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Sample records for cells decrease invasion

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase mediates the ability of retinol to decrease colorectal cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Jennifer N Griffin; Park, Eun Young; Brunson, Anna R; Pinali, Daniel; Lane, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that retinol (vitamin A) decreased both colorectal cancer cell invasion and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity through a retinoic acid receptor-independent mechanism. Here, we determined if these phenomena were related by using parental HCT-116 cells that harbor 1 allele of wild-type PI3K and 1 allele of constitutively active (ca) PI3K and 2 mutant HCT-116 cell lines homozygous for caPI3K. In vitro, treatment of parental HCT-116 cells with 10 μM retinol reduced cell invasion whereas treatment of mutant HCT-116 cell lines with retinol did not. Treatment with 10 μM retinol also decreased the activity of matrixmetalloproteinase-9 and increased tissue inhibitor of matrixmetalloproteinase-I levels in parental, but not mutant, HCT-116 cells. Finally, parental or mutant cells were intrasplenically injected into athymic mice consuming diets with or without supplemental vitamin A. As expected, vitamin A supplementation tended (P = 0.18) to reduce the incidence of metastases in mice injected with the parental cell line and consuming the supplemented diet. In contrast, metastatic incidence was not affected (P = 1.00) by vitamin A supplementation in mice injected with mutant cells. These data indicate that the capacity of retinol to inhibit PI3K activity confers its ability to decrease colorectal cancer metastasis.

  2. [Bovine lactoferrin decreases the invasion of Salmonella enterica to HEp-2 cells].

    PubMed

    Barreto Arce, Liz J; Contreras García, Carmen A; Durand Vara, David; Ochoa Woodell, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    To assess the effect of bovine lactoferrin (bLf) on the invasion of Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium to HEp-2 cells. HEp-2 monolayers were infected with 106 colony forming unit (CFU) of bacteria in the absence and presence of 1 and 10 mg/mL of bLf (iron-saturated) and incubated 1.5 hours at 37°C. Two treatments were evaluated: pre- infection (HEp-2 cells were incubated with bLf one hour prior to infection with Salmonella) and post-infection (bLf was added 15 minutes after the infection). Invasiveness of Salmonella was determined throgh quantification of CFU recovered from inside the HEp-2 cells (after treatment with 100 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL of gentamicin and Triton X -100). In the pre-infection treatment, we observed a decrease of 23% of Salmonella invasion when HEp-2 cells were pre incubated with 1 mg/mL of bLf (2.8x105 vs 2.1x105, p=0.04) and 50% when them were pre-incubated with 10 mg/mL of bLf (2.8x105 vs 1.4x105, p=0.04). In post-infection treatment, no changes were observed in the invasiveness of Salmonella. The results indicated that bLf reduces the invasiveness of Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium to HEp-2 cells in the pre-infection treatment.

  3. Decreased miR-320a promotes invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nan; Wang, Cheng; Zhuang, Zehang; Hou, Jinson; Liu, Xiqiang; Wu, Yue; Liu, Haichao; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-10-04

    We aimed to determine the specific miRNA profile of tumor budding cells and investigate the potential role of miR-320a in invasion and metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). We collected tumor budding cells and paired central tumor samples from five TSCC specimens with laser capture microdissection and examined the specimens using a miRNA microarray. The specific miRNA signature of tumor budding cells was identified. We found that miR-320a was dramatically decreased in tumor budding cells. Knockdown of miR-320a significantly enhanced migration and invasion of TSCC cell lines. Suz12 was shown to be a direct target of miR-320a. Similar results were also observed in nude mouse models. Multivariate analysis indicated that miR-320a was an independent prognostic factor. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-320a and high intensity of tumor budding were correlated with poor survival rate, especially in the subgroup with high-intensity tumor budding and low expression of miR-320a. We concluded that decreased expression of miR-320a could promote invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells by targeting Suz12 in TSCC. A combination of tumor budding and miR-320a may serve as an index to identify an aggressive sub-population of TSCC cells with high metastatic potential.

  4. Decreased miR-320a promotes invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zehang; Hou, Jinson; Liu, Xiqiang; Wu, Yue; Liu, Haichao; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the specific miRNA profile of tumor budding cells and investigate the potential role of miR-320a in invasion and metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). We collected tumor budding cells and paired central tumor samples from five TSCC specimens with laser capture microdissection and examined the specimens using a miRNA microarray. The specific miRNA signature of tumor budding cells was identified. We found that miR-320a was dramatically decreased in tumor budding cells. Knockdown of miR-320a significantly enhanced migration and invasion of TSCC cell lines. Suz12 was shown to be a direct target of miR-320a. Similar results were also observed in nude mouse models. Multivariate analysis indicated that miR-320a was an independent prognostic factor. Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-320a and high intensity of tumor budding were correlated with poor survival rate, especially in the subgroup with high-intensity tumor budding and low expression of miR-320a. We concluded that decreased expression of miR-320a could promote invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells by targeting Suz12 in TSCC. A combination of tumor budding and miR-320a may serve as an index to identify an aggressive sub-population of TSCC cells with high metastatic potential. PMID:27582550

  5. Daphnetin inhibits invasion and migration of LM8 murine osteosarcoma cells by decreasing RhoA and Cdc42 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Hiroki; Nakamura, Seikou; Chisaki, Yugo; Takada, Tetsuya; Toda, Yuki; Murata, Hiroaki; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Yano, Yoshitaka; Takata, Kazuyuki; Ashihara, Eishi

    2016-02-26

    Daphnetin, 7,8-dihydroxycoumarin, present in main constituents of Daphne odora var. marginatai, has multiple pharmacological activities including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells. In this study, using a Transwell system, we showed that daphnetin inhibited invasion and migration of highly metastatic murine osteosarcoma LM8 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Following treatment by daphnetin, cells that penetrated the Transwell membrane were rounder than non-treated cells. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that daphnetin decreased the numbers of intracellular stress fibers and filopodia. Moreover, daphnetin treatment dramatically decreased the expression levels of RhoA and Cdc42. In summary, the dihydroxycoumarin derivative daphnetin inhibits the invasion and migration of LM8 cells, and therefore represents a promising agent for use against metastatic cancer. - Highlights: • Daphnetin, a coumarin-derivative, inhibited invasion and migration of LM8 cells. • Stress fibers and filopodia were decreased by daphnetin treatment. • Daphnetin decreased RhoA and Cdc42 protein expression.

  6. Regulation of carcinoma cell invasion by protein C inhibitor whose expression is decreased in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wakita, Toshiaki; Hayashi, Tatsuya; Nishioka, Junji; Tamaru, Hiroshi; Akita, Nobuyuki; Asanuma, Kunihiro; Kamada, Haruhiko; Gabazza, Esteban C; Ido, Masaru; Kawamura, Juichi; Suzuki, Koji

    2004-02-10

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI), a member of the serine protease inhibitor family, is produced in various human tissues, including the liver, kidney and testis. In addition to inhibiting the anticoagulant protein C pathway, PCI also inhibits urinary plasminogen activator (uPA), which is a well-known mediator of tumor cell invasion. In the present study, to clarify the biologic significance of PCI in the kidney, we compared the expression of PCI between human renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tissue and nontumor kidney tissue. The PCI antigen level in RCC tissue was found to be significantly lower than in nontumor kidney tissue, and expression of PCI mRNA was detected in normal renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC), but not in RCC or in an RCC cell line (Caki-1 cells). No differences were detected between the nucleotide sequence of the major cis-elements in the promoter region of the PCI gene from nontumor kidney and RCC tissues, RPTEC and Caki-1 cells, an RPTEC-derived RCC cell line. The in vitro invasiveness of Caki-1 cells transfected with a PCI expression vector was significantly decreased compared to mock-transfected Caki-1 cells, and it was blocked in the presence of anti-PCI antibody. Since PCI itself did not affect the proliferation rate of Caki-1 cells or cell expression of uPA in vitro, the effect of uPA, PCI, heat-inactivated PCI and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 on the invasive potential of cultured RCC cells was evaluated. The in vitro invasiveness of Caki-1 cells, which express uPA, was significantly enhanced by the addition of uPA, and it was inhibited by anti-uPA antibody, PCI and PAI-1, but not by heat-inactivated PCI. In addition, uPA activity was significantly decreased and uPA-PCI complex level was significantly increased in the culture medium of PCI expression vector-transfected Caki-1 cells as compared to mock-transfected Caki-1 cells. These findings strongly suggest that PCI regulates the invasive potential of RCC cells by inhibiting u

  7. Decreased Tumor Progression and Invasion by a Novel Anti-Cell Motility Target for Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Qunyan; Liu, Guangming; Domeier, Phillip P.; Ding, Wei; Mulder, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described a novel modulator of the actin cytoskeleton that also regulates Ras and mitogen-activated protein kinase activities in TGFβ-sensitive epithelial cells. Here we examined the functional role of this signaling regulatory protein (km23-1) in mediating the migration, invasion, and tumor growth of human colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion of km23-1 in human CRC cells inhibited constitutive extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, as well as pro-invasive ERK effector functions that include phosphorylation of Elk-1, constitutive regulation of c-Fos-DNA binding, TGFβ1 promoter transactivation, and TGFβ1 secretion. In addition, knockdown of km23-1 reduced the paracrine effects of CRC cell-secreted factors in conditioned medium and in fibroblast co-cultures. Moreover, km23-1 depletion in human CRC cells reduced cell migration and invasion, as well as expression of the ERK-regulated, metastasis-associated scaffold protein Ezrin. Finally, km23-1 inhibition significantly suppressed tumor formation in vivo. Thus, our results implicate km23-1 as a novel anti-metastasis target for human colon carcinoma cells, capable of decreasing tumor growth and invasion via a mechanism involving suppression of various pro-migratory features of CRC. These include a reduction in ERK signaling, diminished TGFβ1 production, decreased expression of the plasma membrane-cytoskeletal linker Ezrin, as well as attenuation of the paracrine effects of colon carcinoma-secreted factors on fibroblast migration and mitogenesis. As such, km23-1 inhibitors may represent a viable therapeutic strategy for interfering with colon cancer progression and invasion. PMID:23755307

  8. The glutamate release inhibitor Riluzole decreases migration, invasion, and proliferation of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Le, Maithao N; Chan, Joseph L-K; Rosenberg, Stephen A; Nabatian, Adam S; Merrigan, Kim T; Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Goydos, James S

    2010-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) blockade on melanoma anchorage-independent growth and invasion. We performed colony and invasion assays using GRM1-expressing melanoma lines and the GRM1-negative UACC930 line. Using the glutamate-release inhibitor Riluzole or the non-competitive GRM1 antagonist BAY 36-7620 we were able to induce considerable inhibition of colony formation and invasion in GRM1-expressing melanoma lines. Neither pharmacological agent induced significant reduction in colony formation or invasion in the GRM1-negative melanoma line, UACC930. Additionally we assessed the efficacy of these inhibitors to inhibit the growth of fresh melanoma tumor samples cultured on a 74-mum nylon mesh. Both Riluzole and BAY 36-7620 significantly inhibited tumor cell growth into the interstitial spaces of the mesh. When repeated with normal mole samples both inhibitors were much less effective in preventing the outgrowth of cells. These experiments show that a specific antagonist of GRM1 (BAY 36-7620) or an inhibitor of glutamate release (Riluzole) can significantly suppress melanoma migration, invasion and colony formation as well as inhibit the proliferation of fresh melanoma cells. These findings, added to our previous work, strengthen the case that GRM1 is a valid therapeutic target in patients with melanoma.

  9. The Glutamate Release Inhibitor Riluzole Decreases Migration, Invasion and Proliferation of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le, Maithao N.; Chan, Joseph L.-K.; Rosenberg, Stephen A.; Nabatian, Adam S.; Merrigan, Kim T.; Cohen-Solal, Karine A.; Goydos, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of GRM1 blockade on melanoma anchorage independent growth and invasion. We performed colony and invasion assays using GRM1-expressing melanoma lines and the GRM1 negative UACC930 line. Using the glutamate-release inhibitor Riluzole or the noncompetitive GRM1 antagonist BAY36-7620 we were able to induced considerable inhibition of colony formation and invasion in GRM1-expressing melanoma lines. Neither pharmacological agent induced a significant reduction in colony formation or invasion in the GRM1 negative melanoma line, UACC930. Additionally we assessed the efficacy of these inhibitors to inhibit the growth of fresh melanoma tumor samples cultured on a 74μm nylon mesh. Both Riluzole and BAY36-7620 significantly inhibited tumor cell growth into the interstitial spaces of the mesh. When repeated with normal mole samples both inhibitors were much less effective in preventing the outgrowth of cells. These experiments show that a specific antagonist of GRM1 (BAY36-7620) or an inhibitor of glutamate release (Riluzole) can significantly suppress melanoma migration, invasion and colony formation as well as inhibit the proliferation of fresh melanoma cells. These findings added to our previous work, strengthen the case that GRM1 is a valid therapeutic target in patients with melanoma. PMID:20505744

  10. 17β-Estradiol treatment inhibits breast cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MALAT-1 RNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ziyi; Chen, Changjin; Liu, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2 affects not only estrogen-receptor α positive breast cells but also negative ones. • 100 nM E2 treatment affects breast cells proliferation, migration. • 100 nM E2 treatment functions in an estrogen-receptor α-independent way. • E2 treatment decreases MALAT-1 RNA level by post-transcriptional regulation. - Abstract: Breast cancer cells, which express estrogen receptor α (ERα), respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. But breast cancer cells without ERα show no effect on low concentration of estrogen treatment. Proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF10a, MCF7 and MB231 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified the effects of E2 on these breast cell lines, and looked for the difference in the presence and absence of ERα. Specifically, we looked for the changes of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), which is found extensively and highly expressed in several kinds of tumor cells, including breast carcinoma. It was observed that proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells were greatly affected by high concentration E2 treatment and were not affected by low concentration E2 treatment in an ERα independent way. We found that the high concentration E2 treatment largely decreased MALAT-1 RNA level. Interestingly, MALAT-1 decreasing by knocking down showed similar effects on proliferation, migration and invasion. E2 treatment affects breast tumor or non-tumor cells proliferation, migration and invasion in an ERα -independent, but a dose-dependent way by decreasing the MALAT-1 RNA level.

  11. Tumour cell invasion into blood vessels is significantly related to breast cancer subtypes and decreased survival.

    PubMed

    Klingen, Tor A; Chen, Ying; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Knutsvik, Gøril; Collett, Karin; Abrahamsen, Anne L; Aase, Hildegunn; Aas, Hans; Aas, Turid; Wik, Elisabeth; Akslen, Lars A

    2017-04-01

    Vascular invasion in breast cancer is associated with increased risk of recurrence, metastases and death from disease. However, there are few studies discriminating between blood vessel invasion (BVI) and lymphatic vessel involvement (LVI). A population-based series of 282 breast cancers was examined (200 screen-detected and 82 interval patients) with respect to BVI and LVI in addition to basic features and molecular subtypes, using CD31 and D2-40 antibodies. This series is part of the prospective Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. The frequency of LVI and BVI was 25% and 15%, respectively. BVI was associated with HER2-positive and basal-like tumours, and several features of aggressive breast cancer, whereas LVI showed weaker associations. BVI was the strongest factor to predict interval cancer presentation. BVI showed significant associations with recurrence-free survival and disease-specific survival in univariate and multivariate analyses, whereas LVI was not significant. Our findings indicate that BVI by tumour cells is strongly associated with aggressive tumour features including a basal-like phenotype, and BVI was an independent prognostic factor in contrast to what was found for LVI. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Recombinant nematode anticoagulant protein c2 inhibits cell invasion by decreasing uPA expression in NSCLC cells.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yu; Yue, Jun; Mao, Meng; Liu, Qingqing; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Jiyun

    2015-04-01

    Nematode anticoagulant protein c2 (NAPc2) is an 85-residue polypeptide originally isolated from the hematophagous hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum. Several studies have shown that rNAPc2 inhibits the growth of primary and metastatic tumors in mice independently of its ability to initiate coagulation. We obtained bioactive recombinant rNAPc2 by splicing of the rNAPc2-intein-CBD fusion proteins expressed in E. coli ER2566. In the in vitro assay, rNAPc2 obviously inhibited the invasive ability of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rNAPc2 suppressed tumor growth in vivo by daily intraperitoneal injection of rNAPc2 in an NSCLC cell xenograft model of nude mice. Respectively, rNAPc2 downregulated the production of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) (P<0.05) and suppressed nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity. We also identified that inhibition of NF-κB activity impaired cell invasion and reduced the uPA production in NSCLC cells. Meanwhile, NF-κB was found to directly bind to the uPA promoter in vitro. These results demonstrated that rNAPc2 inhibits cell invasion at least in part through the downregulation of the NF-κB-dependent metastasis-related gene expression in NSCLC. Our results also suggest that uPA, a known metastasis-promoting gene, is indirectly regulated by rNAPc2 through NF-κB activation. These results indicate that rNAPc2 may be a potent agent for the prevention of NSCLC progression.

  13. Inhibition of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) expression is associated with decreased tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ramez N.; Ji, Tao; Huynh, Be; Wardeh, Rooba; Randall, Leslie M; Hoang, Bang

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) expression on endometrial cancer cell line behavior. Methods/materials EZH2 expression levels were compared between the non-malignant endometrial cell line T-HESC, and 3 endometrial cancer cell lines, ECC-1, RL95-2 and HEC1-A. Stable EZH2 knockdown cell lines were created and the impact on cellular proliferation, migration and invasion were determined. Fluorescent activated cell sorting was used to examine effects of EZH2 silencing on cell cycle progression. EZH2 expression in endometrial cancer tissue specimens was examined using immunohistochemistry. Comparison of differences between control and shEZH2 cell lines was performed using student's t test and Fischer's exact test. Results EZH2 protein expression was increased in all 3 cancer cell lines, and human endometrial cancer tissue specimens relative to control. RNA interference of EZH2 expression in ECC-1, RL95-2, and HEC1-A significantly decreased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Down regulation of EZH2 expression resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of cells arrested in G2/M. RNA interference of EZH2 expression was associated with an increase in the expression of Wnt pathway inhibitors sFRP1 and DKK3, and a concomitant decrease in β-catenin. EZH2 expression in human tissue samples was significantly associated with increased stage, grade, depth of invasion and nodal metastasis. Conclusions EZH2 expression is associated with tumor cell proliferation, migration and invasion in 3 endometrial cancer cell lines, as well as increased stage, grade, depth of invasion and nodal metastasis in human cancer tissue specimens. Further investigation into this potential therapeutic target is warranted. PMID:23792601

  14. AGE-modified basement membrane cooperates with Endo180 to promote epithelial cell invasiveness and decrease prostate cancer survival.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Breit, Claudia; Zhang, Yu Zhi; Minamidate, Ai; Caley, Matthew P; McCarthy, Afshan; Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T; Gaughan, Luke; Darby, Steven; Robson, Craig; Mauri, Francesco; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Biomechanical strain imposed by age-related thickening of the basal lamina and augmented tissue stiffness in the prostate gland coincides with increased cancer risk. Here we hypothesized that the structural alterations in the basal lamina associated with age can induce mechanotransduction pathways in prostate epithelial cells (PECs) to promote invasiveness and cancer progression. To demonstrate this, we developed a 3D model of PEC acini in which thickening and stiffening of basal lamina matrix was induced by advanced glycation end-product (AGE)-dependent non-enzymatic crosslinking of its major components, collagen IV and laminin. We used this model to demonstrate that antibody targeted blockade of CTLD2, the second of eight C-type lectin-like domains in Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) that can recognize glycosylated collagens, reversed actinomyosin-based contractility [myosin-light chain-2 (MLC2) phosphorylation], loss of cell polarity, loss of cell-cell junctions, luminal infiltration and basal invasion induced by AGE-modified basal lamina matrix in PEC acini. Our in vitro results were concordant with luminal occlusion of acini in the prostate glands of adult Endo180(Δ) (Ex2-6/) (Δ) (Ex2-6) mice, with constitutively exposed CTLD2 and decreased survival of men with early (non-invasive) prostate cancer with high epithelial Endo180 expression and levels of AGE. These findings indicate that AGE-dependent modification of the basal lamina induces invasive behaviour in non-transformed PECs via a molecular mechanism linked to cancer progression. This study provides a rationale for targeting CTLD2 in Endo180 in prostate cancer and other pathologies in which increased basal lamina thickness and tissue stiffness are driving factors. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons

  15. Decrease of miR-622 expression promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma cells by targeting regulation of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Fei; Li, Zhuo-Ri; Cheng, Zhi-Qi; Yin, Xin-Min; Wu, Jin-Shu

    2017-09-26

    To explore the mechanism of miR-622 in regulating the proliferation, migration and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells. Quantitative real-time PCR was conducted to measure the expression of miR-622 and c-Myc in CCA tissues and cell lines. Protein level of c-Myc was measured by Western blot. The effect of miR-622 on cell proliferation, migration and invasion was analyzed by MTT assay and Transwell chamber migration assay. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to measure the effect of miR-622 on c-Myc. miR-622 expression was downregulated in both CCA tissues and cell lines, while c-Myc expression was uregulated. Overexpression of miR-622 in CCA cells was statistically correlated with a decrease of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, while inhibition of miR-622 made an inverse result. We also proved c-Myc was identified as a target gene of miR-622 in CCA. Moreover, we found overexpression of c-Myc can strengthen the effects of miR-622 on the proliferation, migration and invasion of CCA cells. Decrease of miR-622 promotes the proliferation, migration and invasion of CCA cells by directly targeting c-Myc. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Trans-cinnamaldehyde decreases attachment and invasion of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in urinary tract epithelial cells by modulating virulence gene expression.

    PubMed

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Narayanan, Amoolya; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli is the primary bacterium causing urinary tract infection in humans. Attachment and invasion of urinary tract epithelial cells by UPEC is the first critical step in establishing a successful urinary tract infection. We investigated the efficacy of subinhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde to inhibit uropathogenic E. coli attachment and invasion of human uroepithelial cells. We also determined the trans-cinnamaldehyde effect on uropathogenic E. coli genes encoding virulence factors critical for uroepithelial cell bacterial attachment and invasion. Polystyrene 24-well plates seeded with uroepithelial cells were inoculated with uropathogenic E. coli (about 6.0 log cfu) and subinhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde (0, 325, 560 and 750 μM), and incubated for 60 minutes at 37C. Uroepithelial cells were washed and lysed to enumerate adhered uropathogenic E. coli populations. For the invasion assay uroepithelial cells were treated with gentamicin after incubation and lysed to enumerate invaded uropathogenic E. coli. Also, the trans-cinnamaldehyde effect on uropathogenic E. coli genes encoding attachment and invasion associated virulence factors was determined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Trans-cinnamaldehyde significantly decreased uroepithelial cell attachment and invasion by uropathogenic E. coli (p <0.05). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that trans-cinnamaldehyde significantly decreased the expression of major genes involved in uropathogenic E. coli attachment and invasion of host tissue (p <0.05). The down-regulating effect of trans-cinnamaldehyde on these genes potentially translated into decreased ability of uropathogenic E. coli to attach and invade bladder cells. Trans-cinnamaldehyde may potentially be used as a safe, effective antimicrobial to control uropathogenic E. coli infection. Followup studies in animal models are warranted. Copyright © 2011 American

  17. Frzb, a Secreted Wnt Antagonist, Decreases Growth and Invasiveness of Fibrosarcoma Cells Associated with Inhibition of Met Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yi; Xie, Jun; Rubin, Elyssa; Tang, Ya-Xiong; Lin, Fritz; Zi, Xiaolin; Hoang, Bang H.

    2010-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) have a strong propensity for aggressive growth and metastasis. We showed that the secreted Wnt antagonist Frzb exhibited potent antitumor activity against prostate cancer, an epithelial type of malignancy. In this study, we further showed the antitumor efficacy of Frzb in STS, a mesenchymal group of cancer. Frzb transfection of HT1080 ( fibrosarcoma) and SW872 (liposarcoma) cell lines and their conditioned media resulted in a significant reduction in cellular invasion, motility, and colony formation in soft agar compared with vector control–transfected cells. In a xenograft mouse model, Frzb dramatically suppressed tumor growth of HT1080 cells in nude mice. In a tail-vein injection metastatic model, Frzb-transfected HT1080 cells formed fewer and smaller lung nodules than vector control cells. In addition, we identified new mechanisms for Frzb antitumor activities. Frzb reduced c-Met expression and inhibited Met-mediated signaling, associated with up-regulation of epithelial markers (i.e., keratins 8 and 18) and down-regulation of mesenchymal markers (i.e., vimentin, N-cadherin, fibronectin, Slug, and Twist). Similar to Frzb, silencing of c-Met by short hairpin RNA or using a dominant-negative LRP5 receptor also suppressed Met signaling, leading to reduced cellular motility, invasion, and in vivo tumor growth. Given recent studies indicating an important role of c-Met in sarcoma development and progression, our data showed that Frzb expression was significantly inversely correlated with Met expression in both STS cell lines and tissues. These results suggested the usefulness of Frzb in modulating Met signaling as a new treatment strategy for STS. PMID:18451162

  18. Decrease of breast cancer cell invasiveness by sodium phenylacetate (NaPa) is associated with an increased expression of adhesive molecules.

    PubMed

    Vasse, M; Thibout, D; Paysant, J; Legrand, E; Soria, C; Crépin, M

    2001-03-23

    Sodium phenylacetate (NaPa), a non-toxic phenylalanine metabolite, has been shown to induce in vivo and in vitro cytostatic and antiproliferative effects on various cell types. In this work, we analysed the effect of NaPa on the invasiveness of breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras). Using the highly invasive breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, we demonstrated that an 18-hour incubation with NaPa strongly inhibits the cell invasiveness through Matrigel (86% inhibition at 20 mM of NaPa). As cell invasiveness is greatly influenced by the expression of urokinase (u-PA) and its cell surface receptor (u-PAR) as well as the secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), we tested the effect of NaPa on these parameters. An 18-hour incubation with NaPa did not modify u-PA expression, either on MDA-MB-231 or on MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras cell lines, and induced a small u-PA decrease after 3 days of treatment of MDA-MB-321 with NaPa. In contrast, an 18 h incubation of MDA-MB-231 increased the expression of u-PAR and the secretion of MMP-9. As u-PAR is a ligand for vitronectin, a composant of the extracellular matrix, these data could explain the increased adhesion of MDA-MB-231 to vitronectin, while cell adhesivity of MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras was unmodified by NaPa treatment. NaPa induced also an increased expression of both Lymphocyte Function-Associated-1 (LFA-1) and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which was obvious from 18 hour incubation with NaPa for the MDA-MB-231 cells, but was delayed (3 days) for MCF-7 and MCF-7 ras. Only neutralizing antibodies against LFA-1 reversed the decreased invasiveness of NaPa-treated cells. Therefore we can conclude that the strong inhibition of MDA-MB-231 invasiveness is not due to a decrease in proteases involved in cell migration (u-PA and MMP) but could be related both to the modification of cell structure and an increased expression of adhesion molecules such as u-PAR and LFA-1.

  19. Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Alam, Samina; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-02-15

    Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER−) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: • PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. • PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. • PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. • PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

  20. Knockdown of astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) in cervical cancer cells decreases their invasiveness, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiangwen; Wang, Degui; Liu, Huiling; Feng, Ying; Zhu, Tianyuan; Zhang, Lang; Zhu, Bingdong; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    During cancer development, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) facilitates tumor dissemination and metastatic spread, which is characterized by morphologic changes from epithelial cells to fibroblast-like cells, disassembly of intercellular junction, and increased cell motility. Overexpression of astrocyte elevated gene-1(AEG-1) in various cancer cell lines and cancers has been found to be associated with aggressive tumor behavior. We found that AEG-1 expression was elevated in low differentiation cervical cancer specimens from patients. However, little is known about the AEG-1’s precise role in invasion and metastasis. Here we demonstrate that downregulation of AEG-1 by RNAi significantly decreased the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells, suggesting that AEG-1 overexpression may enhance cancer cell motility by inducing EMT. Downregulation of AEG-1 also led to reduced expression of mesenchymal marker vimentin and the transcription factor Snail but upregulation of epithelial marker E-cadherin in HeLa cells. In addition, knockdown of AEG-1 decreased colony forming units and increased sensitivity to cancer drugs in vitro. Taken together, our results suggest that knockdown of AEG-1 could decrease EMT and chemoresistance in cervical cancer cells and attenuate their aggressive behavior. PMID:24675891

  1. Tumour suppressor microRNA-584 directly targets oncogene Rock-1 and decreases invasion ability in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, K; Hirata, H; Shahryari, V; Chen, Y; Zaman, M S; Singh, K; Tabatabai, Z L; Hinoda, Y; Dahiya, R

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to identify new tumour suppressor microRNAs (miRs) in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), carry out functional analysis of their suppressive role and identify their specific target genes. Methods: To explore suppressor miRs in RCC, miR microarray and real-time PCR were performed using HK-2 and A-498 cells. Cell viability, invasion and wound healing assays were carried out for functional analysis after miR transfection. To determine target genes of miR, we used messenger RNA (mRNA) microarray and target scan algorithms to identify target oncogenes. A 3′UTR luciferase assay was also performed. Protein expression of target genes in ccRCC tissues was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and was compared with miR-584 expression in ccRCC tissues. Results: Expression of miR-584 in RCC (A-498 and 769-P) cells was downregulated compared with HK-2 cells. Transfection of miR-584 dramatically decreased cell motility. The ROCK-1 mRNA was inhibited by miR-584 and predicted to be target gene. The miR-584 decreased 3′UTR luciferase activity of ROCK-1 and ROCK-1 protein expression. Low expression of miR-584 in ccRCC tissues was correlated with high expression of ROCK-1 protein. The knockdown of ROCK-1 by siRNA inhibited cell motility. Conclusion: miR-584 is a new tumour suppressor miR in ccRCC and inhibits cell motility through downregulation of ROCK-1. PMID:21119662

  2. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K. N.; Bao, Lingzhi; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Moreover, NTP reduced the activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme. Western blot analysis indicated that NTP exposure effectively decreased phosphorylation level of both ERK1/2 and JNK, but not p38 MAPK. Furthermore, treatment with MAPK signal pathway inhibitors or NTP all exhibited significant depression of HeLa cells migration and MMP-9 expression. The result showed that NTP synergistically suppressed migration and MMP-9 expression in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor and JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings suggested that NTP exposure inhibited the migration and invasion of HeLa cells via down-regulating MMP-9 expression in ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways dependent manner. These findings provide hints to the potential clinical research and therapy of NTP on cervical cancer metastasis.

  3. Isoorientin induces apoptosis, decreases invasiveness, and downregulates VEGF secretion by activating AMPK signaling in pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Tingting; Su, Jiadong; Huang, Chaohao; Yu, Dinglai; Dai, Shengjie; Huang, Xince; Chen, Bicheng; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    Isoorientin (or homoorientin) is a flavone, which is a chemical flavonoid-like compound, and a 6-C-glucoside of luteolin. Isoorientin has been demonstrated to have anti-cancer activities against various tumors, but its effects on pancreatic cancer (PC) have not been studied in detail. In this study, we aim to investigate whether isoorientin has potential anti-PC effects and its underlying mechanism. In PC, isoorientin strongly inhibited the survival of the cells, induced cell apoptosis, and decreased its malignancy by reversing the expression of epithelial–mesenchymal transition and matrix metalloproteinase and decreased vascular endothelial growth factor expression. Meanwhile, we investigated the activity of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway after isoorientin treatment, which was forcefully activated by isoorientin, as expected. In addition, in the PC cells that were transfected with lentivirus to interfere with the expression of the gene PRKAA1, there were no differences in the apoptosis rate and the expression of malignancy biomarkers in the tumors of the isoorientin-treated and untreated groups. Thus, we demonstrated that isoorientin has potential antitumor effects via the AMPK signaling pathway, and isoorientin merits further investigation. PMID:28003763

  4. β-Carotene inhibits neuroblastoma cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo by decreasing level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo-Sun; Lee, Hyun-Ah; Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Yang; Jung, Chang-Hwan; Yoo, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yuri

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most prevalent extracranial solid tumor in childhood and has poor clinical outcome due to its high potential for metastasis. Consequently, an understanding of the mechanisms that modulate cancer cell invasion, migration and metastasis is important for the development of more effective chemotherapeutic agents. While β-carotene is a vitamin A precursor that has been shown to exert antioxidant and anticancer effects, the anti-metastatic effects of β-carotene on neuroblastoma cells remain poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of β-carotene on highly malignant SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of SK-N-BE(2)C cells with β-carotene was found to attenuate the migratory and invasive capabilities of the cells. In addition, the enzymatic activity and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 was suppressed following β-carotene treatment under both normoxia and hypoxia. To induce metastasis, immunodeficient nude mice were injected with SK-N-BE(2)C cells via the tail vein in vivo. The incidence of liver metastasis and mean tumor volume in mice that were administered β-carotene was decreased compared to controls. Furthermore, mRNA levels of MMPs, membrane-type (MT) 2 MMP and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in liver tumor tissues were also lower following β-carotene treatment. Level of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and its downstream targets, vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), were lower both in vitro and in vivo following β-carotene treatment. In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence that β-carotene may represent an effective chemotherapeutic agent by regulating the invasion and metastasis of neuroblastoma via HIF-1α.

  5. Magnetofection based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-mediated low lncRNA HOTAIR expression decreases the proliferation and invasion of glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kan; Liu, Peifeng; Dong, Suyan; Guo, Yanjie; Cui, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaoying; Li, Xuan; Jiang, Lianghan; Liu, Te; Wu, Yuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are a special subpopulation of glioma cells that are key to the sensitivity of tumors to treatments and to the possibility of tumor recurrence. Identifying new strategies that inhibit the growth of GSCs are therefore important for developing novel therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this study, CD133+ human glioma stem cells were isolated and cultured. Magnetic nanoparticles were used to mediate the expression of siRNAs targeting the HOTAIR (si-HOTAIR) sequence in human gliomas. Effect of downregulation of HOTAIR expression on proliferation, invasion and in vivo tumorigenicity of human GSCs and underlying molecular mechanisms were further evaluated. The results of the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that downregulation of HOTAIR expression inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Transwell assays demonstrated that downregulation of HOTAIR expression resulted in a decrease in the invasive capability of GSCs. Moreover, magnetic nanoparticle-mediated low expression of HOTAIR effectively reduced the tumorigenic capacity of glioma stem cells in vivo. In addition, the results of qRT-PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that downregulation of HOTAIR expression significantly increased the expression of PDCD4 in GSCs, in addition to reducing the expression of CCND1 and CDK4. An in-depth mechanistic analysis showed that downregulation of HOTAIR expression reduced the recruitment of downstream molecules, EZH2 and LSD1, thereby activating the expression of PDCD4 at the transcriptional level. In conclusion, downregulation of HOTAIR expression effectively promoted the expression of PDCD4, thereby inhibiting the proliferation, invasion and in vivo tumorigenicity of human GSCs. PMID:27277755

  6. Decrease of miR-622 expression suppresses migration and invasion by targeting regulation of DYRK2 in colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Sun, Jie; Wei, Xilin; Luan, Lan; Zeng, Xiandong; Wang, Cuifang; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background More and more evidence indicates that microRNAs are present and involved in many tumor-related diseases. The function of microRNA-622 (miR-622) in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. Dual specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) has been reported as a tumor suppressor gene in different cancers. The detailed regulation mechanism of DYRK2 in CRC remains unclear. Methods miR-622 and DYRK2 expression levels were detected at tissue and cellular level respectively by using real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemical staining. Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between miR-622 and DYRK2. Transwell assay was applied to measure the effect of miR-622 on migration and invasion of SW1116 and SW480. We used dual luciferase reporter assay to confirm the targeted binding effect of miR-622 and DYRK2 3′-untranslated region (3′UTR). An antisense experiment was executed to further confirm the role miR-622 had played with regard to migration and invasion by targeting regulation of DYRK2 pathway in CRC cells. Results In our research, we found that the expression of miR-622 was elevated in CRC tissues and cell lines compared to that of nonCRC tissues and the normal human colon epithelial cell line NCM460. Correspondingly, the expression of DYRK2 in CRC tissues and cell lines showed a contrary tendency. The different expression level of DYRK2 was closely correlated with clinicopathological characteristics of CRC patients. We demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-622 could inhibit the ability of migration and invasion of CRC cell lines SW1116 and SW480. Also, we confirmed that DYRK2 was negatively regulated by miR-622 via a specific targeted binding site within the 3′UTR. We finally verified that the migration and invasion ability of CRC cells in the conducted DYRK2 3′UTR defect plasmid transfection group were lower compared to miR-622 and cotransfection group

  7. Leptin and insulin up-regulate miR-4443 to suppress NCOA1 and TRAF4, and decrease the invasiveness of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meerson, Ari; Yehuda, Hila

    2016-11-14

    Obesity is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Normal and tumor cells respond to metabolic hormones, such as leptin and insulin. Thus, obesity-associated resistance to these hormones likely leads to changes in gene expression and behavior of tumor cells. However, the mechanisms affected by leptin and insulin signaling in CRC cells remain mostly unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of tumorigenesis-related gene expression in CRC cells by leptin and insulin. To test this hypothesis, miRNA levels in the CRC-derived cell lines HCT-116, HT-29 and DLD-1 were profiled, following leptin and insulin treatment. Candidate miRNAs were validated by RT-qPCR. Predicted miRNA targets with known roles in cancer, were validated by immunoblots and reporter assays in HCT-116 cells. Transfection of HCT-116 cells with candidate miRNA mimic was used to test in vitro effects on proliferation and invasion. Of ~800 miRNAs profiled, miR-4443 was consistently up-regulated by leptin and insulin in HCT-116 and HT-29, but not in DLD-1, which lacked normal leptin receptor expression. Dose response experiments showed that leptin at 100 ng/ml consistently up-regulated miR-4443 in HCT-116 cells, concomitantly with a significant decrease in cell invasion ability. Transfection with miR-4443 mimic decreased invasion and proliferation of HCT-116 cells. Moreover, leptin and miR-4443 transfection significantly down-regulated endogenous NCOA1 and TRAF4, both predicted targets of miR-4443 with known roles in cancer metastasis. miR-4443 was found to directly regulate TRAF4 and NCOA1, as validated by a reporter assay. The up-regulation of miR-4443 by leptin or insulin was attenuated by the inhibition of MEK1/2. Our findings suggest that miR-4443 acts in a tumor-suppressive manner by down-regulating TRAF4 and NCOA1 downstream of MEK-C/EBP-mediated leptin and insulin signaling, and that insulin and/or leptin resistance (e.g. in obesity) may suppress this

  8. Androgen-regulated microRNA-135a decreases prostate cancer cell migration and invasion through downregulating ROCK1 and ROCK2.

    PubMed

    Kroiss, A; Vincent, S; Decaussin-Petrucci, M; Meugnier, E; Viallet, J; Ruffion, A; Chalmel, F; Samarut, J; Allioli, N

    2015-05-28

    Androgen signaling, via the androgen receptor (AR), is crucial in mediating prostate cancer (PCa) initiation and progression. Identifying new downstream effectors of the androgens/AR pathway will allow a better understanding of these mechanisms and could reveal novel biomarkers and/or therapeutic agents to improve the rate of patient survival. We compared the microRNA expression profiles in androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells stimulated or not with 1 nM R1881 by performing a high-throughput reverse transcriptase-quantitative PCR and found that miR-135a was upregulated. After androgen stimulation, we showed that AR directly activates the transcription of miR-135a2 gene by binding to an androgen response element in the promoter region. Our findings identify miR-135a as a novel effector in androgens/AR signaling. Using xenograft experiments in chick embryos and adult male mice, we showed that miR-135a overexpression decreases in vivo invasion abilities of prostate PC-3 cells. Through in vitro wound-healing migration and invasion assays, we demonstrated that this effect is mediated through downregulating ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression, two genes that we characterized as miR-135a direct target genes. In human surgical samples from prostatectomy, we observed that miR-135a expression was lower in tumoral compared with paired adjacent normal tissues, mainly in tumors classified with a high Gleason score (⩾8). Moreover, miR-135a expression is lower in invasive tumors, showing extraprostatic extension, as compared with intraprostatic localized tumors. In tumor relative to normal glands, we also showed a more frequently higher ROCK1 protein expression determined using a semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry analysis. Therefore, in tumor cells, the lower miR-135a expression could lead to a higher ROCK1 protein expression, which could explain their invasion abilities. The highlighted relationship between miR-135a expression level and the degree of disease aggressiveness suggests

  9. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  10. Enterolobium contortisiliquum Trypsin Inhibitor (EcTI), a Plant Proteinase Inhibitor, Decreases in Vitro Cell Adhesion and Invasion by Inhibition of Src Protein-Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Ferreira, Joana Gasperazzo; Maza, Paloma Korehisa; Suzuki, Erika; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion is vital for cancer progression and metastasis. Adhesion, migration, and degradation of the extracellular matrix are important events involved in the establishment of cancer cells at a new site, and therefore molecular targets are sought to inhibit such processes. The effect of a plant proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on the adhesion, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells was the focus of this study. EcTI showed no effect on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells or fibroblasts but inhibited the adhesion, migration, and cell invasion of gastric cancer cells; however, EcTI had no effect upon the adhesion of fibroblasts. EcTI was shown to decrease the expression and disrupt the cellular organization of molecules involved in the formation and maturation of invadopodia, such as integrin β1, cortactin, neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, membrane type 1 metalloprotease, and metalloproteinase-2. Moreover, gastric cancer cells treated with EcTI presented a significant decrease in intracellular phosphorylated Src and focal adhesion kinase, integrin-dependent cell signaling components. Together, these results indicate that EcTI inhibits the invasion of gastric cancer cells through alterations in integrin-dependent cell signaling pathways. PMID:22039045

  11. Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), a plant proteinase inhibitor, decreases in vitro cell adhesion and invasion by inhibition of Src protein-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Ferreira, Joana Gasperazzo; Maza, Paloma Korehisa; Suzuki, Erika; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2012-01-02

    Tumor cell invasion is vital for cancer progression and metastasis. Adhesion, migration, and degradation of the extracellular matrix are important events involved in the establishment of cancer cells at a new site, and therefore molecular targets are sought to inhibit such processes. The effect of a plant proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on the adhesion, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells was the focus of this study. EcTI showed no effect on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells or fibroblasts but inhibited the adhesion, migration, and cell invasion of gastric cancer cells; however, EcTI had no effect upon the adhesion of fibroblasts. EcTI was shown to decrease the expression and disrupt the cellular organization of molecules involved in the formation and maturation of invadopodia, such as integrin β1, cortactin, neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, membrane type 1 metalloprotease, and metalloproteinase-2. Moreover, gastric cancer cells treated with EcTI presented a significant decrease in intracellular phosphorylated Src and focal adhesion kinase, integrin-dependent cell signaling components. Together, these results indicate that EcTI inhibits the invasion of gastric cancer cells through alterations in integrin-dependent cell signaling pathways.

  12. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P. . E-mail: fpchou@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-07-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-{kappa}B, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment.

  13. Decreased Expression of MiRNA-204-5p Contributes to Glioma Progression and Promotes Glioma Cell Growth, Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhiqiang; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit a spectrum of aberrantly aggressive phenotype. Although increasing evidence indicated that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) contributes to tumorigenesis and invasion, little is known about the roles of miR-204-5p in human gliomas. In the present study, the expression of miR-204-5p in clinical glioma tissues was measured by qRT-PCR. The effects of miR-204-5p on glioma cell growth and metastasis were examined by overexpressing or inhibiting miR-204-5p. We found that the expression level of miR-204-5p was significantly reduced in clinical glioma tissues compared with normal brain tissues. Moreover, we revealed that the introduction of miR-204-5p dramatically suppressed glioma cell growth, migration and invasion. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that RAB22A, a member of the RAS oncogene family, is a direct functional target of miR-204-5p in gliomas. In vivo, restoring miR-204-5p expression in glioma cells suppressed tumorigenesis and increased overall host survival. Our findings suggest that miR-204-5p is a cancer suppressor miRNA and overexpression of miR-204-5p is a novel glioma treatment strategy. PMID:26134825

  14. Elevated integrin α6β4 expression is associated with venous invasion and decreased overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Rachel L; West, Dava; Wang, Chi; Weiss, Heidi L; Gal, Tamas; Durbin, Eric B; O'Connor, William; Chen, Min; O'Connor, Kathleen L

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer carries a poor prognosis and is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The integrin α6β4, a laminin receptor, promotes carcinoma progression in part by cooperating with various growth factor receptors to facilitate invasion and metastasis. In carcinoma cells with mutant TP53, the integrin α6β4 promotes cell survival. TP53 mutations and integrin α6β4 overexpression co-occur in many aggressive malignancies. Because of the high frequency of TP53 mutations in lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), we sought to investigate the association of integrin β4 expression with clinicopathologic features and survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We constructed a lung cancer tissue microarray and stained sections for integrin β4 subunit expression using immunohistochemistry. We found that integrin β4 expression is elevated in SCC compared with adenocarcinoma (P<.0001), which was confirmed in external gene expression data sets (P<.0001). We also determined that integrin β4 overexpression associates with the presence of venous invasion (P=.0048) and with reduced overall patient survival (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-2.09; P=.0422). Elevated integrin β4 expression was also shown to associate with reduced overall survival in lung cancer gene expression data sets (hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-1.69; P<.0001). Using cBioPortal, we generated a network map demonstrating the 50 most highly altered genes neighboring ITGB4 in SCC, which included laminins, collagens, CD151, genes in the EGFR and PI3K pathways, and other known signaling partners. In conclusion, we demonstrate that integrin β4 is overexpressed in NSCLC where it is an adverse prognostic marker.

  15. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  16. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Sylvie; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression.

  17. The potential of non-invasive ventilation to decrease BPD.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Vineet

    2013-04-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the most common chronic lung disease in infancy, has serious long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences right up to adulthood, and is associated with significant healthcare costs. BPD is a multifactorial disease, with genetic and environmental factors interacting to culminate in the characteristic clinical and pathological phenotype. Among the environmental factors, invasive endotracheal tube ventilation is considered a critical contributing factor to the pathogenesis of BPD. Since BPD currently has no specific preventive or effective therapy, considerable interest has focused on the use of non-invasive ventilation as a means to potentially decrease the incidence of BPD. This article reviews the progress made in the last 5 years in the use of nasal continuous positive airways pressure (NCPAP) and nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) as it pertains to impacting on BPD rates. Research efforts are summarized, and some guidelines are suggested for clinical use of these techniques in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  19. Decreased expression of ADAMTS-1 in human breast tumors stimulates migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin motifs) is a member of the ADAMTS family of metalloproteases. Here, we investigated mRNA and protein levels of ADAMTS-1 in normal and neoplastic tissues using qPCR, immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analyses, and we addressed the role of ADAMTS-1 in regulating migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast tumor cell lines. Results In a series of primary breast tumors, we observed variable levels of ADAMTS-1 mRNA expression but lower levels of ADAMTS-1 protein expression in human breast cancers as compared to normal tissue, with a striking decrease observed in high-malignancy cases (triple-negative for estrogen, progesterone and Her-2). This result prompted us to analyze the effect of ADAMTS-1 knockdown in breast cancer cells in vitro. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 expression demonstrated increased migration, invasion and invadopodia formation. The regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of ADAMTS-1 may be related to VEGF, a growth factor involved in migration and invasion. MDA-MB-231 cells with depleted ADAMTS-1 showed increased VEGF concentrations in conditioned medium capable of inducing human endothelial cells (HUVEC) tubulogenesis. Furthermore, expression of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR2) was increased in MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to MCF7 cells. To further determine the relationship between ADAMTS-1 and VEGF regulating breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231 cells with reduced expression of ADAMTS-1 were pretreated with a function-blocking antibody against VEGF and then tested in migration and invasion assays; both were partially rescued to control levels. Conclusions ADAMTS-1 expression was decreased in human breast tumors, and ADAMTS-1 knockdown stimulated migration, invasion and invadopodia formation in breast cancer cells in vitro. Therefore, this series of experiments suggests that VEGF is involved in the effects mediated by ADAMTS-1 in breast cancer cells. PMID

  20. Repression of Invasion Genes and Decreased Invasion in a High-Level Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Fàbrega, Anna; du Merle, Laurence; Le Bouguénec, Chantal; Jiménez de Anta, M. Teresa; Vila, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    Background Nalidixic acid resistance among Salmonella Typhimurium clinical isolates has steadily increased, whereas the level of ciprofloxacin resistance remains low. The main objective of this study was to characterize the fluoroquinolone resistance mechanisms acquired in a S. Typhimurium mutant selected with ciprofloxacin from a susceptible isolate and to investigate its invasion ability. Methodology/Principal Findings Three different amino acid substitutions were detected in the quinolone target proteins of the resistant mutant (MIC of ciprofloxacin, 64 µg/ml): D87G and G81C in GyrA, and a novel mutation, E470K, in ParE. A protein analysis revealed an increased expression of AcrAB/TolC and decreased expression of OmpC. Sequencing of the marRAB, soxRS, ramR and acrR operons did not show any mutation and neither did their expression levels in a microarray analysis. A decreased percentage of invasion ability was detected when compared with the susceptible clinical isolate in a gentamicin protection assay. The microarray results revealed a decreased expression of genes which play a role during the invasion process, such as hilA, invF and the flhDC operon. Of note was the impaired growth detected in the resistant strain. A strain with a reverted phenotype (mainly concerning the resistance phenotype) was obtained from the resistant mutant. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, a possible link between fluoroquinolone resistance and decreased cell invasion ability may exist explaining the low prevalence of fluoroquinolone-resistant S. Typhimurium clinical isolates. The impaired growth may appear as a consequence of fluoroquinolone resistance acquisition and down-regulate the expression of the invasion genes. PMID:19946377

  1. Requirements for invasion of epithelial cells by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; Meyer, D H; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1993-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium implicated in human periodontal disease, was recently demonstrated to invade cultured epithelial cells (D. H. Meyer, P. K. Sreenivasan, and P. M. Fives-Taylor, Infect. Immun. 59:2719-2726, 1991). This report characterizes the requirements for invasion of KB cells by A. actinomycetemcomitans. The roles of bacterial and host factors were investigated by using selective agents that influence specific bacterial or host cell functions. Inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis decreased invasion, suggesting the absence of a preformed pool of proteins involved in A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion. Inhibition of bacterial and eukaryotic energy synthesis also decreased invasion, confirming that A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion is an active process. Bacterial adherence to KB cells was indicated by scanning electron microscopy of infected KB cells. Further, the addition of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific serum to the bacterial inoculum reduced invasion substantially, suggesting a role for bacterial attachment in invasion. Many of the adherent bacteria invaded the epithelial cells under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis inhibited invasion by A. actinomycetemcomitans. Like that of many facultatively intracellular bacteria, A. actinomycetemcomitans invasion was not affected by eukaryotic endosomal acidification. These are the first published observations describing the requirements for epithelial cell invasion by a periodontopathogen. They demonstrate that A. actinomycetemcomitans utilizes a mechanism similar to those used by many but not all invasive bacteria to gain entry into eukaryotic cells. Images PMID:8454326

  2. Host cell invasion by medically important fungi.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Donald C; Filler, Scott G

    2014-11-03

    To infect the host and cause disease, many medically important fungi invade normally nonphagocytic host cells, such as endothelial cells and epithelial cells. Host cell invasion is a two-step process consisting of adherence followed by invasion. There are two general mechanisms of host cell invasion, induced endocytosis and active penetration. Furthermore, fungi can traverse epithelial or endothelial cell barriers either by proteolytic degradation of intercellular tight junctions or via a Trojan horse mechanism in which they are transported by leukocytes. Although these mechanisms of host cell invasion have been best studied using Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, it is probable that other invasive fungi also use one or more of these mechanisms to invade host cells. Identification of these invasion mechanisms holds promise to facilitate the development of new approaches to inhibit fungal invasion and thereby prevent disease. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Host Cell Invasion by Medically Important Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Donald C.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    To infect the host and cause disease, many medically important fungi invade normally nonphagocytic host cells, such as endothelial cells and epithelial cells. Host cell invasion is a two-step process consisting of adherence followed by invasion. There are two general mechanisms of host cell invasion, induced endocytosis and active penetration. Furthermore, fungi can traverse epithelial or endothelial cell barriers either by proteolytic degradation of intercellular tight junctions or via a Trojan horse mechanism in which they are transported by leukocytes. Although these mechanisms of host cell invasion have been best studied using Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans, it is probable that other invasive fungi also use one or more of these mechanisms to invade host cells. Identification of these invasion mechanisms holds promise to facilitate the development of new approaches to inhibit fungal invasion and thereby prevent disease. PMID:25367974

  4. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  5. Decreased expression of APAF-1 and increased expression of cathepsin B in invasive pituitary adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Codrici, Elena; Calenic, Bogdan; Popescu, Ionela Daniela; Mihai, Simona; Necula, Laura; Cruceru, Maria Linda; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (APAF-1) and cathepsin B are important functional proteins in apoptosis; the former is involved in the intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway, while the latter is associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Changes in the expression of apoptosome-related proteins could be useful indicators of tumor development since a priori defects in the mitochondrial pathway might facilitate the inception and progression of human neoplasms. Our aim was to evaluate the profiles of APAF-1 and cathepsin B in relation with other molecules involved in apoptosis/proliferation and to correlate them with the aggressive behavior of invasive pituitary adenomas. Materials and methods APAF-1 and cathepsin B were assessed in tissue samples from 30 patients with pituitary adenomas, of which 16 were functional adenomas and 22 were invasive adenomas. Results A positive relationship between high proliferation and invasiveness was observed in invasive pituitary adenomas when compared to their noninvasive counterparts (Ki-67 labeling index – 4.72% versus 1.75%). Decreased expression of APAF-1 was recorded in most of the invasive adenomas with a high proliferation index, while the cathepsin B level was elevated in this group. We have noticed a negative correlation between the low level of APAF-1 and invasiveness (63.63%; P<0.01); at the same time, a positive correlation between cathepsin B expression and invasiveness (59.09%; P<0.01) was found. In all, 81.25% out of the total APAF-1-positive samples were cathepsin B negative (P<0.01); 76.92% out of the total cathepsin B-positive samples were APAF-1-negative (P<0.01). These results were reinforced by an apoptosis protein array examination, which showed inhibition of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in an invasive pituitary adenoma. Conclusion A bidirectional–inverted relationship between APAF-1 and cathepsin B expressions was noticed. One might hypothesize that shifting the balance between

  6. Decreased structural defence of an invasive thistle under warming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Leshak, A; Shea, K

    2012-01-01

    Plant structural defences play a key role in preventing fitness loss due to herbivory. However, how structural defences are affected by potential climate change is rarely examined. We examined how leaf morphological traits that relate to the structural defence of an invasive thistle, Carduus nutans, change in a warmer climate. We manipulated warming using open-top chambers (OTCs) and examined the morphology of leaves at three different positions (the 5th, 10th and 15th leaves, counted from the top of the plant) in two destructive summer censuses. We found that structural defence traits were different under ambient versus warmed conditions. Prickle densities (both the number of prickles per leaf area and the number of prickles per leaf mass) were significantly lower in plants grown in a warmer climate. Our results suggest that plant structural defences may be reduced under warming, and therefore should be considered when examining species' responses to climate change.

  7. Signaling mechanisms that mediate invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, L; Marchiani, S; Muratori, M; Carloni, V; Forti, G; Baldi, E

    2004-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells have a less malignant phenotype characterized by reduced migration and invasion. We investigated whether the presence of the androgen receptor could affect EGFR-mediated signaling by evaluating autotransphosphorylation of the receptor as well as activation of the downstream signaling pathway PI3K/AKT. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated a reduction of EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR in PC3-AR cells. In addition, EGF-stimulated PI3K activity, a key signaling pathway for invasion of these cells, was decreased in PC3-AR cells and further reduced by treatment with R1881, indicating decreased functionality of EGFR. Our results suggest that the expression of androgen receptors by transfection in PC3 cells confers a less malignant phenotype by interfering with EGFR autophosphorylation and signaling leading to invasion in response to EGF. We used the selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the EGFR gefitinib (also known as Iressa or ZD1839) to further investigate the role of EGFR in the invasion and growth of PC cells. We demonstrate that in the androgen-insensitive cell lines PC3 and DU145 this compound was able to decrease in vitro invasion of Matrigel by inhibiting EGFR autotransphosphorylation and subsequent PI3K activation. Gefitinib may be useful in the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer to limit not only the proliferation but also the invasion of these tumors.

