability. These results indicate that carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolylated (PEGylated) bifunctionalized QInP are biocompatible nanoparticles with potential for use in biomedical imaging studies and drug delivery applications.

  1. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs): From delivery of nucleic acids and antigens to transduction of engineered nucleases for application in transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Campelo, Iana S; Morlighem, Jean-Étienne R L; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2017-06-20

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been studied for their capacity to translocate across the lipid membrane of several cell types. In membrane translocation, these peptides can remarkably transport biologically active hydrophilic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and even high-molecular-weight proteins, Fig. 3 into the cell cytoplasm and organelles. The development of CPPs as transduction agents includes the modification of gene and protein expression, the reprogramming and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells and the preparation of cellular vaccines. A relatively recent field of CPP application is the transduction of plasmid DNA vectors and CPP-fusion proteins to modify genomes and introduce new traits in cells and organisms. CPP-mediated transduction of components for genome editing is an advantageous alternative to viral DNA vectors. Engineered site-specific nucleases, such as Cre recombinase, ZFN, TALENs and CRISPR associated protein (Cas), have been coupled to CPPs, and the fused proteins have been used to permeate targeted cells and tissues. The functionally active fusion CPP-nucleases subsequently home to the nucleus, incise genomic DNA at specific sites and induce repair and recombination. This review has the objective of discussing CPPs and elucidating the prospective use of CPP-mediated transduction technology, particularly in genome modification and transgenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Determination of the optimal cell-penetrating peptide sequence for intestinal insulin delivery based on molecular orbital analysis with self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Kikuchi, Shingo; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko; Terasawa, Yoshiaki; Yasuda, Akihito; Yamamoto, Shuichi; Ida, Nobuo; Nishio, Reiji; Takayama, Kozo

    2013-02-01

    Our recent work has shown that the intestinal absorption of insulin can be improved significantly by coadministration of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), especially penetratin. However, a relatively high dose of penetratin is required to adequately stimulate the intestinal absorption of insulin. Therefore, in this study, we sought to determine the CPP that most effectively enhanced intestinal insulin absorption. An in situ loop absorption study using 26 penetratin analogues suggested that the chain length, hydrophobicity, and amphipathicity of the CPPs, as well as their basicity, contribute to their absorption-enhancing efficiency. Moreover, a molecular orbital method with self-organizing maps (SOMs) classification suggested that multiple factors, including the molecular weight, basicity, the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, absolute hardness, and chemical potential of CPPs, are associated with their effects on intestinal insulin absorption. Furthermore, the new CPPs proposed by SOM clustering had a marked capacity to interact with insulin, and their ability to enhance insulin absorption was much stronger than that of the original penetratin. Therefore, the peptide sequence that optimally enhances intestinal insulin absorption could be defined by SOM with the molecular orbital method, and our present work emphasizes the utility of such methodologies in the development of effective drug delivery systems.

  3. Electrochemical investigation of cellular uptake of quantum dots decorated with a proline-rich cell penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Marín, Sergio; Pujals, Sílvia; Giralt, Ernest; Merkoçi, Arben

    2011-02-16

    The use of square wave voltammetry to monitor the cellular uptake, in HeLa cells, of quantum dots (QD) decorated with sweet arrow peptide (SAP) is reported. A SAP derivative containing an additional N-terminal cysteine residue (C-SAP) was synthesized using the solid-phase method and conjugated to QDs. The obtained results show that QDs-SAP either interact with the extracellular cell membrane matrix or translocate the bilayer. The first situation, membrane adsorption, is probably a transient state before cellular uptake. Both confocal microscopy and SWV results support the detection of this cellular internalization process. The developed electrochemical investigation technique can provide valuable insights into the study of peptide-mediated delivery, as well as the design and development of nanoparticle probes for intracellular imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic applications. In addition, the described electrochemical interrogation is low cost, is easy to use, and offers future interest for diagnostics including cell analysis.

  4. Targeting heat shock proteins on cancer cells: selection, characterization, and cell-penetrating properties of a peptidic GRP78 ligand.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Lillo, Antonietta M; Steiniger, Sebastian C J; Liu, Ying; Ballatore, Carlo; Anichini, Andrea; Mortarini, Roberta; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Zhou, Bin; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Janda, Kim D

    2006-08-08

    Peptidic ligands can be used for specific cell targeting and the delivery of payloads into the target cell. Here we describe the screening of a pool of cyclic peptide phage display libraries using whole-cell panning against human melanoma cell line Me6652/4. This strategy resulted in the selection of the cyclic 13-mer Pep42, CTVALPGGYVRVC, which showed preferential internalization into melanoma cell line Me6652/4 versus the reference cell line Me6652/56. This translocation is a receptor-mediated process that does not require electrostatic interactions nor does it involve transfer to the lysosomal compartment. The cellular receptor for Pep42 was identified as the surface membrane form of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), a member of the heat shock protein family and a marker on malignant cancer cells. The cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking of Pep42-Quantum Dot conjugates was monitored by confocal laser microscopy, and colocalization within the endoplasmic reticulum was observed. The uptake of Pep42 could be blocked by a monoclonal antibody against the identified receptor. Furthermore, Pep42 was shown to target specifically GRP78-expressing cancer cells. The in vitro cytotoxicity of a Pep42-Taxol conjugate was evaluated by flow cytometry wherein the conjugate was shown to induce apoptosis and was more effective in promoting programmed cell death in Me6652/4 cells. In summary, the data presented suggest that cyclic peptide Pep42 might be a powerful tool in the construction of drug conjugates designed to selectively kill malignant cancer cells.

  5. A targeted ultrasound contrast agent carrying gene and cell-penetrating peptide: preparation and gene transfection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jianli; Zhang, Ping; Tian, Ju; Zhou, Zhiyi; Liu, Xingzhao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-09-01

    Targeted and high efficient gene delivery is a main issue in gene treatment. Taking advantage of ischemic memory target P-selectin and our previous study-synergistic effects of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) and TAT peptide on gene transfection, which were characterized by targeted aggregation and high efficient gene transfection, we set up a 'smart' gene delivery system-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) carrying gene and cell-permeable peptides (CPP). Such UCA had a strong binding force with DNA which was protected from being hydrolysed by nuclease. Moreover, synergistic effects of UTMD and TAT peptide increased gene transfection. Specifically, the UCA were reacted with an ischemic memory target P-selectin overexpressed by ischemic issues (including ischemic heart disease) and loaded with gene and CPP, which enabled targeted localization and gene delivery to ischemic cells overexpressing P-selectin. We demonstrated their targeting affinity for hypoxia human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and gene transfection in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that gene and CPP were distributed on the shell of UCA. Red fluorescence was observed on the surface of targeted UCA using immunofluorescent microscopy, which demonstrated that the antibody was successfully connected to the UCA. The targeted UCA was specifically and tightly binded to hypoxia HUVEC, while there were no or little non-targeted UCA binding around hypoxia HUVEC. 24h after transfection, gene transfection efficiency detected by FCM was higher in targeted group than non-targeted group. Overall, the targeted UCA carrying gene and CPP was prepared successfully. It had a strong target binding capacity to hypoxia HUVEC and high efficient gene transfection, which maybe provide a novel strategy for gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cell-penetrating peptide-doxorubicin conjugate loaded NGR-modified nanobubbles for ultrasound triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Xie, Xiangyang; Deng, Jianping; Liu, Hui; Chen, Ying; Fu, Xudong; Liu, Hong; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A new drug-targeting system for CD13(+) tumors has been developed, based on ultrasound-sensitive nanobubbles (NBs) and cell-permeable peptides (CPPs). Here, the CPP-doxorubicin conjugate (CPP-DOX) was entrapped in the asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) peptide modified NB (CPP-DOX/NGR-NB) and the penetration of CPP-DOX was temporally masked; local ultrasound stimulation could trigger the CPP-DOX release from NB and activate its penetration. The CPP-DOX/NGR-NBs had particle sizes of about 200 nm and drug entrapment efficiency larger than 90%. In vitro release results showed that over 85% of the encapsulated DOX or CPP-DOX would release from NBs in the presence of ultrasound, while less than 1.5% of that (30 min) without ultrasound. Cell experiments showed the higher cellular CPP-DOX uptake of CPP-DOX/NGR-NB among the various NB formulations in Human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080, CD13(+)). The CPP-DOX/NGR-NB with ultrasound treatment exhibited an increased cytotoxic activity than the one without ultrasound. In nude mice xenograft of HT-1080 cells, CPP-DOX/NGR-NB with ultrasound showed a higher tumor inhibition effect (3.1% of T/C%, day 24), longer median survival time (50 days) and excellent body safety compared with the normal DOX injection group. These results indicate that the constructed vesicle would be a promising drug delivery system for specific cancer treatment.

  7. Novel pH-sensitive charge-reversal cell penetrating peptide conjugated PEG-PLA micelles for docetaxel delivery: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Ouahab, Ammar; Cheraga, Nihad; Onoja, Vitus; Shen, Yan; Tu, Jiasheng

    2014-05-15

    In order to create a pH-sensitive charge-reversal system for cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to prevent non-specific internalization of the drug; and concomitantly enhance the physical stability and tumor targetability of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(d,l-lactide) (PEG-PLA) micelles, two sets of novel PEG-PLA micelles were developed. Cell penetrating decapeptide arginine-glycine (RG)5 and a pH-sensitive masking decapeptide histidine-glutamic acid (HE)5 were conjugated at the PEG free end to produce pH sensitive with peptides outside micelles (PHPO), while the pH sensitive with peptides inside micelles (PHPI) are the micelles obtained with the two peptides conjugated to the free end of the PLA block. The polymers were successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR and GPC. The mixed micelles were prepared and characterized for their loading efficiency, particle size and zeta potential. The surface charge of PHPO was greatly affected by the pH of the solution and (RG)5:(HE)5 ratio at the surface. The pH value of the solution at which the surface charge of PHPO reversed could be manipulated by the feed ratio of (RG)5-PEG-PLA (RGO) and (HE)5-PEG-PLA (HEO), hence, HEO:RGO molar ratio of 45:55 was selected for tumor targeting. Docetaxel (DTX) was sufficiently solubilized by DTX-PHPO with a loading efficiency of 90.18 ± 1.65%. At pH 7.4, DTX loaded mPEG-PLA (DTX-PM) (41.2 ± 0.3 nm), DTX-PHPO (195.3 ± 1.9 nm) and DTX-PHPI (190.9 ± 4.5 nm) showed sustained DTX release of less than 55% within 48 h. However, at pH 6.8 DTX-PHPI released 87.29 ± 0.24%, while DTX-PHPO released 70.49 ± 0.39% of the initial DTX amount within 48 h. Moreover, the physical stability of DTX-PHPO was increased due to the electrostatic interaction of the two peptides. The cellular uptake of DTX-PHPO in SGC-7901 cells and the cell killing effect tested on MCF-7 cells were enhanced by 2 folds at pH 6.8 compared to pH 7.4. Hence, DTX-PHPO is highly pH-sensitive in mildly acidic pH and exhibited

  8. Attachment of cell-binding ligands to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides enables cytosolic translocation of complexed siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Skye; Choi, Changseon; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Ban, Hongseok; Siefert, Alyssa; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Mothes, Walther; Lee, Sang Kyung; Kumar, Priti

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) like nona-arginine (9R) poorly translocate siRNA into cells. Our studies demonstrate that attaching 9R to ligands that bind cell-surface receptors quantitatively increases siRNA uptake and importantly, allows functional delivery of complexed siRNA. The mechanism involved accumulation of ligand-9R:siRNA microparticles on the cell membrane, which induced transient membrane inversion at the site of ligand-9R binding and rapid siRNA translocation into the cytoplasm. siRNA release also occurred late after endocytosis when the ligand was attached to the L isoform of 9R, but not the protease-resistant 9DR, prolonging mRNA knockdown. This critically depended on endosomal proteolytic activity implying partial CPP degradation is required for endosome to cytosol translocation. The data demonstrate that ligand attachment renders simple polycationic CPPs effective for siRNA delivery by restoring their intrinsic property of translocation. PMID:25544044

  9. Novel Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Based Vaccine Induces Robust CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Derouazi, Madiha; Di Berardino-Besson, Wilma; Belnoue, Elodie; Hoepner, Sabine; Walther, Romy; Benkhoucha, Mahdia; Teta, Patrick; Dufour, Yannick; Yacoub Maroun, Céline; Salazar, Andres M; Martinvalet, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Walker, Paul R

    2015-08-01

    Vaccines that can coordinately induce multi-epitope T cell-mediated immunity, T helper functions, and immunologic memory may offer effective tools for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we report the development of a new class of recombinant protein cancer vaccines that deliver different CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-cell epitopes presented by MHC class I and class II alleles, respectively. In these vaccines, the recombinant protein is fused with Z12, a novel cell-penetrating peptide that promotes efficient protein loading into the antigen-processing machinery of dendritic cells. Z12 elicited an integrated and multi-epitopic immune response with persistent effector T cells. Therapy with Z12-formulated vaccines prolonged survival in three robust tumor models, with the longest survival in an orthotopic model of aggressive brain cancer. Analysis of the tumor sites showed antigen-specific T-cell accumulation with favorable modulation of the balance of the immune infiltrate. Taken together, the results offered a preclinical proof of concept for the use of Z12-formulated vaccines as a versatile platform for the development of effective cancer vaccines.

  10. Delivery of siRNA to the brain using a combination of nose-to-brain delivery and cell-penetrating peptide-modified nano-micelles.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, T; Akiyama, F; Kakizaki, S; Takashima, Y; Seta, Y

    2013-12-01

    The potential for RNA-based agents to serve as effective therapeutics for central nerve systems (CNS) disorders has been successfully demonstrated in vitro. However, the blood-brain barrier limits the distribution of systemically administered therapeutics to the CNS, posing a major challenge for drug development aimed at combatting CNS disorders. Therefore, the development of effective strategies to enhance siRNA delivery to the brain is of great interest in clinical and pharmaceutical fields. To improve the efficiency of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the brain, we developed a nose-to-brain delivery system combined with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) modified nano-micelles comprising polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (PEG-PCL) copolymers conjugated with the CPP, Tat (MPEG-PCL-Tat). In this study, we describe intranasal brain delivery of siRNA or dextran (Mw: 10,000 Da) as a model siRNA, by using MPEG-PCL-Tat. Intranasal delivery of dextran with MPEG-PCL-Tat improved brain delivery compared to intravenous delivery of dextran either with or without MPEG-PCL-Tat. We also studied the intranasal transfer of MPEG-PCL-Tat to the brain via the olfactory and trigeminal nerves, the putative pathways to the brain from the nasal cavity. We found that MPEG-PCL-Tat accelerated transport along the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathway because of its high permeation across the nasal mucosa.

  11. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, James E.; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E.; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J.; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  12. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Dixon, James E; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2016-01-19

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application.

  13. Enhanced intracellular translocation and biodistribution of gold nanoparticles functionalized with a cell-penetrating peptide (VG-21) from vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Pooja Munnilal; Eroglu, Erdal; Bawage, Swapnil Subhash; Vig, Komal; Miller, Michael E; Pillai, Shreekumar; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree Ram

    2014-11-01

    Reduced toxicity and ease of modification make gold nanoparticles (GNPs) suitable for targeted delivery, bioimaging and theranostics by conjugating cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). This study presents the biodistribution and enhanced intracellular uptake of GNPs functionalized with VG-21, a CPP derived from vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (G). Cell penetrating efficiency of VG-21 was demonstrated using CellPPD web server, conjugated to GNPs and were characterized using, UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential. Uptake of VG-21 functionalized GNPs (fGNPs) was tested in eukaryotic cell lines, HEp-2, HeLa, Vero and Cos-7, using flow cytometry, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and inductively coupled plasmon optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The effects of nanoparticles on stress and toxicity related genes were studied in HEp-2 cells. Cytokine response to fGNPs was studied in vitro and in vivo. Biodistribution of nanoparticles was studied in BALB/c mice using TEM and ICP-OES. VG-21, GNPs and fGNPs had little to no effect on cell viability. Upon exposure to fGNPs, HEp-2 cells revealed minimal down regulation of stress response genes. fGNPs displayed higher uptake than GNPs in all cell lines with highest internalization by HEp-2, HeLa and Cos-7 cells, in endocytotic vesicles and nuclei. Cytokine ELISA showed that mouse J774 cells exposed to fGNPs produced less IL-6 than did GNP-treated macrophage cells, whereas TNF-α levels were low in both treatment groups. Biodistribution studies in BALB/c mice revealed higher accumulation of fGNPs than GNPs in the liver and spleen. Histopathological analyses showed that fGNP-treated mice accumulated 35 ng/mg tissue and 20 ng/mg tissue gold in spleen and liver respectively, without any adverse effects. Likewise, serum cytokines were low in both GNP- and fGNP-treated mice. Thus, VG-21-conjugated GNPs have enhanced cellular

  14. Conformational Plasticity of the Cell-Penetrating Peptide SAP As Revealed by Solid-State (19)F-NMR and Circular Dichroism Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Sergii; Kubyshkin, Vladimir; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K; Komarov, Igor V; Ulrich, Anne S

    2017-07-13

    The cell-penetrating peptide SAP, which was designed as an amphipathic poly-l-proline helix II (PPII), was suggested to self-assemble into regular fibrils that are relevant for its internalization. Herein we have analyzed the structure of SAP in the membrane-bound state by solid-state (19)F-NMR, which revealed other structural states, in addition to the expected surface-aligned PPII. Trifluoromethyl-bicyclopentyl-glycine (CF3-Bpg) and two rigid isomers of trifluoromethyl-4,5-methanoprolines (CF3-MePro) were used as labels for (19)F-NMR analysis. The equilibria between different conformations of SAP were studied and were found to be shifted by the substituents at Pro-11. Synchrotron-CD results suggested that substituting Pro-11 by CF3-MePro governed the coil-to-PPII equilibrium in solution and in the presence of a lipid bilayer. Using CD and (19)F-NMR, we examined the slow kinetics of the association of SAP with membranes and the dependence of the SAP conformational dynamics on the lipid composition. The peptide did not bind to lipids in the solid ordered phase and aggregated only in the liquid ordered "raft"-like bilayers. Self-association could not be detected in solution or in the presence of liquid disordered membranes. Surface-bound amphipathic SAP in a nonaggregated state was structured as a mixture of nonideal extended conformations reflecting the equilibrium already present in solution, i.e., before binding to the membrane.

  15. A pH-responsive cell-penetrating peptide-modified liposomes with active recognizing of integrin αvβ3 for the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kairong; Li, Jianping; Cao, Zhonglian; Yang, Ping; Qiu, Yue; Yang, Bo; Wang, Yang; Long, Yang; Liu, Yayuan; Zhang, Qianyu; Qian, Jun; Zhang, Zhirong; Gao, Huile; He, Qin

    2015-11-10

    The use of pH-responsive cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is an attractive strategy for drug delivery in vivo, however, they still could not actively target to the desired sites. Here, we designed a pH-responsive CPP (TR) with the ability of active targeting to integrin αvβ3, which was a tandem peptide consisted of active targeting ligand peptide (c(RGDfK)) and pH-responsive CPP (TH). The targeting efficiency of TR with integrin was evaluated by molecular simulation and docking studies. The affinity assays of TR peptide modified liposomes (TR-Lip) at pH7.4 and pH6.5 demonstrated adequately the pH-responsive binding efficacy of TR-Lip with integrin αvβ3. The cellular uptake of CFPE-labeled TR-Lip on integrin αvβ3-overexpressing B16F10 cells was 41.67-, 30.67-, and 11.90-fold higher than that of CFPE-labeled PEG-, RGD-, and TH-modified liposomes at pH6.5, respectively, suggesting that TR-Lip could not only actively target to αvβ3-overexpressing cells compared to TH-Lip, but also significantly increased cellular uptake compared to RGD-Lip. At the concentration of 20μg/mL paclitaxel (PTX), the killing activity of PTX-loaded TR-Lip (PTX-TR-Lip) against B16F10 cells was 1.80-, 1.45-, 1.30-, 1.15-time higher than that of PTX-loaded PEG-, RGD-, TH-modified liposomes and free PTX at pH6.5, respectively. In vivo imaging displayed the maximum accumulation of DiD-labeled TR-Lip at tumor sites compared to the other groups. Tumor inhibition rate of B16F10 tumor-bearing mice treated with PTX-TR-Lip was 85.04%, relative to that of PBS. In B16F10 tumor-bearing mice, PTX-TR-Lip showed significantly higher survival rate compared with the other groups. Collectively, all the results in vitro and in vivo suggested that TR-Lip would be a potential delivery system for PTX to treat integrin αvβ3-overexpressing tumor-bearing mice.

  16. siRNA-cell-penetrating peptides complexes as a combinatorial therapy against chronic myeloid leukemia using BV173 cell line as model.

    PubMed

    Freire, João Miguel; Rego de Figueiredo, Inês; Valle, Javier; Veiga, Ana Salomé; Andreu, David; Enguita, Francisco J; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2017-01-10

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by a single gene mutation, a reciprocal translocation that originates the Bcr-Abl gene with constitutive tyrosine kinase activity. As a monogenic disease, it is an optimum target for RNA silencing therapy. We developed a siRNA-based therapeutic approach in which the siRNA is delivered by pepM or pepR, two cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) derived from the dengue virus capsid protein. These peptides have a dual role: siRNA delivery into cells and direct action as bioportides, i.e. intracellularly bioactive CPPs, targetting cancer-related signaling processes. Both pepM and pepR penetrate the positive Bcr-Abl(+) Cell Line (BV173). Five in silico designed anti-Bcr-Abl siRNA were selected for in vitro analysis after thorough screening. The Bcr-Abl downregulation kinetics (48h to 168h) was followed by quantitative PCR. The bioportide action of the peptide vectors was evaluated by genome-wide microarray analysis and further validated by testing BV173 cell cycle and cell proliferation monitoring different genes involved in housekeeping/cell stress (RPL13A, HPRT1), cell proliferation (ki67), cell apoptosis (Caspase 3 and Caspase 9) and cell cycle steps (CDK2, CCDN2, CDKN1A). Assays with a commercial transfection agent were carried out for comparison purposes. Maximal Bcr-Abl gene knockdown was observed for one of the siRNA when delivered by pepM at 120h. Both pepM and pepR showed downregulation effects on proliferative CML-related signaling pathways having direct impact on BV173 cell cycle and proliferation, thus reinforcing the siRNA effect by acting as anticancer molecules. With this work we show the therapeutic potential of a CPP shuttle that combines intrinsic anticancer properties with the ability to deliver functional siRNA into CML cell models. By such combination, the pepM-siRNA conjugates lowered Bcr-Abl gene expression levels more extensively than conventional siRNA delivery technologies and

  17. Transfection of infectious RNA and DNA/RNA layered vectors of semliki forest virus by the cell-penetrating peptide based reagent PepFect6.

    PubMed

    Pärn, Kalle; Viru, Liane; Lehto, Taavi; Oskolkov, Nikita; Langel, Ülo; Merits, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Viral vectors have a wide variety of applications ranging from fundamental studies of viruses to therapeutics. Recombinant viral vectors are usually constructed using methods of reverse genetics to obtain the genetic material of the viral vector. The physicochemical properties of DNA and RNA make them unable to access cells by themselves, and they require assistance to achieve intracellular delivery. Non-viral delivery vectors can be used for this purpose if they enable efficient intracellular delivery without interfering with the viral life cycle. In this report, we utilize Semliki Forest virus (genus alphavirus) based RNA and DNA vectors to study the transfection efficiency of the non-viral cell-penetrating peptide-based delivery vector PepFect6 in comparison with that of the cationic liposome-based Lipofectamine 2000, and assess their impact on viral replication. The optimal conditions for transfection were determined for both reagents. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of PepFect6 to transport large (13-19 kbp) constructs across the cell membrane. Curiously, DNA molecules delivered using the PepFect6 reagent were found to be transported to the cell nucleus approximately 1.5 hours later than DNA molecules delivered using the Lipofectamine 2000 reagent. Finally, although both PepFect6 and Lipofectamine 2000 reagents can be used for alphavirus research, PepFect6 is preferred because it does not induce changes in the normal cellular phenotype and it does not affect the normal replication-infection cycle of viruses in previously transfected cells.

  18. Blocking hepatic metastases of colon cancer cells using an shRNA against Rac1 delivered by activatable cell-penetrating peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongliang; Feng, Wenming; Sun, Xinrong; Tang, Chengwu; Wang, Xiang; Shen, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic metastasis is one of the critical progressions of colon cancer. Blocking this process is key to prolonging survival time in cancer patients. Studies on activatable cell-penetrating peptides (dtACPPs) have demonstrated their potential as gene carriers. It showed high tumor cell-targeting specificity and transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity in the in vitro settings of drug delivery. However, using this system to silence target genes to inhibit metastasis in colorectal cancer cells has not been widely reported and requires further investigation. In this study, we observed that expression of Rac1, a key molecule for cytoskeletal reorganization, was higher in hepatic metastatic tumor tissue compared with prime colon cancer tissue and that patients with high Rac1-expressing colon cancer showed shorter survival time. Base on these findings, we created dtACPP-PEG-DGL (dtACPPD)/shRac1 nanoparticles and demonstrated that they downregulated Rac1 expression in colon cancer cells. Moreover, we observed inhibitory effects on migration, invasion and adhesion in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells in vitro, and our results showed that Rac1 regulated colon cancer cell matrix adhesion through the regulation of cytofilament dynamics. Moreover, mechanically, repression of Rac1 inhibiting cells migration and invasion by enhancing cell to cell adhesion and reducing cell to extracellular matrix adhesion. Furthermore, when atCDPPD/shRac1 nanoparticles were administered intravenously to a HCT116 xenograft model, significant tumor metastasis to the liver was inhibited. Our results suggest that atCDPP/shRac1 nanoparticles may enable the blockade of hepatic metastasis in colon cancer. PMID:27791203

  19. Selective Intracellular Delivery of Recombinant Arginine Deiminase (ADI) Using pH-Sensitive Cell Penetrating Peptides To Overcome ADI Resistance in Hypoxic Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzyy-Harn; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Szu-Ying; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Ann, David K; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-04

    Arginine depletion strategies, such as pegylated recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), offer a promising anticancer treatment. Many tumor cells have suppressed expression of a key enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), which converts citrulline to arginine. These tumor cells become arginine auxotrophic, as they can no longer synthesize endogenous arginine intracellularly from citrulline, and are therefore sensitive to arginine depletion therapy. However, since ADI-PEG20 only depletes extracellular arginine due to low internalization, ASS1-expressing cells are not susceptible to treatment since they can synthesize arginine intracellularly. Recent studies have found that several factors influence ASS1 expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hypoxia, frequently encountered in many solid tumors, on ASS1 expression and its relationship to ADI-resistance in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231 cells developed ADI resistance in hypoxic conditions with increased ASS1 expression. To restore ADI sensitivity as well as achieve tumor-selective delivery under hypoxia, we constructed a pH-sensitive cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-based delivery system to carry ADI inside cells to deplete both intra- and extracellular arginine. The delivery system was designed to activate the CPP-mediated internalization only at the mildly acidic pH (6.5-7) associated with the microenvironment of hypoxic tumors, thus achieving better selectivity toward tumor cells. The pH sensitivity of the CPP HBHAc was controlled by recombinant fusion to a histidine-glutamine (HE) oligopeptide, generating HBHAc-HE-ADI. The tumor distribution of HBHAc-HE-ADI was comparable to ADI-PEG20 in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer cells in vivo. In addition, HBHAc-HE-ADI showed increased in vitro cellular uptake in cells incubated in a mildly acidic pH (hypoxic conditions) compared to normal pH (normoxic conditions), which correlated with p

  20. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-07-01

    Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within discrete intracellular compartments. Mitoparan (INLKKLAKL(Aib)KKIL), for example, specifically accumulated

  1. A novel nanoemulsion-based method to produce ultrasmall, water-dispersible nanoparticles from chitosan, surface modified with cell-penetrating peptide for oral delivery of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Barbari, Ghullam Reza; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin; Amini, Mohsen; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Atyabi, Fateme; Balalaie, Saeed; Rafiee Tehrani, Niyousha; Rafiee Tehrani, Morteza

    2017-01-01

    A simple and reproducible water-in-oil (W/O) nanoemulsion technique for making ultrasmall (<15 nm), monodispersed and water-dispersible nanoparticles (NPs) from chitosan (CS) is reported. The nano-sized (50 nm) water pools of the W/O nanoemulsion serve as "nano-containers and nano-reactors". The entrapped polymer chains of CS inside these "nano-reactors" are covalently cross-linked with the chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG), leading to rigidification and formation of NPs. These NPs possess excessive swelling properties in aqueous medium and preserve integrity in all pH ranges due to chemical cross-linking with PEG. A potent and newly developed cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is further chemically conjugated to the surface of the NPs, leading to development of a novel peptide-conjugated derivative of CS with profound tight-junction opening properties. The CPP-conjugated NPs can easily be loaded with almost all kinds of proteins, peptides and nucleotides for oral delivery applications. Feasibility of this nanoparticulate system for oral delivery of a model peptide (insulin) is investigated in Caco-2 cell line. The cell culture results for translocation of insulin across the cell monolayer are very promising (15%-19% increase), and animal studies are actively under progress and will be published separately.

  2. Membrane adsorption and binding, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone: effects of hydrogen bonding and α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaona; Yang, Mingjun; Kasimova, Marina R; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Jorgensen, Lene; Foged, Camilla; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2012-11-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) provide a promising approach for enhancing intracellular delivery of therapeutic biomacromolecules by increasing transport through membrane barriers. Here, proteolytically stable cell-penetrating peptidomimetics with α-peptide/β-peptoid backbone were studied to evaluate the effect of α-chirality in the β-peptoid residues and the presence of guanidinium groups in the α-amino acid residues on membrane interaction. The molecular properties of the peptidomimetics in solution (surface and intramolecular hydrogen bonding, aqueous diffusion rate and molecular size) were studied along with their adsorption to lipid bilayers, cellular uptake, and toxicity. The surface hydrogen bonding ability of the peptidomimetics reflected their adsorbed amounts onto lipid bilayers as well as with their cellular uptake, indicating the importance of hydrogen bonding for their membrane interaction and cellular uptake. Ellipsometry studies further demonstrated that the presence of chiral centers in the β-peptoid residues promotes a higher adsorption to anionic lipid bilayers, whereas circular dichroism results showed that α-chirality influences their overall mean residue ellipticity. The presence of guanidinium groups and α-chiral β-peptoid residues was also found to have a significant positive effect on uptake in living cells. Together, the findings provide an improved understanding on the behavior of cell-penetrating peptidomimetics in the presence of lipid bilayers and live cells.

  3. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  4. Effect of basic cell-penetrating peptides on the structural, thermodynamic, and hydrodynamic properties of a novel drug delivery vector, ELP[V5G3A2-150].

