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Sample records for cells decrease invasion

  1. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Meghan A; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R; Blebea, Catherine A; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  2. SPARC Promotes Cell Invasion In Vivo by Decreasing Type IV Collagen Levels in the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Jayadev, Ranjay; Miley, Ginger R.; Blebea, Catherine A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Ihara, Shinji; Sherwood, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of SPARC, a collagen-binding glycoprotein, is strongly associated with tumor invasion through extracellular matrix in many aggressive cancers. SPARC regulates numerous cellular processes including integrin-mediated cell adhesion, cell signaling pathways, and extracellular matrix assembly; however, the mechanism by which SPARC promotes cell invasion in vivo remains unclear. A main obstacle in understanding SPARC function has been the difficulty of visualizing and experimentally examining the dynamic interactions between invasive cells, extracellular matrix and SPARC in native tissue environments. Using the model of anchor cell invasion through the basement membrane (BM) extracellular matrix in Caenorhabditis elegans, we find that SPARC overexpression is highly pro-invasive and rescues BM transmigration in mutants with defects in diverse aspects of invasion, including cell polarity, invadopodia formation, and matrix metalloproteinase expression. By examining BM assembly, we find that overexpression of SPARC specifically decreases levels of BM type IV collagen, a crucial structural BM component. Reduction of type IV collagen mimicked SPARC overexpression and was sufficient to promote invasion. Tissue-specific overexpression and photobleaching experiments revealed that SPARC acts extracellularly to inhibit collagen incorporation into BM. By reducing endogenous SPARC, we also found that SPARC functions normally to traffic collagen from its site of synthesis to tissues that do not express collagen. We propose that a surplus of SPARC disrupts extracellular collagen trafficking and reduces BM collagen incorporation, thus weakening the BM barrier and dramatically enhancing its ability to be breached by invasive cells. PMID:26926673

  3. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism decreases tumor cell invasion and matrix metalloproteinase expression.

    PubMed

    Koontongkaew, Sittichai; Monthanapisut, Paopanga; Saensuk, Theeranuch

    2010-11-01

    Head and neck cancers are known to synthesize arachidonic acid metabolites. Interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism may inhibit growth and invasiveness of cancer cells. In this study we investigate effects of sulindac (the non-selective COX inhibitor), aspirin (the irreversible, preferential COX-1 inhibitor), NS-398 (the selective COX-2 inhibitor), NDGA (nordihydroguaiaretic acid, the selective LOX inhibitor) and ETYA (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid, the COX and LOX inhibitor) on cell viability, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, and in vitro invasion of cancer cells derived from primary and metastatic head and neck, and colon cancers. The inhibitors of COX and/or LOX could inhibit cell proliferation, MMP activity and invasion in head and neck and colon cancer cells. However, the inhibitory effect was obviously observed in colon cancer cells. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism caused a decrease in cancer cell motility, which partially explained by the inhibition of MMPs. Therefore, COX and LOX pathways play important roles in head and neck cancer cell growth. PMID:20654727

  4. Enhanced Monocyte Response and Decreased Central Memory T Cells in Children with Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ardura, Monica I.; Banchereau, Romain; Mejias, Asuncion; Di Pucchio, Tiziana; Glaser, Casey; Allantaz, Florence; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Ramilo, Octavio

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a significant pathogen causing severe invasive disease in otherwise healthy people. Despite considerable advances in understanding the epidemiology, resistance mechanisms, and virulence factors produced by the bacteria, there is limited knowledge of the in vivo host immune response to acute, invasive S. aureus infections. Herein, we report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with severe S. aureus infections demonstrate a distinctive and robust gene expression profile which is validated in a distinct group of patients and on a different microarray platform. Application of a systems-wide modular analysis framework reveals significant over-expression of innate immunity genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. Simultaneous flow cytometry analyses demonstrated marked alterations in immune cell numbers, with decreased central memory CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased numbers of monocytes. CD14+ monocyte numbers significantly correlated with the gene expression levels of genes related to the innate immune response. These results demonstrate the value of applying a systems biology approach that reveals the significant alterations in the components of circulating blood lymphocytes and monocytes in invasive S. aureus infections. PMID:19424507

  5. Cell-free supernatants from probiotic Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG decrease colon cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Juanita; Lane, Michelle A; Maitin, Vatsala

    2012-08-01

    Probiotics have been shown to have a preventative role in colorectal carcinogenesis but research concerning their prophylactic potential in the later stages of colorectal cancer, specifically metastasis is limited. This study explored the potential of cell-free supernatants (CFS) from 2 probiotic Lactobacillus sp., Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, to inhibit colon cancer cell invasion by influencing matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity and levels of the tight junction protein zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) in cultured metastatic human colorectal carcinoma cells. HCT-116 cells were treated with CFS from L. casei, L. rhamnosus, or Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (a gut commensal); or with uninoculated bacterial growth media. Treatment with CFS from both Lactobacillus sp. decreased colorectal cell invasion but treatment with CFS from B. thetaiotaomicron did not. CFS from both Lactobacillus sp. decreased MMP-9 and increased ZO-1 protein levels. L. rhamnosus CFS also lowered MMP-9 activity. To begin elucidating the secreted bacterial factor conveying these responses, Lactobacillus sp. CFS were fractionated into defined molecular weight ranges and cell invasion assessed. Fractionation revealed that the inhibitory activity was contained primarily in the >100 kDa and 50-100 kDa fractions, suggesting the inhibitory compound may be a macromolecule such as a protein, nucleic acid, or a polysaccharide. PMID:22830611

  6. Overexpression of Csk-binding protein decreases growth, invasion, and migration of esophageal carcinoma cells by controlling Src activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Dong; Dong, Peng; Li, Yu-Min; Guo, Fa-Cai; Zhang, An-Ping; Song, Run-Ze; Zhang, Ya-Min; Li, Zhi-Yong; Yuan, Dong; Yang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanisms by which Csk-binding protein (CBP) inhibits tumor progression in esophageal carcinoma. METHODS: A CBP overexpressing esophageal carcinoma cell line (TE-1) was established. The growth, invasion, and migration of CBP-TE-1 cells, as well as the expression of Src were then determined and compared with those in normal TE-1 cells. RESULTS: The expression of Src was decreased by the overexpression of CBP in TE-1 cells. The growth, invasion, and migration of TE-1 cells were decreased by the overexpression of CBP. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that CBP may decrease the metastasis of esophageal carcinoma by inhibiting the activation of Src. CBP may be a potential tumor suppressor and targeting the CBP gene may be an alternative strategy for the development of therapies for esophageal carcinoma. PMID:25684946

  7. 17β-Estradiol treatment inhibits breast cell proliferation, migration and invasion by decreasing MALAT-1 RNA level

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Ziyi; Chen, Changjin; Liu, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • E2 affects not only estrogen-receptor α positive breast cells but also negative ones. • 100 nM E2 treatment affects breast cells proliferation, migration. • 100 nM E2 treatment functions in an estrogen-receptor α-independent way. • E2 treatment decreases MALAT-1 RNA level by post-transcriptional regulation. - Abstract: Breast cancer cells, which express estrogen receptor α (ERα), respond to estrogen in a concentration dependent fashion, resulting in proliferation or apoptosis. But breast cancer cells without ERα show no effect on low concentration of estrogen treatment. Proliferation, migration and invasion of MCF10a, MCF7 and MB231 cells treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) was performed. We identified the effects of E2 on these breast cell lines, and looked for the difference in the presence and absence of ERα. Specifically, we looked for the changes of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1), which is found extensively and highly expressed in several kinds of tumor cells, including breast carcinoma. It was observed that proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells were greatly affected by high concentration E2 treatment and were not affected by low concentration E2 treatment in an ERα independent way. We found that the high concentration E2 treatment largely decreased MALAT-1 RNA level. Interestingly, MALAT-1 decreasing by knocking down showed similar effects on proliferation, migration and invasion. E2 treatment affects breast tumor or non-tumor cells proliferation, migration and invasion in an ERα -independent, but a dose-dependent way by decreasing the MALAT-1 RNA level.

  8. Isoliquiritigenin inhibits migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells: possible mediation by decreased JNK/AP-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Cho, Han Jin; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Moon, Aree; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-09-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL, 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone), which is found in licorice, shallot and bean sprouts, is a potent antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ISL treatment on the migration, invasion and adhesion characteristics of DU145 human prostate cancer cells. DU145 cells were cultured in the presence of 0-20 micromol/L ISL with or without 10 microg/L epidermal growth factor (EGF). ISL inhibited basal and EGF-induced cell migration, invasion and adhesion dose dependently. ISL decreased EGF-induced secretion of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but increased TIMP-2 secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, ISL decreased the protein levels of integrin-alpha2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and mRNA levels of uPA, MMP-9, VEGF, ICAM and integrin-alpha2. Furthermore, basal and EGF-induced activator protein (AP)-1 binding activity and phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), c-Jun and Akt were decreased after ISL treatment. However, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was not altered. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited basal and EGF-induced secretion of uPA, VEGF, MMP-9 and TIMP-1, as well as AP-1 DNA binding activity and cell migration. These results provide evidence for the role of ISL as a potent antimetastatic agent, which can markedly inhibit the metastatic and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells. The inhibition of JNK/AP-1 signaling may be one of the mechanisms by which ISL inhibits cancer cell invasion and migration. PMID:18824345

  9. ERβ decreases the invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer cells by regulating mutant p53 oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Bado, Igor; Nikolos, Fotis; Rajapaksa, Gayani; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Thomas, Christoforos

    2016-01-01

    Most (80%) of the triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) express mutant p53 proteins that acquire oncogenic activities including promoting metastasis. We previously showed that wild-type ERβ (ERβ1) impedes epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and decreases the invasiveness of TNBC cells. In the present study we searched for signaling pathways that ERβ1 uses to inhibit EMT and invasion in TNBC cells. We show that ERβ1 binds to and opposes the transcriptional activity of mutant p53 at the promoters of genes that regulate metastasis. p63 that transcriptionally cooperates with mutant p53 also binds to ERβ1. Downregulation of p63 represses the epithelial phenotype of ERβ1-expressing cells and alters the expression of mutant p53 target genes. These results describe a novel mechanism through which ERβ1 can disturb oncogenic signals to inhibit aggressiveness in TNBCs. PMID:26871946

  10. Luteolin decreases the attachment, invasion and cytotoxicity of UPEC in bladder epithelial cells and inhibits UPEC biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-fei; Ren, Lai-bin; Teng, Yan; Zheng, Shuang; Yang, Xiao-long; Guo, Xiao-juan; Wang, Xin-yuan; Sha, Kai-hui; Li, Na; Xu, Guang-ya; Tian, Han-wen; Wang, Xiao-ying; Liu, Xiao-kang; Li, Jingyu; Huang, Ning

    2014-10-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI), primarily caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide. Emerging antibiotic resistance requires novel treatment strategies. Luteolin, a dietary polyphenolic flavonoid, has been confirmed as a potential antimicrobial agent. Here, we evaluated the sub-MICs of luteolin for potential properties to modulate the UPEC infection. We found that luteolin significantly decreased the attachment and invasion of UPEC J96 or CFT073 in human bladder epithelial cell lines T24. Meanwhile, obvious decreased expression of type 1 fimbriae adhesin fimH gene, lower bacterial surface hydrophobicity and swimming motility, were observed in luteolin-pretreated UPEC. Furthermore, luteolin could attenuate UPEC-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells, which manifested as decreased activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Simultaneously, the inhibition of luteolin on UPEC-induced cytotoxicity was confirmed by ethidium bromide/acridine orange staining. Finally, the luteolin-pretreated UPEC showed a lower ability of biofilm formation. Collectively, these results indicated that luteolin decreased the attachment and invasion of UPEC in bladder epithelial cells, attenuated UPEC-induced cytotoxicity and biofilm formation via down-regulating the expression of adhesin fimH gene, reducing the bacterial surface hydrophobicity and motility.

  11. Naringenin decreases invasiveness and metastasis by inhibiting TGF-β-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lou, Changjie; Zhang, Fayun; Yang, Ming; Zhao, Juan; Zeng, Wenfeng; Fang, Xiaocui; Zhang, Yanqiao; Zhang, Chunling; Liang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotes cellular motility, invasiveness and metastasis during embryonic development and tumorigenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway is a key regulator of EMT. A lot of evidences suggest that this process is Smad3-dependent. Herein we showed that exposure of aspc-1 and panc-1 pancreatic cancer cells to TGF-β1 resulted in characteristic morphological alterations of EMT, and enhancement of cell motility and gemcitabine (Gem) resistance along with an up-regulation of EMT markers genes such as vimentin, N-cadherin, MMP2 and MMP9. Naringenin (Nar) down-regulated EMT markers expression in both mRNA and protein levels by inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad3 signal pathway in the pancreatic cancer cells. Consequently, Nar suppressed the cells migration and invasion and reversed their resistance to Gem. PMID:23300530

  12. Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Alam, Samina; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-02-15

    Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER−) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: • PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. • PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. • PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. • PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

  13. Non-thermal plasma inhibits human cervical cancer HeLa cells invasiveness by suppressing the MAPK pathway and decreasing matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Yu, K. N.; Bao, Lingzhi; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for anticancer treatment. However, the mechanism underlying its biological effects remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of NTP on the invasion of HeLa cells, and explored the possible mechanism. Our results showed that NTP exposure for 20 or 40 s significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of HeLa cells on the basis of matrigel invasion assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Moreover, NTP reduced the activity and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 enzyme. Western blot analysis indicated that NTP exposure effectively decreased phosphorylation level of both ERK1/2 and JNK, but not p38 MAPK. Furthermore, treatment with MAPK signal pathway inhibitors or NTP all exhibited significant depression of HeLa cells migration and MMP-9 expression. The result showed that NTP synergistically suppressed migration and MMP-9 expression in the presence of ERK1/2 inhibitor and JNK inhibitor, but not p38 MAPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings suggested that NTP exposure inhibited the migration and invasion of HeLa cells via down-regulating MMP-9 expression in ERK1/2 and JNK signaling pathways dependent manner. These findings provide hints to the potential clinical research and therapy of NTP on cervical cancer metastasis.