  8. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  9. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  10. Astrocytes Directly Influence Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Cossette, Stephanie M.; Rarick, Kevin R.; Gershan, Jill; Dwinell, Michael B.; Harder, David R.; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2013-01-01

    Brain metastasis is a defining component of tumor pathophysiology, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well understood. Current dogma is that tumor cells stimulate and activate astrocytes, and this mutual relationship is critical for tumor cell sustenance in the brain. Here, we provide evidence that primary rat neonatal and adult astrocytes secrete factors that proactively induced human lung and breast tumor cell invasion and metastasis capabilities. Among which, tumor invasion factors namely matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 were partly responsible for the astrocyte media-induced tumor cell invasion. Inhibiting MMPs reduced the ability of tumor cell to migrate and invade in vitro. Further, injection of astrocyte media-conditioned breast cancer cells in mice showed increased invasive activity to the brain and other distant sites. More importantly, blocking the preconditioned tumor cells with broad spectrum MMP inhibitor decreased the invasion and metastasis of the tumor cells, in particular to the brain in vivo. Collectively, our data implicate astrocyte-derived MMP-2 and MMP-9 as critical players that facilitate tumor cell migration and invasion leading to brain metastasis. PMID:24324647

  11. Cell-ECM Interactions in Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuxiu; Lee, Byoungkoo; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The cancer cells obtain their invasion potential not only by genetic mutations, but also by changing their cellular biophysical and biomechanical features and adapting to the surrounding microenvironments. The extracellular matrix, as a crucial component of the tumor microenvironment, provides the mechanical support for the tissue, mediates the cell-microenvironment interactions, and plays a key role in cancer cell invasion. The biomechanics of the extracellular matrix, particularly collagen, have been extensively studied in the biomechanics community. Cell migration has also enjoyed much attention from both the experimental and modeling efforts. However, the detailed mechanistic understanding of tumor cell-ECM interactions, especially during cancer invasion, has been unclear. This chapter reviews the recent advances in the studies of ECM biomechanics, cell migration, and cell-ECM interactions in the context of cancer invasion.

  12. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  13. Cooperative cell invasion: matrix metalloproteinase–mediated incorporation between cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Camilla B.; O’Neill, Geraldine M.

    2016-01-01

    Progression to metastatic disease is a leading cause of cancer death. Tumors are a complex mixture of cell types, both genetically heterogeneous malignant cells and associated nonmalignant cells. Models mimicking this heterogeneous cell environment have revealed that invasive cell populations can induce dissemination by otherwise poorly/noninvasive tumor cells, known as cooperative invasion. Neuroblastoma tumors arise in children and are characterized by mixed cellular populations in vivo, consisting chiefly of neuronal (N)-type and substrate (S)-type cells. The S-type cells have all the hallmarks of invasive leader cell populations and have been coisolated with N-type cells from metastatic bone lesions, but to date their ability to induce cooperative invasion has not been investigated. Therefore, in the present study, we analyzed the invasive behavior of mixed N-type and S-type multicellular spheroids embedded in three-dimensional collagen gels. Our analyses show that S-type cells induce invasion of either single cells or small cell clusters of N-type cells. In contrast to other reports of cooperative invasion in which mixed cultures exhibit a follow-the-leader mechanism, we show coincident emergence of S- and N-type cells from mixed spheroids. Our data suggest mutual effects between the two cell types. Thus, whereas coculture with S-type cells induces N-type invasion, coculture with N-type cells slows S-type invasion. Using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors and cell incorporation assays, we demonstrate that MMP activity is required for S-type cells to insert into layers of N-type cells. Our study therefore highlights an important role for S-type neuroblastoma cells in the invasion process and reveals a new mechanism of cooperative invasion. PMID:27605703

  14. RECK overexpression reduces invasive ability in ameloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qi-xiang; Liang, Yan-can; Xu, Zhi-ying; Chen, Wei-liang; Xie, Hong-liang; Zhang, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Ameloblastoma is a frequent odontogenic neoplasm characterized by local invasiveness and high risk of recurrence. Reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) is a tumor suppressor that inhibits metastasis and angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate effects of RECK overexpression on invasive potential in ameloblastoma cells. Lentiviral vectors containing human RECK gene were created and subsequently stably transfected into immortalized ameloblastoma cell line hTERT(+) -AM. Functional characteristics of hTERT(+) -AM cells with stable RECK overexpression included proliferation, migration, invasion, and regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2, MMP-9 measured by zymography or commercially available assays. The stable and higher expression of RECK mRNA and protein (P < 0.01) was detected in RECK-transfected hTERT(+) -AM cells. RECK overexpression caused a decrease in migration and invasion (P < 0.01) for hTERT(+) -AM cells and a decrease in activity of MMP-2, MMP-9 (P < 0.01). Proliferation was not affected by RECK overexpression (P > 0.05). Overexpression of RECK gene significantly inhibited cell invasive ability of hTERT(+) -AM cells, suggesting RECK may be a new target for ameloblastoma treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Targeting invasive properties of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Arozarena, Imanol; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is a skin cancer notorious for its metastatic potential. As an initial step of the metastatic cascade, melanoma cells part from the primary tumour and invade the surrounding tissue, which is crucial for their dissemination and the formation of distant secondary tumours. Over the last two decades, our understanding of both, general and melanoma specific mechanisms of invasion has significantly improved, but to date no efficient therapeutic strategy tackling the invasive properties of melanoma cells has reached the clinic. In this review, we assess the major contributions towards the understanding of the molecular biology of melanoma cell invasion with a focus on melanoma specific traits. These traits are based on the neural crest origin of melanoma cells and explain their intrinsic invasive nature. A particular emphasis is given not only to lineage specific signalling mediated by TGFβ, and noncanonical and canonical WNT signalling, but also to the role of PDE5A and RHO-GTPases in modulating modes of melanoma cell invasion. We discuss existing caveats in the current understanding of the metastatic properties of melanoma cells, as well as the relevance of the 'phenotype switch' model and 'co-operativity' between different phenotypes in heterogeneous tumours. At the centre of these phenotypes is the lineage commitment factor microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, one of the most crucial regulators of the balance between de-differentiation (neural crest specific gene expression) and differentiation (melanocyte specific gene expression) that defines invasive and noninvasive melanoma cell phenotypes. Finally, we provide insight into the current evidence linking resistance to targeted therapies to invasive properties of melanoma cells. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  16. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  17. Metformin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed

    Trinh, Son Xuan; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Bich; Saimuang, Kween; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Chan On, Waraporn

    2017-02-01

    Background: Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic agent that has been widely prescribed for treatment of type II diabetes. Anti-cancer properties of metformin have been revealed for numerous human malignancies including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) with anti-proliferative effects in vitro. However, effects on CCA cell migration and invasion have not been fully investigated. The present study aimed to explore the inhibitory effects of metformin on motility, migration and invasion of the CCA cell line HuCCT1, and examine molecular mechanisms underlying metformin effects. Methods: HuCCT1 cells were exposed to increasing doses of metformin. Viability and growth of HuCCT1 cells were assessed by MTS and colony formation assays, respectively. Motility, migration and invasion of metformin-treated HuCCT1 cells were determined in vitro using wound healing, transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays. Expression of signaling molecules and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers was assessed by Western blotting. Results: It was observed that metformin significantly decreased HuCCT1 cell viability and colony formation. The agent also markedly reduced wound closure, migration and invasion of HuCCT1 cells. Furthermore, metformin exposure resulted in decreased STAT3 activation and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. In addition, it upregulated the expression of E-cadherin, while downregulating that of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-2. Conclusion: These results demonstrated inhibitory effects of metformin on CCA cell migration and invasion, possibly involving the STAT3 pathway and reversal of EMT markers expression. They further suggest that metformin may be useful for CCA management.

  18. Tumor invasion as dysregulated cell motility.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J; Lauffenburger, D A; Turner, T; Wells, A

    2001-04-01

    Investigations across a range of disciplines over the past decade have brought the study of cell motility and its role in invasion to an exciting threshold. The biophysical forces proximally involved in generating cell locomotion, as well as the underlying signaling and genomic regulatory processes, are gradually becoming elucidated. We now appreciate the intricacies of the many cellular and extracellular events that modulate cell migration. This has enabled the demonstration of a causal role of cell motility in tumor progression, with various points of 'dysregulation' of motility being responsible for promoting invasion. In this paper, we describe key fundamental principles governing cell motility and branch out to describe the essence of the data that describe these principles. It has become evident that many proposed models may indeed be converging into a tightly-woven tapestry of coordinated events which employ various growth factors and their receptors, adhesion receptors (integrins), downstream molecules, cytoskeletal components, and altered genomic regulation to accomplish cell motility. Tumor invasion occurs in response to dysregulation of many of these modulatory points; specific examples include increased signaling from the EGF receptor and through PLC gamma, altered localization and expression of integrins, changes in actin modifying proteins and increased transcription from specific promoter sites. This diversity of alterations all leading to tumor invasion point to the difficulty of correcting causal events leading to tumor invasion and rather suggest that the underlying common processes required for motility be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Cancer stem cell contribution to glioblastoma invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal brain tumor in adults. Its invasive nature currently represents the most challenging hurdle to surgical resection. The mechanism adopted by GBM cells to carry out their invasive strategy is an intricate program that recalls what takes place in embryonic cells during development and in carcinoma cells during metastasis formation, the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. GBM cells undergo a series of molecular and conformational changes shifting the tumor toward mesenchymal traits, including extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal re-patterning, and stem-like trait acquisition. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the whole infiltrative process represents the first step toward successful treatment of this pathology. Here, we review recent findings demonstrating the invasive nature of GBM cancer stem cells, together with novel candidate molecules associated with both cancer stem cell biology and GBM invasion, like doublecortin and microRNAs. These findings may affect the design of effective therapies currently not considered for GBM invasive progression. PMID:23510696

  20. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  1. Natural Variant of Collagen-Like Protein A in Serotype M3 Group A Streptococcus Increases Adherence and Decreases Invasive Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jewell, Brittany E.; Versalovic, Erika M.; Olsen, Randall J.; Bachert, Beth A.; Lukomski, Slawomir; Musser, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) predominantly exists as a colonizer of the human oropharynx that occasionally breaches epithelial barriers to cause invasive diseases. Despite the frequency of GAS carriage, few investigations into the contributory molecular mechanisms exist. To this end, we identified a naturally occurring polymorphism in the gene encoding the streptococcal collagen-like protein A (SclA) in GAS carrier strains. All previously sequenced invasive serotype M3 GAS possess a premature stop codon in the sclA gene truncating the protein. The carrier polymorphism is predicted to restore SclA function and was infrequently identified by targeted DNA sequencing in invasive strains of the same serotype. We demonstrate that a strain with the carrier sclA allele expressed a full-length SclA protein, while the strain with the invasive sclA allele expressed a truncated variant. An isoallelic mutant invasive strain with the carrier sclA allele exhibited decreased virulence in a mouse model of invasive disease and decreased multiplication in human blood. Further, the isoallelic invasive strain with the carrier sclA allele persisted in the mouse nasopharynx and had increased adherence to cultured epithelial cells. Repair of the premature stop codon in the invasive sclA allele restored the ability to bind the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and cellular fibronectin. These data demonstrate that a mutation in GAS carrier strains increases adherence and decreases virulence and suggest selection against increased adherence in GAS invasive isolates. PMID:25561712

  2. Downregulation of FOXP2 promoter human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Huiling; Zhang, Tingting; Xu, Pan; Zhang, Shusen; Huang, Wei; Yang, Linlin; Gu, Xingxing; Ni, Runzhou; Zhang, Tianyi

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health concern with a high morbidity and mortality rate worldwide. However, the mechanism underlying hepatocarcinogenesis remains unclear. Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) has been implicated in various human cancer types. However, the role of FOXP2 in HCC remains unknown. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the expression of FOXP2 protein in HCC and adjacent normal tissues in 50 patients. Wound healing and transwell assays were used to determine the cell invasion ability. We showed that the level of FOXP2 was significantly reduced in HCC compared with the adjacent non-tumorous tissue. There was statistical significance between the expression of FOXP2 and vein invasion (P = 0.017), number of tumor nodes (P = 0.028), and AFP (P = 0.033). Low expression of FOXP2 correlated with poor survival. Moreover, wound healing and transwell assays showed that FOXP2 could decrease cell invasion and affect the expression of vimentin and E-cadherin. Our results suggested that FOXP2 expression was downregulated in HCC tumor tissues, and reduced FOXP2 expression was associated with poor overall survival. In addition, downregulation of FOXP2 significantly enhanced cell invasiveness. These findings uncover that FOXP2 might be a new prognostic factor and be closely correlated with HCC cell invasion.

  3. Decreased non-specific adhesivity, receptor targeted (DART) nanoparticles exhibit improved dispersion, cellular uptake, and tumor retention in invasive gliomas.

    PubMed

    Wadajkar, Aniket S; Dancy, Jimena G; Roberts, Nathan B; Connolly, Nina P; Strickland, Dudley K; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J

    2017-09-05

    The most common and deadly form of primary brain cancer, glioblastoma (GBM), is characterized by significant intratumoral heterogeneity, microvascular proliferation, immune system suppression, and brain tissue invasion. Delivering effective and sustained treatments to the invasive GBM cells intermixed with functioning neural elements is a major goal of advanced therapeutic systems for brain cancer. Previously, we investigated the nanoparticle characteristics that enable targeting of invasive GBM cells. This revealed the importance of minimizing non-specific binding within the relatively adhesive, 'sticky' microenvironment of the brain and brain tumors in particular. We refer to such nanoformulations with decreased non-specific adhesivity and receptor targeting as 'DART' therapeutics. In this work, we applied this information toward the design and characterization of biodegradable nanocarriers, and in vivo testing in orthotopic experimental gliomas. We formulated particulate nanocarriers using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PLGA-polyethylene glycol (PLGA-PEG) polymers to generate sub-100nm nanoparticles with minimal binding to extracellular brain components and strong binding to the Fn14 receptor - an upregulated, conserved component in invasive GBM. Multiple particle tracking in brain tissue slices and in vivo testing in orthotopic murine malignant glioma revealed preserved nanoparticle diffusivity and increased uptake in brain tumor cells. These combined characteristics also resulted in longer retention of the DART nanoparticles within the orthotopic tumors compared to non-targeted versions. Taken together, these results and nanoparticle design considerations offer promising new methods to optimize therapeutic nanocarriers for improving drug delivery and treatment for invasive brain tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Decreased expression of SERPINB1 correlates with tumor invasion and poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaopeng; Liu, Yanhua; Wan, Chunhua; Lu, Cuihua; Cai, Jing; He, Song; Ni, Tingting; Zhu, Junya; Wei, Lixian; Zhang, Yixin; Qian, Haixin

    2014-02-01

    SERPINB1 (serine protease inhibitor, clade B, member1) is a member of the SERPINB family. Recent studies suggested that SERPINB1 may suppress the migration and invasion of lung and breast cancers. In this study, we investigated a possible involvement of SERPINB1 in the regulation of hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis (HCC). The expression of SERPINB1 was evaluated using western blot analysis in 8 paired fresh HCC specimens and immunohistochemistrical assay on 67 paraffin-embedded HCC slices. SERPINB1 was downregulated in HCC specimens and correlatively related with two clinicopathologic features of HCC, metastasis (P = 0.000) and vein invasion (P = 0.006). Univariate and multivariate survival analyses showed a lower level of SERPINB1 expression is associated with poor prognosis and clinical outcome (P = 0.001). In addition, small interfering RNA targeting SERPINB1 was used to knock down the expression of SERPINB1 in Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells. We showed that interference of SERPINB1 promoted migration and invasion of HCC cells, while cell proliferation was not affected. Finally, we observed an apparent increase in the level of active matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) after SERPINB1 knockdown, implying that SERPINB1 might participate in the regulation of HCC metastasis through modulating the activation of matrix metalloproteinases. Overall, our results suggested an inhibitory role of SERPINB1 in the migration and invasion of HCC, implying that SERPINB1 might be a potential prognostic indicator of HCC metastasis.

  5. Claudin-6 enhances cell invasiveness through claudin-1 in AGS human adenocarcinoma gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Torres-Martínez, A C; Gallardo-Vera, J F; Lara-Holguin, A N; Montaño, L F; Rendón-Huerta, E P

    2017-01-01

    Claudins participate in tissue barrier function. The loss of this barrier is associated to metalloproteases-related extracellular matrix and basal membranes degradation. Claudin-1 is a pro-MMP-2 activator and claudin-6 transfected AGS (AGS-Cld6) cells are highly invasive. Our aim was to determine if claudin-6 was direct or indirectly associated with MMP-2 activation and cell invasiveness. Cytofluorometry, cell fractioning, immunoprecipitation, gelatin-zymography, cell migration and invasiveness assays were performed, claudin-2, -6, -7 and -9 transfected AGS cells, anti-MMP-2, -9 and -14, anti-claudins specific antibodies and claudin-1 small interfering RNA were used. The results showed a significant (p<0.001) overexpression of claudin-1 in AGS-Cld6 cell membranes. A strong MMP-2 activity was identified in culture supernatants of AGS-Cld6. Claudin-1 co-localized with MMP-2 and MMP-14; interestingly a significant increase in cell membrane and cytosol MMP-14 expression was detected in AGS-Cld6 cells (p<0.05). Silencing of claudin-1 in AGS-Cld6 cells showed a 60% MMP-2 activity decrease in culture supernatants and a significant decrease (p<0.05) in cell migration and invasiveness. Our results suggest that claudin-6 induces MMP-2 activation through claudin-1 membrane expression, which in turn promotes cell migration and invasiveness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Small Molecule Inhibitors Limit Endothelial Cell Invasion by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Diana; Fullenkamp, Christopher R.; Pelly, Rachel R.; Reed, Katie M.; Caffo, Lindy M.; Zahrt, Ashley N.; Newman, Micaleah; Komanapalli, Sarah; Niemeier, Evan M.; Bishop, Derron L.; Bruns, Heather A.; Haynes, Mark K.; Sklar, Larry A.; Sammelson, Robert E.; McDowell, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading causative agent in sepsis, endocarditis, and pneumonia. An emerging concept is that prognosis worsens when the infecting S. aureus strain has the capacity to not only colonize tissue as an extracellular pathogen, but to invade host cells and establish intracellular bacterial populations. In previous work, we identified host CDC42 as a central regulator of endothelial cell invasion by S. aureus. In the current work, we report that ML 141, a first-in-class CDC42 inhibitor, decreases invasion and resultant pathogenesis in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Inhibition was found to be due in part to decreased remodeling of actin that potentially drives endocytic uptake of bacteria/fibronectin/integrin complexes. ML 141 decreased binding to fibronectin at these complexes, thereby limiting a key pathogenic mechanism used by S. aureus to invade. Structural analogs of ML 141 were synthesized (designated as the RSM series) and a subset identified that inhibit invasion through non-cytotoxic and non-bactericidal mechanisms. Our results support the development of adjunctive therapeutics targeting host CDC42 for mitigating invasive infection at the level of the host. PMID:25213310

  7. Chick Heart Invasion Assay for Testing the Invasiveness of Cancer Cells and the Activity of Potentially Anti-invasive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Marc E; Roman, Bart I; Stevens, Christian V; Mus, Liselot M; Parmar, Virinder S; De Wever, Olivier; Mareel, Marc M

    2015-06-06

    The goal of the chick heart assay is to offer a relevant organ culture method to study tumor invasion in three dimensions. The assay can distinguish between invasive and non-invasive cells, and enables study of the effects of test compounds on tumor invasion. Cancer cells - either as aggregates or single cells - are confronted with fragments of embryonic chick heart. After organ culture in suspension for a few days or weeks the confronting cultures are fixed and embedded in paraffin for histological analysis. The three-dimensional interaction between the cancer cells and the normal tissue is then reconstructed from serial sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin or after immunohistochemical staining for epitopes in the heart tissue or the confronting cancer cells. The assay is consistent with the recent concept that cancer invasion is the result of molecular interactions between the cancer cells and their neighbouring stromal host elements (myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, extracellular matrix components, etc.). Here, this stromal environment is offered to the cancer cells as a living tissue fragment. Supporting aspects to the relevance of the assay are multiple. Invasion in the assay is in accordance with the criteria of cancer invasion: progressive occupation and replacement in time and space of the host tissue, and invasiveness and non-invasiveness in vivo of the confronting cells generally correlates with the outcome of the assay. Furthermore, the invasion pattern of cells in vivo, as defined by pathologists, is reflected in the histological images in the assay. Quantitative structure-activity relation (QSAR) analysis of the results obtained with numerous potentially anti-invasive organic congener compounds allowed the study of structure-activity relations for flavonoids and chalcones, and known anti-metastatic drugs used in the clinic (e.g., microtubule inhibitors) inhibit invasion in the assay as well. However, the assay does not take into account

  8. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi apparatus regulates cell-cell adhesion and invasive cell migration in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Emi; Itoh, Toshiki; Hasegawa, Junya; Ijuin, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Yukiko; Irino, Yasuhiro; Fukumoto, Miki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2014-06-01

    Downregulation of cell-cell adhesion and upregulation of cell migration play critical roles in the conversion of benign tumors to aggressive invasive cancers. In this study, we show that changes in cell-cell adhesion and cancer cell migration/invasion capacity depend on the level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] in the Golgi apparatus in breast cancer cells. Attenuating SAC1, a PI(4)P phosphatase localized in the Golgi apparatus, resulted in decreased cell-cell adhesion and increased cell migration in weakly invasive cells. In contrast, silencing phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIβ, which generates PI(4)P in the Golgi apparatus, increased cell-cell adhesion and decreased invasion in highly invasive cells. Furthermore, a PI(4)P effector, Golgi phosphoprotein 3, was found to be involved in the generation of these phenotypes in a manner that depends on its PI(4)P-binding ability. Our results provide a new model for breast cancer cell progression in which progression is controlled by PI(4)P levels in the Golgi apparatus.

  9. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Daniel M.; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Simon, M. Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm3) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1–6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  10. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness. PMID:26872368

  11. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-03

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  12. Amphiregulin exosomes increase cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, James N; Demory Beckler, Michelle; Gephart, Jonathan D; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Bogatcheva, Galina; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Piston, David W; Ayers, Gregory D; McConnell, Russell E; Tyska, Matthew J; Coffey, Robert J

    2011-05-10

    Autocrine, paracrine, and juxtacrine are recognized modes of action for mammalian EGFR ligands including EGF, TGF-α (TGFα), amphiregulin (AREG), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), betacellulin, epiregulin, and epigen. We identify a new mode of EGFR ligand signaling via exosomes. Human breast and colorectal cancer cells release exosomes containing full-length, signaling-competent EGFR ligands. Exosomes isolated from MDCK cells expressing individual full-length EGFR ligands displayed differential activities; AREG exosomes increased invasiveness of recipient breast cancer cells 4-fold over TGFα or HB-EGF exosomes and 5-fold over equivalent amounts of recombinant AREG. Exosomal AREG displayed significantly greater membrane stability than TGFα or HB-EGF. An average of 24 AREG molecules are packaged within an individual exosome, and AREG exosomes are rapidly internalized by recipient cells. Whether the composition and behavior of exosomes differ between nontransformed and transformed cells is unknown. Exosomes from DLD-1 colon cancer cells with a mutant KRAS allele exhibited both higher AREG levels and greater invasive potential than exosomes from isogenically matched, nontransformed cells in which mutant KRAS was eliminated by homologous recombination. We speculate that EGFR ligand signaling via exosomes might contribute to diverse cancer phenomena such as field effect and priming of the metastatic niche. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  14. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  15. Schwann Cells Increase Prostate and Pancreatic Tumor Cell Invasion Using Laminin Binding A6 Integrin.

    PubMed

    Sroka, Isis C; Chopra, Harsharon; Das, Lipsa; Gard, Jaime M C; Nagle, Raymond B; Cress, Anne E

    2016-02-01

    Human pancreatic and prostate cancers metastasize along nerve axons during perineural invasion. The extracellular matrix laminin class of proteins is an abundant component of both myelinated and non-myelinated nerves. Analysis of human pancreatic and prostate tissue revealed both perineural and endoneural invasion with Schwann cells surrounded or disrupted by tumor, respectively. Tumor and nerve cell co-culture conditions were used to determine if myelinating or non-myelinating Schwann cell (S16 and S16Y, respectively) phenotype was equally likely to promote integrin-dependent cancer cell invasion and migration on laminin. Conditioned medium from S16 cells increased tumor cell (DU145, PC3, and CFPAC1) invasion into laminin approximately 1.3-2.0 fold compared to fetal bovine serum (FBS) treated cells. Integrin function (e.g., ITGA6p formation) increased up to 1.5 fold in prostate (DU145, PC3, RWPE-1) and pancreatic (CFPAC1) cells, and invasion was dependent on ITGA6p formation and ITGB1 as determined by function-blocking antibodies. In contrast, conditioned medium isolated from S16Y cells (non-myelinating phenotype) decreased constitutive levels of ITGA6p in the tumor cells by 50% compared to untreated cells and decreased ITGA6p formation 3.0 fold compared to S16 treated cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis revealed loss of ITGA6p formation as reversible and independent of overall loss of ITGA6 expression. These results suggest that the myelinating phenotype of Schwann cells within the tumor microenvironment increased integrin-dependent tumor invasion on laminin. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Role of the L-amino acid transporter-1 (LAT-1) in mouse trophoblast cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chrostowski, M K; McGonnigal, B G; Stabila, J P; Padbury, J F

    2010-06-01

    LAT-1 (L-type amino acid transporter 1) is a system L, Na(+)-independent amino acid transporter responsible for transport of large neutral amino acids. Dysregulated expression of LAT-1 is characteristic of many primary human cancers and it's over expression is related to tumor invasion. LAT-1 is highly expressed in the trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) at the time of implantation. Since trophoblast giant cells are highly invasive during the process of endometrial implantation and placentation, LAT-1 may play a role in the invasive phenotype. Our objectives were to identify the effects of increased and decreased LAT-1 expression on mouse trophoblast invasion. We therefore examined the role of amino acid deprivation, pharmacologic blockade specific to leucine transport and gene silencing (siRNA) on LAT-1 expression and trophoblast cell invasion. We utilized mouse primary trophoblast stem (TS) cells. LAT-1 mRNA expression was quantified by real time qPCR, protein by Western blotting and cell invasion was measured in Transwell plates through Matrigel. Amino acid transport using uptake of tritiated leucine. Under limited leucine availability and/or pharmacologic blockage, LAT-1 gene expression was significantly increased, p<0.05. This was associated with a 3-fold increase in cell invasion, p<0.05. In contrast, following siRNA-mediated gene silencing decreased LAT-1 expression (both mRNA and protein) was associated with decreased cell invasion and decreased leucine uptake, p<0.05. Upregulation of LAT-1 gene expression via limited amino acid availability or following pharmacologic blockade of transport leads to an increase in mouse trophoblast stem cell invasiveness. Downregulation of LAT-1 expression via genetic silencing leads to inhibition of invasiveness. These results demonstrate that LAT-1 plays an important role in trophoblast invasion.

  17. Role of the L- amino acid transporter-1 (LAT-1) in Mouse Trophoblast Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Chrostowski, Magdalena K.; McGonnigal, Bethany G.; Stabila, Joan P.; Padbury, James F.

    2010-01-01

    LAT-1 (L-type amino acid transporter 1) is a system L, Na+-independent amino acid transporter responsible for transport of large neutral amino acids. Dysregulated expression of LAT-1 is characteristic of many primary human cancers and it’s over expression is related to tumor invasion. LAT-1 is highly expressed in the trophoblast giant cells (TGCs) at the time of implantation. Since trophoblast giant cells are highly invasive during the process of endometrial implantation and placentation, LAT-1 may play a role in the invasive phenotype. Our objectives were to identify the effects of increased and decreased LAT-1 expression on mouse trophoblast invasion. We therefore examined the role of amino acid deprivation, pharmacologic blockade specific to leucine transport and gene silencing (siRNA) on LAT-1 expression and trophoblast cell invasion. We utilized mouse primary trophoblast stem (TS) cells. LAT-1 mRNA expression was quantified by real-time qPCR, protein by Western blotting and cell invasion was measured in Transwell plates through Matrigel. Amino acid transport using uptake of tritiated leucine. Under limited leucine availability and/or pharmacologic blockage, LAT-1 gene expression was significantly increased, p<0.05. This was associated with a 3-fold increase in cell invasion, p<0.05. In contrast, following siRNA-mediated gene silencing decreased LAT-1 expression (both mRNA and protein) was associated with decreased cell invasion and decreased leucine uptake, p<0.05. Upregulation of LAT-1 gene expression via limited amino acid availability or following pharmacologic blockade of transport leads to an increase in mouse trophoblast stem cell invasiveness. Downregulation of LAT-1 expression via genetic silencing leads to inhibition of invasiveness. These results demonstrate that LAT-1 plays an important role in trophoblast invasion. PMID:20421131

  18. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  19. Fucoidan reduced the invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells and modified their effects to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junda; Wang, Ketao; Wang, Huayang; Shao, Qianqian; Luan, Yijun; Xu, Yan; Song, Xiaobin; Tan, Wanye; Liu, Shaohua; Wei, Fengcai; Qu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    Fucoidan is a complex of polysaccharides showing antitumor and immunomodulation properties. Our previous studies found its regulation to myeloid immune cells, including macrophages. Aberrant infiltration and functions of macrophages are commonly found in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In this study, we analyzed the effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells, and their regulation to macrophages, trying to evaluate its role as a potential therapy for OSCC. CAL27 and THP-1-derived macrophages were used as models for OSCC cells and tumor-infiltrated macrophages in the in vitro study, respectively. The effects of fucoidan on invasion of OSCC cells and their recruitment to macrophages were analyzed by transwell assay. KIF4A siRNA transfection was performed to investigate its role in fucoidan-modulated OSCC cells invasion. CCL3-neutralizing antibody was added into the conditioned medium of OSCC cells to evaluate its role in fucoidan-mediated macrophages recruitment and re-education. Fucoidan reduced the invasive potential of CAL27 cells with a decrease of MMP-2 and KIF4A transcription. KIF4A knockdown in CAL27 cells led to decreased invasion and MMP-2 expression. The conditioned medium of fucoidan-treated CAL27 cells promoted recruitment and inflammatory cytokines secretion on THP-1-derived macrophages. Further analysis found that fucoidan increased CCL3 production in CAL27 cells. Blocking CCL3 expression reversed the effects of fucoidan on macrophage recruitment and re-education. Our study found that fucoidan regulated the invasion of OSCC cells and also their recruiting and re-educating effects on macrophages, suggesting it could be a complementary approach in the treatment of OSCC.

  20. Quercetin Inhibits Cell Migration and Invasion in Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Haifeng; Hong, Wei; Fan, Pan; Qian, Dongyang; Zhu, Jianwei; Bai, Bo

    2017-09-21

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor associated with high mortality; however, no effective therapies for the disease have been developed. Several studies have focused on elucidating the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma and have aimed to develop novel therapies for the disease. Quercetin is a vital dietary flavonoid that has been shown to have a variety of anticancer effects, as it induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation and is involved in cell adhesion, metastasis and angiogenesis. Herein, we aimed to investigate the effects of quercetin on osteosarcoma migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on osteosarcoma migration and invasion. Cell viability, cell cycle activity and cell apoptosis were measured using CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, and cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The mRNA and protein expression levels of several proteins of interest were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR and western blotting, respectively. Moreover, a nude mouse model of human osteosarcoma lung metastasis was established to assess the anti-metastatic effects of quercetin in vivo. We noted no significant differences in cell cycle activity and apoptosis between HOS and MG63 cells and control cells. Treatment with quercetin significantly attenuated cell migration and invasion in HOS and MG63 cells compared with treatment with control medium. Moreover HIF-1α, VEGF, MMP2, and MMP9 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly downregulated in HOS cells treated with quercetin compared with HOS cells treated with controls. Additionally, treatment with quercetin attenuated metastatic lung tumor formation and growth in the nude mouse model of osteosarcoma compared with treatment with controls. Our findings regarding the inhibitory effects of quercetin on cell migration and invasion suggest that quercetin may have potential as a therapy for human

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 contribution to sarcoma cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, Nandor; Garamszegi, Susanna P; Scully, Sean P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) activity has been linked to numerous disease processes from arthritis to ulcer. Its proteolytic activity has been implicated inconsistently in different steps of tumourigenesis and metastasis. The discrepancies may be attributable to our limited understanding of MMP-1 production, cellular trafficking, secretion and local activation. Specifically, regulation of MMP-1 directional delivery versus its general extracellular matrix secretion is largely unknown. Inhibition of prenylation by farnesyl transferase inhibitor (FTI-276) decreased extracellular MMP-1 and subsequently reduced invasiveness by 30%. Parallel, stable cell line RNAi knockdown of MMP-1 confirmed its role in cellular invasiveness. The prenylation agonist farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) partially normalized FTI-276 inhibited extracellular MMP-1 levels and invasion capacity while transiently delayed its cellular podia distribution. MMP-1 directional delivery to these structures were confirmed by combination of a MMP-1–specific fluorogenic substrate, a MMP1-Ds-Red fusion protein construct expression and DQ-collagen degradation, which demonstrated coupling of directional delivery and activation. MetaMorph analysis of cellular lamellipodia structures indicated that FTI-276 inhibited formation and delivery to these structures. Farnesyl pyrophosphate partially restored lamellipodia area but not MMP-1 delivery under the time frame investigated. These results indicate that MMP-1 directional delivery to podia structures is involved in the invasive activity of sarcoma cells, and this process is prenylation sensitive. PMID:21801306

  2. Collective cell migration: leadership, invasion and segregation.

    PubMed

    Kabla, Alexandre J

    2012-12-07

    A number of biological processes, such as embryo development, cancer metastasis or wound healing, rely on cells moving in concert. The mechanisms leading to the emergence of coordinated motion remain however largely unexplored. Although biomolecular signalling is known to be involved in most occurrences of collective migration, the role of physical and mechanical interactions has only been recently investigated. In this study, a versatile framework for cell motility is implemented in silico in order to study the minimal requirements for the coordination of a group of epithelial cells. We find that cell motility and cell-cell mechanical interactions are sufficient to generate a broad array of behaviours commonly observed in vitro and in vivo. Cell streaming, sheet migration and susceptibility to leader cells are examples of behaviours spontaneously emerging from these simple assumptions, which might explain why collective effects are so ubiquitous in nature. The size of the population and its confinement appear, in particular, to play an important role in the coordination process. In all cases, the complex response of the population can be predicted from the knowledge of the correlation length of the velocity field measured in the bulk of the epithelial layer. This analysis provides also new insights into cancer metastasis and cell sorting, suggesting, in particular, that collective invasion might result from an emerging coordination in a system where single cells are mechanically unable to invade.

  3. In Vitro Culture of Borrelia garinii Results in Loss of Flagella and Decreased Invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Sellek, Ricela E.; Escudero, Raquel; Gil, Horacio; Rodríguez, Isabel; Chaparro, Escolástica; Pérez-Pastrana, Esperanza; Vivo, Amparo; Anda, Pedro

    2002-01-01

    A virulent, low-passage culture of a tick-derived strain of Borrelia garinii was subjected to serial in vitro passages, from which inoculations were made into C3H/HeN mice. A full display of pathogenicity was observed through passage 4, as measured by cultures of ear punch biopsy samples and internal organs and determination of tibiotarsal joint swelling. Decreased dissemination through skin and infection of internal organs were observed beginning at passage 6. These losses correlated with both the selection of clones harboring 21% less flagella than the parent strain, as seen by electron microscopy, and loss of the motility of the higher passages, as demonstrated by a swarm assay. However, during the chronic phase (3 months after infection), spirochetes were cultured from the bladder and kidney of a mouse inoculated with passage 12. The kidney isolate had the same number of flagella and motility as the original low-passage isolate. Although we can't exclude the possibility that other subtle variations may be arising given the uncloned nature of the isolate, we have found a strong association between loss of flagella and decreased invasiveness. Arthritogenicity progressively decreased with passages, so that only 12.5% of chronically infected mice inoculated with passage 29 still presented with joint swelling, concurrent with a decrease in the staining intensity in a Southern blot with a vlsE-based probe. These results suggest a multifactorial model in which the number of flagella drives the invasiveness of this agent, while plasmid-associated factors are responsible for triggering arthritogenicity. PMID:12183529

  4. Migrastatin Analogues Inhibit Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Majchrzak, Kinga; Lo Re, Daniele; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Bulkowska, Małgorzata; Homa, Agata; Pawłowski, Karol; Motyl, Tomasz; Murphy, Paul V.; Król, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer spread to other organs is the main cause of death of oncological patients. Migration of cancer cells from a primary tumour is the crucial step in the complex process of metastasis, therefore blocking this process is currently the main treatment strategy. Metastasis inhibitors derived from natural products, such as, migrastatin, are very promising anticancer agents. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of six migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-1 to 6) on migration and invasion of canine mammary adenocarcinoma cell lines isolated from primary tumours and their metastases to the lungs. Canine mammary tumours constitute a valuable tool for studying multiple aspect of human cancer. Results Our results showed that two of six fully synthetic analogues of migrastatin: MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6 were potent inhibitors of canine mammary cancer cells migration and invasion. These data were obtained using the wound healing test, as well as trans-well migration and invasion assays. Furthermore, the treatment of cancer cells with the most effective compound (MGSTA-6) disturbed binding between filamentous F-actin and fascin1. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that treatment with MGSTA-6 increased the presence of unbound fascin1 and reduced co-localization of F-actin and fascin1 in canine cancer cells. Most likely, actin filaments were not cross-linked by fascin1 and did not generate the typical filopodial architecture of actin filaments in response to the activity of MGSTA-6. Thus, administration of MGSTA-6 results in decreased formation of filopodia protrusions and stress fibres in canine mammary cancer cells, causing inhibition of cancer migration and invasion. Conclusion Two synthetic migrastatin analogues (MGSTA-5 and MGSTA-6) were shown to be promising compounds for inhibition of cancer metastasis. They may have beneficial therapeutic effects in cancer therapy in dogs, especially in combination with other anticancer drugs. However, further in

  5. Hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity in oral squamous cell carcinoma derived cells.

    PubMed

    Rajeev Chaudhari, Pratik; Emlit Charles, Silvania; D'Souza, Zinia Charlotte; Murlidhar Vaidya, Milind

    2017-08-31

    BPAG1e and Plectin are hemidesmosomal linker proteins which anchor intermediate filament proteins to the cell surface through β4 integrin. Recent reports indicate that these proteins play a role in various cellular processes apart from their known anchoring function. However, the available literature is inconsistent. Further, the previous study from our laboratory suggested that Keratin8/18 pair promotes cell motility and tumor progression by deregulating β4 integrin signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) derived cells. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that linker proteins may have a role in neoplastic progression of OSCC. Downregulation of hemidesmosomal linker proteins in OSCC derived cells resulted in reduced cell migration accompanied by alterations in actin organization. Further, decreased MMP9 activity led to reduced cell invasion in linker proteins knockdown cells. Moreover, loss of these proteins resulted in reduced tumorigenic potential. SWATH analysis demonstrated upregulation of N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in linker proteins downregulated cells as compared to vector control cells. Further, the defects in phenotype upon linker proteins ablation were rescued upon loss of NDRG1 in linker proteins knockdown background. These data together indicate that hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity possibly through NDRG1 in OSCC derived cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  7. Intrinsic effects of gold nanoparticles on proliferation and invasion activity in SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yucheng; Zhang, Qingqing; Ruan, Zhongbao; Yin, Yigang

    2016-03-01

    Although biomedical applications of functionalized nanoparticles have taken significant strides, biological characterization of unmodified nanoparticles remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the cell viability and invasion activity of gastric cancer cells after treatment with gold nanoparticles. The growth of SGC-7901 cells was inhibited significantly after treatment with 5-nm gold nanoparticles, and the cell invasion decreased markedly. These effects were not seen by different size gold nanoparticles (10, 20 and 40 nm). The attenuated invasion activity may be associated with the decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1. These data indicated that the response of SGC-7901 cells to gold nanoparticles was strongly associated with their unique size-dependent physiochemical properties. Therefore, we provided new evidence for the effect of gold nanoparticles on gastric cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, making a contribution to the application of gold nanoparticles to novel therapies in gastric cancer.

  8. Cannabidiol inhibits cancer cell invasion via upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Hinz, Burkhard

    2010-04-01

    Although cannabinoids exhibit a broad variety of anticarcinogenic effects, their potential use in cancer therapy is limited by their psychoactive effects. Here we evaluated the impact of cannabidiol, a plant-derived non-psychoactive cannabinoid, on cancer cell invasion. Using Matrigel invasion assays we found a cannabidiol-driven impaired invasion of human cervical cancer (HeLa, C33A) and human lung cancer cells (A549) that was reversed by antagonists to both CB(1) and CB(2) receptors as well as to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). The decrease of invasion by cannabidiol appeared concomitantly with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Knockdown of cannabidiol-induced TIMP-1 expression by siRNA led to a reversal of the cannabidiol-elicited decrease in tumor cell invasiveness, implying a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of cannabidiol. P38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases were identified as upstream targets conferring TIMP-1 induction and subsequent decreased invasiveness. Additionally, in vivo studies in thymic-aplastic nude mice revealed a significant inhibition of A549 lung metastasis in cannabidiol-treated animals as compared to vehicle-treated controls. Altogether, these findings provide a novel mechanism underlying the anti-invasive action of cannabidiol and imply its use as a therapeutic option for the treatment of highly invasive cancers.

  9. Sublethal irradiation promotes invasiveness of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigerer, Lothar; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hecht, Monica . E-mail: monica.hecht@med.uni-goettingen.de

    2005-05-13

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Despite multiple clinical efforts, clinical outcome has remained poor. Neuroblastoma is considered to be radiosensitive, but some clinical studies including the German trial NB90 failed to show a clinical benefit of radiation therapy. The mechanisms underlying this apparent discrepancy are still unclear. We have therefore investigated the effects of radiation on neuroblastoma cell behaviour in vitro. We show that sublethal doses of irradiation up-regulated the expression of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met in some neuroblastoma cell lines. The increase in HGF/c-Met expression was correlated with enhanced invasiveness and activation of proteases degrading the extracellular matrix. Thus, irradiation at sublethal doses may promote the metastatic dissemination of neuroblastoma cells through activating the HGF/c-Met pathway and triggering matrix degradation.

  10. Mitochondrial dynamics regulates migration and invasion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Zhang, J; Yu, M; Xie, Y; Huang, Y; Wolff, D W; Abel, P W; Tu, Y

    2013-10-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic and undergo constant fusion and fission that are essential for maintaining physiological functions of cells. Although dysfunction of mitochondria has been implicated in tumorigenesis, little is known about the roles of mitochondrial dynamics in metastasis, the major cause of cancer death. In the present study, we found a marked upregulation of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) expression in human invasive breast carcinoma and metastases to lymph nodes. Compared with non-metastatic breast cancer cells, mitochondria also were more fragmented in metastatic breast cancer cells that express higher levels of total and active Drp1 and less mitochondrial fusion protein 1 (Mfn1). Silencing Drp1 or overexpression of Mfn1 resulted in mitochondria elongation or clusters, respectively, and significantly suppressed metastatic abilities of breast cancer cells. In contrast, silencing Mfn proteins led to mitochondrial fragmentation and enhanced metastatic abilities of breast cancer cells. Interestingly, these manipulations of mitochondrial dynamics altered the subcellular distribution of mitochondria in breast cancer cells. For example, silencing Drp1 or overexpression of Mfn1 inhibited lamellipodia formation, a key step for cancer metastasis, and suppressed chemoattractant-induced recruitment of mitochondria to lamellipodial regions. Conversely, silencing Mfn proteins resulted in more cell spreading and lamellipodia formation, causing accumulation of more mitochondria in lamellipodia regions. More importantly, treatment with a mitochondrial uncoupling agent or adenosine triphosphate synthesis inhibitor reduced lamellipodia formation and decreased breast cancer cell migration and invasion, suggesting a functional importance of mitochondria in breast cancer metastasis. Together, our findings show a new role and mechanism for regulation of cancer cell migration and invasion by mitochondrial dynamics. Thus targeting

  11. Cranial diameter pulsations measured by non-invasive ultrasound decrease with tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Yost, William T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intracranial pressure (ICP) may play a significant role in physiological responses to microgravity by contributing to the nausea associated with microgravity exposure. However, effects of altered gravity on ICP in astronauts have not been investigated, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed an ultrasonic device that monitors changes in cranial diameter pulsation non-invasively so that we can evaluate ICP dynamics in astronauts during spaceflight. This study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of our ultrasound technique under the physiological condition in which ICP dynamics are changed due to altered gravitational force. METHODS: Six healthy volunteers were placed at 60 degrees head-up, 30 degrees headup, supine, and 15 degrees head-down positions for 3 min at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure (ABP) with a finger pressure cuff, and cranial diameter pulsation with a pulsed phase lock loop device (PPLL). RESULTS: Analysis of covariance demonstrated that amplitudes of cranial diameter pulsations were significantly altered with the angle of tilt (p < 0.001). The 95% confidence interval for linear regression coefficients of the cranial diameter pulsation amplitudes with tilt angle was 0.862 to 0.968. However, ABP amplitudes did not show this relationship. DISCUSSION: Our noninvasive ultrasonic technique reveals that the amplitude of cranial diameter pulsation decreases as a function of tilt angle, suggesting that ICP pulsation follows the same relationship. It is demonstrated that the PPLL device has a sufficient sensitivity to detect changes non-invasively in ICP pulsation caused by altered gravity.

  12. Cranial diameter pulsations measured by non-invasive ultrasound decrease with tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Yost, William T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intracranial pressure (ICP) may play a significant role in physiological responses to microgravity by contributing to the nausea associated with microgravity exposure. However, effects of altered gravity on ICP in astronauts have not been investigated, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed an ultrasonic device that monitors changes in cranial diameter pulsation non-invasively so that we can evaluate ICP dynamics in astronauts during spaceflight. This study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of our ultrasound technique under the physiological condition in which ICP dynamics are changed due to altered gravitational force. METHODS: Six healthy volunteers were placed at 60 degrees head-up, 30 degrees headup, supine, and 15 degrees head-down positions for 3 min at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure (ABP) with a finger pressure cuff, and cranial diameter pulsation with a pulsed phase lock loop device (PPLL). RESULTS: Analysis of covariance demonstrated that amplitudes of cranial diameter pulsations were significantly altered with the angle of tilt (p < 0.001). The 95% confidence interval for linear regression coefficients of the cranial diameter pulsation amplitudes with tilt angle was 0.862 to 0.968. However, ABP amplitudes did not show this relationship. DISCUSSION: Our noninvasive ultrasonic technique reveals that the amplitude of cranial diameter pulsation decreases as a function of tilt angle, suggesting that ICP pulsation follows the same relationship. It is demonstrated that the PPLL device has a sufficient sensitivity to detect changes non-invasively in ICP pulsation caused by altered gravity.

  13. Del-1 overexpression potentiates lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Young; Jing, Feifeng; Kim, Hyesoon; Yun, Chae-Ok; Han, Deok-Jong; Choi, Eun Young

    2015-12-04

    Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is an endogenous anti-inflammatory molecule that is highly expressed in the lung and the brain and limits leukocyte migration to these tissues. We previously reported that the expression of Del-1 is positively regulated by p53 in lung endothelial cells. Although several reports have implicated the altered expression of Del-1 gene in cancer patients, little is known about its role in tumor cells. We here investigated the effect of Del-1 on the features of human lung carcinoma cells. Del-1 mRNA was found to be significantly decreased in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 (containing wild type of p53), H1299 (null for p53) and EKVX (mutant p53), compared to in human normal lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and MRC-5 fibroblasts. The decrease of Del-1 expression was dependent on the p53 activity in the cell lines, but not on the expression of p53. Neither treatment with recombinant human Del-1 protein nor the introduction of adenovirus expressing Del-1 altered the expression of the apoptosis regulators BAX, PUMA and Bcl-2. Unexpectedly, the adenovirus-mediated overexpression of Del-1 gene into the lung carcinoma cell lines promoted proliferation and invasion of the lung carcinoma cells, as revealed by BrdU incorporation and transwell invasion assays, respectively. In addition, overexpression of the Del-1 gene enhanced features of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), such as increasing vimentin while decreasing E-cadherin in A549 cells, and increases in the level of Slug, an EMT-associated transcription regulator. Our findings demonstrated for the first time that there are deleterious effects of high levels of Del-1 in lung carcinoma cells, and suggest that Del-1 may be used as a diagnostic or prognostic marker for cancer progression, and as a novel therapeutic target for lung carcinoma. - Highlights: • Developmental Endothelial Locus-1 (Del-1) expression is downregulated in human lung cancer cells.

  14. p53 in cell invasion, podosomes, and invadopodia

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    Cell invasion of the extracellular matrix is prerequisite to cross tissue migration of tumor cells in cancer metastasis, and vascular smooth muscle cells in atherosclerosis. The tumor suppressor p53, better known for its roles in the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis, has ignited much interest in its function as a suppressor of cell migration and invasion. How p53 and its gain-of-function mutants regulate cell invasion remains a puzzle and a challenge for future studies. In recent years, podosomes and invadopodia have also gained center stage status as veritable apparatus specialized in cell invasion. It is not clear, however, whether p53 regulates cell invasion through podosomes and invadopodia. In this review, evidence supporting a negative role of p53 in podosomes formation in vascular smooth muscle cells will be surveyed, and signaling nodes that may mediate this regulation in other cell types will be explored. PMID:24714032

  15. Beclin1 overexpression inhibitis proliferation, invasion and migration of CaSki cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Jia-hua; Sui, Yu-xia; Jin, Long; Yang, Yin; Lin, Sai-mei; Shi, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the autophagy-related gene Beclin1 on proliferation, invasion and metastasis of the cervical cancer CaSki cells and its possible mechanism in vitro were here targeted. After the overexpression vector pcDNA3.1-Beclin1 and RNA interference vector pSUPER-Beclin1 were transfected into CaSki cells in vitro, stable expression cell lines demonstration Beclin1 expression was upregulated, and VEGF and MMP-9 expression were decreased, leading to cell arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. MTT assays further revealed proliferation of cells was significantly inhibited in Beclin1-overexpressing transfectant cells, with invasion and metastasis also being inhibited in Transwell chamber assays. The present results suggest that Beclin1 inhibits invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer CaSki cells in vitro. Mechanisms probably involve Beclin1 inhibition of cell proliferation, and decreased expression of VEGF and MMP-9 proteins.

  16. Overexpression of Numb suppresses growth, migration, and invasion of human clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sima, Jin; Zhang, Bao; Yu, Yuanzi; Sima, Xinyuan; Mao, Yanxin

    2015-04-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of Numb on cell growth, cell migration, and invasion in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Endogenous expression of Numb was evaluated in the ccRCC cell lines (786-O, Caki-1, and Caki-2) and control reference human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. Numb expression was decreased in the ccRCC cells compared with the control cells (P < 0.01). Then, 786-O and Caki-1 cells described as suitable transfection hosts were used in transfection to carry out biological function studies. The three experimental groups were as follows: Numb-ORF (transfected with Numb-ORF plasmid), blank-vector (transfected with pCMV6-entry), and cell-alone group (no DNA). Numb expression in the Numb-ORF groups was significantly higher than that in the controls (P < 0.01). Cell growth was remarkably reduced (P < 0.01), and the number of migrating or invading cells was reduced (P < 0.01) in the Numb-ORF groups compared with controls. Furthermore, the ratio of G0/G1 phase in the Numb-ORF group of 786-O cells was increased, and the S phase fraction and proliferation index was decreased (P < 0.01). Cyclin D1 and MMP-9 expression was reduced in the Numb-ORF groups compared with controls. Here, we have provided data for attenuated Numb expression in the ccRCC cells. Overexpression of Numb could induce G0/G1 phase arrest and inhibit cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. The suppressive effects might be due to downregulation of cyclin D1 or MMP-9 expression. Taken together, our data suggest that Numb may possibly function as a tumor suppressor involved in the carcinogenesis of ccRCC.

  17. Overcrowding stress decreases macrophage activity and increases Salmonella Enteritidis invasion in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A V S; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Ribeiro, A; Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Pinheiro, M L; Baskeville, E; Akamine, A T; Astolfi-Ferreira, C S; Ferreira, A J P; Palermo-Neto, J

    2014-01-01

    Overcrowding stress is a reality in the poultry industry. Chickens exposed to long-term stressful situations present a reduction of welfare and immunosuppression. We designed this experiment to analyse the effects from overcrowding stress of 16 birds/m(2) on performance parameters, serum corticosterone levels, the relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius, plasma IgA and IgG levels, intestinal integrity, macrophage activity and experimental Salmonella Enteritidis invasion. The results of this study indicate that overcrowding stress decreased performance parameters, induced enteritis and decreased macrophage activity and the relative bursa weight in broiler chickens. When the chickens were similarly stressed and infected with Salmonella Enteritidis, there was an increase in feed conversion and a decrease in plasma IgG levels in the stressed and Salmonella-infected birds. We observed moderate enteritis throughout the duodenum of chickens stressed and infected with Salmonella. The overcrowding stress decreased the macrophage phagocytosis intensity and increased Salmonella Enteritidis counts in the livers of birds challenged with the pathogenic bacterium. Overcrowding stress via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that is associated with an increase in corticosterone and enteritis might influence the quality of the intestinal immune barrier and the integrity of the small intestine. This effect allowed pathogenic bacteria to migrate through the intestinal mucosa, resulting in inflammatory infiltration and decreased nutrient absorption. The data strengthen the hypothesis that control of the welfare of chickens and avoidance of stress from overcrowding in poultry production are relevant factors for the maintenance of intestinal integrity, performance and decreased susceptibility to Salmonella infection.

  18. Divide or Conquer: Cell Cycle Regulation of Invasive Behavior.

    PubMed

    Kohrman, Abraham Q; Matus, David Q

    2017-01-01

    Cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) occurs during normal embryonic development and is a fundamental feature of cancer metastasis. The underlying cellular and genetic machinery required for invasion has been difficult to identify, due to a lack of adequate in vivo models to accurately examine invasion in single cells at subcellular resolution. Recent evidence has documented a functional link between cell cycle arrest and invasive activity. While cancer progression is traditionally thought of as a disease of uncontrolled cell proliferation, cancer cell dissemination, a critical aspect of metastasis, may require a switch from a proliferative to an invasive state. In this work, we review evidence that BM invasion requires cell cycle arrest and discuss the implications of this concept with regard to limiting the lethality associated with cancer metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Jill M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Maine, Erin A.; Dang, Tuyen T.; Esparza, Matthew A.; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these “trailblazer” cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis. PMID:25844900

  20. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Jill M; Prechtl, Amanda M; Maine, Erin A; Dang, Tuyen T; Esparza, Matthew A; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these "trailblazer" cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis.

  1. β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation, migration, and invasion but induces apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-ming; Ji, Shan; Li, Yan; Fu, Li-ye; Jiang, Tao; Meng, Fan-dong

    2017-01-01

    β-Catenin (CTNNB1 gene coding protein) is a component of the Wnt signaling pathway that has been shown to play an important role in the formation of certain cancers. Abnormal accumulation of CTNNB1 contributes to most cancers. This research studied the involvement of β-catenin in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis were analyzed by using Cell Counting Kit-8 and by flow cytometry. Migration and invasion assays were measured by transwell analysis. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to detect the expression of CTNNB1, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 in RCC cell lines. It was found that CTNNB1 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and induced apoptosis of A-498 cells. CTNNB1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis of 786-O cells. Moreover, knockdown of CTNNB1 decreased the levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18 expression, but CTNNB1 overexpression increased the expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, CXCR4, and CCL18. Further in vivo tumor formation study in nude mice indicated that inhibition of CTNNB1 delayed the progress of tumor formation through inhibiting PCNA and Ki67 expression. These results indicate that CTNNB1 could act as an oncogene and may serve as a promising therapeutic strategy for RCC. PMID:28260916

  2. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  3. Stiffness of pancreatic cancer cells is associated with increased invasive potential.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angelyn V; Nyberg, Kendra D; Scott, Michael B; Welsh, Alia M; Nguyen, Andrew H; Wu, Nanping; Hohlbauch, Sophia V; Geisse, Nicholas A; Gibb, Ewan A; Robertson, A Gordon; Donahue, Timothy R; Rowat, Amy C

    2016-12-05

    Metastasis is a fundamentally physical process in which cells are required to deform through narrow gaps as they invade surrounding tissues and transit to distant sites. In many cancers, more invasive cells are more deformable than less invasive cells, but the extent to which mechanical phenotype, or mechanotype, can predict disease aggressiveness in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains unclear. Here we investigate the invasive potential and mechanical properties of immortalized PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors and a secondary metastatic site, as well as noncancerous pancreatic ductal cells. To investigate how invasive behavior is associated with cell mechanotype, we flow cells through micron-scale pores using parallel microfiltration and microfluidic deformability cytometry; these results show that the ability of PDAC cells to passively transit through pores is only weakly correlated with their invasive potential. We also measure the Young's modulus of pancreatic ductal cells using atomic force microscopy, which reveals that there is a strong association between cell stiffness and invasive potential in PDAC cells. To determine the molecular origins of the variability in mechanotype across our PDAC cell lines, we analyze RNAseq data for genes that are known to regulate cell mechanotype. Our results show that vimentin, actin, and lamin A are among the most differentially expressed mechanoregulating genes across our panel of PDAC cell lines, as well as a cohort of 38 additional PDAC cell lines. We confirm levels of these proteins across our cell panel using immunoblotting, and find that levels of lamin A increase with both invasive potential and Young's modulus. Taken together, we find that stiffer PDAC cells are more invasive than more compliant cells, which challenges the paradigm that decreased cell stiffness is a hallmark of metastatic potential.