    PubMed

    Lyons, Daniel F; Le, Vu; Kramer, Wolfgang H; Bidwell, Gene L; Lewis, Edwin A; Raucher, Drazen; Correia, John J

    2014-02-18

    Elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) are large, nonpolar polypeptides under investigation as components of a novel drug delivery system. ELPs are soluble at low temperatures, but they desolvate and aggregate above a transition temperature (TT). This aggregation is being utilized for targeting systemically delivered ELP-drug conjugates to heated tumors. We previously examined the structural, thermodynamic, and hydrodynamic properties of ELP[V5G3A2-150] to understand its behavior as a therapeutic agent. In this study, we investigate the effect that adding basic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to ELP[V5G3A2-150] has on the polypeptide's solubility, structure, and aggregation properties. CPPs are known to enhance the uptake of ELP into cultured cells in vitro and into tumor tissue in vivo. Interestingly, the asymmetric addition of basic residues decreased the solubility of ELP[V5G3A2-150], although below the TT we still observed a low level of self-association that increased with temperature. The ΔH of the aggregation process correlates with solubility, suggesting that the basic CPPs stabilize the aggregated state. This is potentially beneficial as the decreased solubility will increase the fraction aggregated and enhance drug delivery efficacy at a heated tumor. Otherwise, the basic CPPs did not significantly alter the biophysical properties of ELP. All constructs were monomeric at low temperatures but self-associate with increasing temperature through an indefinite isodesmic association. This self-association was coupled to a structural transition to type II β-turns. All constructs reversibly aggregated in an endothermic reaction, consistent with a reaction driven by the release of water.

  5. Tumor Detection at 3 Tesla with an Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide Dendrimer (ACPPD-Gd), a T1 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Molecular Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Christopher D.; Olson, Emilia S.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Jiang, Tao; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect small malignant lesions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited by inadequate accumulations of Gd with standard chelate agents. To date, no T1-targeted agents have proven superiority to Gd chelates in their ability to detect small tumors at clinically relevant field strengths. Activatable cell-penetrating peptides and their Gd-loaded dendrimeric form (ACPPD-Gd) have been shown to selectively accumulate in tumors. In this study we compared the performance of ACPPD-Gd vs. untargeted Gd chelates to detect small tumors in rodent models using a clinical 3T-MR system. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional-Animal Care-and-Use Committee. 2 of 4 inguinal breast fat pads of 16 albino-C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with tumor Py8119 cells and the other 2 with saline at random. MRI at 3T was performed at 4, 9, and 14 days after inoculation on 8 mice 24-hours after injection of 0.036mmol Gd/kg (ACPPD-Gd), and before and 2–3 minutes after 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol on the other 8 mice. T1-weighted (T1w) tumor signal normalized to muscle, was compared among the non-contrast, gadobutrol, and ACPPD-Gd groups using ANOVA. Experienced and trainee readers blinded to experimental conditions assessed for the presence of tumor in each of the 4 breast regions. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and area-under-curve (AUC) values were constructed and analyzed. Results Tumors ≥1mm3 were iso-intense to muscle without contrast on T1w sequences. They enhanced diffusely and homogeneously by 57±20% (p<0.001) 24 hours after ACPPD-Gd and by 25±13% (p<0.001) immediately after gadobutrol. The nearly 2-fold difference was similar for small tumors (1-5mm3) (45±19% vs. 19±18%, p = 0.03). ACPPD-Gd tended to improve tumor detection by an experienced reader (AUC 0.98 vs 0.91) and significantly more for a trainee (0.93 vs. 0.82, p = 0.02) compared to gadobutrol. This improvement was more pronounced when obvious tumors (>5mm3

  6. Membrane damage as first and DNA as the secondary target for anti-candidal activity of antimicrobial peptide P7 derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Song, Fengxia; Sun, Jin; Tian, Xu; Xia, Shufang; Le, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    P7, a peptide analogue derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20, possesses antibacterial and antitumor activities without significant hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated the antifungal effect of P7 and its anti-Candida acting mode in Candida albicans. P7 displayed antifungal activity against the reference C. albicans (MIC = 4 μM), Aspergilla niger (MIC = 32 μM), Aspergillus flavus (MIC = 8 μM), and Trichopyton rubrum (MIC = 16 μM). The effect of P7 on the C. albicans cell membrane was examined by investigating the calcein leakage from fungal membrane models made of egg yolk l-phosphatidylcholine/ergosterol (10 : 1, w/w) liposomes. P7 showed potent leakage effects against fungal liposomes similar to Melittin-treated cells. C. albicans protoplast regeneration assay demonstrated that P7 interacted with the C. albicans plasma membrane. Flow cytometry of the plasma membrane potential and integrity of C. albicans showed that P7 caused 60.9 ± 1.8% depolarization of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells and caused 58.1 ± 3.2% C. albicans cell membrane damage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that part of FITC-P7 accumulated in the cytoplasm. DNA retardation analysis was also performed, which showed that P7 interacted with C. albicans genomic DNA after penetrating the cell membrane, completely inhibiting the migration of genomic DNA above the weight ratio (peptide : DNA) of 6. Our results indicated that the plasma membrane was the primary target, and DNA was the secondary intracellular target of the mode of action of P7 against C. albicans. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A cell-penetrating peptide suppresses the hypoxia inducible factor-1 function by binding to the helix-loop-helix domain of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Thompson, John D; Chan, William K

    2013-04-25

    The heterodimeric hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) complex is composed of the hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT). Activation of the HIF-1 function is essential for tumor growth and metastasis. We previously showed that transfection of a plasmid containing an ARNT-interacting peptide (Ainp1) cDNA suppresses the HIF-1 signaling in Hep3B cells. Here we generated TAT fusion of the Ainp1 peptide (6His-TAT-Ainp1) to determine whether and how the Ainp1 peptide suppresses the HIF-1 function. The bacterially expressed 6His-TAT-Ainp1 was purified under denatured condition and then refolded by limited dialysis. The refolded 6His-TAT-Ainp1 interacts with the helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain of ARNT in a similar fashion as the native 6His-Ainp1. 6His-TAT-Ainp1 colocalizes with ARNT in the nucleus of HeLa and Hep3B cells after protein transduction. The transduced protein reaches the maximum intracellular levels within 2 h while remains detectable up to 96 h in HeLa cells. At 2 μM concentration, 6His-TAT-Ainp1 is not cytotoxic in HeLa cells but suppresses the cobalt chloride-activated, hypoxia responsive enhancer-driven luciferase expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, it decreases the cobalt chloride-dependent induction of the HIF-1 target genes at both the message (vascular endothelial growth factor and aldolase C) and protein (carbonic anhydrase IX and glucose transporter 1) levels. The protein levels of HIF-1α and ARNT are not altered in the presence of 6His-TAT-Ainp1. In summary, we provided evidence to support that the Ainp1 peptide directly suppresses the HIF-1 function by interacting with the ARNT HLH domain, and in turn interfering with the heterodimerization of HIF-1α and ARNT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell Adhesion Induced Using Surface Modification with Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Conjugated Poly(ethylene glycol)-Lipid: A New Cell Glue for 3D Cell-Based Structures.

    PubMed

    Teramura, Yuji; Asif, Sana; Ekdahl, Kristina N; Gustafson, Elisabet; Nilsson, Bo

    2017-01-11

    We synthesized a novel material, cell-penetrating peptide-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid (CPP-PEG-lipid), that can induce the adhesion of floating cells. Firm cell adhesion with spreading could be induced by cell surface modification with the CPP-PEG-lipids. Cell adhesion was induced by CPPs but not by any other cationic short peptides we tested. Here, we demonstrated adherence using the floating cell line CCRF-CEM as well as primary human T cells, B cells, erythrocytes, and hepatocytes. As compared to cells grown in suspension, adherent cells were more rapidly induced to attach to substrates with the cell-surface modification. The critical factor for attachment was localization of CPPs at the cell membrane by PEG-lipids with PEG > 20 kDa. These cationic CPPs on PEG chains were able to interact with substrate surfaces such as polystyrene (PS) surfaces, glass surfaces, and PS microfibers that are negatively charged, inducing firm cell adhesion and cell spreading. Also, as opposed to normal cationic peptides that interact strongly with cell membranes, CPPs were less interactive with the cell surfaces because of their cell-penetrating property, making them more available for adhering cells to the substrate surface. No effects on cell viability or cell proliferation were observed after the induction of cell adhesion. With this technique, cells could be easily immobilized onto PS microfibers, an important step in fabricating 3D cell-based structures. Cells immobilized onto 3D PS microfibers were alive, and human hepatocytes showed normal production of urea and albumin on the microfibers. This method is novel in inducing firm cell adhesion via a one-step treatment.

  9. Superior cell penetration by a rigid and anisotropic synthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Osada, Yoshihito; Sano, Ken-Ichi

    2015-03-10

    Molecules with structural anisotropy and rigidity, such as asbestos, demonstrate high cell-penetrating activity but also high toxicity. Here we synthesize a biodegradable, rigid, and fibrous artificial protein, CCPC 140, as a potential vehicle for cellular delivery. CCPC 140 penetrated 100% of cells tested in vitro, even at a concentration of 3.1 nM-superior to previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. The effects of cell-strain-dependency and aspect ratio on the cell-penetrating activity of CCPC 140 were also investigated.

  10. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood–Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s). PMID:27916828

  11. Enhancing Anticancer Effect of Gefitinib across the Blood-Brain Barrier Model Using Liposomes Modified with One α-Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptide or Glutathione and Tween 80.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Hong, Shu-Ting; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Lo, Yu-Li; Lin, Anya Maan-Yuh; Yang, James Chih-Hsin

    2016-11-29

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as gefitinib, have been demonstrated to effectively treat the patients of extracranial non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, these patients often develop brain metastasis (BM) during their disease course. The major obstacle to treat BM is the limited penetration of anticancer drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the present study, we utilized gefitinib-loaded liposomes with different modifications to improve gefitinib delivery across the in vitro BBB model of bEnd.3 cells. Gefitinib was encapsulated in small unilamellar liposomes modified with glutathione (GSH) and Tween 80 (SUV-G+T; one ligand plus one surfactant) or RF (SUV-RF; one α-helical cell-penetrating peptide). GSH, Tween 80, and RF were tested by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay to find their non-cytotoxic concentrations on bEnd.3 cells. The enhancement on gefitinib across the BBB was evaluated by cytotoxicity assay on human lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells under the bEnd.3 cells grown on the transwell inserts. Our findings showed that gefitinib incorporated in SUV-G+T or SUV-RF across the bEnd.3 cells significantly reduced the viability of PC9 cells more than that of free gefitinib. Furthermore, SUV-RF showed no cytotoxicity on bEnd.3 cells and did not affect the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transendothelial permeability of sodium fluorescein across the BBB model. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy were employed to evaluate the endocytosis pathways of SUV-RF. The results indicated that the uptake into bEnd.3 cells was mainly through adsorptive-mediated mechanism via electrostatic interaction and partially through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In conclusion, cell penetrating peptide-conjugated SUV-RF shed light on improving drug transport across the BBB via modulating the transcytosis pathway(s).

  12. Effect of inserted spacer in hepatic cell-penetrating multifunctional peptide component on the DNA intracellular delivery of quaternary complexes based on modular design

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luchen; Li, Zhenbo; Sun, Fangli; Xu, Yuhong; Du, Zixiu

    2016-01-01

    A safe and efficient quaternary gene delivery system (named Q-complexes) was constructed based on self-assembly of molecules through noncovalent bonds. This system was formulated through the cooperation and competing interactions of cationic liposomes, multifunctional peptides, and DNA, followed by coating hyaluronic acid on the surface of the ternary complexes. The multifunctional peptide was composed of two functional domains: penetrating hepatic tumor-targeted cell moiety (KRPTMRFRYTWNPMK) and a wrapping gene sequence (polyarginine 16). The effect of spacer insertion between the two domains of multifunctional peptide on the intracellular transfection of Q-complexes was further studied. Experimental results showed that the formulations assembled with various peptides in the spacer elements possessed different intercellular pathways and transfection efficiencies. The Q-complexes containing peptide in the absence of spacer element (Pa) showed the highest gene expression among all samples. The Q-complexes containing peptides with a noncleavable spacer GA (Pc) had no ability of intracellular nucleic acid delivery, whereas those with a cleavable spacer RVRR (Pd) showed moderate transfection activity. These results demonstrated that the different spacers inserted in the multifunctional peptide played an important role in in vitro DNA transfection efficiency. Atomic force microscopy images showed that the morphologies of ternary complexes (LPcD) and Q-complexes (HLcPD) were crystal lamellas, whereas those of other nanocomplexes were spheres. Circular dichroism showed the changed configuration of peptide with spacer GA in nanocomplexes compared with that of its free state, whereas the Pa configuration without spacer in nanocomplexes was consistent with that of its free state. The present study contributed to the structural understanding of Q-complexes, and further effective modification is in progress. PMID:27920533

  13. PEGylation of the peptide Bac7(1-35) reduces renal clearance while retaining antibacterial activity and bacterial cell penetration capacity.

    PubMed

    Benincasa, Monica; Zahariev, Sotir; Pelillo, Chiara; Milan, Annalisa; Gennaro, Renato; Scocchi, Marco

    2015-05-05

    The proline-rich antibacterial peptide Bac7(1-35) protects mice against Salmonella typhimurium infection, despite its rapid clearance. To overcome this problem the peptide was linked to a polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule either via a cleavable ester bond or via a non-hydrolysable amide bond. Both the PEGylated conjugates retained most of the in vitro activity against S. typhimurium. In addition, the ester bond was cleaved in human serum or plasma, releasing a carboxymethyl derivative of Bac7(1-35) which accounts for a higher activity of this peptide with relative to the other, non-hydrolysable form. Both PEGylated peptides maintained the capacity of the unconjugated form to kill bacteria without permeabilizing the bacterial membranes, by penetrating into cells. They exploited the same transporter as unmodified Bac7(1-35), suggesting it has the capacity to internalize quite sizeable cargo if this is linked to Bac7 fragment. PEGylation allows the peptide to have a wide distribution in mice, and a slow renal clearance, indicating that this strategy would improve the bioavailability of Bac7, and in principle of other antimicrobial peptides. This can be an equally important issue to reducing cytotoxicity for therapeutic use of these antibacterials.

  14. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery.

  15. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen’s egg test–chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery. PMID:25670897

  16. Intranasal delivery of cell-penetrating anti-NF-κB peptides (Tat-NBD) alleviates infection-sensitized hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dianer; Sun, Yu-Yo; Lin, Xiaoyi; Baumann, Jessica M; Dunn, R Scott; Lindquist, Diana M; Kuan, Chia-Yi

    2013-09-01

    Perinatal infection aggravates neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury and may interfere with therapeutic hypothermia. While the NF-κB signaling pathway has been implicated in microglia activation in infection-sensitized HI, the current therapeutic strategies rely on systemic intervention, which could impair neonatal immunity and increase the risk of severe infection. To devise a brain-targeted anti-NF-κB strategy, we examined the effects of intranasal delivery of tat-NBD peptides in two animal models of neonatal infection-sensitized HI. Kinetic experiments showed that tat-NBD peptides entered the olfactory bulbs rapidly (10-30 min) and peaked in the cerebral cortex around 60 min after intranasal application in P7 rats. Further, intranasal delivery of 1.4 mg/kg tat-NBD, which is only 7% of the intravenous dose in past studies, markedly attenuated NF-κB signaling, microglia activation, and brain damage triggered by HI with 4 or 72 h pre-exposure to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In contrast, intranasal delivery of mutant tat-NBD peptides or systemic application of minocycline failed to block LPS-sensitized HI injury. Yet, intranasal delivery of up to 5.6 mg/kg tat-NBD peptides immediately after pure-HI insult showed little protection, likely due to its rapid clearance from the brain and inability to inhibit parenchymal plasminogen activators. Together, these results suggest a novel therapy of infection-sensitized HI brain injury in newborns.

  17. Biophysical and biological properties of small linear peptides derived from crotamine, a cationic antimicrobial/antitumoral toxin with cell penetrating and cargo delivery abilities.

    PubMed

    Dal Mas, C; Pinheiro, D A; Campeiro, J D; Mattei, B; Oliveira, V; Oliveira, E B; Miranda, A; Perez, K R; Hayashi, M A F

    2017-09-06

    Crotamine is a natural polypeptide from snake venom which delivers nucleic acid molecules into cells, besides having pronounced affinity for negatively charged membranes and antifungal activity. We previously demonstrated that crotamine derived short linear peptides were not very effective as antifungal, although the non-structured recombinant crotamine was overridingly more potent compared to the native structured crotamine. Aiming to identify the features necessary for the antifungal activity of crotamine, two linear short peptides, each comprising half of the total positively charged amino acid residues of the full-length crotamine were evaluated here to show that these linear peptides keep the ability to interact with lipid membrane model systems with different phospholipid compositions, even after forming complexes with DNA. Interestingly, the presence of cysteine residues in the structure of these linear peptides highly influenced the antifungal activity, which was not associated to the lipid membrane lytic activity. In addition to the importance of the positive charges, the crucial role of cysteine residues was noticed for these linear analogs of crotamine, although the tridimensional structure and lipid membrane lytic activity observed only for native crotamine was not essential for the antifungal activity. As these peptides still keep the ability to form complexes with DNA molecules with no prejudice to their ability to bind to lipid membranes, they may be potentially advantageous as membrane translocation vector, as they do not show lipid membrane lytic activity and may harbor or not antifungal activity, by keeping or not the semi-essential amino acid cysteine in their sequence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The neuroprotective efficacy of cell-penetrating peptides TAT, penetratin, Arg-9, and Pep-1 in glutamic acid, kainic acid, and in vitro ischemia injury models using primary cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Meloni, Bruno P; Craig, Amanda J; Milech, Nadia; Hopkins, Richard M; Watt, Paul M; Knuckey, Neville W

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small peptides (typically 5-25 amino acids), which are used to facilitate the delivery of normally non-permeable cargos such as other peptides, proteins, nucleic acids, or drugs into cells. However, several recent studies have demonstrated that the TAT CPP has neuroprotective properties. Therefore, in this study, we assessed the TAT and three other CPPs (penetratin, Arg-9, Pep-1) for their neuroprotective properties in cortical neuronal cultures following exposure to glutamic acid, kainic acid, or in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation). Arg-9, penetratin, and TAT-D displayed consistent and high level neuroprotective activity in both the glutamic acid (IC50: 0.78, 3.4, 13.9 μM) and kainic acid (IC50: 0.81, 2.0, 6.2 μM) injury models, while Pep-1 was ineffective. The TAT-D isoform displayed similar efficacy to the TAT-L isoform in the glutamic acid model. Interestingly, Arg-9 was the only CPP that displayed efficacy when washed-out prior to glutamic acid exposure. Neuroprotection following in vitro ischemia was more variable with all peptides providing some level of neuroprotection (IC50; Arg-9: 6.0 μM, TAT-D: 7.1 μM, penetratin/Pep-1: >10 μM). The positive control peptides JNKI-1D-TAT (JNK inhibitory peptide) and/or PYC36L-TAT (AP-1 inhibitory peptide) were neuroprotective in all models. Finally, in a post-glutamic acid treatment experiment, Arg-9 was highly effective when added immediately after, and mildly effective when added 15 min post-insult, while the JNKI-1D-TAT control peptide was ineffective when added post-insult. These findings demonstrate that different CPPs have the ability to inhibit neurodamaging events/pathways associated with excitotoxic and ischemic injuries. More importantly, they highlight the need to interpret neuroprotection studies when using CPPs as delivery agents with caution. On a positive note, the cytoprotective properties of CPPs suggests they are ideal carrier molecules to

  19. Enzyme-responsive cell-penetrating peptide conjugated mesoporous silica quantum dot nanocarriers for controlled release of nucleus-targeted drug molecules and real-time intracellular fluorescence imaging of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinming; Liu, Fang; Shao, Qing; Min, Yuanzeng; Costa, Marianne; Yeow, Edwin K L; Xing, Bengang

    2014-08-01

    Here, a set of novel and personalized nanocarriers are presented for controlled nucleus-targeted antitumor drug delivery and real-time imaging of intracellular drug molecule trafficking by integrating an enzyme activatable cell penetrating peptide (CPP) with mesoporous silica coated quantum dots nanoparticles. Upon loading of antitumor drug, doxorubicin (DOX) and further exposure to proteases in tumor cell environment, the enzymatic cleavage of peptide sequence activates oligocationic TAT residues on the QDs@mSiO2 surface and direct the DOX delivery into cellular nucleus. The systematic cell imaging and cytotoxicity studies confirm that the enzyme responsive DOX-loaded CPP-QDs@mSiO2 nanoparticles can selectively release DOX in the tumor cells with high cathepsin B enzyme expression and greatly facilitate DOX accumulation in targeted nucleus, thus exhibiting enhanced antitumor activity in these cells. As contrast, there is limited nuclear-targeted drug accumulation and lower tumor cytotoxicity observed in the cells without enzyme expression. More importantly, significant antitumor DOX accumulation and higher tumor inactivation is also found in the drug resistant tumor cells with targeted enzyme expression. Such simple and specific enzyme responsive mesoporous silica-QDs nanoconjugates provide great promise for rational design of targeted drug delivery into biological system, and may thus greatly facilitate the medical theranostics in the near future.

  20. Novel miR-122 delivery system based on MS2 virus like particle surface displaying cell-penetrating peptide TAT for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guojing; Jia, Tingting; Xu, Xixia; Chang, Le; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Yu; Li, Yulong; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Kuo; Lin, Guigao; Han, Yanxi; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have shown inadequate. MicroRNA-122 (miR-122) mediated RNA interference brings new prospects. A safe, efficient miRNA delivery system is an indispensable assurance. Previously, we developed an MS2 bacteriophage virus-like particle (VLP)-based microRNA delivery system crosslinked with the HIV TAT peptide, which served as an effective inhibitor in the treatments of systemic lupus erythematosus and osteoporosis. However, defects, such as low crosslinking efficiency, high cost, and potential toxicity of the crosslinking agent, needed to be confronted. Therefore, TAT peptide was designed to display on the surface of MS2 VLPs, instead of being chemically crosslinked, using the platform of phage surface display. The results reflected that MS2 VLPs displaying TAT could effectively penetrate the cytomembrane and deliver miR-122. Additionally, its inhibitory effects on HCC were significant in Hep3B, HepG2, and Huh7 cells and Hep3B related animal models. Thus, we have established a novel miR-122 delivery system based on MS2 VLPs surface displaying TAT peptide, which could effectively perform the function of penetrating cytomembrane and the inhibition of HCC. PMID:27449085

  1. Dual Myostatin and Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Morpholino Nucleic Acid Oligomers Conjugated to a Cell-penetrating Peptide Is a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Alberto; Kang, Jagjeet K; McClorey, Graham; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew JA; Dickson, George

    2012-01-01

    The knockdown of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass may have important implications in disease conditions accompanied by muscle mass loss like cancer, HIV/AIDS, sarcopenia, muscle atrophy, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In DMD patients, where major muscle loss has occurred due to a lack of dystrophin, the therapeutic restoration of dystrophin expression alone in older patients may not be sufficient to restore the functionality of the muscles. We recently demonstrated that phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) can be used to re-direct myostatin splicing and promote the expression of an out-of-frame transcript so reducing the amount of the synthesized myostatin protein. Furthermore, the systemic administration of the same PMO conjugated to an octaguanidine moiety (Vivo-PMO) led to a significant increase in the mass of soleus muscle of treated mice. Here, we have further optimized the use of Vivo-PMO in normal mice and also tested the efficacy of the same PMO conjugated to an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (B-PMO). Similar experiments conducted in mdx dystrophic mice showed that B-PMO targeting myostatin is able to significantly increase the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle weight and when coadministered with a B-PMO targeting the dystrophin exon 23, it does not have a detrimental interaction. This study confirms that myostatin knockdown by exon skipping is a potential therapeutic strategy to counteract muscle wasting conditions and dual myostatin and dystrophin skipping has potential as a therapy for DMD. PMID:23250360

  2. Dual Myostatin and Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Morpholino Nucleic Acid Oligomers Conjugated to a Cell-penetrating Peptide Is a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Alberto; Kang, Jagjeet K; McClorey, Graham; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew Ja; Dickson, George

    2012-12-18

    The knockdown of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass may have important implications in disease conditions accompanied by muscle mass loss like cancer, HIV/AIDS, sarcopenia, muscle atrophy, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In DMD patients, where major muscle loss has occurred due to a lack of dystrophin, the therapeutic restoration of dystrophin expression alone in older patients may not be sufficient to restore the functionality of the muscles. We recently demonstrated that phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) can be used to re-direct myostatin splicing and promote the expression of an out-of-frame transcript so reducing the amount of the synthesized myostatin protein. Furthermore, the systemic administration of the same PMO conjugated to an octaguanidine moiety (Vivo-PMO) led to a significant increase in the mass of soleus muscle of treated mice. Here, we have further optimized the use of Vivo-PMO in normal mice and also tested the efficacy of the same PMO conjugated to an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (B-PMO). Similar experiments conducted in mdx dystrophic mice showed that B-PMO targeting myostatin is able to significantly increase the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle weight and when coadministered with a B-PMO targeting the dystrophin exon 23, it does not have a detrimental interaction. This study confirms that myostatin knockdown by exon skipping is a potential therapeutic strategy to counteract muscle wasting conditions and dual myostatin and dystrophin skipping has potential as a therapy for DMD.Molecular Therapy - Nucleic Acids (2012) 1, e62; doi:10.1038/mtna.2012.54; published online 18 December 2012.

  3. Noncationic Rigid and Anisotropic Coiled-Coil Proteins Exhibit Cell-Penetration Activity.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Norihisa; Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ijiro, Kuniharu; Osada, Yoshihito; Sano, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-04

    Numerous cationic peptides that penetrate cells have been studied intensively as drug delivery system carriers for cellular delivery. However, cationic molecules tend to be cytotoxic and cause inflammation, and their stability in the blood is usually low. We have previously demonstrated that a rigid and fibrous cationic coiled-coil protein exhibited cell-penetrating ability superior to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. Making use of structural properties, here we describe the cell-penetrating activity of a rigid and fibrous coiled-coil protein with a noncationic surface. A fibrous coiled-coil protein of pI 6.5 penetrated 100% of the cells tested in vitro at a concentration of 500 nM, which is comparable to that of previously reported cell-penetrating peptides. We also investigated the effect of cell-strain dependency and short-term cytotoxicity.

  4. Diversity-Oriented Stapling Yields Intrinsically Cell-Penetrant Inducers of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential pathway by which cellular and foreign material are degraded and recycled in eukaryotic cells. Induction of autophagy is a promising approach for treating diverse human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders and infectious diseases. Here, we report the use of a diversity-oriented stapling approach to produce autophagy-inducing peptides that are intrinsically cell-penetrant. These peptides induce autophagy at micromolar concentrations in vitro, have aggregate-clearing activity in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease, and induce autophagy in vivo. Unexpectedly, the solution structure of the most potent stapled peptide, DD5-o, revealed an α-helical conformation in methanol, stabilized by an unusual (i,i+3) staple which cross-links two d-amino acids. We also developed a novel assay for cell penetration that reports exclusively on cytosolic access and used it to quantitatively compare the cell penetration of DD5-o and other autophagy-inducing peptides. These new, cell-penetrant autophagy inducers and their molecular details are critical advances in the effort to understand and control autophagy. More broadly, diversity-oriented stapling may provide a promising alternative to polycationic sequences as a means for rendering peptides more cell-penetrant. PMID:28414223

  5. Critical amino acid residues of maurocalcine involved in pharmacology, lipid interaction and cell penetration.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Kamel; Ram, Narendra; Boisseau, Sylvie; Strappazzon, Flavie; Rehaim, Amel; Sadoul, Rémy; Darbon, Hervé; Ronjat, Michel; De Waard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is a 33-amino acid residue peptide that was initially identified in the Tunisian scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus. This peptide triggers interest for three main reasons. First, it helps unravelling the mechanistic basis of Ca(2+) mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum because of its sequence homology with a calcium channel domain involved in excitation-contraction coupling. Second, it shows potent pharmacological properties because of its ability to activate the ryanodine receptor. Finally, it is of technological value because of its ability to carry cell-impermeable compounds across the plasma membrane. Herein, we characterized the molecular determinants that underlie the pharmacological and cell-penetrating properties of maurocalcine. We identify several key amino acid residues of the peptide that will help the design of cell-penetrating analogues devoid of pharmacological activity and cell toxicity. Close examination of the determinants underlying cell penetration of maurocalcine reveals that basic amino acid residues are required for an interaction with negatively charged lipids of the plasma membrane. Maurocalcine analogues that penetrate better have also stronger interaction with negatively charged lipids. Conversely, less effective analogues present a diminished ability to interact with these lipids. These findings will also help the design of still more potent cell penetrating analogues of maurocalcine.

  6. Peptide multifunctionalized gold nanorods decrease toxicity of β-amyloid peptide in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Morales-Zavala, Francisco; Arriagada, Hector; Hassan, Natalia; Velasco, Carolina; Riveros, Ana; Álvarez, Alejandra R; Minniti, Alicia N; Rojas-Silva, Ximena; Muñoz, Luis L; Vasquez, Rodrigo; Rodriguez, Katherine; Sanchez-Navarro, Macarena; Giralt, Ernest; Araya, Eyleen; Aldunate, Rebeca; Kogan, Marcelo J

    2017-10-01

    The properties of nanometric materials make nanotechnology a promising platform for tackling problems of contemporary medicine. In this work, gold nanorods were synthetized and stabilized with polyethylene glycols and modified with two kinds of peptides. The D1 peptide that recognizes toxic aggregates of Aβ, a peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD); and the Angiopep 2 that can be used to deliver nanorods to the mammalian central nervous system. The nanoconjugates were characterized using absorption spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy, among other techniques. We determined that the nanoconjugate does not affect neuronal viability; it penetrates the cells, and decreases aggregation of Aβ peptide in vitro. We also showed that when we apply our nanosystem to a Caenorhabditis elegans AD model, the toxicity of aggregated Aβ peptide is decreased. This work may contribute to the development of therapies for AD based on metallic nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Liquid Crystalline Nanodispersions Functionalized with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Topical Delivery of Short-Interfering RNAs: A Proposal for Silencing a Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine in Cutaneous Diseases.

    PubMed

    Petrilli, R; Eloy, J O; Praça, F S G; Del Ciampo, J O; Fantini, M A C; Fonseca, M J V; Bentley, M V L B

    2016-05-01

    Short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are a potential strategy for the treatment of cutaneous diseases. In this context, liquid crystalline nanoparticles functionalized with specific proteins and peptide-transduction domains (PTDs), which act as penetration enhancers, are a promising carrier for siRNA delivery through the skin. Herein, hexagonal phase liquid crystal nanoparticles based on monoolein (MO) and/or oleic acid (OA) containing (or lacking) the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) and the cationic lipid oleylamine (OAM) were functionalized with the membrane transduction peptides transcriptional activator (TAT) or penetratin (PNT). These nanoparticles were complexed with siRNA and characterized by particle size, polydispersity, zeta potential, complexation efficiency and siRNA release. The formulations containing cationic agents presented positive zeta potentials, sizes on the nanometer scale, and complexed siRNAs at concentrations of 10 μM; these agents were successfully released in a heparin competition assay. Cell culture studies demonstrated that nanoparticles composed of MO:OA:PEI functionalized with TAT were the most efficient at transfecting L929 cells, and the uptake efficiency was enhanced by TAT peptide functionalization. Thereafter, the selected formulations were evaluated for in vivo skin irritation, penetration and in vivo efficacy using a chemically induced inflammatory animal model. These nanoparticles did not irritate the skin and provided higher siRNA penetration and delivery into the skin than control formulations. Additionally, efficacy studies in the animal model showed that the association of TAT with the nanodispersion provided higher suppression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Thus, the development of liquid crystalline nanodispersions containing TAT may lead to improved topical siRNA delivery for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  8. A Synthetic Strategy for Conjugation of Paromomycin to Cell-Penetrating Tat(48-60) for Delivery and Visualization into Leishmania Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Defaus, Sira; Gallo, Maria; Abengózar, María A.