  14. AB209630, a long non-coding RNA decreased expression in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, influences proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenming; Wang, Juan; Xiang, Xuan; Li, Guojun; Pan, Xinliang; Lei, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated with the development, progression, and prognosis of human cancers. However, the clinical significance and biological function of lncRNAs in hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (HSCC) remain largely unknown. We characterized the novel lncRNA AB209630 in vivo and in vitro. First, using qRT-PCR, we evaluated whether AB209630 levels differ between HSCC tissues/cell lines and adjacent normal tissues/cell lines. We then assessed whether AB209630 expression levels stimulate or inhibit proliferation, invasion, apoptosis, and metastasis in vitro. Finally, we investigated whether AB209630 levels in tumor tissues were associated with survival outcomes. Our results demonstrated that AB209630 levels were markedly lower in HSCC tissues and cells than in normal tissues and cells, and increased expression of AB209630 level significantly inhibited growth, metastasis, and invasion and stimulated apoptosis in vitro. In addition, patients with decreased expression of AB209630 had a significantly poorer prognosis than those with high AB209630 expression. These data suggest that increased expression of AB209630 might either stimulate or inhibit biological activities involved in HSCC development, indicating a potential application of AB209630 in future treatment for this disease. This study suggest that AB209630 functions as a tumor suppressor in HSCC, and its decreased expression may help predict a poor prognostic outcome of HSCC. Our future work will focus on the mechanisms of whether and how AB209630 as a tumor suppressor gene is involved in HSCC development. PMID:26895099

  15. Magnetofection based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-mediated low lncRNA HOTAIR expression decreases the proliferation and invasion of glioma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kan; Liu, Peifeng; Dong, Suyan; Guo, Yanjie; Cui, Xinxin; Zhu, Xiaoying; Li, Xuan; Jiang, Lianghan; Liu, Te; Wu, Yuncheng

    2016-01-01

    Glioma stem cells (GSCs) are a special subpopulation of glioma cells that are key to the sensitivity of tumors to treatments and to the possibility of tumor recurrence. Identifying new strategies that inhibit the growth of GSCs are therefore important for developing novel therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In this study, CD133+ human glioma stem cells were isolated and cultured. Magnetic nanoparticles were used to mediate the expression of siRNAs targeting the HOTAIR (si-HOTAIR) sequence in human gliomas. Effect of downregulation of HOTAIR expression on proliferation, invasion and in vivo tumorigenicity of human GSCs and underlying molecular mechanisms were further evaluated. The results of the MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis showed that downregulation of HOTAIR expression inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest. Transwell assays demonstrated that downregulation of HOTAIR expression resulted in a decrease in the invasive capability of GSCs. Moreover, magnetic nanoparticle-mediated low expression of HOTAIR effectively reduced the tumorigenic capacity of glioma stem cells in vivo. In addition, the results of qRT-PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that downregulation of HOTAIR expression significantly increased the expression of PDCD4 in GSCs, in addition to reducing the expression of CCND1 and CDK4. An in-depth mechanistic analysis showed that downregulation of HOTAIR expression reduced the recruitment of downstream molecules, EZH2 and LSD1, thereby activating the expression of PDCD4 at the transcriptional level. In conclusion, downregulation of HOTAIR expression effectively promoted the expression of PDCD4, thereby inhibiting the proliferation, invasion and in vivo tumorigenicity of human GSCs. PMID:27277755

  16. Plasma miR-185 is decreased in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and might suppress tumor migration and invasion by targeting RAGE.

    PubMed

    Jing, Rongrong; Chen, Wen; Wang, Huimin; Ju, Shaoqing; Cong, Hui; Sun, Baolan; Jin, Qin; Chu, Shaopeng; Xu, Lili; Cui, Ming

    2015-11-01

    The receptor for advanced-glycation end products (RAGE) is upregulated in various cancers and has been associated with tumor progression, but little is known about its expression and regulation by microRNAs (miRNAs) in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here, we describe miR-185, which represses RAGE expression, and investigate the biological role of miR-185 in ESCC. In this study, we found that the high level of RAGE expression in 29 pairs of paraffin-embedded ESCC tissues was correlated positively with the depth of invasion by immunohistochemistry, suggesting that RAGE was involved in ESCC. We used bioinformatics searches and luciferase reporter assays to investigate the prediction that RAGE was regulated directly by miR-185. Besides, overexpression of miR-185 in ESCC cells was accompanied by 27% (TE-11) and 49% (Eca-109) reduced RAGE expression. The effect was further confirmed in RAGE protein by immunofluorescence in both cell lines. The effects were reversed following cotransfection with miR-185 and high-level expression of the RAGE vector. Furthermore, the biological role of miR-185 in ESCC cell lines was investigated using assays of cell viability, Ki-67 staining, and cell migration and invasion, as well as in a xenograft model. We found that overexpression of miR-185 inhibited migration and invasion by ESCC cells in vitro and reduced their capacity to develop distal pulmonary metastases in vivo partly through the RAGE/heat shock protein 27 pathway. Interestingly, in clinical specimens, the level of plasma miR-185 expression was decreased significantly (P = 0.002) in patients with ESCC [0.500; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.248-1.676] compared with healthy controls (2.410; 95% CI 0.612-5.671). The value of the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.73 (95% CI 0.604-0.855). In conclusion, our findings shed novel light on the role of miR-185/RAGE in ESCC metastasis, and plasma miR-185 has potential as a novel diagnostic biomarker

  17. Placenta-Enriched LincRNAs MIR503HG and LINC00629 Decrease Migration and Invasion Potential of JEG-3 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Muys, Bruna Rodrigues; Lorenzi, Júlio Cesar Cetrulo; Zanette, Dalila Luciola; Bueno, Rafaela de Barros Lima e; de Araújo, Luíza Ferreira; Dinarte-Santos, Anemari Ramos; Alves, Cleidson Pádua; Ramão, Anelisa; de Molfetta, Greice Andreotti; Vidal, Daniel Onofre; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2016-01-01

    LINC00629 and MIR503HG are long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) mapped on chromosome X (Xq26), a region enriched for genes associated with human reproduction. Genes highly expressed in normal reproductive tissues and cancers (CT genes) are well known as potential tumor biomarkers. This study aimed to characterize the structure, expression, function and regulation mechanism of MIR503HG and LINC00629 lincRNAs. According to our data, MIR503HG expression was almost exclusive to placenta and LINC00629 was highly expressed in placenta and other reproductive tissues. Further analysis, using a cancer cell lines panel, showed that MIR503HG and LINC00629 were expressed in 50% and 100% of the cancer cell lines, respectively. MIR503HG was expressed predominantly in the nucleus of JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells. We observed a positively correlated expression between MIR503HG and LINC00629, and between the lincRNAs and neighboring miRNAs. Also, both LINC00629 and MIR503GH could be negatively regulated by DNA methylation in an indirect way. Additionally, we identified new transcripts for MIR503HG and LINC00629 that are relatively conserved when compared to other primates. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of MIR503HG2 and the three-exon LINC00629 new isoforms decreased invasion and migration potential of JEG-3 tumor cell line. In conclusion, our results suggest that lincRNAs MIR503HG and LINC00629 impaired migration and invasion capacities in a choriocarcinoma in vitro model, indicating a potential role in human reproduction and tumorigenesis. Moreover, the MIR503HG expression pattern found here could indicate a putative new tumor biomarker. PMID:27023770

  18. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  19. Decreased expression of long non-coding RNA GAS5 indicates a poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma by regulating vimentin

    PubMed Central

    CHANG, LEI; LI, CUICUI; LAN, TIAN; WU, LONG; YUAN, YUFENG; LIU, QUANYAN; LIU, ZHISU

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are key in carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of lncRNA GAS5 in HCC tissues and to define the role of growth arrest-specific 5 (GAS5) in the regulation of hepatoma cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization were performed to investigate the expression of GAS5 in tumor tissues and corresponding adjacent tissues from 50 patients with HCC. Low expression of GAS5 was significantly correlated with differentiation (P<0.010) and portal vein tumor thrombosis (P=0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that GAS5 expression was an independent predictor for overall survival (P=0.017). Further experiments demonstrated that overexpression of GAS5 significantly suppressed the proliferation and invasion of hepatoma cells in vitro. Overexpression of GAS5 significantly promoted the apoptosis of hepatoma cells. In addition, it was demonstrated that GAS5 negatively regulates vimentin expression in vitro and in vivo. Notably, vimentin knockdown promoted GAS5-pcDNA3.1-inhibition of hepatoma cell proliferation. In conclusion, the present study suggests an important role of GAS5 in the molecular etiology of HCC and suggests the potential application of GAS5 in HCC therapy. PMID:26707238

  20. Inhibitory effect of berberine on the invasion of human lung cancer cells via decreased productions of urokinase-plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, P.-L.; Hsieh, Y.-S.; Wang, C.-J.; Hsu, J.-L.; Chou, F.-P. . E-mail: fpchou@csmu.edu.tw

    2006-07-01

    Berberine, a compound isolated from medicinal herbs, has been reported with many pharmacological effects related to anti-cancer and anti-inflammation capabilities. In this study, we observed that berberine exerted a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the motility and invasion ability of a highly metastatic A549 cells under non-cytotoxic concentrations. In cancer cell migration and invasion process, matrix-degrading proteinases are required. A549 cell treated with berberine at various concentrations showed reduced ECM proteinases including matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA) by gelatin and casein zymography analysis. The inhibitory effect is likely to be at the transcriptional level, since the reduction in the transcripts levels was corresponding to the proteins. Moreover, berberine also exerted its action via regulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and urokinase-plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). The upstream mediators of the effect involved c-jun, c-fos and NF-{kappa}B, as evidenced by reduced phosphorylation of the proteins. These findings suggest that berberine possesses an anti-metastatic effect in non-small lung cancer cell and may, therefore, be helpful in clinical treatment.

  1. RNAi-mediated Downregulation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) and Matrix Metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) in Human Breast Cancer Cells Results in Decreased Tumor Invasion, Angiogenesis and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kunigal, Sateesh; Lakka, Sajani S.; Gondi, Christopher S.; Estes, Norman; Rao, Jasti S.

    2007-01-01

    The serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays a significant role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis when bound to its specific receptor, uPAR (also known as CD87). In addition to the uPA-uPAR system, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, we achieved specific inhibition of uPAR and MMP-9 using RNAi technology. We introduced small interfering RNA (siRNA) to downregulate the expression of uPAR and MMP-9 (pUM) in breast cancer cell lines (MDA MB 231 and ZR 75 1). In vitro angiogenesis studies indicated a decrease in the angiogenic potential of the treated cells; in particular, a remarkable decrease was observed in the cells treated with bicistronic construct (pUM) in comparision to the controls. Additionally, bicistronic construct inhibited the formation of capillary-like structures in in vivo models of angiogenesis. Similarly, the invasive potential and migration decreased dramatically when treated with the bicistronic construct as shown by matrigel invasion and migration assays. These results suggest a synergistic effect from the simultaneous downregulation of uPAR and MMP-9. We also assessed the levels of phosphorylated forms of MAPK, ERK, and AKT signaling pathway molecules and found reduction in the levels of these molecules in cells treated with the bicistronic construct as compared to the control cells. Furthermore, targeting both uPAR and MMP-9 totally regressed orthotopic breast tumors in nude mice. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the simultaneous downregulation of uPAR and MMP-9 using RNAi technology may provide an effective tool for breast cancer therapy. PMID:17657740

  2. Huaier restrains proliferative and invasive potential of human hepatoma SKHEP-1 cells partially through decreased Lamin B1 and elevated NOV

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongdong; Yang, Ailin; Su, Guozhu; Zhao, Yunfang; Wang, Ying; Chai, Xingyun; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cause of malignancy-related mortality worldwide. It is urgently needed to develop potential drugs with good efficacy and low toxicity for HCC treatment. The anti-tumor effect of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has received increasing attention worldwide. Trametes robiniophila Murr. (Huaier) has been used in TCM for approximately 1,600 years. Clinically, Huaier has satisfactory therapeutic effects in cancer treatment, especially in HCC. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effect of Huaier remain ill defined. Herein we have demonstrated that Huaier dramatically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human hepatoma cell line SKHEP-1. Importantly, Huaier restrained the metastatic capability of SKHEP-1 cells. Mechanistically, down-regulation of Lamin B1 and up-regulation of Nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV) were at least partially responsible for the inhibitory effect of Huaier on the proliferative and invasive capacity of SKHEP-1 cells. Our finding provided new insights into mechanisms of anti-HCC effect of Huaier and suggested a new scientific basis for clinical medication. PMID:27503760

  3. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F.; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L.; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression. PMID:26999607

  4. Schwann cells induce cancer cell dispersion and invasion.

    PubMed

    Deborde, Sylvie; Omelchenko, Tatiana; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William F; Chernichenko, Natalya; Lee, Sei-Young; Barajas, Fernando; Chen, Chun-Hao; Bakst, Richard L; Vakiani, Efsevia; He, Shuangba; Hall, Alan; Wong, Richard J

    2016-04-01

    Nerves enable cancer progression, as cancers have been shown to extend along nerves through the process of perineural invasion, which carries a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the innervation of some cancers promotes growth and metastases. It remains unclear, however, how nerves mechanistically contribute to cancer progression. Here, we demonstrated that Schwann cells promote cancer invasion through direct cancer cell contact. Histological evaluation of murine and human cancer specimens with perineural invasion uncovered a subpopulation of Schwann cells that associates with cancer cells. Coculture of cancer cells with dorsal root ganglion extracts revealed that Schwann cells direct cancer cells to migrate toward nerves and promote invasion in a contact-dependent manner. Upon contact, Schwann cells induced the formation of cancer cell protrusions in their direction and intercalated between the cancer cells, leading to cancer cell dispersion. The formation of these processes was dependent on Schwann cell expression of neural cell adhesion molecule 1 (NCAM1) and ultimately promoted perineural invasion. Moreover, NCAM1-deficient mice showed decreased neural invasion and less paralysis. Such Schwann cell behavior reflects normal Schwann cell programs that are typically activated in nerve repair but are instead exploited by cancer cells to promote perineural invasion and cancer progression.