  4. Propentofylline inhibits glioblastoma cell invasion and survival by targeting the TROY signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dhruv, Harshil D; Roos, Alison; Tomboc, Patrick J; Tuncali, Serdar; Chavez, Ashley; Mathews, Ian; Berens, Michael E; Loftus, Joseph C; Tran, Nhan L

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary tumor of the CNS and carries a dismal prognosis. The aggressive invasion of GBM cells into the surrounding normal brain makes complete resection impossible, significantly increases resistance to the standard therapy regimen, and virtually assures tumor recurrence. Median survival for newly diagnosed GBM is 14.6 months and declines to 8 months for patients with recurrent GBM. New therapeutic strategies that target the molecular drivers of invasion are required for improved clinical outcome. We have demonstrated that TROY (TNFRSF19), a member of the TNFR super-family, plays an important role in GBM invasion and resistance. Knockdown of TROY expression inhibits GBM cell invasion, increases sensitivity to temozolomide, and prolongs survival in an intracranial xenograft model. Propentofylline (PPF), an atypical synthetic methylxanthine compound, has been extensively studied in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia where it has demonstrated blood-brain permeability and minimal adverse side effects. Here we showed that PPF decreased GBM cell expression of TROY, inhibited glioma cell invasion, and sensitized GBM cells to TMZ. Mechanistically, PPF decreased glioma cell invasion by modulating TROY expression and downstream signaling, including AKT, NF-κB, and Rac1 activation. Thus, PPF may provide a pharmacologic approach to target TROY, inhibit cell invasion, and reduce therapeutic resistance in GBM.

  5. Snail1-Dependent Activation of Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Controls Epithelial Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Alba-Castellón, Lorena; Olivera-Salguero, Rubén; Mestre-Farrera, Aida; Peña, Raúl; Herrera, Mercedes; Bonilla, Félix; Casal, J Ignacio; Baulida, Josep; Peña, Cristina; García de Herreros, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    Snail1 transcriptional factor is essential for triggering epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and inducing tumor cell invasion. We report here an EMT-independent action of Snail1 on tumor invasion, as it is required for the activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF). Snail1 expression in fibroblasts requires signals derived from tumor cells, such as TGFβ; reciprocally, in fibroblasts, Snail1 organizes a complex program that stimulates invasion of epithelial cells independent of the expression of Snail1 in these cells. Epithelial cell invasion is stimulated by the secretion by fibroblast of diffusible signaling molecules, such as prostaglandin E2 The capability of human or murine CAFs to promote tumor invasion is dependent on Snail1 expression. Inducible Snail1 depletion in mice decreases the invasion of breast tumors; moreover, epithelial tumor cells coxenografted with Snail1-depleted fibroblasts originated tumors with lower invasion than those transplanted with control fibroblasts. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the role of Snail1 in tumor invasion is not limited to EMT, but it is also dependent on its activity in stromal fibroblasts, where it orchestrates the cross-talk with epithelial tumor cells. Cancer Res; 76(21); 6205-17. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Cell-ECM Interactions During Cancer Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), a fibrous material that forms a network in a tissue, significantly affects many aspects of cellular behavior, including cell movement and proliferation. Transgenic mouse tumor studies indicate that excess collagen, a major component of ECM, enhances tumor formation and invasiveness. Clinically, tumor associated collagen signatures are strong markers for breast cancer survival. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear since the properties of ECM are complex, with diverse structural and mechanical properties depending on various biophysical parameters. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic fiber network model, and parameterized it with in vitro collagen mechanics. Using this model, we study ECM remodeling as a result of local deformation and cell migration through the ECM as a network percolation problem. We have also developed a three-dimensional, multiscale model of cell migration and interaction with ECM. Our model reproduces quantitative single cell migration experiments. This model is a first step toward a fully biomechanical cell-matrix interaction model and may shed light on tumor associated collagen signatures in breast cancer. This work was partially supported by NIH-U01CA143069.

  7. Invasion of Porphyromonas gingivalis strains into vascular cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered a major pathogen in adult periodontitis and is also associated with multiple systemic diseases, for example, cardiovascular diseases. One of its most important virulence factors is invasion of host cells. The invasion process includes attachment, entry/internalization, trafficking, persistence, and exit. The present review discusses these processes related to P. gingivalis in cardiovascular cells and tissue. Although most P. gingivalis strains invade, the invasion capacity of strains and the mechanisms of invasion including intracellular trafficking among them differ. This is consistent with the fact that there are significant differences in the pathogenicity of P. gingivalis strains. P. gingivalis invasion mechanisms are also dependent on types of host cells. Although much is known about the invasion process of P. gingivalis, we still have little knowledge of its exit mechanisms. Nevertheless, it is intriguing that P. gingivalis can remain viable in human cardiovascular cells and atherosclerotic plaque and later exit and re-enter previously uninfected host cells. PMID:26329158

  8. Disruption of foraging by a dominant invasive species to decrease its competitive ability.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Fabian Ludwig; Suckling, David Maxwell; Lester, Philip John

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to biodiversity when dominant within their newly established habitat. The globally distributed Argentine ant Linepithema humile has been reported to break the trade-off between interference and exploitative competition, achieve high population densities, and overpower nests of many endemic ant species. We have used the sensitivity of the Argentine ant to the synthetic trail pheromone (Z)-9-hexadecanal to investigate species interactions for the first time. We predicted that disrupting Argentine ant trail following behaviour would reduce their competitive ability and create an opportunity for three other resident species to increase their foraging success. Argentine ant success in the control was reduced with increasing pheromone concentration, as predicted, but interactions varied among competing resident species. These behavioural variations provide an explanation for observed differences in foraging success of the competing resident species and how much each of these individual competitors can increase their foraging if the competitive ability of the dominant invader is decreased. The mechanism for the observed increase in resource acquisition of resident species appears to be a decrease in aggressive behaviour displayed by the Argentine ant, which may create an opportunity for other resident species to forage more successfully. Our demonstration of species interactions with trail pheromone disruption is the first known case of reduced dominance under a pheromone treatment in ants.

  9. Disruption of Foraging by a Dominant Invasive Species to Decrease Its Competitive Ability

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Fabian Ludwig; Suckling, David Maxwell; Lester, Philip John

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to biodiversity when dominant within their newly established habitat. The globally distributed Argentine ant Linepithema humile has been reported to break the trade-off between interference and exploitative competition, achieve high population densities, and overpower nests of many endemic ant species. We have used the sensitivity of the Argentine ant to the synthetic trail pheromone (Z)-9-hexadecanal to investigate species interactions for the first time. We predicted that disrupting Argentine ant trail following behaviour would reduce their competitive ability and create an opportunity for three other resident species to increase their foraging success. Argentine ant success in the control was reduced with increasing pheromone concentration, as predicted, but interactions varied among competing resident species. These behavioural variations provide an explanation for observed differences in foraging success of the competing resident species and how much each of these individual competitors can increase their foraging if the competitive ability of the dominant invader is decreased. The mechanism for the observed increase in resource acquisition of resident species appears to be a decrease in aggressive behaviour displayed by the Argentine ant, which may create an opportunity for other resident species to forage more successfully. Our demonstration of species interactions with trail pheromone disruption is the first known case of reduced dominance under a pheromone treatment in ants. PMID:24594633

  10. p19Arf Inhibits the Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells by Binding to CtBP

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Paliwal, Seema; Draheim, Kyle; Grossman, Steven R.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    The INK4A/ARF tumor suppressor locus is frequently inactivated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), yet the consequences of this remain unknown. We recently described a HCC mouse model in which loss of the Ink4a/Arf locus accelerates the development of metastasis and enhances tumor cell migration and invasion in cell culture assays. We show here that knockdown of p19Arf in a HCC cell line increases invasion in cell culture assays. Further, reintroduction of p19Arf into HCC cell lines lacking Ink4a/Arf inhibits tumor cell invasion, without affecting cell proliferation, or cell transformation as measured by soft agar colony formation. Inhibition of cell invasion by p19Arf was dependent on its C-terminal binding protein (CtBP) interaction domain, but independent of Mdm2 binding and nucleolar localization. Indeed, RNAi-mediated knockdown of CtBP1 or CtBP2 decreased cell invasion, and ectopic expression of CtBP2 enhanced tumor cell migration and invasion. Thus, our data indicate a novel role for the Arf tumor suppressor protein in regulating phenotypes associated with tumor progression and metastasis in HCC cells. PMID:18199542

  11. Saracatinib Impairs Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion by Disrupting Invadopodia Function

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Kelley, Laura C.; Hayes, Karen E.; Evans, Jason V.; Lopez-Skinner, Lesly Ann; Martin, Karen H.; Frederick, Barbara; Rothschild, Brian L.; Raben, David; Elvin, Paul; Green, Tim P.; Weed, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated Src kinase activity is linked to the progression of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Src regulates HNSCC proliferation and tumor invasion, with the Src-targeted small molecule inhibitor saracatinib displaying potent anti-invasive effects in preclinical studies. However, the pro-invasive cellular mechanism(s) perturbed by saracatinib are unclear. The anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of saracatinib on HNSCC cell lines were therefore investigated in pre-clinical cell and mouse model systems. Saracatinib treatment inhibited growth, cell cycle progression and transwell Matrigel invasion in HNSCC cell lines. Dose-dependent decreases in Src activation and phosphorylation of the invasion-associated substrates focal adhesion kinase, p130 CAS and cortactin were also observed. While saracatinib did not significantly impact HNSCC tumor growth in a mouse orthotopic model of tongue squamous cell carcinoma, impaired perineural invasion and cervical lymph node metastasis was observed. Accordingly, saracatinib treatment displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on invadopodia formation, extracellular matrix degradation and matrix metalloprotease 9 activation. These results suggest that inhibition of Src kinase by saracatinib impairs the pro-invasive activity of HNSCC by inhibiting Src substrate phosphorylation important for invadopodia formation and associated matrix metalloprotease activity. PMID:20505783

  12. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-02-13

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade.

  13. Extracellular protonation modulates cell-cell interaction mechanics and tissue invasion in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hofschröer, Verena; Koch, Kevin Alexander; Ludwig, Florian Timo; Friedl, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Stock, Christian; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Detachment of cells from the primary tumour precedes metastatic progression by facilitating cell release into the tissue. Solid tumours exhibit altered pH homeostasis with extracellular acidification. In human melanoma, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 is an important modifier of the tumour nanoenvironment. Here we tested the modulation of cell-cell-adhesion by extracellular pH and NHE1. MV3 tumour spheroids embedded in a collagen matrix unravelled the efficacy of cell-cell contact loosening and 3D emigration into an environment mimicking physiological confinement. Adhesive interaction strength between individual MV3 cells was quantified using atomic force microscopy and validated by multicellular aggregation assays. Extracellular acidification from pHe7.4 to 6.4 decreases cell migration and invasion but increases single cell detachment from the spheroids. Acidification and NHE1 overexpression both reduce cell-cell adhesion strength, indicated by reduced maximum pulling forces and adhesion energies. Multicellular aggregation and spheroid formation are strongly impaired under acidification or NHE1 overexpression. We show a clear dependence of melanoma cell-cell adhesion on pHe and NHE1 as a modulator. These effects are opposite to cell-matrix interactions that are strengthened by protons extruded via NHE1. We conclude that these opposite effects of NHE1 act synergistically during the metastatic cascade. PMID:28205573

  14. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nan; Yan, Wenjie; Yin, Tailang; Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo-secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion.

  15. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  16. Monitoring of ovarian cancer cell invasion in real time with frequency-dependent impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chun-Min; Lo, Jun-Chih; Sato, Priscila Y; Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Mok, Samuel C; Yip, Kay-Pong

    2016-12-01

    The conventional approach to assessing cancer invasion is primarily for end-point analysis, which does not provide temporal information on the invasion process or any information on the interactions between invading cells and the underlying adherent cells. To alleviate these limitations, the present study exploited electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) to monitor the invasion of ovarian cancer cells (SKOV-3) through an adherent monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Impedance was measured at 4 kHz of AC voltage or was measured as a function of AC frequency (25 Hz to 60 kHz). By measuring impedance at 4-kHz AC, we found that the invasion of SKOV-3 cells through the HUVEC monolayer was manifested as a rapid decrease in transendothelial electrical resistance in real time. The invasion was augmented in the presence of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). The enhancing effect of HGF was attenuated by c-Met inhibitor (SU11274). By measuring the frequency-dependent impedance of SKOV-3 cells over time, we found that HGF-enhanced SKOV-3 cell invasion was accomplished with reduced junctional resistance (Rb), increased average cell-substrate separation (h), and increased micromotion. SU11274 attenuated the effects of HGF on Rb, h, and micromotion in the SKOV-3 monolayer. SU11274 also increased the barrier function of the HUVEC monolayer by increasing Rb and decreasing h In conclusion, this study demonstrated an improved method for monitoring and studying the interactions between cancer cells and the underlying adherent cells during invasion in real time. Alterations in cellular biophysical properties (Rb, h) associated with cancer transendothelial invasion were detected. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  17. NG2-mediated Rho activation promotes amoeboid invasiveness of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Paňková, Daniela; Jobe, Njainday; Kratochvílová, Magdalena; Buccione, Roberto; Brábek, Jan; Rösel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the potential role of NG2 chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in amoeboid morphology and invasiveness of cancer cells. In the highly metastatic amoeboid cell lines A3 and A375M2, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of NG2 induced an amoeboid-mesenchymal transition associated with decreased invasiveness in 3D collagen and inactivation of the GTPase Rho. Conversely, the expression of NG2 in mesenchymal sarcoma K2 cells as well as in A375M2 cells resulted in an enhanced amoeboid phenotype associated with increased invasiveness and elevated Rho-GTP levels. Remarkably, the amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in A375M2 cells triggered by NG2 down-regulation was associated with increased extracellular matrix-degrading ability, although this was not sufficient to compensate for the decreased invasive capability caused by down-regulated Rho/ROCK signaling. Conversely, in K2 cells with overexpression of NG2, the ability to degrade the extracellular matrix was greatly reduced. Taken together, we suggest that NG2-mediated activation of Rho leading to effective amoeboid invasiveness is a possible mechanism through which NG2 could contribute to tumor cell invasion and metastasis.

  18. [Methods for studying tumor cell migration and invasiveness].

    PubMed

    Kovaříková, P; Michalova, E; Knopfová, L; Bouchal, P

    2014-01-01

    Migration and invasiveness are phenotypic characteristics of cells that contribute to physiological processes, such as wound healing or embryogenesis and they are involved in serious pathological processes, namely in tumor cell metastasis. Availability of methods for studying migration and invasiveness of the cells is important for understanding molecular basis of these processes. In the case of cancer, migration, invasiveness and metastatic potential of tumor cells are key factors that determine clinical prognosis of the patients. This communication provides an overview of in vitro and in vivo methods which are used to study cell migration, invasion and metastasis. In vitro meth-ods for studying cell migration include simple two dimensional assays (scratch -  wound assay and the assay based on the effect of hepatocyte growth factor) and methods based on chemotaxis (Dunns chamber, videomicroscopy of cells, the use of carriers with chemoattractants). Methods for studying both cell migration and invasiveness in vitro include more complex systems based on the principle of the Boyden chamber (transwell migration/ invasive test, analysis of cell migration and invasion in xCELLigence system, confocal microscopy based approaches) as well as analysis of cell migration in microchannels. Our overview of in vivo methods provides an introduction into model organisms and methods used in this field, with an emphasis on the study of cancer metastasis in mouse models. The methods described in this review are mainly involved in larger research projects aiming at developing new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in oncology.

  19. Keratins significantly contribute to cell stiffness and impact invasive behavior.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Kristin; Fritsch, Anatol W; Käs, Josef A; Magin, Thomas M

    2013-11-12

    Cell motility and cell shape adaptations are crucial during wound healing, inflammation, and malignant progression. These processes require the remodeling of the keratin cytoskeleton to facilitate cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion. However, the role of keratins for biomechanical properties and invasion of epithelial cells is only partially understood. In this study, we address this issue in murine keratinocytes lacking all keratins on genome engineering. In contrast to predictions, keratin-free cells show about 60% higher cell deformability even for small deformations. This response is compared with the less pronounced softening effects for actin depolymerization induced via latrunculin A. To relate these findings with functional consequences, we use invasion and 3D growth assays. These experiments reveal higher invasiveness of keratin-free cells. Reexpression of a small amount of the keratin pair K5/K14 in keratin-free cells reverses the above phenotype for the invasion but does not with respect to cell deformability. Our data show a unique role of keratins as major players of cell stiffness, influencing invasion with implications for epidermal homeostasis and pathogenesis. This study supports the view that down-regulation of keratins observed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition directly contributes to the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells.

  20. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingyi; Wang, Hainan; Chen, Feifei; Fang, Jianzheng; Xu, Aiming; Xi, Wei; Zhang, Shengli; Wu, Gang; Wang, Zengjun

    2016-05-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786‑0 and Caki‑1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E‑cadherin and decreased expression levels of N‑cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose‑dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis.

  1. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CAO, JINGYI; WANG, HAINAN; CHEN, FEIFEI; FANG, JIANZHENG; XU, AIMING; XI, WEI; ZHANG, SHENGLI; WU, GANG; WANG, ZENGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786-0 and Caki-1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:27035542

  2. EGF enhances low-invasive cancer cell invasion by promoting IMP-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianglan; Jung, Im-Hee; Hwang, Young Sun

    2016-02-01

    The initiation and progression of cancer is closely associated with the tumor microenvironment. The overexpression of oncogenes during tumor growth and progression by stromal stimuli can affect the aggressiveness of the cancer. In this study, in vitro and in vivo studies were performed to examine the role of stromal epidermal growth factor (EGF) in enhancing the invasive potential of in low-invasive cancer. EGF was tested in order to elucidate the specific molecules that participate in increasing the invasive potential of low-invasive cancer cells. EGF stimulation enhanced cancer invasion in an EGF receptor (EGFR)-dependent manner. EGF induced insulin-like growth factor-II mRNA-binding protein-3 (IMP-3) and podoplanin (PDPN) expression, which play an important role in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell invasion. An apparent tumor mass was not observed in the mouse xenograft; however, multiple tumor microfoci were seen in mice injected with IMP-3-overexpressing cells. These results show that EGF stimulates IMP-3 expression, thereby increasing cancer invasion and tumor progression.

  3. Cancer Cell Invasion: Treatment and Monitoring Opportunities in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Cell invasion is an intrinsic cellular pathway whereby cells respond to extracellular stimuli to migrate through and modulate the structure of their extracellular matrix (ECM) in order to develop, repair, and protect the body’s tissues. In cancer cells this process can become aberrantly regulated and lead to cancer metastasis. This cellular pathway contributes to the vast majority of cancer related fatalities, and therefore has been identified as a critical therapeutic target. Researchers have identified numerous potential molecular therapeutic targets of cancer cell invasion, yet delivery of therapies remains a major hurdle. Nanomedicine is a rapidly emerging technology which may offer a potential solution for tackling cancer metastasis by improving the specificity and potency of therapeutics delivered to invasive cancer cells. In this review we examine the biology of cancer cell invasion, its role in cancer progression and metastasis, molecular targets of cell invasion, and therapeutic inhibitors of cell invasion. We then discuss how the field of nanomedicine can be applied to monitor and treat cancer cell invasion. We aim to provide a perspective on how the advances in cancer biology and the field of nanomedicine can be combined to offer new solutions for treating cancer metastasis. PMID:21295093

  4. miR-208-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cells promotes cell metastasis and invasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Anan; Shao, Chenghao; Jin, Gang; Liu, Rui; Hao, Jun; Song, Bin; Ouyang, Liu; Hu, Xiangui

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-208 in the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells and the underlying molecular mechanism. miR-208 mimic, miR-208 inhibitor and NC were transfected into pancreatic cancer cell line Bxpc3 using liposome. Transwell invasion and scratch assays were used to test cell migratory and invasive abilities. Western blotting and quantitative PCR methods were used to detect E-cadherin, fibronectin and vimentin protein and mRNA expression in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 after transfection by miR-208 mimic, miR-208 inhibitor and NC. Transwell invasion and scratch assays showed that after overexpressing miR-208, pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 exhibited enhanced in vitro migratory and invasive abilities, while after downregulating miR-208 expression, cell migratory and invasive abilities were decreased. Western blotting and quantitative PCR showed that after overexpressing miR-208, expression of E-cadherin, an epithelial cell marker, was decreased and expression of fibronectin and vimentin, interstitial cell markers, was increased in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3; however, after inhibiting miR-208, increased E-cadherin expression and decreased fibronectin and vimentin expression were observed in pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3. After overexpressing miR-208, p-AKT and p-GSK-3β expression was altered by activating AKT/GSK-3β/snail signaling pathway. miR-208 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition of pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC3 by activating AKT/GSK-3β/snail signaling pathway and thereby promotes cell metastasis and invasion.

  5. SMARCAD1 knockdown uncovers its role in breast cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Al Kubaisy, Elham; Arafat, Kholoud; De Wever, Olivier; Hassan, Ahmed H; Attoub, Samir

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer seen in women worldwide and breast cancer patients are at high risk of recurrence in the form of metastatic disease. Identification of genes associated with invasion and metastasis is crucial in order to develop novel anti-metastasis targeted therapy. It has been demonstrated that the DEAD-BOX helicase DP103 was implicated in breast cancer invasion and metastasis. SMARCAD1 is also a DEAD/H box-containing helicase, suggested to play a role in genetic instability. However, its involvement in cancer migration, invasion, and metastasis has never been explored. Using two different designs of shRNA targeting SMARCAD1, we investigated the impact of SMARCAD1 knockdown on the migration, invasion, and metastasis potential of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T47D. We observed that SMARCAD1 knockdown in the invasive breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231, unlike in the non-invasive breast cancer cells T47D, was associated with an increased cell-cell adhesion and a significant decrease in cell migration, invasion, and metastasis due at least in part to a strong inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that SMARCAD1 is involved in breast cancer metastasis and can be a promising target for metastatic breast cancer therapy.

  6. Vinculin contributes to Cell Invasion by Regulating Contractile Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2008-07-01

    Vinculin is a component of the focal adhesion complex and is described as a mechano-coupling protein connecting the integrin receptor and the actin cytoskeleton. Vinculin knock-out (k.o.) cells (vin-/-) displayed increased migration on a 2-D collagen- or fibronectin-coated substrate compared to wildtype cells, but the role of vinculin in cell migration through a 3-D connective tissue is unknown. We determined the invasiveness of established tumor cell lines using a 3-D collagen invasion assay. Gene expression analysis of 4 invasive and 4 non-invasive tumor cell lines revealed that vinculin expression was significantly increased in invasive tumor cell lines. To analyze the mechanisms by which vinculin increased cell invasion in a 3-D gel, we studied mouse embryonic fibroblasts wildtype and vin-/- cells. Wildtype cells were 3-fold more invasive compared vin-/- cells. We hypothesized that the ability to generate sufficient traction forces is a prerequisite for tumor cell migration in a 3-D connective tissue matrix. Using traction microscopy, we found that wildtype exerted 3-fold higher tractions on fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide gels compared to vin-/- cells. These results show that vinculin controls two fundamental functions that lead to opposite effects on cell migration in a 2-D vs. a 3-D environment: On the one hand, vinculin stabilizes the focal adhesions (mechano-coupling function) and thereby reduces motility in 2-D. On the other hand, vinculin is also a potent activator of traction generation (mechano-regulating function) that is important for cell invasion in a 3-D environment.

  7. Keratins significantly contribute to cell stiffness and impact invasive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Seltmann, Kristin; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Käs, Josef A.; Magin, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Cell motility and cell shape adaptations are crucial during wound healing, inflammation, and malignant progression. These processes require the remodeling of the keratin cytoskeleton to facilitate cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesion. However, the role of keratins for biomechanical properties and invasion of epithelial cells is only partially understood. In this study, we address this issue in murine keratinocytes lacking all keratins on genome engineering. In contrast to predictions, keratin-free cells show about 60% higher cell deformability even for small deformations. This response is compared with the less pronounced softening effects for actin depolymerization induced via latrunculin A. To relate these findings with functional consequences, we use invasion and 3D growth assays. These experiments reveal higher invasiveness of keratin-free cells. Reexpression of a small amount of the keratin pair K5/K14 in keratin-free cells reverses the above phenotype for the invasion but does not with respect to cell deformability. Our data show a unique role of keratins as major players of cell stiffness, influencing invasion with implications for epidermal homeostasis and pathogenesis. This study supports the view that down-regulation of keratins observed during epithelial–mesenchymal transition directly contributes to the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells. PMID:24167274

  8. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  9. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, TETSUSHI; UEMURA, KENTARO; MORIYAMA, KAHO; MITAMURA, KUNIKO; TAGA, ATSUSHI

    2015-01-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy. PMID:25647359

  10. Calreticulin down-regulation inhibits the cell growth, invasion and cell cycle progression of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruo; Ye, Jianwen; Zhou, Chuang; Qi, Lei; Fu, Zhe; Yan, Bing; Liang, Zhiwei; Li, Renfeng; Zhai, Wenlong

    2015-08-27

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent cancers in the world. Calreticulin(CRT) is aberrantly overexpressed in many human cancer cells. The function of CRT in HCC cells remains unclear. We attempted to investigate the effects and the underlying mechanisms of CRT down-regulation on HCC cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle progression and invasion. To investigate the function of CRT in HCC cells, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down the expression of CRT in SMMC7721 and HepG2 HCC cells. CRT expression was examined by Western blot and immunofluorescence. Cell proliferation was detected by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were measured by the flow cytometry. The invasion capability was assessed by transwell assay. The phosphorylation level of Akt was evaluated by Western blot. Compared with human hepatic cells L02, CRT was apparently up-regulated in SMMC7721, HepG2 and Huh7 HCC cells. Down-regulation of CRT expression effectively inhibited HCC cell growth and invasion. CRT knockdown induced cell cycle arrest and the apoptosis in SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of CRT expression significantly decreased the Akt phosphorylation. CRT was aberrantly over-expressed in HCC cell lines. CRT over-expression contributes greatly to HCC malignant behavior, likely via PI3K/Akt pathway. CRT could serve as a potential biomarker and therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Upregulated UHRF1 Promotes Bladder Cancer Cell Invasion by Epigenetic Silencing of KiSS1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Jianwei; Han, Zhiyou; Ma, Xuetao; Zhang, Yuhai

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING finger domains 1 (UHRF1), as an epigenetic regulator, plays important roles in the tumorigenesis and cancer progression. KiSS1 functions as a metastasis suppressor in various cancers, and epigenetic silencing of KiSS1 increases the metastatic potential of cancer cells. We therefore investigated whether UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion by inhibiting KiSS1. The expression levels of UHRF1 and KiSS1 were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay in vitro and in vivo. The role of UHRF1 in regulating bladder cancer metastasis was evaluated in bladder cancer cell. We found that UHRF1 levels are upregulated in most clinical specimens of bladder cancer when compared with paired normal tissues, and UHRF1 expression levels are significantly increased in primary tumors that subsequently metastasized compared with non-metastatic tumors. Forced expression of UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas UHRF1 knockdown decreases cell invasion. Overexpression of UHRF1 increases the methylation of CpG nucleotides and reduces the expression of KiSS1. UHRF1 and KiSS1 expression level is negatively correlated in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of KiSS1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion. Importantly, forced expression of KiSS1 partly abrogates UHRF1-induced cell invasion. These data demonstrated that upregulated UHRF1 increases bladder cancer cell invasion by epigenetic silencing of KiSS1. PMID:25272010

  12. Upregulated UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion by epigenetic silencing of KiSS1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Zhen; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Xin; Liu, Jianwei; Han, Zhiyou; Ma, Xuetao; Zhang, Yuhai

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitin-like with PHD and RING finger domains 1 (UHRF1), as an epigenetic regulator, plays important roles in the tumorigenesis and cancer progression. KiSS1 functions as a metastasis suppressor in various cancers, and epigenetic silencing of KiSS1 increases the metastatic potential of cancer cells. We therefore investigated whether UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion by inhibiting KiSS1. The expression levels of UHRF1 and KiSS1 were examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay in vitro and in vivo. The role of UHRF1 in regulating bladder cancer metastasis was evaluated in bladder cancer cell. We found that UHRF1 levels are upregulated in most clinical specimens of bladder cancer when compared with paired normal tissues, and UHRF1 expression levels are significantly increased in primary tumors that subsequently metastasized compared with non-metastatic tumors. Forced expression of UHRF1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas UHRF1 knockdown decreases cell invasion. Overexpression of UHRF1 increases the methylation of CpG nucleotides and reduces the expression of KiSS1. UHRF1 and KiSS1 expression level is negatively correlated in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of KiSS1 promotes bladder cancer cell invasion. Importantly, forced expression of KiSS1 partly abrogates UHRF1-induced cell invasion. These data demonstrated that upregulated UHRF1 increases bladder cancer cell invasion by epigenetic silencing of KiSS1.

  13. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  14. Baicalein inhibits the migration and invasive properties of human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Teng, Chun-Yuh; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Huang, Hai-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Huang, Chih-Yang; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hwang, Jin-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Flavonoids have been demonstrated to exert health benefits in humans. We investigated whether the flavonoid baicalein would inhibit the adhesion, migration, invasion, and growth of human hepatoma cell lines, and we also investigated its mechanism of action. The separate effects of baicalein and baicalin on the viability of HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep1 cells were investigated for 24 h. To evaluate their invasive properties, cells were incubated on matrigel-coated transwell membranes in the presence or absence of baicalein. We examined the effect of baicalein on the adhesion of cells, on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), protein kinase C (PKC), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and on tumor growth in vivo. We observed that baicalein suppresses hepatoma cell growth by 55%, baicalein-treated cells showed lower levels of migration than untreated cells, and cell invasion was significantly reduced to 28%. Incubation of hepatoma cells with baicalein also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to matrigel, collagen I, and gelatin-coated substrate. Baicalein also decreased the gelatinolytic activities of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased phosphorylated I-kappa-B (IKB)-{beta}. In addition, baicalein reduced the phosphorylation levels of PKC{alpha} and p38 proteins, which regulate invasion in poorly differentiated hepatoma cells. Finally, when SK-Hep1 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of baicalein induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results demonstrate the anticancer properties of baicalein, which include the inhibition of adhesion, invasion, migration, and proliferation of human hepatoma cells in vivo. - Highlight: > Baicalein inhibits several essential steps in the onset of metastasis.

  15. Moesin Expression Is Associated with Glioblastoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Lu, Xiaojie; Zhao, Shidi; Pang, Mingzhi; Wu, Xuechao; Wu, Heng; Hoffman, Robert M; Yang, Zhijian; Zhang, Yan

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the effect of moesin expression on cell proliferaton and invasion of human glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. Glioblastoma LN229 and U87 cells were transfected with the H4645-plenti-EGFP-moesin expression vector for moesin up-regulation. Moesin and β-catenin expression levels in the transfected cells were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Cell proliferation was measured using the CCK8 assay. Cell invasion and migration ability were assessed using a transwell cell invasion and wound-healing assay. Moesin mRNA and protein expression were significantly increased in the two transfected LN229-H4645 and U87-H4645 cell lines. β-catenin expression was increased by moesin up-regulation in the transfected LN229-H4645 and U87-H4645 cell lines. The CCK-8 assay revealed that up-regulating moesin results in a significant increase in glioblastoma cell proliferation. Glioblastoma cell invasion and migration were increased by moesin up-regulation. Up-regulation of moesin expression in glioblastoma cells correlated with increases in cell proliferation, invasion and migration, suggesting moesin's role in glioblastoma progression. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. The prostate metastasis suppressor gene NDRG1 differentially regulates cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anup; Mendonca, Janet; Ying, James; Kim, Hea-Soo; Verdone, James E; Zarif, Jelani C; Carducci, Michael; Hammers, Hans; Pienta, Kenneth J; Kachhap, Sushant

    2017-06-01

    Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that N-myc downregulated gene 1 (NDRG1) functions as a suppressor of prostate cancer metastasis. Elucidating pathways that drive survival and invasiveness of NDRG1-deficient prostate cancer cells can help in designing therapeutics to target metastatic prostate cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that lead NDRG1-deficient prostate cancer cells to increased invasiveness remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that NDRG1-deficient prostate tumors have decreased integrin expression and reduced cell adhesion and motility. Our data indicate that loss of NDRG1 differentially affects Rho GTPases. Specifically, there is a downregulation of active RhoA and Rac1 GTPases with a concomitant upregulation of active Cdc42 in NDRG1-deficient cells. Live cell imaging using a fluorescent sensor that binds to polymerized actin revealed that NDRG1-deficient cells have restricted actin dynamics, thereby affecting cell migration. These cellular and molecular characteristics are in sharp contrast to what is expected after loss of a metastasis suppressor. We further demonstrate that NDRG1-deficient cells have increased resistance to anoikis and increased invasiveness which is independent of its elevated Cdc42 activity. Furthermore, NDRG1 regulates expression and glycosylation of EMMPRIN, a master regulator of matrix metalloproteases. NDRG1 deficiency leads to an increase in EMMPRIN expression with a concomitant increase in matrix metalloproteases and thus invadopodial activity. Using a three-dimensional invasion assay and an in vivo metastasis assay for human prostate xenografts, we demonstrate that NDRG1-deficient prostate cancer cells exhibit a collective invasion phenotype and are highly invasive. Thus, our findings provide novel insights suggesting that loss of NDRG1 leads to a decrease in actin-mediated cellular motility but an increase in cellular invasion, resulting in increased tumor dissemination which

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation within the SH3 domain regulates CAS subcellular localization, cell migration, and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Janoštiak, Radoslav; Tolde, Ondřej; Brůhová, Zuzana; Novotný, Marian; Hanks, Steven K; Rösel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2011-11-01

    Crk-associated substrate (CAS) is a major tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in cells transformed by v-crk and v-src oncogenes and plays an important role in invasiveness of Src-transformed cells. A novel phosphorylation site on CAS, Tyr-12 (Y12) within the ligand-binding hydrophobic pocket of the CAS SH3 domain, was identified and found to be enriched in Src-transformed cells and invasive human carcinoma cells. To study the biological significance of CAS Y12 phosphorylation, phosphomimicking Y12E and nonphosphorylatable Y12F mutants of CAS were studied. The phosphomimicking mutation decreased interaction of the CAS SH3 domain with focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and PTP-PEST and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK. Live-cell imaging showed that green fluorescent protein-tagged CAS Y12E mutant is, in contrast to wild-type or Y12F CAS, excluded from focal adhesions but retains its localization to podosome-type adhesions. Expression of CAS-Y12F in cas-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts resulted in hyperphosphorylation of the CAS substrate domain, and this was associated with slower turnover of focal adhesions and decreased cell migration. Moreover, expression of CAS Y12F in Src-transformed cells greatly decreased invasiveness when compared to wild-type CAS expression. These findings reveal an important role of CAS Y12 phosphorylation in the regulation of focal adhesion assembly, cell migration, and invasiveness of Src-transformed cells.

  18. Role of fascin in the proliferation and invasiveness of esophageal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, J.J.; Xu, L.Y.; Zhang, H.H.; Cai, W.J.; Mai, R.Q.; Xie, Y.M.; Yang, Z.M.; Niu, Y.D.; Shen, Z.Y.; Li, E.M. . E-mail: nmli@stu.edu.cn

    2005-11-11

    Fascin, an actin-bundling protein, induces membrane protrusions and increases cell motility in various transformed cells. The overexpression of fascin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has been described only recently, but the roles and mechanism still remained unclear. Here, by using RNA interference (RNAi), we have stably silenced the expression of the fascin in EC109 cells, an ESCC cell line. Down-regulation of fascin resulted in a suppression of cell proliferation and as well as a decrease in cell invasiveness. Furthermore, we revealed that fascin might have functions in regulating tumor growth in vivo. The effect of fascin on cell invasiveness correlated with the activation of matrix metalloproteases such as MMP-2 and MMP-9. We examined that fascin down-expression also led to a decrease of c-erbB-2 and {beta}-catenin at the protein level. These results suggested that fascin might play crucial roles in regulating neoplasm progression of ESCC.

  19. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Boghaert, Eline; Gleghorn, Jason P; Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2012-11-27

    Breast tumor development is regulated in part by cues from the local microenvironment, including interactions with neighboring nontumor cells as well as the ECM. Studies using homogeneous populations of breast cancer cell lines cultured in 3D ECM have shown that increased ECM stiffness stimulates tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells, which have been shown to exert a tumor-suppressive effect on cocultured cancer cells. Here we explored how the biophysical characteristics of the host microenvironment affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development, by using a 3D microfabrication-based approach to engineer ducts composed of normal mammary epithelial cells that contained a single tumor cell. We found that the phenotype of the tumor cell was dictated by its position in the duct: proliferation and invasion were enhanced at the ends and blocked when the tumor cell was located elsewhere within the tissue. Regions of invasion correlated with high endogenous mechanical stress, as shown by finite element modeling and bead displacement experiments, and modulating the contractility of the host epithelium controlled the subsequent invasion of tumor cells. Combining microcomputed tomographic analysis with finite element modeling suggested that predicted regions of high mechanical stress correspond to regions of tumor formation in vivo. This work suggests that the mechanical tone of nontumorigenic host epithelium directs the phenotype of tumor cells and provides additional insight into the instructive role of the mechanical tumor microenvironment.

  20. Cell invasion through basement membrane: the anchor cell breaches the barrier.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Elliott J; Sherwood, David R

    2011-10-01

    Cell invasion through basement membrane (BM) is a specialized cellular behavior critical to many normal developmental events, immune surveillance, and cancer metastasis. A highly dynamic process, cell invasion involves a complex interplay between cell-intrinsic elements that promote the invasive phenotype, and cell-cell and cell-BM interactions that regulate the timing and targeting of BM transmigration. The intricate nature of these interactions has made it challenging to study cell invasion in vivo and model in vitro. Anchor cell invasion in Caenorhabditis elegans is emerging as an important experimental paradigm for comprehensive analysis of BM invasion, revealing the gene networks that specify invasive behavior and the interactions that occur at the cell-BM interface.

  1. Cell: sporozoite interactions and invasion by apicomplexan parasites of the genus Eimeria.

    PubMed

    Augustine, P C

    2001-01-01

    The site specificity that avian Eimeria sporozoites and, to a more limited degree, other apicomplexan parasites exhibit for invasion in vivo suggests that specific interactions between the sporozoites and the target host cells may mediate the invasion process. Although sporozoite motility and structural and secreted antigens appear to provide the mechanisms for propelling the sporozoite into the host cell,there is a growing body of evidence that the host cell provides characteristics by which the sporozoites recognise and interact with the host cell as a prelude to invasion. Molecules on the surface of cells in the intestinal epithelium, that act as receptor or recognition sites for sporozoite invasion, may be included among these characteristics. The existence of receptor molecules for invasion by apicomplexan parasites was suggested by in vitro studies in which parasite invasion was inhibited in cultured cells that were treated with a variety of substances designed to selectively alter the host cell membrane. These substance included cationic compounds or molecules, enzymes that cleave specific linkages, protease inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, etc. More specific evidence for the presence of receptors was provided by the binding of parasite antigens to specific host cell surface molecules. Analyses of host cells have implicated 22, 31, and 37 kDa antigens, surface membrane glycoconjugates,conserved epitopes of host cells and sporozoites, etc., but no treatment that perturbs these putative receptors has completely inhibited invasion of the cells by parasites. Regardless of the mechanism,sporozoites of the avian Eimeria also invade the same specific sites in foreign host birds that they invade in the natural host. Thus, site specificity for invasion may be a response to characteristics of the intestine that are shared by a number of hosts rather than to a unique trait of the natural host. Protective immunity elicited against avian Eimeria species is not

  2. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in 3-dimensional biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nadine R.; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes larger than 5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in 2D, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3D invasion models in cancer research. PMID:25462839

  3. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  4. Upregulation of MEK5 by Stat3 promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Hao; Song, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen extracellular-signal-regulated kinase kinase 5 (MEK5) plays an important role in promoting cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. The aberrant expression of MEK5 has been reported in various malignant diseases including cancers of breast, prostate, lung, colorectal and brain. However, the function and regulation of MEK5 signaling pathway are ambiguous and remain elusive with respect to its oncogenic roles in various cancers, especially in the regulation of the initiation and progression of cancer invasion and metastasis. Ectopic expression of MEK5 or knockdown of MEK5 by shRNA with in vitro cell based models demonstrated the role of MEK5 in regulation of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that MEK5 upregulated by Stat3 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through EMT. Further study demonstrated that Stat3 could bind to promoter region of MEK5 and enhanced MEK5 transcription and expression. In addition, the phosphorylation of MEK5 significantly increased in breast cancer cells corresponding to metastatic capability of breast cancer cells. The depletion of MEK5 by shRNA significantly decreased breast cancer invasion. Ectopic expression of MEK5 could confer non-invasive breast cancer cells to become invasion capable cells. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Erk5, a MEK5-regulated downstream kinase, was also upregulated consistent with the increased level of active MEK5. Our studies provide insights into a molecular mechanism by which MEK5 transcriptionally upregulated by Stat3 augments breast cancer cell EMT, which subsequently enhances cancer cell invasion and metastasis. This finding may suggest that Stat3 and MEK5/Erk5 pathways could be an effective therapeutic target for inhibition of breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

  5. The planar cell polarity protein Van Gogh-Like 2 regulates tumor cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase-dependent invasion.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, V Ashley; Jessen, Jason R

    2010-01-01

    Van Gogh-Like 2 (VANGL2) is a planar cell polarity protein essential for collective migration during embryonic development, yet its contribution to tumor cell motility and invasion are unknown. We report for the first time that loss of VANGL2 in human cancer cells promotes efficient collective and directed migration and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent ECM invasion. We show that VANGL2 knockdown cells exhibit increased activation of secreted MMP2, higher levels of membrane-localized MMP14, and decreased cell-surface fibronectin. These important findings support the notion that planar cell polarity proteins act in coordination with known regulators of cancer cell migration to influence invasion and perhaps metastasis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Mena invasion isoform potentiates EGF-induced carcinoma cell invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Philippar, Ulrike; Roussos, Evanthia T; Oser, Matthew; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Kim, Hyung-Do; Giampieri, Silvia; Wang, Yarong; Goswami, Sumanta; Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John S; Gertler, Frank B

    2008-12-01

    The spread of cancer during metastatic disease requires that tumor cells subvert normal regulatory networks governing cell motility to invade surrounding tissues and migrate toward blood and lymphatic vessels. Enabled (Ena)/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) proteins regulate cell motility by controlling the geometry of assembling actin networks. Mena, an Ena/VASP protein, is upregulated in the invasive subpopulation of breast cancer cells. In addition, Mena is alternately spliced to produce an invasion isoform, Mena(INV). Here we show that Mena and Mena(INV) promote carcinoma cell motility and invasiveness in vivo and in vitro, and increase lung metastasis. Mena and Mena(INV) potentiate epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced membrane protrusion and increase the matrix degradation activity of tumor cells. Interestingly, Mena(INV) is significantly more effective than Mena in driving metastases and sensitizing cells to EGF-dependent invasion and protrusion. Upregulation of Mena(INV) could therefore enable tumor cells to invade in response to otherwise benign EGF stimulus levels.

  7. Non-small cell lung cancer cyclooxygenase-2-dependent invasion is mediated by CD44.

    PubMed

    Dohadwala, M; Luo, J; Zhu, L; Lin, Y; Dougherty, G J; Sharma, S; Huang, M; Pold, M; Batra, R K; Dubinett, S M

    2001-06-15

    Elevated tumor cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression is associated with increased angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and suppression of host immunity. We have previously shown that genetic inhibition of tumor COX-2 expression reverses the immunosuppression induced by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess the impact of COX-2 expression in lung cancer invasiveness, NSCLC cell lines were transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the human COX-2 cDNA in the sense (COX-2-S) and antisense (COX-2-AS) orientations. COX-2-S clones expressed significantly more COX-2 protein, produced 10-fold more prostaglandin E(2), and demonstrated an enhanced invasive capacity compared with control vector-transduced or parental cells. CD44, the cell surface receptor for hyaluronate, was overexpressed in COX-2-S cells, and specific blockade of CD44 significantly decreased tumor cell invasion. In contrast, COX-2-AS clones had a very limited capacity for invasion and showed diminished expression of CD44. These findings suggest that a COX-2-mediated, CD44-dependent pathway is operative in NSCLC invasion. Because tumor COX-2 expression appears to have a multifaceted role in conferring the malignant phenotype, COX-2 may be an important target for gene or pharmacologic therapy in NSCLC.

  8. Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent Invasion Is Mediated by CD44*

    PubMed Central

    Dohadwala, Mariam; Luo, Jie; Zhu, Li; Lin, Ying; Dougherty, Graeme J.; Sharma, Sherven; Huang, Min; Põld, Mehis; Batra, Raj K.; Dubinett, Steven M.

    2006-01-01

    Elevated tumor cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression is associated with increased angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and suppression of host immunity. We have previously shown that genetic inhibition of tumor COX-2 expression reverses the immunosuppression induced by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To assess the impact of COX-2 expression in lung cancer invasiveness, NSCLC cell lines were transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the human COX-2 cDNA in the sense (COX-2-S) and antisense (COX-2-AS) orientations. COX-2-S clones expressed significantly more COX-2 protein, produced 10-fold more prostaglandin E2, and demonstrated an enhanced invasive capacity compared with control vector-transduced or parental cells. CD44, the cell surface receptor for hyaluronate, was overexpressed in COX-2-S cells, and specific blockade of CD44 significantly decreased tumor cell invasion. In contrast, COX-2-AS clones had a very limited capacity for invasion and showed diminished expression of CD44. These findings suggest that a COX-2-mediated, CD44-dependent pathway is operative in NSCLC invasion. Because tumor COX-2 expression appears to have a multifaceted role in conferring the malignant phenotype, COX-2 may be an important target for gene or pharmacologic therapy in NSCLC. PMID:11320076

  9. Fibrogenic Lung Injury Induces Non-Cell-Autonomous Fibroblast Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Neil; Grasberger, Paula E; Mugo, Brian M; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés; Lagares, David; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis appears to depend on their invasion through basement membranes and extracellular matrices. Fibroblasts from the fibrotic lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been demonstrated to acquire a phenotype characterized by increased cell-autonomous invasion. Here, we investigated whether fibroblast invasion is further stimulated by soluble mediators induced by lung injury. We found that bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from bleomycin-challenged mice or patients with IPF contain mediators that dramatically increase the matrix invasion of primary lung fibroblasts. Further characterization of this non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion suggested that the mediators driving this process are produced locally after lung injury and are preferentially produced by fibrogenic (e.g., bleomycin-induced) rather than nonfibrogenic (e.g., LPS-induced) lung injury. Comparison of invasion and migration induced by a series of fibroblast-active mediators indicated that these two forms of fibroblast movement are directed by distinct sets of stimuli. Finally, knockdown of multiple different membrane receptors, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, lysophosphatidic acid 1, epidermal growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, mitigated the non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion induced by bronchoalveolar lavage from bleomycin-injured mice, suggesting that multiple different mediators drive fibroblast invasion in pulmonary fibrosis. The magnitude of this mediator-driven fibroblast invasion suggests that its inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. Further elaboration of the molecular mechanisms that drive non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion consequently may provide a rich set of novel drug targets for the treatment of IPF and other fibrotic lung diseases.

  10. Senescent tumor cells lead the collective invasion in thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Hwa; Choi, Yong Won; Lee, Jeonghun; Soh, Euy Young; Kim, Jang-Hee; Park, Tae Jun

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been perceived as a barrier against carcinogenesis. However, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) of senescent cells can promote tumorigenesis. Here, we show senescent tumour cells are frequently present in the front region of collective invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), as well as lymphatic channels and metastatic foci of lymph nodes. In in vitro invasion analysis, senescent tumour cells exhibit high invasion ability as compared with non-senescent tumour cells through SASP expression. Collective invasion in PTC is led by senescent tumour cells characterized by generation of a C-X-C-motif ligand (CXCL)12 chemokine gradient in the front region. Furthermore, senescent cells increase the survival of cancer cells via CXCL12/CXCR4 signalling. An orthotopic xenograft in vivo model also shows higher lymphatic vessels involvement in the group co-transplanted with senescent cells and cancer cells. These findings suggest that senescent cells are actively involved in the collective invasion and metastasis of PTC. PMID:28489070

  11. Sevoflurane inhibits the migration and invasion of glioma cells by upregulating microRNA-637.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenbo; Li, Dongliang; Guo, Yongmin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Bin; Li, Xingang

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cell migration and invasion are essential features of the metastatic process. Volatile anesthetic sevoflurane inhibits the migration and invasion of multiple cancer cell lines; however, its effects on glioma cells are unclear. Emerging evidence suggests that microRNA (miRNA)-637 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion through the Akt1 pathway. Sevoflurane has been shown to modulate a number of miRNAs. In the present study, we examined whether sevoflurane inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion and, if so, whether these beneficial effects are mediated by miRNA-637. U251 glioma cells were treated without (control) or with sevoflurane at low, moderate or high concentrations for 6 h. To explore the molecular mechanisms, an additional group of U251 cells was treated with a miRNA‑637 inhibitor prior to treatment with a high concentration of sevoflurane. Compared with the control group, sevoflurane inhibited the migration and invasion of U251 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular analyses revealed that sevoflurane increased the expression of miRNA‑637 and decreased the expression of Akt1 and phosphorylated Akt1 in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of sevoflurane on U251 cell migration and invasion were completely abolished by pre-treatment with miRNA‑637 inhibitor, which reversed the sevoflurane-induced reduction in the expression of Akt1 and phosphorylated Akt1 in the U251 cells. These results demonstrate that sevoflurane inhibits glioma cell migration and invasion and that these beneficial effects are mediated by the upregulation of miRNA‑637, which suppresses Akt1 expression and activity. These findings may have significant clinical implications for anesthesiologists regarding the choice of volatile anesthetic agents for the surgical resection of gliomas to prevent metastases and improve patient outcomes.

  12. Annexin A5 promotes invasion and chemoresistance to temozolomide in glioblastoma multiforme cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Yang, Liang; Xiong, Yu; Guo, Hua; Shen, Xiaoli; Cheng, Zujue; Zhang, Yan; Gao, Ziyun; Zhu, Xingen

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the prevalent and most fatal brain tumor in adults. Invasion and a high rate of recurrence largely contribute to the poor prognosis of GBM. The current standard therapy for GBM includes surgery with maximum feasible resection, radiotherapy, and treatment with chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. Annexin A5 reportedly promotes progression and chemoresistance in a variety of cancers. In the present study, we explored the effects of annexin A5 on GBM cell invasion and chemoresistance to temozolomide. Stable overexpression and knockdown of annexin A5 were performed in both U-87 MG and U-118 MG human GBM cell lines. Overexpression of annexin A5 in both cell lines significantly increased cell invasion, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression/activity, Akt phosphorylation at serine 473, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of temozolomide and markedly decreased temozolomide-induced apoptosis, all of which were abolished by selective PI3K inhibitor BKM120. On the other hand, knockdown of annexin A5 markedly decreased cell invasion, MMP-2 expression/activity, Akt phosphorylation at serine 473, and the IC50 values of temozolomide and significantly increased temozolomide-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence that annexin A5 promotes GBM cell invasion, MMP-2 expression/activity, and chemoresistance to temozolomide through a PI3K-dependent mechanism. It adds new insights not only into the biological function of annexin A5 but also into the molecular mechanisms underlying GBM progression and chemoresistance.

  13. Rottlerin inhibits cell growth and invasion via down-regulation of Cdc20 in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixia; Hou, Yingying; Yin, Xuyuan; Su, Jingna; Zhao, Zhe; Ye, Xiantao; Zhou, Xiuxia; Zhou, Li; Wang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Rottlerin, isolated from a medicinal plant Mallotus phillippinensis, has been demonstrated to inhibit cellular growth and induce cytoxicity in glioblastoma cell lines through inhibition of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III. Emerging evidence suggests that rottlerin exerts its antitumor activity as a protein kinase C inhibitor. Although further studies revealed that rottlerin regulated multiple signaling pathways to suppress tumor cell growth, the exact molecular insight on rottlerin-mediated tumor inhibition is not fully elucidated. In the current study, we determine the function of rottlerin on glioma cell growth, apoptosis, cell cycle, migration and invasion. We found that rottlerin inhibited cell growth, migration, invasion, but induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mechanistically, the expression of Cdc20 oncoprotein was measured by the RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in glioma cells treated with rottlerin. We observed that rottlerin significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc20 in glioma cells, implying that Cdc20 could be a novel target of rottlerin. In line with this, over-expression of Cdc20 decreased rottlerin-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, whereas down-regulation of Cdc20 by its shRNA promotes rottlerin-induced anti-tumor activity. Our findings indicted that rottlerin could exert its tumor suppressive function by inhibiting Cdc20 pathway which is constitutively active in glioma cells. Therefore, down-regulation of Cdc20 by rottlerin could be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of glioma. PMID:27626499

  14. A Novel LZAP-binding Protein, NLBP, Inhibits Cell Invasion*

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Junhye; Cho, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hun; No, Jin Gu; Kwon, Jae Young; Kim, Hongtae

    2010-01-01

    LXXLL/leucine zipper-containing alternative reading frame (ARF)-binding protein (LZAP) was recently shown to function as a tumor suppressor through inhibition of the NF-κB signaling pathway. LZAP is also known as a negative regulator of cell invasion, and its expression was demonstrated to be reduced in several tumor tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of the negative effect of LZAP on cell invasion is unclear. In this study, we identify NLBP as a novel LZAP-binding protein using tandem affinity purification. We demonstrate the negative effects of NLBP on cell invasion and the NF-κB signaling pathway. NLBP expression was not detected in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with strong invasive activity, whereas its expression was detected in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with no invasive activity. We also demonstrate that these two proteins mutually affect the stability of each other by inhibiting ubiquitination of the other protein. Based on these results, we suggest that NLBP may act as a novel tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell invasion, blocking NF-κB signaling, and increasing stability of the LZAP protein. PMID:20164180

  15. A novel LZAP-binding protein, NLBP, inhibits cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Junhye; Cho, Hyun Jung; Han, Seung Hun; No, Jin Gu; Kwon, Jae Young; Kim, Hongtae

    2010-04-16

    LXXLL/leucine zipper-containing alternative reading frame (ARF)-binding protein (LZAP) was recently shown to function as a tumor suppressor through inhibition of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. LZAP is also known as a negative regulator of cell invasion, and its expression was demonstrated to be reduced in several tumor tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of the negative effect of LZAP on cell invasion is unclear. In this study, we identify NLBP as a novel LZAP-binding protein using tandem affinity purification. We demonstrate the negative effects of NLBP on cell invasion and the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. NLBP expression was not detected in hepatocellular carcinoma cells with strong invasive activity, whereas its expression was detected in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with no invasive activity. We also demonstrate that these two proteins mutually affect the stability of each other by inhibiting ubiquitination of the other protein. Based on these results, we suggest that NLBP may act as a novel tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell invasion, blocking NF-kappaB signaling, and increasing stability of the LZAP protein.

  16. Common pathways regulate Type III TGFβ receptor-dependent cell invasion in epicardial and endocardial cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia R; Robinson, Jamille Y; Sanchez, Nora S; Townsend, Todd A; Arrieta, Julian A; Merryman, W David; Trykall, David Z; Olivey, Harold E; Hong, Charles C; Barnett, Joey V

    2016-06-01

    Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation (EMT) and the subsequent invasion of epicardial and endocardial cells during cardiac development is critical to the development of the coronary vessels and heart valves. The transformed cells give rise to cardiac fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells or valvular interstitial cells, respectively. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβR3) receptor regulates EMT and cell invasion in both cell types, but the signaling mechanisms downstream of TGFβR3 are not well understood. Here we use epicardial and endocardial cells in in vitro cell invasion assays to identify common mechanisms downstream of TGFβR3 that regulate cell invasion. Inhibition of NF-κB activity blocked cell invasion in epicardial and endocardial cells. NF-κB signaling was found to be dysregulated in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells which also show impaired cell invasion in response to ligand. TGFβR3-dependent cell invasion is also dependent upon Activin Receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) 2, ALK3, and ALK5 activity. A TGFβR3 mutant that contains a threonine to alanine substitution at residue 841 (TGFβR3-T841A) induces ligand-independent cell invasion in both epicardial and endocardial cells in vitro. These findings reveal a role for NF-κB signaling in the regulation of epicardial and endocardial cell invasion and identify a mutation in TGFβR3 which stimulates ligand-independent signaling.