    2017-01-01

    A successful approach to deliver paromomycin, a poorly absorbed aminoglycoside antibiotic, to parasite cells is reported, based on selective protection of amino and hydroxyl groups followed by conjugation to a fluorolabeled, PEG-functionalized cell-penetrating Tat(48-60) peptide. The resulting construct is efficiently internalized into Leishmania cells, evidencing the fitness of cell-penetrating peptides as vectors for efficiently transporting low-bioavailability drugs into cells. PMID:28286529

  9. Cellular Reprogramming Using Protein and Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bong Jong; Hong, Yean Ju; Do, Jeong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Recently, stem cells have been suggested as invaluable tools for cell therapy because of their self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential. Thus, scientists have developed a variety of methods to generate pluripotent stem cells, from nuclear transfer technology to direct reprogramming using defined factors, or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Considering the ethical issues and efficiency, iPSCs are thought to be one of the most promising stem cells for cell therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated by transduction with a virus, plasmid, RNA, or protein. Herein, we provide an overview of the current technology for iPSC generation and describe protein-based transduction technology in detail. PMID:28273812

  10. Cell-penetrating conjugates of pentaglutamylated methotrexate as potential anticancer drugs against resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Ildikó; Orbán, Erika; Schlosser, Gitta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bánóczi, Zoltán

    2016-06-10

    The emerging resistance of tumor cells against methotrexate (MTX) is one of the major limitations of the MTX treatment of tumorous diseases. The disturbance in the polyglutamation which is a main step in the mechanism of methotrexate action is often the reason of the resistance. Delivery of polyglutamylated MTX into cells may evade the mechanisms that are responsible for drug resistance. In this study conjugates of methotrexate and its pentaglutamylated derivatives with cell-penetrating peptides - penetratin and octaarginine - were investigated. The cellular-uptake and in vitro cytostatic activity of conjugates were examined on breast cancer cell cultures (MDA-MB-231 as resistant and MCF-7 as sensitive cell culture). These cell cultures showed very different behaviour towards the conjugates. Although the presence of pentaglutamyl moiety significantly decreased the internalisation of conjugates, some of them were significantly active in vitro. All of the conjugates were able to penetrate in some extent into both cell types, but only the conjugates of penetratin showed in vitro cytostatic activity. The most effective conjugates were the MTX-Glu5-Penetratin(desMet) and MTX-Glu5-GFLG-Penetratin(desMet). The latter was effective on both cell cultures while the former was active only on the resistant tumor cells. Our results suggest that the translocation of polyglutamylated MTX may be a new way to treat sensitive and more importantly resistant tumors. While both penetratin and octaarginine peptides were successfully used to deliver several kinds of cargos earlier in our case the activity of penetratin conjugates was more pronounced.

  11. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Human neutrophil peptide-1 decreases during ageing in selected Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; de Haro-Acosta, Jeny; Torres-Juarez, Flor; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; González-Amaro, Roberto; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptide innate immunity plays a central role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases, as has been described extensively in different settings. However, the role that these molecules play in the immunity mediated by polymorphonuclear phagocytes as part of the innate immunity of ageing individuals has not been described. In the present study, we addressed the question whether antimicrobial activity in polymorphonuclear cells from elderly individuals was altered in comparison with young adults. We compared phagocytosis index, bacterial killing efficiency, myeloperoxidase activity and cathelicidin expression. Results showed that there were no statistical differences among groups. However, human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) was decreased in the elderly individuals group. Results suggest that the decreased HNP-1 production in the polymorphonuclear phagocytes form elderly individuals might have an important participation in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases.

  13. A single cell penetration system by ultrasonic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiao, Mingfei; Yang, Xing; Wu, Ting

    2008-12-01

    The researches of single cell's control and operation are the hotspots in whole world. Among the various technologies, the transmission of ectogenic genetic materials between cell membrane is very significant. Imitating the Chinese traditional acupuncture therapy, a new ultrasonic resonance driving method, is imported to drive a cell's penetration probe. A set of the single cell penetration system was established to perform this function. This system includes four subsystems: driving part, micromanipulation part, observation and measurement part, and actuation part. Some fish egg experiments indicate that this system is workable and effective.

  14. SAP(E) - A cell-penetrating polyproline helix at lipid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Franz, Johannes; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short membrane-permeating amino acid sequences that can be used to deliver cargoes, e.g. drugs, into cells. The mechanism for CPP internalization is still subject of ongoing research. An interesting family of CPPs is the sweet arrow peptides - SAP(E) - which are known to adopt a polyproline II helical secondary structure. SAP(E) peptides stand out among CPPs because they carry a net negative charge while most CPPs are positively charged, the latter being conducive to electrostatic interaction with generally negatively charged membranes. For SAP(E)s, an internalization mechanism has been proposed, based on polypeptide aggregation on the cell surface, followed by an endocytic uptake. However, this process has not yet been observed directly - since peptide-membrane interactions are inherently difficult to monitor on a molecular scale. Here, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to investigate molecular interactions of SAP(E) with differently charged model membranes, in both mono- and bi-layer configurations. The data suggest that the initial binding mechanism is accompanied by structural changes of the peptide. Also, the peptide-model membrane interaction depends on the charge of the lipid headgroup with phosphocholine being a favorable binding site. Moreover, while direct penetration has also been observed for some CPPs, the spectroscopy reveals that for SAP(E), its interaction with model membranes remains limited to the headgroup region, and insertion into the hydrophobic core of the lipid layer does not occur.

  15. Interaction of β(3) /β(2) -peptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu segments, with POPC giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and white blood cancer cells (U937)--a new type of cell-penetrating peptides, and a surprising chain-length dependence of their vesicle- and cell-lysing activity.

    PubMed

    Kolesinska, Beata; Eyer, Klaus; Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S; Beck, Albert K; Seebach, Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many years ago, β(2) /β(3) -peptides, consisting of alternatively arranged β(2) - and β(3) h-amino-acid residues, have been found to undergo folding to a unique type of helix, the 10/12-helix, and to exhibit non-polar, lipophilic properties (Helv. Chim. Acta 1997, 80, 2033). We have now synthesized such 'mixed' hexa-, nona-, dodeca-, and octadecapeptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu triads, with N-terminal fluorescein (FAM) labels, i.e., 1-4, and studied their interactions with POPC (=1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and with human white blood cancer cells U937. The methods used were microfluidic technology, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a flow-cytometry assay, a membrane-toxicity assay with the dehydrogenase G6PDH as enzymatic reporter, and visual microscopy observations. All β(3) /β(2) -peptide derivatives penetrate the GUVs and/or the cells. As shown with the isomeric β(3) /β(2) -, β(3) -, and β(2) -nonamers, 2, 5, and 6, respectively, the derivatives 5 and 6 consisting exclusively of β(3) - or β(2) -amino-acid residues, respectively, interact neither with the vesicles nor with the cells. Depending on the method of investigation and on the pretreatment of the cells, the β(3) /β(2) -nonamer and/or the β(3) /β(2) -dodecamer derivative, 2 and/or 3, respectively, cause a surprising disintegration or lysis of the GUVs and cells, comparable with the action of tensides, viral fusion peptides, and host-defense antimicrobial peptides. Possible sources of the chain-length-dependent destructive potential of the β(3) /β(2) -nona- and β(3) /β(2) -dodecapeptide derivatives, and a possible relationship with the phosphate-to-phosphate and hydrocarbon thicknesses of GUVs, and eukaryotic cells are discussed. Further investigations with other types of GUVs and of eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism(s) of interaction of 'mixed' β(3) /β(2) -peptides with

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide decreases blood volume in intact and anephric rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trippodo, N.C.; Chien, Y.W.; Pegram, B.L.; Cole, F.E.; MacPhee, A.A.; Kardon, M.B.

    1986-03-05

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reportedly lowers atrial pressure and increases hematocrit, suggesting venodilation and/or decreased blood volume (BV). To examine these possibilities, rat ANP (99-126) was administered to Inactinanesthetized rats (313 +/- 9 g, +/- SE) at 0.5 ..mu..g/kg/min for 30 minutes. Urine flow increased by 0.05 ml/min (p < 0.001) during the last 15 minutes of infusion. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and thoracic central venous pressure (CVP) decreased (p < 0.001) by 12 and 0.5 mmHg, respectively; hematocrit increased by 4.1 units (p < 0.001) and BV (/sup 51/Cr-RBC) decreased by 3.4 ml/kg (p < 0.001). Mean circulatory filling pressure, measured by inflating an intracardiac balloon to briefly stop the circulation, did not change. Distribution of BV between the thoracic and spanchnic organs (whole-animal freezing in liquid nitrogen) was not measurably altered. The results suggest that the decrease in CVP was related more to decreased BV than to venodilation. To investigate possible mechanisms for the decreased BV, the same dose of ANP was administered to anephric rats. MAP decreased by 8 mmHg (p < 0.001); hematocrit increased by 2.4 units (p < 0.001) and BV decreased by 1.7 ml/kg (p < 0.05). The results indicate that short-term administration of ANP decreases blood volume by causing intravascular fluid to shift into the interstitium as well as by inducing diuresis.

  17. Cell Penetrating Peptoids (CPPos): Synthesis of a Small Combinatorial Library by Using IRORI MiniKans

    PubMed Central

    Kölmel, Dominik K.; Fürniss, Daniel; Susanto, Steven; Lauer, Andrea; Grabher, Clemens; Bräse, Stefan; Schepers, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptoids (CPPos) are potent mimics of the corresponding cell penetrating peptides (CPPs). The synthesis of diverse oligomeric libraries that display a variety of backbone scaffolds and side-chain appendages are a very promising source of novel CPPos, which can be used to either target different cellular organelles or even different tissues and organs. In this study we established the submonomer-based solid phase synthesis of a “proof of principle” peptoid library in IRORI MiniKans to expand the amount for phenotypic high throughput screens of CPPos. The library consisting of tetrameric peptoids [oligo(N-alkylglycines)] was established on Rink amide resin in a split and mix approach with hydrophilic and hydrophobic peptoid side chains. All CPPos of the presented library were labeled with rhodamine B to allow for the monitoring of cellular uptake by fluorescent confocal microscopy. Eventually, all the purified peptoids were subjected to live cell imaging to screen for CPPos with organelle specificity. While highly charged CPPos enter the cells by endocytosis with subsequent endosomal release, critical levels of lipophilicity allow other CPPos to specifically localize to mitochondria once a certain lipophilicity threshold is reached. PMID:24281336

  18. Cell-penetrating compounds preferentially bind glycosaminoglycans over plasma membrane lipids in a charge density- and stereochemistry-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Prevette, Lisa E; Benish, Nicolas C; Schoenecker, Amber R; Braden, Kristin J

    2015-12-01

    Cell-penetrating compounds (CPCs) are often conjugated to drugs and genes to facilitate cellular uptake. We hypothesize that the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged amines of the cell-penetrating compounds and the negatively charged glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) extending from cell surfaces is the initiating step in the internalization process. The interactions of generation 5 PAMAM dendrimer, Tat peptide and 25 kDa linear PEI with four different GAGs have been studied using isothermal titration calorimetry to elucidate structure-function relationships that could lead to improved drug and gene delivery methods to a wide variety of cell types. Detailed thermodynamic analysis has determined that CPC-GAG binding constants range from 8.7×10(3) to 2.4×10(6)M(-1) and that affinity is dependent upon GAG charge density and stereochemistry and CPC molecular weight. The effect of GAG composition on affinity is likely due to hydrogen bonding between CPC amines and amides and GAG hydroxyl and amine groups. These results were compared to the association of CPCs with lipid vesicles of varying composition as model plasma membranes to finally clarify the relative importance of each cell surface component in initial cell recognition. CPC-lipid affinity increases with anionic lipid content, but GAG affinity is higher for all cell-penetrating compounds, confirming the role these heterogeneous polysaccharides play in cellular association and clustering.

  19. Heat Shock–Related Protein 20 Peptide Decreases Human Airway Constriction Downstream of β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Banathy, Alex; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Goleniewska, Kasia; Boyd, Kelly L.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Peebles, R. Stokes

    2016-01-01

    Severe bronchospasm refractory to β-agonists is a challenging aspect of asthma therapy, and novel therapeutics are needed. β-agonist–induced airway smooth muscle (ASM) relaxation is associated with increases in the phosphorylation of the small heat shock–related protein (HSP) 20. We hypothesized that a transducible phosphopeptide mimetic of HSP20 (P20 peptide) causes relaxation of human ASM (HASM) by interacting with target(s) downstream of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) pathway. The effect of the P20 peptide on ASM contractility was determined in human and porcine ASM using a muscle bath. The effect of the P20 peptide on filamentous actin dynamics and migration was examined in intact porcine ASM and cultured primary HASM cells. The efficacy of the P20 peptide in vivo on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was determined in an ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization and challenge murine model of allergic airway inflammation. P20 peptide caused dose-dependent relaxation of carbachol-precontracted ASM and blocked carbachol-induced contraction. The β2AR inhibitor, (±)-1-[2,3-(dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol hydrochloride (ICI 118,551), abrogated isoproterenol but not P20 peptide–mediated relaxation. The P20 peptide decreased filamentous actin levels in intact ASM, disrupted stress fibers, and inhibited platelet-derived growth factor–induced migration of HASM cells. The P20 peptide treatment reduced methacholine-induced AHR in OVA mice without affecting the inflammatory response. These results suggest that the P20 peptide decreased airway constriction and disrupted stress fibers through regulation of the actin cytoskeleton downstream of β2AR. Thus, the P20 peptide may be a potential therapeutic for asthma refractory to β-agonists. PMID:26909644

  20. Activatable and Cell-Penetrable Multiplex FRET Nanosensor for Profiling MT1-MMP Activity in Single Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eddie Y.; Ochs, Christopher J.; Wang, Yi; Lei, Lei; Qin, Qin; Smith, Andrew M.; Strongin, Alex Y.; Kamm, Roger; Qi, Ying-Xin; Lu, Shaoying; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    We developed a quantum-dot-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (QD-FRET) nanosensor to visualize the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) at cell membrane. A bended peptide with multiple motifs was engineered to position the FRET pair at a close proximity to allow energy transfer, which can be cleaved by active MT1-MMP to result in FRET changes and the exposure of cell penetrating sequence. Via FRET and penetrated QD signals, the nanosensor can profile cancer cells. PMID:26203778

  1. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Evans, Brian C; Hocking, Kyle M; Kilchrist, Kameron V; Wise, Eric S; Brophy, Colleen M; Duvall, Craig L

    2015-06-23

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides.

  2. Cell-Penetrating, Guanidinium-Rich Molecular Transporters for Overcoming Efflux-Mediated Multidrug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major cause of chemotherapy failure in the clinic. Drugs that were once effective against naïve disease subsequently prove ineffective against recurrent disease, which often exhibits an MDR phenotype. MDR can be attributed to many factors; often dominating among these is the ability of a cell to suppress or block drug entry through upregulation of membrane-bound drug efflux pumps. Efflux pumps exhibit polyspecificity, recognizing and exporting many different types of drugs, especially those whose lipophilic nature contributes to residence in the membrane. We have developed a general strategy to overcome efflux-based resistance. This strategy involves conjugating a known drug that succumbs to efflux-mediated resistance to a cell-penetrating molecular transporter, specifically, the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), d-octaarginine. The resultant conjugates are discrete single entities (not particle mixtures) and highly water-soluble. They rapidly enter cells, are not substrates for efflux pumps, and release the free drug only after cellular entry at a rate controlled by linker design and favored by target cell chemistry. This general strategy can be applied to many classes of drugs and allows for an exceptionally rapid advance to clinical testing, especially of drugs that succumb to resistance. The efficacy of this strategy has been successfully demonstrated with Taxol in cellular and animal models of resistant cancer and with ex vivo samples from patients with ovarian cancer. Next generation efforts in this area will involve the extension of this strategy to other chemotherapeutics and other MDR-susceptible diseases. PMID:24798708

  3. Neuroprotective natural antibodies to assemblies of amyloidogenic peptides decrease with normal aging and advancing Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Britschgi, M; Olin, C E; Johns, H T; Takeda-Uchimura, Y; LeMieux, M C; Rufibach, K; Rajadas, J; Zhang, H; Tomooka, B; Robinson, W H; Clark, C M; Fagan, A M; Galasko, D R; Holtzman, D M; Jutel, M; Kaye, J A; Lemere, C A; Leszek, J; Li, G; Peskind, E R; Quinn, J F; Yesavage, J A; Ghiso, J A; Wyss-Coray, T

    2009-07-21

    A number of distinct beta-amyloid (Abeta) variants or multimers have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and antibodies recognizing such peptides are in clinical trials. Humans have natural Abeta-specific antibodies, but their diversity, abundance, and function in the general population remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate with peptide microarrays the presence of natural antibodies against known toxic Abeta and amyloidogenic non-Abeta species in plasma samples and cerebrospinal fluid of AD patients and healthy controls aged 21-89 years. Antibody reactivity was most prominent against oligomeric assemblies of Abeta and pyroglutamate or oxidized residues, and IgGs specific for oligomeric preparations of Abeta1-42 in particular declined with age and advancing AD. Most individuals showed unexpected antibody reactivities against peptides unique to autosomal dominant forms of dementia (mutant Abeta, ABri, ADan) and IgGs isolated from plasma of AD patients or healthy controls protected primary neurons from Abeta toxicity. Aged vervets showed similar patterns of plasma IgG antibodies against amyloid peptides, and after immunization with Abeta the monkeys developed high titers not only against Abeta peptides but also against ABri and ADan peptides. Our findings support the concept of conformation-specific, cross-reactive antibodies that may protect against amyloidogenic toxic peptides. If a therapeutic benefit of Abeta antibodies can be confirmed in AD patients, stimulating the production of such neuroprotective antibodies or passively administering them to the elderly population may provide a preventive measure toward AD.

  4. Inhibitory modulation of CART peptides in accumbal neuron through decreasing interaction of CaMKIIα with dopamine D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhenyu; Zhang, Dalei; Ying, Ying; Yan, Min; Yang, Jianhua; Xu, Fangyun; Oh, Kiwan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2014-04-04

    Previous studies in rats have shown that microinjections of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide into the nucleus accumbens (NAc; the area of the brain that mediates drug reward and reinforcement) attenuate the locomotor effects of psychostimulants. CART peptide has also been shown to induce decreased intracellular concentrations of calcium (Ca(2+)) in primary cultures of hippocampus neurons. The purpose of this study was to characterize the interaction of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKIIα) with dopamine D3 (D3) receptors (R) in primary cultures of accumbal neurons. This interaction is involved in inhibitory modulation of CART peptides. In vitro, CART (55-102) peptide (0.1, 0.5 or 1μM) was found to dose-dependently inhibit K(+) depolarization-elicited Ca(2+) influx and CaMKIIα phosphorylation in accumbal neurons. Moreover, CART peptides were also found to block cocaine (1μM)-induced Ca(2+) influx, CaMKIIα phosphorylation, CaMKIIα-D3R interaction, and CREB phosphorylation. In vivo, repeated microinjections of CART (55-102) peptide (2μg/1μl/side) into the NAc over a 5-day period had no effect on behavioral activity but blocked cocaine-induced locomotor activity. These results indicate that D3R function in accumbal neurons is a target of CART (55-102) peptide and suggest that CART peptide by dephosphorylating limbic D3Rs may have potential as a treatment for cocaine abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitofusin-2 knockdown increases ER-mitochondria contact and decreases amyloid β-peptide production.

    PubMed

    Leal, Nuno Santos; Schreiner, Bernadette; Pinho, Catarina Moreira; Filadi, Riccardo; Wiehager, Birgitta; Karlström, Helena; Pizzo, Paola; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are physically and biochemically in contact with other organelles including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Such contacts are formed between mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), specialized subregions of ER, and the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). We have previously shown increased expression of MAM-associated proteins and enhanced ER to mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer from ER to mitochondria in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-related neuronal models. Here, we report that siRNA knockdown of mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), a protein that is involved in the tethering of ER and mitochondria, leads to increased contact between the two organelles. Cells depleted in Mfn2 showed increased Ca(2+) transfer from ER to mitchondria and longer stretches of ER forming contacts with OMM. Interestingly, increased contact resulted in decreased concentrations of intra- and extracellular Aβ40 and Aβ42 . Analysis of γ-secretase protein expression, maturation and activity revealed that the low Aβ concentrations were a result of impaired γ-secretase complex function. Amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 and neprilysin expression as well as neprilysin activity were not affected by Mfn2 siRNA treatment. In summary, our data shows that modulation of ER-mitochondria contact affects γ-secretase activity and Aβ generation. Increased ER-mitochondria contact results in lower γ-secretase activity suggesting a new mechanism by which Aβ generation can be controlled. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  6. Discovery and Characterization of a New Cell-Penetrating Protein

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Rudo L.; Chamoun, Ana Maria; McMillin, Thomas; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new cell-penetrating protein, B1, capable of delivering conjugated proteins and nucleic acids into mammalian cells. B1 is a 244-amino-acid product of a single-base frameshift in the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The molecule has a net positive charge of 43 and a very high charge-to-mass ratio of 1.5. eGFP-fused B1 potently penetrates both adherent and suspension cells with >80% of cells taking up the protein when exposed to concentrations as low as 1 μM. The protein was found to cluster in the paranuclear region of TZM-bl cells. Most importantly, we show that B1 not only facilitates cellular uptake, but allows biomolecular cargo to reach sites of biological relevance. For example, baby hamster kidney cells underwent DNA recombination when exposed to B1-tagged Cre recombinase at protein concentrations as low as 2.5 μM, indicating potent nuclear delivery of functional protein cargos. Additionally, B1 delivers non-covalently conjugated RNA and DNA across the cell membrane to cytosolic and nuclear sites accessible to the cellular translation and transcription machinery, as gauged by detection of encoded reporter functions, with efficiency comparable to commercially available cationic lipid reagents. B1 appears to utilize cell-surface glycans and multiple competing endocytic pathways to enter and traffic through cells. These studies provide both a new tool for intracellular delivery of biomolecules and insights that could aid in the design of more effective cell penetrating proteins. PMID:24047285

  7. Glucagon-like peptide 1 decreases lipotoxicity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Matthew J.; Hull, Diana; Guo, Kathy; Barton, Darren; Hazlehurst, Jonathan M.; Gathercole, Laura L.; Nasiri, Maryam; Yu, Jinglei; Gough, Stephen C.; Newsome, Philip N.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity are pathognomonic in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues are licensed for type 2 diabetes, but no prospective experimental data exists in NASH. This study determined the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, on organ-specific insulin sensitivity, hepatic lipid handling and adipose dysfunction in biopsy-proven NASH. Methods Fourteen patients were randomised to 1.8 mg liraglutide or placebo for 12-weeks of the mechanistic component of a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT01237119). Patients underwent paired hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamps, stable isotope tracers, adipose microdialysis and serum adipocytokine/metabolic profiling. In vitro isotope experiments on lipid flux were performed on primary human hepatocytes. Results Liraglutide reduced BMI (−1.9 vs. +0.04 kg/m2; p <0.001), HbA1c (−0.3 vs. +0.3%; p <0.01), cholesterol-LDL (−0.7 vs. +0.05 mmol/L; p <0.01), ALT (−54 vs. −4.0 IU/L; p <0.01) and serum leptin, adiponectin, and CCL-2 (all p <0.05). Liraglutide increased hepatic insulin sensitivity (−9.36 vs. −2.54% suppression of hepatic endogenous glucose production with low-dose insulin; p <0.05). Liraglutide increased adipose tissue insulin sensitivity enhancing the ability of insulin to suppress lipolysis both globally (−24.9 vs. +54.8 pmol/L insulin required to ½ maximally suppress serum non-esterified fatty acids; p <0.05), and specifically within subcutaneous adipose tissue (p <0.05). In addition, liraglutide decreased hepatic de novo lipogenesis in vivo (−1.26 vs. +1.30%; p <0.05); a finding endorsed by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonist on primary human hepatocytes (24.6% decrease in lipogenesis vs. untreated controls; p <0.01). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces metabolic dysfunction, insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in the key metabolic organs in the pathogenesis of

  8. Fifteen years of cell-penetrating, guanidinium-rich molecular transporters: basic science, research tools, and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Stanzl, Erika Geihe; Trantow, Brian M; Vargas, Jessica R; Wender, Paul A

    2013-12-17

    All living systems require biochemical barriers. As a consequence, all drugs, imaging agents, and probes have targets that are either on, in, or inside of these barriers. Fifteen years ago, we initiated research directed at more fully understanding these barriers and at developing tools and strategies for breaching them that could be of use in basic research, imaging, diagnostics, and medicine. At the outset of this research and now to a lesser extent, the "rules" for drug design biased the selection of drug candidates mainly to those with an intermediate and narrow log P. At the same time, it was becoming increasingly apparent that Nature had long ago developed clever strategies to circumvent these "rules." In 1988, for example, independent reports documented the otherwise uncommon passage of a protein (HIV-Tat) across a membrane. A subsequent study implicated a highly basic domain in this protein (Tat49-57) in its cellular entry. This conspicuously contradictory behavior of a polar, highly charged peptide passing through a nonpolar membrane set the stage for learning how Nature had gotten around the current "rules" of transport. As elaborated in our studies and discussed in this Account, the key strategy used in Nature rests in part on the ability of a molecule to change its properties as a function of microenvironment; such molecules need to be polarity chameleons, polar in a polar milieu and relatively nonpolar in a nonpolar environment. Because this research originated in part with the protein Tat and its basic peptide domain, Tat49-57, the field focused heavily on peptides, even limiting its nomenclature to names such as "cell-penetrating peptides," "cell-permeating peptides," "protein transduction domains," and "membrane translocating peptides." Starting in 1997, through a systematic reverse engineering approach, we established that the ability of Tat49-57 to enter cells is not a function of its peptide backbone, but rather a function of the number and

  9. Improved affinity at the cost of decreased specificity: a recurring theme in PDZ-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, O Andreas; Sundell, Gustav N; Andersson, Eva; Ivarsson, Ylva; Jemth, Per

    2016-10-03

    The E6 protein from human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role during productive infection and is a potential drug target. We have previously designed a high affinity bivalent protein binder for the E6 protein, a fusion between a helix from the E6 associated protein and PDZØ9, an engineered variant (L391F/K392M) of the second PDZ domain from synapse associated protein 97 (SAP97 PDZ2). How the substitutions improve the affinity of SAP97 PDZ2 for HPV E6 is not clear and it is not known to what extent they affect the specificity for cellular targets. Here, we explore the specificity of wild type SAP97 PDZ2 and PDZØ9 through proteomic peptide phage display. In addition, we employ a double mutant cycle of SAP97 PDZ2 in which the binding kinetics for nine identified potential cellular peptide ligands are measured and compared with those for the C-terminal E6 peptide. The results demonstrate that PDZØ9 has an increased affinity for all peptides, but at the cost of specificity. Furthermore, there is a peptide dependent coupling free energy between the side chains at positions 391 and 392. This corroborates our previous allosteric model for PDZ domains, involving sampling of intramolecular energetic pathways.

  10. p75NTR antagonistic cyclic peptide decreases the size of beta amyloid-induced brain inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L; Stewart, Kenneth B; Qureshi, Nazer H; Kowall, Neil W; Gilchrest, Barbara A

    2008-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75(NTR) antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Abeta and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75(NTR). In vivo injections of Abeta into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Abeta and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Abeta to p75(NTR) may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  11. p75NTR Antagonistic Cyclic Peptide Decreases the Size of β Amyloid-Induced Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yaar, Mina; Arble, Bennet L.; Stewart, Kenneth B.; Qureshi, Nazer H.; Kowall, Neil W.

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) was shown to bind the 75 kD neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) to induce neuronal death. We synthesized a p75NTR antagonistic peptide (CATDIKGAEC) that contains the KGA motif that is present in the toxic part of Aβ and closely resembles the binding site of NGF for p75NTR. In vivo injections of Aβ into the cerebral cortex of B57BL/6 mice together with the peptide produced significantly less inflammation than simultaneous injections of Aβ and a control (CKETIADGAC, scrambled) peptide injected into the contralateral cortex. These data suggest that blocking the binding of Aβ to p75NTR may reduce neuronal loss in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:18807174

  12. Quantitative evaluation of the cell penetrating properties of an iodinated Tyr-L-maurocalcine analog.

    PubMed

    Tisseyre, Céline; Ahmadi, Mitra; Bacot, Sandrine; Dardevet, Lucie; Perret, Pascale; Ronjat, Michel; Fagret, Daniel; Usson, Yves; Ghezzi, Catherine; De Waard, Michel

    2014-10-01

    L-Maurocalcine (L-MCa) is the first reported animal cell-penetrating toxin. Characterizing its cell penetration properties is crucial considering its potential as a vector for the intracellular delivery of drugs. Radiolabeling is a sensitive and quantitative method to follow the cell accumulation of a molecule of interest. An L-MCa analog containing an additional N-terminal tyrosine residue (Tyr-L-MCa) was synthesized, shown to fold and oxidize properly, and successfully radioiodinated to (125)I-Tyr-L-MCa. Using various microscopy techniques, the average volume of the rat line F98 glioma cells was evaluated at 8.9 to 18.9×10(-7)μl. (125)I-Tyr-L-MCa accumulates within cells with a dose-dependency similar to the one previously published using 5,6-carboxyfluorescein-L-MCa. According to subcellular fractionation of F98 cells, plasma membranes keep less than 3% of the peptide, regardless of the extracellular concentration, while the nucleus accumulates over 75% and the cytosol around 20% of the radioactive material. Taking into account both nuclear and cytosolic fractions, cells accumulate intracellular concentrations of the peptide that are equal to the extracellular concentrations. Estimation of (125)I-Tyr-L-MCa cell entry kinetics indicate a first rapid phase with a 5min time constant for the plasma membrane followed by slower processes for the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Once inside cells, the labeled material no longer escapes from the intracellular environment since 90% of the radioactivity remains 24h after washout. Dead cells were found to have a lower uptake than live ones. The quantitative information gained herein will be useful for better framing the use of L-MCa in biotechnological applications. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Decreasing oxidative stress and neuroinflammation with a multifunctional peptide rescues memory deficits in mice with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-wei; Lu, Shuai; Su, Ya-jing; Xue, Di; Yu, Xiao-lin; Wang, Shao-wei; Zhang, He; Xu, Peng-xin; Xie, Xi-xiu; Liu, Rui-tian

    2014-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular senile plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and memory loss. Aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ), oxidative stress, and inflammation have pivotal roles in the pathogenesis of AD. Therefore, the inhibition of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammation is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of AD. In this study, a heptapeptide, isolated from a Ph.D.-C7C library by phage display, attenuated Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and reduced Aβ42-induced oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species and glutathione disulfide. As a result, glutathione level increased and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were enhanced in vitro and in vivo. This peptide also suppressed the inflammatory response by decreasing the release of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β, in microglia and by reducing microgliosis and astrogliosis in AD transgenic mice. This peptide was intracerebroventricularly administered to APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice. We found that this peptide significantly improved spatial memory and reduced the amyloid plaque burden and soluble and insoluble Aβ levels. Our findings suggest that this multifunctional peptide has therapeutic potential for an Aβ-targeted treatment of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Cell-penetrating Antibody Fragment against HIV-1 Rev Has High Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiaolei; Stahl, Stephen J.; Watts, Norman R.; DiMattia, Michael A.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 protein Rev oligomerizes on viral transcripts and directs their nuclear export. Previously, a Fab against Rev generated by phage display was used to crystallize and solve the structure of the Rev oligomerization domain. Here we have investigated the capability of this Fab to block Rev oligomerization and inhibit HIV-1 replication. The Fab itself did not have antiviral activity, but when a Tat-derived cell-penetrating peptide was appended, the resulting molecule (FabRev1-Tat) was strongly inhibitory of three different CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolates (IC50 = 0.09–0.44 μg/ml), as assessed by suppression of reverse transcriptase activity in infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and had low cell toxicity (TC50 > 100 μg/ml). FabRev1-Tat was taken up by both peripheral blood mononuclear and HEK293T cells, appearing in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, as shown by immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. Computational alanine scanning was used to identify key residues in the complementarity-determining regions to guide mutagenesis experiments. Residues in the light chain CDR3 (LCDR3) were assessed to be important. Residues in LCDR3 were mutated, and LCDR3-Tyr92 was found to be critical for binding to Rev, as judged by surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy. Peptides corresponding to all six CDR regions were synthesized and tested for Rev binding. None of the linear peptides had significant affinity for Rev, but four of the amide-cyclic forms did. Especially cyclic-LCDR3 (LGGYPAASYRTA) had high affinity for Rev and was able to effectively depolymerize Rev filaments, as shown by both surface plasmon resonance and electron microscopy. PMID:24878961

  15. Determining the Time Window for Dynamic Nanowire Cell Penetration Processes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xi; Aalipour, Amin; Gupta, Sneha V; Melosh, Nicholas A

    2015-12-22

    Nanowire (NW) arrays offer opportunities for parallel, nondestructive intracellular access for biomolecule delivery, intracellular recording, and sensing. Spontaneous cell membrane penetration by vertical nanowires is essential for these applications, yet the time- and geometry-dependent penetration process is still poorly understood. In this work, the dynamic NW-cell interface during cell spreading was examined through experimental cell penetration measurements combined with two mechanical models based on substrate adhesion force or cell traction forces. Penetration was determined by comparing the induced tension at a series of given membrane configurations to the critical membrane failure tension. The adhesion model predicts that penetration occurs within a finite window shortly after initial cell contact and adhesion, while the traction model predicts increasing penetration over a longer period. NW penetration rates determined from a cobalt ion delivery assay are compared to the predicted results from the two models. In addition, the effects of NW geometry and cell properties are systematically evaluated to identify the key factors for penetration.