  5. In situ clinical evidence that zinc levels are decreased in breast invasive ductal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jing; Franklin, Renty B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Altered zinc levels in malignant cells versus their normal cells have important implications in the development and progression of several cancers. Prostate, pancreatic, and hepatocellular carcinomas exhibit consistent marked zinc decrease in situ in the malignant cells, and other cancers (such as kidney, lung, and thyroid) also exhibit decreased tissue zinc levels. However, zinc levels are increased in breast cancer tissue compared to breast normal tissue, and the contemporary dominant view is that zinc is increased in invasive ductal carcinoma. This has important implications regarding the role and effects of zinc in breast malignancy compared to other cancers, which caused us to initiate this study to either confirm or challenge the contemporary view of an increased zinc level in the invasive ductal malignant cells. Methods We employed dithizone staining of breast tissue sections and tissue cores to determine the relative in situ cellular zinc levels specifically in the invasive ductal malignant cells as compared to normal ductal epithelium. This approach had not been employed in any of the reported breast studies. Results The results revealed that the zinc levels are consistently and markedly decreased in the ductal malignant cells as compared with higher prominent zinc levels in the normal ductal epithelium. Decreased zinc is evident in Grade 1 well-differentiated malignancy and in Grade 2 and Grade 3 carcinomas. Among the twenty-five cancer cases in this study, none exhibited increased zinc in the invasive ductal carcinoma compared to the zinc level in the normal ductal epithelium. Conclusions The decreased zinc levels in breast invasive ductal carcinoma is consistent with prostate, pancreatic, and liver carcinomas in which the decrease in zinc is a required event in the development of malignancy to prevent cytotoxicity that would result from the higher zinc levels in the normal cells. This new understanding requires a redirection in elucidating the

  6. Junction Protein Shrew-1 Influences Cell Invasion and Interacts with Invasion-promoting Protein CD147

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Alexander; Ruonala, Mika; Jakob, Viktor; Suthaus, Jan; Boles, Eckhard; Wouters, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Shrew-1 was previously isolated from an endometriotic cell line in our search for invasion-associated genes. It proved to be a membrane protein that targets to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells, interacting with E-cadherin–catenin complexes of adherens junctions. Paradoxically, the existence of adherens junctions is incompatible with invasion. To investigate whether shrew-1 can indeed influence cellular invasion, we overexpressed it in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. This resulted in enhanced invasiveness, accompanied by an increased matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 level in the supernatant, raising the question about the role of shrew-1 in this process. Logic suggested we looked for an interaction with CD147, a known promoter of invasiveness and MMP activity. Indeed, genetics-based, biochemical, and microscopy experiments revealed shrew-1– and CD147-containing complexes in invasive endometriotic cells and an interaction in epithelial cells, which was stronger in MCF7 tumor cells, but weaker in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. In contrast to the effect mediated by overexpression, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of either shrew-1 or CD147 in HeLa cells decreased invasiveness without affecting the proliferation behavior of HeLa cells, but the knockdown cells displayed decreased motility. Altogether, our results imply that shrew-1 has a function in the regulation of cellular invasion, which may involve its interaction with CD147. PMID:17267690

  7. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  8. Invasive cancer cells and metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-12-01

    The physics of cancer is a relatively new emerging field of cancer research. In the last decade it has become a focus of biophysical research as well as becoming a novel focus for classical cancer research. This special section of Physical Biology focusing on invasive cancer cells and metastasis (physical oncology) will give greater insight into the different subfields where physical approaches are being applied to cancer research. This focus on the physical aspects of cancer is necessary because novel approaches in the field of genomics and proteomics have not altered the field of cancer research dramatically, due to the fact that few breakthroughs have been made. It is still not understood why some primary tumors metastasize and thus have a worse outcome compared to others that do not metastasize. As biophysicists, we and others suggest that the mechanical properties of the cancer cells, which possess the ability to transmigrate, are quite different compared to non-metastatic and non-invasive cancer cells. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these cancer cells undergo a selection process within the primary tumor that enables them to weaken their cell-cell adhesions and to alter their cell-matrix adhesions in order to be able to cross the outermost boundary of the primary tumor, as well as the surrounding basement membrane, and to invade the connective tissue. This prerequisite may also help the cancer cells to enter blood or lymph vessels, get transported with the vessel flow and form secondary tumors either within the vessel, directly on the endothelium, or in a different organ after crossing the endothelial lining a second time. This special section begins with a paper by Mark F Coughlin and Jeffrey J Fredberg on the changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology due to the metastatic capability of cancer cells from different cancer tissue types such as skin, bladder, prostate and kidney [1]. The hypothesis was that the metastatic outcome is impacted by

  9. RNAi knockdown of Hop (Hsp70/Hsp90 organising protein) decreases invasion via MMP-2 down regulation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Naomi; Larkin, AnneMarie; Swan, Niall; Conlon, Kevin; Dowling, Paul; McDermott, Ray; Clynes, Martin

    2011-07-28

    We previously identified Hop as over expressed in invasive pancreatic cancer cell lines and malignant tissues of pancreatic cancer patients, suggesting an important role for Hop in the biology of invasive pancreatic cancer. Hop is a co-chaperone protein that binds to both Hsp70/Hsp90. We hypothesised that by targeting Hop, signalling pathways modulating invasion and client protein stabilisation involving Hsp90-dependent complexes may be altered. In this study, we show that Hop knockdown by small interfering (si)RNA reduces the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, resulting in decreased expression of the downstream target gene, matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2). Hop in conditioned media co-immunoprecipitates with MMP-2, implicating a possible extracellular function for Hop. Knockdown of Hop expression also reduced expression levels of Hsp90 client proteins, HER2, Bcr-Abl, c-MET and v-Src. Furthermore, Hop is strongly expressed in high grade PanINs compared to lower PanIN grades, displaying differential localisation in invasive ductal pancreatic cancer, indicating that the localisation of Hop is an important factor in pancreatic tumours. Our data suggests that the attenuation of Hop expression inactivates key signal transduction proteins which may decrease the invasiveness of pancreatic cancer cells possibly through the modulation of Hsp90 activity. Therefore, targeting Hop in pancreatic cancer may constitute a viable strategy for targeted cancer therapy.

  10. Trophoblast stem cells differentiate in vitro into invasive trophoblast giant cells.

    PubMed

    Hemberger, Myriam; Hughes, Martha; Cross, James C

    2004-07-15

    Trophoblast cells are characterized by an invasive behavior into the surrounding uterine tissue. In rodents, an early peri-/endovascular type of invasion exerted by trophoblast giant cells can be distinguished from a late interstitial type carried out by glycogen trophoblast cells. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms of trophoblast invasion has been hampered, however, by the complex temporal and spatial patterns of invasion. We utilized trophoblast stem (TS) cell lines to study trophoblast invasion in vitro and to establish a model that facilitates investigation of this process on the molecular level. Our results showed that trophoblast giant cells that differentiate from TS cells in vitro are capable of penetrating a reconstituted basement membrane matrix. Consequently, invasion rates were increased in various giant cell differentiation-promoting conditions. We also derived TS cell lines that are homozygous for a mutation of the Hand1 transcription factor. The Hand1-/- TS cells showed reduced levels of giant cell differentiation and exhibited an approximately 50% decrease in invasion rates. In summary, trophoblast giant cells that differentiate from TS cells in vitro recapitulate the invasive capacity of normal trophoblast cells in vivo. The TS cell system is a valuable tool to identify and quantitatively study regulators of trophoblast invasion.

  11. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  12. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  13. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  14. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L.; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M.; Clarke, Frank M.; Tonissen, Kathryn F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration. PMID:26760912

  15. Microfluidic cytometric analysis of cancer cell transportability and invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zongbin; Lee, Yeonju; Jang, Joon hee; Li, Ying; Han, Xin; Yokoi, Kenji; Ferrari, Mauro; Zhou, Ledu; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    The extensive phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of cancer cells plays an important role in tumor progression and therapeutic resistance. Characterizing this heterogeneity and identifying invasive phenotype may provide possibility to improve chemotherapy treatment. By mimicking cancer cell perfusion through circulatory system in metastasis, we develop a unique microfluidic cytometry (MC) platform to separate cancer cells at high throughput, and further derive a physical parameter ‘transportability’ to characterize the ability to pass through micro-constrictions. The transportability is determined by cell stiffness and cell-surface frictional property, and can be used to probe tumor heterogeneity, discriminate more invasive phenotypes and correlate with biomarker expressions in breast cancer cells. Decreased cell stiffness and cell-surface frictional force leads to an increase in transportability and may be a feature of invasive cancer cells by promoting cell perfusion through narrow spaces in circulatory system. The MC-Chip provides a promising microfluidic platform for studying cell mechanics and transportability could be used as a novel marker for probing tumor heterogeneity and determining invasive phenotypes. PMID:26404901

  16. In Vitro Cell Invasion of Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Florian; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2000-01-01

    The ability of the widespread avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum to invade cultured human epithelial cells (HeLa-229) and chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) was investigated by using the gentamicin invasion assay and a double immunofluorescence microscopic technique for accurate localization of cell-associated mycoplasmas. The presence of intracellular mycoplasmas in both cell lines was clearly demonstrated, with organisms entering the eukaryotic cells within 20 min. Internalized mycoplasmas have the ability to leave the cell, but also to survive within the intracellular space over a 48-h period. Frequencies of invasion were shown to differ between the two cell lines, but were also considerably dependent on the mycoplasma input population. Of the prototype strain R, a low-passage population in artificial medium, Rlow, was capable of active cell invasion, while a high-passage population, Rhigh, showed adherence to but nearly no uptake into HeLa-229 and CEF. By passaging Rlow and Rhigh multiple times through HeLa-229 cells, the invasion frequency was significantly increased. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that M. gallisepticum has the capability of entering nonphagocytic host cells that may provide this pathogen with the opportunity for resisting host defenses and selective antibiotic therapy, establishing chronic infections, and passing through the respiratory mucosal barrier to cause systemic infections. PMID:10858241

  17. Downregulation of FOXP2 promoter human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xia; Zhou, Huiling; Zhang, Tingting; Xu, Pan; Zhang, Shusen; Huang, Wei; Yang, Linlin; Gu, Xingxing; Ni, Runzhou; Zhang, Tianyi

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health concern with a high morbidity and mortality rate worldwide. However, the mechanism underlying hepatocarcinogenesis remains unclear. Forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) has been implicated in various human cancer types. However, the role of FOXP2 in HCC remains unknown. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to measure the expression of FOXP2 protein in HCC and adjacent normal tissues in 50 patients. Wound healing and transwell assays were used to determine the cell invasion ability. We showed that the level of FOXP2 was significantly reduced in HCC compared with the adjacent non-tumorous tissue. There was statistical significance between the expression of FOXP2 and vein invasion (P = 0.017), number of tumor nodes (P = 0.028), and AFP (P = 0.033). Low expression of FOXP2 correlated with poor survival. Moreover, wound healing and transwell assays showed that FOXP2 could decrease cell invasion and affect the expression of vimentin and E-cadherin. Our results suggested that FOXP2 expression was downregulated in HCC tumor tissues, and reduced FOXP2 expression was associated with poor overall survival. In addition, downregulation of FOXP2 significantly enhanced cell invasiveness. These findings uncover that FOXP2 might be a new prognostic factor and be closely correlated with HCC cell invasion.

  18. Decreased FOXF1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma tumorigenesis, invasion, and stemness and is associated with poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen-guo; Wang, De-qiang; Hu, De-fei; Li, You-sheng; Liu, Shuang-hai

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box F1 (FOXF1), a member of the forkhead transcription factor superfamily, plays critical roles in the progression of certain types of cancers. However, the expression and function of FOXF1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still unclear. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry detected the relatively lower expression status of FOXF1 in HCC cases. Soft agar and transwell assays clearly demonstrated that FOXF1-knockdown cells showed significantly increased in vitro cell tumorigenesis and invasion, and FOXF1-overexpressing cells had significantly reduced growth and invasion potential. Our study also examined the role of FOXF1 in HCC cell stemness by sphere formation, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1) activity, and CD44/133-positive cell analysis. Enforced FOXF1 expression decreased HCC cell stemness, and the downregulation of FOXF1 promoted cancer cell stemness. The in vivo study showed that overexpressed FOXF1 inhibits nude mouse tumorigenicity with downregulation of CD44 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. More importantly, loss of FOXF1 expression was linked to poor overall survival time by Kaplan–Meier analysis. PMID:27042124

  19. Development of dual PLD1/2 and PLD2 selective inhibitors from a common 1,3,8-Triazaspiro[4.5]decane Core: discovery of Ml298 and Ml299 that decrease invasive migration in U87-MG glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Matthew C; Scott, Sarah A; Brown, Kyle A; Oguin, Thomas H; Thomas, Paul G; Daniels, J Scott; Morrison, Ryan; Brown, H Alex; Lindsley, Craig W

    2013-03-28

    An iterative parallel synthesis effort identified a PLD2 selective inhibitor, ML298 (PLD1 IC50 > 20000 nM, PLD2 IC50 = 355 nM) and a dual PLD1/2 inhibitor, ML299 (PLD1 IC50 = 6 nM, PLD2 IC50 = 20 nM). SAR studies revealed that a small structural change (incorporation of a methyl group) increased PLD1 activity within this classically PLD2-preferring core and that the effect was enantiospecific. Both probes decreased invasive migration in U87-MG glioblastoma cells.