  17. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  18. Nuclear Membrane-Targeted Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ali, Moustafa R K; Wu, Yue; Ghosh, Deepraj; Do, Brian H; Chen, Kuangcai; Dawson, Michelle R; Fang, Ning; Sulchek, Todd A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2017-03-27

    Most cancer patients die from metastasis. Recent studies have shown that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can slow down the migration/invasion speed of cancer cells and suppress metastasis. Since nuclear stiffness of the cell largely decreases cell migration, our hypothesis is that targeting AuNPs to the cell nucleus region could enhance nuclear stiffness, and therefore inhibit cell migration and invasion. Our results showed that upon nuclear targeting of AuNPs, the ovarian cancer cell motilities decrease significantly, compared with nontargeted AuNPs. Furthermore, using atomic force microscopy, we observed an enhanced cell nuclear stiffness. In order to understand the mechanism of cancer cell migration/invasion inhibition, the exact locations of the targeted AuNPs were clearly imaged using a high-resolution three-dimensional imaging microscope, which showed that the AuNPs were trapped at the nuclear membrane. In addition, we observed a greatly increased expression level of lamin A/C protein, which is located in the inner nuclear membrane and functions as a structural component of the nuclear lamina to enhance nuclear stiffness. We propose that the AuNPs that are trapped at the nuclear membrane both (1) add to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus and (2) stimulate the overexpression of lamin A/C located around the nuclear membrane, thus increasing nuclear stiffness and slowing cancer cell migration and invasion.

  19. Swainsonine Inhibits Invasion and the EMT Process in Esophageal Carcinoma Cells by Targeting Twist1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junxun; Wan, Lijie; Li, Jinyu; Zhang, Guoqing; Tao, Haitao; Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Danyang; Hu, Yi

    2017-09-06

    Esophageal cancer is a common gastrointestinal cancer, with a very high mortality rate in patients with metastasis. Swainsonine, a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid, has been shown to inhibit cell growth in esophageal cancer. In the present study, we explored the effects of swainsonine on cell invasion and metastasis in esophageal cancer cells. Human esophageal carcinoma cells were treated with different doses of swainsonine, and then cell viability, invasion and apoptosis were measured, respectively. The mRNA and protein expressions of Twist1, apoptosis- and EMT-related factors and PI3K/AKT pathway factors were detected by qRT-PCR and western blot. Swainsonine had no effect on esophageal cancer cell viability and apoptosis, but it significantly decreased cell invasion in a dosedependent manner. Swainsonine increased the expression of E-cadherin but decreased the expression of N-cadherin, vimentin, ZEB1, and snail in a dose-dependent manner, thereby inhibiting EMT. Lastly, we found that swainsonine inhibits cell invasion and EMT in the esophageal carcinoma cells by downregulation of Twist1 and deactivation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  20. Inhibition of TRPC6 reduces non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Yan; Zhai, Yu-Jia; Bao, Qing; Doetsch, Paul W.; Deng, Xingming; Thai, Tiffany L.; Alli, Abdel A.; Eaton, Douglas C.; Shen, Bao-Zhong; Ma, He-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that the transient receptor potential canonical 6 (TRPC6) channel is highly expressed in several types of cancer cells. However, it remains unclear whether TRPC6 contributes to the malignancy of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We used a human NSCLC A549 cell line as a model and found that pharmacological blockade or molecular knockdown of TRPC6 channel inhibited A549 cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at the S-G2M phase and caused a significant portion of cells detached and rounded-up, but did not induce any types of cell death. Western blot and cell cycle analysis show that the detached round cells at the S-G2M phase expressed more TRPC6 than the still attached polygon cells at the G1 phase. Patch-clamp data also show that TRPC whole-cell currents in the detached cells were significantly higher than in the still attached cells. Inhibition of Ca2+-permeable TRPC6 channels significantly reduced intracellular Ca2+ in A549 cells. Interestingly, either blockade or knockdown of TRPC6 strongly reduced the invasion of this NSCLC cell line and decreased the expression of an adherent protein, fibronectin, and a tight junction protein, zonula occluden protein-1 (ZO-1). These data suggest that TRPC6-mediated elevation of intracellular Ca2+ stimulates NSCLC cell proliferation by promoting cell cycle progression and that inhibition of TRPC6 attenuates cell proliferation and invasion. Therefore, further in vivo studies may lead to a consideration of using a specific TRPC6 blocker as a complement to treat NSCLC. PMID:28030826

  1. Apigenin inhibits proliferation and invasion, and induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangming; Han, Xiaodong; Cheng, Wei; Ni, Jing; Zhang, Yunfei; Lin, Jingrong; Song, Zhiqi

    2017-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most invasive and fatal form of cutaneous cancer. Moreover it is extremely resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Apigenin, a non-mutagenic flavonoid, has been found to exhibit chemopreventive and/or anticancerogenic properties in many different types of human cancer cells. Therefore, apigenin may have particular relevance for development as a chemotherapeutic agent for cancer treatment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of apigenin on the viability, migration and invasion potential, dendrite morphology, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in human melanoma A375 and C8161 cell lines in vitro. Apigenin effectively suppressed the proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. Moreover, it inhibited cell migration and invasion, lengthened the dendrites, and induced G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, apigenin promoted the activation of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP proteins and decreased the expression of phosphorylated (p)‑ERK1/2 proteins, p-AKT and p-mTOR. Consequently, apigenin is a novel therapeutic candidate for melanoma.

  2. Multimodal therapy for synergic inhibition of tumour cell invasion and tumour-induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are highly invasive tumours with frequent local and distant recurrence. Metastasis formation requires degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is fulfilled by membrane-associated proteases such as the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). WX-UK1 is a competitive active site inhibitor of the protease function of uPA that impairs on the capacity of tumour cells to invade in vitro. Methods In the present study, effects of combinations of WX-UK1 with matrix metalloprotease inhibitors (MMP, galardin®) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, celecoxib®) inhibitors on tumour cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis induction were evaluated. Matrigel invasion chambers and a spheroid co-cultivation model with human fibroblast served to determine the invasive potential of both FaDu (SCCHN) and HeLa (cervical carcinoma) cells, each treated with combinations of Celecoxib®, Galardin®, and WX-UK1. Results Blocking of single protease systems resulted in a significant 50% reduction of tumour cell invasion using WX-UK1, while the triple combination was even more effective with 80% reduction of invasion. Additionally, a sprouting assay with HUVEC was used to test the anti-angiogenetic potential of the triple combination, resulting in a 40% decrease in the sprouting rate. Conclusions A combined approach targeting different families of proteases and cyclooxygenases represents a promising adjuvant therapy. PMID:20222943

  3. Survivin promotes the invasion of human colon carcinoma cells by regulating the expression of MMP‑7.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Feng; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wenjun; Su, Yan; Luo, Weiren

    2014-03-01

    Increased expression levels of survivin are crucial for invasion activity in several types of human cancer, including colon carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms whereby survivin regulates cancer invasion have not been completely elucidated. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the role of matrix metalloprotease‑7 (MMP‑7) in cell invasion that is induced by survivin by using in vitro assays, including western blot, immunofluorescence and qPCR analyses. The results demonstrated that the ectopic expression of survivin significantly promoted the invasive activity of colon carcinoma cells (SW620 and HCT‑116) and resulted in increased levels of MMP‑7 activation. By contrast, the small interfering RNA (siRNA)‑based knockdown of survivin markedly reduced cell migration and led to a dose‑dependent decrease in MMP‑7 expression levels. Compared with the controls, knockdown of MMP‑7 by siRNA in colon carcinoma cells led to reduced invasion ability, whereas no obvious changes were observed when MMP‑7 expression was silenced in survivin‑overexpressing colon carcinoma cells. These findings demonstrate that MMP‑7 is crucial for survivin‑mediated invasiveness, suggesting that the survivin‑mediated MMP‑7 signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colon carcinoma.

  4. Multimodal therapy for synergic inhibition of tumour cell invasion and tumour-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zengel, Pamela; Ramp, Diana; Mack, Brigitte; Zahler, Stefan; Berghaus, Alexander; Muehlenweg, Bernd; Gires, Olivier; Schmitz, Suna

    2010-03-11

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are highly invasive tumours with frequent local and distant recurrence. Metastasis formation requires degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is fulfilled by membrane-associated proteases such as the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). WX-UK1 is a competitive active site inhibitor of the protease function of uPA that impairs on the capacity of tumour cells to invade in vitro. In the present study, effects of combinations of WX-UK1 with matrix metalloprotease inhibitors (MMP, galardin) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, celecoxib) inhibitors on tumour cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis induction were evaluated. Matrigel invasion chambers and a spheroid co-cultivation model with human fibroblast served to determine the invasive potential of both FaDu (SCCHN) and HeLa (cervical carcinoma) cells, each treated with combinations of Celecoxib, Galardin, and WX-UK1. Blocking of single protease systems resulted in a significant 50% reduction of tumour cell invasion using WX-UK1, while the triple combination was even more effective with 80% reduction of invasion. Additionally, a sprouting assay with HUVEC was used to test the anti-angiogenetic potential of the triple combination, resulting in a 40% decrease in the sprouting rate. A combined approach targeting different families of proteases and cyclooxygenases represents a promising adjuvant therapy.

  5. Adhesion to and invasion of cultured human cells by Bartonella bacilliformis.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, E M; Raji, A; Valenzuela, M S; Garcia, F; Hoover, R

    1992-01-01

    Bartonella bacilliformis was tested for its ability to adhere to and invade tissue culture cell monolayers. The parasite was able to efficiently bind and penetrate human dermal fibroblasts, human laryngeal epithelium, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Exposure of the organism to immune serum prepared against a crude Bartonella extract containing cell wall and membranous material resulted in decreased ability of the parasite to invade host cells. There was also an overall reduction in the invasiveness of bartonellae and total host cell association when human laryngeal epithelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were preexposed to cytochalasin D, indicating an active involvement of host cells in the uptake of bartonellae. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of bartonellae inside and outside intracellular vacuoles. These data suggest that a surface-associated factor is involved in the invasion process and that internalization of the parasite by host cells involves a microfilament-dependent process similar to phagocytosis. Images PMID:1398917

  6. Digital Holographic Microscopy for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cell Cycle Arrest in L929 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falck Miniotis, Maria; Mukwaya, Anthonny; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has emerged as a powerful non-invasive tool for cell analysis. It has the capacity to analyse multiple parameters simultaneously, such as cell- number, confluence and phase volume. This is done while cells are still adhered and growing in their culture flask. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DHM was able to monitor drug-induced cell cycle arrest in cultured cells and thus provide a non-disruptive alternative to flow cytometry. DHM parameters from G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrested L929 mouse fibroblast cells were collected. Cell cycle arrest was verified with flow cytometry. This study shows that DHM is able to monitor phase volume changes corresponding to either a G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest. G1-phase arrest with staurosporine correlated with a decrease in the average cell phase volume and G2/M-phase arrest with colcemid and etoposide correlated with an increase in the average cell phase volume. Importantly, DHM analysis of average cell phase volume was of comparable accuracy to flow cytometric measurement of cell cycle phase distribution as recorded following dose-dependent treatment with etoposide. Average cell phase volume changes in response to treatment with cell cycle arresting compounds could therefore be used as a DHM marker for monitoring cell cycle arrest in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:25208094

  7. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  8. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  9. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion.

  10. Invasion of Ureaplasma diversum in Hep-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Understanding mollicutes is challenging due to their variety and relationship with host cells. Invasion has explained issues related to their opportunistic role. Few studies have been done on the Ureaplasma diversum mollicute, which is detected in healthy or diseased bovine. The invasion in Hep-2 cells of four clinical isolates and two reference strains of their ureaplasma was studied by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and gentamicin invasion assay. Results The isolates and strains used were detected inside the cells after infection of one minute without difference in the arrangement for adhesion and invasion. The adhesion was scattered throughout the cells, and after three hours, the invasion of the ureaplasmas surrounded the nuclear region but were not observed inside the nuclei. The gentamicin invasion assay detected that 1% of the ATCC strains were inside the infected Hep-2 cells in contrast to 10% to the clinical isolates. A high level of phospholipase C activity was also detected in all studied ureaplasma. Conclusions The results presented herein will help better understand U. diversum infections, aswell as cellular attachment and virulence. PMID:20236540

  11. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ashley J; Doscas, Michelle E; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-03-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT.

  12. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ashley J.; Doscas, Michelle E.; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B.; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A.; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  13. Toxoplasma Actin Is Required for Efficient Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Drewry, Lisa L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apicomplexan parasites actively invade host cells using a mechanism predicted to be powered by a parasite actin-dependent myosin motor. In the model apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, inducible knockout of the actin gene, ACT1, was recently demonstrated to limit but not completely abolish invasion. This observation has led to the provocative suggestion that T. gondii possesses alternative, ACT1-independent invasion pathways. Here, we dissected the residual invasive ability of Δact1 parasites. Surprisingly, we were able to detect residual ACT1 protein in inducible Δact1 parasites as long as 5 days after ACT1 deletion. We further found that the longer Δact1 parasites were propagated after ACT1 deletion, the more severe an invasion defect was observed. Both findings are consistent with the quantity of residual ACT1 retained in Δact1 parasites being responsible for their invasive ability. Furthermore, invasion by the Δact1 parasites was also sensitive to the actin polymerization inhibitor cytochalasin D. Finally, there was no clear defect in attachment to host cells or moving junction formation by Δact1 parasites. However, Δact1 parasites often exhibited delayed entry into host cells, suggesting a defect specific to the penetration stage of invasion. Overall, our results support a model where residual ACT1 protein retained in inducible Δact1 parasites facilitates their limited invasive ability and confirm that parasite actin is essential for efficient penetration into host cells during invasion. PMID:26081631

  14. PinX1 inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Mei, Peng-Jin; Chen, Yan-Su; Du, Ying; Bai, Jin; Zheng, Jun-Nian

    2015-03-01

    PinX1 induces apoptosis and suppresses cell proliferation in some cancer cells, and the expression of PinX1 is frequently decreased in some cancer and negatively associated with metastasis and prognosis. However, the precise roles of PinX1 in gliomas have not been studied. In this study, we found that PinX1 obviously reduced the gliomas cell proliferation through regulating the expressions of cell cycle-relative molecules to arrest cell at G1 phase and down-regulating the expression of component telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT in human), which is the hardcore of telomerase. Moreover, PinX1 could suppress the abilities of gliomas cell wound healing, migration and invasion via suppressing MMP-2 expression and increasing TIMP-2 expression. In conclusion, our results suggested that PinX1 may be a potential suppressive gene in the progression of gliomas.

  15. Hypoxia Decreases Invasin-Mediated Yersinia enterocolitica Internalization into Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E.; Dersch, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y.; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a major cause of human yersiniosis, with enterocolitis being a typical manifestation. These bacteria can cross the intestinal mucosa, and invade eukaryotic cells by binding to host β1 integrins, a process mediated by the bacterial effector protein invasin. This study examines the role of hypoxia on the internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells, since the gastrointestinal tract has been shown to be physiologically deficient in oxygen levels (hypoxic), especially in cases of infection and inflammation. We show that hypoxic pre-incubation of Caco-2 cells resulted in significantly decreased bacterial internalization compared to cells grown under normoxia. This phenotype was absent after functionally blocking host β1 integrins as well as upon infection with an invasin-deficient Y. enterocolitica strain. Furthermore, downstream phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase was also reduced under hypoxia after infection. In good correlation to these data, cells grown under hypoxia showed decreased protein levels of β1 integrins at the apical cell surface whereas the total protein level of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) alpha was elevated. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the HIF-1 α stabilizer dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) also reduced invasion and decreased β1 integrin protein levels compared to control cells, indicating a potential role for HIF-1α in this process. These results suggest that hypoxia decreases invasin-integrin-mediated internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells by reducing cell surface localization of host β1 integrins. PMID:26731748

  16. Targeting TGF-β1 suppresses survival of and invasion by anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenhai; Xu, Yanyan; Zhao, Cheng; Hao, Fengyun; Chen, Dong; Guan, Jinping; Zhang, Kejun

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has been implicated in promoting cell survival, migration and invasion in many cancers, including anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC). In the present study, we studied the effect of suppressing TGF-β1 by RNA silencing on the survival, invasion and metastasis of ATC cells. Methods: Small interfering RNA (siRNA) constructs targeting TGF-β1 were validated and used to develop clonal derivatives of the ATC cell line, 8505C. The cells were used in several in vitro assays, including migration, invasion, survival rate, colony formation and apoptosis. A wound healing assay was used to determine the migration of cells in culture and a Boyden chamber transwell assay was used for invasion. Further, clones were used in an in vivo mouse model to study the kinetics of tumor growth and metastatic growth in lungs. Results: Targeting TGF-β1 expression in 8505C cells caused a 70% decrease in migration and a 78% decrease in invasion, as well as a 68% decrease in proliferation and a 19% increase in apoptosis in vitro. The growth of primary tumors in vivo was also inhibited when compared with parental 8505C cells; however, the number of mice bearing lung metastases was not significantly decreased. Conclusions: Targeting TGF-β1 may be effective in inhibiting primary tumor formation, but not metastasis, by ATC cells. TGF-β1 inhibition in combination with other tumor-targeted therapies may be more effective in inhibiting ATC. PMID:28386367

  17. Involvement of calreticulin in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in diallyl disulfide-treated HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lan; Shan, Jian; Chen, Xin; Li, Guoqing; Li, Linwei; Tan, Hui; Su, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has shown potential as a therapeutic agent in various cancers. Previously, calreticulin (CRT) was found to be downregulated in differentiated HL-60 cells treated with DADS. The present study investigated the role of CRT proteins in DADS-induced proliferation, invasion and differentiation in HL-60 cells. The present study demonstrated that DADS treatment significantly changed the morphology of HL-60 cells and caused the significant time-dependent downregulation of CRT. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRT expression significantly inhibited proliferation, decreased invasion ability, increased the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)11b and reduced the expression of CD33 in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. DADS also significantly affected cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in CRT-overexpressed HL-60 cells. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assays showed decreased NBT reduction activity in the CRT overexpression group and increased NBT reduction in the CRT siRNA group. Following treatment with DADS, the NBT reduction abilities in all groups were increased. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the downregulation of CRT during DADS-induced differentiation in HL-60 cells and indicates that CRT is involved in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in DADS-treated HL-60 cells.

  18. Involvement of calreticulin in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in diallyl disulfide-treated HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lan; Shan, Jian; Chen, Xin; Li, Guoqing; Li, Linwei; Tan, Hui; Su, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has shown potential as a therapeutic agent in various cancers. Previously, calreticulin (CRT) was found to be downregulated in differentiated HL-60 cells treated with DADS. The present study investigated the role of CRT proteins in DADS-induced proliferation, invasion and differentiation in HL-60 cells. The present study demonstrated that DADS treatment significantly changed the morphology of HL-60 cells and caused the significant time-dependent downregulation of CRT. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRT expression significantly inhibited proliferation, decreased invasion ability, increased the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)11b and reduced the expression of CD33 in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. DADS also significantly affected cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in CRT-overexpressed HL-60 cells. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assays showed decreased NBT reduction activity in the CRT overexpression group and increased NBT reduction in the CRT siRNA group. Following treatment with DADS, the NBT reduction abilities in all groups were increased. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the downregulation of CRT during DADS-induced differentiation in HL-60 cells and indicates that CRT is involved in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. PMID:27588133

  19. Intracellular Expression of PAI-1 Specific Aptamers Alters Breast Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fortenberry, Yolanda M.; Brandal, Stephanie M.; Carpentier, Gilles; Hemani, Malvi; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is elevated in various cancers, where it has been shown to effect cell migration and invasion and angiogenesis. While, PAI-1 is a secreted protein, its intercellular levels are increased in cancer cells. Consequently, intracellular PAI-1 could contribute to cancer progression. While various small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 are currently being investigated, none specifically target intracellular PAI-1. A class of inhibitors, termed aptamers, has been used effectively in several clinical applications. We previously generated RNA aptamers that target PAI-1 and demonstrated their ability to inhibit extracellular PAI-1. In the current study we explored the effect of these aptamers on intracellular PAI-1. We transiently transfected the PAI-1 specific aptamers into both MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and studied their effects on cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Aptamer expressing MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a decrease in cell migration and invasion. Additionally, intracellular PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) protein levels decreased, while the PAI-1/uPA complex increased. Moreover, a significant decrease in endothelial tube formation in HUVECs transfected with the aptamers was observed. In contrast, conditioned media from aptamer transfected MDA-MB-231 cells displayed a slight pro-angiogenic effect. Collectively, our study shows that expressing functional aptamers inside breast and endothelial cells is feasible and may exhibit therapeutic potential. PMID:27755560

  20. Inhibition of TRPM7 by carvacrol suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Barszczyk, Andrew; Turlova, Ekaterina; Deurloo, Marielle; Liu, Baosong; Yang, Burton B; Rutka, James T; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2015-06-30

    Glioblastomas are progressive brain tumors with devastating proliferative and invasive characteristics. Ion channels are the second largest target class for drug development. In this study, we investigated the effects of the TRPM7 inhibitor carvacrol on the viability, resistance to apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness of the human U87 glioblastoma cell line.The expression levels of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in U87 cells were detected by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 currents were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. An MTT assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments were used to evaluate cell migration and invasion. Protein levels of p-Akt/t-Akt, p-ERK1/2/t-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, MMP-2 and phosphorylated cofilin were also detected.TRPM7 mRNA and protein expression in U87 cells is higher than in normal human astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed that carvacrol blocks recombinant TRPM7 current in HEK293 cells and endogenous TRPM7-like current in U87 cells. Carvacrol treatment reduced the viability, migration and invasion of U87 cells. Carvacrol also decreased MMP-2 protein expression and promoted the phosphorylation of cofilin. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited the Ras/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways.Therefore, carvacrol may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of glioblastomas through its inhibition of TRPM7 channels.

  1. Inhibition of TRPM7 by carvacrol suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Barszczyk, Andrew; Turlova, Ekaterina; Deurloo, Marielle; Liu, Baosong; Yang, Burton B.; Rutka, James T.; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas are progressive brain tumors with devastating proliferative and invasive characteristics. Ion channels are the second largest target class for drug development. In this study, we investigated the effects of the TRPM7 inhibitor carvacrol on the viability, resistance to apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness of the human U87 glioblastoma cell line. The expression levels of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in U87 cells were detected by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 currents were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. An MTT assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments were used to evaluate cell migration and invasion. Protein levels of p-Akt/t-Akt, p-ERK1/2/t-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, MMP-2 and phosphorylated cofilin were also detected. TRPM7 mRNA and protein expression in U87 cells is higher than in normal human astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed that carvacrol blocks recombinant TRPM7 current in HEK293 cells and endogenous TRPM7-like current in U87 cells. Carvacrol treatment reduced the viability, migration and invasion of U87 cells. Carvacrol also decreased MMP-2 protein expression and promoted the phosphorylation of cofilin. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited the Ras/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Therefore, carvacrol may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of glioblastomas through its inhibition of TRPM7 channels. PMID:25965832

  2. [Grape seed proanthocyanidins inhibits the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yehan; Ye, Xiufeng; Shi, Yao; Wang, Ke; Wan, Dan

    2016-02-01

    To explore the effect of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSPs) on the invasion and migration of A549 lung cancer cells and the underlying mechanism. Trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to determine the cytotoxic effect of varying doses of GSPs on the BEAS-2B normal human pulmonary epithelial cells. After treated with 0, 10, 20, 40, 80 μg/mL GSP, the proliferation of A549 cells was detected by MTT assay; the invasion and migration of A549 cells were determined by Transwell(TM) assay and scratch wound assay, respectively. The levels of epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), E-cadherin, N-cadherin in A549 cells treated with GSPs were detected by Western blotting. (0-40) μg/mL GSPs had no significant toxic effect on BEAS-2B cells, while 80 μg/mL GSPs had significant cytotoxicity to BEAS-2B cells. The proliferation of A549 cells was significantly inhibited within limited dosage in a dose-dependent manner, and the abilities of invasion and migration of A549 cells were also inhibited. Western blotting showed that the expression of EGFR and N-cadherin decreased, while E-cadherin increased after GSPs treatment. GSPs could inhibit the abilities of proliferation, invasion and migration of A549 cells, which might be related to the dow-regulation of EGFR and N-cadherin and the up-regulation of E-cadherin.

  3. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  4. Lipid-Soluble Ginseng Extract Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of B16F10 Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jieun; Kim, Bo Geun; Kang, Jong Soon; Park, Song-Kyu; Lee, Kiho; Hyun, Dong-Hoon; In, Man-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study was performed to elucidate the effect of a lipid-soluble ginseng extract (LSGE) on cancer invasion and metastasis. The LSGE, even at noncytotoxic concentrations, potently inhibited invasion and migration of B16F10 mouse melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of 3 μg/mL of LSGE, the invasion and migration of B16F10 cells were significantly inhibited by 98.1% and 71.4%, respectively. Furthermore, the LSGE decreased mRNA and protein levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 in B16F10 cells, leading to a decrease in MMP-2 activity. After B16F10 cells were intravenously injected in the tail vein of C57BL/6 mice, 1000 mg/kg/day of LSGE was orally administered for 13 days, after which lung metastasis of cancer cells was inhibited by 59.3%. These findings indicate that LSGE inhibits cancer cell invasion and migration in vitro and lung metastasis of melanoma cells in vivo by inhibiting MMP-2 expression. PMID:25354136

  5. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits HNSCC cell migration and invasion, and sensitizes HNSCC cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M Allison; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis and chemoresistance represent two detrimental events that greatly hinder the outcome for those suffering with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Herein, we investigated benzyl isothiocyanate's (BITC) ability to inhibit HNSCC migration and invasion and enhance chemotherapy. Our data suggests that treatment with BITC 1) induced significant reductions in the viability of multiple HNSCC cell lines tested (HN12, HN8, and HN30) after 24 and 48 h, 2) decreased migration and invasion of the HN12 cells in a dose dependent manner, and 3) inhibited expression and altered localization of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, vimentin. We also observed that a pretreatment of BITC followed by cisplatin treatment 1) induced a greater decrease in HN12, HN30, and HN8 cell viability and total cell count than either treatment alone and 2) significantly increased apoptosis when compared to either treatment alone. Taken together these data suggest that BITC has the capacity to inhibit processes involved in metastasis and enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Consequently, the results indicate that further investigation, including in vivo studies, are warranted.

  6. Small‑sized gold nanoparticles inhibit the proliferation and invasion of SW579 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingqing; Ma, Yongmei; Yang, Shufang; Xu, Bangkui; Fei, Xiaoqiang

    2015-12-01

    The present study reported on an intrinsic property of gold nanoparticles (Au‑NPs), namely their ability to inhibit the proliferation and invasion of thyroid carcinoma cells. Au‑NPs of various sizes (5‑60 nm) were synthesized and their uptake into the SW579 human thyroid carcinoma cell line was verified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The viability, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and invasive capacity of SW579 cells were assessed following treatment with Au‑NPs using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay, flow cytometric analysis and a Transwell as well as a fluorometric invasion assay. TEM demonstrated that all sizes of Au‑NPs could be taken up by the SW579 cells. The results showed that small‑sized Au‑NPs (5 and 10 nm) significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion of SW579 cells and induced apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase, while larger‑sized gold nanoparticles (20‑60 nm) did not exert these effects, therefore suggesting that the effects of Au‑NPs on SW579 cells were highly associated with their particle size. The reduction of the invasive capacity of SW579 cells following treatment with Au‑NPs may be attributed to decreases in the expression of matrix metalloproteinase‑2 and ‑9, which were observed using western blot and reverse‑transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. The present study was the first to demonstrate that small‑sized Au‑NPs inhibit the proliferation and invasion of thyroid carcinoma cells, which may contribute to the advancement of biomedical applications of Au‑NPs.

  7. Urothelial cells undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition after exposure to muscle invasive bladder cancer exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, C A; Blackwell, R H; Todorovic, V; Greco, K A; Foreman, K E; Flanigan, R C; Kuo, P C; Gupta, G N

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer, the fourth most common noncutaneous malignancy in the United States, is characterized by high recurrence rate, with a subset of these cancers progressing to a deadly muscle invasive form of disease. Exosomes are small secreted vesicles that contain proteins, mRNA and miRNA, thus potentially modulating signaling pathways in recipient cells. Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process by which epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion and gain migratory and invasive properties to become mesenchymal stem cells. EMT has been implicated in the initiation of metastasis for cancer progression. We investigated the ability of bladder cancer-shed exosomes to induce EMT in urothelial cells. Exosomes were isolated by ultracentrifugation from T24 or UMUC3 invasive bladder cancer cell conditioned media or from patient urine or bladder barbotage samples. Exosomes were then added to the urothelial cells and EMT was assessed. Urothelial cells treated with bladder cancer exosomes showed an increased expression in several mesenchymal markers, including α-smooth muscle actin, S100A4 and snail, as compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated cells. Moreover, treatment of urothelial cells with bladder cancer exosomes resulted in decreased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and β-catenin, as compared with the control, PBS-treated cells. Bladder cancer exosomes also increased the migration and invasion of urothelial cells, and this was blocked by heparin pretreatment. We further showed that exosomes isolated from patient urine and bladder barbotage samples were able to induce the expression of several mesenchymal markers in recipient urothelial cells. In conclusion, the research presented here represents both a new insight into the role of exosomes in transition of bladder cancer into invasive disease, as well as an introduction to a new platform for exosome research in urothelial cells. PMID:26280654

  8. E-Cadherin Mediates MMP Down-Regulation in Highly Invasive Bronchial Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nawrocki-Raby, Béatrice; Gilles, Christine; Polette, Myriam; Martinella-Catusse, Corinne; Bonnet, Noël; Puchelle, Edith; Foidart, Jean-Michel; van Roy, Frans; Birembaut, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    The disorganization of E-cadherin/catenin complexes and the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are frequently involved in the capacity of epithelial cells to acquire an invasive phenotype. The functional link between E-cadherin and MMPs was studied by transfecting invasive bronchial BZR tumor cells with human E-cadherin cDNA. Using different in vitro (cell dispersion, modified Boyden chamber) and in vivo assays (human airway epithelial xenograft), we showed that E-cadherin-positive clones displayed a decrease of invasive abilities. As shown by immunoprecipitation, the re-expressed E-cadherin was able to sequestrate one part of free cytoplasmic β-catenin in BZR cells. The decrease of β-catenin transcriptional activity in E-cadherin-transfected clones was demonstrated using the TOP-FLASH reporter construct. Finally, we observed a decrease of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MT1-MMP, both at the mRNA and at the protein levels, in E-cadherin-positive clones whereas no changes in MMP-2, TIMP-1, or TIMP-2 were observed when compared with control clones. Moreover, zymography analysis revealed a loss of MMP-2 activation ability in E-cadherin-positive clones treated with the concanavalin A lectin. These data demonstrate a direct role of E-cadherin/catenin complex organization in the regulation of MMPs and suggest an implication of this regulation in the expression of an invasive phenotype by bronchial tumor cells. PMID:12875984

  9. Shear-induced Volume Decrease in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinseok; Sachs, Frederick; Wang, Jianbin; Hua, Susan Z.

    2013-01-01

    Using a microfluidic cell volume sensor we measured the change in the cell volume of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells induced by shear stress. An increase in shear stress from 0.2 to 2.0 dyn/cm2 resulted in a volume decrease to a steady state volume ~ 20 – 30 % smaller than the initial resting cell volume. Independent experiments based on fluorescence quenching confirmed the volume reduction. This shear-induced cell shrinkage was irreversible on the time scale of the experiment (~ 30 min). Treatment of 0.1 μM Hg2+ significantly inhibited the volume decrease, suggesting that the shear-induced cell shrinkage is associated with water efflux through aquaporins. The volume decrease cannot be inhibited by 75 mM TEA, 100 μM DIDS, or 100 μM Gd3+ suggesting that volume reduction is not directly mediated by K+ and Cl− channels that typically function during regulatory volume decrease (RVD), nor is it through cationic stretch-activated ion channels (SACs). The process also appears to be Ca2+ independent because it was insensitive to intracellular Ca2+ level. Since cell volume is determined by the intracellular water content, we postulate that the shear induced reductions in cell volume may arise from increased intracellular hydrostatic pressure as the cell is deformed under flow, which promotes the efflux of water. The increase in internal pressure in a deformable object under the flow is supported by the finite element mechanical model. PMID:22759987

  10. Obesity decreases B cell responses in young and elderly individuals.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Daniela; Ferracci, Franco; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Lechner, Suzanne; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of obesity-associated inflammation on influenza vaccine responses. In young and elderly individuals, both lean and with obesity, antibody responses to influenza vaccination were measured. A decrease in in vivo vaccine responses, circulating switched memory, and transitional B cells and an increase in pro-inflammatory late/exhausted memory B cells were found. In vitro B cell function was measured by activation-induced cytidine deaminase and E47, markers of optimal antibody responses. Moreover, IL-6 production was increased, whereas IL-10 production was decreased in cultures of B cells from individuals with obesity. Markers of immune activation (TNF-α, TLR4, micro-RNAs) in unstimulated B cells were also found increased and were negatively correlated with B cell function. In order to reveal potential mechanisms, we stimulated B cells from lean individuals in vitro with leptin, the adipokine increased in obesity. Leptin increased phospho-STAT3, crucial for TNF-α production, and decreased phospho-AMPK, the energy sensing enzyme upstream of phospho-p38 MAPK and E47. Leptin-induced phospho-STAT3 and phospho-AMPK levels were similar to those in B cells from individuals with obesity. These results demonstrate that leptin can be responsible for decreased B cell function in obesity. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  11. Corticotropin Releasing Factor promotes breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Androulidaki, Ariadne; Dermitzaki, Erini; Venihaki, Maria; Karagianni, Effie; Rassouli, Olga; Andreakou, Erini; Stournaras, Christos; Margioris, Andrew N; Tsatsanis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cancer cells secrete bioactive peptides that act in an autocrine or paracrine fashion affecting tumor growth and metastasis. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a hypothalamic neuropeptide that controls the response to stress, has been detected in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. CRF can affect breast cancer cells in an autocrine or paracrine manner via its production from innervating sympathetic neurons or immune cells. Methods In the present study we report our findings regarding the impact of CRF on breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. For this purpose we used the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and evaluated the effect of CRF on motility and invasiveness using the wound-healing and boyden-chamber assays. In addition, we measured the effect of CRF on molecules that mediate motility by western blot, immunofluorescence, ELISA and RT-PCR. Results Our findings show that: 1. CRF transiently inhibited the apoptosis of MCF7 cells. 2. CRF enhanced MCF7 cell motility in a wound healing assay and their invasiveness through extracellular matrix. 3. CRF increased actin polymerization, phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), providing a potential mechanism for the observed induction of MCF7 motility. 4. CRF induced the expression of Cox-1 but not Cox-2 in MCF7 cells as well as the production of prostaglandins, factors known to promote invasiveness and metastasis. Conclusion Overall, our data suggest that CRF stimulates cell motility and invasiveness of MCF7 cells most probably via induction of FAK phosphorylation and actin filament reorganization and production of prostaglandins via Cox1. Based on these findings we postulate that the stress neuropeptide CRF present in the vicinity of tumors (either produced locally by the tumor cells themselves or by nearby normal cells or secreted from the innervations of surrounding tissues) may play an important role on breast tumor growth and metastatic capacity, providing a potential link between stress

  12. Endothelial cell sensing, restructuring, and invasion in collagen hydrogel structures.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Y; Agah, M; Verbridge, S S

    2015-11-01

    Experimental tools to model cell-tissue interactions will likely lead to new ways to both understand and treat cancer. While the mechanical properties and regulation of invasion have been recently studied for tumor cells, they have received less attention in the context of tumor vascular dynamics. In this article, we have investigated the interaction between the surfaces of structures encountered by endothelial cells invading their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during angiogenesis. For this purpose, we have fabricated round and sharp geometries with various curvature and sharpness indices in collagen hydrogel over a wide range of stiffness to mimic different microenvironments varying from normal to tumor tissues. We have then cultured endothelial cells on these structures to investigate the bi-directional interaction between the cells and ECM. We have observed that cell invasion frequency is higher from the structures with the highest sharpness and curvature index, while interestingly the dependence of invasion on the local micro-geometry is strongest for the highest density matrices. Notably, structures with the highest invasion length are linked with higher deformation of side structures, which may be related to traction force-activated signaling suggesting further investigation. We have noted that round structures are more favorable for cell adhesion and in some cases round structures drive cell invasion faster than sharp ones. These results highlight the ability of endothelial cells to sense small variations in ECM geometry, and respond with a balance of matrix invasion as well as deformation, with potential implications for feedback mechanisms that may enhance vascular abnormality in response to tumor-induced ECM alterations.

  13. Ursolic acid inhibits the invasive phenotype of SNU-484 human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    KIM, EUN-SOOK; MOON, AREE

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of cancer-related mortality in patients with gastric cancer. Ursolic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid compound derived from medicinal herbs, has been demonstrated to exert anticancer effects in various cancer cell systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, the inhibitory effect of ursolic acid on the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells has yet to be reported. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ursolic acid on the invasiveness of SNU-484 human gastric cancer cells. Ursolic acid efficiently induced apoptosis, possibly via the downregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), the upregulation of Bcl-2-associated X protein and the proteolytic activation of caspase-3. Furthermore, the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase was increased by the administration of ursolic acid. In addition, ursolic acid significantly suppressed the invasive phenotype of the SNU-484 cells and significantly decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, indicating that MMP-2 may be responsible for the anti-invasive activity of ursolic acid. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrate that ursolic acid induces apoptosis and inhibits the invasive phenotype of gastric cancer cells; therefore, ursolic acid may have a potential application as a chemopreventive agent to prevent the metastasis of gastric cancer or to alleviate the process of metastasis. PMID:25621065

  14. Modification of Glycosylation Mediates the Invasive Properties of Murine Hepatocarcinoma Cell Lines to Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lihong; Liu, Chunqing; Ma, Hongye; Jia, Li

    2013-01-01

    Among the various posttranslational modification reactions, glycosylation is the most common, and nearly 50% of all known proteins are thought to be glycosylated. In fact, changes in glycosylation readily occur in carcinogenesis, invasion and metastasis. This report investigated the modification of glycosylation mediated the invasive properties of Hca-F and Hca-P murine hepatocarcinoma cell lines, which have high, low metastatic potential in the lymph nodes, respectively. Analysis revealed that the N-glycan composition profiling, expression of glycogenes and lectin binding profiling were different in Hca-F cells, as compared to those in Hca-P cells. Further analysis of the N-glycan regulation by tunicamycin (TM) application or PNGase F treatment in Hca-F cells showed partial inhibition of N-glycan glycosylation and decreased invasion both in vitro and in vivo. We targeted glycogene ST6GAL1, which was expressed differently in Hca-F and Hca-P cells, and regulated the expression of ST6GAL1. The altered levels of ST6GAL1 were also responsible for changed invasive properties of Hca-F and Hca-P cells both in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate a role for glycosylation modification as a mediator of tumor lymphatic metastasis, with its altered expression causing an invasive ability differentially. PMID:23840320

  15. The cytoskeleton significantly impacts invasive behavior of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, Anatol; Käs, Josef; Seltman, Kristin; Magin, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is a key determinant of cancer metastasis and nerve regeneration. The role of the cytoskeleton for the epithelial-meschenymal transition (EMT), i.e, for invasive behavior of cells, is only partially understood. Here, we address this issue in cells lacking all keratins upon genome engineering. In contrast to prediction, keratin-free cells show a 60% higher deformability compared to less pronounced softening effects for actin depolymerization. To relate these findings with functional consequences, we use invasion and three-dimensional growth assays. These reveal higher invasiveness of keratin-free cells. This study supports the view that downregulation of keratins observed during EMT directly contributes to the migratory and invasive behavior of tumor cells. Cancer cells that effectively move through tissues are softer and more contractile than cells that stay local in tissues. Soft and contractile avoids jamming. Naturally, softness has to have its limits. So neuronal growth cones are too soft to carry large loads to move efficiently through scar tissue, which is required for nerve regeneration. In synopsis, the physical bounds that the functional modules of a moving cell experience in tissues may provide an overarching motif for novel approaches in diagnosis and therapy.

  16. Effects of X-irradiation on artificial blood vessel wall degradation by invasive tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heisel, M.A.; Laug, W.E.; Stowe, S.M.; Jones, P.A.

    1984-06-01

    Artificial vessel wall cultures, constructed by growing arterial endothelial cells on preformed layers of rat smooth muscle cells, were used to evaluate the effects of X-irradiation on tumor cell-induced tissue degradation. Bovine endothelial cells had radiation sensitivities similar to those of rat smooth muscle cells. Preirradiation of smooth muscle cells, before the addition of human fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells, did not increase the rate of degradation and destruction by the invasive cells. However, the degradation rate was decreased if the cultures were irradiated after the addition of HT 1080 cells. The presence of bovine endothelial cells markedly inhibited the destructive abilities of fibrosarcoma cells, but preirradiation of artificial vessel walls substantially decreased their capabilities to resist HT 1080-induced lysis. These findings suggest that the abilities of blood vessels to limit extravasation may be compromised by ionizing radiation.

  17. Histone modifications associated with cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Hieda, Miki; Matsuura, Nariaki; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide aberrant histone modifications are present in a wide range of cancers, and they are associated with carcinogenesis and cancer progression. Aberrant histone modification patterns affect transcriptional regulation, chromosome stability, chromatin structure, chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation; furthermore, these patterns can predict clinical outcome in many types of cancer. The main cause of poor clinical outcome is metastasis, which is strongly associated with tissue invasion at the primary tumor site. Invasion of cancer cells into surrounding tissue and the vasculature is an important initial step in tumor metastasis, and cell migration is a critical requirement for metastasis. Here, we describe the advantages of detecting global histone modifications by immunohistochemical analysis and provide a collection of protocols for assaying cell migration, invasion, and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion in vitro.

  18. Fungal Invasion of Normally Non-Phagocytic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Filler, Scott G; Sheppard, Donald C

    2006-01-01

    Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research. PMID:17196036

  19. Fungal invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells.

    PubMed

    Filler, Scott G; Sheppard, Donald C

    2006-12-01

    Many fungi that cause invasive disease invade host epithelial cells during mucosal and respiratory infection, and subsequently invade endothelial cells during hematogenous infection. Most fungi invade these normally non-phagocytic host cells by inducing their own uptake. Candida albicans hyphae interact with endothelial cells in vitro by binding to N-cadherin on the endothelial cell surface. This binding induces rearrangement of endothelial cell microfilaments, which results in the endocytosis of the organism. The capsule of Cryptococcus neoformans is composed of glucuronoxylomannan, which binds specifically to brain endothelial cells, and appears to mediate both adherence and induction of endocytosis. The mechanisms by which other fungal pathogens induce their own uptake are largely unknown. Some angioinvasive fungi, such as Aspergillus species and the Zygomycetes, invade endothelial cells from the abluminal surface during the initiation of invasive disease, and subsequently invade the luminal surface of endothelial cells during hematogenous dissemination. Invasion of normally non-phagocytic host cells has different consequences, depending on the type of invading fungus. Aspergillus fumigatus blocks apoptosis of pulmonary epithelial cells, whereas Paracoccidioides brasiliensis induces apoptosis of epithelial cells. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which diverse fungal pathogens invade normally non-phagocytic host cells and discusses gaps in our knowledge that provide opportunities for future research.

  20. Effects of environmental organochlorine pesticides on human breast cancer: putative involvement on invasive cell ability.

    PubMed

    Pestana, Diogo; Teixeira, Diana; Faria, Ana; Domingues, Valentina; Monteiro, Rosário; Calhau, Conceição

    2015-02-01

    Human exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is a certainty, even to long banned pesticides like o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (o,p'-DDT), and its metabolites p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE), and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (p,p'-DDD). POPs are known to be particularly toxic and have been associated with endocrine-disrupting effects in several mammals, including humans even at very low doses. As environmental estrogens, they could play a critical role in carcinogenesis, such as in breast cancer. With the purpose of evaluating their effect on breast cancer biology, o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDD (50-1000 nM) were tested on two human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines: MCF-7 expressing estrogen receptor (ER) α and MDA-MB-231 negative for ERα, regarding cell proliferation and viability in addition to their invasive potential. Cell proliferation and viability were not equally affected by these compounds. In MCF-7 cells, the compounds were able to decrease cell proliferation and viability. On the other hand, no evident response was observed in treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Concerning the invasive potential, the less invasive cell line, MCF-7, had its invasion potential significantly induced, while the more invasive cell line MDA-MB-231, had its invasion potential dramatically reduced in the presence of the tested compounds. Altogether, the results showed that these compounds were able to modulate several cancer-related processes, namely in breast cancer cell lines, and underline the relevance of POP exposure to the risk of cancer development and progression, unraveling distinct pathways of action of these compounds on tumor cell biology. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Loss of Tpm4.1 leads to disruption of cell-cell adhesions and invasive behavior in breast epithelial cells via increased Rac1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jeong, SukYeong; Lim, SunYoung; Schevzov, Galina; Gunning, Peter W; Helfman, David M

    2017-05-16

    Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel high molecular weight isoform of tropomyosin, Tpm4.1, expressed from the human TPM4 gene. Tpm4.1 expression is down-regulated in a subset of breast cancer cells compared with untransformed MCF10A breast epithelial cells and in highly metastatic breast cancer cell lines derived from poorly metastatic MDA-MD-231 cells. In addition, patients with invasive ductal breast carcinoma show decreased TPM4 expression compared with patients with ductal breast carcinoma in situ, and low TPM4 expression is associated with poor prognosis. Loss of Tpm4.1 using siRNA in MCF10A cells increases cell migration in wound-healing and Boyden chamber assays and invasion out of spheroids as well as disruption of cell-cell adhesions. Down-regulation of Tpm4.1 in MDA-MB-231 cells leads to disruption of actin organization and increased cell invasion and dissemination from spheroids into collagen gels. The down-regulation of Tpm4.1 induces Rac1-mediated alteration of myosin IIB localization, and pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 or down-regulation of myosin IIB using siRNA inhibits the invasive phenotypes in MCF10A cells. Thus Tpm4.1 plays an important role in blocking invasive behaviors through Rac1-myosin IIB signaling and our findings suggest that decreased expression of Tpm4.1 might play a crucial role during tumor progression.

  2. A Prognostic Dilemma of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Intravascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Castley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy; however, it very rarely metastasizes. Despite the low mortality caused by this cancer, once it spreads, it has dim prognosis. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with rare intravascular invasion and review the literature for risk factors and management of metastasis. PMID:27757356

  3. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Mense, Sarah M; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-03-31

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP₃, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion.

  4. E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion prevents invasiveness of human carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The ability of carcinomas to invade and to metastasize largely depends on the degree of epithelial differentiation within the tumors, i.e., poorly differentiated being more invasive than well-differentiated carcinomas. Here we confirmed this correlation by examining various human cell lines derived from bladder, breast, lung, and pancreas carcinomas. We found that carcinoma cell lines with an epithelioid phenotype were noninvasive and expressed the epithelium-specific cell- cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin (also known as Arc-1, uvomorulin, and cell-CAM 120/80), as visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy and by Western and Northern blotting, whereas carcinoma cell lines with a fibroblastoid phenotype were invasive and had lost E-cadherin expression. Invasiveness of these latter cells could be prevented by transfection with E-cadherin cDNA and was again induced by treatment of the transfected cells with anti-E-cadherin mAbs. These findings indicate that the selective loss of E-cadherin expression can generate dedifferentiation and invasiveness of human carcinoma cells, and they suggest further that E-cadherin acts as an invasion suppressor. PMID:2007622

  5. Resveratrol suppresses breast cancer cell invasion by inactivating a RhoA/YAP signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Na; Choe, So Ra; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Cho, Do Yeun; Kang, Jaeku; Park, Chang Gyo; Lee, Hoi Young

    2017-01-01

    Hippo/YAP signaling is implicated in tumorigenesis and progression of various cancers. By inhibiting a plethora signaling cascades, resveratrol has strong anti-tumorigenic and anti-metastatic activity. In the present study, we demonstrate that resveratrol decreases the expression of YAP target genes. In addition, our data showed that resveratrol attenuates breast cancer cell invasion through the activation of Lats1 and consequent inactivation of YAP. Strikingly, we also demonstrate that resveratrol inactivates RhoA, leading to the activation of Lats1 and induction of YAP phosphorylation. Further, resveratrol in combination with other agents that inactivate RhoA or YAP showed more marked suppression of breast cancer cell invasion compared with single treatment. Collectively, these findings indicate the beneficial effects of resveratrol on breast cancer patients by suppressing the RhoA/Lats1/YAP signaling axis and subsequently inhibiting breast cancer cell invasion. PMID:28232662

  6. USP2 promotes cell migration and invasion in triple negative breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qing; Mao, Yan; Xiao, Gang; Fei, Xiaochun; Wang, Jinglong; Zhang, Yuzi; Liu, Junjun; Cheng, Guangcun; Chen, Xiaosong; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Kunwei

    2015-07-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is often associated with a poor prognosis. The aim of our study was to identify biomarkers predictive of TNBC progression. Primary TNBC breast tissue samples including four with metastasis and six without metastasis were subjected to Affymetrix GeneChip® analysis (human genome U133). Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) was identified as an upregulated gene in the metastatic group, and its expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 121 primary breast cancers, 13 paired normal tissues, and 13 paired metastatic lesions. Survival analysis was performed using the log-rank test and Cox regression hazard model. Matrigel migration and invasion assays in USP2-silenced and USP2-overexpressed breast cancer cell lines were used to investigate the mechanisms of USP2 in vitro. Positive immunostaining for USP2 was detected in breast tumors and was correlated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) statuses and TNBC subtype. USP2 was overexpressed in distant metastatic lesions compared with primary breast cancers. Survival analyses demonstrated that positive USP2 is a poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Silencing of USP2 expression decreased migration and invasion in LM2-4175 and SCP46 cells in association with the downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression, whereas overexpression of USP2 in MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-231 cells enhanced migration and invasion and upregulated the expression of MMP2. The present study showed that USP2 expression is associated with TNBC cell line's invasiveness and poor survival of breast cancer patients and may serve as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target for TNBC.

  7. Rap1-GTP-interacting Adaptor Molecule (RIAM) Protein Controls Invasion and Growth of Melanoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Varas, Pablo; Coló, Georgina P.; Bartolomé, Ruben A.; Paterson, Andrew; Medraño-Fernández, Iria; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Lafuente, Esther M.; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A.; Strömblad, Staffan; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    The Mig-10/RIAM/lamellipodin (MRL) family member Rap1-GTP-interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM) interacts with active Rap1, a small GTPase that is frequently activated in tumors such as melanoma and prostate cancer. We show here that RIAM is expressed in metastatic human melanoma cells and that both RIAM and Rap1 are required for BLM melanoma cell invasion. RIAM silencing in melanoma cells led to inhibition of tumor growth and to delayed metastasis in a severe combined immunodeficiency xenograft model. Defective invasion of RIAM-silenced melanoma cells arose from impairment in persistent cell migration directionality, which was associated with deficient activation of a Vav2-RhoA-ROCK-myosin light chain pathway. Expression of constitutively active Vav2 and RhoA in cells depleted for RIAM partially rescued their invasion, indicating that Vav2 and RhoA mediate RIAM function. These results suggest that inhibition of cell invasion in RIAM-silenced melanoma cells is likely based on altered cell contractility and cell polarization. Furthermore, we show that RIAM depletion reduces β1 integrin-dependent melanoma cell adhesion, which correlates with decreased activation of both Erk1/2 MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, two central molecules controlling cell growth and cell survival. In addition to causing inhibition of cell proliferation, RIAM silencing led to higher susceptibility to cell apoptosis. Together, these data suggest that defective activation of these kinases in RIAM-silenced cells could account for inhibition of melanoma cell growth and that RIAM might contribute to the dissemination of melanoma cells. PMID:21454517

  8. p11 regulates extracellular plasmin production and invasiveness of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyu-Sil; Fogg, Darin K; Yoon, Chang-Soon; Waisman, David M

    2003-02-01

    The defining characteristic of a tumor cell is its ability to escape the constraints imposed by neighboring cells, invade the surrounding tissue, and metastasize to distant sites. This invasive property of tumor cells is dependent on activation of proteases at the cell surface. Most cancer cells secrete the urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which converts cell-bound plasminogen to plasmin. Here we address the issue of whether the plasminogen binding protein, p11, plays a significant role in this process. Transfection of human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells with the human p11 gene in the antisense orientation resulted in a loss of p11 protein from the cell surface and concomitant decreases in cellular plasmin production, ECM degradation, and cellular invasiveness. The transfected cells demonstrated reduced development of lung metastatic foci in SCID mice. In contrast, HT1080 cells transfected with the p11 gene in the sense orientation displayed increased cell surface p11 protein and concomitant increases in cellular plasmin production, as well as enhanced ECM degradation and enhanced cellular invasiveness. The p11 overexpressing cells showed enhanced development of lung metastatic foci. These data establish that changes in the extracellular expression of the plasminogen receptor protein, p11, dramatically affect tumor cell-mediated pericellular proteolysis.

  9. Minimization of thermodynamic costs in cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyu; Duclos, Guillaume; Sun, Bo; Lee, Jeongseog; Wu, Amy; Kam, Yoonseok; Sontag, Eduardo D.; Stone, Howard A.; Sturm, James C.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Austin, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis, the truly lethal aspect of cancer, occurs when metastatic cancer cells in a tumor break through the basement membrane and penetrate the extracellular matrix. We show that MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells cooperatively invade a 3D collagen matrix while following a glucose gradient. The invasion front of the cells is a dynamic one, with different cells assuming the lead on a time scale of 70 h. The front cell leadership is dynamic presumably because of metabolic costs associated with a long-range strain field that precedes the invading cell front, which we have imaged using confocal imaging and marker beads imbedded in the collagen matrix. We suggest this could be a quantitative assay for an invasive phenotype tracking a glucose gradient and show that the invading cells act in a cooperative manner by exchanging leaders in the invading front. PMID:23319630

  10. EGR1-dependent PTEN upregulation by 2-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde attenuates cell invasion and EMT in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkyung; Kang, Hye Suk; Lee, Yu-Jin; Lee, Heon-Jin; Yun, Jieun; Shin, Jung Hyu; Lee, Chang Woo; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Hong, Su-Hyung

    2014-07-10

    There has been little evidence to support EGR1 and PTEN function on the EMT of cancer cells. We tried to evaluate how these genes affect cancer cell invasion and EMT through investigating the molecular mechanism(s) of 2'-benzoyloxycinnamaldehyde (BCA). Matrigel invasion and wound healing assay, and in vivo mice model were used to evaluate the effect of BCA on colon cancer cell migration. The molecular mechanism(s) of BCA were evaluated by knock-down or overexpression of EGR1 and PTEN. BCA at 50 nM increased E-cadherin and EGR1 expression without cytotoxicity. Cell migration was inhibited significantly by BCA both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, BCA inhibits Snail and Vimentin expression, as well as β-catenin nuclear accumulation. Suppression of EGR1 by siRNA attenuated the inhibition of matrigel invasion by BCA, indicating that EGR1 is responsible for BCA effect. PTEN was upregulated by BCA treatment or EGR1 overexpression. In addition, shPTEN transfection stimulated EMT and cell invasion in vitro. Our data suggest that BCA leads to a remarkable upregulation of EGR1 expression, and that EMT and invasion is decreased via EGR1-dependent PTEN activation. These data showed a critical role of EGR1-PTEN signaling pathway in the EMT of colon cancer, as well as metastasis.