  16. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  17. HIV-1 fusion peptide decreases bending energy and promotes curved fusion intermediates.

    PubMed

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Nagle, John F

    2007-09-15

    A crucial step in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is fusion between the viral envelope and the T-cell membrane, which must involve intermediate membrane states with high curvature. Our main result from diffuse x-ray scattering is that the bending modulus K(C) is greatly reduced upon addition of the HIV fusion peptide FP-23 to lipid bilayers. A smaller bending modulus reduces the free energy barriers required to achieve and pass through the highly curved intermediate states and thereby facilitates fusion and HIV infection. The reduction in K(C) is by a factor of 13 for the thicker, stiffer 1,2-sn-dierucoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers and by a factor of 3 for 1,2-sn-dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers. The reduction in K(C) decays exponentially with concentration of FP-23, and the 1/e concentration is <1 mol % peptide/lipid, which is well within the physiological range for a fusion site. A secondary result is, when FP-23 is added to the samples which consist of stacks of membranes, that the distance between membranes increases and eventually becomes infinite at full hydration (unbinding); we attribute this both to electrostatic repulsion of the positively charged arginine in the FP-23 and to an increase in the repulsive fluctuation interaction brought about by the smaller K(C). Although this latter interaction works against membrane fusion, our results show that the energy that it requires of the fusion protein machinery to bring the HIV envelope membrane and the target T-cell membrane into close contact is negligible.

  18. Proteasome Inhibitors Decrease AAV2 Capsid derived Peptide Epitope Presentation on MHC Class I Following Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Jonathan D; Hui, Daniel; Downey, Harre D; Dunn, Danielle; Pien, Gary C; Mingozzi, Federico; Zhou, Shangzhen; High, Katherine A

    2009-01-01

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are an extensively studied and highly used vector platform for gene therapy applications. We hypothesize that in the first clinical trial using AAV to treat hemophilia B, AAV capsid proteins were presented on the surface of transduced hepatocytes, resulting in clearance by antigen-specific CD8+ T cells and consequent loss of therapeutic transgene expression. It has been previously shown that proteasome inhibitors can have a dramatic effect on AAV transduction in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, to decrease capsid antigen presentation on hepatocytes in vitro, whereas at the same time, enhancing gene expression in vivo. Using an AAV capsid-specific T-cell reporter (TCR) line to analyze the effect of proteasome inhibitors on antigen presentation, we demonstrate capsid antigen presentation at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs), and inhibition of antigen presentation at pharmacologic levels of bortezomib. We also demonstrate that bortezomib can enhance Factor IX (FIX) expression from an AAV2 vector in mice, although the same effect was not observed for AAV8 vectors. A pharmacological agent that can enhance AAV transduction, decrease T-cell activation/proliferation, and decrease capsid antigen presentation would be a promising solution to obstacles to successful AAV-mediated, liver-directed gene transfer in humans. PMID:19904235

  19. Effective capture of proteins inside living cells by antibodies indirectly linked to a novel cell-penetrating polymer-modified protein A derivative.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Shoko; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Hisafumi; Mitsuhashi, Naoto; Majima, Eiji; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cytoplasmic proteins are useful tools that can control cellular function and clarify signaling mechanisms. However, it is difficult to capture proteins inside living cells, and thus appropriate methods for antibody delivery to the cytoplasm of living cells are required. Cell-penetrating materials, such as the TAT-peptide, have received attention for their ability to deliver various cargos into living cells. However, the direct modification of cargos with cell-penetrating materials is time-consuming and lacks versatility. Therefore, we conceived that protein A, which can bind to the fragment crystallizable region of an antibody, could indirectly link antibodies with cell-penetrating materials, creating an efficient and simple antibody delivery system. Here, we constructed a novel antibody delivery system using a cell-penetrating polymer-modified protein A derivative (CPP-pAd). Living cells treated with CPP-pAd/antibody complexes showed significantly higher antibody levels than those achieved with the commercially available reagent HVJ-E. Pre-treatment with sucrose prevented cellular uptake of the CPP-pAd/antibody complex, suggesting that the CPP-pAd/antibody internalization mechanism occurs through clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Interestingly, intracellularly delivered antibodies did not colocalize with endosome/lysosome markers, further suggesting that antibodies were delivered to the cytoplasm by escape from endosome/lysosome. Moreover, we observed that anti-nuclear pore complex antibodies, delivered to cells using CPP-pAd, localized to the nuclear membrane and inhibited nuclear factor κB dependent luciferase activity. Together, these results suggest that the antibodies delivered by CPP-pAd captured functional proteins, making CPP-pAd a promising strategy for effective capture of proteins inside living cells.

  20. Peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide-1 contribute to decreased food intake after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Svane, M S; Jørgensen, N B; Bojsen-Møller, K N; Dirksen, C; Nielsen, S; Kristiansen, V B; Toräng, S; Wewer Albrechtsen, N J; Rehfeld, J F; Hartmann, B; Madsbad, S; Holst, J J

    2016-11-01

    Exaggerated postprandial secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and peptide YY (PYY) may explain appetite reduction and weight loss after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), but causality has not been established. We hypothesized that food intake decreases after surgery through combined actions from GLP-1 and PYY. GLP-1 actions can be blocked using the GLP-1 receptor antagonist Exendin 9-39 (Ex-9), whereas PYY actions can be inhibited by the administration of a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor preventing the formation of PYY3-36. Appetite-regulating gut hormones and appetite ratings during a standard mixed-meal test and effects on subsequent ad libitum food intake were evaluated in two studies: in study 1, nine patients with type 2 diabetes were examined prospectively before and 3 months after RYGB with and without Ex-9. In study 2, 12 RYGB-operated patients were examined in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design on four experimental days with: (1) placebo, (2) Ex-9, (3) the DPP-4 inhibitor, sitagliptin, to reduce formation of PYY3-36 and (4) Ex-9/sitagliptin combined. In study 1, food intake decreased by 35% following RYGB compared with before surgery. Before surgery, GLP-1 receptor blockage increased food intake but no effect was seen postoperatively, whereas PYY secretion was markedly increased. In study 2, combined GLP-1 receptor blockage and DPP-4 inhibitor mediated lowering of PYY3-36 increased food intake by ~20% in RYGB patients, whereas neither GLP-1 receptor blockage nor DPP-4 inhibition alone affected food intake, perhaps because of concomitant marked increases in the unblocked hormone. Blockade of actions from only one of the two L-cell hormones, GLP-1 and PYY3-36, resulted in concomitant increased secretion of the other, probably explaining the absent effect on food intake on these experimental days. Combined blockade of GLP-1 and PYY actions increased food intake after RYGB, supporting that these hormones have a role in

  1. Statins decrease expression of the proinflammatory neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Bucelli, Robert C; Gonsiorek, Eugene A; Kim, Woo-Yang; Bruun, Donald; Rabin, Richard A; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2008-03-01

    Clinical and experimental observations suggest that statins may be useful for treating diseases presenting with predominant neurogenic inflammation, but the mechanism(s) mediating this potential therapeutic effect are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that statins act directly on sensory neurons to decrease expression of proinflammatory neuropeptides that trigger neurogenic inflammation, specifically calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, radioimmunoassay, and immunocytochemistry were used to quantify CGRP and substance P expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) harvested from adult male rats and in primary cultures of sensory neurons derived from embryonic rat DRG. Systemic administration of statins at pharmacologically relevant doses significantly reduced CGRP and substance P levels in DRG in vivo. In cultured sensory neurons, statins blocked bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-induced CGRP and substance P expression and decreased expression of these neuropeptides in sensory neurons pretreated with BMPs. These effects were concentration-dependent and occurred independent of effects on cell survival or axon growth. Statin inhibition of neuropeptide expression was reversed by supplementation with mevalonate and cholesterol, but not isoprenoid precursors. BMPs signal via Smad activation, and cholesterol depletion by statins inhibited Smad1 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. These findings identify a novel action of statins involving down-regulation of proinflammatory neuropeptide expression in sensory ganglia via cholesterol depletion and decreased Smad1 activation and suggest that statins may be effective in attenuating neurogenic inflammation.

  2. A cell-penetrating bispecific antibody for therapeutic regulation of intracellular targets.

    PubMed

    Weisbart, Richard H; Gera, Joseph F; Chan, Grace; Hansen, James E; Li, Erica; Cloninger, Cheri; Levine, Arnold J; Nishimura, Robert N

    2012-10-01

    The therapeutic use of antibodies is restricted by the limited access of antibodies to intracellular compartments. To overcome this limitation, we developed a cell-penetrating monoclonal antibody, mAb 3E10, as an intracellular delivery vehicle for the intracellular and intranuclear delivery of antibodies constructed as bispecific single-chain Fv fragments. Because MDM2 is an important target in cancer therapy, we selected monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3G5 for intracellular transport. mAb 3G5 binds MDM2 and blocks binding of MDM2 to p53. Here, we show that the resulting 3E10-3G5 bispecific antibody retains cell-penetrating and MDM2-binding activity, increases tumor p53 levels, and inhibits growth of MDM2-addicted tumors. The use of cell-penetrating bispecific antibodies in targeted molecular therapy will significantly broaden the spectrum of accessible intracellular targets and may have a profound impact in cancer therapy.

  3. Weight loss during oligofructose supplementation is associated with decreased ghrelin and increased peptide YY in overweight and obese adults2

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Jill A; Reimer, Raylene A

    2013-01-01

    Background Rodent studies show that oligofructose promotes weight loss, stimulates satiety hormone secretion, reduces energy intake, and improves lipid profiles. Objective Our objective was to examine the effects of oligofructose supplementation on body weight and satiety hormone concentrations in overweight and obese adults. Design This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Forty-eight otherwise healthy adults with a body mass index (in kg/m2) > 25 were randomly assigned to receive 21 g oligo-fructose/d or a placebo (maltodextrin) for 12 wk. Body composition (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); meal tolerance tests, including satiety hormone response; food intake; and subjective appetite ratings were determined. Results There was a reduction in body weight of 1.03 ±0.43 kg with oligofructose supplementation, whereas the control group experienced an increase in body weight of 0.45 ± 0.31 kg over 12 wk (P = 0.01). A lower area under the curve (AUC) for ghrelin (P = 0.004) and a higher AUC for peptide YY (PYY) with oligofructose (P = 0.03) coincided with a reduction in self-reported caloric intake (P ≤ 0.05). Glucose decreased in the oligofructose group and increased in the control group between initial and final tests (P ≤ 0.05). Insulin concentrations mirrored this pattern (P ≤ 0.05). Oligofructose supplementation did not affect plasma active glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion. According to a visual analog scale designed to assess side effects, oligofructose was well tolerated. Conclusions Independent of other lifestyle changes, oligofructose supplementation has the potential to promote weight loss and improve glucose regulation in overweight adults. Suppressed ghrelin and enhanced PYY may contribute in part to the reduction in energy intake. The trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00522353. PMID:19386741

  4. Bioreducible polymers with cell penetrating and endosome buffering functionality for gene delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-il; Rothmund, Thomas; Kissel, Thomas; Kim, Sung Wan

    2011-05-30

    Bioreducible cationic polymers (p(DAH(a)-R/API(b))s) composed of different ratios (a:b=2:1, 1:1, 1:2) between arginine-grafted diaminohexane (DAH-R) (cell penetrating functionality) and 1-(3-aminopropyl) imidazole (API) (endosome buffering functionality) monomers were synthesized by Michael reaction of N,N'-cystaminebisacrylamide (CBA) with them, in order to study the effect of endosome buffering moiety on arginine-grafted bioreducible polymeric gene carriers. Several experiments displayed a distinct correlation between monomer composition ratios of p(DAH-R/API)s and the polymer features. Increased endosome buffering capacities proportional to API portions was evaluated for p(DAH-R/API)s due to the imidazole group (pKa=6) of API. Increased portions of API non-ionized at physiological pH and resultant decrease of arginine residues also reduced cytotoxicities of the polymers due to less interaction of cellular compartments with less positively charged polymers but decreased pDNA condensing abilities, Zeta-potential values, cellular uptakes of polyplexes, and finally transfection efficiencies as well. Thus, the predominance of arginine residues over endosome buffering moieties was revealed regarding efficient gene delivery for p(DAH-R/API)s. From transfection results with chloroquine or nigericin, it can be deduced that the endosomal escape of p(DAH-R/API) polyplexes occurs by direct endosome membrane penetration of arginine moieties as well as endosome buffering of the polymers after cellular uptake, which emphasizes the importance of arginine moieties for polymeric gene delivery systems. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioreducible polymers with cell penetrating and endosome buffering functionality for gene delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-il; Rothmund, Thomas; Kissel, Thomas; Kim, Sung Wan

    2011-01-01

    Bioreducible cationic polymers (p(DAHa-R/APIb)s) composed of different ratios (a:b = 2:1, 1:1, 1:2) between arginine-grafted diaminohexane (DAH-R) (cell penetrating functionality) and 1-(3-aminopropyl) imidazole (API) (endosome buffering functionality) monomers were synthesized by Michael reaction of N,N’-cystaminebisacrylamide (CBA) with them, in order to study the effect of endosome buffering moiety on arginine-grafted bioreducible polymeric gene carriers. Several experiments displayed a distinct correlation between monomer composition ratios of p(DAH-R/API)s and the polymer features. Increased endosome buffering capacities proportional to API portions was evaluated for p(DAH-R/API)s due to the imidazole group (pKa=6) of API. Increased portions of API non-ionized at physiological pH and resultant decrease of arginine residues also reduced cytotoxicities of the polymers due to less interaction of cellular compartments with less positively charged polymers, but decreased pDNA condensing abilities, Zeta-potential values, cellular uptakes of polyplexes, and finally transfection efficiencies as well. Thus, the predominance of arginine residues over endosome buffering moieties was revealed regarding efficient gene delivery for p(DAH-R/API)s. From transfection results with chloroquine or nigericin, it can be deduced that the endosomal escape of p(DAH-R/API) polyplexes occurs by direct endsome membrane penetration of arginine moieties as well as endosome buffering abilities of the polymers after cellular uptake, which emphasizes the importance of arginine moieties for polymeric gene delivery systems. PMID:21352876

  6. CRMP-2 peptide mediated decrease of high and low voltage-activated calcium channels, attenuation of nociceptor excitability, and anti-nociception in a model of AIDS therapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Piekarz, Andrew D; Due, Michael R; Khanna, May; Wang, Bo; Ripsch, Matthew S; Wang, Ruizhong; Meroueh, Samy O; Vasko, Michael R; White, Fletcher A; Khanna, Rajesh

    2012-07-24

    The ubiquity of protein-protein interactions in biological signaling offers ample opportunities for therapeutic intervention. We previously identified a peptide, designated CBD3, that suppressed inflammatory and neuropathic behavioral hypersensitivity in rodents by inhibiting the ability of collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2) to bind to N-type voltage-activated calcium channels (CaV2.2) [Brittain et al. Nature Medicine 17:822-829 (2011)]. Here, we utilized SPOTScan analysis to identify an optimized variation of the CBD3 peptide (CBD3A6K) that bound with greater affinity to Ca²⁺ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the CBD3A6K peptide was more stable and less prone to the unfolding observed with the parent CBD3 peptide. This mutant peptide, conjugated to the cell penetrating motif of the HIV transduction domain protein TAT, exhibited greater anti-nociception in a rodent model of AIDS therapy-induced peripheral neuropathy when compared to the parent TAT-CBD3 peptide. Remarkably, intraperitoneal administration of TAT-CBD3A6K produced none of the minor side effects (i.e. tail kinking, body contortion) observed with the parent peptide. Interestingly, excitability of dissociated small diameter sensory neurons isolated from rats was also reduced by TAT-CBD3A6K peptide suggesting that suppression of excitability may be due to inhibition of T- and R-type Ca²⁺ channels. TAT-CBD3A6K had no effect on depolarization-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release compared to vehicle control. Collectively, these results establish TAT-CBD3A6K as a peptide therapeutic with greater efficacy in an AIDS therapy-induced model of peripheral neuropathy than its parent peptide, TAT-CBD3. Structural modifications of the CBD3 scaffold peptide may result in peptides with selectivity against a particular subset of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in a multipharmacology of action on the target.

  7. GK-1 peptide reduces tumor growth, decreases metastatic burden, and increases survival in a murine breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Torres-García, D; Pérez-Torres, A; Manoutcharian, K; Orbe, U; Servín-Blanco, R; Fragoso, G; Sciutto, E

    2017-10-09

    GK-1 is a parasite-derived peptide adjuvant of 18 amino acid-length that enhances T-cell function and increases survival in B16-F10 melanoma tumor-bearing mice. This study was designed to evaluate in vivo the antitumor efficacy of GK-1 on 4T1 mouse mammary carcinoma. BALB/c mice with palpable primary tumors were weekly intravenously injected three times with saline solution or three different concentrations (10, 50, or 100μg per mouse) of GK-1. GK-1 significantly increased lifespan (p<0.0001) and reduced the primary tumor weight (p=0.014) and volume (p<0.0001) with respect to control mice, with no statistically significant differences among GK-1 doses. At the primary tumor, we found increased necrotic areas associated with a reduction in tumor mass, as well as an increase in the antitumor cytokine IL-12. Especially encouraging is the ability of GK-1 to reduce the number of lung metastasis (p=0.006) disregarding the dose used. The participation of IL-6 in metastasis development and the decreased levels of CCL-2, CCL-3, TNF-α, CXCL-9, GM-CSF, and b-FGF found in lungs of GK-1-treated mice is discussed. Our study supports the effectiveness of GK-1 as an antineoplastic agent that merits further exploration in combination with other therapeutic approaches in future translational studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell Penetrating Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Cancer REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average...Bispecific Antibodies for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors in Advanced Prostate Cancer Michael Lilly, MD Richard Weisbart, MD Medical...0534, entitled Cell- penetrating bispecific antibodies for targeting oncogenic transcription factors in advanced prostate cancer . The research is a

  9. Design and Use of Peptide-Based Antibodies Decreasing Superoxide Production by Mitochondrial Complex I and Complex II

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Patrick T.; Yun, June; Kaumaya, Pravin P.T.; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of reactive oxygen species. Both complex I and complex II mediate O2•− production in mitochondria and host reactive protein thiols. To explore the functions of the specific domains involved in the redox modifications of complexes I and II, various peptide-based antibodies were generated against these complexes, and their inhibitory effects were subsequently measured. The redox domains involved in S-glutathionylation and nitration, as well as the binding motif of the iron-sulfur cluster (N1a) of the complexes I and II were utilized to design B cell epitopes for generating antibodies. The effect of antibody binding on enzyme-mediated O2•− generation was measured by EPR spin trapping. Binding of either antibody AbGSCA206 or AbGSCB367 against glutathione (GS)-binding domain to complex I inhibits its O2•− generation, but does not affect electron transfer efficiency. Binding of antibody (Ab24N1a) against the binding motif of N1a to complex I modestly suppresses both O2•− generation and electron transfer efficiency. Binding of either antibody Ab75 or Ab24 against non-redox domain decreases electron leakage for O2•− production. In complex II, binding of antibody AbGSC90 against GS-binding domain to complex II marginally decreases both O2•− generation and electron transfer activity. Binding of antibody AbY142 to complex II against the nitrated domain modestly inhibits electron leakage, but does not affect the electron transfer activity of complex II. In conclusion, mediation of O2•− generation by complexes I and II can be regulated by specific redox and non-redox domains. PMID:20564035

  10. Decreased ghrelin-induced GH release in thyrotoxicosis: comparison with GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH.

    PubMed

    Nascif, Sergio Oliva; Correa-Silva, Silvia Regina; Silva, Marcos Roberto; Lengyel, Ana-Maria Judith

    2007-01-01

    In thyrotoxicosis GH response to several stimuli is impaired, but there is no data on ghrelin-induced GH release in these patients. Ghrelin is a potent GH secretagogue and it also increases glucose levels in men. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of ghrelin (1 microg/kg), GHRP-6 (1 mug/kg) and GHRH (100 microg), i.v., on GH levels in 10 hyperthyroid patients and in 8 controls. Glucose levels were also measured during ghrelin and GHRP-6 administration. In control subjects and hyperthyroid patients peak GH (microg/l; mean +/- SE) values after ghrelin injection (controls: 66.7 +/- 13.6; hyper: 19.3 +/- 2.4) were significantly higher than those obtained after GHRP-6 (controls: 26.7 +/- 5.1; hyper: 12.6 +/- 1.3) and GHRH (controls: 13.5 +/- 4.3; hyper: 5.3 +/- 1.3). There was a significant decrease in GH responsiveness to ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH in the hyperthyroid group compared to controls. In control subjects and hyperthyroid patients basal glucose (mmol/l) values were 4.5 +/- 0.1 and 4.7 +/- 0.2, respectively. There was a significant increase in glucose levels 30 min after ghrelin injection (controls: 4.9 +/- 0.1; hyper: 5.2 +/- 0.2), which remained elevated up to 120 min. When the two groups were compared no differences in glucose values were observed. GHRP-6 administration was not able to increase glucose levels in both groups. Our data shows that GH release after ghrelin, GHRP-6 and GHRH administration is decreased in thyrotoxicosis. This suggests that thyroid hormone excess interferes with GH-releasing pathways activated by these peptides. Our results also suggest that ghrelin's ability to increase glucose levels is not altered in thyrotoxicosis.

  11. Increased proliferation and decreased membrane permeability as defense mechanisms of Fusobacterium nucleatum against human neutrophilic peptide-1.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Mutlu; Könönen, Eija; Söderling, Eva; Isik, Gülden; Firatli, Erhan; Uitto, Veli-Jukka; Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman

    2014-12-01

    Human neutrophilic peptides (HNPs) constitute a class of host defense molecules, which contribute to the non-oxidative killing of bacteria and other microorganisms. Since the adaptability is crucial to bacterial survival in changing environments, it is of interest to know how Fusobacterium nucleatum, the major bridge organism connecting early and late colonizers in dental biofilms, defends itself against HNPs. This study aimed to examine the planktonic growth, membrane permeability, and biofilm formation characteristics as defense mechanisms of F. nucleatum against HNP-1. In all experiments, the type strain of F. nucleatum (ssp. nucleatum ATCC 25586) and two clinical strains (ssp. nucleatum AHN 9508 and ssp. polymorphum AHN 9910) were used. Planktonic growth (measured in colony forming units), capsular polysaccharide production (visualized by Ziehl-Neelsen stain), membrane permeability (demonstrated as N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine uptake), biofilm formation, and established biofilm development (measured as total mass and polysaccharide levels) were analyzed in the presence of 0 μg/ml (control), 1 μg/ml, 5 μg/ml, and 10 μg/ml of HNP-1. Planktonic growth of the strains AHN 9508 and ATCC 25586 were significantly (p<0.05) increased in the presence of HNP-1, while their membrane permeability decreased (p<0.005) in the planktonic form. HNP-1 decreased the biofilm formation of the strains ATCC 25586 and AHN 9910, whereas it increased the growth of the strain AHN 9508 in established biofilms. Capsule formation and polysaccharide production were not observed in any strain. We conclude that the inhibition of the membrane permeability and the increase in planktonic and established biofilm growth could act as bacterial defense mechanisms against neutrophilic defensins. In addition, this strain-dependent survival ability against HNP-1 may explain the variation in the virulence of different F. nucleatum strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Peptide YY3-36 Decreases Reinstatement of High-Fat Food Seeking during Dieting in a Rat Relapse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ghitza, Udi E.; Nair, Sunila G.; Golden, Sam A.; Gray, Sarah M.; Uejima, Jamie L.; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Shaham, Yavin

    2007-01-01

    A major problem in treating obesity is high rates of relapse to maladaptive food-taking habits during dieting. This relapse is often provoked by acute re-exposure to palatable food, food-associated cues, or stress. We used a reinstatement model, commonly used to study relapse to abused drugs, to explore the effect of peptide YY3-36 (PYY3-36) on reinstatement of high-fat (35%, 45 mg pellets) food seeking induced by acute exposure to the pellets (pellet priming), a cue previously associated with pellet delivery (pellet cue), or yohimbine (2 mg/kg, a pharmacological stressor). Rats were placed on a restricted diet (16 g of chow per day) and lever-pressed for the pellets for 9 – 12 sessions (6 h/d, every 48 h); pellet delivery was paired with a tone–light cue. They were then given 10 – 20 extinction sessions wherein lever presses were not reinforced with the pellets and subsequently tested for reinstatement of food seeking. Systemic PYY3-36 injections (100 – 200 μg/kg) decreased pellet priming- and pellet cue-induced reinstatement of food seeking but not yohimbine-induced reinstatement. Arcuate nucleus (Arc) injections of PYY3-36 (0.4 μg per side) decreased pellet priming-induced reinstatement. The attenuation of pellet priming-induced reinstatement by systemic PYY3-36 was reversed by systemic (2 mg/kg) but not Arc (0.5 μg per side) injections of the Y2 receptor antagonist BIIE0246. Arc PYY3-36 injections did not decrease pellet cue-induced reinstatement. Finally, systemic PYY3-36 injections had minimal effects on ongoing food self-administration or heroin priming- or heroin cue-induced reinstatement of heroin seeking. These data identify an effect of systemic PYY3-36 on relapse to food seeking that is independent of Y2 receptor activation in Arc and suggest that PYY3-36 should be considered for the treatment of relapse to maladaptive food-taking habits during dieting. PMID:17959795

  13. Glucocorticoids decrease body weight and food intake and inhibit appetite regulatory peptide expression in the hypothalamus of rats

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIAO-YAN; SHI, JIAN-HUA; DU, WEN-HUA; FAN, YAN-PING; HU, XIAO-LEI; ZHANG, CHEN-CHEN; XU, HUAN-BAI; MIAO, YAN-JUN; ZHOU, HAI-YAN; XIANG, PING; CHEN, FENG-LING

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on appetite and gene expression of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AGRP) and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), in non-obese and obese rats. Both non-obese and obese rats were randomly assigned to three groups: normal saline, low- and high-dose GC groups (NSG, LDG and HDG, respectively), which received an intraperitoneal injection with normal saline (0.2 ml/100 g) or hydrocortisone sodium succinate at 5 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, for 20 days. The expression levels of NPY, AGRP and CART mRNA in the hypothalamus were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Non-obese and obese rats were found to undergo weight loss after GC injection, and a higher degree of weight loss was observed in the HDG rats. The average and cumulative food intakes in the obese and non-obese rats injected with high-dose GC were lower compared to that in the NSG (p<0.05). mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and the anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, were significantly lower in the HDG than levels in the NSG for both the obese and non-obese rats (p<0.05). GC treatment decreased appetite and body weight, induced apparent glucolipid metabolic disturbances and hyperinsulinemia, while down-regulated mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, in the hypothalamus in the rats. The mechanism which induces this neuropeptide expression requires further study. PMID:22977608

  14. Glucocorticoids decrease body weight and food intake and inhibit appetite regulatory peptide expression in the hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Jian-Hua; DU, Wen-Hua; Fan, Yan-Ping; Hu, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Chen-Chen; Xu, Huan-Bai; Miao, Yan-Jun; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Xiang, Ping; Chen, Feng-Ling

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on appetite and gene expression of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AGRP) and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), in non-obese and obese rats. Both non-obese and obese rats were randomly assigned to three groups: normal saline, low- and high-dose GC groups (NSG, LDG and HDG, respectively), which received an intraperitoneal injection with normal saline (0.2 ml/100 g) or hydrocortisone sodium succinate at 5 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, for 20 days. The expression levels of NPY, AGRP and CART mRNA in the hypothalamus were measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Non-obese and obese rats were found to undergo weight loss after GC injection, and a higher degree of weight loss was observed in the HDG rats. The average and cumulative food intakes in the obese and non-obese rats injected with high-dose GC were lower compared to that in the NSG (p<0.05). mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and the anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, were significantly lower in the HDG than levels in the NSG for both the obese and non-obese rats (p<0.05). GC treatment decreased appetite and body weight, induced apparent glucolipid metabolic disturbances and hyperinsulinemia, while down-regulated mRNA expression levels of the orexigenic neuropeptides, NPY and AGRP, and anorexigenic neuropeptide, CART, in the hypothalamus in the rats. The mechanism which induces this neuropeptide expression requires further study.