  20. Chick Heart Invasion Assay for Testing the Invasiveness of Cancer Cells and the Activity of Potentially Anti-invasive Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bracke, Marc E; Roman, Bart I; Stevens, Christian V; Mus, Liselot M; Parmar, Virinder S; De Wever, Olivier; Mareel, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the chick heart assay is to offer a relevant organ culture method to study tumor invasion in three dimensions. The assay can distinguish between invasive and non-invasive cells, and enables study of the effects of test compounds on tumor invasion. Cancer cells - either as aggregates or single cells - are confronted with fragments of embryonic chick heart. After organ culture in suspension for a few days or weeks the confronting cultures are fixed and embedded in paraffin for histological analysis. The three-dimensional interaction between the cancer cells and the normal tissue is then reconstructed from serial sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin or after immunohistochemical staining for epitopes in the heart tissue or the confronting cancer cells. The assay is consistent with the recent concept that cancer invasion is the result of molecular interactions between the cancer cells and their neighbouring stromal host elements (myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, extracellular matrix components, etc.). Here, this stromal environment is offered to the cancer cells as a living tissue fragment. Supporting aspects to the relevance of the assay are multiple. Invasion in the assay is in accordance with the criteria of cancer invasion: progressive occupation and replacement in time and space of the host tissue, and invasiveness and non-invasiveness in vivo of the confronting cells generally correlates with the outcome of the assay. Furthermore, the invasion pattern of cells in vivo, as defined by pathologists, is reflected in the histological images in the assay. Quantitative structure-activity relation (QSAR) analysis of the results obtained with numerous potentially anti-invasive organic congener compounds allowed the study of structure-activity relations for flavonoids and chalcones, and known anti-metastatic drugs used in the clinic (e.g., microtubule inhibitors) inhibit invasion in the assay as well. However, the assay does not take into account

  1. Transgelin promotes migration and invasion of cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Kyung; Han, Gi-Yeon; Park, Hye Won; Song, Yeo-Ju; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of a small subset of cancer cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs), which possess the ability to initiate malignancies, promote tumor formation, drive metastasis, and evade conventional chemotherapies. Elucidation of the specific signaling pathway and mechanism underlying the action of CSCs might improve the efficacy of cancer treatments. In this study, we analyzed differentially expressed proteins between tumerigenic and nontumorigenic cells isolated from the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, Huh7, via proteomic analysis to identify proteins correlated with specific features of CSCs. The expression level of Transgelin was 25-fold higher in tumorigenic cells than nontumorigenic cells. Similar results were also observed in tumorigenic cells derived from colorectal adenocarcinoma and prostate carcinoma. More importantly, the elevated levels of Transgelin significantly increased the invasiveness of tumorigenic cells, whereas reduced levels decreased the invasive potential. Moreover, in tumors derived from Huh7-induced xenografts, Transgelin was also co-expressed with CXCR4, which is responsible for tumor invasion. Taken together, these results indicate that the metastatic potential of CSCs arises from highly expressed Transgelin.

  2. Cell-cell contacts mediated by E-cadherin (uvomorulin) restrict invasive behavior of L-cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    L-cells were cotransfected with plasmids coding for mouse E-cadherin (uvomorulin) and the neophosphotransferase gene, and stable transfectants expressing E-cadherin at the cell surface were selected and cloned. Control transfection was done with the neophosphotransferase gene alone. The invasive migration of transfected and untransfected L-cells into three-dimensional collagen gels was then analyzed. L-cells not expressing E-cadherin migrated efficiently into the gels, whereas invasion of the E-cadherin-expressing L-cells was restricted in a cell density dependent manner. At sparse density, when the cells exhibited little cell-cell contacts, no difference was observed between the level of invasion of the cadherin-expressing cells and the control cells. However, with increasing cell density, decreasing amounts of the cadherin-expressing cells but increasing amounts of the control cells migrated into the gels. At confluent density hardly any cadherin-expressing cells were able to migrate into the gels. The inhibition of the invasion of the cadherin-expressing cells could be reverted if confluent cells were cultured in the presence of monoclonal antibodies against E-cadherin. Since the expression of E-cadherin did not influence the invasive mobility of single cells, these results indicate that E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts inhibited invasive cellular migration. Time-lapse videoscopy and studies of cell migration from a monolayer into a cell-free area demonstrated that the restricted invasion could be explained by contact inhibition of cell movement of the cadherin-expressing cells. PMID:1649199

  3. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  4. Perfluorochemical emulsions decrease Kupffer cell phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bottalico, L.A.; Betensky, H.T.; Min, Y.B.; Weinstock, S.B. )

    1991-07-01

    One drawback to using perfluorochemical emulsions as blood substitutes is that perfluorochemical particles are cleared from the blood by the reticuloendothelial system, primarily liver and spleen. The authors measured the impact of two perfluorochemical emulsions on clearance of colloidal carbon (less than 1 microns) and 51Cr-sheep red blood cells (about 8 microns) by the reticuloendothelial system in vivo and in the isolated perfused liver. Male rats were injected with 2 ml/100 gm body wt of Fluosol-DA or Oxypherol-ET for 4 consecutive days. Carbon (1 ml/100 gm body wt) or sheep red blood cells (0.05 ml of 5% vol/vol/100 gm body wt) were then injected intravenously (in vivo) or added to perfusate. Samples were taken at several time points for 1 hr. In the isolated perfused liver, carbon clearance was depressed by 25% 1 day after treatment. Rates returned to control levels by 12 days in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but remained depressed by 67% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats. Sheep red blood cell (8 microns) clearance was two to five times slower than carbon clearance and depressed by 40% in livers from Fluosol-DA rats 1 day and 12 days after treatment. Added serum did not improve phagocytosis. In vivo carbon clearance remained normal in Fluosol-DA-treated rats but decreased by 74% in Oxypherol-ET-treated rats 1 day after treatment, returning to normal by 12 days. Clearance rates were similar in control rats in vivo and in the perfused liver. They conclude that the isolated perfused liver is a good model to measure liver clearance function. Although low doses of perfluorochemical emulsions may depress Kupffer cell phagocytosis, general reticuloendothelial system function is not significantly compromised.

  5. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness.

  6. Cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gandalovičová, Aneta; Vomastek, Tomáš; Rosel, Daniel; Brábek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Apico-basal polarity is typical of cells present in differentiated epithelium while front-rear polarity develops in motile cells. In cancer development, the transition from epithelial to migratory polarity may be seen as the hallmark of cancer progression to an invasive and metastatic disease. Despite the morphological and functional dissimilarity, both epithelial and migratory polarity are controlled by a common set of polarity complexes Par, Scribble and Crumbs, phosphoinositides, and small Rho GTPases Rac, Rho and Cdc42. In epithelial tissues, their mutual interplay ensures apico-basal and planar cell polarity. Accordingly, altered functions of these polarity determinants lead to disrupted cell-cell adhesions, cytoskeleton rearrangements and overall loss of epithelial homeostasis. Polarity proteins are further engaged in diverse interactions that promote the establishment of front-rear polarity, and they help cancer cells to adopt different invasion modes. Invading cancer cells can employ either the collective, mesenchymal or amoeboid invasion modes or actively switch between them and gain intermediate phenotypes. Elucidation of the role of polarity proteins during these invasion modes and the associated transitions is a necessary step towards understanding the complex problem of metastasis. In this review we summarize the current knowledge of the role of cell polarity signaling in the plasticity of cancer cell invasiveness. PMID:26872368

  7. A human breast cell model of pre-invasive to invasive transition

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina J; Rizki, Aylin; Weaver, Valerie M.; Lee, Sun-Young; Rozenberg, Gabriela I.; Chin, Koei; Myers, Connie A.; Bascom, Jamie L.; Mott, Joni D.; Semeiks, Jeremy R.; Grate, Leslie R.; Mian, I. Saira; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Jensen, Roy A.; Idowu, Michael O.; Chen, Fanqing; Chen, David J.; Petersen, Ole W.; Gray, Joe W.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-03-10

    A crucial step in human breast cancer progression is the acquisition of invasiveness. There is a distinct lack of human cell culture models to study the transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype as it may occur 'spontaneously' in vivo. To delineate molecular alterations important for this transition, we isolated human breast epithelial cell lines that showed partial loss of tissue polarity in three-dimensional reconstituted-basement membrane cultures. These cells remained non-invasive; however, unlike their non-malignant counterparts, they exhibited a high propensity to acquire invasiveness through basement membrane in culture. The genomic aberrations and gene expression profiles of the cells in this model showed a high degree of similarity to primary breast tumor profiles. The xenograft tumors formed by the cell lines in three different microenvironments in nude mice displayed metaplastic phenotypes, including squamous and basal characteristics, with invasive cells exhibiting features of higher grade tumors. To find functionally significant changes in transition from pre-invasive to invasive phenotype, we performed attribute profile clustering analysis on the list of genes differentially expressed between pre-invasive and invasive cells. We found integral membrane proteins, transcription factors, kinases, transport molecules, and chemokines to be highly represented. In addition, expression of matrix metalloproteinases MMP-9,-13,-15,-17 was up regulated in the invasive cells. Using siRNA based approaches, we found these MMPs to be required for the invasive phenotype. This model provides a new tool for dissection of mechanisms by which pre-invasive breast cells could acquire invasiveness in a metaplastic context.

  8. MicroRNA-126 inhibits invasion in non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, M.; Brawner, E.; Batte, K.; Yu, L.; Hunter, M.G.; Otterson, G.A.; Nuovo, G.; Marsh, C.B.; Nana-Sinkam, S.P.

    2008-09-05

    Crk is a member of a family of adaptor proteins that are involved in intracellular signal pathways altering cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. Increased expression of Crk has been described in lung cancer and associated with increased tumor invasiveness. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of small non-coding RNAs (approximately 21-25 nt long) that are capable of targeting genes for either degradation of mRNA or inhibition of translation. Crk is a predicted putative target gene for miR-126. Over-expression of miR126 in a lung cancer cell line resulted in a decrease in Crk protein without any alteration in the associated mRNA. These lung cancer cells exhibit a decrease in adhesion, migration, and invasion. Decreased cancer cell invasion was also evident following targeted knockdown of Crk. MiR-126 alters lung cancer cell phenotype by inhibiting adhesion, migration, and invasion and the effects on invasion may be partially mediated through Crk regulation.

  9. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant'Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  10. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  11. Cannabidiol inhibits cancer cell invasion via upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1.

    PubMed

    Ramer, Robert; Merkord, Jutta; Rohde, Helga; Hinz, Burkhard

    2010-04-01

    Although cannabinoids exhibit a broad variety of anticarcinogenic effects, their potential use in cancer therapy is limited by their psychoactive effects. Here we evaluated the impact of cannabidiol, a plant-derived non-psychoactive cannabinoid, on cancer cell invasion. Using Matrigel invasion assays we found a cannabidiol-driven impaired invasion of human cervical cancer (HeLa, C33A) and human lung cancer cells (A549) that was reversed by antagonists to both CB(1) and CB(2) receptors as well as to transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). The decrease of invasion by cannabidiol appeared concomitantly with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Knockdown of cannabidiol-induced TIMP-1 expression by siRNA led to a reversal of the cannabidiol-elicited decrease in tumor cell invasiveness, implying a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of cannabidiol. P38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases were identified as upstream targets conferring TIMP-1 induction and subsequent decreased invasiveness. Additionally, in vivo studies in thymic-aplastic nude mice revealed a significant inhibition of A549 lung metastasis in cannabidiol-treated animals as compared to vehicle-treated controls. Altogether, these findings provide a novel mechanism underlying the anti-invasive action of cannabidiol and imply its use as a therapeutic option for the treatment of highly invasive cancers.

  12. Gallic acid suppresses cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yong; Jiang, Feng; Jiang, Hao; Wu, Kalina; Zheng, Xuguang; Cai, Yizhong; Katakowski, Mark; Chopp, Michael; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2010-01-01

    Gallic acid, an organic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, is cytotoxic against certain cancer cells, without harming normal cells. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether gallic acid can inhibit glioma cell viability, proliferation, invasion and reduce glioma cell mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of U87 and U251n glioma cells with gallic acid inhibited cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BrdU and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased glioma cell proliferation and tube formation in mouse brain endothelial cells, respectively. In addition, gallic acid decreased U87 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis showed that expression of ADAM17, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in both U87 and U251n cell lines. These data suggest that suppression of ADAM17 and downregulation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MAPK signaling pathways may contribute to gallic acid-induced decrease of invasiveness. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for treatment of brain tumor. PMID:20553913

  13. Cranial diameter pulsations measured by non-invasive ultrasound decrease with tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, Toshiaki; Ballard, Richard E.; Macias, Brandon R.; Yost, William T.; Hargens, Alan R.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intracranial pressure (ICP) may play a significant role in physiological responses to microgravity by contributing to the nausea associated with microgravity exposure. However, effects of altered gravity on ICP in astronauts have not been investigated, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed an ultrasonic device that monitors changes in cranial diameter pulsation non-invasively so that we can evaluate ICP dynamics in astronauts during spaceflight. This study was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of our ultrasound technique under the physiological condition in which ICP dynamics are changed due to altered gravitational force. METHODS: Six healthy volunteers were placed at 60 degrees head-up, 30 degrees headup, supine, and 15 degrees head-down positions for 3 min at each angle. We measured arterial blood pressure (ABP) with a finger pressure cuff, and cranial diameter pulsation with a pulsed phase lock loop device (PPLL). RESULTS: Analysis of covariance demonstrated that amplitudes of cranial diameter pulsations were significantly altered with the angle of tilt (p < 0.001). The 95% confidence interval for linear regression coefficients of the cranial diameter pulsation amplitudes with tilt angle was 0.862 to 0.968. However, ABP amplitudes did not show this relationship. DISCUSSION: Our noninvasive ultrasonic technique reveals that the amplitude of cranial diameter pulsation decreases as a function of tilt angle, suggesting that ICP pulsation follows the same relationship. It is demonstrated that the PPLL device has a sufficient sensitivity to detect changes non-invasively in ICP pulsation caused by altered gravity.