  11. SNAIL transcription factor increases the motility and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    OSORIO, LUIS A.; FARFÁN, NANCY M.; CASTELLÓN, ENRIQUE A.; CONTRERAS, HÉCTOR R.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are increasing, and PCa is almost the second-leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in men. During tumor progression, epithelial cells decrease the number of adhesion molecules, change their polarity and position, rearrange their cytoskeleton and increase their migratory and invasive capacities. These changes are known under the concept of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is characterized by an upregulation of certain transcription factors, including SNAIL1, which represses genes that are characteristic of an epithelial phenotype, including E-cadherin, and indirectly increase the expression levels of genes, which are associated with the mesenchymal phenotype. It has been suggested that the transcription factor, SNAIL1, decreases the proliferation and increases the migratory and invasive capacities of PCa cell lines. The present study was performed using LNCaP and PC3 cell lines, in which the expression levels of SNAIL1 were increased or silenced through the use of lentiviral vectors. The expression levels of EMT markers were quantified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, cell survival was analyzed using an MTS assay; cell proliferation was examined using an antibody targeting Ki-67; migration on plates with 8 µm pores to allow the passage of cells; and invasiveness was analyzed using a membrane chamber covered in dried basement membrane matrix solution. The levels of apoptosis were determined using a Caspase 3/7 assay containing a substrate modified by caspases 3 and 7. The results demonstrated that the overexpression and silencing of SNAIL1 decreased cell proliferation and survival. However, the overexpression of SNAIL1 decreased apoptosis, compared with cells with the SNAIL1-silenced cells, in which cell apoptosis increased. The migration and invasive capacities increased in the cells overexpressing SNAIL1, and

  12. Hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 decreased survival rate of canine lymphoma cells under hypoxic condition.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroki; Lai, Yu-Chang; Tateno, Morihiro; Setoguchi, Asuka; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Endo, Yasuyuki; Nakaichi, Munekazu; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Miura, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that hypoxic stimulation enhances growth potentials of canine lymphoma cells by activating hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), and that the hypoxia-activated prodrug (TH-302) inhibits growth potentials in the cells. We investigated how hypoxic culture affects the growth rate, chemoresistance, and invasiveness of canine lymphoma cells and doxorubicin (DOX)-resistant lymphoma cells, and influences of TH-302 on survival rate of the cells under hypoxic conditions. Our results demonstrated that hypoxic culture upregulated the expression of HIF-1α and its target genes, including ATP-binding cassette transporter B1 (ABCB1), ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and survivin, and enhanced the growth rate, DOX resistance, and invasiveness of the cells. Additionally, TH-302 decreased the survival rate of the cells under hypoxic condition. Our studies suggest that hypoxic stimulation may advance the tumorigenicity of canine lymphoma cells, favoring malignant transformation. Therefore, the data presented may contribute to the development of TH-302-based hypoxia-targeting therapies for canine lymphoma.

  13. Deletion of Yin Yang 1 protein in osteosarcoma cells on cell invasion and CXCR4/angiogenesis and metastasis.

    PubMed

    de Nigris, Filomena; Rossiello, Raffaele; Schiano, Concetta; Arra, Claudio; Williams-Ignarro, Sharon; Barbieri, Antonio; Lanza, Alessandro; Balestrieri, Antonio; Giuliano, Maria Teresa; Ignarro, Louis J; Napoli, Claudio

    2008-03-15

    We know that the Yin Yang 1 protein (YY1) overexpression is positively and strongly correlated with the degree of malignancy of bone tumors. Therefore, we questioned whether we could influence cell invasiveness by deleting YY1 in human osteosarcoma cells (SaOs-2), as tested in Matrigel-coated filters and metastasis implantation of such osteosarcoma cells in vivo, by serial analysis with nuclear magnetic resonance. Moreover, we focused our work on the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its inhibition by T22 antibody, as well as on systemic (direct in vivo assay) and computer-assisted imaging of angiogenesis-related metastasis. Results showed that cell invasiveness and metastasis implantation by wild-type SaOs-2 cells, as evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry, are associated with up-regulation of CXCR4 expression, which in turn was significantly reduced by T22. In addition, deletion of YY1 (siRNAYY1-SaOs-2) induced a significant decrease of cell invasion and metastasis growth. This phenomenon was associated with decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/angiogenesis and a complex rearrangement of the gene expression profile as evaluated by microarray analysis. In conclusion, YY1 and VEGF/CXCR4 seem to intervene in the pathogenesis of the malignant phenotype of osteosarcoma by acting on cell invasiveness and metastasis growth.

  14. Fat cell invasion in long-term denervated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    de Castro Rodrigues, Antonio; Andreo, Jesus Carlos; Rosa, Geraldo Marco; dos Santos, Nícolas Bertolaccini; Moraes, Luis Henrique Rapucci; Lauris, José Roberto P

    2007-01-01

    There are several differences between red and white muscles submitted to different experimental conditions, especially following denervation: a) denervation atrophy is more pronounced in red than white muscles; b) the size of the fibers in the red muscles does not vary between different parts of the muscle before and after denervation, when compared to white muscles; c) the regional difference in the white muscles initially more pronounced after denervation than red muscle; d) red muscle fibers and fibers of the deep white muscle present degenerative changes such as disordered myofibrils and sarcolemmal folds after long-term denervation; e) myotube-like fibers with central nuclei occur in the red muscle more rapidly than white after denervation. Denervation of skeletal muscles causes, in addition to fibers atrophy, loss of fibers with subsequent regeneration, but the extent of fat cell percentage invasion is currently unknown. The present article describes a quantitative study on fat cell invasion percentage in red m. soleus and white m. extensor digitorum longus (EDL) rat muscles at 7 weeks for up to 32 weeks postdenervation. The results indicate that the percentage of fat cells increase after denervation and it is steeper than the age-related fat invasion in normal muscles. The fat percentage invasion is more pronounced in red compared with white muscle. All experimental groups present a statistically significant difference as regard fat cell percentage invasion.

  15. Astragalus saponins affect proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of gastric cancer BGC-823 cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Astragalus memebranaceus is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used in treatment of common cold, diarrhea, fatigue, anorexia and cardiac diseases. Recently, there are growing evidences that Astragalus extract may be a potential anti-tumorigenic agent. Some research showed that the total saponins obtained from Astragalus membranaceus possess significant antitumorigenic activity. Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world, almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. But the effect of Astragalus membranaceus on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of gastric cancer BGC-823 cells remains unclear. Methods Astragalus saponins were extracted. Cells proliferation was determined by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by the flow cytometry. Boyden chamber was used to evaluate the invasion and metastasis capabilities of BGC-823 cells. Tumor growth was assessed by subcutaneous inoculation of cells into BALB/c nude mice. Results The results demonstrated that total Astragalus saponins could inhibit human gastric cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, in additional, Astragalus saponins deceased the invasion ability and induced the apoptosis of gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. Conclusions Total Astragalus saponins inhibited human gastric cancer cell growth, decreased the invasion ability and induced the apoptosis. This suggested the possibility of further developing Astragalus as an alternative treatment option, or perhaps using it as adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:24152941

  16. Astragalus saponins affect proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of gastric cancer BGC-823 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xuan, Xiaoyan; Li, Min; Gao, Ping; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Wenqiao; Zhao, Guoqiang

    2013-10-24

    Astragalus memebranaceus is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine used in treatment of common cold, diarrhea, fatigue, anorexia and cardiac diseases. Recently, there are growing evidences that Astragalus extract may be a potential anti-tumorigenic agent. Some research showed that the total saponins obtained from Astragalus membranaceus possess significant antitumorigenic activity. Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in the world, almost two-thirds of gastric cancer cases and deaths occur in less developed regions. But the effect of Astragalus membranaceus on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of gastric cancer BGC-823 cells remains unclear. Astragalus saponins were extracted. Cells proliferation was determined by CCK-8 assay. Cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by the flow cytometry. Boyden chamber was used to evaluate the invasion and metastasis capabilities of BGC-823 cells. Tumor growth was assessed by subcutaneous inoculation of cells into BALB/c nude mice. The results demonstrated that total Astragalus saponins could inhibit human gastric cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo, in additional, Astragalus saponins deceased the invasion ability and induced the apoptosis of gastric cancer BGC-823 cells. Total Astragalus saponins inhibited human gastric cancer cell growth, decreased the invasion ability and induced the apoptosis. This suggested the possibility of further developing Astragalus as an alternative treatment option, or perhaps using it as adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent in gastric cancer therapy.

  17. Pharmacological targeting of membrane rigidity: implications on cancer cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braig, Simone; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Stoiber, Katharina; Händel, Chris; Möhn, Till; Werz, Oliver; Müller, Rolf; Zahler, Stefan; Koeberle, Andreas; Käs, Josef A.; Vollmar, Angelika M.

    2015-08-01

    The invasive potential of cancer cells strongly depends on cellular stiffness, a physical quantity that is not only regulated by the mechanical impact of the cytoskeleton but also influenced by the membrane rigidity. To analyze the specific role of membrane rigidity in cancer progression, we treated cancer cells with the Acetyl-CoA carboxylase inhibitor Soraphen A and revealed an alteration of the phospholipidome via mass spectrometry. Migration, invasion, and cell death assays were employed to relate this alteration to functional consequences, and a decrease of migration and invasion without significant impact on cell death has been recorded. Fourier fluctuation analysis of giant plasma membrane vesicles showed that Soraphen A increases membrane rigidity of carcinoma cell membranes. Mechanical measurements of the creep deformation response of whole intact cells were performed using the optical stretcher. The increase in membrane rigidity was observed in one cell line without changing the creep deformation response indicating no restructuring of the cytoskeleton. These data indicate that the increase of membrane rigidity alone is sufficient to inhibit invasiveness of cancer cells, thus disclosing the eminent role of membrane rigidity in migratory processes.

  18. MicroRNA-150 upregulation reduces osteosarcoma cell invasion and metastasis by downregulating Ezrin

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Ce; Li, Cheng; Zhang, Hao; Tang, Hao; Ji, Fang; Qiao, Su-Chi; Xu, Wei-Dong; Wang, Zhi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of microRNA-150 (miRNA/miR-150) in osteosarcoma (OS) cell invasion and metastasis by the regulation of Ezrin. To compare the differences in the expression of miR-150 and Ezrin, cell models of OS metastasis were established by exogenous transfection of miR-150 on the basis of different expression levels of miR-150. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to estimate these expression levels. Ezrin expression was detected by western blot assay. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was performed to determine cells proliferation. Cell invasion and migration were measured in vitro by Transwell migration assays. Detection of apoptosis adopted flow cytometry. The results of RT-qPCR showed that the miR-150 expression in OS F5M2 cells was significantly increased following exogenous transfection of miR-150 mimics, and the expression of miR-150 was positively correlated with the concentration of the miR-150 mimics. Western blot assay indicated that the Ezrin expression in the F5M2 cells was decreased with the exogenous overexpression of miR-150. Additionally, Transwell assays revealed that the overexpression of miR-150 significantly suppressed the invasion and metastasis ability of the F5M2 cells. miR-150 upregulation may reduce OS cell invasion and metastasis by downregulating the expression of Ezrin. PMID:27900020

  19. MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhen; Liu, Yun-hui; Diao, Hong-yu; Ma, Jun; Yao, Yi-long

    2015-12-25

    In this study, we analyzed the functional role of miR-661 in glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that overexpression of miR-661 obviously suppressed the proliferation, migration and invasion of glioma cells. MiRNA target prediction algorithms implied that hTERT is a candidate target gene for miR-661. A fluorescent reporter assay confirmed that miR-661 could lead to hTERT gene silencing by recognizing and specifically binding to the predicted site of the hTERT mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) specifically. Furthermore, hTERT knockdown significantly decreased the growth and viability of glioma cells. These results indicate that miR-661 can inhibit glioma cell proliferation, migration and invasion by targeting hTERT. - Highlights: • MiR-661 was downregulated in glioma tissues and functional as a tumor suppressor. • MiR-661 modulates cell proliferation, invasion and migration of glioma cells. • MiR-661 directly target hTERT in glioma cells. • MiR-661 inhibits glioma cell tumorgenesis by targeting hTERT.

  20. Inhibition of cancer cell invasion and metastasis by genistein

    PubMed Central

    Pavese, Janet M.; Farmer, Rebecca L.

    2010-01-01

    Genistein is a small, biologically active flavonoid that is found in high amounts in soy. This important compound possesses a wide variety of biological activities, but it is best known for its ability to inhibit cancer progression. In particular, genistein has emerged as an important inhibitor of cancer metastasis. Consumption of genistein in the diet has been linked to decreased rates of metastatic cancer in a number of population-based studies. Extensive investigations have been performed to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying genistein’s antimetastatic activity, with results indicating that this small molecule has significant inhibitory activity at nearly every step of the metastatic cascade. Reports have demonstrated that, at high concentrations, genistein can inhibit several proteins involved with primary tumor growth and apoptosis, including the cyclin class of cell cycle regulators and the Akt family of proteins. At lower concentrations that are similar to those achieved through dietary consumption, genistein can inhibit the prometastatic processes of cancer cell detachment, migration, and invasion through a variety of mechanisms, including the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling pathway. Several in vitro findings have been corroborated in both in vivo animal studies and in early-phase human clinical trials, demonstrating that genistein can both inhibit human cancer metastasis and also modulate markers of metastatic potential in humans, respectively. Herein, we discuss the variety of mechanisms by which genistein regulates individual steps of the metastatic cascade and highlight the potential of this natural product as a promising therapeutic inhibitor of metastasis. PMID:20730632

  1. Management of periorbital basal cell carcinoma with orbital invasion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Albert; Figueira, Edwin; Huilgol, Shyamala; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common eyelid malignancy; however, orbital invasion by periocular BCC is rare, and management remains challenging. Established risk factors for orbital invasion by BCC include male gender, advanced age, medial canthal location, previous recurrences, large tumor size, aggressive histologic subtype and perineural invasion. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach with orbital exenteration remaining the treatment of choice. Globe-sparing treatment may be appropriate in selected patients and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are often used as adjuvant therapies for advanced or inoperable cases, although the evidence remains limited. We aim to summarize the presentation and treatment of BCC with orbital invasion to better guide the management of this complex condition.

  2. Focal adhesion kinase is involved in type III group B streptococcal invasion of human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sooan; Paul-Satyaseela, Maneesh; Maneesh, Paul-Satyaseela; Lee, Jong-Seok; Romer, Lewis H; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2006-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS), the leading cause of neonatal meningitis, has been shown to invade human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), which constitute the blood-brain barrier. GBS invasion of HBMEC has been shown to require the host cell actin cytoskeleton rearrangements. The present study examined the mechanisms underlying actin cytoskeleton rearrangements that are involved in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC. We showed that type III GBS invasion was inhibited by genistein, a general tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mean 54% invasion decrease at 100 microM), and LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase inhibitor (mean 70% invasion decrease at 50 microM), but not by PP2, an inhibitor of the Src family tyrosine kinases. We subsequently showed that the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was the one of the host proteins tyrosine phosphorylated by type III GBS. Over-expression of a dominant negative form of the FAK C-terminal domain significantly decreased type III GBS invasion of HBMEC (mean 51% invasion decrease). In addition, we showed that FAK phosphorylation correlated with its association of paxillin, an adapter protein of actin filament, and PI3-kinase subunit p85. This is the first demonstration that FAK phosphorylation and its association with paxillin and PI3 kinase play a key role in type III GBS invasion of HBMEC.

  3. Metastasis-associated phosphatase PRL-2 regulates tumor cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Lazo, J S

    2012-02-16

    The phosphatase of regenerating liver (PRL) family, comprising PRL-1, PRL-2 and PRL-3, is a group of prenylated phosphatases that are candidate cancer biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Although several studies have documented that altered expression of PRL-1 or PRL-3 can influence cell proliferation, migration and invasion, there is a dearth of knowledge about the biological functions of PRL-2. Thus, in the current study we have evaluated the role of PRL-2 in cell migration and invasion in human cancer cells. We found that four human lung cancer cells, including A549 cells, overexpress PRL-2 when compared with normal lung cells. PRL-2 knockdown by RNA interference markedly inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this inhibition can be restored by overexpressing the short interference RNA (siRNA)-resistant vector HA-PRL-2m. PRL-2 suppression by siRNA decreased p130Cas and vinculin expression, and decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, while increasing the phosphorylation of ezrin on tyrosine 146. We found no significant changes in total p53, Akt and c-Src expression levels or their phosphorylation status, suggesting that PRL-2 knockdown could inhibit tumor cell migration and invasion through a Src-independent p130Cas signaling pathway. Ectopic expression of wild-type PRL-2, a catalytic inactive C101S mutant and a C-terminal CAAX deletion revealed a requirement for both the PRL-2 catalytic functionality and prenylation site. Expression of wild-type but not mutant forms of PRL-2 caused ERK phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. These results support a model in which PRL-2 promotes cell migration and invasion through an ERK-dependent signaling pathway.

  4. Tumor cell invasion of basement membrane in vitro is regulated by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Rinehart, C A; Kim, J P; Tolleson-Rinehart, S; Lawing, L F; Kaufman, D G; Siegal, G P

    1996-01-01

    Because most cancer deaths result from disseminated disease, understanding the regulation of tumor invasion and metastasis is a central theme in tumor cell biology. Interactions between extracellular matrices (ECM) and cellular microenvironment play a crucial role in this process. We have tested selected amino acids and polyamines for their ability to regulate RL95-2 cell invasion through both intact human amniotic basement membrane and a novel human ECM (Amgel). Three major systems for neutral amino acid transport, systems L, A, and ASC, are operational in these neoplastic cells. Amino acids entering the cell via transport system A or N, i.e., (methyl amino)-isobutyrate (MeAIB) or Asn, markedly enhanced invasiveness of these human adenocarcinoma cells as measured by a standard 72-hr amnion or Amgel invasion assay. Addition of 2-amino-2-norborane carboxylic acid (BCH; 1 mM), a model substrate of the L transport system, caused a significant decrease in invasive activity when tested in the Amgel assay. Interestingly, Val lowers steady-state levels of MeAIB uptake and blocks the increase in cell invasion elicited by MeAIB. At the same time, these amino acids do not influence cell proliferation activity. Neither the charged amino acid Lys or Asp (not transported by A/N/L systems) nor the polyamines putrescine, spermidine, or spermine modulate invasiveness under similar experimental conditions. Moreover, the observed time-dependent stimulation of system A activity (cellular influx of MeAIB) by substrate depletion is prevented by the addition of actinomycin D (5 microM) or cycloheximide (100 microM), suggesting the involvement of de novo RNA and protein synthesis events in these processes. MeAIB treatment of tumor cells selectively increased the activities of key invasion-associated type IV collagenases/gelatinases. These results indicate that in the absence of defined regulators (growth factors or hormones), certain amino acids may contribute to the epigenetic control

  5. Depleting MEKK1 expression inhibits the ability of invasion and migration of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Fuqin; Li, Hongyan; Yan, Chaoqi; Jia, Baoqing; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2009-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein/ERK kinase 1 (MEKK1) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase belonging to the MEKK/STE11 subgroup of the MAPKKK family and plays a key role in tumor metastasis. However, it remains unclear about its functions in pancreatic cancer. We analyzed MEKK1 expression in 41 surgically resection pancreatic cancer patient's samples by immunohistochemistry and determined its role in BxPC3 cells via RNAi experiment. The abilities of invasion, motility, and adhesion of BxPC3 cells were detected by transwell assay, wound healing assay and adhesion assay, respectively. Gelatinase activity of MMPs in cultured cells was examined by gelatin zymography. Our data showed that MEKK1 expression is positively correlated with lymphatic metastases (P < 0.01). The abilities of invasion, motility, and adhesion of BxPC3 cells were inhibited significantly (P < 0.01) when MEKK1 was depleted with a specific siRNA. We observed that the activity of MMP2 was decreased in the MEKK1 depletion cell line (P < 0.05), accompanied with decreased phosphorylated ERK1/2. Our results indicated that the depletion of MEKK1 led to a potent inhibition on the invasion and migration of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma in vitro. It suggests that MEKK1 may be a potential target for development of anti-invasion and metastasis drugs.

  6. ETV4 and Myeov knockdown impairs colon cancer cell line proliferation and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Alan C. . E-mail: amoss@bidmc.harvard.edu; Lawlor, Garrett; Murray, David; Tighe, Donal; Madden, Stephen F.; Mulligan, Anne-Marie; Keane, Conor O.; Brady, Hugh R.; Doran, Peter P.; MacMathuna, Padraic

    2006-06-23

    We have identified novel colorectal cancer-associated genes using NCBI's UNIGENE cDNA libraries. Colon cancer libraries were examined using Digital Differential Display and disease-associated genes were selected. Among these were ETV4 and MYEOV, novel colorectal cancer-associated genes. Samples of matched normal and neoplastic colon were obtained from human subjects and gene expression was quantified using real-time PCR. ETV4 gene expression was significantly increased in colonic neoplasia in comparison to matched normal colonic tissue (p < 0.05). Myeov expression was also increased in colon neoplasia in comparison to matched normal tissue. The effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of ETV4 and Myeov on cell proliferation and invasion was assessed. ETV4 knockdown resulted in a 90% decrease in cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and a 67% decrease in cell invasion. Myeov knockdown resulted in a 48% decrease in cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and a 36% decrease in cell invasion. These data suggest that ETV4 and Myeov may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Identification of molecular pathways facilitating glioma cell invasion in situ.

    PubMed

    Nevo, Ido; Woolard, Kevin; Cam, Maggie; Li, Aiguo; Webster, Joshua D; Kotliarov, Yuri; Kim, Hong Sug; Ahn, Susie; Walling, Jennifer; Kotliarova, Svetlana; Belova, Galina; Song, Hua; Bailey, Rolanda; Zhang, Wei; Fine, Howard A

    2014-01-01

    Gliomas are mostly incurable secondary to their diffuse infiltrative nature. Thus, specific therapeutic targeting of invasive glioma cells is an attractive concept. As cells exit the tumor mass and infiltrate brain parenchyma, they closely interact with a changing micro-environmental landscape that sustains tumor cell invasion. In this study, we used a unique microarray profiling approach on a human glioma stem cell (GSC) xenograft model to explore gene expression changes in situ in Invading Glioma Cells (IGCs) compared to tumor core, as well as changes in host cells residing within the infiltrated microenvironment relative to the unaffected cortex. IGCs were found to have reduced expression of genes within the extracellular matrix compartment, and genes involved in cell adhesion, cell polarity and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes. The infiltrated microenvironment showed activation of wound repair and tissue remodeling networks. We confirmed by protein analysis the downregulation of EMT and polarity related genes such as CD44 and PARD3 in IGCs, and EFNB3, a tissue-remodeling agent enriched at the infiltrated microenvironment. OLIG2, a proliferation regulator and glioma progenitor cell marker upregulated in IGCs was found to function in enhancing migration and stemness of GSCs. Overall, our results unveiled a more comprehensive picture of the complex and dynamic cell autonomous and tumor-host interactive pathways of glioma invasion than has been previously demonstrated. This suggests targeting of multiple pathways at the junction of invading tumor and microenvironment as a viable option for glioma therapy.

  8. Decreasing strain on the surgeon in gynecologic minimally invasive surgery by using semi-active robotics.

    PubMed

    Tchartchian, Garri; Dietzel, Joanna; Bojahr, Bernd; Hackethal, Andreas; De Wilde, Rudy

    2011-01-01

    To assess the advantages of a surgeon-controlled robotic endoscope holder in gynecologic minimally invasive solo-surgery as compared with conventional assistance with a second surgeon. One hundred gynecologic laparoscopies were consecutively allocated to surgery with either a robot as the surgical assistant or a conventional assistant surgeon. Total operation time, image stability, and frequency of corrective maneuvers of the camera, in addition to the surgeon's satisfaction regarding the ergonomics of the intervention, were recorded. All interventions were performed by the same surgeon. All laparoscopic surgery was classified as either easy or advanced surgery. The image stability score was significantly higher (10 vs 7; P<0.001) and fewer corrective maneuvers of the robotic endoscope were necessary (1 vs 5; P<0.001) with the robotic laparoscope holder; in addition, the surgeon recorded a significantly higher satisfaction score for the ergonomics of the semi-active robot (10 vs 7; P<0.001). The robot does not prolong total operation time and increases the surgeon's comfort by improving image stability and laparoscope handling. It could provide major benefit, especially in complex gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. CRISPR-Cas9 Mediated NOX4 Knockout Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Invasion in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Rackhyun; Li, Liqing; Jang, Minsu; Morris, Andrew J.; Huang, Cai

    2017-01-01

    Increased expression of NOX4 protein is associated with cancer progression and metastasis but the role of NOX4 in cell proliferation and invasion is not fully understood. We generated NOX4 knockout HeLa cell lines using the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system to explore the cellular functions of NOX4. After transfection of CRISPR-Cas9 construct, we performed T7 endonuclease 1 assays and DNA sequencing to generate and identify insertion and deletion of the NOX4 locus. We confirmed the knockout of NOX4 by Western blotting. NOX4 knockout cell lines showed reduced cell proliferation with an increase of sub-G1 cell population and the decrease of S/G2/M population. Moreover, NOX4 deficiency resulted in a dramatic decrease in invadopodium formation and the invasive activity. In addition, NOX4 deficiency also caused a decrease in focal adhesions and cell migration in HeLa cells. These results suggest that NOX4 is required for both efficient proliferation and invasion of HeLa cells. PMID:28099519

  10. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong-Xia; Wang, Honglan; Wang, Yuchun; Song, Juan; Tian, Hua; Xia, Chunhui; Shen, Yetong

    2016-12-01

    Changes in the carbohydrate structure on the surface of tumor cells is an important feature of cancer metastasis. The specific role of sialic acids in the glycoconjugate terminal has not yet been clearly elucidated in these processes. Previously, we reported that α2,3-sialic acid residues in breast cancer are associated with metastatic potential. The α2,3-sialyltransferase ST3Gal III, which adds α2,3-sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in various tumors, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor metastasis, yet its mechanistic role has not been fully evaluated. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the influence of ST3Gal III on key steps in the process of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III-overexpressing and ST3Gal III-silenced breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell lines were generated. They showed an increase or decrease in the tumor-associated antigen sialyl-Lewis X (SLeX). The E-selectin binding capacity of the transfectants was proportional to cell surface SLeX levels. Cell migration and invasion were positively correlated with ST3Gal III levels. Moreover, ST3Gal III expression modulated the protein expression of invasion-related molecules, including β1 integrin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and cyclooxygenase-2, which may account for the mechanism involved in the effects of ST3Gal III on breast cancer invasiveness. In conclusion, our findings in these novel models of ST3Gal III expression revealed a critical requirement for ST3Gal III in several steps of breast cancer metastasis. ST3Gal III modulates breast cancer cell adhesion and invasion by altering the expression of invasion-related molecules. This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying metastasis and suggests a new target for the effective drug treatment of breast cancer metastasis.

  11. Melanotransferrin induces human melanoma SK-Mel-28 cell invasion in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Yanick . E-mail: oncomol@nobel.si.uqam.ca

    2007-02-09

    The expression of melanotransferrin (MTf), a membrane-bound glycoprotein highly expressed in melanomas, is correlated with tumor vascularization and progression, suggesting a proinvasive function associated with MTf in malignant tumors. To test this hypothesis, we silenced MTf in human melanoma SK-MEL-28 cells using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and examined the plasmin activity and invasiveness of MTf-silenced melanoma. In vitro, the siRNA-mediated MTf knockdown inhibited by 58% the cell surface activation of plasminogen into plasmin. In addition, decreased expression of MTf in melanoma cells reduced cell migration. In vivo, we used a nude mice invasion model in which tissue factor (TF) induces vascular [{sup 125}I]-fibrin deposition following injection. Using this metastasis model, the invasive potential of MTf-silenced cells into the lungs was reduced by fivefold. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that MTf overexpression in melanoma cells contributes to tumor progession by stimulating plasmin generation as well as cell migration and invasion.

  12. Emodin inhibits migration and invasion of MHCC-97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wanfu; Zhong, Maofeng; Liang, Shufang; Chen, Yongan; Liu, Dong; Yin, Zifei; Cao, Qingxin; Wang, Chen; Ling, Changquan

    2016-01-01

    Emodin, an anthraquinone derivative from the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum L., was found to have antitumor effects in different types of cancer by regulating multi-molecular targets. The aim of the present study was to explore the effect of emodin on the migration and invasion of MHCC-97H human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Firstly, it was demonstrated that emodin can inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis of cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, using a MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. However, when emodin concentration was <50 µmol/l, it had little effect on the inhibition of proliferation or the induction of apoptosis. Then, it was observed that emodin can significantly suppress cell migration and invasion with a treatment dose <50 µmol/l compared with the control (P<0.05), which was not attributed to a decrease in cell number. Further study demonstrated that emodin significantly suppressed the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 compared with the control, which may be mediated by the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway and suppression of extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK)/MAPK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways. Therefore, the present study, for the first time, used MHCC-97H cells, which have the high potential of malignant invasion, to demonstrate that emodin may inhibit cell migration and invasion. PMID:27882165

  13. Targeting H19 by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference increases A549 cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Sun, Yan; Yi, Jiqun; Wang, Xiuwen; Liang, Jizhen; Pan, Zhaojun; Li, Li; Jiang, Gaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common and a lethal malignancy in the world and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most usual type. H19 long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays essential roles in tumor development. But its role in tumor metastasis is still unclear. MACC1 RNAi and Lentivirus-mediated H19-specific shRNA was used to establish H19 stable knocking-down A549 cells. Transwell assays were performed to examine the effect of H19 knocking-down on A549 cells migration and invasion. The downstream signaling proteins targeted by H19 were also examined by western blot. AG1478 and U0126 were used as the inhibitor of EGFR and ERK1/2, respectively. The knockdown of H19 increased the migration and invasion of A549 cells, and knockdown of metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1) decreased the migration and invasion of A549 cells. Furthermore, MACC1 protein targeted by H19 was upregulated as well as the downstream signaling proteins including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), β-catenin, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibited the expression of EGFR or ERK1/2 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of tumor cells. Our findings showed that H19 functions as a suppressor of NSCLC and plays an important role in the migration and invasion of NSCLC. More importantly, H19 may regulate NSCLC metastasis through modulating cellular signaling pathway proteins related to cell proliferation and cell adhesion, including MACC1, EGFR, β-catenin and ERK1/2. These results put forward our understanding of the detailed mechanism of H19 lncRNA regulating the process of NSCLC metastasis.

  14. Resolvins Decrease Oxidative Stress Mediated Macrophage and Epithelial Cell Interaction through Decreased Cytokine Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Ruan; Phillips, Oluwakemi; Fukumoto, Jutaro; Fukumoto, Itsuko; Tamarapu Parthasarathy, Prasanna; Mandry, Maria; Cho, Young; Lockey, Richard; Kolliputi, Narasaiah

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a key hallmark of ALI and is mediated through ungoverned cytokine signaling. One such cytokine, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) has been demonstrated to be the most bioactive cytokine in ALI patients. Macrophages are the key players responsible for IL-1β secretion into the alveolar space. Following the binding of IL-1β to its receptor, “activated” alveolar epithelial cells show enhanced barrier dysfunction, adhesion molecule expression, cytokine secretion, and leukocyte attachment. More importantly, it is an important communication molecule between the macrophage and alveolar epithelium. While the molecular determinants of this inflammatory event have been well documented, endogenous resolution processes that decrease IL-1β secretion and resolve alveolar epithelial cell activation and tissue inflammation have not been well characterized. Lipid mediator Aspirin-Triggered Resolvin D1 (AT-RvD1) has demonstrated potent pro-resolutionary effects in vivo models of lung injury; however, the contribution of the alveoli to the protective benefits of this molecule has not been well documented. In this study, we demonstrate that AT-RvD1 treatment lead to a significant decrease in oxidant induced macrophage IL-1β secretion and production, IL-1β-mediated cytokine secretion, adhesion molecule expression, leukocyte adhesion and inflammatory signaling. Methods THP-1 macrophages were treated with hydrogen peroxide and extracellular ATP in the presence or absence of AT-RvD1 (1000–0.1 nM). A549 alveolar-like epithelial cells were treated with IL-1β (10 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of AT-RvD1 (0.1 μM). Following treatment, cell lysate and cell culture supernatants were collected for Western blot, qPCR and ELISA analysis of pro-inflammatory molecules. Functional consequences of IL-1β induced alveolar epithelial cell and macrophage activation were also measured following treatment with IL-1β ± AT-RvD1. Results Results demonstrate that

  15. Paracrine regulation of pancreatic cancer cell invasion by peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ziv; Cavel, Oren; Kelly, Kaitlyn; Brader, Peter; Rein, Avigail; Gao, Sizhi P; Carlson, Diane L; Shah, Jatin P; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J

    2010-01-20

    The ability of cancer to infiltrate along nerves is a common clinical observation in pancreas, head and neck, prostate, breast, and gastrointestinal carcinomas. For these tumors, nerves may provide a conduit for local cancer progression into the central nervous system. Although neural invasion is associated with poor outcome, the mechanism that triggers it is unknown. We used an in vitro Matrigel dorsal root ganglion and pancreatic cancer cell coculture model to assess the dynamic interactions between nerves and cancer cell migration and the role of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). An in vivo murine sciatic nerve model was used to study how nerve invasion affects sciatic nerve function. Nerves induced a polarized neurotrophic migration of cancer cells (PNMCs) along their axons, which was more efficient than in the absence of nerves (migration distance: mean = 187.1 microm, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 148 to 226 microm vs 14.4 microm, 95% CI = 9.58 to 19.22 microm, difference = 143 microm; P < .001; n = 20). PNMC was induced by secretion of GDNF, via phosphorylation of the RET-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Nerves from mice deficient in GDNF had reduced ability to attract cancer cells (nerve invasion index: wild type vs gdnf+/-, mean = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.77 vs 0.43, 95% CI = 0.42 to 0.44; P < .001; n = 60-66). Tumor specimens excised from patients with neuroinvasive pancreatic carcinoma had higher expression of the GDNF receptors RET and GRFalpha1 as compared with normal tissue. Finally, systemic therapy with pyrazolopyrimidine-1, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting the RET pathway, suppressed nerve invasion toward the spinal cord and prevented paralysis in mice. These data provide evidence for paracrine regulation of pancreatic cancer invasion by nerves, which may have important implications for potential therapy directed against nerve invasion by cancer.

  16. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  17. JSI-124 Suppresses Invasion and Angiogenesis of Glioblastoma Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guang; Yan, Shaofeng; Xue, Hao; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Jintang; Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the utmost malignant tumors. Excessive angiogenesis and invasiveness are the major reasons for their uncontrolled growth and resistance toward conventional strategies resulting in poor prognosis. In this study, we found that low-dose JSI-124 reduced invasiveness and tumorigenicity of GBM cells. JSI-124 effectively inhibited VEGF expression in GBM cells. In a coculture study, JSI-124 completely prevented U87MG cell–mediated capillary formation of HUVECs and the migration of HUVECs when cultured alone or cocultured with U87MG cells. Furthermore, JSI-124 inhibited VEGF-induced cell proliferation, motility, invasion and the formation of capillary-like structures in HUVECs in a dose-dependent manner. JSI-124 suppressed VEGF-induced p-VEGFR2 activity through STAT3 signaling cascade in HUVECs. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that the expression of CD34, Ki67, p-STAT3 and p-VEGFR2 protein in xenografts was remarkably decreased. Taken together, our findings provide the first evidence that JSI-124 effectively inhibits tumor angiogenesis and invasion, which might be a viable drug in anti-angiogenesis and anti-invasion therapies. PMID:25789853

  18. Role of lipase in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) invasion of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mullen, T; Markey, K; Murphy, P; McClean, S; Callaghan, M

    2007-12-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of ten closely related species associated with life-threatening infection in cystic fibrosis (CF). These bacteria are highly antibiotic resistant, with some strains transmissible, and in a subgroup of patients, they can cause a rapid and fatal necrotising pneumonia. The Bcc organisms produce a range of exoproducts with virulence potential, including exopolysaccharide, proteases and lipases. Many members of the Bcc are also capable of epithelial cell invasion, although the mechanism(s) involved are poorly understood. This study investigates a role for Bcc lipase in epithelial cell invasion by Bcc strains. Lipase activity was measured in eight species of the Bcc. Strains that produced high levels of lipase were predominantly from the B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia species. Pre-treatment of two epithelial cell lines with Bcc lipase significantly increased invasion by two B. multivorans strains and one B. cenocepacia strain and did not affect either plasma membrane or tight junction integrity. Inhibition of Bcc lipase production by the lipase inhibitor Orlistat significantly decreased invasion by both B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia strains in a concentration-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the extent of lipase production across the Bcc and establishes a potential role for lipase in Bcc epithelial cell invasion.

  19. Differential effects of MTSS1 on invasion and proliferation in subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ling, Dong-Jin; Chen, Zhong-Shu; Liao, Qian-De; Feng, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Yin, Ta-Yao

    2016-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for >80% of all cases of lung cancer and can be divided into lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), large-cell carcinoma (LCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Accumulating evidence suggests that MTSS1, which is a newly discovered protein associated with tumor progression and metastasis, may have differential roles in cancer malignancy. As it has been demonstrated that MTSS1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and may be an independent prognostic factor in patients with SCC, the present study explored the differential roles of MTSS1 in the invasion and proliferation of different subtypes of NSCLC. Stable overexpression and knockdown of MTSS1 was performed in human NSCLC H920 (LAC), H1581 (LCC) and SW900 cell lines (SCC), and western blot, cell invasion, proliferation and FAK activity analyses were used to investigate the effects. Overexpression of MTSS1 enhanced the invasion and proliferation abilities of H920 and H1581 cells, and these effects were abolished by treatment with selective FAK inhibitor 14, which did not affect the expression of MTSS1. Notably, overexpression of MTSS1 inhibited invasion and proliferation in SW900 cells, and this effect was enhanced by the selective FAK inhibitor. Knockdown of MTSS1 decreased the invasion and proliferation abilities of H920 and H1581 cells, whereas knockdown increased invasion and proliferation in SW900 cells. Furthermore, while overexpression of MTSS1 induced FAK phosphorylation and activity in H920 and H1581 cells, MTSS1 overexpression inhibited FAK phosphorylation/activity in SW900 cells. Knockdown of MTSS1 decreased FAK phosphorylation/activity in H920 and H1581 cells, whereas knockdown increased these processes in SW900 cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to demonstrate that MTSS1 has differential roles in various subtypes of NSCLC, acting via a FAK-dependent mechanism. The results indicated that MTSS1 may enhance invasion and proliferation in LAC and LCC

  20. Initial steps of metastasis: cell invasion and endothelial transmigration.

    PubMed

    van Zijl, Franziska; Krupitza, Georg; Mikulits, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer mortality. The metastatic cascade represents a multi-step process which includes local tumor cell invasion, entry into the vasculature followed by the exit of carcinoma cells from the circulation and colonization at the distal sites. At the earliest stage of successful cancer cell dissemination, the primary cancer adapts the secondary site of tumor colonization involving the tumor-stroma crosstalk. The migration and plasticity of cancer cells as well as the surrounding environment such as stromal and endothelial cells are mandatory. Consequently, the mechanisms of cell movement are of utmost relevance for targeted intervention of which three different types have been reported. Tumor cells can migrate either collectively, in a mesenchymal or in an amoeboid type of movement and intravasate the blood or lymph vasculature. Intravasation by the interaction of tumor cells with the vascular endothelium is mechanistically poorly understood. Changes in the epithelial plasticity enable carcinoma cells to switch between these types of motility. The types of migration may change depending on the intervention thereby increasing the velocity and aggressiveness of invading cancer cells. Interference with collective or mesenchymal cell invasion by targeting integrin expression or metalloproteinase activity, respectively, resulted in an amoeboid cell phenotype as the ultimate exit strategy of cancer cells. There are little mechanistic details reported in vivo showing that the amoeboid behavior can be either reversed or efficiently inhibited. Future concepts of metastasis intervention must simultaneously address the collective, mesenchymal and amoeboid mechanisms of cell invasion in order to advance in anti-metastatic strategies as these different types of movement can coexist and cooperate. Beyond the targeting of cell movements, the adhesion of cancer cells to the stroma in heterotypic circulating tumor cell emboli is of paramount

  1. NHE1 mediates MDA-MB-231 cells invasion through the regulation of MT1-MMP.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yani; Chang, Guoqiang; Wang, Jian; Jin, Weina; Wang, Lihong; Li, Huawen; Ma, Li; Li, Qinghua; Pang, Tianxiang

    2011-08-15

    Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger 1 (NHE1), an important regulator of intracellular pH (pH(i)) and extracellular pH (pH(e)), has been shown to play a key role in breast cancer metastasis. However, the exact mechanism by which NHE1 mediates breast cancer metastasis is not yet well known. We showed here that inhibition of NHE1 activity, with specific inhibitor Cariporide, could suppress MDA-MB-231 cells invasion as well as the activity and expression of MT1-MMP. Overexpression of MT1-MMP resulted in a distinguished increase in MDA-MB-231 cells invasiveness, but treatment with Cariporide reversed the MT1-MMP-mediated enhanced invasiveness. To explore the role of MAPK signaling pathways in NHE1-mediated breast cancer metastasis, we compared the difference of constitutively phosphorylated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK and JNK in non-invasive MCF-7 cells and invasive MDA-MB-231 cells. Interestingly, we found that the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in MDA-MB-231 cells were higher than in MCF-7 cells, but both MCF-7 cells and MDA-MB-231 cells expressed similar constitutively phosphorylated JNK. Treating MDA-MB-231 cells with Cariporide led to decreased phosphorylation level of both p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 in a time-dependent manner, but JNK activity was not influenced. Supplementation with MAPK inhibitor (MEK inhibitor PD98059, p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and JNK inhibitor SP600125) or Cariporide all exhibited significant depression of MDA-MB-231 cells invasion and MT1-MMP expression. Furthermore, we co-treated MDA-MB-231 cells with MAPK inhibitor and Cariporide. The result showed that Cariporide synergistically suppressed invasion and MT1-MMP expression with MEK inhibitor and p38 MAPK inhibitor, but not be synergistic with the JNK inhibitor. These findings suggest that NHE1 mediates MDA-MB-231 cells invasion partly through regulating MT1-MMP in ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways dependent manner.

  2. CXCR4 silencing inhibits invasion and migration of human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Juntao; Huang, Yongwang; Zhang, Lun

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4 has been reported in various types of human cancer, which is associated with cancer progression and metastasis. However, the investigation of CXCR4 in laryngeal cancer is extremely rare. In the present study, we used lentivirus-mediated shRNA targeting CXCR4 to silenced CXCR4 expression in Hep-2 cells and evaluated the effect of long-term suppression of CXCR4 on Hep-2 growth and metastasis. The Cell proliferation was analyzed by MTS assay, and the invasion and metastasis potentials were analyzed using wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. Our results showed that lentivirus-mediated shRNA effectively infected Hep-2 cells and suppressed CXCR4 expression, and inhibited cell growth of Hep-2 cells. Cell invasion and apoptosis were decreased concomitantly with the reduction in CXCR4 protein expression. Further analysis revealed that CXCR4 silencing caused the reducion of CXCR4, CXCL12, TIMP2, VEGF and MMP9, and the phosphorylation levels of IκB, AKT and MAPK, and also decreased the activity of NF-κB. These results suggested that knockdown of CXCR4 inhibits the invasion and metastasis of Hep-2 through PI3K/AKT and MAPK signaling pathways, by decreasing NF-κB activities to down-regulate VEGF, TIMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of CXCR4 may be an effective interventional therapeutic strategy in laryngeal cancer.

  3. Inhibitory effect of blue light emitting diode on migration and invasion of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Eun-Mi; Hwang, Hyosook; Ryu, Hyang Hwa; Lim, SeokTae; Sohn, Myung-Hee; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong

    2017-01-18

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects and molecular mechanism of blue light emitting diode (LED) in tumor cells. A migration and invasion assay for the metastatic behavior of mouse colon cancer CT-26 and human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells was performed. Cancer cell migration-related proteins were identified by obtaining a 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in total cellular protein profile of blue LED-irradiated cancer cells, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis of proteins. Protein levels were examined by immunoblotting. Irradiation with blue LED inhibited CT-26 and HT-1080 cell migration and invasion. The anti-metastatic effects of blue LED irradiation were associated with inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression. P38 MAPK phosphorylation was increased in blue LED-irradiated CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, but was inhibited after pretreatment with SB203580, a specific inhibitor of p38 MAPK. Inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation by SB203580 treatment increased number of migratory cancer cells in CT-26 and HT-1080 cells, indicating that blue LED irradiation inhibited cancer cell migration via phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Additionally blue LED irradiation of mice injected with CT-26 cells expressing luciferase decreased early stage lung metastasis compared to untreated control mice. These results indicate that blue LED irradiation inhibits cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro and in vivo.

  4. [Kinetic observation on the invasion into and proliferation in IEC-6 cells of Toxoplasma gondii RH strain tachyzoites in vitro].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiao-li; Yin, Guo-rong; Liu, Hong-li; Wang, Hai-long

    2009-02-28

    To study the invasion and proliferation in IEC-6 cells of Toxoplasma gondii RH strain tachyzoites in vitro. T. gondii tachyzoites of RH strain were co-cultured with IEC-6 cells in vitro, the process of cell adhesion, invasion and proliferation by tachyzoites was observed consecutively with inverted microscope. At 5 min, 10 min, 20 min, 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after co-culture, the tachyzoite invasion to IEC-6 and intracellular proliferation were observed with Giemsa-Wright's staining, respectively. The invasive rate of tachyzoites to IEC-6 was counted. T. gondii tachyzoites invaded the IEC-6 cells 5 min after culture, henceforth the invasive rate increased gradually. The invasive rate was about 55.0% at the first hour after culture with 1-5 tachyzoites in one cell. In the second hour after culture, the rate reached highest with 81.8% and there were many pseudocysts emerging. At the same time, tachyzoites invaded the cell nucleus and proliferated in the nucleus. At the 4th hour after culture, the invasive rate began to decrease (80.8 +/- 9.2)%, the pseudocysts began to break and tachyzoites were released to cluster. The clustering tachyzoites increased significantly at the 6th hour. At the 12th hour the clustering tachyzoites decreased and most tachyzoites were free, the number of complete cells decreased obviously. There were only a few cells and pseudocysts left at the 24th hour, and a great quantity of free tachyzoites existed out of the IEC-6 cells. There were plenty of mobile tachyzoites while none of IEC-6 cells existed after 48 h culture. IEC-6 cell may be the suitable target cell of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite. The tachyzoites can invade the IEC-6 cells quickly in vitro and proliferate in the plasma and nucleus with a reproductive cycle of about 6 to 12 hrs.

  5. Decreasing Outer Hair Cell Membrane Cholesterol Increases Cochlear Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    The effect of decreasing membrane cholesterol on the mechanical response of the cochlea to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry. In contrast to pharmacological interventions that typically decrease cochlear electromechanics, reducing membrane cholesterol increased the response. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents and cholesterol depletion increased the asymmetry. The results confirm that outer hair cell electromotility is enhanced by low membrane cholesterol. The asymmetry of the response indicates the outer hair cell resting membrane potential is hyperpolarized relative to the voltage of maximum gain for the outer hair cell voltage-displacement function. The magnitude of the response increase suggests a non-uniform distribution of cholesterol along the lateral wall of normal adult outer hair cells.

  6. Calpain 2 Is Required for the Invasion of Glioblastoma Cells in the Zebrafish Brain Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sangeet; La Du, Jane; Tanguay, Robert L.; Greenwood, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. The ability of glioblastoma cells to invade surrounding brain tissue presents the primary challenge for the success of focal therapeutic approaches. We previously reported that the calcium-activated protease calpain 2 is critical for glioblastoma cell invasion in vitro. Here, we show that expression of calpain 2 is required for the dispersal of glioblastoma cells in a living brain microenvironment. Knockdown of calpain 2 resulted in a 2.9-fold decrease in the invasion of human glioblastoma cells in zebrafish brain. Control cells diffusely migrated up to 450 μm from the site of injection, whereas knockdown cells remained confined in clusters. The invasion study was repeated in organotypic mouse brain tissues, and calpain 2 knockdown cells demonstrated a 2.3-fold lower area of dispersal compared with control cells. In zebrafish brain, glioblastoma cells appeared to migrate in part along the blood vessels of the host. Furthermore, angiogenesis was detected in 27% of zebrafish injected with control cells, whereas only 12.5% of fish receiving knockdown cells showed the formation of new vessels, suggesting a role for calpain 2 in tumor cell angiogenesis. Consistent with the progression of glioblastoma in humans, transplanted tumor cells were not observed to metastasize outside the brain of zebrafish. This study demonstrates that calpain 2 expression is required for the dispersal of glioblastoma cells within the dynamic microenvironment of the brain, identifying zebrafish as a valuable orthotopic system for studying glioblastoma cell invasion. PMID:22183788

  7. Altered CXCR3 isoform expression regulates prostate cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carcinoma cells must circumvent the normally suppressive signals to disseminate. While often considered 'stop' signals for adherent cells, CXCR3-binding chemokines have recently been correlated positively with cancer progression though the molecular basis remains unclear. Results Here, we examined the expression and function of two CXCR3 variants in human prostate cancer biopsies and cell lines. Globally, both CXCR3 mRNA and protein were elevated in localized and metastatic human cancer biopsies compared to normal. Additionally, CXCR3A mRNA level was upregulated while CXCR3B mRNA was downregulated in these prostate cancer specimens. In contrast to normal prostate epithelial cells (RWPE-1), CXCR3A was up to half the receptor in the invasive and metastatic DU-145 and PC-3 prostate cancer cells, but not in the localized LNCaP cells. Instead of inhibiting cell migration as in RWPE-1 cells, the CXCR3 ligands CXCL4/PF4 and CXCL10/IP10 promoted cell motility and invasiveness in both DU-145 and PC-3 cells via PLCβ3 and μ-calpain activation. CXCR3-mediated diminution of cell motility in RWPE-1 cells is likely a result of cAMP upregulation and m-calpain inhibition via CXCR3B signal transduction. Interestingly, overexpression of CXCR3B in DU-145 cells decreased cell movement and invasion. Conclusion These data suggest that the aberrant expression of CXCR3A and down-regulation of CXCR3B may switch a progression "stop" to a "go" signal to promote prostate tumor metastasis via stimulating cell migration and invasion. PMID:22236567

  8. The Inside Story of Shigella Invasion of Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carayol, Nathalie; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy

    2013-01-01

    As opposed to other invasive pathogens that reside into host cells in a parasitic mode, Shigella, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, invades the colonic mucosa but does not penetrate further to survive into deeper tissues. Instead, Shigella invades, replicates, and disseminates within the colonic mucosa. Bacterial invasion and spreading in intestinal epithelium lead to the elicitation of inflammatory responses responsible for the tissue destruction and shedding in the environment for further infection of other hosts. In this article, we highlight specific features of the Shigella arsenal of virulence determinants injected by a type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) that point to the targeting of intestinal epithelial cells as a discrete route of invasion during the initial event of the infectious process. PMID:24086068

  9. Wnt-11 overexpression promoting the invasion of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heng; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Shizhuo; Pang, Xiaoao; Zhang, Shulan

    2016-09-01

    Wnt-11 is a positive regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, which plays a crucial role in carcinogenesis. However, Wnt-11 expression in cervical cancer has not been well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Wnt-11 in cervical tumor proliferation and invasion. This study examined 24 normal cervical squamous epithelia, 29 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and 78 cervical cancer samples. The expression of Wnt-11 was investigated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The expression of the high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) E6 oncoprotein was also investigated by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the expression of Wnt-11, HR-HPV E6, JNK-1, phosphorylated JNK-1(P-JNK1), and β-catenin was examined by western blot analysis following Wnt-11 knockdown or overexpression in HeLa or SiHa cells, respectively. The promotion of cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion was investigated using the cell counting kit-8 and Matrigel invasion assay, respectively. Wnt-11 and HR-HPV E6 expression increased in a manner that corresponded with the progression of cervical cancer and was significantly correlated with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics cancer stage, lymph node metastasis, tumor size, and HPV infection. Wnt-11 protein expression was positively associated with HR-HPV E6 protein expression in all 78 cervical cancer samples (P < 0.001). Furthermore, Wnt-11 was positively associated with P-JNK1 expression and promoted cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion. These observations suggest that the increased Wnt-11 expression observed in cervical cancer cells may lead to the phosphorylation and activation of JNK-1 and significantly promote tumor cell proliferation and cell migration/invasion through activation of the Wnt/JNK pathway. Consequently, Wnt-11 may serve as a novel target for cervical cancer therapy.

  10. Varying Effects of EGF, HGF and TGFβ on Formation of Invadopodia and Invasiveness of Melanoma Cell Lines of Different Origin

    PubMed Central

    Makowiecka, A.; Simiczyjew, A.; Nowak, D.; Mazur, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of melanoma malignancy mechanisms is essential for patient survival, because melanoma is responsible for ca. 75% of deaths related to skin cancers. Enhanced formation of invadopodia and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation are two important drivers of cell invasion, and actin dynamics facilitate protrusive activity by providing a driving force to push through the ECM. We focused on the influence of epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) on melanoma cell invasiveness, since they are observed in the melanoma microenvironment. All three factors stimulated invasion of A375 and WM1341D cells derived from primary tumor sites. In contrast, only EGF and HGF stimulated invasion of WM9 and Hs294T cells isolated from lymph node metastasis. Enhanced formation of invadopodia and ECM degradation underlie the increased amount of invasive cells after stimulation with the tested agents. Generally, a rise in invasive potential was accompanied by a decrease in actin polymerization state (F:G ratio). The F:G ratio remained unchanged or was even increased in cell lines from a metastasis treated with TGFβ. Our findings indicate that the effects of stimulation with EGF, HGF and TGFβ on melanoma cell invasiveness could depend on melanoma cell progression stage. PMID:28076931

  11. Downregulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPL1 alters cell cycle and upregulates invasion-related genes in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Carolina; Flores, M Luz; Conde, José M; Medina, Rafael; Torrubia, Francisco J; Japón, Miguel A; Sáez, Carmen

    2012-04-01

    PTPL1, a non-receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase, has been involved in the regulation of apoptosis and invasiveness of various tumour cell types, but its role in prostate cancer remained to be investigated. We report here that downregulation of PTPL1 by small interfering RNA in PC3 cells decreases cell proliferation and concomitantly reduces the expression of cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclins E and B1, PCNA, PTTG1 and phospho-histone H3. PTPL1 downregulation also increases the invasion ability of PC3 cells through Matrigel coated membranes. cDNA array of PTPL1-silenced PC3 cells versus control cells showed an upregulation of invasion-related genes such as uPA, uPAR, tPA, PAI-1, integrin α6 and osteopontin. This increased expression was also confirmed in PTPL1-silenced DU145 prostate cancer cells by quantitative real time PCR and western blot. These findings suggest that PTPL1 is an important mediator of central cellular processes such as proliferation and invasion.

  12. Melittin inhibits the invasion of MCF-7 cells by downregulating CD147 and MMP-9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianjun; Li, Fengyu; Tan, Jiang; Peng, Xuewei; Sun, Lili; Wang, Ping; Jia, Shengnan; Yu, Qingmiao; Huo, Hongliang; Zhao, Hongyan

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are the critical steps in determining the aggressive phenotype of human cancers. Melittin, a major component of bee venom, has been reported to induce apoptosis in several cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of melittin involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis remain unclear. Our previous study indicated that melittin inhibits cyclophilin A (CypA), a ubiquitously distributed peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase, in macrophage cells. In the present study, the Transwell assay results showed that melittin may downregulate the invasion level of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, it was also found, using flow cytometry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, that melittin decreased the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)147 and matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9), whereas CypA upregulated the expression of CD147 and MMP-9. Overall, the present study indicated that melittin decreased the invasion level of MCF-7 cells by downregulating CD147 and MMP-9 by inhibiting CypA expression. The results of the present study provide an evidence for melittin in anticancer therapy and mechanisms. PMID:28356935

  13. Grape seed extract suppresses MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Dinicola, Simona; Pasqualato, Alessia; Cucina, Alessandra; Coluccia, Pierpaolo; Ferranti, Francesca; Canipari, Rita; Catizone, Angela; Proietti, Sara; D'Anselmi, Fabrizio; Ricci, Giulia; Palombo, Alessandro; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer remains a leading cause of mortality among women. In metastasis, cascade migration of cancer cells and invasion of extracellular matrix (ECM) represent critical steps. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), as well as metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9, strongly contribute to ECM remodelling, thus becoming associated with tumour migration and invasion. In addition, the high expression of cytoskeletal (CSK) proteins, as fascin, has been correlated with clinically aggressive metastatic tumours, and CSK proteins are thought to affect the migration of cancer cells. Consumption of fruits and vegetables, characterized by high procyanidin content, has been associated to a reduced mortality for breast cancer. Therefore, we investigated the biological effect of grape seed extract (GSE) on the highly metastatic MDA-MB231 breast cancer cell line, focusing on studying GSE ability in inhibiting two main metastatic processes, i.e., cell migration and invasion. After MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells stimulated with GSE migration and invasion were evaluated by means of trans-well assays and uPA as well as MMPs activity was detected by gelatin zymography. Fascin, β-catenin and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression were determined using western blot technique. β-Catenin localization was observed by confocal microscopy. We observed that high concentrations of GSE inhibited cell proliferation and apoptosis. Conversely, low GSE concentration decreased cell migration and invasion, likely by hampering β-catenin expression and localization, fascin and NF-κB expression, as well as by decreasing the activity of uPA, MMP-2 and MMP-9. These results make GSE a powerful candidate for developing preventive agents against cancer metastasis.