  15. Cell Penetrable Human scFv Specific to Middle Domain of Matrix Protein-1 Protects Mice from Lethal Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Dong-din-on, Fonthip; Songserm, Thaweesak; Pissawong, Tippawan; Srimanote, Potjanee; Thanongsaksrikul, Jeeraphong; Thueng-in, Kanyarat; Moonjit, Pattra; Lertwatcharasarakul, Preeda; Seesuay, Watee; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2015-01-01

    A new anti-influenza remedy that can tolerate the virus antigenic variation is needed. Influenza virus matrix protein-1 (M1) is highly conserved and pivotal for the virus replication cycle: virus uncoating, assembly and budding. An agent that blocks the M1 functions should be an effective anti-influenza agent. In this study, human scFv that bound to recombinant M1 middle domain (MD) and native M1 of A/H5N1 was produced. Phage mimotope search and computerized molecular docking revealed that the scFv bound to the MD conformational epitope formed by juxtaposed helices 7 and 9 of the M1. The scFv was linked molecularly to a cell penetrable peptide, penetratin (PEN). The PEN-scFv (transbody), when used to treat the cells pre-infected with the heterologous clade/subclade A/H5N1 reduced the viral mRNA intracellularly and in the cell culture fluids. The transbody mitigated symptom severity and lung histopathology of the H5N1 infected mice and caused reduction of virus antigen in the tissues as well as extricated the animals from the lethal challenge in a dose dependent manner. The transbody specific to the M1 MD, either alone or in combination with the cognate human scFvs specific to other influenza virus proteins, should be an effective, safe and mutation tolerable anti-influenza agent. PMID:25594836

  16. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  17. Increased Mobility of Major Histocompatibility Complex I-Peptide Complexes Decreases the Sensitivity of Antigen Recognition*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Segura, Jean-Manuel; Guillaume, Philippe; Mark, Silke; Dojcinovic, Danijel; Johannsen, Alexandre; Bosshard, Giovanna; Angelov, Georgi; Legler, Daniel F.; Vogel, Horst; Luescher, Immanuel F.

    2008-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) can recognize and kill target cells expressing only a few cognate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-peptide complexes. This high sensitivity requires efficient scanning of a vast number of highly diverse MHC I-peptide complexes by the T cell receptor in the contact site of transient conjugates formed mainly by nonspecific interactions of ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Tracking of single H-2Kd molecules loaded with fluorescent peptides on target cells and nascent conjugates with CTL showed dynamic transitions between states of free diffusion and immobility. The immobilizations were explained by association of MHC I-peptide complexes with ICAM-1 and strongly increased their local concentration in cell adhesion sites and hence their scanning by T cell receptor. In nascent immunological synapses cognate complexes became immobile, whereas noncognate ones diffused out again. Interfering with this mobility modulation-based concentration and sorting of MHC I-peptide complexes strongly impaired the sensitivity of antigen recognition by CTL, demonstrating that it constitutes a new basic aspect of antigen presentation by MHC I molecules. PMID:18579518

  18. Polypeptides with Quaternary Phosphonium Side Chains: Synthesis, Characterization, and Cell-Penetrating Properties

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polypeptides bearing quaternary phosphonium side chains were synthesized via controlled ring-opening polymerization of chlorine-functionalized amino acid N-carboxyanhydride monomers followed by one-step nucleophilic substitution reaction with triethylphosphine. The conformation of the resulting polypeptides can be controlled by modulating the side-chain length and α-carbon stereochemistry. The phosphonium-based poly(l-glutamate) derivatives with 11 σ-bond backbone-to-charge distance adopt stable α-helical conformation against pH and ionic strength changes. These helical, quaternary phosphonium-bearing polypeptides exhibit higher cell-penetrating capability than their racemic and random-coiled analogues. They enter cells mainly via an energy-independent, nonendocytic cell membrane transduction mechanism and exhibit low cytotoxicity, substantiating their potential use as a safe and effective cell-penetrating agent. PMID:24635536

  19. Discovery of the cell-penetrating function of A2 domain derived from LTA subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Guo, Hua; Zheng, Wenyun; Zhang, Na; Wang, Tianwen; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is a protein toxin produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). As a bacterial toxin, LT holotoxin can enter intestinal epithelial cells and cause diarrhea. In addition, LT is also a powerful mucosal adjuvant capable of enhancing the strong immune responses to co-administered antigens. However, the LT immunological mechanism is still not clear in some aspects, especially with the respect to how the LTA subunit functions alone. Here, we discovered that the A2 domain of LTA could carry a fluorescent protein into cells, whose function is similar to a cell-penetrating peptide. The transmembrane-transporting ability of the A2 domain is non-specific in its cell-penetrating function, which was shown through testing with different cell types. Moreover, the LTA2 fusion protein penetrated a fluorescently labeled cell membrane that identified LTA2 internalization through membrane transport pathways, and showed it finally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, low-temperature stress and pharmacological agent treatments showed that the LTA2 internalization route is a temperature-dependent process involving the clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the macropinocytosis pathways. These results could explain the internalization of the LTA subunit alone without the LTB pentamer, contributing to a better understanding of LTA working as a mucosal adjuvant; they also suggest that the A2 domain could be used as a novel transport vehicle for research and treatment of disease.

  20. Predictors of Left Ventricle Remodeling: Combined Plasma B-type Natriuretic Peptide Decreasing Ratio and Peak Creatine Kinase-MB.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Chung, Chang-Min; Chu, Chi-Ming; Lin, Yu-Shen; Pan, Kuo-Li; Chang, Jung-Jung; Wang, Po-Chang; Chang, Shih-Tai; Yang, Teng-Yao; Jang, Shih-Jung; Yang, Tsung-Han; Hsiao, Ju-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported that patients who had an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have found that measuring B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) during the subacute phase of left ventricular (LV) remodeling can predict the possible course of LV remodeling. This study assessed the use of serial BNP serum levels combined with early creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) to predict the development of significant LV remodeling in AMI patients. Methods: Nighty-seven patients with new onset AMI were assessed using serial echocardiographic studies and serial measurements of BNP levels, both performed on day-2 (BNP1), day-7 (BNP2), day-90 (BNP3), and day-180 (BNP4) after admission. LV remodeling was defined as >20% increase in biplane LV end-diastolic volume on day-180 compared to baseline (day-2). Results: Patients were divided into LV remodeling [LVR(+)] and non LV remodeling [LVR(-)] groups. No first-week BNP level was found to predict remodeling. However, the two groups had significantly different day-90 BNP level (208.1 ± 263.7 pg/ml vs. 82.4 ± 153.7 pg/ml, P = 0.039) and significantly different 3-month BNP decrease ratios ( R BNP13) (14.4 ± 92.2% vs. 69.4 ± 25.9%, P < 0.001). The appropriate cut-off value for R BNP13 was 53.2% (AUC = 0.764, P < 0.001). Early peak CK-MB (cut-off 48.2 ng/ml; AUC = 0.672; P = 0.014) was another independent predictor of remodeling. Additionally, combining peak CK-MB and R BNP13 offered an excellent discrimination for half-year remodeling when assessed by ROC curve (AUC = 0.818, P < 0.001). Conclusion: R BNP13 is a significant independent predictor of 6-month LV remodeling. The early peak CK-MB additionally offered an incremental power to the predictions derived from serial BNP examinations.

  1. Predictors of Left Ventricle Remodeling: Combined Plasma B-type Natriuretic Peptide Decreasing Ratio and Peak Creatine Kinase-MB

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Te; Chung, Chang-Min; Chu, Chi-Ming; Lin, Yu-Shen; Pan, Kuo-Li; Chang, Jung-Jung; Wang, Po-Chang; Chang, Shih-Tai; Yang, Teng-Yao; Jang, Shih-Jung; Yang, Tsung-Han; Hsiao, Ju-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies reported that patients who had an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have found that measuring B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) during the subacute phase of left ventricular (LV) remodeling can predict the possible course of LV remodeling. This study assessed the use of serial BNP serum levels combined with early creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) to predict the development of significant LV remodeling in AMI patients. Methods: Nighty-seven patients with new onset AMI were assessed using serial echocardiographic studies and serial measurements of BNP levels, both performed on day-2 (BNP1), day-7 (BNP2), day-90 (BNP3), and day-180 (BNP4) after admission. LV remodeling was defined as >20% increase in biplane LV end-diastolic volume on day-180 compared to baseline (day-2). Results: Patients were divided into LV remodeling [LVR(+)] and non LV remodeling [LVR(-)] groups. No first-week BNP level was found to predict remodeling. However, the two groups had significantly different day-90 BNP level (208.1 ± 263.7 pg/ml vs. 82.4 ± 153.7 pg/ml, P = 0.039) and significantly different 3-month BNP decrease ratios (RBNP13) (14.4 ± 92.2% vs. 69.4 ± 25.9%, P < 0.001). The appropriate cut-off value for RBNP13 was 53.2% (AUC = 0.764, P < 0.001). Early peak CK-MB (cut-off 48.2 ng/ml; AUC = 0.672; P = 0.014) was another independent predictor of remodeling. Additionally, combining peak CK-MB and RBNP13 offered an excellent discrimination for half-year remodeling when assessed by ROC curve (AUC = 0.818, P < 0.001). Conclusion: RBNP13 is a significant independent predictor of 6-month LV remodeling. The early peak CK-MB additionally offered an incremental power to the predictions derived from serial BNP examinations. PMID:28138312

  2. Immunization and challenge with toluene diisocyanate decrease tachykinin and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in guinea pig central airways.

    PubMed

    Mapp, C E; Lucchini, R E; Miotto, D; Chitano, P; Jovine, L; Saetta, M; Maestrelli, P; Springall, D R; Polak, J; Fabbri, L M

    1998-07-01

    Toluene diisocyanate (TDI) is a potent sensitizer that causes occupational asthma in a significant proportion of subjects exposed. We used an animal model to investigate whether neuropeptide changes occur in the airways of immunized and TDI-challenged guinea pigs. Animals were immunized by weekly intradermal injections, challenged with TDI (5 to 20 ppb) after the third injection, and killed 6 h after exposure. Control guinea pigs received injections of saline. Lung tissue was processed immediately and analyzed for nerves using the streptavidin-biotin complex peroxidase method with antisera to the neural marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), substance P (SP), and calcitonin gene- related peptide (CGRP). We also quantified the inflammatory infiltrate in the submucosa of central airways, and we measured the serum level of specific IgG and IgG1. Specific antibodies against TDI were present only in immunized animals. Immunized as compared with nonimmunized animals had a significant increase in eosinophils in the submucosa of central airways, and a further increase was observed 6 h after TDI challenge. Immunization and TDI challenge did not modify the number of mononuclear cells in the submucosa of central airways in both nonimmunized and immunized animals. TDI exposure did not change the overall innervation in both nonimmunized and immunized animals, but the density of PGP 9.5-positive nerves was significantly different between nonimmunized and immunized TDI-challenged animals. The density of SP-, and CGRP-immunostained nerves was significantly lower in immunized TDI-challenged than in nonimmunized animals. TDI exposure significantly decreased the density of SP-positive nerves in nonimmunized animals. A negative relationship was found between the presence of airway inflammation, as indexed by eosinophil cell infiltration, and the density of PGP 9.5-, SP-, and CGRP-immunostained nerves. In conclusion, TDI produces airway inflammation and neuropeptides changes in the

  3. Airbrushed composite polymer Zr-ACP nanofiber scaffolds with improved cell penetration for bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Skrtic, Drago; Sun, Jirun; Tutak, Wojtek

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun polymer nanofibers have multiple applications in the tissue engineering field despite limited cell penetration within the scaffolds and slow synthesis rates. Airbrushing, a proposed alternative to traditional electrospinning, is a technique capable of synthesizing open structure nanofiber scaffolds at high rates. In this study, three biocompatible polymers-poly-D,L-lactic acid (P-DL-LA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were airbrushed to form networks for bone tissue regeneration. All three polymers were loaded with up to 20% (w/w) zirconium-modified amorphous calcium phosphate (Zr-ACP). A simple one-step mix and straightforward material deposition yielded open structure networks with well-distributed Zr-ACP. Cell penetration within the airbrushed scaffolds was found to be more than twice the cell penetration within conventional electrospun networks. The airbrushed polymer network supported cell growth and differentiation. Cells grown on the Zr-ACP in P-DL-LA fibers exhibited improved levels of osteocalcin protein with an increase in the Zr-ACP content by day 16. This airbrushing method promises to be a viable and attractive alternative to currently used electrospinning techniques in the formation of composite 3D nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  4. Airbrushed Composite Polymer Zr-ACP Nanofiber Scaffolds with Improved Cell Penetration for Bone Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Skrtic, Drago; Sun, Jirun

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun polymer nanofibers have multiple applications in the tissue engineering field despite limited cell penetration within the scaffolds and slow synthesis rates. Airbrushing, a proposed alternative to traditional electrospinning, is a technique capable of synthesizing open structure nanofiber scaffolds at high rates. In this study, three biocompatible polymers—poly-D,L-lactic acid (P-DL-LA), polycaprolactone (PCL), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), were airbrushed to form networks for bone tissue regeneration. All three polymers were loaded with up to 20% (w/w) zirconium-modified amorphous calcium phosphate (Zr-ACP). A simple one-step mix and straightforward material deposition yielded open structure networks with well-distributed Zr-ACP. Cell penetration within the airbrushed scaffolds was found to be more than twice the cell penetration within conventional electrospun networks. The airbrushed polymer network supported cell growth and differentiation. Cells grown on the Zr-ACP in P-DL-LA fibers exhibited improved levels of osteocalcin protein with an increase in the Zr-ACP content by day 16. This airbrushing method promises to be a viable and attractive alternative to currently used electrospinning techniques in the formation of composite 3D nanofiber scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. PMID:25128269

  5. Decreased specific CD8+ T cell cross-reactivity of antigen recognition following vaccination with Melan-A peptide.

    PubMed

    Appay, Victor; Speiser, Daniel E; Rufer, Nathalie; Reynard, Severine; Barbey, Catherine; Cerottini, Jean-Charles; Leyvraz, Serge; Pinilla, Clemencia; Romero, Pedro

    2006-07-01

    The aim of T cell vaccines is the expansion of antigen-specific T cells able to confer immune protection against pathogens or tumors. Although increase in absolute cell numbers, effector functions and TCR repertoire of vaccine-induced T cells are often evaluated, their reactivity for the cognate antigen versus their cross-reactive potential is rarely considered. In fact, little information is available regarding the influence of vaccines on T cell fine specificity of antigen recognition despite the impact that this feature may have in protective immunity. To shed light on the cross-reactive potential of vaccine-induced cells, we analyzed the reactivity of CD8(+) T cells following vaccination of HLA-A2(+) melanoma patients with Melan-A peptide, incomplete Freund's adjuvant and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant, which was shown to induce strong expansion of Melan-A-reactive CD8(+) T cells in vivo. A collection of predicted Melan-A cross-reactive peptides, identified from a combinatorial peptide library, was used to probe functional antigen recognition of PBMC ex vivo and Melan-A-reactive CD8(+) T cell clones. While Melan-A-reactive CD8(+) T cells prior to vaccination are usually constituted of widely cross-reactive naive cells, we show that peptide vaccination resulted in expansion of memory T cells displaying a reactivity predominantly restricted to the antigen of interest. Importantly, these cells are tumor-reactive.

  6. Astrocytes protect neurons from Aβ1-42 peptide-induced neurotoxicity increasing TFAM and PGC-1 and decreasing PPAR-γ and SIRT-1.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Ortega, Angel; Mauricio, M Dolores; Vila, Jose Ma; Valles, Soraya L

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of astrocytes at sites of Aβ1-42 depositions. Our results indicate that Aβ1-42 toxic peptide increases lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and cell death in neurons but not in astrocytes in primary culture. Aβ1-42-induced deleterious neuronal effects are not present when neurons and astrocytes are mixed cultured. Stimulation of astrocytes with toxic Aβ1-42 peptide increased p-65 and decreased IκB resulting in inflammatory process. In astrocytes Aβ1-42 decreases protein expressions of sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and over-expresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), protecting mitochondria against Aβ1-42-induced damage and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. In summary our data suggest that astrocytes may have a key role in protecting neurons, increasing neural viability and mitochondrial biogenesis, acquiring better oxidative stress protection and perhaps modulating inflammatory processes against Aβ1-42 toxic peptide. This might be a sign of a complex epigenetic process in Alzheimer's disease development.

  7. Astrocytes Protect Neurons from Aβ1-42 Peptide-Induced Neurotoxicity Increasing TFAM and PGC-1 and Decreasing PPAR-γ and SIRT-1

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre-Rueda, Diana; Guerra-Ojeda, Sol; Aldasoro, Martin; Iradi, Antonio; Obrador, Elena; Ortega, Angel; Mauricio, M. Dolores; Vila, Jose Mª; Valles, Soraya L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease is accumulation of astrocytes at sites of Aβ1-42 depositions. Our results indicate that Aβ1-42 toxic peptide increases lipid peroxidation, apoptosis and cell death in neurons but not in astrocytes in primary culture. Aβ1-42-induced deleterious neuronal effects are not present when neurons and astrocytes are mixed cultured. Stimulation of astrocytes with toxic Aβ1-42 peptide increased p-65 and decreased IκB resulting in inflammatory process. In astrocytes Aβ1-42 decreases protein expressions of sirtuin 1 (SIRT-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and over-expresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), protecting mitochondria against Aβ1-42-induced damage and promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. In summary our data suggest that astrocytes may have a key role in protecting neurons, increasing neural viability and mitochondrial biogenesis, acquiring better oxidative stress protection and perhaps modulating inflammatory processes against Aβ1-42 toxic peptide. This might be a sign of a complex epigenetic process in Alzheimer's disease development. PMID:25552918

  8. Central pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) decrease the baroreflex sensitivity in trout.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Conlon, J Michael; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2011-04-01

    Although PACAP and VIP exert diverse actions on heart and blood vessels along the vertebrate phylum, no information is currently available concerning the potential role of these peptides on the regulation of the baroreflex response, a major mechanism for blood pressure homeostasis. Consequently, the goal of this study was to examine in our experimental model, the unanesthetized rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, whether PACAP and VIP are involved in the regulation of the cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Cross-spectral analysis techniques using a fast Fourier transform algorithm were employed to calculate the coherence, phase and gain of the transfer function between spontaneous fluctuations of systolic arterial blood pressure and R-R intervals of the electrocardiogram. The BRS was estimated as the mean of the gain of the transfer function when the coherence between the two signals was high and the phase negative. Compared with vehicle, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of trout PACAP-27 and trout VIP (25-100 pmol) dose-dependently reduced the cardiac BRS to the same extent with a threshold dose of 50 pmol for a significant effect. When injected intra-arterially at the same doses as for i.c.v. injections, only the highest dose of VIP (100 pmol) significantly attenuated the BRS. These results suggest that the endogenous peptides PACAP and VIP might be implicated in the central control of cardiac baroreflex functions in trout.

  9. Characterization of a possible uptake mechanism of selective antibacterial peptides.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Carlos; Samaniego, José Lino; Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Buhse, Thomas; Sordo, Marili Leopold

    2013-01-01

    Selective antibacterial peptides containing less than 30 amino acid residues, cationic, with amphipathic properties, have been the subject of several studies due to their active participation and beneficial effects in strengthening the immune system of all living organisms. This manuscript reports the results of a comparison between the group of selective antibacterial peptides and another group called "cell penetrating peptides". An important number of the selective antibacterial peptides are cell penetrating peptides, suggesting that their toxicity is related to their uptake mechanism. The verification of this observation also includes the adaptation of a method previously published, called Polarity index, which reproduces and confirms the action of this new set of peptides. The efficiency of this method was verified based on four different databases, yielding a high score. The verification was based exclusively on the peptides already reported in the databases which have been experimentally verified.

  10. N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide is decreased in insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective cohort trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background N-terminal-pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is elevated in gestational hypertension and preeclampsia. This trial aimed to generate data for gestational diabetes mellitus patients, who are at risk to develop these complications. Methods We have measured NT-proBNP in 223 otherwise healthy women between gestational week 24 and 32 referred to the outpatient diabetes unit in a cross-sectional study. Results 88 control subjects, 45 patients with indication for medical nutrition therapy (MNT) alone and 90 patients who required insulin therapy were included. Groups of women were comparable regarding gestational week. Body mass index before pregnancy and at blood draw was significantly higher in subjects with insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus compared to MNT controlled gestational diabetes mellitus. NT-proBNP was significantly lower in patients with insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus (35 ± 25 pg/ml) compared to controls (53 ± 43 pg/ml, p = 0.012). Conclusions NT-proBNP is within the reference range of normal subjects in women with gestational diabetes mellitus. Differences in body mass index, changes in glomerular filtration rate and haemodynamics may explain lower NT-proBNP concentrations in insulin dependent gestational diabetes mellitus. A false negative interpretation needs to be considered in these women. PMID:21489265

  11. Feeding rumen-inert fats differing in their degree of saturation decreases intake and increases plasma concentrations of gut peptides in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Relling, A E; Reynolds, C K

    2007-03-01

    Our objective was to determine the effect of feeding rumen-inert fats differing in their degree of saturation on dry matter intake (DMI), milk production, and plasma concentrations of insulin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36) amide (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), and cholecystokinin (CCK) in lactating dairy cows. Four midlactation, primiparous Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square experiment with 2-wk periods. Cows were fed a control mixed ration ad libitum, and treatments were the dietary addition (3.5% of ration dry matter) of 3 rumen-inert fats as sources of mostly saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Daily DMI, milk yield, and composition were measured on the last 4 d of each period. Jugular vein blood was collected every 30 min over a 7-h period on d 12 and 14 of each period for analysis of plasma concentrations of hormones, glucose, and nonesterified fatty acids. Feeding fat decreased DMI, and the decrease tended to be greater for MUFA and PUFA compared with SFA. Plasma concentration of GLP-1 increased when fat was fed and was greater for MUFA and PUFA. Feeding fat increased plasma glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and CCK concentrations and decreased plasma insulin concentration. Plasma CCK concentration was greater for MUFA and PUFA than for SFA and was greater for MUFA than PUFA. Decreases in DMI in cows fed fat were associated with increased plasma concentrations of GLP-1 and CCK and a decreased insulin concentration. The role of these peptides in regulating DMI in cattle fed fat requires further investigation.

  12. Short peptides interfering with signaling pathways as new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ellert-Miklaszewska, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Katarzyna; Kaminska, Bozena

    2017-01-01

    Short peptides have many advantages, such as low molecular weight, selectivity for a specific target, organelles or cells with minimal toxicity. We describe properties of short peptides, which interfere with communication networks in tumor cells and within microenvironment of malignant gliomas, the most common brain tumors. We focus on ligand/receptor axes and intracellular signaling pathways critical for gliomagenesis that could be targeted with interfering peptides. We review structures and efficacy of organelle-specific and cell-penetrating peptides and describe diverse chemical modifications increasing proteolytic stability and protecting synthetic peptides against degradation. We report results of application of short peptides in glioma therapy clinical trials, their rises and falls. The most advanced examples of therapeutics such as short interfering peptides combined with cell-penetrating peptides that show good effectiveness in disease models are presented. It is foreseen that identification of peptides with better clinical properties may improve their success rates in clinical trials.

  13. Modifications of Natural Peptides for Nanoparticle and Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Jallouk, Andrew P.; Palekar, Rohun U.; Pan, Hua; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural products serve as an important source of novel compounds for drug development. Recently, peptides have emerged as a new class of therapeutic agents due to their versatility and specificity for biological targets. Yet, their effective application often requires use of a nanoparticle delivery system. In this chapter, we review the role of natural peptides in the design and creation of nanomedicines, with a particular focus on cell-penetrating peptides, antimicrobial peptides, and peptide toxins. The use of natural peptides in conjunction with nanoparticle delivery systems holds great promise for the development of new therapeutic formulations as well as novel platforms for the delivery of various cargoes. PMID:25819276

  14. Iodine treatment in children with subclinical hypothyroidism due to chronic iodine deficiency decreases thyrotropin and C-peptide concentrations and improves the lipid profile.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Aeberli, Isabelle; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Grimci, Lindita; Bridson, John; Chaouki, Noureddine; Mbhenyane, Xikombiso; Jooste, Pieter L

    2009-10-01

    Chronic iodine deficiency (ID) increases thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations and produces a thyroid hormone pattern consistent with subclinical hypothyroidism (ScH). ScH may be associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Thus, the study aim was to determine if iodine treatment of children with elevated TSH concentrations due to ID would affect their lipid profile, insulin (C-peptide) levels, and/or subclinical inflammation. In controlled intervention trials of oral iodized oil or iodized salt, 5-14-year-old children from Morocco, Albania, and South Africa with TSH concentrations > or = 2.5 mU/L (n = 262) received 400 mg iodine as oral iodized oil or household distribution of iodized salt containing 25 microg iodine/g salt. At baseline and after 5 or 6 months, urinary iodine (UI) and blood concentrations of total thyroxine, TSH, C-reactive protein (CRP), C-peptide, and lipids were measured. Median (range) UI at baseline was 46 (2-601) microg/L. Compared to the control group, iodine treatment significantly increased UI and total thyroxine and decreased TSH, C-peptide, and total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The mean low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio fell from 3.3 to 2.4 after iodine treatment (p < 0.001). Iodine treatment had no significant effect on concentrations of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, or C-reactive protein. Correction of ID-associated ScH improves the insulin and lipid profile and may thereby reduce risk for cardiovascular disease. This previously unrecognized benefit of iodine prophylaxis may be important because ID remains common in rapidly developing countries with increasing rates of obesity and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Effective Design of Multifunctional Peptides by Combining Compatible Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Christian; Garza Ramos Martínez, Georgina; Moreno Blas, Daniel; Castillo González, David A.; Corzo, Gerardo; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Multifunctionality is a common trait of many natural proteins and peptides, yet the rules to generate such multifunctionality remain unclear. We propose that the rules defining some protein/peptide functions are compatible. To explore this hypothesis, we trained a computational method to predict cell-penetrating peptides at the sequence level and learned that antimicrobial peptides and DNA-binding proteins are compatible with the rules of our predictor. Based on this finding, we expected that designing peptides for CPP activity may render AMP and DNA-binding activities. To test this prediction, we designed peptides that embedded two independent functional domains (nuclear localization and yeast pheromone activity), linked by optimizing their composition to fit the rules characterizing cell-penetrating peptides. These peptides presented effective cell penetration, DNA-binding, pheromone and antimicrobial activities, thus confirming the effectiveness of our computational approach to design multifunctional peptides with potential therapeutic uses. Our computational implementation is available at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/dcf. PMID:27096600

  16. Synthetic Human TLR9-LRR11 Peptide Attenuates TLR9 Signaling by Binding to and thus Decreasing Internalization of CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xichun; Li, Bin; Kuang, Mei; Liu, Xin; Cen, Yanyan; Qin, Rongxin; Ding, Guofu; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2016-02-22

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 is an endosomal receptor recognizing bacterial DNA/CpG-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODN). Blocking CpG ODN/TLR9 activity represents a strategy for therapeutic prevention of immune system overactivation. Herein, we report that a synthetic peptide (SP) representing the leucine-rich repeat 11 subdomain of the human TLR9 extracellular domain could attenuate CpG ODN/TLR9 activity in RAW264.7 cells by binding to CpG ODN and decreasing its internalization. Our results demonstrate that preincubation with SP specifically inhibited CpG ODN- but not lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and lipopeptide (PAM3CSK4)-stimulated TNF-α and IL-6 release. Preincubation of SP with CpG ODN dose-dependently decreased TLR9-driven phosphorylation of IκBα and ERK and activation of NF-κB/p65. Moreover, SP dose-dependently decreased FAM-labeled CpG ODN internalization, whereas non-labeled CpG ODN reversed the inhibition. The KD value of SP-CpG ODN binding was within the micromolar range. Our results demonstrated that SP was a specific inhibitor of CpG ODN/TLR9 activity via binding to CpG ODN, leading to reduced ODN internalization and decreased activation of subsequent pathways within cells. Thus, SP could be used as a potential CpG ODN antagonist to block TLR9 signaling.

  17. Decrease of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor following anti-TNFα therapy (infliximab) in rheumatoid arthritis is associated with clinical improvement

    PubMed Central

    Alessandri, C; Bombardieri, M; Papa, N; Cinquini, M; Magrini, L; Tincani, A; Valesini, G

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of infliximab treatment on anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor (RF) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 43 patients with rheumatoid arthritis not responding to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) received intravenous infliximab at a dose of 3 mg/kg at baseline and after two and six weeks, and subsequently bimonthly, in combination with methotrexate. Serum samples were collected at baseline and at week 24. A commercial enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to test for anti-CCP antibodies; RF were detected using a quantitative nephelometric assay. Results: At baseline, 38 of the 43 patients (88%) were positive for anti-CCP antibodies, and 41 (95%) were positive for RF. The serum titre of anti-CCP and RF decreased significantly after six months of treatment (p = 0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively). When the patients were grouped on the basis of their clinical response to infliximab, a significant decrease in serum anti-CCP antibodies and RF was observed only in patients who had clinical improvement (ACR 20 and ACR 50). Conclusions: Anti-TNFα treatment in rheumatoid arthritis results in a decrease in the serum titres of RF and anti-CCP antibodies in patients showing clinical improvement, suggesting that these measurements may be a useful adjunct in assessing treatment efficacy. PMID:15361374

  18. Dietary peptides from the non-digestible fraction of Phaseolus vulgaris L. decrease angiotensin II-dependent proliferation in HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells through the blockade of the renin-angiotensin system.

    PubMed

    Luna-Vital, Diego A; Liang, Katie; González de Mejía, Elvira; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2016-05-18

    This study aimed to determine the ability of peptides present in the non-digestible fraction (NDF) of common beans to decrease angiotensin II (AngII) through the blockade of RAS and its effect on the proliferation of HCT116 human colorectal cancer cells. Pure synthesized peptides GLTSK and GEGSGA and the peptide fractions (PF) of cultivars Azufrado Higuera and Bayo Madero were used. The cells were pretreated with pure peptides, PF or AGT at their IC50 or IC25 values, in comparison with the simultaneous treatment of peptides and AGT. For western blot and microscopy analysis, 100 μM and 0.5 mg mL(-1) were used for pure peptides and PF treatments, respectively. According to the ELISA tests, GLTSK and GEGSGA decreased (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AGT to angiotensin I (AngI) by 38 and 28%, respectively. All the peptides tested reduced (p < 0.05) the conversion rate of AngI to AngII from 38 to 50%. When the cells were pretreated with both pure peptides and PF before exposure to AGT, the effectiveness inhibiting cell proliferation was higher than the simultaneous treatment suggesting their preventive effects. GLTSK and GEGSGA interacted with the catalytic site of renin, the angiotensin-I converting enzyme, and the AngII receptor, mainly through hydrogen bonds, polar, hydrophobic and cation-π interactions according to molecular docking. Through confocal microscopy, it was determined that GLTSK and GEGSGA caused the decrease (p < 0.05) of AngII-dependent STAT3 nuclear activation in HCT116 cells by 66 and 23%, respectively. The results suggest that peptides present in the common bean NDF could potentially ameliorate the effects of RAS overexpression in colorectal cancer.