  14. Anchors away! Fos fosters anchor-cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Montell, Denise J

    2005-06-17

    Invasion of cells through breakdown of the basement membrane is a crucial step during development and cancer metastasis. In this issue of Cell, simple and genetically tractable cellular assay in the worm for elucidating the molecular processes that underlie cell invasion in vivo is described. They demonstrate that the transcription factor Fos is required for cell invasion and identify three of its downstream target genes (encoding a matrix metalloproteinase, hemicentin, and a fat-like protocadherin).

  15. Beclin1 overexpression inhibitis proliferation, invasion and migration of CaSki cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Jia-hua; Sui, Yu-xia; Jin, Long; Yang, Yin; Lin, Sai-mei; Shi, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the autophagy-related gene Beclin1 on proliferation, invasion and metastasis of the cervical cancer CaSki cells and its possible mechanism in vitro were here targeted. After the overexpression vector pcDNA3.1-Beclin1 and RNA interference vector pSUPER-Beclin1 were transfected into CaSki cells in vitro, stable expression cell lines demonstration Beclin1 expression was upregulated, and VEGF and MMP-9 expression were decreased, leading to cell arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. MTT assays further revealed proliferation of cells was significantly inhibited in Beclin1-overexpressing transfectant cells, with invasion and metastasis also being inhibited in Transwell chamber assays. The present results suggest that Beclin1 inhibits invasion and metastasis of cervical cancer CaSki cells in vitro. Mechanisms probably involve Beclin1 inhibition of cell proliferation, and decreased expression of VEGF and MMP-9 proteins.

  16. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Jill M; Prechtl, Amanda M; Maine, Erin A; Dang, Tuyen T; Esparza, Matthew A; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W

    2015-05-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these "trailblazer" cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis.

  17. An epigenetically distinct breast cancer cell subpopulation promotes collective invasion

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Jill M.; Prechtl, Amanda M.; Maine, Erin A.; Dang, Tuyen T.; Esparza, Matthew A.; Sun, Han; Zhou, Yunyun; Xie, Yang; Pearson, Gray W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells can engage in a process called collective invasion, in which cohesive groups of cells invade through interstitial tissue. Here, we identified an epigenetically distinct subpopulation of breast tumor cells that have an enhanced capacity to collectively invade. Analysis of spheroid invasion in an organotypic culture system revealed that these “trailblazer” cells are capable of initiating collective invasion and promote non-trailblazer cell invasion, indicating a commensal relationship among subpopulations within heterogenous tumors. Canonical mesenchymal markers were not sufficient to distinguish trailblazer cells from non-trailblazer cells, suggesting that defining the molecular underpinnings of the trailblazer phenotype could reveal collective invasion-specific mechanisms. Functional analysis determined that DOCK10, ITGA11, DAB2, PDFGRA, VASN, PPAP2B, and LPAR1 are highly expressed in trailblazer cells and required to initiate collective invasion, with DOCK10 essential for metastasis. In patients with triple-negative breast cancer, expression of these 7 genes correlated with poor outcome. Together, our results indicate that spontaneous conversion of the epigenetic state in a subpopulation of cells can promote a transition from in situ to invasive growth through induction of a cooperative form of collective invasion and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of trailblazer cell invasion may help prevent metastasis. PMID:25844900

  18. Targeting cancer cell invasiveness using homing peptide-nanocomplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarato, Giulia; Cathcart, Jillian; Li, Weiyi; Cao, Jian; Meng, Yizhi

    Matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) plays critical roles in digesting the basement membrane and extracellular matrix and inducing cancer migration. We recently unraveled a unique role in cell invasion of the hemopexin (PEX) domain of MMP-14. The minimal motif located at the outmost strand of the fourth blade of the PEX domain was identified to form homodimers of MMP-14. A peptide (IVS4) mimicking the binding motif was shown to interrupt MMP-14 dimerization and decrease MMP-14-mediated functions. Since most invasive cancer cells express upregulated MMP-14 at the surface, IVS4 could be used as a cancer homing peptide to specifically deliver cytotoxic drugs for cancer therapy. We developed cancer homing nanocarriers by linking IVS4 to polysaccharide-based micellar nanoparticles (NPs). To determine if conjugation of IVS4 to NPs maintains the IVS4 inhibition of MMP-14 function, substrate degradation and cell migration assays were performed. IVS4-NPs efficiently prevented MMP-14-mediated substrate degradation and cell migration, and were minimally uptaken by non-cancer cells. Importantly, IVS4 confers an uptake advantage compared to the control peptide in MMP-14-expressing cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potential use of IVS4-NPs as novel cancer nanotherapeutics.

  19. Cell-ECM Interactions During Cancer Invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yi

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), a fibrous material that forms a network in a tissue, significantly affects many aspects of cellular behavior, including cell movement and proliferation. Transgenic mouse tumor studies indicate that excess collagen, a major component of ECM, enhances tumor formation and invasiveness. Clinically, tumor associated collagen signatures are strong markers for breast cancer survival. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear since the properties of ECM are complex, with diverse structural and mechanical properties depending on various biophysical parameters. We have developed a three-dimensional elastic fiber network model, and parameterized it with in vitro collagen mechanics. Using this model, we study ECM remodeling as a result of local deformation and cell migration through the ECM as a network percolation problem. We have also developed a three-dimensional, multiscale model of cell migration and interaction with ECM. Our model reproduces quantitative single cell migration experiments. This model is a first step toward a fully biomechanical cell-matrix interaction model and may shed light on tumor associated collagen signatures in breast cancer. This work was partially supported by NIH-U01CA143069.

  20. Disruption of foraging by a dominant invasive species to decrease its competitive ability.

    PubMed

    Westermann, Fabian Ludwig; Suckling, David Maxwell; Lester, Philip John

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to biodiversity when dominant within their newly established habitat. The globally distributed Argentine ant Linepithema humile has been reported to break the trade-off between interference and exploitative competition, achieve high population densities, and overpower nests of many endemic ant species. We have used the sensitivity of the Argentine ant to the synthetic trail pheromone (Z)-9-hexadecanal to investigate species interactions for the first time. We predicted that disrupting Argentine ant trail following behaviour would reduce their competitive ability and create an opportunity for three other resident species to increase their foraging success. Argentine ant success in the control was reduced with increasing pheromone concentration, as predicted, but interactions varied among competing resident species. These behavioural variations provide an explanation for observed differences in foraging success of the competing resident species and how much each of these individual competitors can increase their foraging if the competitive ability of the dominant invader is decreased. The mechanism for the observed increase in resource acquisition of resident species appears to be a decrease in aggressive behaviour displayed by the Argentine ant, which may create an opportunity for other resident species to forage more successfully. Our demonstration of species interactions with trail pheromone disruption is the first known case of reduced dominance under a pheromone treatment in ants.

  1. Disruption of Foraging by a Dominant Invasive Species to Decrease Its Competitive Ability

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Fabian Ludwig; Suckling, David Maxwell; Lester, Philip John

    2014-01-01

    Invasive species are a major threat to biodiversity when dominant within their newly established habitat. The globally distributed Argentine ant Linepithema humile has been reported to break the trade-off between interference and exploitative competition, achieve high population densities, and overpower nests of many endemic ant species. We have used the sensitivity of the Argentine ant to the synthetic trail pheromone (Z)-9-hexadecanal to investigate species interactions for the first time. We predicted that disrupting Argentine ant trail following behaviour would reduce their competitive ability and create an opportunity for three other resident species to increase their foraging success. Argentine ant success in the control was reduced with increasing pheromone concentration, as predicted, but interactions varied among competing resident species. These behavioural variations provide an explanation for observed differences in foraging success of the competing resident species and how much each of these individual competitors can increase their foraging if the competitive ability of the dominant invader is decreased. The mechanism for the observed increase in resource acquisition of resident species appears to be a decrease in aggressive behaviour displayed by the Argentine ant, which may create an opportunity for other resident species to forage more successfully. Our demonstration of species interactions with trail pheromone disruption is the first known case of reduced dominance under a pheromone treatment in ants. PMID:24594633

  2. Effects and mechanisms of curcumin and basil polysaccharide on the invasion of SKOV3 cells and dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Shao, Qianqian; Wang, Huayang; Shi, Huan; Wang, Ting; Gao, Wenjuan; Song, Bingfeng; Zheng, Guangjuan; Kong, Beihua; Qu, Xun

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, a polysaccharide extract was obtained from Ocimum basilicum (basil polysaccharide, BPS) and the effects of curcumin and BPS on the invasion activity of the SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) were investigated. SKOV3 cells and immature or mature DCs were treated with 50 µM curcumin or 100 µg/ml BPS. A transwell invasion assay demonstrated that curcumin and BPS differentially regulate the invasion of SKOV3 cells and DCs. Curcumin significantly decreased the invasion of SKOV3 cells and immature and mature DCs, while BPS only decreased SKOV3 cell invasion. Osteopontin (OPN) mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced in curcumin and BPS-treated SKOV3 cells and curcumin-treated DCs. Furthermore, flow cytometry showed that curcumin significantly inhibited the surface expression of CD44 in SKOV3 cells and DCs, while BPS had a minimal effect on CD44 expression. Matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9) mRNA and protein expression were also reduced in all curcumin-treated cells and BPS-treated SKOV3 cells. The results indicated that curcumin and BPS regulated invasion of SKOV3 cells and DCs by distinctly downregulating OPN, CD44 and MMP-9 expression. Therefore, Curcumin and BPS may be suitable candidates for DC-based vaccines for ovarian cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24065177

  3. Saracatinib Impairs Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion by Disrupting Invadopodia Function

    PubMed Central

    Ammer, Amanda Gatesman; Kelley, Laura C.; Hayes, Karen E.; Evans, Jason V.; Lopez-Skinner, Lesly Ann; Martin, Karen H.; Frederick, Barbara; Rothschild, Brian L.; Raben, David; Elvin, Paul; Green, Tim P.; Weed, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated Src kinase activity is linked to the progression of solid tumors, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Src regulates HNSCC proliferation and tumor invasion, with the Src-targeted small molecule inhibitor saracatinib displaying potent anti-invasive effects in preclinical studies. However, the pro-invasive cellular mechanism(s) perturbed by saracatinib are unclear. The anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of saracatinib on HNSCC cell lines were therefore investigated in pre-clinical cell and mouse model systems. Saracatinib treatment inhibited growth, cell cycle progression and transwell Matrigel invasion in HNSCC cell lines. Dose-dependent decreases in Src activation and phosphorylation of the invasion-associated substrates focal adhesion kinase, p130 CAS and cortactin were also observed. While saracatinib did not significantly impact HNSCC tumor growth in a mouse orthotopic model of tongue squamous cell carcinoma, impaired perineural invasion and cervical lymph node metastasis was observed. Accordingly, saracatinib treatment displayed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on invadopodia formation, extracellular matrix degradation and matrix metalloprotease 9 activation. These results suggest that inhibition of Src kinase by saracatinib impairs the pro-invasive activity of HNSCC by inhibiting Src substrate phosphorylation important for invadopodia formation and associated matrix metalloprotease activity. PMID:20505783

  4. Decreased sirtuin 4 expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qingyu; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Xianyu; Geng, Jingshu; He, Xiaohui; Nu, Ming; Pang, Da

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant metabolism is a hallmark of human cancer. Glutamine metabolism has been identified as a central metabolic pathway in cancer and thus, targeting glutamine metabolism may exhibit therapeutic potential. Sirtuin 4 (SIRT4) is an important molecule that mediates the blockade of glutamine catabolism by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase. In the present study, SIRT4 protein expression levels were analyzed in 409 breast cancer tissues and 241 paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues by immunohistochemical analysis and the correlation between SIRT4 expression and the clinicopathological features was evaluated. SIRT4 protein was markedly increased in the breast cancer cells compared with adjacent non-tumor mammary cells and was correlated with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, nuclear-associated antigen Ki-67 and tumor protein p53 status, as well as breast cancer subtypes. Furthermore, low SIRT4 expression was associated with poor overall survival in breast cancers patients, particularly in Luminal A patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that increased SIRT4 expression was an independent predictive factor of good prognosis for breast cancer patients. In conclusion, SIRT4 expression represents a significant favorable prognostic factor for patients with invasive breast cancer. PMID:27698834

  5. Decreased sirtuin 4 expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qingyu; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Xianyu; Geng, Jingshu; He, Xiaohui; Nu, Ming; Pang, Da

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant metabolism is a hallmark of human cancer. Glutamine metabolism has been identified as a central metabolic pathway in cancer and thus, targeting glutamine metabolism may exhibit therapeutic potential. Sirtuin 4 (SIRT4) is an important molecule that mediates the blockade of glutamine catabolism by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase. In the present study, SIRT4 protein expression levels were analyzed in 409 breast cancer tissues and 241 paired adjacent non-cancerous tissues by immunohistochemical analysis and the correlation between SIRT4 expression and the clinicopathological features was evaluated. SIRT4 protein was markedly increased in the breast cancer cells compared with adjacent non-tumor mammary cells and was correlated with estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, nuclear-associated antigen Ki-67 and tumor protein p53 status, as well as breast cancer subtypes. Furthermore, low SIRT4 expression was associated with poor overall survival in breast cancers patients, particularly in Luminal A patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that increased SIRT4 expression was an independent predictive factor of good prognosis for breast cancer patients. In conclusion, SIRT4 expression represents a significant favorable prognostic factor for patients with invasive breast cancer.