  14. RASSF4 Overexpression Inhibits the Proliferation, Invasion, EMT, and Wnt Signaling Pathway in Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minglei; Wang, Dapeng; Zhu, Tongtong; Yin, Ruofeng

    2017-01-02

    RASSF4, a member of the RASSF family, is broadly expressed in normal tissues but often inactivated in human cancers. Despite various studies on RASSF4, its role in osteosarcoma remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of RASSF4 expression on osteosarcoma cells and explored the underlying mechanism. The results of our study showed that RASSF4 was lowly expressed in osteosarcoma tissues and cells. RASSF4 overexpression significantly inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as the EMT process in osteosarcoma cells. Meanwhile, we found that RASSF4 overexpression markedly decreased the protein expression of β-catenin, cyclin D1, and c-Myc in osteosarcoma cells. In conclusion, our findings showed that RASSF4 overexpression inhibits proliferation, invasion, EMT, and Wnt signaling pathway in osteosarcoma cells. Thus, RASSF4 may be considered a novel target for osteosarcoma treatment.

  15. Tramadol inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion via α2-adrenoceptor signaling in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, M; Tong, J-H; Zhou, Z-Q; Duan, M-L; Xu, J-G; Zeng, H-J; Wang, S-H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the function of tramadol on cell proliferation, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells in vitro, and to evaluate the effect of tramadol in vivo. Further, we explore the mechanism accounting for the role of tramadol on breast cancer cells. Cell proliferation was detected by the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. Wound healing assay and transwell assay was applied to quantify the migration and invasion ability of MDA-MB-231 cells. The expression of endogenous α2-adrenoceptor and ERK was measured by Western blotting. Tramadol at a clinical dose of up to 2 μM significantly inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion in a time-dependent manner from day 0 to 28 in vitro. Moreover, tramadol suppressed the growth of xenotransplant tumor in vivo markedly. Furthermore, the protein levels of α2-adrenoceptor and phosphorylated ERK were decreased by tramadol, whereas the expression of total ERK remained unchanged. In addition, downregulation of α2-adrenoceptor by yohimbine could mimic the effect of tramadol treatment. Collectively, we demonstrated that tramadol could inhibit proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cancers via inactivating α2-adrenoceptor signaling pathway. Our data provide the experimental fundamental for further investigation of the anti-cancer effect of tramadol in breast cancer cells.

  16. Inhibitory effects of p-dodecylaminophenol on the invasiveness of human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Noriko; Takeda, Kotaro; Imai, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Cancer is a major cause of death, and the development of new anticancer drugs is urgently needed. Invasion and metastasis are the primary causes of death due to cancer rather than growth of the primary tumor. In the current study, we examined the anti-invasive effects of p-dodecylaminophenol (1), which was developed based on N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (2), a synthetic amide of all-trans-retinoic acid (3). In HT1080 cells 1 inhibited growth, induced apoptosis and arrested the cell cycle in S phase in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, 1 significantly suppressed cell invasion, and the activity and mRNA expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Furthermore, the expression of the reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK), which is a negative regulator of MMP-9, was increased by treatment with 1. These results suggest that 1 could be an effective anti-cancer agent that suppresses cell growth through apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest, which also inhibits cell invasion by decreasing MMP-9 expression due to an increase in RECK. Compound 1 might be useful clinically as a new and potent anticancer agent that could overcome adverse side effects of the retinoids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Diversin Is Overexpressed in Breast Cancer and Accelerates Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinmiao; Wang, Minghao; Dong, Qianze; Jin, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Diversin was recently reported to play roles in Wnt and JNK pathways. However, the expression pattern and biological roles of diversin in human breast cancer have not been reported. In the present study, we found that diversin was overexpressed in breast cancer specimens by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Significant association was observed between diversin overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0036), nodal metastasis (p = 0.0033), negative estrogen receptor expression (p = 0.0012) and triple-negative status (p = 0.0017). Furthermore, colony formation assay and matrigel invasion assay showed that knockdown of diversin expression in MDA-MB-231 cell line with high endogenous expression decreased cell proliferation and cell invasion. Transfection of diversin plasmid in MCF-7 cell line increased cell proliferation and invasion. Further analysis showed that diversin depletion downregulated JNK phosphorylation while its overexpression upregulated JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that diversin was overexpressed in human breast cancers. Diversin could contribute to breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. PMID:24858714

  18. Hyaluronan-CD44 Interactions Decrease the Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    HA) [1]. HA is a disaccharide ubiquitously expressed throughout extracellular matrices. It binds the adhesion receptor CD44, affecting multiple...inhibits cellular invasion, then the addition of this antibody should have no effect on levels of invasion as this does not affect the composition of HA...HA to the cellular media can promote invasion [7, 21, 22]. We next set out to determine if HA affects cell invasion differently depending on if it

  19. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nicole E.; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H.; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant–soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m−2. Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant–microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  20. Epithelial cells captured from ductal carcinoma in situ reveal a gene expression signature associated with progression to invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abuázar, Carolina Sens; de Toledo Osorio, Cynthia Aparecida Bueno; Pinilla, Mabel Gigliola; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Silva, Wilson Araujo; e Ferreira, Elisa Napolitano; Brentani, Helena Paula; Carraro, Dirce Maria

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer biomarkers that can precisely predict the risk of progression of non-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions to invasive disease are lacking. The identification of molecular alterations that occur during the invasion process is crucial for the discovery of drivers of transition to invasive disease and, consequently, biomarkers with clinical utility. In this study, we explored differences in gene expression in mammary epithelial cells before and after the morphological manifestation of invasion, i.e., early and late stages, respectively. In the early stage, epithelial cells were captured from both pre-invasive lesions with distinct malignant potential [pure DCIS as well as the in situ component that co-exists with invasive breast carcinoma lesions (DCIS-IBC)]; in the late stage, epithelial cells were captured from the two distinct morphological components of the same sample (in situ and invasive components). Candidate genes were identified using cDNA microarray and rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) cDNA libraries and validated by RT-qPCR assay using new samples from each group. These analyses revealed 26 genes, including 20 from the early and 6 from the late stage. The expression profile based on the 20 genes, marked by a preferential decrease in expression level towards invasive phenotype, discriminated the majority of DCIS samples. Thus, this study revealed a gene expression signature with the potential to predict DCIS progression and, consequently, provides opportunities to tailor treatments for DCIS patients. PMID:27708222

  1. Proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Aimed to facilitate candidate biomarkers selection and improve network-based multi-target therapy, we perform comparative proteomics research on muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Laser capture microdissection was used to harvest purified muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells from 4 paired samples. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the proteome expression profile. The differential proteins were further analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared with the published literature. Results A total of 885/890 proteins commonly appeared in 4 paired samples. 295/337 of the 488/493 proteins that specific expressed in tumor/normal cells own gene ontology (GO) cellular component annotation. Compared with the entire list of the international protein index (IPI), there are 42/45 GO terms exhibited as enriched and 9/5 exhibited as depleted, respectively. Several pathways exhibit significantly changes between cancer and normal cells, mainly including spliceosome, endocytosis, oxidative phosphorylation, etc. Finally, descriptive statistics show that the PI Distribution of candidate biomarkers have certain regularity. Conclusions The present study identified the proteome expression profile of muscle-invasive bladder cancer cells and normal urothelial cells, providing information for subcellular pattern research of cancer and offer candidate proteins for biomarker panel and network-based multi-target therapy. PMID:21645413

  2. Resveratrol inhibits development of experimental endometriosis in vivo and reduces endometrial stromal cell invasiveness in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bruner-Tran, Kaylon L; Osteen, Kevin G; Taylor, Hugh S; Sokalska, Anna; Haines, Kaitlin; Duleba, Antoni J

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecologic disorder characterized by ectopic attachment and growth of endometrial tissues. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol with antiproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties. Our objective was to study the effects of resveratrol on human endometriotic implants in a nude mouse model and to examine its impact on human endometrial stromal (HES) cell invasiveness in vitro. Human endometrial tissues were obtained from healthy donors. Endometriosis was established in oophorectomized nude mice by intraperitoneal injection of endometrial tissues. Mice were treated with 17β-estradiol (8 mg, silastic capsule implants) alone (n = 16) or with resveratrol (6 mg/mouse; n = 20) for 10-12 and 18-20 days beginning 1 day after tissue injection. Mice were killed and endometrial implants were evaluated. A Matrigel invasion assay was used to examine the effects of resveratrol on HES cells. We assessed number and size of endometriotic implants in vivo and Matrigel invasion in vitro. Resveratrol decreased the number of endometrial implants per mouse by 60% (P < 0.001) and the total volume of lesions per mouse by 80% (P < 0.001). Resveratrol (10-30 μM) also induced a concentration-dependent reduction of invasiveness of HES by up to 78% (P < 0.0001). Resveratrol inhibits development of endometriosis in the nude mouse and reduces invasiveness of HES cells. These observations may aid in the development of novel treatments of endometriosis.

  3. Anti-invasive activity against cancer cells of phytochemicals in red jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Pintha, Komsak; Yodkeeree, Supachai; Pitchakarn, Pornsirit; Limtrakul, Pornngarm

    2014-01-01

    Red rice contains pharmacological substances including phenolics, oryzanol, tocotrienol and tocopherol. Recently, red rice extract has been employed as a source of antioxidants for inhibition of tumor growth. This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-invasion effects of red rice extract fractions on cancer cells. It was found that at 100 μg/ml of crude ethanolic extract (CEE), hexane fraction (Hex) and dichloromethane fraction (DCM) could reduce HT1080 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cell invasion. Hex and DCM revealed higher potency levels than CEE, whereas an ethyl acetate fraction (EtOAc) had no effect. Gelatin zymography revealed that Hex decreased the secretion and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and-9). In contrast, the DCM fraction exhibited slightly effect on MMPs secretion and had no effect on MMPs activity. Collagenase activity was significantly inhibited by the Hex and DCM fractions. High amounts of γ-oryzanol and γ-tocotrienol were found in the Hex and DCM fractions and demonstrated an anti-invasion property. On the other hand, proanthocyanidin was detected only in the CEE fraction and reduced MDA-MB-231 cells invasion property. These observations suggest that proanthocyanidin, γ-oryzanol and γ-tocotrienol in the red rice fractions might be responsible for the anti invasion activity. The red rice extract may have a potential to serve as a food-derived chemotherapeutic agent for cancer patients.

  4. Tomatidine inhibits invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma cell A549 by reducing matrix metalloproteinases expression.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kun-Huang; Lee, Liang-Ming; Yan, Shao-Han; Huang, Hsiang-Ching; Li, Chia-Chen; Lin, Hui-Ting; Chen, Pin-Shern

    2013-05-25

    Tomatidine is an aglycone of glycoalkaloid tomatine in tomato. Tomatidine is found to possess anti-inflammatory properties and may serve as a chemosensitizer in multidrug-resistant tumor cells. However, the effect of tomatidine on cancer cell metastasis remains unclear. This study examines the effect of tomatidine on the migration and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell in vitro. The data demonstrates that tomatidine does not effectively inhibit the viability of A549 cells. When treated with non-toxic doses of tomatidine, cell invasion is markedly suppressed by Boyden chamber invasion assay, while cell migration is not affected. Tomatidine reduces the mRNA level of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9 and increases the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK), as well as tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1). The immunoblotting assays indicate that tomatidine is very effective in suppressing the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK). In addition, tomatidine significantly decreases the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), which suggests that tomatidine inhibits NF-κB activity. Furthermore, the treatment of inhibitors specific for PI3K/Akt (LY294002), ERK (U0126), or NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) to A549 cells reduced cell invasion and MMP-2/9 expression. The results suggest that tomatidine inhibits the invasion of A549 cells by reducing the expression of MMPs. It also inhibits ERK and Akt signaling pathways and NF-κB activity. These findings demonstrate a new therapeutic potential for tomatidine in anti-metastatic therapy.

  5. Phosphorylation-mediated activation of LDHA promotes cancer cell invasion and tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Chun, J; Pan, C; Alesi, G N; Li, D; Magliocca, K R; Kang, Y; Chen, Z G; Shin, D M; Khuri, F R; Fan, J; Kang, S

    2017-07-06

    Metastases remain the major cause of death from cancer. Recent molecular advances have highlighted the importance of metabolic alterations in cancer cells, including the Warburg effect that describes an increased glycolysis in cancer cells. However, how this altered metabolism contributes to tumour metastasis remains elusive. Here, we report that phosphorylation-induced activation of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), an enzyme that catalyses the interconversion of pyruvate and lactate, promotes cancer cell invasion, anoikis resistance and tumour metastasis. We demonstrate that LDHA is phosphorylated at tyrosine 10 by upstream kinases, HER2 and Src. Targeting HER2 or Src attenuated LDH activity as well as invasive potential in head and neck cancer and breast cancer cells. Inhibition of LDH activity by small hairpin ribonucleic acid or expression of phospho-deficient LDHA Y10F sensitized the cancer cells to anoikis induction and resulted in attenuated cell invasion and elevated reactive oxygen species, whereas such phenotypes were reversed by its product lactate or antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting that Y10 phosphorylation-mediated LDHA activity promotes cancer cell invasion and anoikis resistance through redox homeostasis. In addition, LDHA knockdown or LDHA Y10F rescue expression in human cancer cells resulted in decreased tumour metastasis in xenograft mice. Furthermore, LDHA phosphorylation at Y10 positively correlated with progression of metastatic breast cancer in clinical patient tumour samples. Our findings demonstrate that LDHA phosphorylation and activation provide pro-invasive, anti-anoikis and pro-metastatic advantages to cancer cells, suggesting that Y10 phosphorylation of LDHA may represent a promising therapeutic target and a prognostic marker for metastatic human cancers.

  6. Mutated D4-guanine diphosphate-dissociation inhibitor is found in human leukemic cells and promotes leukemic cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Yuji; Kondoh, Kensuke; Fukushima, Sachiko; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Du, Wenlin; Hayashi, Mutsumi; Fujimoto, Jun-ichiroh; Hata, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Taketo

    2008-01-01

    cells showed an augmentation of adhesiveness and cell motility. On the other hand, wt D4 cells showed a decreased ability of cell motility. These results suggest the mutated D4-GDI functions as a dominant negative molecule against the wt D4-GDI and accelerates invasion via regulation of cytoskeletal machinery.

  7. Effect of 3-bromopyruvate acid on the redox equilibrium in non-invasive MCF-7 and invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Wojtala, Martyna; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Soszyński, Mirosław; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela

    2016-02-01

    Novel approaches to cancer chemotherapy employ metabolic differences between normal and tumor cells, including the high dependence of cancer cells on glycolysis ("Warburg effect"). 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BP), inhibitor of glycolysis, belongs to anticancer drugs basing on this principle. 3-BP was tested for its capacity to kill human non-invasive MCF-7 and invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We found that 3-BP was more toxic for MDA-MB-231 cells than for MCF-7 cells. In both cell lines, a statistically significant decrease of ATP and glutathione was observed in a time- and 3-BP concentration-dependent manner. Transient increases in the level of reactive oxygen species and reactive oxygen species was observed, more pronounced in MCF-7 cells, followed by a decreasing tendency. Activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) decreased in 3-BP treated MDA-MB-231 cells. For MCF-7 cells decreases of GR and GST activities were noted only at the highest concentration of 3-BP.These results point to induction of oxidative stress by 3-BP via depletion of antioxidants and inactivation of antioxidant enzymes, more pronounced in MDA-MB-231 cells, more sensitive to 3-BP.

  8. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future.

  9. Daucus carota Pentane/Diethyl Ether Fraction Inhibits Motility and Reduces Invasion of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Perla; Daher, Costantine F; Mroueh, Mohamad; Nasrallah, Anita; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2014-01-01

    Daucus carota (DC) is a herb used in folklore medicine in Lebanon to treat numerous diseases including cancer. Recent studies in our laboratory on DC oil and its fractions revealed potent anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the most potent DC fraction, pentane/diethyl ether (50:50), on lung, skin, breast and glioblastoma cancer cell motility and invasion. Upon treatment, a pronounced decrease in cancer cell motility was observed in the 4 cell lines. The treatment also led to a decrease in cancer cell invasion and an increased cell adhesion. Additionally, the DC fraction caused a decrease in the activation of the ρ-GTPases Rac and CDC42, a finding that may partially explain the treatment-induced decrease in cell motility. The current study demonstrates a crucial effect of the DC pentane/diethyl ether fraction on cancer cell motility and metastasis, making it a potential candidate for cancer therapy specifically targeting cancer motility and metastasis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Inhibition by Tyroserleutide (YSL) on the Invasion and Adhesion of the Mouse Melanoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi; Che, Xu-chun; Lu, Rong; Zheng, Min-na; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Li, Jin-ping; Jian, Xu; Shi, Lin-xi; Liu, Jun-yan; Gao, Wen-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Tyroserleutide (YSL) is an active, low-molecular-weight polypeptide, comprised of three amino acids, that has shown antitumor effects on human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the inhibition of YSL on invasion and adhesion of the mouse B16-F10 melanoma cell line by injecting B16-F10 cells into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice to establish an experimental lung metastasis model. YSL inhibited B16-F10 cell metastasis to lung, reducing the number and area of metastasis lesions. When we treated B16-F10 cells with YSL (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL) in vitro, we found that YSL inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 cells with a 28.11% rate of inhibition. YSL significantly decreased the adhesiveness of B16-F10 cells to Matrigel with a 29.15% inhibition rate; YSL also significantly inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 cells, producing an inhibition of 35.31%. By analyses with Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, we found that YSL markedly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 in B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that YSL inhibits the growth, invasion, and adhesion of B16-F10 cells. PMID:17515953

  11. Cancer Cell Glycocalyx Mediates Mechanostransduction and Flow-Regulated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Henry; Palomino, Rocio; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Munn, Lance L.; Tarbell, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells are covered by a surface proteoglycan (glycocalyx) layer, and it is known that blood vessel-lining endothelial cells use the glycocalyx to sense and transduce the shearing forces of blood flow into intracellular signals. Tumor cells in vivo are exposed to forces from interstitial fluid flow that may affect metastatic potential but are not reproduced by most in vitro cell motility assays. We hypothesized that glycocalyx-mediated mechanotransduction of interstitial flow shear stress is an un-recognized factor that can significantly enhance metastatic cell motility and play a role in augmentation of invasion. Involvement of MMP levels, cell adhesion molecules (CD44, α3 integrin), and glycocalyx components (heparan sulfate and hyaluronan) were investigated in a cell/collagen gel suspension model designed to mimic the interstitial flow microenvironment. Physiologic levels of flow upregulated MMP levels and enhanced the motility of metastatic cells. Blocking the flow-enhanced expression of MMP actvity or adhesion molecules (CD44 and integrins) resulted in blocking the flow-enhanced migratory activity. The presence of a glycocalyx-like layer was verified around tumor cells, and the degradation of this layer by hyaluronidase and heparinase blocked the flow-regulated invasion. This study shows for the first time that interstitial flow enhancement of metastatic cell motility can be mediated by the cell surface glycocalyx – a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24077103

  12. How does cancer cell metabolism affect tumor migration and invasion?

    PubMed

    Han, Tianyu; Kang, De; Ji, Daokun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Weihua; Fu, Minggui; Xin, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Accordingly, identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control whether or not tumor cells become "directed walkers" is a crucial issue of cancer research. The deregulation of cell migration during cancer progression determines the capacity of tumor cells to escape from the primary tumors and invade adjacent tissues to finally form metastases. The ability to switch from a predominantly oxidative metabolism to glycolysis and the production of lactate even when oxygen is plentiful is a key characteristic of cancer cells. This metabolic switch, known as the Warburg effect, was first described in 1920s, and affected not only tumor cell growth but also tumor cell migration. In this review, we will focus on the recent studies on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumor cell migration and invasion. Understanding the new aspects on molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling tumor cell migration is critical for development of therapeutic strategies for cancer patients.

  13. [Effect of calmodulin antagonist EBB on invasion of human fibrosarcoma cell HT1080].

    PubMed

    Pan, Bing; Zhou, Yuan; Qi, Jing; Xiong, Dong-sheng; Liu, Jie-wen; Qi, Shu-ling; Cheng, Yan-hong; Yang, Chun-zheng; Zhu, Hui-fang

    2005-06-01

    To investigate the potential effect of EBB, a calmodulin antagonist, on invasion of human fibrosarcoma cells HT1080. The antitumor effect of EBB was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were measured by Zymogrophy analysis. The mRNA levels, of MMP-2, MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 were evaluated by reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Transwell chamber assay was applied to measure the effect of EBB on the invasion of HT1080 cells. Calmodulin antagonist EBB inhibited the proliferation of HT1080 cells with an IC50 of (8.2 +/- 1.2) microg/ml. EBB down-regulated the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, and down-regulated the mRNA levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9, while up-regulated the mRNA levels of TIMP-1. The invasive ability of HT1080 cells was decreased to (31.13 +/- 2.265)%, (59.91 +/- 2.566)%, and (71.58 +/- 0.5960)% after exposure of the cells with 2, 5, and 10 microg/ml EBB, respectively. Treatment with calmodulin antagonist EBB is effective in suppressing tumor invasion. The possible mechanism is the down-regulation of MMPs.

  14. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  15. P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, W-H; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H-Q; Liu, Y; You, J-F; Tian, X-X; Fang, W-G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Our previous study demonstrated that extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) stimulated prostate cancer cell invasion via P2Y receptors. However, the purinergic receptor subtype(s) involved in this process remains unclear. Here we aimed to determine whether P2Y2, one subtype of P2Y receptors, was involved in the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells, and elucidated the underlying mechanism. Methods: RNAi was introduced to silence the expression of P2Y2. In vitro invasion and migration assays and in vivo experiments were carried out to examine the role of P2Y2 receptor in cell invasion and metastasis. cDNA microarray was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes downstream of ATP treatment. Results: P2Y2 was significantly expressed in the prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor suppressed cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Further experiments identified that ATP could promote IL-8 and Snail expression and inhibit E-cadherin and Claudin-1 expression. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor affected the expression of these EMT/invasion-related genes in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells via some EMT/invasion-related genes. Thereby, P2Y2 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23969730

  16. P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, W-H; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H-Q; Liu, Y; You, J-F; Tian, X-X; Fang, W-G

    2013-09-17

    Our previous study demonstrated that extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) stimulated prostate cancer cell invasion via P2Y receptors. However, the purinergic receptor subtype(s) involved in this process remains unclear. Here we aimed to determine whether P2Y2, one subtype of P2Y receptors, was involved in the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells, and elucidated the underlying mechanism. RNAi was introduced to silence the expression of P2Y2. In vitro invasion and migration assays and in vivo experiments were carried out to examine the role of P2Y2 receptor in cell invasion and metastasis. cDNA microarray was performed to identify the differentially expressed genes downstream of ATP treatment. P2Y2 was significantly expressed in the prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor suppressed cell invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Further experiments identified that ATP could promote IL-8 and Snail expression and inhibit E-cadherin and Claudin-1 expression. Knockdown of P2Y2 receptor affected the expression of these EMT/invasion-related genes in vitro and in vivo. P2Y2 receptor promotes cell invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells via some EMT/invasion-related genes. Thereby, P2Y2 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Tumour-suppressor microRNAs regulate ovarian cancer cell physical properties and invasive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yinghong; Nyberg, Kendra; Marra, Marco A.; Lim, Emilia L.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Maar, Dianna; Gibb, Ewan A.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Rowat, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    The activities of pathways that regulate malignant transformation can be influenced by microRNAs (miRs). Recently, we showed that increased expression of five tumour-suppressor miRs, miR-508-3p, miR-508-5p, miR-509-3p, miR-509-5p and miR-130b-3p, correlate with improved clinical outcomes in human ovarian cancer patients, and that miR-509-3p attenuates invasion of ovarian cancer cell lines. Here, we investigate the mechanism underlying this reduced invasive potential by assessing the impact of these five miRs on the physical properties of cells. Human ovarian cancer cells (HEYA8, OVCAR8) that are transfected with miR mimics representing these five miRs exhibit decreased invasion through collagen matrices, increased cell size and reduced deformability as measured by microfiltration and microfluidic assays. To understand the molecular basis of altered invasion and deformability induced by these miRs, we use predicted and validated mRNA targets that encode structural and signalling proteins that regulate cell mechanical properties. Combined with analysis of gene transcripts by real-time PCR and image analysis of F-actin in single cells, our results suggest that these tumour-suppressor miRs may alter cell physical properties by regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Our findings provide biophysical insights into how tumour-suppressor miRs can regulate the invasive behaviour of ovarian cancer cells, and identify potential therapeutic targets that may be implicated in ovarian cancer progression. PMID:27906134

  18. Propofol suppresses proliferation and invasion of glioma cells by upregulating microRNA-218 expression

    PubMed Central

    XU, JINQUAN; XU, WEIYUN; ZHU, JIAQUN

    2015-01-01

    Propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol) is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic agent. The present study aimed to assess the effect of propofol on the proliferation and invasion of human glioma cells, and to determine the potential underlying molecular mechanisms. The effects of propofol on U373 glioblastoma cell proliferation, apoptosis and invasion were detected by an MTT assay, caspase-3 activity measurement and a Matrigel™ invasion assay, respectively. MicroRNA (miR)-218 expression and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 protein expression levels were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. In addition, miR-218 precursor was transfected into the cells to assess whether overexpression of miR-218 could affect MMP-2 expression. Anti-miR-218 was transfected into the cells to evaluate the role of miR-218 in the effects of propofol on the biological behavior of glioma cells. The results of the present study demonstrated that propofol significantly increased the expression levels of miR-218, inhibited U373 cell proliferation and invasion, and facilitated apoptosis. In addition, treatment with propofol efficiently reduced MMP-2 protein expression levels, and overexpression of miR-218 also decreased MMP-2 protein expression levels. Whereas, neutralization of miR-218 using the anti-miR-218 antibody reversed the effects of propofol on the biological behavior of U373 cells, and on the inhibition of MMP-2 protein expression. In conclusion, propofol may effectively suppress proliferation and invasion, and induce the apoptosis of glioma cells, at least partially through upregulation of miR-218 expression. PMID:26133092

  19. Tumor Cell Invasion-Not All Barriers Are Created Equal.

    PubMed

    Welch, Danny R

    2016-04-01

    The importance of invasion in the complex process of metastasis, although now well established, has been studied with increasing molecular detail due to the development of robust in vitro experimental assays. In this issue of Cancer Research, we highlight a paper published by George Poste and colleagues that compared and contrasted several different invasion assays. The authors concluded that various barriers impose different selective pressures and that simply enriching for invasive ability did not necessarily translate into greater metastasis efficiency. Although perhaps obvious now, these findings were surprising when they were published. Certainly, the data highlight the importance of tumor cell-microenvironment interactions and the necessity to interpret experiments taking the context into consideration. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1675-6. ©2016 AACRSee related article by Poste et al., Cancer Res 1980;40:1636-44.

  20. Complement and Antibody-mediated Enhancement of Red Blood Cell Invasion and Growth of Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Biryukov, Sergei; Angov, Evelina; Landmesser, Mary E; Spring, Michele D; Ockenhouse, Christian F; Stoute, José A

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a deadly pathogen. The invasion of red blood cells (RBCs) by merozoites is a target for vaccine development. Although anti-merozoite antibodies can block invasion in vitro, there is no efficacy in vivo. To explain this discrepancy we hypothesized that complement activation could enhance RBC invasion by binding to the complement receptor 1 (CR1). Here we show that a monoclonal antibody directed against the merozoite and human polyclonal IgG from merozoite vaccine recipients enhanced RBC invasion in a complement-dependent manner and that soluble CR1 inhibited this enhancement. Sialic acid-independent strains, that presumably are able to bind to CR1 via a native ligand, showed less complement-dependent enhancement of RBC invasion than sialic acid-dependent strains that do not utilize native CR1 ligands. Confocal fluorescent microscopy revealed that complement-dependent invasion resulted in aggregation of CR1 at the RBC surface in contact with the merozoite. Finally, total anti-P. berghei IgG enhanced parasite growth and C3 deficiency decreased parasite growth in mice. These results demonstrate, contrary to current views, that complement activation in conjunction with antibodies can paradoxically aid parasites invade RBCs and should be considered in future design and testing of merozoite vaccines. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The role of annexin A1 in expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and invasion of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyereen; Ko, Jesang; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of ANXA1 on promoting migration and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 siRNA inhibits invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 regulates MMP-9 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANX-1 siRNA inhibits the activation of NF-{kappa}B in MDA-MB-231 cells. -- Abstract: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. However, the regulatory mechanism of MMP-9 expression and its biological effects on breast cancer development remain obscure. In the current study, we examined the potential role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in regulating migration and invasion in breast cancer cell lines. Both ANXA1 mRNA and protein are expressed in the highly invasive, hormone-insensitive human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3, but not in the hormone-responsive cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Downregulation of ANXA1 expression with specific small interfering RNAs (ANXA1 siRNA) in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in decreased cancer cell migration and invasion. Ablation of ANXA1 expression decreases the expression of MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels and also reduces the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, silencing ANXA1 also decreases the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by the suppression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-{kappa}B) activity. Collectively, these results indicate that ANXA1 functions as a positive regulator of MMP-9 expression and invasion of breast cancer cells through specific activation of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  2. Cell migration and invasion assays as tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hulkower, Keren I; Herber, Renee L

    2011-03-11

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  3. Interference with Tim-3 protein expression attenuates the invasion of clear cell renal cell carcinoma and aggravates anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Muming; Lu, Bin; Liu, Yancun; Me, Ying; Wang, Lijun; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Tumor cells resistant to anoikis are considered to be candidates for metastasis. In the present study, the role of Tim-3 in anoikis and its influence on the invasion of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) was investigated. Here, polyhydroxylethylmethacrylate (poly-HEMA) was applied to two ccRCC cell lines, 786-O and Caki-2, to induce detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tim-3 mRNA and protein expression levels were assayed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot, respectively. Anoikis was measured by Ho33342/PI double staining, acridine orange staining, and further determined using the CytoSelect™ 24-well Anoikis Assay kit. Apoptosis was measured using flow cytometry, E-cadherin and N-cadherin protein expression were determined using western blotting and a Chemicon cell invasion assay kit was used to quantify the invasive capacity of 786-O and Caki-2 cells. It was demonstrated that detachment from the ECM decreases transcription and the protein expression level of Tim-3 in 786-O and Caki-2 cells compared with control cells. Interference with Tim-3 expression using small interfering RNA exacerbated anoikis in 786-O and Caki-2 cells induced by poly-HEMA treatment. E-cadherin upregulation, N-cadherin downregulation, and ECM detachment-induced reduction in invasion ability were all exacerbated by knockdown of Tim-3. In conclusion, interference with Tim-3 expression may attenuate the invasion of renal cell carcinoma by aggravating anoikis, indicating Tim-3 as a potential therapeutic target for treating ccRCC. PMID:28112366

  4. Cytoskeletal protein flightless I inhibits apoptosis, enhances tumor cell invasion and promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Yang, Gink N.; Jackson, Jessica E.; Melville, Elizabeth L.; Cal1ey, Matthew P.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Darby, Ian A.; O'Toole, Edel A.; Samuel, Michael S.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2015-01-01

    Flightless I (Flii) is an actin remodeling protein that affects cellular processes including adhesion, proliferation and migration. In order to determine the role of Flii during carcinogenesis, squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were induced in Flii heterozygous (Flii+/−), wild-type and Flii overexpressing (FliiTg/Tg) mice by intradermal injection of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Flii levels were further assessed in biopsies from human SCCs and the human SCC cell line (MET-1) was used to determine the effect of Flii on cellular invasion. Flii was highly expressed in human SCC biopsies particularly by the invading cells at the tumor edge. FliiTg/Tg mice developed large, aggressive SCCs in response to MCA. In contrast Flii+/− mice had significantly smaller tumors that were less invasive. Intradermal injection of Flii neutralizing antibodies during SCC initiation and progression significantly reduced the size of the tumors and, in vitro, decreased cellular sphere formation and invasion. Analysis of the tumors from the Flii overexpressing mice showed reduced caspase I and annexin V expression suggesting Flii may negatively regulate apoptosis within these tumors. These studies therefore suggest that Flii enhances SCC tumor progression by decreasing apoptosis and enhancing tumor cell invasion. Targeting Flii may be a potential strategy for reducing the severity of SCCs. PMID:26497552

  5. Cathepsin B promotes colorectal tumorigenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Benjamin; Mongrain, Sébastien; Cagnol, Sébastien; Langlois, Marie‐Josée; Boulanger, Jim; Bernatchez, Gérald; Carrier, Julie C.; Boudreau, François

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a cysteine proteinase that primarily functions as an endopeptidase within endolysosomal compartments in normal cells. However, during tumoral expansion, the regulation of cathepsin B can be altered at multiple levels, thereby resulting in its overexpression and export outside of the cell. This may suggest a possible role of cathepsin B in alterations leading to cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intracellular and extracellular cathepsin B in growth, tumorigenesis, and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Results show that mRNA and activated levels of cathepsin B were both increased in human adenomas and in CRCs of all stages. Treatment of CRC cells with the highly selective and non‐permeant cathepsin B inhibitor Ca074 revealed that extracellular cathepsin B actively contributed to the invasiveness of human CRC cells while not essential for their growth in soft agar. Cathepsin B silencing by RNAi in human CRC cells inhibited their growth in soft agar, as well as their invasion capacity, tumoral expansion, and metastatic spread in immunodeficient mice. Higher levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 were observed in cathepsin B‐deficient tumors as well as an increase in cyclin B1. Finally, cathepsin B colocalized with p27Kip1 within the lysosomes and efficiently degraded the inhibitor. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that cathepsin B is a significant factor in colorectal tumor development, invasion, and metastatic spreading and may, therefore, represent a potential pharmacological target for colorectal tumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808857

  6. [Effects of miR-382 on cell migration, invasion and proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803].

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Bu, P; Li, F; Liu, X L; Xu, J

    2017-02-28

    Objective: To investigate the effects of miR-382 on cell migration, invasion and proliferation of gastric cancer cell lines MGC-803. Methods: The level of miR-382 expression was detected by real-time RT-PCR in 50 paired gastric cancer tissues and their adjacent normal tissues. miR-382 overexpression was achieved by transfection of construct pcDNA-miR-382 into MGC-803 cells. The migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells were detected by the scratch wound assay, Transwell and CCK-8, respectively. Results: miR-382 was decreased in 41 cases (82%) of gastric cancer tissues compared to their control. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-382 effectively inhibited the migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells(P<0.05). Conclusion: Down-regulation of miR-382 has a correlation with the progression of gastric cancer. Up-regulation of miR-382 can inhibit the migration, invasion and proliferation of MGC-803 cells.

  7. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Podocalyxin promotes glioblastoma multiforme cell invasion and proliferation by inhibiting angiotensin-(1-7)/Mas signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Yugang

    2015-05-01

    Podocalyxin (PODX) reportedly enhances invasion in many human cancers including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Recent studies have shown that the local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in tumor environment contributes significantly to tumor progression. As a counter-regulatory axis in RAS, angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas signaling has been shown to inhibit the growth and invasiveness of several human cancers including GBM. In the present study, we examined the crosstalk between PODX and Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling in GBM cells, and assessed its impact on GBM cell invasion and proliferation. A strong negative correlation between the expression of PODX and Mas in GBM tumor tissues from 10 consecutive patients (r=-0.768, p<0.01) was observed. The stable overexpression of PODX in LN-229 and U-118 MG human GBM cells decreased the expression of Mas at the mRNA and protein levels, which led to decreased density of Ang-(1-7)-binding Mas on the cell membrane. This effect was completely abolished by selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor BKM120. By contrast, the stable knockdown of PODX in LN-229 and U-118 MG cells increased the expression of Mas and the density of Ang-(1-7)-binding Mas on the cell membrane. Overexpression and knockdown of PODX respectively reversed and enhanced the inhibitory effects of Ang-(1-7) on the expression/activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cell invasion and proliferation in GBM cells. Although the overexpression of Mas showed no significant effect on the promoting effect of PODX on GBM cell invasion and proliferation in the absence of Ang-(1-7), it completely eliminated the effect of PODX in the presence of Ang-(1-7). In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study provided the first evidence that PODX inhibits Ang-(1-7)/Mas signaling by downregulating the expression of Mas through a PI3K-dependent mechanism in GBM cells. This effect led to enhanced GBM cell invasion and proliferation. The results of this study add

  9. Reoxygenation using a novel CO2 therapy decreases the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Risa; Kawamoto, Teruya; Ueha, Takeshi; Minoda, Masaya; Toda, Mitsunori; Onishi, Yasuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Hara, Hitomi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Miwa, Masahiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Akisue, Toshihiro

    2013-08-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary solid malignant bone tumor. Despite substantial improvements in surgery and chemotherapy, metastasis remains a major cause of fatal outcomes, and the molecular mechanisms of metastasis are still poorly understood. Hypoxia, which is common in malignant tumors including osteosarcoma, increases expressions of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, and can induce invasiveness. As we previously showed a novel transcutaneous CO2 application to decrease HIF-1α expression and induce apoptosis in malignant fibrous histiocytoma, we hypothesize that transcutaneous CO2 application could suppress metastatic potential of osteosarcoma by improving hypoxic conditions. Here, we examined the effects of transcutaneous CO2 application on apoptosis, and development of pulmonary metastasis using a highly metastatic osteosarcoma cell line, LM8. Transcutaneous CO2 application significantly decreased tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis in LM8 cells. Apoptotic activity increased, and intratumoral hypoxia was improved with decreased expressions of HIF-1α, MMP-2 and MMP-9, significantly, in the CO2-treated tumors. In conclusion, we found that transcutaneous CO2 application can induce tumor cell apoptosis and might suppress pulmonary metastasis by improvement of hypoxic conditions with decreased expressions of HIF-1α and MMPs in highly metastatic osteosarcoma cell. These findings strongly indicate that this novel transcutaneous CO2 therapy could be a therapeutic breakthrough for osteosarcoma patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of N-cadherin in proliferation, migration, and invasion of germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Bremmer, Felix; Schallenberg, Simon; Jarry, Hubertus; Küffer, Stefan; Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Strauß, Arne; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Honecker, Friedemann; Behnes, Carl Ludwig

    2015-10-20

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common malignancies in young men. Most patients with GCT can be cured with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, even in metastatic disease. In case of therapy resistance, prognosis is usually poor. We investigated the potential of N-cadherin inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the GCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2, TCam-2, and the cisplatin-resistant sublines NCCIT-R and NTERA-2R. Effects of a blocking antibody or siRNA against N-cadherin on proliferation, migration, and invasion were investigated. Mouse xenografts of GCT cell lines were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for N-cadherin expression. All investigated GCT cell lines were found to express N-cadherin protein in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of N-cadherin in vitro leads to a significant inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion. N-cadherin-downregulation leads to a significantly higher level of pERK. N-cadherin-inhibition resulted in significantly higher rates of apoptotic cells in caspase-3 staining. Expression of N-cadherin is preserved in cisplatin-resistant GCT cells, pointing to an important physiological role in cell survival. N-cadherin-downregulation results in a significant decrease of proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulates apoptosis in cisplatin-naive and resistant GCT cell lines. Therefore, targeting N-cadherin may be a promising therapeutic approach, particularly in cisplatin-resistant, therapy refractory and metastatic GCT.

  11. Cofilin drives cell-invasive and metastatic responses to TGF-β in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Joanne; Zhu, Beibei; Larkin, Spencer; Martin, Sarah K; Pu, Hong; Horbinski, Craig; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-04-15

    Cofilin (CFL) is an F-actin-severing protein required for the cytoskeleton reorganization and filopodia formation, which drives cell migration. CFL binding and severing of F-actin is controlled by Ser3 phosphorylation, but the contributions of this step to cell migration during invasion and metastasis of cancer cells are unclear. In this study, we addressed the question in prostate cancer cells, including the response to TGF-β, a critical regulator of migration. In cells expressing wild-type CFL, TGF-β treatment increased LIMK-2 activity and cofilin phosphorylation, decreasing filopodia formation. Conversely, constitutively active CFL (SerAla) promoted filipodia formation and cell migration mediated by TGF-β. Notably, in cocultures of prostate cancer epithelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, active CFL promoted invasive migration in response to TGF-β in the microenvironment. Further, constitutively active CFL elevated the metastatic ability of prostate cancer cells in vivo. We found that levels of active CFL correlated with metastasis in a mouse model of prostate tumor and that in human prostate cancer, CFL expression was increased significantly in metastatic tumors. Our findings show that the actin-severing protein CFL coordinates responses to TGF-β that are needed for invasive cancer migration and metastasis.

  12. Role of N-cadherin in proliferation, migration, and invasion of germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Hubertus; Küffer, Stefan; Kaulfuss, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Strauβ, Arne; Thelen, Paul; Radzun, Heinz Joachim; Ströbel, Philipp; Honecker, Friedemann; Behnes, Carl Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most common malignancies in young men. Most patients with GCT can be cured with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy, even in metastatic disease. In case of therapy resistance, prognosis is usually poor. We investigated the potential of N-cadherin inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. We analyzed the GCT cell lines NCCIT, NTERA-2, TCam-2, and the cisplatin-resistant sublines NCCIT-R and NTERA-2R. Effects of a blocking antibody or siRNA against N-cadherin on proliferation, migration, and invasion were investigated. Mouse xenografts of GCT cell lines were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for N-cadherin expression. All investigated GCT cell lines were found to express N-cadherin protein in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of N-cadherin in vitro leads to a significant inhibition of proliferation, migration, and invasion. N-cadherin-downregulation leads to a significantly higher level of pERK. N-cadherin-inhibition resulted in significantly higher rates of apoptotic cells in caspase-3 staining. Expression of N-cadherin is preserved in cisplatin-resistant GCT cells, pointing to an important physiological role in cell survival. N-cadherin-downregulation results in a significant decrease of proliferation, migration, and invasion and stimulates apoptosis in cisplatin-naive and resistant GCT cell lines. Therefore, targeting N-cadherin may be a promising therapeutic approach, particularly in cisplatin-resistant, therapy refractory and metastatic GCT. PMID:26451610

  13. Non-invasive microsensors for studying cell/tissue physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Taguchi, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Burrs, S.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive tools that allow real-time quantification of molecules relevant to metabolism, homeostasis, and cell signaling in cells and tissue are of great importance for studying physiology. Several microsensor technologies have been developed to monitor concentration of molecules such as ions, oxygen, electroactive molecules (e.g., nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide), and biomolecules (e.g., sugars, hormones). The major challenges for microsensors are overcoming relatively low sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio. Modern approaches for enhancing microsensor performance focus on the incorporation of catalytic nanomaterials to increase sensitivity, reduce response time, and increase operating range. To improve signal-to-noise ratio, a non-invasive microsensor modality called self-referencing (SR) is being applied. The SR technique allows measurement of temporal and spatial transport dynamics at the cell, tissue, organ, and organismal level.

  14. Primary invasive ocular squamous cell carcinoma in a horse.

    PubMed

    Kaps, Simone; Richter, Marianne; Philipp, Martin; Bart, Madeleine; Eule, Corinna; Spiess, Bernhard M

    2005-01-01

    A 12-year-old Haflinger gelding was presented to the veterinary medical teaching hospital of the University of Zurich with a light-pink raised mass on the temporal limbus and conjunctiva of the left eye. Squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed histologically after keratectomy and cryotherapy. Seven months later, a smooth pink, progressively enlarging mass was observed within the cornea of the left eye. Ultrasonographically, the mass was not only infiltrating the corneal stroma but seemed to protrude into the anterior chamber. The globe was surgically removed and submitted for pathology. A histologic diagnosis of corneal ocular squamous cell carcinoma with deep stromal invasion, infiltration of the uveoscleral meshwork and iridocorneal angle and resulting intraocular extension was made. This is the first detailed description of a limbal squamous cell carcinoma with invasion into the cornea and uvea in the horse.

  15. FOXL2 suppresses proliferation, invasion and promotes apoptosis of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing-Long; Meng, Yu-Han; Wang, Jian-Li; Yang, Biao-Bing; Zhang, Fan; Tang, Sheng-Jian

    2014-01-01

    FOXL2 is a transcription factor that is essential for ovarian function and maintenance, the germline mutations of which give rise to the blepharophimosis ptosis epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES), often associated with premature ovarian failure. Recently, its mutations have been found in ovarian granulosa cell tumors (OGCTs). In this study, we measured the expression of FOXL2 in cervical cancer by immunohistochemistry and its mRNA level in cervical cancer cell lines Hela and Siha by RT-PCR. Then we overexpressed FOXL2 in Hela cells and silenced it in Siha cells by plasmid transfection and verified using western blotting. When FOXL2 was overexpressed or silenced, cells proliferation and apoptosis were determined by Brdu assay and Annexin V/PI detection kit, respectively. In addition, we investigated the effects of FOXL2 on the adhesion and invasion of Hela and Siha cells. Finally, we analyzed the influences of FOXL2 on Ki67, PCNA and FasL by flow cytometry. The results showed that FOXL2 was highly expressed in cervical squamous cancer. Overexpressing FOXL2 suppressed Hela proliferation and facilitated its apoptosis. Silencing FOXL2 enhanced Siha proliferation and inhibited its apoptosis. Meanwhile, silencing FOXL2 promoted Siha invasion, but it had no effect on cells adhesion. In addition, overexpressing FOXL2 decreased the expression of Ki67 in Hela and Siha cells. Therefore, our results suggested that FOXL2 restrained cells proliferation and enhanced cells apoptosis mainly through decreasing Ki67 expression.

  16. FOXL2 suppresses proliferation, invasion and promotes apoptosis of cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing-Long; Meng, Yu-Han; Wang, Jian-Li; Yang, Biao-Bing; Zhang, Fan; Tang, Sheng-Jian

    2014-01-01

    FOXL2 is a transcription factor that is essential for ovarian function and maintenance, the germline mutations of which give rise to the blepharophimosis ptosis epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES), often associated with premature ovarian failure. Recently, its mutations have been found in ovarian granulosa cell tumors (OGCTs). In this study, we measured the expression of FOXL2 in cervical cancer by immunohistochemistry and its mRNA level in cervical cancer cell lines Hela and Siha by RT-PCR. Then we overexpressed FOXL2 in Hela cells and silenced it in Siha cells by plasmid transfection and verified using western blotting. When FOXL2 was overexpressed or silenced, cells proliferation and apoptosis were determined by Brdu assay and Annexin V/PI detection kit, respectively. In addition, we investigated the effects of FOXL2 on the adhesion and invasion of Hela and Siha cells. Finally, we analyzed the influences of FOXL2 on Ki67, PCNA and FasL by flow cytometry. The results showed that FOXL2 was highly expressed in cervical squamous cancer. Overexpressing FOXL2 suppressed Hela proliferation and facilitated its apoptosis. Silencing FOXL2 enhanced Siha proliferation and inhibited its apoptosis. Meanwhile, silencing FOXL2 promoted Siha invasion, but it had no effect on cells adhesion. In addition, overexpressing FOXL2 decreased the expression of Ki67 in Hela and Siha cells. Therefore, our results suggested that FOXL2 restrained cells proliferation and enhanced cells apoptosis mainly through decreasing Ki67 expression. PMID:24817949

  17. Signalling to cancer cell invasion through PAK family kinases.

    PubMed

    Whale, Andrew; Hashim, Fariesha Nur; Fram, Sally; Jones, Gareth E; Wells, Claire M

    2011-01-01

    Cancer cell metastasis involves a series of changes in cell behaviour, driven by oncogenic transformation, that leads to local tissue invasion, migration through extracellular matrix, entry into the vascular or lymphatic system and colonisation of distant sites. It is well established that the Rho family GTPases Rho, Rac and Cdc42 orchestrate many of the processes required during metastasis. The Rho family GTPases regulate cellular behaviour through their interaction with downstream effector proteins. The p-21 activated kinases (PAKs), effector proteins for Rac and Cdc42, are known to be important regulators of cell migration and invasion. There are six mammalian PAKs which can be divided into two groups: group I PAKs (PAK1-3) and group II PAKs (PAK4-6). Although the two PAK groups are architecturally similar there are differences in their mode of regulation suggesting their cellular functions are likely to be different. This review will focus on the latest evidence relating to the role of PAK family kinases in the cell signalling pathways that drive cancer cell migration and invasion.

  18. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  19. Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Bieri, Andrej; Brand, Françoise; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-23

    The fight against most infectious diseases, including malaria, is often hampered by the emergence of drug resistance and lack or limited efficacies of vaccines. Therefore, new drugs, vaccines, or other strategies to control these diseases are needed. Here, we present an innovative nanotechnological strategy in which the nanostructure itself represents the active substance with no necessity to release compounds to attain therapeutic effect and which might act in a drug- and vaccine-like dual function. Invasion of Plasmodium falciparum parasites into red blood cells was selected as a biological model for the initial validation of this approach. Stable nanomimics-polymersomes presenting receptors required for parasite attachment to host cells-were designed to efficiently interrupt the life cycle of the parasite by inhibiting invasion. A simple way to build nanomimics without postformation modifications was established. First, a block copolymer of the receptor with a hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and then mixed with a polymersome-forming block copolymer. The resulting nanomimics bound parasite-derived ligands involved in the initial attachment to host cells and they efficiently blocked reinvasion of malaria parasites after their egress from host cells in vitro. They exhibited efficacies of more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than the soluble form of the receptor, which can be explained by multivalent interactions of several receptors on one nanomimic with multiple ligands on the infective parasite. In the future, our strategy might offer interesting treatment options for severe malaria or a way to modulate the immune response.

  20. Sickle Cell Trait, Hemoglobin C Trait and Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Poehling, Katherine A.; Light, Laney S; Rhodes, Melissa; Snively, Beverly M.; Halasa, Natasha B.; Mitchel, Ed; Schaffner, William; Craig, Allen S.; Griffin, Marie R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The cause of historically higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease among blacks than whites has remained unknown. We tested the hypothesis that sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait is an independent risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease. Methods Eligible children were born in Tennessee (1996–2003), had a newborn screen, enrolled in TennCare aged <1 year, and resided in a Tennessee county with laboratory-confirmed, pneumococcal surveillance. Race/ethnicity was ascertained from birth certificates. Children were followed through 2005 until loss of enrollment, pneumococcal disease episode, 5th birthday or death. We calculated incidence rates by race/ethnicity and hemoglobin type before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction. Poisson regression analyses compared IPD rates among blacks with sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait to whites and blacks with normal hemoglobin, controlling for age, gender, time (pre-PCV7, transition year or post-PCV7) and high-risk conditions (i.e. heart disease). Results Over 10 years, 415 invasive pneumococcal disease episodes occurred during 451,594 observed child-years. Before PCV7 introduction, disease rates/100,000 child-years were 2941 for blacks with sickle cell disease, 258 for blacks with sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait and 188, 172, and 125 for blacks, whites, and Hispanics with normal hemoglobin. Post-PCV7, rates declined for all groups. Blacks with sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait had 77% (95% CI 22%–155%) and 42% (95% CI 1%–100%) higher rates than whites and blacks with normal hemoglobin. Conclusion Black children with sickle cell trait or hemoglobin C trait have an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:20220521

  1. RSK isoforms in cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sulzmaier, Florian J; Ramos, Joe W

    2013-10-15

    Metastasis, the spreading of cancer cells from a primary tumor to secondary sites throughout the body, is the primary cause of death for patients with cancer. New therapies that prevent invasion and metastasis in combination with current treatments could therefore significantly reduce cancer recurrence and morbidity. Metastasis is driven by altered signaling pathways that induce changes in cell-cell adhesion, the cytoskeleton, integrin function, protease expression, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell survival. The ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) family of kinases is a group of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK) effectors that can regulate these steps of metastasis by phosphorylating both nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. However, our understanding of RSK function in metastasis remains incomplete and is complicated by the fact that the four RSK isoforms perform nonredundant, sometimes opposing functions. Although some isoforms promote cell motility and invasion by altering transcription and integrin activity, others impair cell motility and invasion through effects on the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanism of RSK action depends both on the isoform and the cancer type. However, despite the variance in RSK-mediated outcomes, chemical inhibition of this group of kinases has proven effective in blocking invasion and metastasis of several solid tumors in preclinical models. RSKs are therefore a promising drug target for antimetastatic cancer treatments that could supplement and improve current therapeutic approaches. This review highlights contradiction and agreement in the current data on the function of RSK isoforms in metastasis and suggests ways forward in developing RSK inhibitors as new antimetastasis drugs.

  2. Candida parapsilosis Protects Premature Intestinal Epithelial Cells from Invasion and Damage by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Gonia, Sara; Archambault, Linda; Shevik, Margaret; Altendahl, Marie; Fellows, Emily; Bliss, Joseph M.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Gale, Cheryl A.

    2017-01-01

    Candida is a leading cause of late-onset sepsis in premature infants and is thought to invade the host via immature or damaged epithelial barriers. We previously showed that the hyphal form of Candida albicans invades and causes damage to premature intestinal epithelial cells (pIECs), whereas the non-hyphal Candida parapsilosis, also a fungal pathogen of neonates, has less invasion and damage abilities. In this study, we investigated the potential for C. parapsilosis to modulate pathogenic interactions of C. albicans with the premature intestine. While a mixed infection with two fungal pathogens may be expected to result in additive or synergistic damage to pIECs, we instead found that C. parapsilosis was able to protect pIECs from invasion and damage by C. albicans. C. albicans-induced pIEC damage was reduced to a similar extent by multiple different C. parapsilosis strains, but strains differed in their ability to inhibit C. albicans invasion of pIECs, with the inhibitory activity correlating with their adhesiveness for C. albicans and epithelial cells. C. parapsilosis cell-free culture fractions were also able to significantly reduce C. albicans adhesion and damage to pIECs. Furthermore, coadministration of C. parapsilosis cell-free fractions with C. albicans was associated with decreased infection and mortality in zebrafish. These results indicate that C. parapsilosis is able to reduce invasion, damage, and virulence functions of C. albicans. Additionally, the results with cellular and cell-free fractions of yeast cultures suggest that inhibition of pathogenic interactions between C. albicans and host cells by C. parapsilosis occurs via secreted molecules as well as by physical contact with the C. parapsilosis cell surface. We propose that non-invasive commensals can be used to inhibit virulence features of pathogens and deserve further study as a non-pharmacological strategy to protect the fragile epithelial barriers of premature infants. PMID:28382297

  3. miR-940 Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion and Migration via Regulation of CXCR2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dong; Zhang, Yaodong; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Xing; Ji, Guwei; Huo, Liqun; Shao, Zicheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the expression of miR-940 in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on function and biological mechanism in the HCC cells. Methods. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to quantify miR-940 expression in 46 cases of tissues and cells. Transfection of HCC cell lines was performed by miR-940 mimics; the abilities of invasion and migration were assessed through Transwell array. Western blot represents the alteration in expression of CXCR2 by miR-940 mimics. Results. miR-940 expression was decreased significantly in the HCC tissues and the relevant cell lines. miR-940 upregulation suppressed the invasion and migration of HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CXCR2 was downregulated to suppress invasion and migration after miR-940 mimics. Moreover, decreased miR-940 expression was negatively correlated with Edmondson grade (P = 0.008), tumor microsatellite or multiple tumors (P = 0.04), vascular invasion (P = 0.035), and recurrence and metastasis (P = 0.038). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-940 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Our findings present that miR-940 acts as a pivotal adaptor of CXCR2 and its transcription downregulated CXCR2 expression to decrease HCC invasion and migration in vitro. Our study suggests that miR-940 may be a novel poor prognostic biomarker for HCC. PMID:27807540

  4. Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase β2-subunit (AMOG) expression abrogates invasion of glioblastoma-derived brain tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Matthew Z; Kim, Joseph M; Oh, Michael C; Safaee, Michael; Kaur, Gurvinder; Clark, Aaron J; Bloch, Orin; Ivan, Michael E; Kaur, Rajwant; Oh, Taemin; Fouse, Shaun D; Phillips, Joanna J; Berger, Mitchel S; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms of glioma invasion remain to be fully elucidated. Glioma cells within glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) range from well-differentiated tumor cells to less-differentiated brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs). The β2-subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, called the adhesion molecule on glia (AMOG), is highly expressed in normal glia but is thought to be universally downregulated in GBM. To test our hypothesis that expression of AMOG is heterogeneous in GBM and confers a less invasive phenotype, we compared it between BTICs and differentiated cells from patient-matched GBM and then tested GBM invasion in vitro after AMOG overexpression. Immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and real-time PCR were used to characterize AMOG protein and mRNA expression in tumor samples, BTICs, and differentiated cells. Matrigel invasion assay, scratch assay, and direct cell counting were used for testing in vitro invasion, migration, and proliferation, respectively. While AMOG expression is heterogeneous in astrocytomas of grades II-IV, it is lost in most GBM. BTICs express higher levels of AMOG mRNA and protein compared with patient-matched differentiated tumor cells. Overexpression of AMOG decreased GBM cell and BTIC invasion without affecting migration or proliferation. Knockdown of AMOG expression in normal human astrocytes increased invasion. AMOG expression inhibits GBM invasion. Its downregulation increases invasion in glial cells and may also represent an important step in BTIC differentiation. These data provide compelling evidence implicating the role of AMOG in glioma invasion and provide impetus for further investigation.