  19. Technique for internal channelling of hydroentangled nonwoven scaffolds to enhance cell penetration

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Elaine R; Ingham, Eileen; Russell, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    An important requirement in thick, high-porosity scaffolds is to maximise cellular penetration into the interior and avoid necrosis during culture in vitro. Hitherto, reproducible control of the pore structure in nonwoven scaffolds has proved challenging. A new, channelled scaffold manufacturing process is reported based on water jet entanglement of fibres (hydroentangling) around filamentous template to form a coherent scaffold that is subsequently removed. Longitudinally-oriented channels were introduced within the scaffold in controlled proximity using 220 µm diameter cylindrical templates. In this case study, channelled scaffolds composed of poly(l-lactic acid) were manufactured and evaluated in vitro. Environmental scanning electron microscope and µCT (X-ray microtomography) confirmed channel openings in the scaffold cross-section before and after cell culture with human dermal fibroblasts up to 14 weeks. Histology at week 11 indicated that the channels promoted cell penetration and distribution within the scaffold interior. At week 14, cellular matrix deposition was evident in the internal channel walls and the entrances remained unoccluded by cellular matrix suggesting that diffusion conduits for mass transfer of nutrient to the scaffold interior could be maintained. PMID:22532409

  20. Purification and characterization of a novel cell-penetrating carrier similar to cholera toxin chimeric protein.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weiping; Zheng, Xi; Wang, Huaqian; Yu, Lin; Zhou, Xiaofen; Sun, Yunxiao; Zhao, Suqing; Du, Zhiyun; Zhang, Kun

    2017-01-01

    Developing a recombinant vector for noninvasively delivering biological macromolecules into the brain is important. This study constructed and purified a protein complex based on the cholera toxin (CT) molecular structure. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-modified A2 subunits of CT (CTA2) were used as tracer molecules for introduction of transactivator of transcription (TAT) through the A subunit into cells. The protein complex EGFP-CTA2-TAT/(CTB)5 (CTB: B subunit of CT) was obtained using an in vitro recombination method and verified by monosialoganglioside-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and high performance liquid chromatography assay. The protein complexes bound more strongly to monosialoganglioside (GM1) than (CTB)5 at low concentrations (0.625-1.25 μg/mL). In vitro assays revealed that the transmembrane function of TAT was also maintained. The GM1-binding activity and cell membrane-penetrating ability suggested that a CT structure-based protein complexes could be used to design a delivery carrier for intranasal administration through GM1 binding. The expression vector introduced in this study provides a feasible expression frame for constructing several new macromolecular protein drugs for effective cell penetration.

  1. Biofunctionalized nanoparticles with pH-responsive and cell penetrating blocks for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar, V. M.; Marques, J. G.; Sousa, F.; Louro, R. O.; Queiroz, J. A.; Correia, I. J.

    2013-07-01

    Bridging the gap between nanoparticulate delivery systems and translational gene therapy is a long sought after requirement in nanomedicine-based applications. However, recent developments regarding nanoparticle functionalization have brought forward the ability to synthesize materials with biofunctional moieties that mimic the evolved features of viral particles. Herein we report the versatile conjugation of both cell penetrating arginine and pH-responsive histidine moieties into the chitosan polymeric backbone, to improve the physicochemical characteristics of the native material. Amino acid coupling was confirmed by 2D TOCSY NMR and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The synthesized chitosan-histidine-arginine (CH-H-R) polymer complexed plasmid DNA biopharmaceuticals, and spontaneously assembled into stable 105 nm nanoparticles with spherical morphology and positive surface charge. The functionalized delivery systems were efficiently internalized into the intracellular compartment, and exhibited remarkably higher transfection efficiency than unmodified chitosan without causing any cytotoxic effect. Additional findings regarding intracellular trafficking events reveal their preferential escape from degradative lysosomal pathways and nuclear localization. Overall, this assembly of nanocarriers with bioinspired moieties provides the foundations for the design of efficient and customizable materials for cancer gene therapy.

  2. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  3. TOE1 is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication with cell-penetrating capability

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Sabina; Barat, Corinne; Cabrita, Miguel A.; Gargaun, Ana; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Tremblay, Michel J.; de Belle, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Target of Egr1 (TOE1) is a nuclear protein localized primarily in nucleoli and Cajal bodies that was identified as a downstream target of the immediate early gene Egr1. TOE1 displays a functional deadenylation domain and has been shown to participate in spliceosome assembly. We report here that TOE1 can function as an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and show evidence that supports a direct interaction of TOE1 with the viral specific transactivator response element as part of the inhibitory mechanism. In addition, we show that TOE1 can be secreted by activated CD8+ T lymphocytes and can be cleaved by the serine protease granzyme B, one of the main components of cytotoxic granules. Both full-length and cleaved TOE1 can spontaneously cross the plasma membrane and penetrate cells in culture, retaining HIV-1 inhibitory activity. Antiviral potency of TOE1 and its cell-penetrating capability have been identified to lie within a 35-amino-acid region containing the nuclear localization sequence. PMID:26056259

  4. Development of cell-penetrating peptide-modified MPEG-PCL diblock copolymeric nanoparticles for systemic gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ko; Kanazawa, Takanori; Shibata, Yasunori; Suda, Yumiko; Fukuda, Tsunehiko; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2010-08-30

    To develop a safe and efficient systemic non-viral gene vector, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG)/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) diblock copolymers conjugated with a Tat analog through the ester or disulfide linkage were synthesized and their suitability as a systemic non-viral gene carrier evaluated. The physicochemical properties of the MPEG-PCL diblock copolymers were determined by GPC, (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The particle sizes and in vitro (COS7 and S-180 cells) transfection efficiencies and cytotoxicity were evaluated. Furthermore, the luciferase activity was then determined in various tissues after intravenous injection of MPEG-PCL-SS-Tat/pCMV-Luc complex into mice bearing S-180 cells. The particle sizes of the MPEG-PCL-Tat copolymers with or without pDNA were about 40 and 60nm, respectively. The luciferase activity in COS7 cells transfected with pCMV-Luc with MPEG-PCL-ester-Tat or MPEG-PCL-SS-Tat was higher than that with pDNA only. MPEG-PCL-SS-Tat greatly increased the transfection efficiency compared to MPEG-PCL-ester-Tat in COS7 and S-180 cells. In an in vitro cytotoxicity test MPEG-PCL-SS-Tat did not induce any remarkable cytotoxicity. In an in vivo experiment, the synthesized MPEG-PCL-SS-Tat copolymers promoted the delivery and expression of pDNA into tumor tissue in tumor-bearing mice. In conclusion, this vector might be applicable as a tumor-targeting non-viral systemic gene carrier in the clinical setting. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced cytotoxicity and decreased CD8 dependence of human cancer-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes after vaccination with low peptide dose.

    PubMed

    Lövgren, Tanja; Baumgaertner, Petra; Wieckowski, Sébastien; Devêvre, Estelle; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Speiser, Daniel E

    2012-06-01

    In mice, vaccination with high peptide doses generates higher frequencies of specific CD8+ T cells, but with lower avidity compared to vaccination with lower peptide doses. To investigate the impact of peptide dose on CD8+ T cell responses in humans, melanoma patients were vaccinated with 0.1 or 0.5 mg Melan-A/MART-1 peptide, mixed with CpG 7909 and Incomplete Freund's adjuvant. Neither the kinetics nor the amplitude of the Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cell responses differed between the two vaccination groups. Also, CD8+ T cell differentiation and cytokine production ex vivo were similar in the two groups. Interestingly, after low peptide dose vaccination, Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cells showed enhanced degranulation upon peptide stimulation, as assessed by CD107a upregulation and perforin release ex vivo. In accordance, CD8+ T cell clones derived from low peptide dose-vaccinated patients showed significantly increased degranulation and stronger cytotoxicity. In parallel, Melan-A-specific CD8+ T cells and clones from low peptide dose-vaccinated patients expressed lower CD8 levels, despite similar or even stronger binding to tetramers. Furthermore, CD8+ T cell clones from low peptide dose-vaccinated patients bound CD8 binding-deficient tetramers more efficiently, suggesting that they may express higher affinity TCRs. We conclude that low peptide dose vaccination generated CD8+ T cell responses with stronger cytotoxicity and lower CD8 dependence.

  6. The incretin hormone glucagon‐like peptide 1 increases mitral cell excitability by decreasing conductance of a voltage‐dependent potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn‐Smith, Ida J.; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2016-01-01

    Key points The gut hormone called glucagon‐like peptide 1 (GLP‐1) is a strong moderator of energy homeostasis and communication between the peripheral organs and the brain.GLP‐1 signalling occurs in the brain; using a newly developed genetic reporter line of mice, we have discovered GLP‐synthesizing cells in the olfactory bulb.GLP‐1 increases the firing frequency of neurons (mitral cells) that encode olfactory information by decreasing activity of voltage‐dependent K channels (Kv1.3).Modifying GLP‐1 levels, either therapeutically or following the ingestion of food, could alter the excitability of neurons in the olfactory bulb in a nutrition or energy state‐dependent manner to influence olfactory detection or metabolic sensing.The results of the present study uncover a new function for an olfactory bulb neuron (deep short axon cells, Cajal cells) that could be capable of modifying mitral cell activity through the release of GLP‐1. This might be of relevance for the action of GLP‐1 mimetics now widely used in the treatment of diabetes. Abstract The olfactory system is intricately linked with the endocrine system where it may serve as a detector of the internal metabolic state or energy homeostasis in addition to its classical function as a sensor of external olfactory information. The recent development of transgenic mGLU‐yellow fluorescent protein mice that express a genetic reporter under the control of the preproglucagon reporter suggested the presence of the gut hormone, glucagon‐like peptide (GLP‐1), in deep short axon cells (Cajal cells) of the olfactory bulb and its neuromodulatory effect on mitral cell (MC) first‐order neurons. A MC target for the peptide was determined using GLP‐1 receptor binding assays, immunocytochemistry for the receptor and injection of fluorescence‐labelled GLP‐1 analogue exendin‐4. Using patch clamp recording of olfactory bulb slices in the whole‐cell configuration, we report that GLP‐1 and its

  7. The incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 increases mitral cell excitability by decreasing conductance of a voltage-dependent potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J; Gribble, Fiona; Reimann, Frank; Trapp, Stefan; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2016-05-15

    The gut hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a strong moderator of energy homeostasis and communication between the peripheral organs and the brain. GLP-1 signalling occurs in the brain; using a newly developed genetic reporter line of mice, we have discovered GLP-synthesizing cells in the olfactory bulb. GLP-1 increases the firing frequency of neurons (mitral cells) that encode olfactory information by decreasing activity of voltage-dependent K channels (Kv1.3). Modifying GLP-1 levels, either therapeutically or following the ingestion of food, could alter the excitability of neurons in the olfactory bulb in a nutrition or energy state-dependent manner to influence olfactory detection or metabolic sensing. The results of the present study uncover a new function for an olfactory bulb neuron (deep short axon cells, Cajal cells) that could be capable of modifying mitral cell activity through the release of GLP-1. This might be of relevance for the action of GLP-1 mimetics now widely used in the treatment of diabetes. The olfactory system is intricately linked with the endocrine system where it may serve as a detector of the internal metabolic state or energy homeostasis in addition to its classical function as a sensor of external olfactory information. The recent development of transgenic mGLU-yellow fluorescent protein mice that express a genetic reporter under the control of the preproglucagon reporter suggested the presence of the gut hormone, glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), in deep short axon cells (Cajal cells) of the olfactory bulb and its neuromodulatory effect on mitral cell (MC) first-order neurons. A MC target for the peptide was determined using GLP-1 receptor binding assays, immunocytochemistry for the receptor and injection of fluorescence-labelled GLP-1 analogue exendin-4. Using patch clamp recording of olfactory bulb slices in the whole-cell configuration, we report that GLP-1 and its stable analogue exendin-4 increase the action potential

  8. Impact of decreased serum albumin levels on acute kidney injury in patients with acute decompensated heart failure: a potential association of atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Yoichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Goto, Yoichi; Anzai, Toshihisa; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao; Kawano, Yuhei; Kangawa, Kenji

    2017-02-07

    Although hypoalbuminemia at admission is a risk for acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), the clinical significance of decreased serum albumin levels (DAL) during ADHF therapy has not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate whether DAL was associated with AKI, and whether intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) administration, which provides an effective treatment for ADHF but promotes albumin extravasation, was associated with DAL and AKI. A total of 231 consecutive patients with ADHF were enrolled. AKI was defined as ≥0.3 mg/dl absolute or 1.5-fold increase in serum creatinine levels within 48 h. AKI occurred in 73 (32%) of the 231 patients during ADHF therapy. The median value of decreases in serum albumin levels was 0.3 g/dl at 7 days after admission. When DAL was defined as ≥0.3 g/dl decrease in serum albumin levels, DAL occurred in 113 patients, and was independently associated with AKI. Of the 231 patients, 73 (32%) were treated with intravenous ANP. DAL occurred more frequently in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (77 vs. 36%, p < 0.001), and ANP was independently associated with DAL. The incidence of AKI was higher in patients receiving ANP than in those not receiving ANP (48 vs. 24%, p < 0.001). ANP was independently associated with AKI. In conclusion, DAL is associated with AKI. Intravenous ANP administration may be one of the promoting factors of DAL, which leads to AKI, indicating a possible novel mechanism of AKI.

  9. VDAC1-based peptides: novel pro-apoptotic agents and potential therapeutics for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prezma, T; Shteinfer, A; Admoni, L; Raviv, Z; Sela, I; Levi, I; Shoshan-Barmatz, V

    2013-09-19

    The voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane, mediates metabolic cross-talk between the mitochondrion and the cytoplasm and thus serves a fundamental role in cell energy metabolism. VDAC1 also plays a key role in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, interacting with anti-apoptotic proteins. Resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis involves quenching the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by over-expression of anti-apoptotic/pro-survival hexokinase (HK) and Bcl-2 family proteins, proteins that mediate their anti-apoptotic activities via interaction with VDAC1. Using specifically designed VDAC1-based cell-penetrating peptides, we targeted these anti-apoptotic proteins to prevent their pro-survival/anti-apoptotic activities. Anti-apoptotic proteins are expressed at high levels in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), an incurable disease requiring innovative new approaches to improve therapeutic outcome. CLL is characterized by a clonal accumulation of mature neoplastic B cells that are resistant to apoptosis. Specifically, we demonstrate that the VDAC1-based peptides (Antp-LP4 and N-Terminal-Antp) selectively kill peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from CLL patients, yet spare those obtained from healthy donors. The cell death induction competence of the peptides was well correlated with the amount of double positive CD19/CD5 cancerous CLL PBMCs, further illustrating their selectivity toward cancer cells. Moreover, these VDAC1-based peptides induced apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-mediated pathway, reflected in membrane blebbing, condensation of nuclei, DNA fragmentation, release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased cellular ATP levels and detachment of HK, all leading to apoptotic cell death. Thus, the mode of action of the peptides involves decreasing energy production and inducing apoptosis. Over 27 versions of cell-penetrating VDAC1-based peptides

  10. A Cell-Permeable Phospholipase C[gamma]1-Binding Peptide Transduces Neurons and Impairs Long-Term Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Sonja; Dash, Pramod K.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factor-mediated signaling has emerged as an essential component of memory formation. In this study, we used a phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC[gamma]1) binding, cell-penetrating peptide to sequester PLC[gamma]1 away from its target, the phosphotyrosine residues within the activated growth factor receptor. Peptides appear to transduce neurons…

  11. A Cell-Permeable Phospholipase C[gamma]1-Binding Peptide Transduces Neurons and Impairs Long-Term Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Sonja; Dash, Pramod K.

    2004-01-01

    Growth factor-mediated signaling has emerged as an essential component of memory formation. In this study, we used a phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC[gamma]1) binding, cell-penetrating peptide to sequester PLC[gamma]1 away from its target, the phosphotyrosine residues within the activated growth factor receptor. Peptides appear to transduce neurons…

  12. Anticancer activities of bovine and human lactoferricin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio; Hilchie, Ashley L; Haney, Evan F; Bolscher, Jan G M; Hyndman, M Eric; Hancock, Robert E W; Vogel, Hans J

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a mammalian host defense glycoprotein with diverse biological activities. Peptides derived from the cationic region of LF possess cytotoxic activity against cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Bovine lactoferricin (LFcinB), a peptide derived from bovine LF (bLF), exhibits broad-spectrum anticancer activity, while a similar peptide derived from human LF (hLF) is not as active. In this work, several peptides derived from the N-terminal regions of bLF and hLF were studied for their anticancer activities against leukemia and breast-cancer cells, as well as normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The cyclized LFcinB-CLICK peptide, which possesses a stable triazole linkage, showed improved anticancer activity, while short peptides hLF11 and bLF10 were not cytotoxic to cancer cells. Interestingly, hLF11 can act as a cell-penetrating peptide; when combined with the antimicrobial core sequence of LFcinB (RRWQWR) through either a Pro or Gly-Gly linker, toxicity to Jurkat cells increased. Together, our work extends the library of LF-derived peptides tested for anticancer activity, and identified new chimeric peptides with high cytotoxicity towards cancerous cells. Additionally, these results support the notion that short cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides can be combined to create new adducts with increased potency.

  13. Neurochemical evidence that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) 55-102 peptide modulates the dopaminergic reward system by decreasing the dopamine release in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Rakovska, Angelina; Baranyi, Maria; Windisch, Katalin; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Gagov, Hristo; Kalfin, Reni

    2017-09-01

    CART (Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript) peptide is a neurotransmitter naturally occurring in the CNS and found mostly in nucleus accumbens, ventrotegmental area, ventral pallidum, amygdalae and striatum, brain regions associated with drug addiction. In the nucleus accumbens, known for its significant role in motivation, pleasure, reward and reinforcement learning, CART peptide inhibits cocaine and amphetamine-induced dopamine-mediated increases in locomotor activity and behavior, suggesting a CART peptide interaction with the dopaminergic system. Thus in the present study, we examined the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on the basal, electrical field stimulation-evoked (EFS-evoked) (30V, 2Hz, 120 shocks) and returning basal dopamine (DA) release and on the release of the DA metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetaldehyde (DOPAL), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) as well as on norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine-o-quinone (Daq) in isolated mouse nucleus accumbens, in a preparation, in which any CART peptide effects on the dendrites or soma of ventral tegmental projection neurons have been excluded. We further extended our study to assess the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on basal cocaine-induced release of dopamine and its metabolites DOPAL, DOPAC, HVA, DOPET and 3-MT as well as on NE and Daq. To analyze the amount of [(3)H]dopamine, dopamine metabolites, Daq and NE in the nucleus accumbens superfusate, a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with electrochemical, UV and radiochemical detections was used. CART (55-102) peptide, 0.1μM, added alone, exerted: (i) a significant decrease in the basal and EFS-evoked levels of extracellular dopamine (ii) a significant increase in the EFS-evoked and returning basal levels of the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA, major products of dopamine degradation and (iii) a significant decrease in the returning basal

  14. Site-Specific Polymer Attachment to HR2 Peptide Fusion Inhibitors against HIV-1 Decreases Binding Association Rates and Dissociation Rates Rather Than Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Stauffer, Angela N; Wurm, Frederik R; Root, Michael J; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2017-03-15

    A popular strategy for overcoming the limited plasma half-life of peptide heptad repeat 2 (HR2) fusion inhibitors against HIV-1 is conjugation with biocompatible polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). However, despite improved resistance to proteolysis and reduced renal elimination, covalent attachment of polymers often causes a loss in therapeutic potency. In this study, we investigated the molecular origins of the loss in potency upon conjugation of linear, midfunctional, and hyperbranched PEG-like polymers to peptides that inhibit HIV-1-host cell membrane fusion. Fluorescence binding assays revealed that polymer conjugation imparted mass transport limitations that manifested as coexistent slower association and dissociation rates from the gp41 target on HIV-1. Furthermore, reduced association kinetics rather than affinity disruption was responsible for the loss in antiviral potency. Finally, the binding assays indicated that the unmodified HR2-derived peptide demonstrated diffusion-limited binding. The observed high potency of the unmodified peptide in HIV-1 inhibition assays was therefore attributed to rapid peptide conformational changes upon binding to the gp41 prehairpin structure. This study emphasizes that the view in which polymer ligation to therapeutic peptides inadvertently leads to loss in potency due to a loss in binding affinity requires scientific verification on a case-by-case basis and that high peptide potency may be due to rapid target-binding events.

  15. Thermally Targeted Delivery of a c-Myc Inhibitory Peptide In Vivo Using Elastin-Like Polypeptide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), bactenecin (Bac), penetratin ( Pen ), or Tat, is conjugated to the ELP to enhance delivery of the polypeptide across the...CPPs are short peptides known to enhance the cellular uptake of large cargo. The three CPPs proposed for this study are the penetratin ( Pen ...we conjugated the c-Myc inhibitory peptide and the Pen peptide to ELP for thermally targeted delivery ( Pen -ELP-H1) (1). Uptake of Pen -ELP-H1 in MCF-7

  16. A Novel Apolipoprotein C-II Mimetic Peptide That Activates Lipoprotein Lipase and Decreases Serum Triglycerides in Apolipoprotein E–Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E–knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25395590

  17. A novel apolipoprotein C-II mimetic peptide that activates lipoprotein lipase and decreases serum triglycerides in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Amar, Marcelo J A; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-02-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright.

  18. DNA-Interactive Properties of Crotamine, a Cell-Penetrating Polypeptide and a Potential Drug Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Chun; Hayashi, Mirian A. F.; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Karpel, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Crotamine, a 42-residue polypeptide derived from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, has been shown to be a cell-penetrating protein that targets chromosomes, carries plasmid DNA into cells, and shows specificity for actively proliferating cells. Given this potential role as a nucleic acid-delivery vector, we have studied in detail the binding of crotamine to single- and double-stranded DNAs of different lengths and base compositions over a range of ionic conditions. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry analysis indicate that complexes of crotamine with long-chain DNAs readily aggregate and precipitate at low ionic strength. This aggregation, which may be important for cellular uptake of DNA, becomes less likely with shorter chain length. 25-mer oligonucleotides do not show any evidence of such aggregation, permitting the determination of affinities and size via fluorescence quenching experiments. The polypeptide binds non-cooperatively to DNA, covering about 5 nucleotide residues when it binds to single (ss) or (ds) double stranded molecules. The affinities of the protein for ss- vs. ds-DNA are comparable, and inversely proportional to salt levels. Analysis of the dependence of affinity on [NaCl] indicates that there are a maximum of ∼3 ionic interactions between the protein and DNA, with some of the binding affinity attributable to non-ionic interactions. Inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the protein suggests that residues 31 to 35, Arg-Trp-Arg-Trp-Lys, could serve as a potential DNA-binding site. A hexapeptide containing this sequence displayed a lower DNA binding affinity and salt dependence as compared to the full-length protein, likely indicative of a more suitable 3D structure and the presence of accessory binding sites in the native crotamine. Taken together, the data presented here describing crotamine-DNA interactions may lend support to the design of more effective nucleic

  19. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analogue, exendin-4, decreases the rewarding value of food: a new role for mesolimbic GLP-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Suzanne L; Shirazi, Rozita H; Hansson, Caroline; Bergquist, Filip; Nissbrandt, Hans; Skibicka, Karolina P

    2012-04-04

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) system is a recently established target for type 2 diabetes treatment. In addition to regulating glucose homeostasis, GLP-1 also reduces food intake. Previous studies demonstrate that the anorexigenic effects of GLP-1 can be mediated through hypothalamic and brainstem circuits which regulate homeostatic feeding. Here, we demonstrate an entirely novel neurobiological mechanism for GLP-1-induced anorexia in rats, involving direct effects of a GLP-1 agonist, Exendin-4 (EX4) on food reward that are exerted at the level of the mesolimbic reward system. We assessed the impact of peripheral, central, and intramesolimbic EX4 on two models of food reward: conditioned place preference (CPP) and progressive ratio operant-conditioning. Food-reward behavior was reduced in the CPP test by EX4, as rats no longer preferred an environment previously paired to chocolate pellets. EX4 also decreased motivated behavior for sucrose in a progressive ratio operant-conditioning paradigm when administered peripherally. We show that this effect is mediated centrally, via GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs). GLP-1Rs are expressed in several key nodes of the mesolimbic reward system; however, their function remains unexplored. Thus we sought to determine the neurobiological substrates underlying the food-reward effect. We found that the EX4-mediated inhibition of food reward could be driven from two key mesolimbic structures-ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens-without inducing concurrent malaise or locomotor impairment. The current findings, that activation of central GLP-1Rs strikingly suppresses food reward/motivation by interacting with the mesolimbic system, indicate an entirely novel mechanism by which the GLP-1R stimulation affects feeding-oriented behavior.

  20. Glycosphingolipid-facilitated membrane insertion and internalization of cobra cardiotoxin. The sulfatide.cardiotoxin complex structure in a membrane-like environment suggests a lipid-dependent cell-penetrating mechanism for membrane binding polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Hui; Liu, Jyung-Hurng; Lee, Shao-Chen; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2006-01-06

    Cobra cardiotoxins, a family of basic polypeptides having lipid- and heparin-binding capacities similar to the cell-penetrating peptides, induce severe tissue necrosis and systolic heart arrest in snakebite victims. Whereas cardiotoxins are specifically retained on the cell surface via heparan sulfate-mediated processes, their lipid binding ability appears to be responsible, at least in part, for cardiotoxin-induced membrane leakage and cell death. Although the exact role of lipids involved in toxin-mediated cytotoxicity remains largely unknown, monoclonal anti-sulfatide antibody O4 has recently been shown to inhibit the action of CTX A3, the major cardiotoxin from Taiwan cobra venom, on cardiomyocytes by preventing cardiotoxin-induced membrane leakage and CTX A3 internalization into mitochondria. Here, we show that anti-sulfatide acts by blocking the binding of CTX A3 to the sulfatides in the plasma membrane to prevent sulfatide-dependent CTX A3 membrane pore formation and internalization. We also describe the crystal structure of a CTX A3-sulfatide complex in a membrane-like environment at 2.3 angstroms resolution. The unexpected orientation of the sulfatide fatty chains in the structure allows prediction of the mode of toxin insertion into the plasma membrane. CTX A3 recognizes both the headgroup and the ceramide interfacial region of sulfatide to induce a lipid conformational change that may play a key role in CTX A3 oligomerization and cellular internalization. This proposed lipid-mediated toxin translocation mechanism may also shed light on the cellular uptake mechanism of the amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptides known to involve multiple internalization pathways.

  1. Decrease in formalin-inactivated respiratory syncytial virus (FI-RSV) enhanced disease with RSV G glycoprotein peptide immunization in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Rey, Gertrud U; Miao, Congrong; Caidi, Hayat; Trivedi, Suvang U; Harcourt, Jennifer L; Tripp, Ralph A; Anderson, Larry J; Haynes, Lia M

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a high priority target for vaccine development. One concern in RSV vaccine development is that a non-live virus vaccine would predispose for enhanced disease similar to that seen with the formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccine. Since a mAb specific to RSV G protein can reduce pulmonary inflammation and eosinophilia seen after RSV infection of FI-RSV vaccinated mice, we hypothesized that RSV G peptides that induce antibodies with similar reactivity may limit enhanced disease after subunit or other non-live RSV vaccines. In support of this hypothesis, we show that FI-RSV vaccinated mice administered RSV G peptide vaccines had a significant reduction in enhanced disease after RSV challenge. These data support the importance of RSV G during infection to RSV disease pathogenesis and suggest that use of appropriately designed G peptide vaccines to reduce the risk of enhanced disease with non-live RSV vaccines merits further study.

  2. Oxysterols decrease apical-to-basolateral transport of Aß peptides via an ABCB1-mediated process in an in vitro Blood-brain barrier model constituted of bovine brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saint-Pol, Julien; Candela, Pietra; Boucau, Marie-Christine; Fenart, Laurence; Gosselet, Fabien

    2013-06-23

    It is known that activation of the liver X receptors (LXRs) by natural or synthetic agonists decreases the amyloid burden and enhances cognitive function in transgenic murine models of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent evidence suggests that LXR activation may affect the transport of amyloid ß (Aß) peptides across the blood-brain barrier (the BBB, which isolates the brain from the peripheral circulation). By using a well-characterized in vitro BBB model, we demonstrated that LXR agonists (24S-hydroxycholesterol, 27-hydroxycholesterol and T0901317) modulated the expression of target genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis (such as ATP-binding cassette sub-family A member 1 (ABCA1)) and promoted cellular cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and high density lipoproteins. Interestingly, we also observed a decrease in Aß peptide influx across brain capillary endothelial cells, although ABCA1 did not appear to be directly involved in this process. By focusing on others receptors and transporters that are thought to have major roles in Aß peptide entry into the brain, we then demonstrated that LXR stimulation provoked an increase in expression of the ABCB1 transporter (also named P-glycoprotein (P-gp)). Further investigations confirmed ABCB1's involvement in the restriction of Aß peptide influx. Taken as a whole, our results not only reinforce the BBB's key role in cerebral cholesterol homeostasis but also demonstrate the importance of the LXR/ABCB1 axis in Aß peptide influx-highlighting an attractive new therapeutic approach whereby the brain could be protected from peripheral Aß peptide entry.

  3. Sequence-specific bacterial growth inhibition by peptide nucleic acid targeted to the mRNA binding site of 16S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hatamoto, Masashi; Nakai, Kazufumi; Ohashi, Akiyoshi; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2009-10-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) targeted to the functional domains of 23S rRNA can inhibit translation and cell growth. However, effective inhibition of translation and cell growth using 16S rRNA-targeted PNA has still not been achieved. Here, we report that PNA targeted to the functional site of 16S rRNA could inhibit both gene expression in vitro and bacterial growth in pure culture with sequence specificity. We used 10-mer PNAs conjugated with a cell-penetrating peptide, which targeted the mRNA binding site at the 3' end of 16S rRNA. Using 0.6 microM of the peptide-PNAs, cell-free ss-galactosidase production decreased by 50%, whereas peptide-PNAs with one or two mismatches to the target sequence showed much weaker inhibition effects. To determine the growth inhibition and bactericidal effects of the peptide-PNA conjugate, we performed OD measurement and viable cell counting. We observed dose- and sequence-dependent inhibition of cell growth and bactericidal effects. These growth inhibitory effects are observed both in the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and Corynebacterium efficiens, although inhibitory concentrations were different for each bacterial species. These results present possibilities for 16S rRNA sequence-based specific bacterial growth inhibition using a peptide-PNA conjugate.