  6. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  7. Gallic acid reduces cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, BING; HU, MENGCAI

    2013-01-01

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, which is present in plants worldwide, including Chinese medicinal herbs. Gallic acid has been shown to have cytotoxic effects in certain cancer cells, without damaging normal cells. The objective of the present study was to determine whether gallic acid is able to inhibit human cervical cancer cell viability, proliferation and invasion and suppress cervical cancer cell-mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of HeLa and HTB-35 human cancer cells with gallic acid decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. BrdU proliferation and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased human cervical cancer cell proliferation and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, respectively. Additionally, gallic acid decreased HeLa and HTB-35 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of ADAM17, EGFR, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in the HeLa and HTB-35 cell lines. These data indicate that the suppression of ADAM17 and the downregulation of the EGFR, Akt/p-Akt and Erk/p-Erk signaling pathways may contribute to the suppression of cancer progression by Gallic acid. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:24843386

  8. Decreasing lncRNA HOTAIR expression inhibits human colorectal cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Jun; Ni, Yaoyao; He, Xiangfeng; Wu, Di; Li, Miao; Wu, Songyan; Zhang, Rong; Guo, Mei; Zhao, Fengsu

    2016-01-01

    Research on the relationship between aberrant long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) and cancer stem cell (CSC) biology in cancer patients has been recently gaining attention. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the decreasing lncRNA HOTAIR expression would inhibit human colorectal cancer (CRC) stem cells. CD133+CSCs were isolated from human CRC LoVo cell line by using a magnetic-activated cell sorting system, and were transfected with the expression vector-based small hairpin RNA targeting HOTAIR (shHOTAIR). The ability of cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, colony-forming, and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated molecule expression as well as the tumorigenicity of CD133+-shHOTAIR were evaluated by the MTT, wound-healing, cellular invasion, colony formation and Western blot assays, respectively. This study found that, when compared with control cells in vitro, CD133+-shHOTAIR exhibited the decreased HOTAIR expression, suppressed cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, colony-forming, and inhibited the Vimentin expression with increased E-cadherin expression. In particular, the down-regulation of the HOTAIR expression in CD133+CSCs markedly attenuated the tumor growth and lung metastasis in xenograft nude mice. Taken together, this study found that down-regulating the HOTAIR expression in CD133+CSCs could serve as a potential anti-cancer regimen to inhibit the invasiveness and metastasis of CRC CSCs. PMID:27069543

  9. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex antigens in invading glioma cells: stealth invasion of the brain.

    PubMed

    Zagzag, David; Salnikow, Konstantin; Chiriboga, Luis; Yee, Herman; Lan, Li; Ali, M Aktar; Garcia, Roberto; Demaria, Sandra; Newcomb, Elizabeth W

    2005-03-01

    Invasion into surrounding brain tissue is a fundamental feature of gliomas and the major reason for treatment failure. The process of brain invasion in gliomas is not well understood. Differences in gene expression and/or gene products between invading and noninvading glioma cells may identify potential targets for new therapies. To look for genes associated with glioma invasion, we first employed Affymetrix microarray Genechip technology to identify genes differentially expressed in migrating glioma cells in vitro and in invading glioma cells in vivo using laser capture microdissection. We observed upregulation of a variety of genes, previously reported to be linked to glioma cell migration and invasion. Remarkably, major histocompatiblity complex (MHC) class I and II genes were significantly downregulated in migrating cells in vitro and in invading cells in vivo. Decreased MHC expression was confirmed in migrating glioma cells in vitro using RT-PCR and in invading glioma cells in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of human and murine glioblastomas for beta2 microglobulin, a marker of MHC class I protein expression. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe the downregulation of MHC class I and II antigens in migrating and invading glioma cells, in vitro and in vivo, respectively. These results suggest that the very process of tumor invasion is associated with decreased expression of MHC antigens allowing glioma cells to invade the surrounding brain in a 'stealth'-like manner.

  10. Galangin inhibits cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inducing apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CAO, JINGYI; WANG, HAINAN; CHEN, FEIFEI; FANG, JIANZHENG; XU, AIMING; XI, WEI; ZHANG, SHENGLI; WU, GANG; WANG, ZENGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Galangin, a flavonoid extracted from the root of the Alpinia officinarum Hence, has been shown to have anticancer properties against several types of cancer cells. However, the influence of galangin on human renal cancer cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, proliferation of 786-0 and Caki-1 cells was suppressed following exposure to various doses of galangin. Cell invasion and wound healing assays were used to observe the effect of galangin on invasion and migration. The results demonstrated that Galangin inhibited cell invasion by suppressing the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), with an increase in the expression of E-cadherin and decreased expression levels of N-cadherin and vimentin. The apoptosis induced by galangin was analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that galangin induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important contributing factor for the apoptosis of various types of cancer cell. The dichlorofluorescein-diacetate method was used to determine the level of ROS. Galangin induced the accumulation of intracellular ROS and malondialdehyde, and decreased the activities of total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase in renal cell carcinoma cells. Galangin exerted an antiproliferative effect and inhibited renal cell carcinoma invasion by suppressing the EMT. This treatment also induced apoptosis, accompanied by the production of ROS. Therefore, the present data suggested that galangin may have beneficial effects by preventing renal cell carcinoma growth, inhibiting cell invasion via the EMT and inducing cell apoptosis. PMID:27035542

  11. Progesterone promotes cell migration, invasion and cofilin activation in human astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Cerbón, Marco; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytomas are the most common and aggressive primary brain tumors in humans. Invasiveness of these tumors has been attributed in part to deregulation of cell motility-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics that involves actin-binding proteins such as cofilin. Progesterone (P4) has been found to induce migration and invasion of cells derived from breast cancer and endothelium. However, the role of P4 in migration and invasion of astrocytoma cells as well as its effects on astrocytomas cytoskeleton remodeling is not known. In this work we evaluated these aspects in D54 and U251 cells derived from human astrocytomas from the highest degree of malignancy (grade IV, glioblastoma). Our results showed that in scratch-wound assays P4 increased the number of D54 and U251 cells migrating from 3 to 48 h. Both RU486, a P4 receptor (PR) antagonist, and an oligonucleotide antisense against PR significantly blocked P4 effects. Transwell assays showed that P4 significantly increased the number of invasive cells at 24h. As in the case of migration, this effect was blocked by RU486. Finally, by Western blotting, an increase in the cofilin/p-cofilin ratio at 15 and 30 min and a decrease at 30 and 60 min in U251 and D54 cells, respectively, was observed after P4, P4+RU486 and RU486 treatments. These data suggest that P4 increases human astrocytoma cells migration and invasion through its intracellular receptor, and that cofilin activation by P4 is independent of PR action. PMID:26639431

  12. Vinculin contributes to Cell Invasion by Regulating Contractile Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2008-07-01

    Vinculin is a component of the focal adhesion complex and is described as a mechano-coupling protein connecting the integrin receptor and the actin cytoskeleton. Vinculin knock-out (k.o.) cells (vin-/-) displayed increased migration on a 2-D collagen- or fibronectin-coated substrate compared to wildtype cells, but the role of vinculin in cell migration through a 3-D connective tissue is unknown. We determined the invasiveness of established tumor cell lines using a 3-D collagen invasion assay. Gene expression analysis of 4 invasive and 4 non-invasive tumor cell lines revealed that vinculin expression was significantly increased in invasive tumor cell lines. To analyze the mechanisms by which vinculin increased cell invasion in a 3-D gel, we studied mouse embryonic fibroblasts wildtype and vin-/- cells. Wildtype cells were 3-fold more invasive compared vin-/- cells. We hypothesized that the ability to generate sufficient traction forces is a prerequisite for tumor cell migration in a 3-D connective tissue matrix. Using traction microscopy, we found that wildtype exerted 3-fold higher tractions on fibronectin-coated polyacrylamide gels compared to vin-/- cells. These results show that vinculin controls two fundamental functions that lead to opposite effects on cell migration in a 2-D vs. a 3-D environment: On the one hand, vinculin stabilizes the focal adhesions (mechano-coupling function) and thereby reduces motility in 2-D. On the other hand, vinculin is also a potent activator of traction generation (mechano-regulating function) that is important for cell invasion in a 3-D environment.

  13. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  14. Effect of Bisphenol A on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zi-Yi; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Yuan-Zhen; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Teng; Qu, Xin-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a kind of environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) that interfere embryo implantation. Trophoblast invasion plays a crucial role during embryo implantation. In this study, the effects of BPA on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo and its possible mechanism were investigated. BeWo cells were exposed to BPA and co-cultured with human endometrial cells to mimic embryo implantation in transwell model. The proliferation and invasion capability of BeWo cells were detected. The expression of E-cadherin, DNMT1, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were also analyzed. The results showed that the invasion capability of BeWo was reduced after daily exposure to BPA. BPA had biphasic effect on E-cadherin expression level in BeWo cells and expression level of DNMT1 was decreased when treated with BPA. Moreover, BPA treatment also changed the balance of MMPs/TIMPs in BeWo cells by down-regulating MMP-2, MMP-9 and up-regulating TIMP-1, TIMP-2 with increasing BPA concentration. Taken together, these results showed that BPA treatment could reduce the invasion ability of BeWo cells and alter the expression level of E-cadherin, DNMT1, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, MMP-2, and MMP-9. Our study would help us to understand the possible mechanism of BPA effect on invasion ability of human trophoblastic cell line BeWo. PMID:26823751

  15. Inhibition of microRNA-21 decreases the invasiveness of fibroblast-like synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis via TGFβ/Smads signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Gaoxin; Huang, Zhang; Jiang, Hua; Pan, Zhengjun; Xie, Jie; Wang, Shuangli

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): MicroRNA-21 (miR21) is aberrantly elevated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, the significance of this microRNA in RA pathogenesis and treatment, however, has not been investigated. In this study, by using RA-derived fibroblast-like synoviocyte (FLS) cells as a model, we investigated the effect and corresponding mechanism of miR21 inhibition on FLSs invasion. Materials and Methods: miR21 expression in synovial tissue and FLSs in RA patients and non-RA controls were determined by stem-loop RT-PCR. The effect of miR21 on FLSs viability and invasiveness were evaluated using miR21 inhibition. Cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay and the expression of genes at mRNA and protein levels was determined by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Results: Our results showed that miR21 expression was highly increased in synovial tissue and FLSs in RA patients. Also, we reported that miR21 inhibitor treatment could significantly suppress the invasiveness of FLSs without affecting cell viability. The decreased FLSs invasion by miR21 inhibition was associated with down-regulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP3, and MMP13. Further analysis revealed that miR21 inhibition could suppress the expression of TGFβ1 and Smad4, but promote that of Smad7. Moreover, suppression of FLS invasion and MMPs expression by miR21 treatment could be counteracted by additional TGFβ1 treatment. Conclusion: Our results indicated that miR21 inhibition can down-regulate the expression of MMP1, MMP3, and MMP13 and consequently suppress the invasiveness of FLS, which is achieved through TGFβ1/Smad4/7 signaling pathway. The findings of this study could offer a novel approach for RA treatment. PMID:27635204

  16. Modeled microgravity suppressed invasion and migration of human glioblastoma U87 cells through downregulating store-operated calcium entry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zi-xuan; Rao, Wei; Wang, Huan; Wang, Nan-ding; Si, Jing-Wen; Zhao, Jiao; Li, Jun-chang; Wang, Zong-ren

    2015-02-13

    Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor and is characterized with robust invasion and migration potential resulting in poor prognosis. Previous investigations have demonstrated that modeled microgravity (MMG) could decline the cell proliferation and attenuate the metastasis potential in several cell lines. In this study, we studied the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials of glioblastoma in human glioblastoma U87 cells. We found that MMG stimulation significantly attenuated the invasion and migration potentials, decreased thapsigargin (TG) induced store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) and downregulated the expression of Orai1 in U87 cells. Inhibition of SOCE by 2-APB or stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) downregulation both mimicked the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Furthermore, upregulation of Orai1 significantly weakened the effects of MMG on the invasion and migration potentials in U87 cells. Therefore, these findings indicated that MMG stimulation inhibited the invasion and migration potentials of U87 cells by downregulating the expression of Orai1 and sequentially decreasing the SOCE, suggesting that MMG might be a new potential therapeutic strategy in glioblastoma treatment in the future. - Highlights: • Modeled microgravity (MMG) suppressed migration and invasion in U87 cells. • MMG downregulated the SOCE and the expression of Orai1. • SOCE inhibition mimicked the effects of MMG on migration and invasion potentials. • Restoration of SOCE diminished the effects of MMG on migration and invasion.