  5. CYR61 downregulation reduces osteosarcoma cell invasion, migration, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Fromigue, Olivia; Hamidouche, Zahia; Vaudin, Pascal; Lecanda, Fernando; Patino, Ana; Barbry, Pascal; Mari, Bernard; Marie, Pierre J

    2011-07-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary tumor of bone. The rapid development of metastatic lesions and resistance to chemotherapy remain major mechanisms responsible for the failure of treatments and the poor survival rate for patients. We showed previously that the HMGCoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase inhibitor statin exhibits antitumoral effects on osteosarcoma cells. Here, using microarray analysis, we identify Cyr61 as a new target of statins. Transcriptome and molecular analyses revealed that statins downregulate Cyr61 expression in human and murine osteosarcoma cells. Cyr61 silencing in osteosarcoma cell lines enhanced cell death and reduced cell migration and cell invasion compared with parental cells, whereas Cyr61 overexpression had opposite effects. Cyr61 expression was evaluated in 231 tissue cores from osteosarcoma patients. Tissue microarray analysis revealed that Cyr61 protein expression was higher in human osteosarcoma than in normal bone tissue and was further increased in metastatic tissues. Finally, tumor behavior and metastasis occurrence were analyzed by intramuscular injection of modified osteosarcoma cells into BALB/c mice. Cyr61 overexpression enhanced lung metastasis development, whereas cyr61 silencing strongly reduced lung metastases in mice. The results reveal that cyr61 expression increases with tumor grade in human osteosarcoma and demonstrate that cyr61 silencing inhibits in vitro osteosarcoma cell invasion and migration as well as in vivo lung metastases in mice. These data provide a novel molecular target for therapeutic intervention in metastatic osteosarcoma. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  6. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of collective cell invasion: tuning by ECM density and organization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kapoor, Aastha; Desai, Sejal; Inamdar, Mandar M; Sen, Shamik

    2016-02-02

    Cancer cells manoeuvre through extracellular matrices (ECMs) using different invasion modes, including single cell and collective cell invasion. These modes rely on MMP-driven ECM proteolysis to make space for cells to move. How cancer-associated alterations in ECM influence the mode of invasion remains unclear. Further, the sensitivity of the two invasion modes to MMP dynamics remains unexplored. In this paper, we address these open questions using a multiscale hybrid computational model combining ECM density-dependent MMP secretion, MMP diffusion, ECM degradation by MMP and active cell motility. Our results demonstrate that in randomly aligned matrices, collective cell invasion is more efficient than single cell invasion. Although increase in MMP secretion rate enhances invasiveness independent of cell-cell adhesion, sustenance of collective invasion in dense matrices requires high MMP secretion rates. However, matrix alignment can sustain both single cell and collective cell invasion even without ECM proteolysis. Similar to our in-silico observations, increase in ECM density and MMP inhibition reduced migration of MCF-7 cells embedded in sandwich gels. Together, our results indicate that apart from cell intrinsic factors (i.e., high cell-cell adhesion and MMP secretion rates), ECM density and organization represent two important extrinsic parameters that govern collective cell invasion and invasion plasticity.

  7. Non-Invasive Measurements of Carboxyhemoglobin and Methemoglobin in Children with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Caboot, Jason B.; Jawad, Abbas F.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Bowdre, Cheryl Y.; Arens, Raanan; Marcus, Carole L.; Mason, Thornton B.A.; Smith-Whitley, Kim; Ohene-Frempong, Kwaku; Allen, Julian L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Assessment of oxyhemoglobin saturation in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is vital for prompt recognition of hypoxemia. The accuracy of pulse oximeter measurements of blood oxygenation in SCD patients is variable, partially due to carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and methemoglobin (MetHb), which decrease the oxygen content of blood. This study evaluated the accuracy and reliability of a non-invasive pulse co-oximeter in measuring COHb and MetHb percentages (SpCO and SpMet) in children with SCD. We hypothesized that measurements of COHb and MetHb by non-invasive pulse co-oximetry agree within acceptable clinical accuracy with those made by invasive whole blood co-oximetry. Fifty children with SCD-SS underwent pulse co-oximetry and blood co-oximetry while breathing room air. Non-invasive COHb and MetHb readings were compared to the corresponding blood measurements. The pulse co-oximeter bias was 0.1% for COHb and −0.22% for MetHb. The precision of the measured SpCO was ±2.1% within a COHb range of 0.4–6.1%, and the precision of the measured SpMet was ±0.33% within a MetHb range of 0.1–1.1%. Non-invasive pulse co-oximetry was useful in measuring COHb and MetHb levels in children with SCD. Although the non-invasive technique slightly overestimated the invasive COHb measurements and slightly underestimated the invasive MetHb measurements, there was close agreement between the two methods. PMID:22328189

  8. Rho1-Wnd signaling regulates loss-of-cell polarity-induced cell invasion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Chen, Y; Zhang, S; Xu, W; Shao, Y; Yang, Y; Li, W; Li, M; Xue, L

    2016-02-18

    Both cell polarity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity are essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and disruption of either is commonly seen in cancer progression. Despite the established connection between loss-of-cell polarity and JNK activation, much less is known about the molecular mechanism by which aberrant cell polarity induces JNK-mediated cell migration and tumor invasion. Here we show results from a genetic screen using an in vivo invasion model via knocking down cell polarity gene in Drosophila wing discs, and identify Rho1-Wnd signaling as an important molecular link that mediates loss-of-cell polarity-triggered JNK activation and cell invasion. We show that Wallenda (Wnd), a protein kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, by forming a complex with the GTPase Rho1, is both necessary and sufficient for Rho1-induced JNK-dependent cell invasion, MMP1 activation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, Wnd promotes cell proliferation and tissue growth through wingless production when apoptosis is inhibited by p35. Finally, Wnd shows oncogenic cooperation with Ras(V12) to trigger tumor growth in eye discs and causes invasion into the ventral nerve cord. Together, our data not only provides a novel mechanistic insight on how cell polarity loss contributes to cell invasion, but also highlights the value of the Drosophila model system to explore human cancer biology.

  9. TGFβ loss activates ADAMTS-1-mediated EGF-dependent invasion in a model of esophageal cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bras, Grégoire F.; Taylor, Chase; Koumangoye, Rainelli B.; Revetta, Frank; Loomans, Holli A.; Andl, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is essential to epithelial homeostasis and is often inhibited during progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Recently, an important role for TGFβ signaling has been described in the crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating squamous tumor cell invasion in mouse models of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Loss of TGFβ signaling, in either compartment, leads to HNSCC however, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Using organotypic reconstruct cultures (OTC) to model the interaction between epithelial and stromal cells that occur in dysplastic lesions, we show that loss of TGFβ signaling promotes an invasive phenotype in both fibroblast and epithelial compartments. Employing immortalized esophageal keratinocytes established to reproduce common mutations of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, we show that treatment of OTC with inhibitors of TGFβ signaling (A83-01 or SB431542) enhances invasion of epithelial cells into a fibroblast-embedded Matrigel/collagen I matrix. Invasion induced by A83-01 is independent of proliferation but relies on protease activity and expression of ADAMTS-1 and can be altered by matrix density. This invasion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1 and EGFR ligands HB-EGF and TGFα. Altering EGF signaling prevented or induced epithelial cell invasion in this model. Loss of expression of the TGFβ target gene ROBO1 suggested that chemorepulsion may regulate keratinocyte invasion. Taken together, our data show increased invasion through inhibition of TGFβ signaling altered epithelial-fibroblasts interactions, repressing markers of activated fibroblasts, and altering integrin-fibronectin interactions. These results suggest that inhibition of TGFβ signaling modulates an array of pathways that combined promote multiple aspects of tumor invasion. - Highlights: • Chemical inhibition of TGFβ signaling advances collective invasion

  10. RUNX2 is overexpressed in melanoma cells and mediates their migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Boregowda, Rajeev K; Olabisi, Oyenike O; Abushahba, Walid; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Haenssen, Keneshia K; Chen, Wenjin; Chekmareva, Marina; Lasfar, Ahmed; Foran, David J; Goydos, James S; Cohen-Solal, Karine A

    2014-06-28

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the transcription factor RUNX2 in melanomagenesis. We demonstrated that the expression of transcriptionally active RUNX2 was increased in melanoma cell lines as compared with human melanocytes. Using a melanoma tissue microarray, we showed that RUNX2 levels were higher in melanoma cells as compared with nevic melanocytes. RUNX2 knockdown in melanoma cell lines significantly decreased Focal Adhesion Kinase expression, and inhibited their cell growth, migration and invasion ability. Finally, the pro-hormone cholecalciferol reduced RUNX2 transcriptional activity and decreased migration of melanoma cells, further suggesting a role of RUNX2 in melanoma cell migration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. MDR1/P-gp and VEGF synergistically enhance the invasion of Hep-2 cells with multidrug resistance induced by taxol.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Jiang, Alice C; Dong, Pin; Wang, Haibo; Xu, Wei; Xu, Chengzhi

    2009-05-01

    Tumor invasion/metastasis and multidrug resistance (MDR) are the main causes of treatment failure and high mortality in all kinds of cancer patients. The relationship between the two factors is still unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between MDR and invasion, especially the role of multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein (MDR1/P-gp) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) during the invasion. Multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) were detected with real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting at the levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein, respectively. RNA interference was applied to inhibit the expression of MDR1. The invasive assays were performed with the CHEMICON cell invasion assay kit. The MDR cell line induced by Taxol (Hep-2T cell) was more invasive than its parent cell line (Hep-2 cell), which was at least in part mediated through the overexpressed MDR1/P-pg. MDR1-targeted RNA interference could effectively inhibit the expression of MDR1 and obviously decrease the invasive ability. Synergistic enhancing effects existed between MDR1/P-gp and VEGF on the invasion of Hep-2T cells. The expression of VEGFR-2 was elevated in Hep-2T cells. SU1498 could significantly decrease the invasion of Hep-2T cells. MDR1-targeted RNA interference and SU1498 had synergistic decreasing effect on the invasion of Hep-2T cells. MDR1/P-pg may be a risk predictor for the invasion of laryngeal cancer. MDR1 knock down and VEGFR-2 inhibitor may be two promising treatment regiments for advanced laryngeal carcinoma patients with MDR and invasion/metastasis.

  12. Twist promotes invasion and cisplatin resistance in pancreatic cancer cells through growth differentiation factor 15.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Lu, Hong-Wei; Li, Yi-Ming; Lu, Le; Wang, Jin-Long; Zhang, Ya-Fei; Shang, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is an aggressive and devastating disease with a poor prognosis. Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent for solid tumors, is effective as a single agent or in combination with other drugs for the treatment of PC. Previous studies have suggested that Twist and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) are involved in the progression of PC. However, the role of Twist and GDF15 in PC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the individual effect of and interaction between Twist and GDF15 in PC cell invasion and chemoresistance to cisplatin was examined. Twist and/or GDF15 were stably overexpressed or knocked down in ASPC‑1 and BXPC‑3 human PC cells. Overexpression of Twist in the two cell lines markedly increased GDF15 expression, cell invasion, matrix metalloproteinase‑2 expression/activity and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of cisplatin, which was eradicated by GDF15 knockdown or the selective p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor SB203580 (10 µM). By contrast, Twist knockdown significantly decreased GDF15 expression, cell invasion, matrix metalloproteinase‑2 expression/activity and the IC50 values of cisplatin, which was completely reversed by overexpression of GDF15. In addition, while overexpression and knockdown of Twist increased and decreased p38 MAPK activity, respectively, GDF15 demonstrated no significant effect on p38 MAPK activity in PC cells. In conclusion, the present study, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, demonstrated that Twist promotes PC cell invasion and cisplatin chemoresistance through inducing GDF15 expression via a p38 MAPK‑dependent mechanism. The present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying PC progression and chemoresistance.

  13. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF regulates migration, invasion, and MMP secretion of immortalized cells derived from human ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Marina Rolo Pinheiro; Falcão, Aline Semblano Carreira; Fuzii, Hellen Thais; da Silva Kataoka, Maria Sueli; Ribeiro, André L R; Boccardo, Enrique; de Siqueira, Adriane Sousa; Jaeger, Ruy G; de Jesus Viana Pinheiro, João; de Melo Alves Júnior, Sérgio

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic tumor characterized by local invasiveness and frequent recurrence. The surrounding stroma, composed of different cell types and extracellular matrix (ECM), may influence ameloblastoma invasive behavior. Furthermore, tumor and stromal cells secrete matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), which, in turn, can modulate the matrix and promote the release of ECM-bound growth factors. Among these growth factors, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor, EGFR, have already been shown to stimulate MMP synthesis, suggesting that an interdependent mechanism, involving MMP activity and growth factors release, may contribute to tumor invasiveness. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the EGF/EGFR signaling pathway on migration, invasion, and MMP activity, in a primary cell line derived from human ameloblastoma. We established and characterized a primary cell line (AME-1) from a human ameloblastoma sample. This cell line was transduced with human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 oncogenes, generating the AME-HPV continuous cell line. EGF, MMP2, and MMP9 expression in ameloblastoma biopsies and in the AME-HPV cell line was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, respectively. Migratory activity of EGF-treated AME-HPV cells was investigated using monolayer wound assays and Transwell chambers. EGF-induced invasion was assessed in Boyden chambers coated with Matrigel. Conditioned medium from EGF-treated cells was subjected to zymography. EGFR expression in AME-HPV cells was silenced by small interfering RNA (siRNA), to verify the relationship between this receptor and MMP secretion. Ameloblastoma samples and AME-HPV cells expressed EGF, EGFR, MMP2, and MMP9. AME-HPV cells treated with EGF showed increased rates of migration and invasion, as well as enhanced MMP2 and MMP9 activity. EGFR knockdown decreased MMP2 and MMP9 levels in AME-HPV cells. EGFR signaling downstream of EGF probably regulates migration, invasion

  14. Sinomenine inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell invasion by mediating the STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shulong; Gao, Yebo; Hou, Wei; Liu, Rui; Qi, Xin; Xu, Xia; Li, Jie; Bao, Yanju; Zheng, Honggang; Hua, Baojin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the failure of lung cancer treatment may occur as a result of tumor invasion and metastasis. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor, is a key signaling molecule involved in the proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Sinomenine is an alkaloid compound with an antineoplastic potential against a variety of cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the antitumor mechanisms of sinomenine in the A549 human lung cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that sinomenine manifested dose-dependent cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. The protein expression of Janus kinase 2, STAT3, phosphorylated-STAT3, Snail, N-cadherin and vimentin decreased in sinomenine-treated cells, while E-cadherin protein expression increased. The regulation of STAT3, N-cadherin and E-cadherin by sinomenine was further confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescent staining. It was demonstrated that sinomenine exerts inhibitory effects on A549 human lung cancer cell invasion, possibly through the inhibition of STAT3 signaling. These results provide a novel insight into the role of sinomenine in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:27446441

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells differentially affect the invasion of distinct glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Breznik, Barbara; Motaln, Helena; Vittori, Miloš; Rotter, Ana; Turnšek, Tamara Lah

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme are an aggressive form of brain tumors that are characterized by distinct invasion of single glioblastoma cells, which infiltrate the brain parenchyma. This appears to be stimulated by the communication between cancer and stromal cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are part of the glioblastoma microenvironment, and their ‘cross-talk’ with glioblastoma cells is still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of bone marrow-derived MSCs on two different established glioblastoma cell lines U87 and U373. We focused on mutual effects of direct MSC/glioblastoma contact on cellular invasion in three-dimensional invasion assays in vitro and in a zebrafish embryo model in vivo. This is the first demonstration of glioblastoma cell-type-specific responses to MSCs in direct glioblastoma co-cultures, where MSCs inhibited the invasion of U87 cells and enhanced the invasion of U373. Inversely, direct cross-talk between MSCs and both of glioblastoma cell lines enhanced MSC motility. MSC-enhanced invasion of U373 cells was assisted by overexpression of proteases cathepsin B, calpain1, uPA/uPAR, MMP-2, -9 and -14, and increased activities of some of these proteases, as determined by the effects of their selective inhibitors on invasion. In contrast, these proteases had no effect on U87 cell invasion under MSC co-culturing. Finally, we identified differentially expressed genes, in U87 and U373 cells that could explain different response of these cell lines to MSCs. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MSC/glioblastoma cross-talk is different in the two glioblastoma cell phenotypes, which contributes to tumor heterogeneity. PMID:28424417

  16. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Lu, Na; Guo, Qinglong

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  17. A Minimally Invasive Cox-Maze IV is as Effective as Sternotomy While Decreasing Major Morbidity and Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Lawrance, Christopher P.; Henn, Matthew C.; Miller, Jacob; Sinn, Laurie A.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Maniar, Hersh S.; Damiano, Ralph J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Cox-Maze IV has the best results for the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation. It has been traditionally performed through sternotomy with excellent outcomes, but this has been felt to be too invasive. An alternative approach is to perform a less invasive right anterolateral minithoracotomy. This series compared these approaches at a single center in consecutive patients. Methods Patients receiving Cox-Maze IV (n=356) were retrospectively reviewed from January 2002 to February 2014. Patients were stratified into two groups: right mini-thoracotomy (RMT: n=104) and sternotomy (ST: n=252). Preoperative and perioperative variables were compared as well as long term outcomes. Patients were followed for up two years and rhythm was confirmed with electrocardiogram or prolonged monitoring. Results Freedom from atrial tachyarrhythmias off antiarrhythmic drugs was 81% and 74% at 1 and 2 year respectively using a RMT approach and was not significantly different from the ST group at these same time points. Overall complication rate was lower in the RMT group (6% vs. 13%, p=0.044) as was 30 day morality (0% vs. 4%, p=0.039). Median ICU length of stay was lower in the RMT group (2 days [range 0-21] vs. 3 days [range 1-61], p=0.004) as was median hospital length of stay (7 days [range 4-35] vs. 9 days [range 1-111], p<0.001). Conclusions The Cox-Maze IV performed through a right mini-thoracotomy is as effective as sternotomy in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. This approach was associated with fewer complications and decreased mortality and decreased ICU and hospital length of stays. PMID:25048635

  18. Cyclic mechanical stretching promotes migration but inhibits invasion of rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bingyu; Luo, Qing; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Jinghui; Xu, Baiyao; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin

    2015-03-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also broadly known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) are multipotent stem cells that have a self-renewal capacity and multilineage differentiation potential. Mechanical stretching plays a vital role in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of BMSCs. However, little is known about the effects of cyclic stretching on BMSC migration and invasion. In this study, using a custom-made cell-stretching device, we studied the effects of cyclic mechanical stretching on rat BMSC migration and invasion using a Transwell Boyden Chamber. The protein secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was detected by gelatin zymography, and the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) was measured by western blot. We found that cyclic mechanical stretching with 10% amplitude at 1Hz frequency for 8h promotes BMSC migration, but reduces BMSC invasion. FAK and ERK1/2 signals were activated in BMSCs after exposure to cyclic stretching. In the presence of the FAK phosphorylation blocker PF573228 or the ERK1/2 phosphorylation blocker PD98059, the cyclic-stretch-promoted migration of BMSCs was completely suppressed. On the other hand, cyclic mechanical stretching reduced the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in BMSCs, and PF573228 suppressed the cyclic-stretch-reduced secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. The decrease of BMSC invasion induced by mechanical stretching is partially restored by PF573228 but remained unaffected by PD98059. Taken together, these data show that cyclic mechanical stretching promotes BMSC migration via the FAK-ERK1/2 signalling pathway, but reduces BMSC invasion by decreasing secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9 via FAK, independent of the ERK1/2 signal.

  19. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I.; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Parra, Columba de la; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J.; Wade, Paul A.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Donnell, Robert M.; Pestell, Richard G.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  20. Insulin resistance reduces sensitivity to Cis-platinum and promotes adhesion, migration and invasion in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Jing; Li, Guang-Di; Wei, Hu-Lai; Chen, Jing; Liu, Yu-Mei; Li, Fei; Xie, Bei; Wang, Bei; Li, Cai-Li

    2014-01-01

    The liver is normally the major site of glucose metabolism in intact organisms and the most important target organ for the action of insulin. It has been widely accepted that insulin resistance (IR) is closely associated with postoperative recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the relationship between IR and drug resistance in liver cancer cells is unclear. In the present study, IR was induced in HepG2 cells via incubation with a high concentration of insulin. Once the insulin-resistant cell line was established, the instability of HepG2/ IR cells was further tested via incubation in insulin-free medium for another 72h. Afterwards, the biological effects of insulin resistance on adhesion, migration, invasion and sensitivity to cis-platinum (DDP) of cells were determined. The results indicated that glucose consumption was reduced in insulin-resistant cells. In addition, the expression of the insulin receptor and glucose transportor-2 was downregulated. Furthermore, HepG2/IR cells displayed markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and invasion. Most importantly, these cells exhibited a lower sensitivity to DDP. By contrast, HepG2/IR cells exhibited decreased adhesion and invasion after treatment with the insulin sensitizer pioglitazone hydrochloride. The results suggest that IR is closely related to drug resistance as well as adhesion, migration, and invasion in HepG2 cells. These findings may help explain the clinical observation of limited efficacy for chemotherapy on a background of IR, which promotes the invasion and migration of cancer cells.

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  2. miR-135a Inhibits the Invasion of Cancer Cells via Suppression of ERRα

    PubMed Central

    Tribollet, Violaine; Barenton, Bruno; Kroiss, Auriane; Vincent, Séverine; Zhang, Ling; Forcet, Christelle; Cerutti, Catherine; Périan, Séverine; Allioli, Nathalie; Samarut, Jacques; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-135a (miR-135a) down-modulates parameters of cancer progression and its expression is decreased in metastatic breast cancers (as compared to non-metastatic tumors) as well as in prostate tumors relative to normal tissue. These expression and activity patterns are opposite to those of the Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family. Indeed high expression of ERRα correlates with poor prognosis in breast and prostate cancers, and the receptor promotes various traits of cancer aggressiveness including cell invasion. Here we show that miR-135a down-regulates the expression of ERRα through specific sequences of its 3’UTR. As a consequence miR-135a also reduces the expression of downstream targets of ERRα. miR-135a also decreases cell invasive potential in an ERRα-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of miR-135a in metastatic tumors leads to elevated ERRα expression, resulting in increased cell invasion capacities. PMID:27227989

  3. Functional characterization of E- and P-cadherin in invasive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Alterations in the cadherin-catenin adhesion complexes are involved in tumor initiation, progression and metastasis. However, the functional implication of distinct cadherin types in breast cancer biology is still poorly understood. Methods To compare the functional role of E-cadherin and P-cadherin in invasive breast cancer, we stably transfected these molecules into the MDA-MB-231 cell line, and investigated their effects on motility, invasion and gene expression regulation. Results Expression of either E- and P-cadherin significantly increased cell aggregation and induced a switch from fibroblastic to epithelial morphology. Although expression of these cadherins did not completely reverse the mesenchymal phenotype of MDA-MB-231 cells, both E- and P-cadherin decreased fibroblast-like migration and invasion through extracellular matrix in a similar way. Moreover, microarray gene expression analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells after expression of E- and P-cadherins revealed that these molecules can activate signaling pathways leading to significant changes in gene expression. Although the expression patterns induced by E- and P-cadherin showed more similarities than differences, 40 genes were differentially modified by the expression of either cadherin type. Conclusion E- and P-cadherin have similar functional consequences on the phenotype and invasive behavior of MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time that these cadherins can induce both common and specific gene expression programs on invasive breast cancer cells. Importantly, these identified genes are potential targets for future studies on the functional consequences of altered cadherin expression in human breast cancer. PMID:19257890

  4. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; DeVaney, Trevor; Zimmer, Andreas; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  5. Methyl jasmonate abolishes the migration, invasion and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells through down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 14

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence indicates that methyl jasmonate (MJ), a plant stress hormone, exhibits anti-cancer activity on human cancer cells. The aim of this study is to determine whether sub-cytotoxic MJ can abolish the migration, invasion and angiogenesis gastric cancer cells. Methods Human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MKN-45 were treated with diverse concentrations of MJ. Cell viability, proliferation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis capabilities of cancer cells were measured by MTT colorimetry, EdU incorporation, scratch assay, matrigel invasion assay, and tube formation assay. Gene expression was detected by western blot and real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Binding of transcription factor on gene promoter was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results Sub-cytotoxic (0.05 to 0.2 mM) MJ attenuated the migration, invasion and angiogenesis, but not the cell viability or proliferation, of gastric cancer cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 14 (MMP-14) and its downstream gene vascular endothelial growth factor. Restoration of MMP-14 expression rescued the SGC-7901 and MKN-45 cells from sub-cytotoxic MJ-inhibited migration, invasion and angiogenesis. In addition, sub-cytotoxic MJ decreased the specificity protein 1 (Sp1) expression and binding on MMP-14 promoter, while restoration of Sp1 expression rescued the cancer cells from sub-cytotoxic MJ-mediated defects in MMP-14 expression, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Conclusions Sub-cytotoxic MJ attenuates the MMP-14 expression via decreasing the Sp1 expression and binding on MMP-14 promoter, thus inhibiting the migration, invasion and angiogenesis of gastric cancer cells. PMID:23394613

  6. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Invasion-Resistant Cells Identifies Laminin α2 as a Host Factor for Bacterial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Xander M.; Döhrmann, Simon; Hallström, Björn M.; Li, Shangzhong; Voldborg, Bjørn G.; Meng, Brandon X.; McKee, Karen K.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Lewis, Nathan E.; Nizet, Victor

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To understand the role of glycosaminoglycans in bacterial cellular invasion, xylosyltransferase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were created using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-cas9) gene targeting. When these mutants were compared to the pgsA745 cell line, a CHO xylosyltransferase mutant generated previously using chemical mutagenesis, an unexpected result was obtained. Bacterial invasion of pgsA745 cells by group B Streptococcus (GBS), group A Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus was markedly reduced compared to the invasion of wild-type cells, but newly generated CRISPR-cas9 mutants were only resistant to GBS. Invasion of pgsA745 cells was not restored by transfection with xylosyltransferase, suggesting that an additional mutation conferring panresistance to multiple bacteria was present in pgsA745 cells. Whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) uncovered a deletion in the gene encoding the laminin subunit α2 (Lama2) that eliminated much of domain L4a. Silencing of the long Lama2 isoform in wild-type cells strongly reduced bacterial invasion, whereas transfection with human LAMA2 cDNA significantly enhanced invasion in pgsA745 cells. The addition of exogenous laminin-α2β1γ1/laminin-α2β2γ1 strongly increased bacterial invasion in CHO cells, as well as in human alveolar basal epithelial and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, the L4a domain in laminin α2 is important for cellular invasion by a number of bacterial pathogens. PMID:28074024

  7. Isoforms of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) have opposing effects on prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lambert, L A; Whyteside, A R; Turner, A J; Usmani, B A

    2008-10-07

    Cross-talk between tumour and stromal cells can profoundly influence cancer cell invasion by increasing the availability of mitogenic peptides such as endothelin-1 (ET-1). Endothelin-1 is elevated in men with metastatic prostate cancer (PC), and can exert both an autocrine (epithelial) and a paracrine (stromal) influence on growth. Endothelin-1 is generated from its inactive precursor big-ET-1 by endothelin-converting enzyme 1 (ECE-1). We and others have demonstrated that ECE-1 expression is significantly elevated in tumours and surrounding stromal tissue. Our current data show siRNA-mediated knockdown of stromal ECE-1 reduces epithelial (PC-3) cell invasion in coculture. Interestingly, readdition of ET-1 only partially recovers this effect suggesting a novel role for ECE-1 independent of ET-1 activation. Parallel knockdown of ECE-1 in both stromal and epithelial compartments results in an additive decrease in cell invasion. We extrapolated this observation to the four recognised isoforms ECE-1a, ECE-1b, ECE-1c and ECE-1d. Only ECE-1a and ECE-1c were significant but with reciprocal effects on cell invasion. Transient ECE-1c overexpression increased PC-3 invasiveness through matrigel, whereas transient ECE-1a expression suppressed invasion. Furthermore, transient ECE-1a expression in stromal cells strongly counteracts the effect of transient ECE-1c expression in PC-3 cells. The ECE-1 isoforms may, therefore, be relevant targets for antiinvasive therapy in prostate and other cancers.

  8. Human NUMB6 Induces Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Enhances Breast Cancer Cells Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Karaczyn, Aldona A; Adams, Tamara L; Cheng, Robert Y S; Matluk, Nicholas N; Verdi, Joseph M

    2017-02-01

    Mammalian NUMB is alternatively spliced generating four isoforms NUMB1-NUMB4 that can function as tumor suppressors. NUMB1-NUMB4 proteins, which normally determine how different cell types develop, are reduced in 21% of primary breast tumors. Our previous work has, however, indicated that two novel NUMB isoforms, NUMB5 and NUMB6 have the pro-oncogenic functions. Herein, we address a novel function of human NUMB isoform 6 (NUMB6) in promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. We found that NUMB6 induced expression of embryonic transcription factor Slug, which in turn actively repressed E-cadherin, prompting cells to undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Low-metastatic breast cancer cells DB-7 stably expressing NUMB6, lost their epithelial phenotype, exhibited migratory and pro-invasive behavior, and ultimately elevated expression of mesenchymal markers. Among these markers, increased vimentin, β-catenin, and fibronectin expression elicited metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) production. Our results revealed that NUMB6-DB-7 cells have significantly increased level of Akt1 and Akt2 phosphorylation. Therefore, antagonizing Akt signaling using a chemical inhibitor LY294002, we found that NUMB6-induced Slug expression was reduced, and ultimately accompanied with decreased cell migration and invasion. In summary, this study identified a novel molecular determinant of breast cancer progression, uncovering a potential oncogenic role for the NUMB6 protein in cancer cell migration and invasion, coupled to the maintenance of mesenchymal-like cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 237-251, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Casticin impairs cell migration and invasion of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells via PI3K/AKT and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yung-Luen; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chu, Yung-Lin; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-09-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, is one of the major active components obtained from Fructus viticis, which have been shown to have anticancer activities including induce cell apoptosis in human cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which casticin inhibits cell migration and invasion of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Cell viability was examined by MTT assay and the results indicated that casticin decreased the total percentages of viable cells in dose-dependent manners. Casticin affected cell migration and invasion in B16F10 cells were examined by wound healing mobility assay and Boyden chamber migration and invasion assay and results indicated that casticin inhibited cell migration and invasion in dose-dependent manners. Western blotting was used to examine the protein expression of B16F10 cells after exposed to casticin and the results showed that casticin decreased the expressions of MMP-9, MMP-2, MMP-1, FAK, 14-3-3, GRB2, Akt, NF-κB p65, SOS-1, p-EGFR, p-JNK 1/2, uPA, and Rho A in B16F10 cells. Furthermore, cDNA microarray assay was used to show that casticin affected associated gene expression of cell migration and invasion and the results indicated that casticin affected some of the gene expression such as increased SCN1B (cell adhesion molecule 1) and TIMP2 (TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2) and decreased NDUFS4 (NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein4), VEGFA (vascular endothelial growth factor A), and DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3) which associated cell migration and invasion in B16F10 cells. Based on those observations, we suggest that casticin could be used as a novel anticancer metastasis of melanoma cancer in the future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A flow cytometric assay to quantify invasion of red blood cells by rodent Plasmodium parasites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lelliott, Patrick M; Lampkin, Shelley; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2014-03-17

    Malaria treatments are becoming less effective due to the rapid spread of drug resistant parasites. Increased understanding of the host/parasite interaction is crucial in order to develop treatments that will be less prone to resistance. Parasite invasion of the red blood cell (RBC) is a critical aspect of the parasite life cycle and is, therefore, a promising target for the development of malaria treatments. Assays for analysing parasite invasion in vitro have been developed, but no equivalent assays exist for in vivo studies. This article describes a novel flow cytometric in vivo parasite invasion assay. Experiments were conducted with mice infected with erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium chabaudi adami strain DS. Exogenously labelled blood cells were transfused into infected mice at schizogony, and collected blood samples stained and analysed using flow cytometry to specifically detect and measure proportions of labelled RBC containing newly invaded parasites. A combination of antibodies (CD45 and CD71) and fluorescent dyes, Hoechst (DNA) and JC-1 (mitochondrial membrane potential), were used to differentiate parasitized RBCs from uninfected cells, RBCs containing Howell-Jolly bodies, leukocytes and RBC progenitors. Blood cells were treated ex vivo with proteases to examine the effects on in vivo parasite invasion. The staining and flow cytometry analysis method was accurate in determining the parasitaemia down to 0.013% with the limit of detection at 0.007%. Transfused labelled blood supported normal rates of parasite invasion. Protease-treated red cells resulted in 35% decrease in the rate of parasite invasion within 30 minutes of introduction into the bloodstream of infected mice. The invasion assay presented here is a versatile method for the study of in vivo red cell invasion efficiency of Plasmodium parasites in mice, and allows direct comparison of invasion in red cells derived from two different populations. The method also serves as an accurate

  11. Biophysical regulation of tumor cell invasion: moving beyond matrix stiffness.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Amit; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-04-01

    Invasion of cancer cells into the extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key step in tumor infiltration and metastasis. While the strong influence of ECM stiffness in governing tumor cell migration has been well established in two-dimensional culture paradigms, investigation of this parameter in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs has proven considerably more challenging, in part because perturbations that change 3D ECM stiffness often concurrently change microscale matrix parameters that critically regulate cell migration, such as pore size, fiber architecture, and local material deformability. Here we review the potential importance of these parameters in the context of tumor cell migration in 3D ECMs. We begin by discussing biophysical mechanisms of cell motility in 3D ECMs, with an emphasis on the cell-matrix mechanical interactions that underlie this process and key signatures of mesenchymal and amoeboid modes of motility. We then consider microscale matrix physical properties that are particularly relevant to 3D culture and would be expected to regulate motility, including matrix microstructure and nonlinear elasticity. We also discuss how changes in 3D matrix properties might be expected to trigger transitions in subcellular mechanisms, which in turn contribute to mesenchymal-amoeboid transition (MAT) by imposing restrictions on 3D motility. We expect that the field will gain valuable insight into invasion and metastasis by deepening its understanding of microscale, biophysical interactions between tumor cells and matrix elements and by creating new 3D scaffolds that permit orthogonal manipulation of specific matrix parameters.

  12. Inherent aggressive character of invasive and non-invasive cells dictates the in vitro migration pattern of multicellular spheroid.

    PubMed

    Gayan, Sukanya; Teli, Abhishek; Dey, Tuli

    2017-09-14

    Cellular migration, a process relevant to metastasis, is mostly studied in the conventional 2D condition. However, cells cultured in the 3D condition assumed to mimic the in vivo conditions better. The current study is designed to compare an invasive and non-invasive adenocarcinoma cell with an invasive fibrosarcoma cell to understand the migration pattern of the multicellular spheroid. It is observed that conventional haplotaxis, chemotactic and pseudo-3D migration assay cannot distinguish between the invasive and non-invasive cells conclusively under 2D condition. Invasive spheroids migrate rapidly in sprouting assay in comparison to non-invasive spheroids. Effects of cytochalasin B, marimastat and blebbistatin are tested to determine the influence of different migration modality namely actin polymerization, matrix metalloprotease and acto-myosin in both culture conditions. Altered mRNA profile of cellular migration related genes (FAK, Talin, Paxillin, p130cas and Vinculin) is observed between 2D and 3D condition followed by the changed expression of matrix metallo proteases. A distinct difference is observed in distribution and formation of focal adhesion complex under these culture conditions. This study demonstrates the efficacy of multicellular spheroids in identifying the intrinsic aggressive behavior of different cell lines as a proof of concept and recognizes the potential of spheroids as a migration model.

  13. Glucocorticoids decrease Treg cell numbers in lungs of allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, P C; Kitoko, J Z; Ferreira, T P; de-Azevedo, C T; Arantes, A C; Martins, Μ A

    2015-01-15

    Glucocorticoids have been the hallmark anti-inflammatory drug used to treat asthma. It has been shown that glucocorticoids ameliorate asthma by increasing numbers and activity of Tregs, in contrast recent data show that glucocorticoid might have an opposite effect on Treg cells from normal mice. Since Tregs are target cells that act on the resolution of asthma, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on lung Tregs in mouse models of asthma. Allergen challenged mice were treated with either oral dexamethasone or nebulized budesonide. Broncoalveolar lavage and airway hyperresponsiveness were evaluated after allergenic challenge. Lung, thymic and lymph node cells were phenotyped on Treg through flow cytometry. Lung cytokine secretion was detected by ELISA. Although dexamethasone inhibited airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, improving resolution, we have found that both dexamethasone and budesonide induce a reduction of Treg numbers on lungs and lymphoid organs of allergen challenged mice. The reduction of lung Treg levels was independent of mice strain or type of allergen challenge. Our study also indicates that both glucocorticoids do not increase Treg activity through production of IL-10. Glucocorticoid systemic or localized treatment induced thymic atrophy. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids decrease Treg numbers and activity in different asthma mouse models, probably by reducing thymic production of T cells. Therefore, it is possible that glucocorticoids do not have beneficial effects on lung populations of Treg cells from asthmatic patients.

  14. Emerging medical devices for minimally invasive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D; Ng, Kelvin S; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2014-02-01

    The past decade has seen the first wave of cell-based therapeutics undergo clinical trials with varying degrees of success. Although attention is increasingly focused on clinical trial design, owing to spiraling regulatory costs, tools used in delivering cells and sustaining the cells' viability and functions in vivo warrant careful scrutiny. While the clinical administration of cell-based therapeutics often requires additional safeguarding and targeted delivery compared with traditional therapeutics, there is significant opportunity for minimally invasive device-assisted cell therapy to provide the physician with new regenerative options at the point of care. Herein we detail exciting recent advances in medical devices that will aid in the safe and efficacious delivery of cell-based therapeutics.

  15. Gemifloxacin, a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drug, inhibits migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kan, Jung-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Gemifloxacin (GMF) is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF- κ B and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF- α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased I κ B phosphorylation and NF- κ B nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer.

  16. Gemifloxacin, a Fluoroquinolone Antimicrobial Drug, Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Jung-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Wang, Jaw-Yuan; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Gemifloxacin (GMF) is an orally administered broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agent used to treat acute bacterial exacerbation of pneumonia and bronchitis. Although fluoroquinolone antibiotics have also been found to have anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects, studies on the effect of GMF on treating colon cancer have been relatively rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the antimetastasis activities of GMF in colon cancer and the possible mechanisms involved. Results have shown that GMF inhibits the migration and invasion of colon cancer SW620 and LoVo cells and causes epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). In addition, GMF suppresses the activation of NF-κB and cell migration and invasion induced by TNF-α and inhibits the TAK1/TAB2 interaction, resulting in decreased IκB phosphorylation and NF-κB nuclear translocation in SW620 cells. Furthermore, Snail, a critical transcriptional factor of EMT, was downregulated after GMF treatment. Overexpression of Snail by cDNA transfection significantly decreases the inhibitory effect of GMF on EMT and cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, GMF may be a novel anticancer agent for the treatment of metastasis in colon cancer. PMID:24386633

  17. Putrescine importer PlaP contributes to swarming motility and urothelial cell invasion in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Shin; Sakai, Yumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Muth, Aaron; Phanstiel, Otto; Rather, Philip N

    2013-05-31

    Previously, we reported that the speA gene, encoding arginine decarboxylase, is required for swarming in the urinary tract pathogen Proteus mirabilis. In addition, this previous study suggested that putrescine may act as a cell-to-cell signaling molecule (Sturgill, G., and Rather, P. N. (2004) Mol. Microbiol. 51, 437-446). In this new study, PlaP, a putative putrescine importer, was characterized in P. mirabilis. In a wild-type background, a plaP null mutation resulted in a modest swarming defect and slightly decreased levels of intracellular putrescine. In a P. mirabilis speA mutant with greatly reduced levels of intracellular putrescine, plaP was required for the putrescine-dependent rescue of swarming motility. When a speA/plaP double mutant was grown in the presence of extracellular putrescine, the intracellular levels of putrescine were greatly reduced compared with the speA mutant alone, indicating that PlaP functioned as the primary putrescine importer. In urothelial cell invasion assays, a speA mutant exhibited a 50% reduction in invasion when compared with wild type, and this defect could be restored by putrescine in a PlaP-dependent manner. The putrescine analog Triamide-44 partially inhibited the uptake of putrescine by PlaP and decreased both putrescine stimulated swarming and urothelial cell invasion in a speA mutant.

  18. A novel role of sphingosine kinase-1 in the invasion and angiogenesis of VHL mutant clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mohamed F; Carroll, Brittany; Adada, Mohamad; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-07-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1), the enzyme responsible for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) production, is overexpressed in many human solid tumors. However, its role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) has not been described previously. ccRCC cases are usually associated with mutations in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) and subsequent normoxic stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). We previously showed that HIF-2α up-regulates SK1 expression during hypoxia in glioma cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that the stabilized HIF in ccRCC cells will be associated with increased SK1 expression. Here, we demonstrate that SK1 is overexpressed in 786-0 renal carcinoma cells lacking functional VHL, with concomitant high S1P levels that appear to be HIF-2α mediated. Moreover, examining the TCGA RNA seq database shows that SK1 expression was ∼2.7-fold higher in solid tumor tissue from ccRCC patients, and this was associated with less survival. Knockdown of SK1 in 786-0 ccRCC cells had no effect on cell proliferation. On the other hand, this knockdown resulted in an ∼3.5-fold decrease in invasion, less phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and an ∼2-fold decrease in angiogenesis. Moreover, S1P treatment of SK1 knockdown cells resulted in phosphorylation of FAK and invasion, and this was mediated by S1P receptor 2. These results suggest that higher SK1 and S1P levels in VHL-defective ccRCC could induce invasion in an autocrine manner and angiogenesis in a paracrine manner. Accordingly, targeting SK1 could reduce both the invasion and angiogenesis of ccRCC and therefore improve the survival rate of patients.

  19. Heparanase promotes human gastric cancer cells migration and invasion by increasing Src and p38 phosphorylation expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiu Mei; Shen, Zhi Hua; Liu, Zhi Yao; Wang, Fang; Hai, Ling; Gao, Lin Tao; Wang, Hai Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers and it remains difficult to cure, primarily because most cancer stem like cells possess higher capability of invasion and metastasis. Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins and activating signaling molecules. There were less associated with heparanase of molecular biology mechanism in human gastric cancer. We first evaluated the endogenous expression of heparanase in human gastric cancer cell lines and found Heparanase expression higher in SGC-7901 than MGC-803. Using the technology of RNAi in SGC-7901 cells down regulated heparanase gene, and reduced SGC-7901 cells migration and invasion. On the other hand, recombinant heparanase protein added in MGC-803 cells enhanced MGC-803 cell migration and invasion. The elevated cell migration and invasion were impaired by treatment of Src inhibitor pp2 or p38 inhibitor SB 203580. We further found that Stable knockdown of heparanase in SGC-7901 cells decreased phosphorylation of Src and p38. The phosphorylation of p38 was inhibited in response to pp2 treatment while the addition of SB 203580 to SGC-7901 cells did not change phosphorylation of Src. These data suggest that heparanase facilitates invasion and migration of human gastric cancer cells probably through elevating phosphorylation of Src and p38.

  20. Renal cell carcinoma with vascular invasion: Mortality and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cabello, M A; Laso-García, I; Donis-Canet, F; Gómez-Dos-Santos, V; Varona-Crespo, C; Burgos-Revilla, F J

    2017-03-01

    Analysis of the results of patients who had been operated of renal cell carcinoma with vascular invasion in our institution, evaluation of prognostic factors and complications. Retrospective observational study of 37 patients diagnosed of renal cell carcinoma with vascular invasion operated between May 1999 and July 2013. We used the method of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and the Mantel-Haenszel's test (log rank) and the Cox's proportional hazards analysis test to analyse the risk factors of mortality. The median age was 60 years. Mean follow-up period was 42.1 months. The median overall survival and disease-free survival were 53.8and 36.3 months, respectively. There was statistical association between overall survival and ASA (p=0.047), tumor stage (p=0.003), lymph node involvement (p=0.024), presence of metastases (p=0.013), level of tumor thrombus (p=0, 05) and histological type (p=0.001). 14 patients had grade IIIb complications or higher according to the Clavien Dindo classification, the most frequent was bleeding. Renal cell carcinoma with vascular invasion is a disease with high rate of mortality. Surgery is a therapeutic option that can be curative. The number of complications is important. Survival is conditioned by the ASA, tumor stage, the level of tumor thrombus, lymph node involvement, metastasis and histological type. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP3, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion. PMID:25829446

  2. [Thyroid C cells are decreased in experimental CDH].

    PubMed

    Martínez, L; De Ceano-Vivas, M; González-Reyes, S; Fernández-Dumont, V; Calonge, W M; Ruiz, E; Rodríguez, J I; Tovar, J A

    2006-04-01

    Experimental CDH is often associated with malformations of neural crest origin. Several of these features are present in human CDH and therefore likely similar pathogenic mechanisms should be explored. The aim of the present study is to examine whether thyroid C-cells, another neural crest derivative, are abnormal in this rat model. Pregnant rats were exposed either to 100 mg of 2-4-dichlorophenyl-p-nitrophenyl ether (nitrofén) or vehicle (controls) on 9.5 day of gestation. Fetuses were recovered on day 21st and the thyroids of those with CDH (68%) were immuno-histochemically stained with anti-calcitonin antibody. The number of positively stained cells per high power field were counted using a computer-assisted image analysis method in at least 5 sections per thyroid. The distribution of the cells within the gland was assessed as well. Comparisons between CDH and control rats were made by non-parametric tests with a significance threshold of p<0.05. The number of c-cells was dramatically reduced in CDH animals in comparison with controls (101.2 +/- 61.3 vs 23.1 +/- 37, p<0.0001). Histology of the thyroid was similar in both groups, but the distribution of positive C-cells within the gland followed an abnormal pattern in CDH rats with the cells tending to be located at the periphery rather than at the core of the lobes. Nitrofén induces a severe decrease in thyroid C cells accompanied by abnormal distribution patterns. These results add further evidence of the involvement of a neural crest dysregulation as a component of the pathogenesis of experimental CDH. Whether there is or not a clinical counterpart to these findings is still unknown, but the nature of the cardiovascular and craneo-facial malformations in some babies with CDH strongly support further research in this field.

  3. RNA interference targeting CD147 inhibits the invasion of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells by downregulating MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Wu, Weiguang; Shi, Haixia; Han, Jianqiu

    2013-07-01

    Cervical squamous carcinoma is a highly invasive tumour that has a great capacity to metastasise. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN or CD147), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein. It is highly expressed on malignant tumour cell surfaces, including human cervical squamous carcinoma. It also plays a critical role in the invasive and metastatic activity of malignant cells by stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The anti-invasive effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against CD147 on human cervical squamous carcinoma cells and its possible pathways has been investigated. The downregulation of CD147 by transfection with siRNA resulted in MMP-9 expression and decreased activity in the cervical squamous carcinoma cell line SiHa. In vitro analysis showed that the invasive capacity of SiHa cells decreased. Thus CD147 inhibition and subsequent MMP-9 deletion may have anti-tumour effects by inhibiting the invasiveness of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells.

  4. TGF-β Effects on Prostate Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion Require FosB.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Cachétne S X; Millena, Ana C; Khan, Shafiq A

    2017-01-01

    decreased after FosB knockdown in PC3 cells. Our data suggest that FosB is required for migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. We also conclude that TGF-β1 effect on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion may be mediated through the induction of FosB. Prostate 77:72-81, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. TGF-β Effects on Prostate Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion Require FosB

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Cachétne S.X.; Millena, Ana C.; Khan, Shafiq A.

    2017-01-01

    were also significantly decreased after FosB knockdown in PC3 cells. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that FosB is required for migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. We also conclude that TGF-β1 effect on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion may be mediated through the induction of FosB. PMID:27604827

  6. MicroRNA-3713 regulates bladder cell invasion via MMP9.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Wei; Du, Yi-Heng; Li, Hao; Xia, Shu-Jie; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2016-08-31

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer but its carcinogenesis remains not completely elucidated. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is well known to be involved in the development of various cancers, including TCC, whereas a role of miR-3713 in the pathogenesis of TCC has not been appreciated. Here, we reported that significantly higher levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and significantly lower levels of miR-3713 were detected in TCC tissue, compared to the adjacent non-tumor tissue, and were inversely correlated. Moreover, the low miR-3713 levels in TCC specimens were associated with poor survival of the patients. In vitro, overexpression of miR-3713 significantly decreased cell invasion, and depletion of miR-3713 increased cell invasion in TCC cells. The effects of miR-3713 on TCC cell growth appeared to result from its modification of MMP9 levels, in which miR-3713 was found to bind to the 3'-UTR of MMP9 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in TCC cells. This study highlights miR-3713 as a previously unrecognized factor that controls TCC invasiveness, which may be important for developing innovative therapeutic targets for TCC treatment.

  7. PlGF Knockdown Decreases Tumorigenicity and Stemness Properties of Spheroid Body Cells Derived from Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Fatemeh; Akrami, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family regulates some cell processes such as survival, growth of vascular endothelial cells, invasiveness, and also involves in pathological angiogenesis and metastasis in most cancers. Cancer stem cells are believed to be the main reason for the tumor relapse and resistance to therapy. These cells have various characteristics as same as normal tissue-specific adult stem cells including self-renewability and potent to differentiate into various cell types. However, the function of PlGF in gastric cancer stem cells is not well understood. We have investigated the effect of PlGF knockdown on the tumorigenicity and stem cell properties of spheroid body cells derived from two human gastric cancer cell lines. In this study, we isolated spheroid body cells which have stemness properties from MKN-45 and AGS without using growth factors. Validation of spheroid body cells was confirmed by various methods. Then the effects of PlGF knockdown were investigated on in vitro tumorigenicity, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and transcription levels of stemness markers of spheroid body cells. Our findings indicated that isolation of spheroid body cells from MKN-45 and AGS cells without using growth factors is an easy and inexpensive method to isolate cancer stem cells and knockdown of PlGF in spheroid body cells reduced in vitro tumorigenicity and stemness properties of spheroid body cells such as Self-renewal ability, colony forming, migratory, and MMPs activities and decreased ability to differentiation and angiogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 851-859, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Guggulsterone decreases proliferation and metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating JAK/STAT and Src/FAK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Macha, Muzafar A.; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Gupta, Suprit; Pai, Priya; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.; Jain, Maneesh

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate efficacy, high toxicity and drug resistance associated with existing chemotherapeutic agents mandate a need for novel therapeutic strategies for highly aggressive pancreatic cancer (PC). Guggulsterone (GS) exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects against various cancer cells and has emerged as an attractive candidate for use in complementary or preventive cancer therapies. However, the knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of GS in PC is still limited and needs to be explored. We studied the effect of GS on PC cell growth, motility and invasion and elucidated the molecular mechanisms associated with its anti-tumor effects. Treatment of Capan1 and CD18/HPAF PC cells with GS resulted in dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition and decreased colony formation. Further, GS treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest as assessed by Annexin-V assay and FACS analysis. Increased apoptosis following GS treatment was accompanied with Bad dephosphorylation and its translocation to the mitochondria, increased Caspase-3 activation, decreased Cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and xIAP expression. Additionally, GS treatment decreased motility and invasion of PC cells by disrupting cytoskeletal organization, inhibiting activation of FAK and Src signaling and decreased MMP9 expression. More importantly, GS treatment decreased mucin MUC4 expression in Capan1 and CD18/HPAF cells through transcriptional regulation by inhibiting Jak/STAT pathway. In conclusion, our results support the utility of GS as a potential therapeutic agent for lethal PC. PMID:23920124

  9. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  10. AEG-1 knockdown in colon cancer cell lines inhibits radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, Sebastian; Capodanno, Alessandra; Murthy, Raghavendra Vasudeva; Ejby Jensen, Lasse Dahl; Sun, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is a well-established anti-cancer treatment. Although radiotherapy has been shown to significantly decrease the local relapse in rectal cancer patients, the rate of distant metastasis is still very high. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether AEG-1 is involved in radiation-enhanced migration and invasion in vitro and in a novel in vivo zebrafish model. Results Migration and invasion were decreased in all the AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we observed that radiation enhanced migration and invasion, while AEG-1 knockdown abolished this effect. The results from the zebrafish embryo model confirmed the results obtained in vitro. MMP-9 secretion and expression were decreased in AEG-1 knockdown cells. Materials and Methods We evaluated the involvement of AEG-1 in migration and invasion and, radiation-enhanced migration and invasion by Boyden chamber assay in three colon cancer cell lines and respective stable AEG-1 knockdown cell lines. Furthermore, we injected those cells into zebrafish embryos and evaluated the amount of disseminated cells into the tail. Conclusion AEG-1 knockdown inhibits migration and invasion, as well as radiation-enhanced invasion both in vitro and in vivo. We speculate that this is done via the downregulation of the intrinsic or radiation-enhanced MMP-9 expression by AEG-1 in the cancer cells. This study also shows, for the first time, that the zebrafish is a great model to study the early events in radiation-enhanced invasion. PMID:27835571

  11. Tumor cell migration and invasion are regulated by expression of variant integrin glycoforms

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Faheem M; Seales, Eric C; Clem, William C; Hennessy, Kristin M; Zhuo, Ya; Bellis, Susan L

    2008-01-01

    The ST6Gal-I glycosyltransferase, which adds α2-6-linked sialic acids to glycoproteins, is overexpressed in colon adenocarcinoma, and enzyme activity is correlated with tumor cell invasiveness. Previously we reported that forced expression of oncogenic ras in HD3 colonocytes causes upregulation of ST6Gal-I, leading to increased α2-6 sialylation of β1 integrins. To determine whether ras-induced sialylation is involved in promoting the tumor cell phenotype, we used shRNA to downregulate ST6Gal-I in ras-expressors, and then monitored integrin-dependent responses. Here we show that forced ST6Gal-I downregulation, leading to diminished α2-6 sialylation of integrins, inhibits cell adhesion to collagen-I, a β1 ligand. Correspondingly, collagen binding is reduced by enzymatic removal of cell surface sialic acids from ras-expressors with high ST6Gal-I levels (i.e., no shRNA). Cells with forced ST6Gal-I downregulation also exhibit decreased migration on collagen-I and diminished invasion through Matrigel. Importantly, GD25 cells, which lack β1 integrins (and ST6Gal-I), do not demonstrate differential invasiveness when forced to express ST6Gal-I, suggesting that the effects of variant sialylation are mediated specifically by β1 integrins. The observation that cell migration and invasion can be blocked in oncogenic ras-expressing cells by forcing ST6Gal-I downregulation implicates differential sialylation as an important ras effector, and also suggests that ST6Gal-I is a promising therapeutic target. PMID:18703050

  12. CXCL7 promotes proliferation and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qian; Jian, Zhixiang; Jia, Baoqing; Chang, Liang

    2017-02-01

    CXCL7 is an important chemoattractant cytokine, which signals through binding to its receptor CXCR2. Recent studies have demonstrated that the CXCL7/CXCR2 signaling plays a promoting role in several common malignancies, including lung, renal, colon, and breast cancer. However, the regulatory role of CXCL7, in cholangiocarcinoma, as well as the underlying mechanism, has not been previously reported. Herein, we found more positive expression of CXCL7 in cholangiocarcinoma tissues compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues. High CXCL7 expression was significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, vascular invasion and advanced clinical stage, but was not associated with age, gender, or tumor size. Besides, the expression of CXCL7 was significantly associated with the Ki67 expression, but not associated with CA199, AFP, or P53 expression in cholangiocarcinoma. Moreover, the overall survival of cholangiocarcinoma patients with high CXCL7 expression was significantly shorter than those with low CXCL7 expression. In vitro study indicated that CXCL7 and CXCR2 were also positively expressed in several common cholangiocarcinoma cell lines, including HuCCT1, HuH28, QBC939, EGI-1, OZ and WITT. SiRNA-induced inhibition of CXCL7 significantly reduced the proliferation and invasion of QBC939 cells. On the contrary, overexpression of CXCL7 markedly promoted these malignant phenotypes of QBC939 cells. Of note, the conditioned medium of CXCL7-overexpresing human hepatic stellate cells could also promote the proliferation and invasion of QBC939 cells, suggesting that CXCL7 may also play an oncogenic role in cholangiocarcinoma in a paracrine-dependent manner, not only in an autocrine-dependent manner. Molecular assay data suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the CXCL7-mediated malignant phenotypes of QBC939 cells. In summary, our study suggests that CXCL7 plays a promoting role in regulating the growth and metastasis of cholangiocarcinoma.