  4. Versatile pH-response Micelles with High Cell-Penetrating Helical Diblock Copolymers for Photoacoustic Imaging Guided Synergistic Chemo-Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shengyu; Liu, Yajing; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Zhihuang; Ding, Yunsheng; Wu, Zongquan; Yin, Jun; Nie, Liming

    2016-01-01

    With high optical absorption efficiency, near infrared (NIR) dyes have been proposed as theranostic agents for fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and photothermal therapy (PTT). However, inherent hydrophobicity and short circulation time of small molecule hinder the further biomedical application. Herein smart amphiphilic copolymer was synthesized containing IR780/camptothecin@poly(ε-caprolactone) (IR780/CPT@PCL) as core, helical poly(phenyl isocyanide) (PPI) blocks as shell with the pH-responsive rhodamine B (RhB) moieties in the core-shell interface. With hydrophilic helical PPI coronas, these micelles present significantly enhanced cell-penetrating capacity that plays a key role in facilitating intracellular delivery of various cargos. By encapsulating CPT and IR780 molecules, the multifunctional self-assemble probe has huge potential to realize functional cooperativity and adaptability for cancer diagnosis and therapy. The in vitro and in vivo experimental results demonstrate that the pH-triggered fluorescent responsiveness and strong acoustic generation permit them efficient fluorescent and PA signal sensing for cancer diagnosis. Moreover, with 808 nm laser irradiation, the generated heat significantly improves the drug release from PCL core, leading to synergetic chemo-photothermal therapy and decreases tumor recurrence rates in mice. Overall, the biocompatible multifunctional micelles with these combined advantages can potentially be utilized for PAI guided disease diagnosis and tumor ablation. PMID:27924155

  5. Decreased Caffeine-Induced Locomotor Activity via Microinjection of CART Peptide into the Nucleus Accumbens Is Linked to Inhibition of the pCaMKIIa-D3R Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Dong, Yun; Huang, Yonghong; Yang, Jianhua; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the inhibitory modulation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides, particularly with respect to the function of the D3 dopamine receptor (D3R), which is activated by its interaction with phosphorylated CaMKIIα (pCaMKIIα) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After repeated oral administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg) for five days, microinjection of CART peptide (0.08 μM/0.5 μl/hemisphere) into the NAc affected locomotor behavior. The pCaMKIIα-D3R interaction, D3R phosphorylation and cAMP/PKA/phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) signaling pathway activity were measured in NAc tissues, and Ca2+ influx and pCaMKIIα levels were measured in cultured NAc neurons. We found that CART attenuated the caffeine-mediated enhancement of depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx and CaMKIIα phosphorylation in cultured NAc neurons. Repeated microinjection of CART peptides into the NAc decreased the caffeine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ channels activity, pCaMKIIα levels, the pCaMKIIα-D3R interaction, D3R phosphorylation, cAMP levels, PKA activity and pCREB levels in the NAc. Furthermore, behavioral sensitization was observed in rats that received five-day administration of caffeine following microinjection of saline but not in rats that were treated with caffeine following microinjection of CART peptide. These results suggest that caffeine-induced CREB phosphorylation in the NAc was ameliorated by CART peptide due to its inhibition of D3R phosphorylation. These effects of CART peptides may play a compensatory role by inhibiting locomotor behavior in rats. PMID:27404570

  6. Decreased Caffeine-Induced Locomotor Activity via Microinjection of CART Peptide into the Nucleus Accumbens Is Linked to Inhibition of the pCaMKIIa-D3R Interaction.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Dong, Yun; Huang, Yonghong; Yang, Jianhua; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hu, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the inhibitory modulation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides, particularly with respect to the function of the D3 dopamine receptor (D3R), which is activated by its interaction with phosphorylated CaMKIIα (pCaMKIIα) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). After repeated oral administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg) for five days, microinjection of CART peptide (0.08 μM/0.5 μl/hemisphere) into the NAc affected locomotor behavior. The pCaMKIIα-D3R interaction, D3R phosphorylation and cAMP/PKA/phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) signaling pathway activity were measured in NAc tissues, and Ca2+ influx and pCaMKIIα levels were measured in cultured NAc neurons. We found that CART attenuated the caffeine-mediated enhancement of depolarization-induced Ca2+ influx and CaMKIIα phosphorylation in cultured NAc neurons. Repeated microinjection of CART peptides into the NAc decreased the caffeine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ channels activity, pCaMKIIα levels, the pCaMKIIα-D3R interaction, D3R phosphorylation, cAMP levels, PKA activity and pCREB levels in the NAc. Furthermore, behavioral sensitization was observed in rats that received five-day administration of caffeine following microinjection of saline but not in rats that were treated with caffeine following microinjection of CART peptide. These results suggest that caffeine-induced CREB phosphorylation in the NAc was ameliorated by CART peptide due to its inhibition of D3R phosphorylation. These effects of CART peptides may play a compensatory role by inhibiting locomotor behavior in rats.

  7. The fusogenic peptide HA2 impairs selectivity of CXCR4-targeted protein nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-García, L; Serna, N; Mattanovich, M; Cazzanelli, P; Sánchez-Chardi, A; Conchillo-Solé, O; Cortés, F; Daura, X; Unzueta, U; Mangues, R; Villaverde, A; Vázquez, E

    2017-03-21

    We demonstrate here that the genetic incorporation of the fusogenic peptide HA2 into a CXCR4-targeted protein nanoparticle dramatically reduces the specificity of the interaction between nanoparticles and cell receptors, a factor to be considered when designing tumor-homing drug vehicles displaying endosomal-escape agents. The loss of specificity is concomitant with enhanced cell penetrability.

  8. Design of antiviral stapled peptides containing a biphenyl cross-linker.

    PubMed

    Muppidi, Avinash; Zhang, Hongtao; Curreli, Francesca; Li, Nan; Debnath, Asim K; Lin, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Here we report the design and synthesis of a panel of stapled peptides containing a distance-matching biphenyl cross-linker based upon a peptide capsid assembly inhibitor reported previously. Compared with the linear peptide, the biphenyl-stapled peptides exhibited significantly enhanced cell penetration and potent antiviral activity in the cell-based infection assays. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that the most active stapled CAI peptide binds to the C-terminal domain of HIV capsid protein as well as envelop glycoprotein gp120 with low micromolar binding affinities, and as a result, inhibits both the HIV-1 virus entry and the virus assembly.

  9. Increasing Growth Yield and Decreasing Acetylation in Escherichia coli by Optimizing the Carbon-to-Magnesium Ratio in Peptide-Based Media.

    PubMed

    Christensen, David G; Orr, James S; Rao, Christopher V; Wolfe, Alan J

    2017-03-15

    Complex media are routinely used to cultivate diverse bacteria. However, this complexity can obscure the factors that govern cell growth. While studying protein acetylation in buffered tryptone broth supplemented with glucose (TB7-glucose), we observed that Escherichia coli did not fully consume glucose prior to stationary phase. However, when we supplemented this medium with magnesium, the glucose was completely consumed during exponential growth, with concomitant increases in cell number and biomass but reduced cell size. Similar results were observed with other sugars and other peptide-based media, including lysogeny broth. Magnesium also limited cell growth for Vibrio fischeri and Bacillus subtilis in TB7-glucose. Finally, magnesium supplementation reduced protein acetylation. Based on these results, we conclude that growth in peptide-based media is magnesium limited. We further conclude that magnesium supplementation can be used to tune protein acetylation without genetic manipulation. These results have the potential to reduce potentially deleterious acetylated isoforms of recombinant proteins without negatively affecting cell growth.IMPORTANCE Bacteria are often grown in complex media. These media are thought to provide the nutrients necessary to grow bacteria to high cell densities. In this work, we found that peptide-based media containing a sugar are magnesium limited for bacterial growth. In particular, magnesium supplementation is necessary for the bacteria to use the sugar for cell growth. Interestingly, in the absence of magnesium supplementation, the bacteria still consume the sugar. However, rather than use it for cell growth, the bacteria instead use the sugar to acetylate lysines on proteins. As lysine acetylation may alter the activity of proteins, this work demonstrates how lysine acetylation can be tuned through magnesium supplementation. These findings may be useful for recombinant protein production, when acetylated isoforms are to be avoided

  10. Short polyhistidine peptides penetrate effectively into Nicotiana tabacum-cultured cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Sayaka; Kawano, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The polyhistidine peptides (PHPs) have been previously reported as novel cell-penetrating peptides and are efficiently internalized into mammal cells; however, penetration of PHPs into other cell types is unknown. In this study, the cellular uptake of PHPs in plant and yeast cells was found to be dependent on the number of histidines, and short PHPs (H6-H10 peptides) showed effective internalization. The H8 peptide showed the highest cell-penetrating capacity and localized to vacuoles in plant and yeast cells. Low-temperature conditions inhibited significantly the cellular uptake of short PHPs by both cells. However, net charge neutralization of PHPs also completely inhibited cellular uptake by plant cells, but not by yeast cells. These results indicate that short PHPs penetrate effectively into plant and yeast cells by similar mechanism with the exception of net charge dependency. The findings show the short PHPs are promising candidates for new delivery tools into plant and yeast cells.

  11. The Antitumor Peptide CIGB-552 Increases COMMD1 and Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández Massó, Julio R; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Tejeda, Yelaine; Astrada, Soledad; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Delgado-Roche, Livan; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Vallespí, Maribel G

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the peptide L-2 designed from an alanine scanning of the Limulus-derived LALF32-51 region is a potential candidate for the anticancer therapy and its cell-penetrating capacity is an associated useful property. By the modification in the primary structure of L-2, a second-generation peptide (CIGB-552) was developed. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κB, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 decreases the antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in the tumor cells. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the mechanism of action of the peptide CIGB-552, which could be relevant in the design of future anticancer therapies.

  12. The Antitumor Peptide CIGB-552 Increases COMMD1 and Inhibits Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Massó, Julio R.; Oliva Argüelles, Brizaida; Tejeda, Yelaine; Astrada, Soledad; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Delgado-Roche, Livan; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Vallespí, Maribel G.

    2013-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the peptide L-2 designed from an alanine scanning of the Limulus-derived LALF32-51 region is a potential candidate for the anticancer therapy and its cell-penetrating capacity is an associated useful property. By the modification in the primary structure of L-2, a second-generation peptide (CIGB-552) was developed. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its cytotoxic activity remains partially unknown. In this study, it was shown that CIGB-552 increases the levels of COMMD1, a protein involved in copper homeostasis, sodium transport, and the NF-κB signaling pathway. We found that CIGB-552 induces ubiquitination of RelA and inhibits the antiapoptotic activity regulated by NF-κB, whereas the knockdown of COMMD1 blocks this effect. We also found that CIGB-552 decreases the antioxidant capacity and induces the peroxidation of proteins and lipids in the tumor cells. Altogether, this study provides new insights into the mechanism of action of the peptide CIGB-552, which could be relevant in the design of future anticancer therapies. PMID:23401744

  13. The frog skin host-defense peptide CPF-SE1 improves glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and islet function and decreases plasma lipids in high-fat fed mice.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Dinesh; Ojo, Opeolu O; Owolabi, Bosede O; Conlon, J Michael; Flatt, Peter R; Abdel-Wahab, Yasser H A

    2015-10-05

    The frog skin host-defense peptide CPF-SE1 has previously been shown to stimulate the in vitro release of insulin from clonal BRIN-BD11 β-cells. In this study, the in vivo effects of the peptide were investigated in male NIH Swiss mice maintained on a high-fat diet to induce obesity and insulin resistance. Insulin-secretory responses of islets isolated from treated and untreated mice and changes in islet morphology were also examined. Total body fat, plasma glucagon, triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were measured at the end of the treatment period. Acute intraperitoneal administration of CPF-SE1 (75 nmol body weight) to high-fat fed mice together with glucose (18 mmol/kg body weight) improved glucose tolerance and insulin responses compared to high-fat fed controls. Long term administration of CPF-SE1 (twice-daily administration of 75 nmol/kg body weight for 28 days) did not affect body weight or energy intake but decreased circulating glucose and increased insulin concentrations. Insulin sensitivity and insulin-secretory responses of islets to secretagogues were also significantly improved at 28 days in peptide-treated mice. In addition, significant decreases in plasma glucagon concentrations, pancreatic insulin and glucagon content, islet and beta cell area, body fat and plasma triglyceride levels were observed in CPF-SE1 treated with mice. In conclusion, CPF-SE1 improves beta cell function, insulin sensitivity and glycaemic control whilst reducing total body fat and circulating triglyceride levels. The peptide shows potential for development into an agent for treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Stapling Architecture on Physiochemical Properties and Cell Permeability of Stapled α-Helical Peptides: a Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Jiang, Yanhong; Li, Jingxu; Wang, Dongyuan; Zhao, Hui; Li, Zigang

    2017-09-06

    Stapled peptides emerged as a new class of targeting molecules of high binding affinity and specificity for intracellular undruggable targets. Their ability to penetrate cell membranes were exceptionally intriguing to the field, yet elusively and controversially discussed. To understand the effect of stapling architectures on their physiochemical properties and to aid in promoting their cell permeability, we report herein a comparative study on physiochemical properties and cell permeability of stapled α-helical peptides with different types of cross-links. We highlight the decisive impact of intrinsic properties of the cross-links on cell permeability rather than peptides' helical contents in a model amphipathic sequences targeting estrogen receptor - coactivator interaction. We envision this finding to further shed light on chemical optimization of stapled α-helical peptides or macrocyclic cell penetrating peptides for enhanced cell penetration. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Structure-Function Analysis of the Glioma Targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 Peptide Corresponding to the Tubulin-Binding Site on the Light Neurofilament Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Takahashi, Masayuki; Prevost, Chantal; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that a 24 amino acid peptide (NFL-TBS.40-63) corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, selectively enters in glioblastoma cells where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. Here, we analyzed the structure-function relationships using an alanine-scanning strategy, in order to identify residues essential for these biological activities. We showed that the majority of modified peptides present a decreased or total loss to penetrate in these cells, or to alter microtubules. Correspondingly, circular dichroism measurements showed that this peptide forms either β-sheet or α-helix structures according to the solvent and that alanine substitution modified or destabilized the structure, in relation with changes in the biological activities. Moreover, substitution of serine residues by phosphoserine or aspartic acid concomitantly decreased the cell penetrating activity and the structure stability. These results indicate the importance of structure for the activities, including selectivity to glioblastoma cells of this peptide, and its regulation by phosphorylation. PMID:23152907

  16. Structure-function analysis of the glioma targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide corresponding to the tubulin-binding site on the light neurofilament subunit.

    PubMed

    Berges, Raphael; Balzeau, Julien; Takahashi, Masayuki; Prevost, Chantal; Eyer, Joel

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that a 24 amino acid peptide (NFL-TBS.40-63) corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, selectively enters in glioblastoma cells where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. Here, we analyzed the structure-function relationships using an alanine-scanning strategy, in order to identify residues essential for these biological activities. We showed that the majority of modified peptides present a decreased or total loss to penetrate in these cells, or to alter microtubules. Correspondingly, circular dichroism measurements showed that this peptide forms either β-sheet or α-helix structures according to the solvent and that alanine substitution modified or destabilized the structure, in relation with changes in the biological activities. Moreover, substitution of serine residues by phosphoserine or aspartic acid concomitantly decreased the cell penetrating activity and the structure stability. These results indicate the importance of structure for the activities, including selectivity to glioblastoma cells of this peptide, and its regulation by phosphorylation.

  17. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies of peptide-lipid interactions using the mouse paneth cell α-defensin cryptdin-4.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhijit; Tai, Kenneth P; Schmidt, Nathan W; Ouellette, André J; Wong, Gerard C L

    2011-01-01

    In the presence of specialized proteins or peptides, a biological membrane can spontaneously restructure itself to allow communication between the intracellular and the extracellular sides. Examples of these proteins include cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which interact with cell membranes in complex ways. We briefly review cell-penetrating peptides and AMPs, and describe in detail how recombinant AMPs are made and their activity evaluated, using α-defensins as a specific example. We also review X-ray scattering methods used in studying peptide-membrane interactions, focusing on the procedures for small-angle X-ray scattering experiments on peptide-membrane interactions at realistic solution conditions, using both laboratory and synchrotron sources.

  18. Decreased glycation and structural protection properties of γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-cysteine peptide isolated from fresh garlic scales (Allium sativum L.).

    PubMed

    Tan, Dehong; Zhang, Yao; Chen, Lulu; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Xuan; Wu, Zhaoxia; Bai, Bing; Ji, Shujuan

    2015-01-01

    The antiglycative effect of γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-cysteine (GSAC) peptide isolated from fresh garlic scales was investigated in the bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose system. GSAC inhibited the increase of fluorescence intensity at about 440 nm in a concentration-dependent manner and reduced reacted free lysine side chains by 10.9%, 24.7% and 37.7%, as the GSAC concentrations increased from 0.1 to 2.5 mg mL(-1). Glycation-specific decline in BSA α-helix content (from 61.3% to 55.6%) and increase in β-sheet (from 2.1% to 5.4%) were prevented by GSAC (2.5 mg mL(-1)) in vitro, implying its stabilisation effect. GSAC treatment (2.5 mg mL(-1)) suppressed protein crosslinking to form polymers. Additionally, GSAC (10, 40, and 160 μg mL(-1)) showed radical-scavenging and metal-chelating capacities. In conclusion, GSAC has an antiglycative effect, which may involve its radical-scavenging and metal-chelating capacities.

  19. pH-Dependent In-Cell Self-Assembly of Peptide Inhibitors Increases the Anti-Prion Activity While Decreasing the Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Waqas, Muhammad; Jeong, Woo-Jin; Lee, Young-Joo; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Ryou, Chongsuk; Lim, Yong-Beom

    2017-02-13

    The first step in the conventional approach to self-assembled biomaterials is to develop well-defined nanostructures in vitro, which is followed by disruption of the preformed nanostructures at the inside of the cell to achieve bioactivity. Here, we propose an inverse strategy to develop in-cell gain-of-function self-assembled nanostructures. In this approach, the supramolecular building blocks exist in a unimolecular/unordered state in vitro or at the outside of the cell and assemble into well-defined nanostructures after cell internalization. We used block copolypeptides of an oligoarginine and a self-assembling peptide as building blocks and investigated correlations among the nanostructural state, antiprion bioactivity, and cytotoxicity. The optimal bioactivity (i.e., the highest antiprion activity and lowest cytotoxicity) was obtained when the building blocks existed in a unimolecular/unordered state in vitro and during the cell internalization process, exerting minimal cytotoxic damage to cell membranes, and were subsequently converted into high-charge-density vesicles in the low pH endosome/lysosomes in vivo, thus, resulting in the significantly enhanced antiprion activity. In particular, the in-cell self-assembly concept presents a feasible approach to developing therapeutics against protein misfolding diseases. In general, the in-cell self-assembly provides a novel inverse methodology to supramolecular bionanomaterials.

  20. The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 improves reference memory performance and decreases immobility in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Isacson, Ruben; Nielsen, Elisabet; Dannaeus, Karin; Bertilsson, Göran; Patrone, Cesare; Zachrisson, Olof; Wikström, Lilian

    2011-01-10

    We have earlier shown that the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exendin-4 stimulates neurogenesis in the subventricular zone and excerts anti-parkinsonian behavior. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of exendin-4 treatment on hippocampus-associated cognitive and mood-related behavior in adult rodents. To investigate potential effects of exendin-4 on hippocampal function, radial maze and forced swim test were employed. The time necessary to solve a radial maze task and the duration of immobility in the forced swim test were significantly reduced compared to respective vehicle groups if the animals had received exendin-4 during 1-2weeks before testing. In contrast to the positive control imipramine, single administration of exendin-4 1h before the challenge in the forced swim test had no effect. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine, a marker for DNA synthesis, as well as doublecortin expression was increased in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following chronic treatment with exendin-4 compared to vehicle-treated controls. The neurogenic effect of exendin-4 on hippocampus was confirmed by quantitative PCR showing an upregulation of mRNA expression for Ki-67, doublecortin and Mash-1. Since exendin-4 significantly improves hippocampus-associated behavior in adult rodents, it may be a candidate for alleviation of mood and cognitive disorders.

  1. Stapled peptides for intracellular drug targets.

    PubMed

    Verdine, Gregory L; Hilinski, Gerard J

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that engage in intracellular interactions with other proteins are widely considered among the most biologically appealing yet chemically intractable targets for drug discovery. The critical interaction surfaces of these proteins typically lack the deep hydrophobic involutions that enable potent, selective targeting by small organic molecules, and their localization within the cell puts them beyond the reach of protein therapeutics. Considerable interest has therefore arisen in next-generation targeting molecules that combine the broad target recognition capabilities of protein therapeutics with the robust cell-penetrating ability of small molecules. One type that has shown promise in early-stage studies is hydrocarbon-stapled α-helical peptides, a novel class of synthetic miniproteins locked into their bioactive α-helical fold through the site-specific introduction of a chemical brace, an all-hydrocarbon staple. Stapling can greatly improve the pharmacologic performance of peptides, increasing their target affinity, proteolytic resistance, and serum half-life while conferring on them high levels of cell penetration through endocytic vesicle trafficking. Here, we discuss considerations crucial to the successful design and evaluation of potent stapled peptide interactions, our intention being to facilitate the broad application of this technology to intractable targets of both basic biologic interest and potential therapeutic value.

  2. Mechanisms of the Antifungal Action of Marine Metagenome-Derived Peptide, MMGP1, against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of resistant variants to existing antifungal drugs continues to be the serious problem in Candida albicans-induced fungal pathogenesis, which has a considerable impact on animal and human health. Identification and characterization of newer drugs against C. albicans is, therefore, essential. MMGP1 is a direct cell-penetrating peptide recently identified from marine metagenome, which was found to possess potent antifungal activity against C. albicans. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated the mechanism of antifungal action of MMGP1 against C. albicans. Agarose gel shift assay found the peptide to be having a remarkable DNA-binding ability. The modification of the absorption spectra and fluorescence quenching of the tryptophyl residue correspond to the stacking between indole ring and nucleotide bases. The formation of peptide–DNA complexes was confirmed by fluorescence quenching of SYTO 9 probe. The interaction of peptide with plasmid DNA afforded protection of DNA from enzymatic degradation by DNase I. In vitro transcription of mouse β-actin gene in the presence of peptide led to a decrease in the level of mRNA synthesis. The C. albicans treated with MMGP1 showed strong inhibition of biosynthetic incorporation of uridine analog 5-ethynyluridine (EU) into nascent RNA, suggesting the peptide’s role in the inhibition of macromolecular synthesis. Furthermore, the peptide also induces endogenous accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. albicans. MMGP1 supplemented with glutathione showed an increased viability of C. albicans cells. The hyper-produced ROS by MMGP1 leads to increased levels of protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and it also causes dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation in C. albicans cells. Conclusion And Significance: Therefore, the antifungal activity of MMGP1 could be attributed to its binding with DNA, causing inhibition of

  3. Vitamin B12 Conjugation of Peptide-YY3–36 Decreases Food Intake Compared to Native Peptide-YY3–36 Upon Subcutaneous Administration in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kelly E.; Elfers, Clinton T.; Burke, Rachael M.; Chepurny, Oleg G.; Holz, George G.; Blevins, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Challenges to peptide-based therapies include rapid clearance, ready degradation by hydrolysis/proteolysis, and poor intestinal uptake and/or a need for blood brain barrier transport. This work evaluates the efficacy of conjugation of vitamin B12 (B12) on sc administered peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY)3–36 function. In the current experiments, a B12-PYY3–36 conjugate was tested against native PYY3–36, and an inactive conjugate B12-PYYC36 (null control) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments demonstrated similar agonism for the neuropeptide Y2 receptor by the B12-PYY3–36 conjugate (EC50 26.5 nM) compared with native PYY3–36 (EC50 16.0 nM), with the null control having an EC50 of 1.8 μM. In vivo experiments were performed in young adult male Sprague Dawley rats (9 wk). Daily treatments were delivered sc in five 1-hour pulses, each pulse delivering 5–10 nmol/kg, by implanted microinfusion pumps. Increases in hindbrain Fos expression were comparable 90 minutes after B12-PYY3–36 or PYY3–36 injection relative to saline or B12-PYYC36. Food intake was reduced during a 5-day treatment for both B12-PYY3–36- (24%, P = .001) and PYY3–36-(13%, P = .008) treated groups relative to baseline. In addition, reduction of food intake after the three dark cycle treatment pulses was more consistent with B12-PYY3–36 treatment (−26%, −29%, −27%) compared with the PYY3–36 treatment (−3%, −21%, −16%), and B12-PYY3–36 generated a significantly longer inhibition of food intake vs PYY3–36 treatment after the first two pulses (P = .041 and P = .036, respectively). These findings demonstrate a stronger, more consistent, and longer inhibition of food intake after the pulses of B12-PYY3–36 conjugate compared with the native PYY3–36. PMID:25658456

  4. Vitamin B12 conjugation of peptide-YY(3-36) decreases food intake compared to native peptide-YY(3-36) upon subcutaneous administration in male rats.

    PubMed

    Henry, Kelly E; Elfers, Clinton T; Burke, Rachael M; Chepurny, Oleg G; Holz, George G; Blevins, James E; Roth, Christian L; Doyle, Robert P

    2015-05-01

    Challenges to peptide-based therapies include rapid clearance, ready degradation by hydrolysis/proteolysis, and poor intestinal uptake and/or a need for blood brain barrier transport. This work evaluates the efficacy of conjugation of vitamin B12 (B12) on sc administered peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY)(3-36) function. In the current experiments, a B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate was tested against native PYY(3-36), and an inactive conjugate B12-PYYC36 (null control) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments demonstrated similar agonism for the neuropeptide Y2 receptor by the B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate (EC50 26.5 nM) compared with native PYY(3-36) (EC50 16.0 nM), with the null control having an EC50 of 1.8 μM. In vivo experiments were performed in young adult male Sprague Dawley rats (9 wk). Daily treatments were delivered sc in five 1-hour pulses, each pulse delivering 5-10 nmol/kg, by implanted microinfusion pumps. Increases in hindbrain Fos expression were comparable 90 minutes after B12-PYY(3-36) or PYY3-36 injection relative to saline or B12-PYYC36. Food intake was reduced during a 5-day treatment for both B12-PYY(3-36)- (24%, P = .001) and PYY(3-36)-(13%, P = .008) treated groups relative to baseline. In addition, reduction of food intake after the three dark cycle treatment pulses was more consistent with B12-PYY(3-36) treatment (-26%, -29%, -27%) compared with the PYY(3-36) treatment (-3%, -21%, -16%), and B12-PYY(3-36) generated a significantly longer inhibition of food intake vs. PYY(3-36) treatment after the first two pulses (P = .041 and P = .036, respectively). These findings demonstrate a stronger, more consistent, and longer inhibition of food intake after the pulses of B12-PYY(3-36) conjugate compared with the native PYY(3-36).

  5. Combination treatment with Grb7 peptide and Doxorubicin or Trastuzumab (Herceptin) results in cooperative cell growth inhibition in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pero, S C; Shukla, G S; Cookson, M M; Flemer, S; Krag, D N

    2007-05-21

    Grb7 has potential importance in the progression of cancer. We have previously identified a novel peptide that binds to the SH2 domain of Grb7 and inhibits its association with several different receptor tyrosine kinases. We have synthesised the Grb7 peptide, G7-18NATE, with two different cell penetrating peptides, Penetratin and Tat. In this study, we have shown that both Penetratin- and Tat-conjugated G7-18NATE peptides are able to inhibit the proliferation of SK-BR-3, ZR-75-30, MDA-MB-361 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. There was no significant effects on breast cancer MCF-7cells, non-malignant MCF 10A or 3T3 cells. In addition, there was no significant inhibition of proliferation by Penetratin or Tat alone or by their conjugates with arbitrary peptide sequence in any of the cell lines tested. We determined the EC50 of G7-18NATE-P peptide for SK-BR-3 cell proliferation to be 7.663 x 10(-6) M. Co-treatment of G7-18NATE-P peptide plus Doxorubicin in SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells resulted in an additional inhibition of proliferation, resulting in 56 and 84% decreases in the Doxorubicin EC50 value in the presence of 5 x 10(-6) and 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide, respectively. Importantly, the co-treatment with Doxorubicin and the delivery peptide did not change the Doxorubicin EC50. Since Grb7 associates with ErbB2, we assessed whether the peptide inhibitor would have a combined effect with a molecule that targets ErbB2, Herceptin. Co-treatment of Herceptin plus 1.0 x 10(-5) M G7-18NATE-P peptide in SK-BR-3 cells resulted in a 46% decrease in the Herceptin EC50 value and no decrease following the co-treatment with Herceptin and penetratin alone. This Grb7 peptide has potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent alone, in combination with traditional chemotherapy, or in combination with other targeting molecules.

  6. Elevated Peak Postoperative B-type Natriuretic Peptide Predicts Decreased Longer-Term Physical Function after Primary Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Amanda A.; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Collard, Charles D.; Thoma, Mathis; Perry, Tjorvi E.; Shernan, Stanton K.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Body, Simon C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated peak postoperative B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is associated with increased major adverse cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Whether elevated postoperative BNP predicts worse post-discharge physical function (PF) is unknown. We hypothesized that peak postoperative BNP associates with PF assessed up to 2 years after CABG surgery, even after adjusting for clinical risk factors including preoperative PF. Methods This two institution prospective cohort study included patients undergoing primary CABG surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Short Form-36 questionnaires were administered to subjects preoperatively and 6 months, 1 and 2 years postoperatively. Short Form-36 PF domain scores were calculated using the Short Form-36 norm based scoring algorithm. Plasma BNP concentrations measured preoperatively and on postoperative days 1–5 were log10 transformed before analysis. To determine whether peak postoperative BNP independently predicts PF scores 6 months through 2 years after CABG surgery, multivariable longitudinal regression analysis of the postoperative PF scores was performed, adjusting for important clinical risk factors. Results 845 subjects (mean age±SD: 65±10 years) were analyzed. Peak postoperative BNP was significantly associated with postoperative PF (effect estimate for log10 peak BNP = −7.66 PF score points; 95% CI = −9.68, −5.64; P=<0.0001). After multivariable adjustments, peak postoperative BNP remained independently associated with postoperative PF (effect estimate for log10 peak BNP =−3.06 PF score points; 95% CI = −5.15, −0.97; P=0.004). Conclusions Elevated peak postoperative BNP independently associates with worse longer-term physical function after primary CABG surgery. Future studies are needed to determine whether medical management targeted towards reducing elevated postoperative BNP can improve PF after CABG surgery. PMID:21427536

  7. Decrease in plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in the early phase after the start of carvedilol therapy is a novel predictor of long-term outcome in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Mitsunori; Akaike, Masashi; Iwase, Takashi; Yoshida, Sumiko; Sumitomo, Yuka; Yagi, Shusuke; Ikeda, Yasumasa; Hashizume, Shunji; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Nishiuchi, Takeshi; Yasumura, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Toshio

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether change in plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level at an early phase of carvedilol therapy is a predictor of improvement in cardiac function and long-term prognosis in patients with systolic chronic heart failure (CHF). Neurohumoral factors and haemodynamics were examined in 64 patients with systolic CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) below 45%) before and one month (early phase) and 3 to 6 months (late phase) after the start of carvedilol therapy. These patients were followed up for a mean period of 57 months. Plasma BNP levels were already decreased in the early phase before improvement of LVEF in response to carvedilol therapy. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses showed that Delta log brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)E (= log BNP at baseline--log BNP at early phase) (P < 0.0001) was a significant independent predictor of improvement in LVEF in the late phase. Cardiac events occurred in I I patients during the follow-up period. In addition, multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that Delta log BNPE (P = 0.0045) and systolic blood pressure at baseline (P = -0.048) were significant independent predictors of the development of cardiac events. Decrease in plasma BNP level in the early phase of carvedilol therapy is a novel predictor of not only improvement of LVEF in the late phase but also prognosis in patients with systolic CHF.

  8. How to address CPP and AMP translocation? Methods to detect and quantify peptide internalization in vitro and in vivo (Review).