  17. GATA3 inhibits GCM1 activity and trophoblast cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yueh Ho; Chen, Hungwen

    2016-01-01

    Development of human placenta involves the invasion of trophoblast cells from anchoring villi into the maternal decidua. Placental transcription factor GCM1 regulates trophoblast cell invasion via transcriptional activation of HtrA4 gene, which encodes a serine protease enzyme. The GATA3 transcription factor regulates trophoblast cell differentiation and is highly expressed in invasive murine trophoblast giant cells. The regulation of trophoblastic invasion by GCM1 may involve novel cellular factors. Here we show that GATA3 interacts with GCM1 and inhibits its activity to suppress trophoblastic invasion. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates that GATA3 and GCM1 are coexpressed in villous cytotrophoblast cells, syncytiotrophoblast layer, and extravillous trophoblast cells of human placenta. Interestingly, GATA3 interacts with GCM1, but not the GCM2 homologue, through the DNA-binding domain and first transcriptional activation domain in GCM1 and the transcriptional activation domains and zinc finger 1 domain in GATA3. While GATA3 did not affect DNA-binding activity of GCM1, it suppressed transcriptional activity of GCM1 and therefore HtrA4 promoter activity. Correspondingly, GATA3 knockdown elevated HtrA4 expression in BeWo and JEG-3 trophoblast cell lines and enhanced the invasion activities of both lines. This study uncovered a new GATA3 function in placenta as a negative regulator of GCM1 activity and trophoblastic invasion. PMID:26899996

  18. Enhanced Invasion of Metastatic Cancer Cells via Extracellular Matrix Interface

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiangrui; Liang, Long; Jiao, Yang; Liu, Liyu

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell invasion is a major component of metastasis and is responsible for extensive cell diffusion into and major destruction of tissues. Cells exhibit complex invasion modes, including a variety of collective behaviors. This phenomenon results in the structural heterogeneity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in tissues. Here, we systematically investigated the environmental heterogeneity facilitating tumor cell invasion via a combination of in vitro cell migration experiments and computer simulations. Specifically, we constructed an ECM microenvironment in a microfabricated biochip and successfully created a three-dimensional (3D) funnel-like matrigel interface inside. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the interface was at the interior defects of the nano-scale molecular anisotropic orientation and the localized structural density variations in the matrigel. Our results, particularly the correlation of the collective migration pattern with the geometric features of the funnel-like interface, indicate that this heterogeneous in vitro ECM structure strongly guides and promotes aggressive cell invasion in the rigid matrigel space. A cellular automaton model was proposed based on our experimental observations, and the associated quantitative analysis indicated that cell invasion was initiated and controlled by several mechanisms, including microenvironment heterogeneity, long-range cell-cell homotype and gradient-driven directional cellular migration. Our work shows the feasibility of constructing a complex and heterogeneous in vitro 3D ECM microenvironment that mimics the in vivo environment. Moreover, our results indicate that ECM heterogeneity is essential in controlling collective cell invasive behaviors and therefore determining metastasis efficiency. PMID:25706718

  19. Baicalein inhibits the migration and invasive properties of human hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Yung-Wei; Lin, Tseng-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Shih; Teng, Chun-Yuh; Liou, Yi-Sheng; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Lin, Wea-Lung; Huang, Hai-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Huang, Chih-Yang; Liu, Jer-Yuh; Wang, Wen-Hung; Hwang, Jin-Ming

    2011-09-15

    Flavonoids have been demonstrated to exert health benefits in humans. We investigated whether the flavonoid baicalein would inhibit the adhesion, migration, invasion, and growth of human hepatoma cell lines, and we also investigated its mechanism of action. The separate effects of baicalein and baicalin on the viability of HA22T/VGH and SK-Hep1 cells were investigated for 24 h. To evaluate their invasive properties, cells were incubated on matrigel-coated transwell membranes in the presence or absence of baicalein. We examined the effect of baicalein on the adhesion of cells, on the activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), protein kinase C (PKC), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and on tumor growth in vivo. We observed that baicalein suppresses hepatoma cell growth by 55%, baicalein-treated cells showed lower levels of migration than untreated cells, and cell invasion was significantly reduced to 28%. Incubation of hepatoma cells with baicalein also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to matrigel, collagen I, and gelatin-coated substrate. Baicalein also decreased the gelatinolytic activities of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2, MMP-9, and uPA, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased phosphorylated I-kappa-B (IKB)-{beta}. In addition, baicalein reduced the phosphorylation levels of PKC{alpha} and p38 proteins, which regulate invasion in poorly differentiated hepatoma cells. Finally, when SK-Hep1 cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of baicalein induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results demonstrate the anticancer properties of baicalein, which include the inhibition of adhesion, invasion, migration, and proliferation of human hepatoma cells in vivo. - Highlight: > Baicalein inhibits several essential steps in the onset of metastasis.

  20. Overexpression of CD99 Increases the Migration and Invasiveness of Human Malignant Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Seol, Ho Jun; Chang, Jong Hee; Yamamoto, Junkoh; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Suh, Youngchul; Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Smith, Christian A; Rutka, James T

    2012-09-01

    The malignant glioma is the most common primary human brain tumor, and its migration and invasiveness away from the primary tumor mass are considered a leading cause of tumor recurrence and treatment failure. Recently, gene expression profiling revealed that the transmembrane glycoprotein CD99 is more highly expressed in malignant glioma than in normal brain. Although its function is not completely understood, CD99 is implicated in cell adhesion and migration in a variety of different cell types. CD99 has wild-type and splice variant isoforms. Previous studies have shown that wild-type CD99 may be an oncosuppressor in some tumors, distinct from the role of the splice variant isoform. In this study, our data reveal that only wild-type CD99 is expressed in human glioma cells and tissues. Using a tissue microarray, we validated that gliomas demonstrate higher expression of CD99 compared with nonneoplastic brain. To assess the role of CD99 in glioma migration and invasion, we inhibited CD99 expression by siRNA and demonstrated decreased glioma migration and invasion. In contrast, when CD99 was overexpressed in glioma cells, we observed enhancement of cell migration and invasiveness. An orthotopic brain tumor model demonstrates that CD99 overexpression significantly increases invasiveness and decreases survival rate. Interestingly, Rac activity was decreased and Rho activity was increased in CD99 overexpressing glioma cells, and the proportion of amoeboid cells to mesenchymal cells was significantly increased. Taken together, our findings suggest that CD99 may play an important role in the migration and invasion of human gliomas independent of Akt, ERK, or JNK signaling pathways. Moreover, CD99 might be involved in amoeboid-mesenchymal transition in glioma migration. CD99 may be an important future target to inhibit migration and invasion, especially in CD99-expressing gliomas. PMID:23486730

  1. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in three-dimensional biopolymer networks.

    PubMed

    Lang, Nadine R; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E; Fabry, Ben

    2015-02-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a three-dimensional (3-D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3-D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3-D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes >5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3-D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in two dimensions, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3-D invasion models in cancer research.

  2. Biphasic response of cell invasion to matrix stiffness in 3-dimensional biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Nadine R.; Skodzek, Kai; Hurst, Sebastian; Mainka, Astrid; Steinwachs, Julian; Schneider, Julia; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    When cells come in contact with an adhesive matrix, they begin to spread and migrate with a speed that depends on the stiffness of the extracellular matrix. On a flat surface, migration speed decreases with matrix stiffness mainly due to an increased stability of focal adhesions. In a 3-dimensional (3D) environment, cell migration is thought to be additionally impaired by the steric hindrance imposed by the surrounding matrix. For porous 3D biopolymer networks such as collagen gels, however, the effect of matrix stiffness on cell migration is difficult to separate from effects of matrix pore size and adhesive ligand density, and is therefore unknown. Here we used glutaraldehyde as a crosslinker to increase the stiffness of self-assembled collagen biopolymer networks independently of collagen concentration or pore size. Breast carcinoma cells were seeded onto the surface of 3D collagen gels, and the invasion depth was measured after 3 days of culture. Cell invasion in gels with pore sizes larger than 5 μm increased with higher gel stiffness, whereas invasion in gels with smaller pores decreased with higher gel stiffness. These data show that 3D cell invasion is enhanced by higher matrix stiffness, opposite to cell behavior in 2D, as long as the pore size does not fall below a critical value where it causes excessive steric hindrance. These findings may be important for optimizing the recellularization of soft tissue implants or for the design of 3D invasion models in cancer research. PMID:25462839

  3. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Boghaert, Eline; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast tumor development is regulated in part by cues from the local microenvironment, including interactions with neighboring nontumor cells as well as the ECM. Studies using homogeneous populations of breast cancer cell lines cultured in 3D ECM have shown that increased ECM stiffness stimulates tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells, which have been shown to exert a tumor-suppressive effect on cocultured cancer cells. Here we explored how the biophysical characteristics of the host microenvironment affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development, by using a 3D microfabrication-based approach to engineer ducts composed of normal mammary epithelial cells that contained a single tumor cell. We found that the phenotype of the tumor cell was dictated by its position in the duct: proliferation and invasion were enhanced at the ends and blocked when the tumor cell was located elsewhere within the tissue. Regions of invasion correlated with high endogenous mechanical stress, as shown by finite element modeling and bead displacement experiments, and modulating the contractility of the host epithelium controlled the subsequent invasion of tumor cells. Combining microcomputed tomographic analysis with finite element modeling suggested that predicted regions of high mechanical stress correspond to regions of tumor formation in vivo. This work suggests that the mechanical tone of nontumorigenic host epithelium directs the phenotype of tumor cells and provides additional insight into the instructive role of the mechanical tumor microenvironment. PMID:23150585

  4. Stable SET knockdown in breast cell carcinoma inhibits cell migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Yang, Xi-fei; Ren, Xiao-hu; Meng, Xiao-jing; Huang, Hai-yan; Zhao, Qiong-hui; Yuan, Jian-hui; Hong, Wen-xu; Xia, Bo; Huang, Xin-feng; Zhou, Li; Liu, Jian-jun; Zou, Fei

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We employed RNA interference to knockdown SET expression in breast cancer cells. • Knockdown of SET expression inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Knockdown of SET expression increases the activity and expression of PP2A. • Knockdown of SET expression decreases the expression of MMP-9. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most malignant tumor for women, however, the mechanisms underlying this devastating disease remain unclear. SET is an endogenous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and involved in many physiological and pathological processes. SET could promote the occurrence of tumor through inhibiting PP2A. In this study, we explore the role of SET in the migration and invasion of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and ZR-75-30. The stable suppression of SET expression through lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was shown to inhibit the growth, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. Knockdown of SET increases the activity and expression of PP2Ac and decrease the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). These data demonstrate that SET may be involved in the pathogenic processes of breast cancer, indicating that SET can serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  5. Carcinoma-Associated Fibroblasts Lead the Invasion of Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Cells by Creating an Invasive Track

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Jia, Zhuqiang; Kong, Jing; Zhang, Fuyin; Fang, Shimeng; Li, Xiaojie; Li, Wuwei; Yang, Xuesong; Luo, Yong; Lin, Bingcheng; Liu, Tingjiao

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are critical in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. However the role of CAFs in the invasion of salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is poorly understood. In this study, we isolated primary CAFs from two ACC patients. ACC-derived CAFs expressed typical CAF biomarkers and showed increased migration and invasion activity. Conditioned medium collected from CAFs significantly promoted ACC cell migration and invasion. Co-culture of CAFs with ACC cells in a microfluidic device further revealed that CAFs localized at the invasion front and ACC cells followed the track behind the CAFs. Interfering of both matrix metalloproteinase and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway inhibited ACC invasion promoted by CAFs. Overall, our study demonstrates that ACC-derived CAFs exhibit the most important defining feature of CAFs by promoting cancer invasion. In addition to secretion of soluble factors, CAFs also lead ACC invasion by creating an invasive track in the ECM. PMID:26954362

  6. Resistin-Like Molecule-β Promotes Invasion and Migration of Gastric Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Zhao, Chunming; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Shengxi; Sun, Xiaogang; Tian, Yang; Song, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistin-like molecule-β (RELMβ) is a novel secretory protein from intestinal goblet cells and participates in epithelial differentiation, tumor occurrence, and immune response. RELMβ is absent in normal gastric mucosa but is abundantly expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues, and is correlated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important mechanism governing tumor cell invasion. This study thus investigated the modulation of RELMβ in gastric cancer metastasis and its correlation with EMT. Material/Methods We used RELMβ-low expression AGS cell line of gastric cancer and normal mucosa cell line GES1 as in vitro models, on which RELMβ0-expressing vector was transfected. The invasion and migration of cells were quantified by Transwell assay. EMT-related protein including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Snail, and Vimentin were detected by Western blotting in transfected AGS cells. Results RELMβ transfection significantly potentiated invasion and migration abilities of AGS cells, whose RELMβ protein level was significantly elevated compared to those in untransfected AGS or GES1 cells. After RELMβ transfection, EMT-related proteins, including N-cadherin, Snail, and Vimentin levels, were elevated, but E-cadherin expression was depressed. Conclusions RELMβ-overexpression can facilitate invasion and migration of gastric carcinoma cells and it increases the expression of EMT-related proteins, such as N-cadherin, Snail, Vimentin, but decreases E-cadherin level, thus promoting the progression of EMT. PMID:27001185

  7. Slug down-regulation by RNA interference inhibits invasion growth in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the most aggressive carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract. We assessed the relevance of Slug in measuring the invasive potential of ESCC cells in vitro and in vivo in immunodeficient mice. Methods We utilized RNA interference to knockdown Slug gene expression, and effects on survival and invasive carcinoma were evaluated using a Boyden chamber transwell assay in vitro. We evaluated the effect of Slug siRNA-transfection and Slug cDNA-transfection on E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression in ESCC cells. A pseudometastatic model of ESCC in immunodeficient mice was used to assess the effects of Slug siRNA transfection on tumor metastasis development. Results The EC109 cell line was transfected with Slug-siRNA to knockdown Slug expression. The TE13 cell line was transfected with Slug-cDNA to increase Slug expression. EC109 and TE13 cell lines were tested for the expression of apoptosis-related genes bcl-2 and metastasis-related gene E-cadherin identified previously as Slug targets. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug cDNA-transfected TE13 cells. Invasion of Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells was reduced and apoptosis was increased whereas invasion was greater in Slug cDNA-transfected cells. Animals injected with Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells exhihited fewer seeded nodes and demonstrated more apoptosis. Conclusions Slug down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and decreases invasion capability in vitro and in vivo. Slug inhibition may represent a novel strategy for treatment of metastatic ESCC. PMID:21599940

  8. Effects of atmospheric nonthermal plasma on invasion of colorectal cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Kwon, Seyeoul; Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Keunho; Jun, Seung Ik; Rack, Philip D.; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-06-01

    The effect that the gas content and plasma power of atmospheric, nonthermal plasma has on the invasion activity in colorectal cancer cells has been studied. Helium and helium plus oxygen plasmas were induced through a nozzle and operated with an ac power of less than 10 kV which exhibited a length of 2.5 cm and a diameter of 3-4 mm in ambient air. Treatment of cancer cells with the plasma jet resulted in a decrease in cell migration/invasion with higher plasma intensity and the addition of oxygen to the He flow gas.