  13. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by modulating matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Han, Yu Kyeong; Han, Jeong Yoon; Lee, Chang Geun

    2016-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is a conjugated form of UDCA that modulates several signaling pathways and acts as a chemical chaperone to relieve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The present study showed that TUDCA reduced the invasion of the MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using an in vitro invasion assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that the reduced invasion following TUDCA treatment was associated with a decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and −13, which play important roles in invasion and metastasis. Inhibitors and short hairpin RNAs were used to show that the effect of TUDCA in the reduction of invasion appeared to be dependent on the protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway, a downstream ER stress signaling pathway. Thus, TUDCA is a candidate anti-metastatic agent to target the ER stress pathway. PMID:27602168

  14. Ets-1 controls breast cancer cell balance between invasion and growth.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Alessandro; Vercamer, Chantal; Bouali, Fatima; Damour, Isabelle; Chotteau-Lelievre, Anne; Wernert, Nicolas; Desbiens, Xavier; Pourtier, Albin

    2014-11-15

    Ets-1 overexpression in human breast cancers is associated with invasiveness and poor prognosis. By overexpressing Ets-1 or a dominant negative mutant in MMT breast cancer cells, we previously highlighted the key role of Ets-1 in coordinating multiple invasive features of these cells. Interestingly, we also noticed that Ets-1 decreased the density of breast cancer cells cultured in three-dimensional extracellular matrix gels. The 3D context was instrumental to this phenomenon, as such downregulation was not observed in cells grown on two-dimensional plastic or matrix-coated dishes. Ets-1 overexpression was deleterious to anchorage-independent growth of MMT cells in soft agar, a standard model for in vitro tumorigenicity. The relevance of this mechanism was confirmed in vivo, during primary tumor growth and in a metastatic assay of lung colonization. In these models, Ets-1 was associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition features and modulated the ratio of Ki67-positive cells, while hardly affecting in vivo apoptotic cell death. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ets-1 in human breast cancer cell lines also decreased colony growth, both in anchorage-independent assays and 3D extracellular matrix cultures. These in vitro and in vivo observations shed light on an unsuspected facet of Ets-1 in breast tumorigenesis. They show that while promoting malignancy through the acquisition of invasive features, Ets-1 also attenuates breast tumor cell growth and could therefore repress the growth of primary tumors and metastases. This work also demonstrates that 3D models may reveal mechanisms of tumor biology that are cryptic in standard 2D models. © 2014 UICC.

  15. Extract of Clinopodium bolivianum protects against E. coli invasion of uroepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Soumitra; Kamolvit, Witchuda; Zambrana, Silvia; Sandström, Corine; Gonzales, Eduardo; Östenson, Claes-Göran; Brauner, Annelie

    2017-02-23

    Clinopodium bolivianum is a South American plant with anti-inflammatory and anti-infective activities. The increasing antibiotic resistance urges for alternative therapy. Based on its use in traditional medicine, we investigated the effect of C. bolivianum on the ability to defend bladder epithelial cells from E. coli infection. The extract was analyzed by LC-MS. Bladder epithelial cell lines T24 and 5637 and uropathogenic E. coli No. 12, its isogenic mutant WE16 csgBA bscA::Cm and CFT073 were used to investigate the effect of C. bolivianum on uroepithelial infection. Bacterial adherence and invasion to cells treated with C. bolivianum were analyzed. Expression of uroplakin 1a, β1 integrin, caveolin-1, IL-8 and antimicrobial peptides in response to C. bolivianum treatment was assessed using RT-PCR. Protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis or ELISA. The antimicrobial effects of C. bolivianum on bacteria and fungus were investigated using minimum inhibitory concentration. Furthermore, the formation of biofilm was investigated with crystal violet assay. C. bolivianum extract consisted of more than 70 different types of phytochemicals including sugars and phenolic compounds. The extract decreased the uroplakin 1a expression and E. coli adhesion and invasion of uroepithelial cells while up-regulated caveolin-1. In uninfected C. bolivianum treated cells, IL-8 was lower than in non-treated cells. In infected cells, however, no difference was observed between treated and non-treated cells. Further, C. bolivianum treatment reduced uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms but did not inhibit bacterial growth. Our results show that C. bolivianum has a protective role on bladder epithelial cells against UPEC infection by decreasing the bacterial adhesion, invasion and biofilm formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of targeted silencing of IL-8 on in vitro migration and invasion of SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanyu; Liu, Ling; Yin, Zeyuan; Xu, Hui; Li, Shuang; Tao, Wei; Cheng, Hui; Du, Lei; Zhou, Xueyuan; Zhang, Bei

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether interleukin-8 (IL-8) affects human SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion by targeting silencing of IL-8 expression. Silencing small-interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting IL-8 gene was constructed to infect SKOV3 cells by lentiviral vector. The expression of IL-8 and p-nuclear factor (NF)-κB protein was detected by western blot analysis. The wound scratch and Transwell tests were used to assay the cell migration and invasiveness of SKOV3 cells infected with lentiviral vector targeting IL-8 gene siRNA. The levels of IL-8 protein expressed by SKOV3 cells infected by lentiviral vector targeting IL-8 gene siRNA decreased by 72.3%. IL-8 (50 ng/ml) increased the ability of SKOV3 cells to suppress cell migration (p<0.01). Cisplatin and silencing of IL-8 achieved the ability to inhibit SKOV3 cell invasion (p<0.01), and 100 ng/ml concentration of IL-8 enhanced the ability of SKOV3 invasion (p<0.01). Silencing of IL-8 to a certain extent reduced the expression of p-NF-κB proteins, but it was not statistically significant. In conclusion, silencing of IL-8 may inhibit the migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells, which may be independent of the p-NF-κB protein. PMID:28356930

  17. Antiproliferative and anti-invasive effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on human and murine melanoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hiwatashi, Yoko; Tadokoro, Hiroko; Henmi, Kayo; Arai, Mariko; Kaise, Toshikazu; Tanaka, Sachiko; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2011-09-01

    For patients with advanced melanoma, no treatment options are available at present that provide either sufficient response rates or a significant prolongation of overall survival. The present study examines the effects of two inorganic and six organic arsenic compounds on cell proliferation and cell invasion of melanoma cells in vitro. The effects of arsenic compounds on proliferation of human melanoma A375 cells and murine melanoma B16F10 cells were examined by MTT assay and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay, and the effects of the compounds on cell invasion were examined by the Boyden chamber invasion assay. The amounts of active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and pro-MMP-2 in the culture supernatant of A375 cells were determined by an MMP-2 activity assay system. Arsenate and arsenic trioxide (As(2) O(3) ) inhibited the proliferation of A375 and B16F10 cells significantly at concentration ranges of 0.1-20µg/ml (P<0.001), while the organic compounds arsenobetaine, arsenocholine, dimethylarsinic acid, methylarsonic acid, tetramethylarsonium and trimethylarsine oxide did not show any inhibitory effects even at 20µg/ml. Cell invasion of A375 and B16F10 cells through a layer of collagen IV was significantly inhibited by 0.1-20 µg/ml of arsenate or As(2) O(3) (P<0.05), while the organic compounds did not inhibit cell invasion. Arsenate or As(2) O(3) at 0.2-10µg/ml significantly inhibited the amount of active MMP-2 and pro-MMP-2 secreted into the A375 cell culture supernatant (P<0.05). Our findings show that the inorganic arsenic compounds arsenate and As(2) O(3) inhibit cell proliferation and prevent the invasive properties of melanoma cells, possibly by decreasing MMP-2 production from the cells. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  18. GOLPH3 promotes glioblastoma cell migration and invasion via the mTOR-YB1 pathway in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Ding, Zhijun; Mo, Jianbing; Sang, Ben; Shi, Qiong; Hu, Jinxia; Xie, Shao; Zhan, Wenjian; Lu, Dong; Yang, Minglin; Bian, Wenbin; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong

    2015-11-01

    The identification of genes involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression is of great interest, since these genes might be possible as candidates for new tumor targeted therapy strategies. Our previous study shows that Golgi phosphoprotein 3 (GOLPH3) is involved in glioma cell migration and invasion, the critical characteristics of malignant gliomas. In this study, we explored the mechanism of GOLPH3 affecting cell migration and invasion and found that GOLPH3 promotes glioblastoma (GBM) cell migration and invasion via the mammalian target of rapamycin(mTOR)-Y-box binding protein-1 (YB1) pathway in vitro. Both the protein levels of GOLPH3 and YB1 were up-regulated in human glioma tissues and they exhibited direct correlation with each other. In addition, down-regulation of GOLPH3 inhibited glioma cell migration and invasion, while over-expression of GOLPH3 enhanced them. Meanwhile, GOLPH3 down-regulation led to a significant decrease of YB1 level as well as mTOR activity, both required for glioma cell migration and invasion. On the contrary, YB1 level and mTOR activity increased after GOLPH3 over-expression. YB1 down-regulation or mTOR ATP site inhibitor INK128 treatment inhibited cell migration and invasion, similar to the effect of GOLPH3 down-regulation. Furthermore, over-expression of GOLPH3 induced glioma cell migration and invasion was blocked by INK128 and YB1 down-regulation. Taken together, these results show that GOLPH3 promotes glioblastoma cell migration and invasion via the mTOR-YB1pathway, indicating that GOLPH3-mTOR-YB1 pathway might be a new therapeutic target for glioma treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Decreased Sp1 Expression Mediates Downregulation of SHIP2 in Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yan; Qian, Xue Yi; Xiao, Miao Miao; Shao, Yu Ling; Guo, Li Mei; Liao, Dong Ping; Da, Jie; Zhang, Lin Jie; Xu, Jiegou

    2017-01-01

    Past studies have shown that the Src homology 2-containing inositol 5-phosphatase 2 (SHIP2) is commonly downregulated in gastric cancer, which contributes to elevated activation of PI3K/Akt signaling, proliferation and tumorigenesis of gastric cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying the reduced expression of SHIP2 in gastric cancer remain unclear. While gene copy number variation analysis and exon sequencing indicated the absence of genomic alterations of SHIP2, bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS) showed promoter hypomethylation of SHIP2 in gastric cancer cells. Analysis of transcriptional activity of SHIP2 promoter revealed Specificity protein 1 (Sp1) was responsible for the regulation of SHIP2 expression in gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, Sp1 expression, but not Sp3, was frequently downregulated in gastric cancer compared with normal gastric mucosa, which was associated with a paralleled reduction in SHIP2 levels in gastric cancer. Moreover, overexpression of Sp1 inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, suppressed cell motility and invasion in gastric cancer cells in vitro, which was, at least in part, due to transcriptional activation of SHIP2 mediated by Sp1, thereby inactivating Akt. Collectively, these results indicate that decreased expression of transcription factor Sp1 contributes to suppression of SHIP2 in gastric cancer cells. PMID:28117748

  20. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-10-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro‑apoptotic protein, B‑cell lymphoma‑associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells.

  1. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells. PMID:27510325

  2. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Menter, David G.; DuBois, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1) are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1–4 receptors (EP1–4). Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1–4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM). Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1–4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy. PMID:22505934

  3. The interplay between invasion and proliferation in tumor cell navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2013-03-01

    Tumor cells can employ different cellular and molecular modes of invasion. The two main phenotypic mechanisms are: 1. Amoeboid (or ``path finder'') cells that can squeeze through small gaps in the ECM (extracellular matrix). 2. Mesenchymal (or ``path generator'') cells that are more rigid and can decompose the ECM to pass through. In addition there is interplay between energy directed to more rapid motility vs. energy used for proliferation. Understanding the relative contributions of these distinct mechanisms and the balance between motility and proliferation to the efficiency of metastatic cancer migration is fundamental to the therapeutic targeting of cancer. We present a conceptual and modeling framework for the analysis and assessment of the success rate, time-to-target, and survival probability of amoeboid vs. mesenchymal modes. Similarly, we contrast invasion with and without proliferation. We treat the complex ECM geometry as a maze and employ semi-realistic modeling of cell motility. Our approach includes metabolic and timing degrees of freedom. The theoretical studies were compared with experimental efforts of cell navigation in specially designed microfluidic devices. Center for Theoretical Biological Physics sponsored by the NSF (Grant PHY-0822283) Rice University, The Tauber Family Foundation and the Maguy-Glass Chair in Physics of Complex Systems at Tel Aviv University.

  4. Invasion of Host Cells and Tissues by Uropathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Adam J.; Richards, Amanda C.; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    Within the mammalian urinary tract uropathogenic bacteria face many challenges, including the shearing flow of urine, numerous antibacterial molecules, the bactericidal effects of phagocytes, and a scarcity of nutrients. These problems may be circumvented in part by the ability of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and several other uropathogens to invade the epithelial cells that line the urinary tract. By entering host cells, uropathogens can gain access to additional nutrients and protection from both host defenses and antibiotic treatments. Translocation through host cells can facilitate bacterial dissemination within the urinary tract, while the establishment of stable intracellular bacterial populations may create reservoirs for relapsing and chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs). Here we review the mechanisms and consequences of host cell invasion by uropathogenic bacteria, with consideration of the defenses that are brought to bear against facultative intracellular pathogens within the urinary tract. The relevance of host cell invasion to the pathogenesis of UTIs in human patients is also assessed, along with some of the emerging treatment options that build upon our growing understanding of the infectious life cycle of UPEC and other uropathogenic bacteria. PMID:28087946

  5. Matrine inhibits the migratory and invasive properties of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SUN, BIN; XU, MIN

    2015-01-01

    Matrine is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine that has historically been used in the treatment of inflammation and cancer. However, the antimetastatic effects and associated molecular mechanisms of matrine on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess the antimetastatic effects of matrine on NPC, and identify the underlying mechanisms. Matrine inhibited the proliferation of NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, matrine inhibited the migration and invasion of NPC tumor cells at doses below the toxic range. Following treatment with matrine for 24 h, there was a decrease in the protein expression levels and activities of matrix metal-loproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in NPC-039 cells. In addition, matrine markedly reduced the expression levels of p65 and p50 in the nuclei. Combined treatment of matrine with helenalin, a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression levels, and the invasive capabilities of the NPC-039 cells were also reduced. In conclusion, matrine inhibits NPC cell migration and invasion by suppressing the NF-κB pathway. These results suggest that matrine may be a potential therapeutic agent for NPC. PMID:25633440

  6. The integrin inhibitor cilengitide affects meningioma cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wilisch-Neumann, Annette; Kliese, Nadine; Pachow, Doreen; Schneider, Thomas; Warnke, Jan-Peter; Braunsdorf, Werner Ek; Böhmer, Frank-Dietmar; Hass, Peter; Pasemann, Diana; Helbing, Cornelia; Kirches, Elmar; Mawrin, Christian

    2013-10-01

    Meningiomas are frequent intracranial or spinal neoplasms, which recur frequently and can show aggressive clinical behaviour. We elucidated the impact of the integrin inhibitor cilengitide on migration, proliferation, and radiosensitization of meningioma cells. We analyzed integrin expression in tissue microarrays of human meningiomas and the antimeningioma properties of cilengitide in cell cultures, subcutaneous and intracranial nude mouse models by measuring tumor volumes and survival times. αvβ5 was the predominantly expressed integrin heterodimer in meningiomas, whereas αvβ3 was mainly detected in tumor blood vessels. Application of up to 100 μg/mL cilengitide resulted in only mildly reduced proliferation/survival of meningioma cell lines. Effects on cell survival could be enhanced by irradiation. One μg/mL cilengitide was sufficient to significantly inhibit meningioma cell migration and invasion in vitro. A daily dosage of 75 mg/kg did neither affect tumor volumes nor overall survival (P = 0.813, log-rank test), but suppressed brain invasion in a significant fraction of treated animals. A combination of 75 mg/kg cilengitide daily and irradiation (2 × 5 Gy) led to a 67% reduction of MRI-estimated tumor volumes in the intracranial model (P < 0.01), whereas the corresponding reduction reached by irradiation alone was only 55% (P < 0.05). These data show that a monotherapy with cilengitide is not likely to achieve major responses in rapidly growing malignant meningiomas, although brain invasion may be reduced because of the strong antimigratory properties of the drug. The combination with radiotherapy warrants further attention. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Decreased hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization in pearl mice.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Matthew O; Niemeyer, Glenn P; Vaglenov, Alex; Hock, Tommy; Urie, Bridget; Christopherson, Peter; Lothrop, Clinton D

    2013-10-01

    Neutropenia is common to both Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 2 and canine cyclic hematopoiesis (CH) which are caused by mutations in the AP3B1 gene. The purpose of this study was to determine if pearl mice were neutropenic. Complete blood counts (CBCs) and bone marrow differential counts, colony forming unit (CFU) assay, bone marrow lineage negative (lin(-)), Sca(+) and c-kit(+) cells (LSK cells), bone marrow elastase, myeloperoxidase, and cathepsin G enzyme activity were compared in C57Bl6 (Bl/6) and pearl mice. Stress granulopoiesis was evaluated following 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or 1 mg/kg bortezomib administration and by limiting dilution bone marrow transplantation. The CBCs and CFUs were determined in Bl/6 and pearl mice following AMD3100 or granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration. Pearl mice were not neutropenic and did not have cyclic neutropenia. Bone marrow elastase, myeloperoxidase, and cathepsin G enzyme activity were similar in pearl and Bl/6 mice. The numbers of CFU-G, CFU-GEMM, and LSK cells were increased moderately in pearl mice. Stress granulopoiesis was similar in Bl/6 and pearl mice. CFU assays and CBCs performed on Bl/6 and pearl mice administered AMD3100 resulted in similar results. However, normal mice administered G-CSF had higher peripheral blood neutrophil counts and greater CFU numbers compared with pearl mice. Unlike patients with HPS-2 and dogs with CH, pearl mice did not have neutropenia or CH but had decreased hematopoietic progenitor cell and granulocyte mobilization in response to G-CSF. Copyright © 2013 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Caveolin-1 mediates inflammatory breast cancer cell invasion via the Akt1 pathway and RhoC GTPase.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Madhura; Elbazanti, Weam O; Weitzman, Matthew D; Lehman, Heather L; van Golen, Kenneth L

    2015-06-01

    With a propensity to invade the dermal lymphatic vessels of the skin overlying the breast and readily metastasize, inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is arguably the deadliest form of breast cancer. We previously reported that caveolin-1 is overexpressed in IBC and that RhoC GTPase is a metastatic switch responsible for the invasive phenotype. RhoC-driven invasion requires phosphorylation by Akt1. Using a reliable IBC cell line we set out to determine if caveolin-1 expression affects RhoC-mediated IBC invasion. Caveolin-1 was down regulated by introduction of siRNA or a caveolin scaffolding domain. The ability of the cells to invade was tested and the status of Akt1 and RhoC GTPase examined. IBC cell invasion is significantly decreased when caveolin-1 is down regulated. Activation of Akt1 is decreased when caveolin-1 is down regulated, leading to decreased phosphorylation of RhoC GTPase. Thus, we report here that caveolin-1 overexpression mediates IBC cell invasion through activation Akt1, which phosphorylates RhoC GTPase.

  9. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Invasion-Resistant Cells Identifies Laminin α2 as a Host Factor for Bacterial Invasion.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Xander M; Döhrmann, Simon; Hallström, Björn M; Li, Shangzhong; Voldborg, Bjørn G; Meng, Brandon X; McKee, Karen K; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Yurchenco, Peter D; Palsson, Bernhard O; Lewis, Nathan E; Nizet, Victor; Esko, Jeffrey D

    2017-01-10

    To understand the role of glycosaminoglycans in bacterial cellular invasion, xylosyltransferase-deficient mutants of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were created using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated gene 9 (CRISPR-cas9) gene targeting. When these mutants were compared to the pgsA745 cell line, a CHO xylosyltransferase mutant generated previously using chemical mutagenesis, an unexpected result was obtained. Bacterial invasion of pgsA745 cells by group B Streptococcus (GBS), group A Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus was markedly reduced compared to the invasion of wild-type cells, but newly generated CRISPR-cas9 mutants were only resistant to GBS. Invasion of pgsA745 cells was not restored by transfection with xylosyltransferase, suggesting that an additional mutation conferring panresistance to multiple bacteria was present in pgsA745 cells. Whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) uncovered a deletion in the gene encoding the laminin subunit α2 (Lama2) that eliminated much of domain L4a. Silencing of the long Lama2 isoform in wild-type cells strongly reduced bacterial invasion, whereas transfection with human LAMA2 cDNA significantly enhanced invasion in pgsA745 cells. The addition of exogenous laminin-α2β1γ1/laminin-α2β2γ1 strongly increased bacterial invasion in CHO cells, as well as in human alveolar basal epithelial and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Thus, the L4a domain in laminin α2 is important for cellular invasion by a number of bacterial pathogens. Pathogenic bacteria penetrate host cellular barriers by attachment to extracellular matrix molecules, such as proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens, leading to invasion of epithelial and endothelial cells. Here, we show that cellular invasion by the human pathogens group B Streptococcus, group A Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus aureus depends on a specific domain of the laminin α2 subunit. This

  10. Decrease of fibrinolytic activity in human endothelial cells by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wu, Hua-Lin; Han, Huai-Song; Shi, Guey-Yueh

    2002-01-01

    Blackfoot disease (BFD) is an endemic peripheral vascular occlusive disease that occurred in the southwest coast of Taiwan. It is believed that arsenic in the drinking water from artesian wells plays an important role in the development of the disease. We have previously shown that BFD patients had significant lower tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen level and higher plasminogen activator inhibitor, Type 1 (PAI-1) antigen level than normal controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenite on the fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities of cultured macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Incubation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with arsenite caused a decrease of t-PA mRNA level, a rise of both PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI activity. Arsenite could also inhibit the thrombomodulin (TM) mRNA expression and reduce the TM antigen level in HMEC-1. In conclusion, arsenite had a greater effect on HMEC-1 as compared to HUVECs in lowering the fibrinolytic activity and may be responsible for the reduced capacity of fibrinolysis associated with BFD.

  11. Electrical Monitoring Cytotoxic Effect of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Transendothelial Invasion of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opp, Daniel; Lo, Chun-Min

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the effects of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on barrier function and cellular migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and on the invasive activities of ovarian carcinoma cells through HUVEC monolayers as well. Central to this work was the use of electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS), a cell-based biosensor that monitors motility and other morphology changes of cells adherent on small gold electrodes. Upon addition of different concentrations of CSC, the junctional resistance and the wound healing rate of the HUVEC layers decrease as CSC concentration increases from 0.01 to 0.25 mg/ml, whereas the average cell-substrate separation increases with CSC concentration. Following the addition of OVCA429 ovarian cancer cells to HUVEC layers with the presence of different CSC concentrations, dose-dependent changes of the transcellular resistance drop were observed. Our results suggest that CSC is detrimental to normal endothelial cell function in maintaining vascular integrity. In addition, the chemicals present in CSC may increase transendothelial invasion of ovarian cancer cells.

  12. Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 regulates adhesion and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    YE, LIN; SANDERS, ANDREW J.; SUN, PING-HUI; MASON, MALCOLM D.; JIANG, WEN G.

    2014-01-01

    Capillary morphogenesis gene 2 (CMG2), also known as anthrax toxin receptor 2, has been indicated in the formation of new vasculature and in the internalisation of the anthrax toxin. Anti-angiogenesis therapy that targets this molecule has been investigated. However, our recent studies of this molecule have indicated that this gene may also play certain roles in cancer cells. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CMG2 in prostate cancer tissues and cell lines, and also its impact on cellular functions. The expression of CMG2 was detectable in normal and prostate cancer tissues. The prostate cancer cell lines appeared to have relatively high expression compared with the prostatic epithelial cells. Knockdown of CMG2 impaired the adherence of the prostate cancer cells. CMG2 overexpression resulted in decreasing invasiveness, while the knockdown of CMG2 contrastingly enhanced this ability. The altered expression of CMG2 in the prostate cancer cells did not affect the in vitro or in vivo growth of the cells. Taken together, these results show that CMG2 is expressed in prostatic epithelia and cancer cells. In addition to its role in the angiogenesis and the internalisation of anthrax toxin, CMG2 also plays an important role in regulating the adhesion and invasion of prostate cancer cells. PMID:24932305

  13. Stimulators of Mineralization Limit the Invasive Phenotype of Human Osteosarcoma Cells by a Mechanism Involving Impaired Invadopodia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cmoch, Anna; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Palczewska, Malgorzata; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Groves, Patrick; Pikula, Slawomir

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly aggressive bone cancer affecting children and young adults. Growing evidence connects the invasive potential of OS cells with their ability to form invadopodia (structures specialized in extracellular matrix proteolysis). Results In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commonly used in vitro stimulators of mineralization limit the invadopodia formation in OS cells. Here we examined the invasive potential of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) and osteolytic-like (143B) OS cells treated with the stimulators of mineralization (ascorbic acid and B-glycerophosphate) and observed a significant difference in response of the tested cells to the treatment. In contrast to 143B cells, osteoblast-like cells developed a mineralization phenotype that was accompanied by a decreased proliferation rate, prolongation of the cell cycle progression and apoptosis. On the other hand, stimulators of mineralization limited osteolytic-like OS cell invasiveness into collagen matrix. We are the first to evidence the ability of 143B cells to degrade extracellular matrix to be driven by invadopodia. Herein, we show that this ability of osteolytic-like cells in vitro is limited by stimulators of mineralization. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that mineralization competency determines the invasive potential of cancer cells. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which stimulators of mineralization regulate and execute invadopodia formation would reveal novel clinical targets for treating osteosarcoma. PMID:25314307

  14. Enantioselective Effects of o,p'-DDT on Cell Invasion and Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells: Chirality in Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangming; Dong, Xiaowu; Zou, Dehong; Yu, Yang; Fang, Qunying; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Meirong

    2015-08-18

    The o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) with a chiral center possesses enantioselective estrogenic activity, in which R-(-)-o,p'-DDT exerts a more potent estrogenic effect than S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. Although concern regarding DDT exposure and breast cancer has increased in recent decades, the mode of enantioselective action of o,p'-DDT in breast cancer development is still unknown. Herein, we conducted a systematic study of the effect of o,p'-DDT on stereoselective breast tumor cell progression in a widely used in vitro breast tumor cell model, MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that R-(-)-o,p'-DDT promoted more cancer cell invasion mediated by the human estrogen receptor (ER) by inducing invasion-promoted genes (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and inhibiting invasion-inhibited genes (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -4). Molecular docking verified that the binding affinity between R-(-)-o,p'-DDT and human ER was stronger than that of S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. The enantioselective-induced decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion may involve the downregulation of adhesion-promoted genes (E-cadherin and β-catenin). For the first time, these results reveal that estrogenic-like chiral compounds are of significant concern in the progression of human cancers and that human health risk assessment of chiral chemicals should consider enantioselectivity.

  15. Globular adiponectin enhances invasion in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FALK LIBBY, EMILY; LIU, JIANZHONG; LI, YI; LEWIS, MONICA J.; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, a large number of women succumb to metastatic breast cancer due to a lack of curative approaches for this disease. Adiponectin (AdipoQ) is the most abundant of the adipocyte-secreted adipokines. In recent years, there has been an interest in the use of AdipoQ and AdipoQ receptor agonists as therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. However, while multiple epidemiological studies have previously indicated that low levels of circulating plasma AdipoQ portend poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, recent studies have reported that elevated expression levels of AdipoQ in breast tissue are correlated with advanced stages of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which AdipoQ in breast tissue acts directly on tumor cells to regulate the early steps of breast cancer metastasis. In the present study, the effects of different AdipoQ isoforms on the metastatic potential of human breast cancer cells were investigated. The results revealed that globular adiponectin (gAd) promoted invasive cell morphology and significantly increased the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells, whereas full-length adiponectin (fAd) had no effect on these cells. Additionally, gAd, but not fAd, increased the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3B)-II and intracellular LC3B puncta, which are indicators of autophagosome formation, thus suggesting autophagic induction by gAd. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagic function by autophagy-related protein 7 knockdown attenuated the gAd-induced increase in invasiveness in breast cancer cells. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that a specific AdipoQ isoform may enhance breast cancer invasion, possibly via autophagic induction. Understanding the roles of the different AdipoQ isoforms as microenvironmental regulatory molecules may aid the development of effective AdipoQ-based treatments for breast cancer

  16. Prelamin A causes progeria through cell-extrinsic mechanisms and prevents cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Freije, José M P; Cabanillas, Rubén; Osorio, Fernando G; Fraga, Mario F; Fernández-García, M Soledad; Rad, Roland; Fanjul, Víctor; Ugalde, Alejandro P; Liang, Qi; Prosser, Haydn M; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Defining the relationship between ageing and cancer is a crucial but challenging task. Mice deficient in Zmpste24, a metalloproteinase mutated in human progeria and involved in nuclear prelamin A maturation, recapitulate multiple features of ageing. However, their short lifespan and serious cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic alterations restrict the application and interpretation of carcinogenesis protocols. Here we present Zmpste24 mosaic mice that lack these limitations. Zmpste24 mosaic mice develop normally and keep similar proportions of Zmpste24-deficient (prelamin A-accumulating) and Zmpste24-proficient (mature lamin A-containing) cells throughout life, revealing that cell-extrinsic mechanisms are preeminent for progeria development. Moreover, prelamin A accumulation does not impair tumour initiation and growth, but it decreases the incidence of infiltrating oral carcinomas. Accordingly, silencing of ZMPSTE24 reduces human cancer cell invasiveness. Our results support the potential of cell-based and systemic therapies for progeria and highlight ZMPSTE24 as a new anticancer target.

  17. Prelamin A causes progeria through cell-extrinsic mechanisms and prevents cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Freije, José M. P.; Cabanillas, Rubén; Osorio, Fernando G.; Fraga, Mario F.; Fernández-García, M. Soledad; Rad, Roland; Fanjul, Víctor; Ugalde, Alejandro P.; Liang, Qi; Prosser, Haydn M.; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Defining the relationship between ageing and cancer is a crucial but challenging task. Mice deficient in Zmpste24, a metalloproteinase mutated in human progeria and involved in nuclear prelamin A maturation, recapitulate multiple features of ageing. However, their short lifespan and serious cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic alterations restrict the application and interpretation of carcinogenesis protocols. Here we present Zmpste24 mosaic mice that lack these limitations. Zmpste24 mosaic mice develop normally and keep similar proportions of Zmpste24-deficient (prelamin A accumulating) and Zmpste24-proficient (mature lamin A containing) cells throughout life, revealing that cell-extrinsic mechanisms are preeminent for progeria development. Moreover, prelamin A accumulation does not impair tumour initiation and growth, but it decreases the incidence of infiltrating oral carcinomas. Accordingly, silencing of ZMPSTE24 reduces human cancer cell invasiveness. Our results support the potential of cell-based and systemic therapies for progeria and highlight ZMPSTE24 as a new anticancer target. PMID:23917225

  18. FTSJ2, a Heat Shock-Inducible Mitochondrial Protein, Suppresses Cell Invasion and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ken-Yo; Liu, Fang-Chueh; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Cheng, Winston T. K.; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA large subunit methyltransferase J (RrmJ), an Escherichia coli heat shock protein, is responsible for 2′-O-ribose methylation in 23S rRNA. In mammals, three close homologs of RrmJ have been identified and have been designated as FTSJ1, FTSJ2 and FTSJ3; however, little is known about these genes. In this study, we characterized the mammalian FTSJ2, which was the most related protein to RrmJ in a phylogenetic analysis that had similar amino acid sequence features and tertiary protein structures of RrmJ. FTSJ2 was first identified in this study as a nucleus encoded mitochondrial protein that preserves the heat shock protein character in mammals in which the mRNA expressions was increased in porcine lung tissues and A549 cells after heat shock treatment. In addition, a recent study in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggested that the FTSJ2 gene is located in a novel oncogenic locus. However, our results demonstrate that the expression of FTSJ2 mRNA was decreased in the more invasive subline (CL1-5) of the lung adenocarcinoma cells (CL1) compared with the less invasive subline (CL1-0), and overexpression of FTSJ2 resulted in the inhibition of cell invasion and migration in the rhabdomyosarcoma cell (TE671). In conclusion, our findings indicate that mammalian FTSJ2 is a mitochondrial ortholog of E. coli RrmJ and conserves the heat shock protein properties. Moreover, FTSJ2 possesses suppressive effects on the invasion and migration of cancer cells. PMID:24595062

  19. Loss of tricellular tight junction protein LSR promotes cell invasion and migration via upregulation of TEAD1/AREG in human endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Hiroshi; Abe, Shyuetsu; Kohno, Takayuki; Satohisa, Seiro; Konno, Takumi; Takahashi, Syunta; Hatakeyama, Tsubasa; Arimoto, Chihiro; Kakuki, Takuya; Kaneko, Yakuto; Takano, Ken-ichi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is a unique molecule of tricellular contacts of normal and cancer cells. We investigated how the loss of LSR induced cell migration, invasion and proliferation in endometrial cancer cell line Sawano. mRNAs of amphiregulin (AREG) and TEA domain family member 1 (TEAD1) were markedly upregulated by siRNA-LSR. In endometrial cancer tissues, downregulation of LSR and upregulation of AREG were observed together with malignancy, and Yes-associated protein (YAP) was present in the nuclei. siRNA-AREG prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR, whereas treatment with AREG induced cell migration and invasion. LSR was colocalized with TRIC, angiomotin (AMOT), Merlin and phosphorylated YAP (pYAP). siRNA-LSR increased expression of pYAP and decreased that of AMOT and Merlin. siRNA-YAP prevented expression of the mRNAs of AREG and TEAD1, and the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. Treatment with dobutamine and 2-deoxy-D-glucose and glucose starvation induced the pYAP expression and prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. siRNA-AMOT decreased the Merlin expression and prevented the cell migration and invasion induced by siRNA-LSR. The loss of LSR promoted cell invasion and migration via upregulation of TEAD1/AREG dependent on YAP/pYAP and AMOT/Merlin in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:28071680

  20. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  1. RhoC is essential for TGF-{beta}1-induced invasive capacity of rat ascites hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, M.; Endo, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Tatsuta, M.; Togawa, A.; Nakamura, H.; Inoue, M. . E-mail: inoue-ma2@mc.pref.osaka.jp

    2006-07-21

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) is a multifunctional growth factor that plays a role in cell proliferation, differentiation, extracellular matrix production, apoptosis, and cell motility. We show here that TGF-{beta}1 increased the invasiveness of MM1 cells, which are a highly invasive clone of rat ascites hepatoma cells. Both mRNA and protein levels of RhoC but not RhoA in TGF-{beta}1-treated MM1 cells increased. In parallel with this increase in expression, RhoC activity was induced by TGF-{beta}1 treatment. When RhoC was overexpressed in MM1 cells, the invasive capacity increased. The RhoC-overexpressing cells formed more nodules than did mock cells when injected into rat peritoneum. Furthermore, when RhoC expression was reduced by transfection with shRNA/RhoC, the invasiveness of MM1 cells decreased with concomitant suppression of RhoC expression. Thus, the induced expression of RhoC by TGF-{beta}1 in MM1 cells plays a critical role in TGF-{beta}1-induced cell migration.

  2. [Effect of Aloe emodin on invasion and metastasis of high metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells].

    PubMed

    He, Zhen-Hui; Huang, Yue-Qun; Weng, Shan-Fan; Tan, Yao-Rong; He, Tai-Ping; Qin, Yan-Mei; Liang, Nian-Ci

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effect of Aloe emodin (AE) on the invasive and metastatic abilities of human high metastatic breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. MTT assay was used to evaluate the viability of MDA-MB-231 cells after treated with AE for 6 h and 24 h. The adhesive potential of MDA-MB-231 cells to FN and LN was tested by cell-matrix adhesion assay. The effect of AE on invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was measured by Transwell chamber assay. Scratch wound healing assay was applied to determine the effect on migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. The effect of AE on MDA-MB-231 lung metastasis was determined on an experimental metastatic model. 80 micromol/L AE significantly inhibited the invasion, adhesion to FN, LN of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro, the inhibitory rates were (52.98 +/- 5.46)%, (34.99 +/- 2.63)%, (28.73 +/- 7.00)%, respectively. After 24 h treatment, AE significantly inhibited the migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. The number and volume of lung metastatic nodules formed by MDA-MB-231 cells after 80 micromol/L AE 24 h treatment were decreased compared with control group. AE can suppress the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells. Their mechanisms may be related to the inhibition of the capabilities of invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells.

  3. Dynamic metabolic transformation in tumor invasion and metastasis in mice with LM-8 osteosarcoma cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Yingqi; Qiu, Yunping; Zhao, Aihua; Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Tianlu; Zhang, Zhiyu; Chi, Yi; Li, Quan; Sun, Wei; Li, Guodong; Cai, Zhengdong; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Jia, Wei

    2011-08-05

    While extensive evidence indicates that tumor cells shift their global metabolic programs, the molecular details of the metabolic transformation in tumor invasion, progression, and metastasis remain largely unknown. Characterization of the time-dependent metabolic shift during the tumor invasion, development, and metastasis will describe an important aspect of tumor phenotypes and potentially allow us to design therapies that inhibit tumor cell movement. In this study, a metabonomic study was performed to characterize the global metabolic changes during the process of tumor invasion and metastasis to lung in a mouse model with subcutaneous transplantation of murine osteosarcoma cell line (LM8). The serum metabolic profiling revealed that many key metabolites in glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, as well as most of the amino acids were elevated at rapidly growing stage of tumor, presumably resulting from a high energy demand and turnover of anabolic metabolism during the tumor cell proliferation. Serum levels of succinic acid and proline significantly increased (with fold change FC = 10.75 and 4.43, relative to controls) among all the metabolites in the third week. The serum metabolic profile of lung metastasis at week 4 was different from that at week 3, in that most of previously increased serum metabolites were found decreased, except for cholesterol and several free fatty acids, suggesting lowered carbohydrate and amino acids metabolism, but an elevated lipid metabolism associated with tumor metastasis.

  4. CLDN1 expression in cervical cancer cells is related to tumor invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-li; Hu, Zheng; Zhu, Da; Ding, Wen-cheng; Liu, Dan; Li, Ke-zhen; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Even though infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV) is very important, it is not the sole cause of cervical cancer. Because it is known that genetic variations that result from HPV infection are probably the most important causes of cervical cancer, we used human whole genome array comparative genomic hybridization to detect the copy number variations of genes in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The results of the array were validated by PCR, FISH and immunohistochemistry. We find that the copy number and protein expression of claudin-1 (CLDN1) increase with the progression of cervical cancer. The strong positive staining of CLDN1 in the cervical lymph node metastasis group received a significantly higher score than the staining in the group with no lymph node metastasis of cervical cancer tissues. The overexpression of CLDN1 in SiHa cells can increase anti-apoptosis ability and promote invasive ability of these cells accompanied by a decrease in expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin as well as an increase in the expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. CLDN1 induces the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through its interaction with SNAI1. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CLDN1 overexpression has significant effects on the growth and metastasis of xenografted tumors in athymic mice. These data suggest that CLDN1 promotes invasion and metastasis in cervical cancer cells via the expression of EMT/invasion-related genes. Therefore, CLDN1 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27974683

  5. Talin2-mediated traction force drives matrix degradation and cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Jafari, Naser; Li, Xiang; Chen, Zaozao; Li, Liqing; Hytönen, Vesa P; Goult, Benjamin T; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Huang, Cai

    2016-10-01

    Talin binds to β-integrin tails to activate integrins, regulating cell migration, invasion and metastasis. There are two talin genes, TLN1 and TLN2, encoding talin1 and talin2, respectively. Talin1 regulates focal adhesion dynamics, cell migration and invasion, whereas the biological function of talin2 is not clear and, indeed, talin2 has been presumed to function redundantly with talin1. Here, we show that talin2 has a much stronger binding to β-integrin tails than talin1. Replacement of talin2 Ser339 with Cys significantly decreased its binding to β1-integrin tails to a level comparable to that of talin1. Talin2 localizes at invadopodia and is indispensable for the generation of traction force and invadopodium-mediated matrix degradation. Ablation of talin2 suppressed traction force generation and invadopodia formation, which were restored by re-expressing talin2 but not talin1. Furthermore, re-expression of wild-type talin2 (but not talin2(S339C)) in talin2-depleted cells rescued development of traction force and invadopodia. These results suggest that a strong interaction of talin2 with integrins is required to generate traction, which in turn drives invadopodium-mediated matrix degradation, which is key to cancer cell invasion. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. A novel role of sphingosine kinase-1 in the invasion and angiogenesis of VHL mutant clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Mohamed F.; Carroll, Brittany; Adada, Mohamad; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1), the enzyme responsible for sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) production, is overexpressed in many human solid tumors. However, its role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) has not been described previously. ccRCC cases are usually associated with mutations in von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) and subsequent normoxic stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). We previously showed that HIF-2α up-regulates SK1 expression during hypoxia in glioma cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that the stabilized HIF in ccRCC cells will be associated with increased SK1 expression. Here, we demonstrate that SK1 is overexpressed in 786-0 renal carcinoma cells lacking functional VHL, with concomitant high S1P levels that appear to be HIF-2α mediated. Moreover, examining the TCGA RNA seq database shows that SK1 expression was ∼2.7-fold higher in solid tumor tissue from ccRCC patients, and this was associated with less survival. Knockdown of SK1 in 786-0 ccRCC cells had no effect on cell proliferation. On the other hand, this knockdown resulted in an ∼3.5-fold decrease in invasion, less phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), and an ∼2-fold decrease in angiogenesis. Moreover, S1P treatment of SK1 knockdown cells resulted in phosphorylation of FAK and invasion, and this was mediated by S1P receptor 2. These results suggest that higher SK1 and S1P levels in VHL-defective ccRCC could induce invasion in an autocrine manner and angiogenesis in a paracrine manner. Accordingly, targeting SK1 could reduce both the invasion and angiogenesis of ccRCC and therefore improve the survival rate of patients.—Salama, M. F., Carroll, B., Adada, M., Pulkoski-Gross, M., Hannun, Y. A., Obeid, L. M. A novel role of sphingosine kinase-1 in the invasion and angiogenesis of VHL mutant clear cell renal cell carcinoma. PMID:25805832

  7. Muc-1 promotes migration and invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells via PI3K-Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Xiao, Li Ying; Tan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Muc-1 is a member of the carbohydrate-binding protein family that contributes to neoplastic transformation, tumor survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of muc-1 in human oral squamous cell carcinoma progression. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that muc-1 regulate oral squamous cell carcinoma cells (SCC-9) malignant biological behaviors, and silencing muc-1 reduced SCC-9 cellular colony forming ability, migration and invasion. Moreover, silenced cells present defects in phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-serine/threonine kinase (Akt) signaling, and reduced expression/activity of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)-2/9. Furthermore, in muc-1 siRNA-transfected cells, we detected a decrease in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In vivo, muc-1 siRNA cells inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice demonstrated decreased tumor growth and PI3K-Akt signaling inhibition. These results indicate that muc-1 is a key factor in SCC-9 tumor migration, invasion, and suggesting that muc-1 can be a novel therapeutic target in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  8. The selenium metabolite methylselenol inhibits the migration and invasion potential of HT1080 tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Briske-Anderson, Mary; Idso, Joseph P; Hunt, Curtiss D

    2006-06-01

    There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium as cancer-chemopreventive compounds. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical selenium metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. To determine whether tumor cell migration, invasion, and cell cycle characteristics are inhibited by methylselenol, we exposed HT1080 cells to methylselenol. Methylselenol was generated with seleno-L-methionine (a substrate for methioninase). Submicromolar methylselenol exposure led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase, indicating slower cell growth. Furthermore, methylselenol inhibited the migration and invasion rate of the tumor cells by up to 53 and 76%, respectively, when compared with the control tumor cells. Although all cells had increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme activities of pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9, the active form of MMP-2 was decreased in HT1080 cells cultured with methylselenol. In addition, methylselenol increased the protein levels of antimetastasic tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. Collectively, these results demonstrate that submicromolar concentrations of methylselenol increase both prometastasis MMP-2 and MMP-9 and antimetastasis TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression. The apparent net effect of these changes is the inhibition of pro-MMP-2 activation and carcinogenic potential or activity.

  9. Gremlin-1 Induces BMP-Independent Tumor Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsoo; Yoon, Soomin; Lee, Sukmook; Ha, Seon Ah; Kim, Hyun Kee; Kim, Jin Woo; Chung, Junho

    2012-01-01

    Gremlin-1, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, is overexpressed in various cancerous tissues but its role in carcinogenesis has not been established. Here, we report that gremlin-1 binds various cancer cell lines and this interaction is inhibited by our newly developed gremlin-1 antibody, GRE1. Gremlin-1 binding to cancer cells was unaffected by the presence of BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7. In addition, the binding was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) expression on the cell surface. Addition of gremlin-1 to A549 cells induced a fibroblast-like morphology and decreased E-cadherin expression. In a scratch wound healing assay, A549 cells incubated with gremlin-1 or transfected with gremlin-1 showed increased migration, which was inhibited in the presence of the GRE1 antibody. Gremlin-1 transfected A549 cells also exhibited increased invasiveness as well as an increased growth rate. These effects were also inhibited by the addition of the GRE1 antibody. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that gremlin-1 directly interacts with cancer cells in a BMP- and VEGFR2-independent manner and can induce cell migration, invasion, and proliferation. PMID:22514712

  10. Gremlin-1 induces BMP-independent tumor cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Yoon, Soomin; Lee, Sukmook; Ha, Seon Ah; Kim, Hyun Kee; Kim, Jin Woo; Chung, Junho

    2012-01-01

    Gremlin-1, a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist, is overexpressed in various cancerous tissues but its role in carcinogenesis has not been established. Here, we report that gremlin-1 binds various cancer cell lines and this interaction is inhibited by our newly developed gremlin-1 antibody, GRE1. Gremlin-1 binding to cancer cells was unaffected by the presence of BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-7. In addition, the binding was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) expression on the cell surface. Addition of gremlin-1 to A549 cells induced a fibroblast-like morphology and decreased E-cadherin expression. In a scratch wound healing assay, A549 cells incubated with gremlin-1 or transfected with gremlin-1 showed increased migration, which was inhibited in the presence of the GRE1 antibody. Gremlin-1 transfected A549 cells also exhibited increased invasiveness as well as an increased growth rate. These effects were also inhibited by the addition of the GRE1 antibody. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that gremlin-1 directly interacts with cancer cells in a BMP- and VEGFR2-independent manner and can induce cell migration, invasion, and proliferation.

  11. BMP2 signals loss of epithelial character in epicardial cells but requires the Type III TGFβ receptor to promote invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Cynthia R.; Sanchez, Nora S.; Love, Joseph D.; Arrieta, Julian A.; Hong, Charles C.; Brown, Christopher B.; Austin, Anita F.; Barnett, Joey V.

    2012-01-01

    Coronary vessel development depends on a subpopulation of epicardial cells that undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and invade the subepicardial space and myocardium. These cells form the smooth muscle of the vessels and fibroblasts, but the mechanisms that regulate these processes are poorly understood. Mice lacking the Type III Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor (TGFβR3) die by E14.5 due to failed coronary vessel development accompanied by reduced epicardial cell invasion. BMP2 signals via TGFβR3 emphasizing the importance of determining the relative contributions of the canonical BMP signaling pathway and TGFβR3-dependent signaling to BMP2 responsiveness. Here we examined the role of TGFβR3 in BMP2 signaling in epicardial cells. Whereas TGFβ induced loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle differentiation, BMP2 induced an ALK3-dependent loss of epithelial character and modestly inhibited TGFβ-stimulated differentiation. Tgfbr3−/− cells respond to BMP2 indicating that TGFβR3 is not required. However, Tgfbr3−/− cells show decreased invasion in response to BMP2 and overexpression of TGFβR3 in Tgfbr3−/− cells rescued invasion. Invasion was dependent on ALK5, ALK2, ALK3, and Smad4. Expression of TGFβR3 lacking the 3 C-terminal amino acids required to interact with the scaffolding protein GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) did not rescue. Knockdown of GIPC in Tgfbr3+/+ or Tgfbr3−/− cells rescued with TGFβR3 decreased BMP2-stimulated invasion confirming a requirement for TGFβR3/GIPC interaction. Our results reveal the relative roles of TGFβR3-dependent and TGFβR3-independent signaling in the actions of BMP2 on epicardial cell behavior and demonstrate the critical role of TGFβR3 in mediating BMP2-stimulated invasion. PMID:22237159

  12. BMP2 signals loss of epithelial character in epicardial cells but requires the Type III TGFβ receptor to promote invasion.

    PubMed

    Hill, Cynthia R; Sanchez, Nora S; Love, Joseph D; Arrieta, Julian A; Hong, Charles C; Brown, Christopher B; Austin, Anita F; Barnett, Joey V

    2012-05-01

    Coronary vessel development depends on a subpopulation of epicardial cells that undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and invade the subepicardial space and myocardium. These cells form the smooth muscle of the vessels and fibroblasts, but the mechanisms that regulate these processes are poorly understood. Mice lacking the Type III Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor (TGFβR3) die by E14.5 due to failed coronary vessel development accompanied by reduced epicardial cell invasion. BMP2 signals via TGFβR3 emphasizing the importance of determining the relative contributions of the canonical BMP signaling pathway and TGFβR3-dependent signaling to BMP2 responsiveness. Here we examined the role of TGFβR3 in BMP2 signaling in epicardial cells. Whereas TGFβ induced loss of epithelial character and smooth muscle differentiation, BMP2 induced an ALK3-dependent loss of epithelial character and modestly inhibited TGFβ-stimulated differentiation. Tgfbr3(-/-) cells respond to BMP2 indicating that TGFβR3 is not required. However, Tgfbr3(-/-) cells show decreased invasion in response to BMP2 and overexpression of TGFβR3 in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells rescued invasion. Invasion was dependent on ALK5, ALK2, ALK3, and Smad4. Expression of TGFβR3 lacking the 3 C-terminal amino acids required to interact with the scaffolding protein GIPC (GAIP-interacting protein, C terminus) did not rescue. Knockdown of GIPC in Tgfbr3(+/+) or Tgfbr3(-/-) cells rescued with TGFβR3 decreased BMP2-stimulated invasion confirming a requirement for TGFβR3/GIPC interaction. Our results reveal the relative roles of TGFβR3-dependent and TGFβR3-independent signaling in the actions of BMP2 on epicardial cell behavior and demonstrate the critical role of TGFβR3 in mediating BMP2-stimulated invasion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced Expression of the ROCK Inhibitor Rnd3 Is Associated with Increased Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential in Mesenchymal Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Frapolli, Roberta; Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Chiodi, Ilaria; Favero, Francesco; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Dei Tos, Angelo P.; Giulotto, Elena; Taraboletti, Giulia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Mondello, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal and amoeboid movements are two important mechanisms adopted by cancer cells to invade the surrounding environment. Mesenchymal movement depends on extracellular matrix protease activity, amoeboid movement on the RhoA-dependent kinase ROCK. Cancer cells can switch from one mechanism to the other in response to different stimuli, limiting the efficacy of antimetastatic therapies. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the acquisition and molecular regulation of the invasion capacity of neoplastically transformed human fibroblasts, which were able to induce sarcomas and metastases when injected into immunocompromised mice. We found that neoplastic transformation was associated with a change in cell morphology (from fibroblastic to polygonal), a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, a decrease in the expression of several matrix metalloproteases and increases in cell motility and invasiveness. In a three-dimensional environment, sarcomagenic cells showed a spherical morphology with cortical actin rings, suggesting a switch from mesenchymal to amoeboid movement. Accordingly, cell invasion decreased after treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, but not with the matrix protease inhibitor Ro 28-2653. The increased invasiveness of tumorigenic cells was associated with reduced expression of Rnd3 (also known as RhoE), a cellular inhibitor of ROCK. Indeed, ectopic Rnd3 expression reduced their invasive ability in vitro and their metastatic potential in vivo. Conclusions These results indicate that, during neoplastic transformation, cells of mesenchymal origin can switch from a mesenchymal mode of movement to an amoeboid one. In addition, they point to Rnd3 as a possible regulator of mesenchymal tumor cell invasion and to ROCK as a potential therapeutic target for sarcomas. PMID:21209796

  14. Elevated dietary linoleic acid increases gastric carcinoma cell invasion and metastasis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, T; Adair, J E; Lih, F B; Hsi, L C; Rubino, M; Eling, T E; Tomer, K B; Yashiro, M; Hirakawa, K; Olden, K; Roberts, J D

    2010-01-01

    Background: Dietary (n-6)-polyunsaturated fatty acids influence cancer development, but the mechanisms have not been well characterised in gastric carcinoma. Methods: We used two in vivo models to investigate the effects of these common dietary components on tumour metastasis. In a model of experimental metastasis, immunocompromised mice were fed diets containing linoleic acid (LA) at 2% (LLA), 8% (HLA) or 12% (VHLA) by weight and inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with human gastric carcinoma cells (OCUM-2MD3). To model spontaneous metastasis, OCUM-2MD3 tumours were grafted onto the stomach walls of mice fed with the different diets. In in vitro assays, we investigated invasion and ERK phosphorylation of OCUM-2MD3 cells in the presence or absence of LA. Finally, we tested whether a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin, could block peritoneal metastasis in vivo. Results: Both the HLA and VHLA groups showed increased incidence of tumour nodules (LA: 53% HLA: 89% VHLA: 100% P<0.03); the VHLA group also displayed increased numbers of tumour nodules and higher total volume relative to LLA group in experimental metastasis model. Both liver invasion (78%) and metastasis to the peritoneal cavity (67%) were more frequent in VHLA group compared with the LLA group (22% and 11%, respectively; P<0.03) in spontaneous metastasis model. We also found that the invasive ability of these cells is greatly enhanced when exposed to LA in vitro. Linoleic acid also increased invasion of other scirrhous gastric carcinoma cells, OCUM-12, NUGC3 and MKN-45. Linoleic acid effect on OCUM-2MD3 cells seems to be dependent on phosphorylation of ERK. The data suggest that invasion and phosphorylation of ERK were dependent on COX. Indomethacin decreased the number of tumours and total tumour volume in both LLA and VHLA groups. Finally, COX-1, which is known to be an important enzyme in the generation of bioactive metabolites from dietary fatty acids, appears to be responsible for the

  15. Premature red blood cells have decreased aggregation and enhanced aggregability.

    PubMed

    Arbell, D; Orkin, B; Bar-Oz, B; Barshtein, G; Yedgar, S

    2008-06-01

    Preterm infants are highly susceptible to ischemic damage. This damage is most obvious in the brain, retina, and gastrointestinal tract. Studies focusing on the rheological properties of premature red blood cells (pRBCs) have consistently shown minimal or no RBC aggregation. Previously, measurements of pRBC aggregation kinetics indicated that specific plasma properties are responsible for the decreased RBC aggregation observed in the neonates, but that their specific RBC properties do not affect it. However, the strength of interaction in the pRBC aggregates as a function of medium composition has not been tested. In our previous research, we described clinically relevant parameters, that is, the aggregate resistance to disaggregation by flow. With the help of a cell flow property analyzer (CFA), we can monitor RBC aggregation by direct visualization of its dynamics during flow. We used the CFA to examine pRBC (from 9 premature babies) in the natural plasma and in PBS buffer supplemented with dextran (500 kDa) to distinguish between RBC intrinsic-cellular and plasma factors. pRBCs suspended in the native plasma showed minimal or no aggregation in comparison to normal adult RBC. When we transferred pRBCs from the same sample to the dextran solution, enhanced resistance to disaggregation by flow was apparent.

  16. Icotinib inhibits the invasion of Tca8113 cells via downregulation of nuclear factor κB-mediated matrix metalloproteinase expression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, CAILING; YAN, JIANGUO; YUAN, GUOYAN; ZHANG, YINGHUA; LU, DERONG; REN, MINGXIN; CUI, WEIGANG

    2014-01-01

    Icotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which has been revealed to inhibit proliferation in tumor cells. However, the effect of icotinib on cancer cell metastasis remains to be explained. This study examines the effect of icotinib on the migration and invasion of squamous cells of tongue carcinoma (Tca8113 cells) in vitro. The results of the Boyden chamber invasion assay demonstrated that icotinib reduced cell invasion, suppressed the protein levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, and increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. In addition, icotinib was found to significantly decrease the protein levels of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, which suggested that icotinib inhibits NF-κB activity. Furthermore, treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, suppressed cell invasion and MMP-2 expression. These results suggested that icotinib inhibits the invasion of Tca8113 cells by downregulating MMP via the inactivation of the NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:25120710

  17. Invasive urothelial carcinoma exhibiting basal cell immunohistochemical markers: A variant of urothelial carcinoma associated with aggressive features.