    PubMed

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Melo, Manuel Nuno; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2007-01-01

    Membrane translocation is a crucial issue when addressing the activity of both cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides. Translocation is responsible for the therapeutic potential of cell-penetrating peptides as drug carriers and can dictate the killing mechanisms, selectivity and efficiency of antimicrobial peptides. It is essential to evaluate if the internalization of cell-penetrating peptides is mediated by endocytosis and if it is able to internalize attached cargoes. The mode of action of an antimicrobial peptide cannot be fully understood if it is not known whether the peptide acts exclusively at the membrane level or also at the cytoplasm. Therefore, experimental methods to evaluate and quantify translocation processes are of first importance. In this work, over 20 methods described in the literature for the assessment of peptide translocation in vivo and in vitro, with and without attached macromolecular cargoes, are discussed and their applicability, advantages and disadvantages reviewed. In addition, a classification of these methods is proposed, based on common approaches to detect translocation.

  9. Potential Participation of calpain in platelet activation studied by use of a cell penetrating calpain inhibitor (Calpeptin)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Ariyoshi, Hideo; Uemura, Yoshio; Sakon, Masato; Kambayashi, Junichi; Mori, Takesada )

    1990-01-01

    Employing a cell penetrating calpain inhibitor (calpeptin), the role of calpain in platelet activation was examined. In washed platelets (WPs) both thrombin and collagen-induced platelet aggregation were dose-dependently inhibited by calpeptin. The addition of plasma to WPs interfered with the action of calpeptin, however more than 3 min preincubation of calpeptin with WPs completely abolished the influence of plasma. In thrombin-activated WPs with calcium, the increase of intracellular calcium concentration, (Ca{sup 2+})i, and the production of inositol triphosphate (IP{sub 3}) were dose-dependently inhibited by calpeptin. The generation of thromboxane B{sub 2} (TxB{sub 2}) was inhibited by calpeptin in collagen and thrombin-activated WPs. In ({sub 3}H)-arachidonic acid (AA)-labelled platelets, calpeptin increased the amount of ({sup 3}H)-AA liberated by inhibiting ({sup 3}H)-AA degradation after collagen or thrombin stimulation. When ({sup 14}C)-AA degradation by the platelet suspension was observed, calpeptin inhibited TxB{sub 2} and hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) generation but increased prostaglandin (PG) E{sub 1}, E{sub 2}, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12HETE) and AA. Based on these findings, calpain may be involved in the activation phospholipase C and thromboxane synthetase.

  10. Development of surface modified biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles to deliver GSE24.2 peptide to cells: a promising approach for the treatment of defective telomerase disorders.

    PubMed

    Egusquiaguirre, Susana P; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Iarriccio, Laura; Carbajo, Daniel; Albericio, Fernando; Royo, Miriam; Pedraz, José Luís; Hernández, Rosa M; Perona, Rosario; Igartua, Manuela

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a novel strategy to deliver intracellularly the peptide GSE24.2 for the treatment of Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and other defective telomerase disorders. For this purpose, biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA NPs) or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-poly ethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG NPs) attached to either polycations or cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) were prepared in order to increase their cellular uptake. The particles exhibited an adequate size and zeta potential, with good peptide loading and a biphasic pattern obtained in the in vitro release assay, showing an initial burst release and a later sustained release. GSE24.2 structural integrity after encapsulation was assessed using SDS-PAGE, revealing an unaltered peptide after the NPs elaboration. According to the cytotoxicity results, cell viability was not affected by uncoated polymeric NPs, but the incorporation of surface modifiers slightly decreased the viability of cells. The intracellular uptake exhibited a remarkable improvement of the internalization, when the NPs were conjugated to the CPPs. Finally, the bioactivity, addressed by measuring DNA damage rescue and telomerase reactivation, showed that some formulations had the lowest cytotoxicity and highest biological activity. These results proved that GSE24.2-loaded NPs could be delivered to cells, and therefore, become an effective approach for the treatment of DC and other defective telomerase syndromes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phospholipid conjugate for intracellular delivery of peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gang; Fang, Huafeng; Song, Yinyin; Bielska, Agata A.; Wang, Zhenghui; Taylor, John-Stephen A.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have a number of attractive features that have made them an ideal choice for antisense and antigene-based tools, probes and drugs, but their poor membrane permeability has limited their application as therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Herein we report a general method for the synthesis of phospholipid-PNAs (LP-PNAs), and compare the effect of non-cleavable lipids and bioreductively cleavable lipids (L and LSS) and phospholipid (LP) on the splice-correcting bioactivity of a PNA bearing the cell penetrating Arg9 group (PNA-R9). While the three constructs show similar and increasing bioactivity at 1–3 μM, the activity of LP-PNA-R9 continues to increase from 4–6 μM while the activity of L-PNA-R9 remains constant and LSS-PNA-R9 decreases rapidly in parallel with their relative cytotoxicity. The activity of both LP-PNA-R9 and L-PNA-R9 were found to dramatically increase with chloroquine, as expected for an endocytotic entry mechanism. Both constructs were also found to have CMC values of 1.0 and 4.5 μM in 150 mM NaCl, pH 7 water, suggesting that micelle formation may play a hitherto unrecognized role in modulating toxicity and/or facilitating endocytosis. PMID:19678628

  12. Membrane Thinning and Thickening Induced by Membrane-Active Amphipathic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Grage, Stephan L.; Afonin, Sergii; Kara, Sezgin; Buth, Gernot; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane thinning has been discussed as a fundamental mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides can perturb cellular membranes. To understand which factors play a role in this process, we compared several amphipathic peptides with different structures, sizes and functions in their influence on the lipid bilayer thickness. PGLa and magainin 2 from X. laevis were studied as typical representatives of antimicrobial cationic amphipathic α-helices. A 1:1 mixture of these peptides, which is known to possess synergistically enhanced activity, allowed us to evaluate whether and how this synergistic interaction correlates with changes in membrane thickness. Other systems investigated here include the α-helical stress-response peptide TisB from E. coli (which forms membrane-spanning dimers), as well as gramicidin S from A. migulanus (a natural antibiotic), and BP100 (designer-made antimicrobial and cell penetrating peptide). The latter two are very short, with a circular β-pleated and a compact α-helical structure, respectively. Solid-state 2H-NMR and grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) on oriented phospholipid bilayers were used as complementary techniques to access the hydrophobic thickness as well as the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance including the water layer in between. This way, we found that magainin 2, gramicidin S, and BP100 induced membrane thinning, as expected for amphiphilic peptides residing in the polar/apolar interface of the bilayer. PGLa, on the other hand, decreased the hydrophobic thickness only at very high peptide:lipid ratios, and did not change the bilayer-bilayer repeat distance. TisB even caused an increase in the hydrophobic thickness and repeat distance. When reconstituted as a mixture, PGLa and magainin 2 showed a moderate thinning effect which was less than that of magainin 2 alone, hence their synergistically enhanced activity does not seem to correlate with a modulation of membrane thickness. Overall, the absence of a

  13. Liposomes Combined an Integrin αvβ3-Specific Vector with pH-Responsible Cell-Penetrating Property for Highly Effective Antiglioma Therapy through the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kairong; Long, Yang; Xu, Chaoqun; Wang, Yang; Qiu, Yue; Yu, Qianwen; Liu, Yayuan; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2015-09-30

    Glioma, one of the most common aggressive malignancies, has the highest mortality in the present world. Delivery of nanocarriers from the systemic circulation to the glioma sites would encounter multiple physiological and biological barriers, such as blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the poor penetration of nanocarriers into the tumor. To circumvent these hurdles, the paclitaxel-loaded liposomes were developed by conjugating with a TR peptide (PTX-TR-Lip), integrin αvβ3-specific vector with pH-responsible cell-penetrating property, for transporting drug across the BBB and then delivering into glioma. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies confirmed the very high affinity of TR-Lip and integrin αvβ3. In vitro results showed that TR-Lip exhibited strong transport ability across BBB, killed glioma cells and brain cancer stem cells (CSCs), and destroyed the vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels. In vivo results demonstrated that TR-Lip could better target glioma, and eliminated brain CSCs and the VM channels in tumor tissues. The median survival time of tumor-bearing mice after administering PTX-TR-Lip (45 days) was significantly longer than that after giving free PTX (25.5 days, p < 0.001) or other controls. In conclusion, PTX-TR-Lip would improve the therapeutic efficacy of brain glioma in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Multifunctional Prenylated Peptides for Live Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wollack, James W.; Zeliadt, Nicholette A.; Mullen, Daniel G.; Amundson, Gregg; Geier, Suzanne; Falkum, Stacy; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a common post-translational modification present in eukaryotic cells. Many key proteins involved in signal transduction pathways are prenylated and inhibition of prenylation can be useful as a therapeutic intervention. While significant progress has been made in understanding protein prenylation in vitro, we have been interested in studying this process in living cells, including the question of where prenylated molecules localize. Here, we describe the synthesis and live cell analysis of a series of fluorescently labeled multifunctional peptides, based on the C-terminus of the naturally prenylated protein CDC42. A synthetic route was developed that features a key Acm to Scm protecting group conversion. This strategy was compatible with acid-sensitive isoprenoid moieties, and allowed incorporation of an appropriate fluorophore as well as a cell-penetrating sequence (penetratin). These peptides are able to enter cells through different mechanisms, depending on the presence or absence of the penetratin vehicle and the nature of the prenyl group attached. Interestingly, prenylated peptides lacking penetratin are able to enter cells freely through an energy-independent process, and localize in a perinuclear fashion. This effect extends to a prenylated peptide that includes a full “CAAX box” sequence (specifically, CVLL). Hence, these peptides open the door for studies of protein prenylation in living cells, including enzymatic processing and intracellular peptide trafficking. Moreover, the synthetic strategy developed here should be useful for the assembly of other types of peptides that contain acid sensitive functionalities. PMID:19425596

  15. Increased peptide YY blood concentrations, not decreased acyl-ghrelin, are associated with reduced hunger and food intake in healthy older women: Preliminary evidence.

    PubMed

    Hickson, Mary; Moss, Charlotte; Dhillo, Waljit S; Bottin, Jeanne; Frost, Gary

    2016-10-01

    With ageing there is frequently a loss of appetite, termed anorexia of ageing, which can result in under-nutrition. We do not know how appetite control alters with ageing. The objective of this study was to investigate whether differences in the release of, and response to, gastrointestinal appetite hormones is altered in young compared to old healthy volunteers. We hypothesised that an increase in PYY and GLP-1 or a decrease ghrelin may result in a decreased appetite. A comparative experimental design, using a cross-sectional sample of ages from a healthy population, matched for sex and BMI was used. The study compared total ghrelin, acyl-ghrelin, PYY, GLP-1 and subjective appetite responses to ingestion of a standardised 2781kj (660 kcal) test meal. 31 female volunteers aged between 21 and 92yrs took part. Multiple linear regression showed that both age and sex had an independent effect on energy intake. Subjective appetite scores showed that hunger, pleasantness to eat, and prospective food intake were significantly lower in the older age groups. PYY incremental area under the curve (IAUC) was greater in the oldest old compared to younger ages f(3,27) = 2.9, p = 0.05. No differences in GLP-1, ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin were observed in the older compared to younger age groups. Our data suggest that there may be increases in postprandial PYY(3-36) levels in female octogenarians, potentially resulting in reduced appetite. There does not appear to be any change in ghrelin or acyl-ghrelin concentrations with ageing.

  16. CIGB-300, a proapoptotic peptide, inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farina, Hernán G; Benavent Acero, Fernando; Perera, Yasser; Rodríguez, Arielis; Perea, Silvio E; Castro, Boris Acevedo; Gomez, Roberto; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E

    2011-07-15

    We have previously demonstrated that a proapoptotic cyclic peptide CIGB-300, formerly known as P15-Tat delivered into the cells by the cell-penetrating peptide Tat, was able to abrogate the CK2-mediated phosphorylation and induce tumor regression when injected directly into solid tumors in mice or by systemic administration. In this work, we studied the role of CIGB-300 on the main events that take place in angiogenesis. At non-cytotoxic doses, CIGB-300 was able to inhibit adhesion, migration, and tubular network formation induced by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) growing upon Matrigel in vitro. Likewise, we evaluated the cellular penetration and localization into the HUVEC cells of CIGB-300. Our results confirmed a quick cellular penetration and a cytoplasmic accumulation in the early minutes of incubation and a translocation into the nuclei beginning at 12h of treatment, with a strong presence in the perinuclear area. A microarray analysis was used to determine the genes affected by the treatment. We observed that CIGB-300 significantly decreased four genes strongly associated with tubulogenesis, growth, and differentiation of endothelial cells. The CIGB-300 was tested in vivo on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membranes (CAM), and a large number of newly formed blood vessels were significantly regressed. The results suggested that CIGB-300 has a potential as an antiangiogenic treatment. The mechanism of action may be associated with partial inhibition of VEGF and Notch pathways.

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  18. Taming the Wildness of "Trojan-Horse" Peptides by Charge-Guided Masking and Protease-Triggered Demasking for the Controlled Delivery of Antitumor Agents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nian-Qiu; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2017-03-14

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), also called "Trojan Horse" peptide, has become a successful approach to deliver various payloads into cells for achieving the intracellular access. However, the "Trojan Horse" peptide is too wild, not just to "Troy", but rather widely distributed in the body. Thus, there is an urgent need to tame the wildness of "Trojan Horse" peptide for targeted delivery of antineoplastic agents to the tumor site. To achieve this goal, we exploit a masked CPP-doxorubicin conjugate platform for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs using charge-guided masking and protease-triggered demasking strategies. In this platform, the cell-penetrating function of the positively CPP (d-form nonaarginine) is abrogated by a negatively shielding peptide (masked CPP), and between them is a cleavable substrate peptide by the protease (MMP-2/9). Protease-triggered demasking would occur when the masked CPP reached the MMP-2/9-riched tumor. The CPP-doxorubicin conjugate (CPP-Dox) and the masked CPP-Dox conjugate (mCPP-Dox) were used as models for the evaluation of masking and demasking processes. It was found that exogenous MMP-2/9 could effectively trigger the reversion of CPP-cargo in this conjugate, and this trigger adhered to the Michaelis-Menten kinetics profile. This conjugate was sensitive to the trigger of endogenous MMP-2/9 and could induce enhanced cytotoxicity toward MMP-2/9-rich tumor cells. In vivo antitumor efficacy revealed that this masked conjugate had considerable antitumor activity and could inhibit the tumor growth at a higher level relative to CPP-cargo. Low toxicity in vivo showed the noticeably decreased wildness of this conjugate toward normal tissues and more controllable entry of antitumor agents into "Troy". On the basis of analyses in vitro and in vivo, this mCPP-cargo conjugate delivery system held an improved selectivity toward MMP-2/9-rich tumors and would be a promising strategy for tumor-targeted treatment.

  19. The non-peptide neurokinin-1 antagonist, RPR 100893, decreases c-fos expression in trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious chemical meningeal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutrer, F M; Moussaoui, S; Garret, C; Moskowitz, M A

    1995-02-01

    The effect of RPR 100893, a selective and specific neurokinin-1 antagonist, or its enantiomer RPR 103253 was examined on c-fos antigen expression in brain stem and upper cervical cord 2 h after intracisternal capsaicin injection (30.5 micrograms/ml) in pentobarbital-anesthetized Hartley guinea-pigs. Positive cells were counted at three levels corresponding to obex, -2.25 mm and -6.75 mm in 18 sections (50 microns). Immunoreactivity was strongly expressed within laminae I and IIo of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, area postrema and the leptomeninges. Moderate labeling was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the medullary lateral reticular nucleus, whereas few positive cells were found in the ventral portion of the medullary reticular nucleus and Rexed laminae III-V and X. The distribution of labeled cells was consistent with previously reported results following subarachnoid placement of the noxious agents, blood or carrageenin. Pretreatment with RPR 100893 (1, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) but not its enantiomer (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) 30 min prior to capsaicin injection significantly reduced the number of positive cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner, but not within area postrema or nucleus of the solitary tract. These results indicate that (i) the instillation of capsaicin into the subarachnoid space is an effective stimulus for the induction of c-fos antigen within trigeminal nucleus caudalis, presumably through activation of trigeminovascular afferents, and (ii) the neurokinin-1 antagonist RPR 100893 reduces the number of positive cells selectively within this nucleus. The findings are significant because drugs which alleviate vascular headaches decrease the number of c-fos-positive cells within trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious meningeal stimulation. Hence, strategies aimed at blocking the neurokinin-1 receptor may be useful for treating migraine and cluster headache.

  20. Design and implementation of a high yield production system for recombinant expression of peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Making peptide pharmaceuticals involves challenging processes where many barriers, which include production and manufacture, need to be overcome. A non common but interesting research area is related to peptides with intracellular targets, which opens up new possibilities, allowing the modulation of processes occurring within the cell or interference with signaling pathways. However, if the bioactive sequence requires fusion to a carrier peptide to allow access into the cell, the resulting peptide could be such a length that traditional production could be difficult. The goal of the present study was the development of a flexible recombinant expression and purification system for peptides, as a contribution to the discovery and development of these potentially new drugs. Results In this work, a high throughput recombinant expression and purification system for production of cell penetrating peptides in Escherichia coli has been designed and implemented. The system designed produces target peptides in an insoluble form by fusion to a hexahistidine tagged ketosteroid isomerase which is then separated by a highly efficient thrombin cleavage reaction procedure. The expression system was tested on the anticancer peptides p53pAnt and PNC27. These peptides comprise the C-terminal region and the N-terminal region of the protein p53, respectively, fused by its carboxyl terminal extreme to the cell penetrating peptide Penetratin. High yields of purified recombinant fused peptides were obtained in both cases; nevertheless, thrombin cleavage reaction was successful only for p53pAnt peptide release. The features of the system, together with the procedure developed, allow achievement of high production yields of over 30 mg of highly pure p53pAnt peptide per g of dry cell mass. It is proposed that the system could be used for production of other peptides at a similar yield. Conclusions This study provides a system suitable for recombinant production of peptides for

  1. Paclitaxel inhibits the activity and membrane localization of PKCα and PKCβI/II to elicit a decrease in stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release from cultured sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Darby, Lisa M; Meng, Hongdi; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2017-04-09

    Peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting and debilitating side effect of the chemotherapeutic drug, paclitaxel. Consequently, elucidating the mechanisms by which this drug alters sensory neuronal function is essential for the development of successful therapeutics for peripheral neuropathy. We previously demonstrated that chronic treatment with paclitaxel (3-5days) reduces neuropeptide release stimulated by agonists of TRPV1. Because the activity of TRPV1 channels is modulated by conventional and novel PKC isozymes (c/nPKC), we investigated whether c/nPKC mediate the loss of neuropeptide release following chronic treatment with paclitaxel (300nM; 3 and 5days). Release of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), was measured as an index of neuronal sensitivity. Following paclitaxel treatment, cultured dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons were stimulated with a c/nPKC activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), or a TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, in the absence and presence of selective inhibitors of conventional PKCα and PKCβI/II isozymes (cPKC). Paclitaxel (300nM; 3days and 5days) attenuated both PDBu- and capsaicin-stimulated release in a cPKC-dependent manner. Under basal conditions, there were no changes in the protein expression, phosphorylation or membrane localization of PKC α, βI or βII, however, paclitaxel decreased cPKC activity as indicated by a reduction in the phosphorylation of cPKC substrates. Under stimulatory conditions, paclitaxel attenuated the membrane translocation of phosphorylated PKC α, βI and βII, providing a rationale for the attenuation in PDBu- and capsaicin-stimulated release. Our findings suggest that a decrease in cPKC activity and membrane localization are responsible for the reduction in stimulated peptide release following chronic treatment with paclitaxel in sensory neurons.

  2. Subcutaneous inverse vaccination with PLGA particles loaded with a MOG peptide and IL-10 decreases the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Cappellano, Giuseppe; Woldetsadik, Abiy Demeke; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Shivakumar, Yogesh; Rizzi, Manuela; Carniato, Fabio; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Boggio, Elena; Clemente, Nausicaa; Comi, Cristoforo; Dianzani, Chiara; Boldorini, Renzo; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Renò, Filippo; Dianzani, Umberto

    2014-09-29

    "Inverse vaccination" refers to antigen-specific tolerogenic immunization treatments that are capable of inhibiting autoimmune responses. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), initial trials using purified myelin antigens required repeated injections because of the rapid clearance of the antigens. This problem has been overcome by DNA-based vaccines encoding for myelin autoantigens alone or in combination with "adjuvant" molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-4 or IL-10, that support regulatory immune responses. Phase I and II clinical trials with myelin basic protein (MBP)-based DNA vaccines showed positive results in reducing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-measured lesions and inducing tolerance to myelin antigens in subsets of MS patients. However, DNA vaccination has potential risks that limit its use in humans. An alternative approach could be the use of protein-based inverse vaccines loaded in polymeric biodegradable lactic-glycolic acid (PLGA) nano/microparticles (NP) to obtain the sustained release of antigens and regulatory adjuvants. The aim of this work was to test the effectiveness of PLGA-NP loaded with the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 autoantigen and recombinant (r) IL-10 to inverse vaccinate mice with EAE. In vitro experiments showed that upon encapsulation in PLGA-NP, both MOG35-55 and rIL-10 were released for several weeks into the supernatant. PLGA-NP did not display cytotoxic or proinflammatory activity and were partially endocytosed by phagocytes. In vivo experiments showed that subcutaneous prophylactic and therapeutic inverse vaccination with PLGA-NP loaded with MOG35-55 and rIL-10 significantly ameliorated the course of EAE induced with MOG35-55 in C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, they decreased the histopathologic lesions in the central nervous tissue and the secretion of IL-17 and interferon (IFN)-γ induced by MOG35-55 in splenic T cells in vitro. These data suggest that

  3. Identification and Characterization of Receptor-Specific Peptides for siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-targeted delivery of siRNA remains a major barrier in fully realizing the therapeutic potential of RNA interference. While cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are promising siRNA carrier candidates, they are universal internalizers that lack cell-type specificity. Herein, we design and screen a library of tandem tumor-targeting and cell-penetrating peptides that condense siRNA into stable nanocomplexes for cell type-specific siRNA delivery. Through physiochemical and biological characterization, we identify a subset of the nanocomplex library of that are taken up by cells via endocytosis, trigger endosomal escape and unpacking of the carrier, and ultimately deliver siRNA to the cytosol in a receptor-specific fashion. To better understand the structure–activity relationships that govern receptor-specific siRNA delivery, we employ computational regression analysis and identify a set of key convergent structural properties, namely the valence of the targeting ligand and the charge of the peptide, that help transform ubiquitously internalizing cell-penetrating peptides into cell type-specific siRNA delivery systems. PMID:22909216

  4. Stitched α-helical peptides via bis ring-closing metathesis.

    PubMed

    Hilinski, Gerard J; Kim, Young-Woo; Hong, Jooyeon; Kutchukian, Peter S; Crenshaw, Charisse M; Berkovitch, Shaunna S; Chang, Andrew; Ham, Sihyun; Verdine, Gregory L

    2014-09-03

    Conformationally stabilized α-helical peptides are capable of inhibiting disease-relevant intracellular or extracellular protein-protein interactions in vivo. We have previously reported that the employment of ring-closing metathesis to introduce a single all-hydrocarbon staple along one face of an α-helical peptide greatly increases α-helical content, binding affinity to a target protein, cell penetration through active transport, and resistance to proteolytic degradation. In an effort to improve upon this technology for stabilizing a peptide in a bioactive α-helical conformation, we report the discovery of an efficient and selective bis ring-closing metathesis reaction leading to peptides bearing multiple contiguous staples connected by a central spiro ring junction. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, NMR, and computational analyses have been used to investigate the conformation of these "stitched" peptides, which are shown to exhibit remarkable thermal stabilities. Likewise, trypsin proteolysis assays confirm the achievement of a structural rigidity unmatched by peptides bearing a single staple. Furthermore, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and confocal microscopy assays demonstrate that stitched peptides display superior cell penetrating ability compared to their stapled counterparts, suggesting that this technology may be useful not only in the context of enhancing the drug-like properties of α-helical peptides but also in producing potent agents for the intracellular delivery of proteins and oligonucleotides.

  5. Clickable Cγ-azido(methylene/butylene) peptide nucleic acids and their clicked fluorescent derivatives: synthesis, DNA hybridization properties, and cell penetration studies.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepak R; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2014-07-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and DNA complementation studies of clickable C(γ)-substituted methylene (azm)/butylene (azb) azido PNAs show that these analogues enhance the stability of the derived PNA:DNA duplexes. The fluorescent PNA oligomers synthesized by their click reaction with propyne carboxyfluorescein are seen to accumulate around the nuclear membrane in 3T3 cells.

  6. Characterisation of the membrane affinity of an isoniazide peptide conjugate by tensiometry, atomic force microscopy and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, using a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer model.

    PubMed

    Hill, Katalin; Pénzes, Csanád Botond; Schnöller, Donát; Horváti, Kata; Bosze, Szilvia; Hudecz, Ferenc; Keszthelyi, Tamás; Kiss, Eva

    2010-10-07

    Tensiometry, sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy were employed to assess the cell penetration ability of a peptide conjugate of the antituberculotic agent isoniazide. Isoniazide was conjugated to peptide (91)SEFAYGSFVRTVSLPV(106), a functional T-cell epitope of the immunodominant 16 kDa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. As a simple but versatile model of the cell membrane a phospholipid Langmuir monolayer at the liquid/air interface was used. Changes induced in the structure of the phospholipid monolayer by injection of the peptide conjugate into the subphase were followed by tensiometry and sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy. The drug penetrated lipid films were transferred to a solid support by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique, and their structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Peptide conjugation was found to strongly enhance the cell penetration ability of isoniazide.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2016-01-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24 hours and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24 hour time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. PMID:27473896

  8. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blunt the response of Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) glucose inhibited (GI) neurons to decreased glucose.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lihong; Sheng, Zhenyu; Potian, Joseph; Deak, Adam; Rohowsky-Kochan, Christine; Routh, Vanessa H

    2016-10-01

    A population of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons which co-express Agouti-related peptide (AgRP) in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC) are inhibited at physiological levels of brain glucose and activated when glucose levels decline (e.g. glucose-inhibited or GI neurons). Fasting enhances the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) inhibits the enhanced activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by low glucose following a fast. Mice which express green fluorescent protein (GFP) on their NPY promoter were used to identify NPY/AgRP neurons. Fasting for 24h and LPS injection decreased blood glucose levels. As we have found previously, fasting increased c-fos expression in NPY/AgRP neurons and increased the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. As we predicted, LPS blunted these effects of fasting at the 24h time point. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) blocked the activation of NPY/AgRP-GI neurons by decreased glucose. These data suggest that LPS and TNFα may alter glucose and energy homeostasis, in part, due to changes in the glucose sensitivity of NPY/AgRP neurons. Interestingly, our findings also suggest that NPY/AgRP-GI neurons use a distinct mechanism to sense changes in extracellular glucose as compared to our previous studies of GI neurons in the adjacent ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A common landscape for membrane-active peptides

    PubMed Central

    Last, Nicholas B; Schlamadinger, Diana E; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-01-01

    Three families of membrane-active peptides are commonly found in nature and are classified according to their initial apparent activity. Antimicrobial peptides are ancient components of the innate immune system and typically act by disruption of microbial membranes leading to cell death. Amyloid peptides contribute to the pathology of diverse diseases from Alzheimer's to type II diabetes. Preamyloid states of these peptides can act as toxins by binding to and permeabilizing cellular membranes. Cell-penetrating peptides are natural or engineered short sequences that can spontaneously translocate across a membrane. Despite these differences in classification, many similarities in sequence, structure, and activity suggest that peptides from all three classes act through a small, common set of physical principles. Namely, these peptides alter the Brownian properties of phospholipid bilayers, enhancing the sampling of intrinsic fluctuations that include membrane defects. A complete energy landscape for such systems can be described by the innate membrane properties, differential partition, and the associated kinetics of peptides dividing between surface and defect regions of the bilayer. The goal of this review is to argue that the activities of these membrane-active families of peptides simply represent different facets of what is a shared energy landscape. PMID:23649542

  10. A viral peptide for intracellular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Cantisani, Marco; Della Pepa, Maria Elena; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2012-10-01

    Biological membranes represent a critical hindrance for administering active molecules which are often unable to reach their designated intracellular target sites. In order to overcome this barrier-like behavior not easily circumvented by many pharmacologically-active molecules, synthetic transporters have been exploited to promote cellular uptake. Linking or complexing therapeutic molecules to peptides that can translocate through the cellular membranes could enhance their internal delivery, and consequently, a higher amount of active compound would reach the site of action. Use of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) is one of the most promising strategy to efficiently translocate macromolecules through the plasma membrane, and have attracted a lot of attention. New translocating peptides are continuously described and in the present review, we will focus on viral derived peptides, and in particular a peptide (gH625) derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein H (gH) that has proved to be a useful delivery vehicle due to its intrinsic properties of inducing membrane perturbation.

  11. Inhibition of ovarian cancer cell proliferation by a cell cycle inhibitory peptide fused to a thermally responsive polypeptide carrier

    PubMed Central

    Massodi, Iqbal; Moktan, Shama; Rawat, Aruna; Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2009-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by normal tissue tolerance, resulting in a narrow therapeutic index. To increase drug specificity and efficacy and to reduce toxicity in normal tissues, we have developed a polypeptide carrier for a cell cycle inhibitory peptide, which has the potential to be thermally targeted to the tumor site. The design of this polypeptide is based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP). The coding sequence of ELP was modified by the addition of the cell penetrating peptide Bac-7 at the N-terminus and a 23 amino acid peptide derived from p21 at the C-terminus (Bac-ELP1-p21). Bac-ELP1-p21 is soluble in aqueous solutions below physiological temperature (37°C) but aggregates when the temperature is raised above 39°C, making it a promising thermally responsive therapeutic carrier that may be actively targeted to solid tumors by application of focused hyperthermia. While Bac-ELP1-p21 at 37°C did not have any effect on SKOV-3 cell proliferation, the use of hyperthermia increased the antiproliferative effect of Bac-ELP1-p21 compared with a thermally unresponsive control polypeptide. Bac-ELP1-p21 displayed both a cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution in the SKOV-3 cells, with nuclear-localized polypeptide enriched in the heated cells, as revealed by confocal microscopy. Using Western blotting, we show that Bac-ELP1-p21 caused a decrease in Rb phosphorylation levels in cells treated at 42°C. The polypeptide also induced caspase activation, PARP cleavage, and cell cycle arrest in S-phase and G2/M-phase. These studies indicate that ELP is a promising macromolecular carrier for the delivery of cell cycle inhibitory peptides to solid tumors. PMID:19588502

  12. Recent Developments in Peptide-Based Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D.; Restle, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    Despite the fact that non-viral nucleic acid delivery systems are generally considered to be less efficient than viral vectors, they have gained much interest in recent years due to their superior safety profile compared to their viral counterpart. Among these synthetic vectors are cationic polymers, branched dendrimers, cationic liposomes and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The latter represent an assortment of fairly unrelated sequences essentially characterised by a high content of basic amino acids and a length of 10–30 residues. CPPs are capable of mediating the cellular uptake of hydrophilic macromolecules like peptides and nucleic acids (e.g. siRNAs, aptamers and antisense-oligonucleotides), which are internalised by cells at a very low rate when applied alone. Up to now, numerous sequences have been reported to show cell-penetrating properties and many of them have been used to successfully transport a varie