  9. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  10. Knockdown of FAK inhibits the invasion and metastasis of Tca‑8113 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenbo; Jiang, Mingxin; Li, Hongdan; Li, Chunshan; Su, Rongjian; Huang, Keqiang

    2013-08-01

    Tongue cancer originating on the surface of the tongue is most commonly squamous cell carcinoma, which has a higher invasive ability and a lower survival rate compared with other forms of tongue cancer. Notably, tongue squamous cell carcinomas metastasize into lymph nodes at early stages. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an important protein tyrosine kinase involved in invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. In the present study, the role of FAK in the invasion and metastasis of tongue cancer was evaluated and the underlying mechanisms involved in this process were explored. FAK knockdown was performed using shRNA in the tongue cancer cell line, Tca‑8113, and the invasion and metastasis potentials were analyzed using wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. Cytoskeletal arrangement was detected by fluorescence using TRITC‑conjugated phalloidin staining. The activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and ‑9 was examined by gelatin zymography. Paxillin distribution was observed by immunofluorescence. The levels of E‑cadherin, N‑cadherin, MMP‑2 and ‑9, and c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase (JNK) was detected by western blot analysis. Wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated that FAK knockdown inhibited the invasion and metastasis of Tca‑8113 cells. Further analysis revealed that FAK knockdown caused the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton and decreased the activity of MMP‑2 and ‑9. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that downregulation of FAK induced the relocalization of paxillin. Paxillin accumulated as dots and patches at the cell membrane in control cells. By contrast, in FAK knockdown cells, paxillin was distributed homogeneously in the cytoplasm. Western blot analysis revealed that FAK knockdown inhibited epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and decreased levels of MMP‑2 and ‑9, and p‑JNK. Knockdown of FAK inhibits the invasion and metastasis of Tca‑8113 by decreasing MMP‑2 and ‑9 activities and led to the

  11. Targeting the MAP kinase pathway in astrocytoma cells using a recombinant anthrax lethal toxin as a way to inhibit cell motility and invasion.

    PubMed

    Al-Dimassi, Saleh; Salloum, Gilbert; Saykali, Bechara; Khoury, Oula; Liu, Shihui; Leppla, Stephen H; Abi-Habib, Ralph; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2016-05-01

    Malignant astrocytomas are highly invasive into adjacent and distant regions of the normal brain. Understanding and targeting cancer cell invasion is an important therapeutic approach. Cell invasion is a complex process that replies on many signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK). In many cell lines, the use of MAPK-targeted drugs proved to be a potential method to inhibit cancer cell motility. In the present study, we use a recombinant anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx), which selectively inhibits the MAPK pathway, in order to target invasion. LeTx proved ineffective on cell survival in astrocytoma (as well as normal cells). However, astrocytoma cells that were treated with LeTx showed a significant decrease in cell motility as seen by wound healing as well as random 2D motility in serum. The cells also showed a decrease in invasion across a collagen matrix. The effect of LeTx on cell migration was mediated though the deregulation of Rho GTPases, which play a role in cell motility. Finally, the effect of LeTx on cell migration and Rho GTPases was mimicked by the inhibition of the MAPK pathway. In this study, we describe for the first time the effect of the LeTx on cancer cell motility and invasion not cell survival making it a potentially selective brain tumor invasion inhibitor. PMID:26984023

  12. Digital Holographic Microscopy for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Cell Cycle Arrest in L929 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Falck Miniotis, Maria; Mukwaya, Anthonny; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Digital holographic microscopy (DHM) has emerged as a powerful non-invasive tool for cell analysis. It has the capacity to analyse multiple parameters simultaneously, such as cell- number, confluence and phase volume. This is done while cells are still adhered and growing in their culture flask. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DHM was able to monitor drug-induced cell cycle arrest in cultured cells and thus provide a non-disruptive alternative to flow cytometry. DHM parameters from G1 and G2/M cell cycle arrested L929 mouse fibroblast cells were collected. Cell cycle arrest was verified with flow cytometry. This study shows that DHM is able to monitor phase volume changes corresponding to either a G1 or G2/M cell cycle arrest. G1-phase arrest with staurosporine correlated with a decrease in the average cell phase volume and G2/M-phase arrest with colcemid and etoposide correlated with an increase in the average cell phase volume. Importantly, DHM analysis of average cell phase volume was of comparable accuracy to flow cytometric measurement of cell cycle phase distribution as recorded following dose-dependent treatment with etoposide. Average cell phase volume changes in response to treatment with cell cycle arresting compounds could therefore be used as a DHM marker for monitoring cell cycle arrest in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:25208094

  13. Hypoxia Decreases Invasin-Mediated Yersinia enterocolitica Internalization into Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Dersch, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a major cause of human yersiniosis, with enterocolitis being a typical manifestation. These bacteria can cross the intestinal mucosa, and invade eukaryotic cells by binding to host β1 integrins, a process mediated by the bacterial effector protein invasin. This study examines the role of hypoxia on the internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells, since the gastrointestinal tract has been shown to be physiologically deficient in oxygen levels (hypoxic), especially in cases of infection and inflammation. We show that hypoxic pre-incubation of Caco-2 cells resulted in significantly decreased bacterial internalization compared to cells grown under normoxia. This phenotype was absent after functionally blocking host β1 integrins as well as upon infection with an invasin-deficient Y. enterocolitica strain. Furthermore, downstream phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase was also reduced under hypoxia after infection. In good correlation to these data, cells grown under hypoxia showed decreased protein levels of β1 integrins at the apical cell surface whereas the total protein level of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) alpha was elevated. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the HIF-1 α stabilizer dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) also reduced invasion and decreased β1 integrin protein levels compared to control cells, indicating a potential role for HIF-1α in this process. These results suggest that hypoxia decreases invasin-integrin-mediated internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells by reducing cell surface localization of host β1 integrins.

  14. Hypoxia Decreases Invasin-Mediated Yersinia enterocolitica Internalization into Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeitouni, Nathalie E.; Dersch, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y.; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a major cause of human yersiniosis, with enterocolitis being a typical manifestation. These bacteria can cross the intestinal mucosa, and invade eukaryotic cells by binding to host β1 integrins, a process mediated by the bacterial effector protein invasin. This study examines the role of hypoxia on the internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells, since the gastrointestinal tract has been shown to be physiologically deficient in oxygen levels (hypoxic), especially in cases of infection and inflammation. We show that hypoxic pre-incubation of Caco-2 cells resulted in significantly decreased bacterial internalization compared to cells grown under normoxia. This phenotype was absent after functionally blocking host β1 integrins as well as upon infection with an invasin-deficient Y. enterocolitica strain. Furthermore, downstream phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase was also reduced under hypoxia after infection. In good correlation to these data, cells grown under hypoxia showed decreased protein levels of β1 integrins at the apical cell surface whereas the total protein level of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) alpha was elevated. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the HIF-1 α stabilizer dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) also reduced invasion and decreased β1 integrin protein levels compared to control cells, indicating a potential role for HIF-1α in this process. These results suggest that hypoxia decreases invasin-integrin-mediated internalization of Y. enterocolitica into intestinal epithelial cells by reducing cell surface localization of host β1 integrins. PMID:26731748

  15. Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 promotes breast cancer cell invasion through the induction of MMP9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, R. Mitchell; Haghandish, Nasim; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Amin, Shahrier; Paris, Geneviève; Falls, Theresa J.; Bell, John C.; Islam, Shahidul; Côté, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence points to the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of enzymes playing critical roles in cancer. PRMT7 has been identified in several gene expression studies to be associated with increased metastasis and decreased survival in breast cancer patients. However, this has not been extensively studied. Here we report that PRMT7 expression is significantly upregulated in both primary breast tumour tissues and in breast cancer lymph node metastases. We have demonstrated that reducing PRMT7 levels in invasive breast cancer cells using RNA interference significantly decreased cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Conversely, overexpression of PRMT7 in non-aggressive MCF7 cells enhanced their invasiveness. Furthermore, we show that PRMT7 induces the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), a well-known mediator of breast cancer metastasis. Importantly, we significantly rescued invasion of aggressive breast cancer cells depleted of PRMT7 by the exogenous expression of MMP9. Our results demonstrate that upregulation of PRMT7 in breast cancer may have a significant role in promoting cell invasion through the regulation of MMP9. This identifies PRMT7 as a novel and potentially significant biomarker and therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:25605249

  16. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  17. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion.

  18. N-Glycans influence the in vitro adhesive and invasive behaviour of three metastatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bironaite, D; Nesland, J M; Dalen, H; Risberg, B; Bryne, M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cellular glycosylation may play a key role in metastatic behaviour of tumour cells. We studied three metastatic cell lines, LOX (malignant melanoma), FEMX (malignant melanoma) and MA-11 (mammary carcinoma). These cell lines have a very different metastatic behaviour in vivo, and different glycans have been postulated to be partly responsible for these differences. To further investigate the functional role of carbohydrates, these three cell lines have been treated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of N-glycans and benzyl- alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine (benzyl-alpha-GalNAc; BnGalNAc), an inhibitor of mature O-linked glycans. Various in vitro adhesion and invasion assays were undertaken for functional studies. Tunicamycin significantly inhibited adhesion to laminin, but only slightly affected cell adhesion to collagen IV. The same compound significantly decreased cellular invasiveness through a Matrigel invasion chamber. Moreover, tunicamycin reduced homotypic aggregation of cells. BnGalNAc had generally little effect on cell behaviour in in vitro assay. The effects of the inhibitors were, however, to some extent cell line-specific. We conclude that N-glycans, but probably not mature O-glycans have important in vitro functions in cell adhesion to laminin, cell invasion through Matrigel and cellular aggregation in the studied cell lines. These results support the view that carbohydrates are functionally involved in several steps of the metastatic process. PMID:10754467

  19. Cell biology and invasion of the microsporidia.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi, E; Sacchi, L

    2001-04-01

    Microsporidia are amitochondrial eukaryotic obligate intracellular parasites. They are reported to infect every animal group from protists to vertebrates, including humans. Microsporidia are of interest as opportunistic pathogens in humans and for certain characteristics which raise questions about their evolution and phylogenetic position. This review describes the basic biology and invasion mechanisms of microsporidian species infecting humans.

  20. Acid treatment of melanoma cells selects for invasive phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Moellering, Raymond E; Black, Kvar C; Krishnamurty, Chetan; Baggett, Brenda K; Stafford, Phillip; Rain, Matthew; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Solid tumors become acidic due to hypoxia and upregulated glycolysis. We have hypothesized that this acidosis leads to more aggressive invasive behavior during carcinogenesis (Nature Reviews Cancer 4:891-899, 2004). Previous work on this subject has shown mixed results. While some have observed an induction of metastasis and invasion with acid treatments, others have not. To investigate this, human melanoma cells were acclimated to low pH growth conditions. Significant cell mortality occurred during acclimation, suggesting that acidosis selected for resistant phenotypes. Cells maintained under acidic conditions exhibited a greater range of motility, a reduced capacity to form flank tumors in SCID mice and did not invade more rapidly in vitro, compared to non-selected control cells. However, re-acclimation of these selected cells to physiological pH gave rise to stable populations with significantly higher in vitro invasion. These re-acclimated cells maintained higher invasion and higher motility for multiple generations. Transcriptomic analyses of these three phenotypes revealed significant differences, including upregulation of relevant pathways important for tissue remodeling, cell cycle control and proliferation. These results reinforce the hypothesis that acidosis promotes selection of stable, more invasive phenotypes, rather than inductive changes, which would be reversible.

  1. Pravastatin induces cell cycle arrest and decreased production of VEGF and bFGF in multiple myeloma cell line.

    PubMed

    Trojan, P J J; Bohatch-Junior, M S; Otuki, M F; Souza-Fonseca-Guimarães, F; Svidnicki, P V; Nogaroto, V; Fernandes, D; Krum, E A; Favero, G M

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a B cell bone marrow neoplasia characterized by inflammation with an intense secretion of growth factors that promote tumor growth, cell survival, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of pravastatin, a drug used to reduce cholesterol, in a MM cell line.Cell cycle and viability were determinate by Trypan Blue and Propidium Iodide. IL6, VEGF, bFGF and TGFβ were quantified by ELISA and qRT-PCR including here de HMG CoA reductase. It was observed reduction of cell viability, increase of cells in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and reducing the factors VEGF and bFGF without influence on 3-Methyl-Glutaryl Coenzyme A reductase expression.The results demonstrated that pravastatin induces cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 and decreased production of growth factors in Multiple Myeloma cell line. PMID:26909624

  2. Involvement of calreticulin in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in diallyl disulfide-treated HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lan; Shan, Jian; Chen, Xin; Li, Guoqing; Li, Linwei; Tan, Hui; Su, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) has shown potential as a therapeutic agent in various cancers. Previously, calreticulin (CRT) was found to be downregulated in differentiated HL-60 cells treated with DADS. The present study investigated the role of CRT proteins in DADS-induced proliferation, invasion and differentiation in HL-60 cells. The present study demonstrated that DADS treatment significantly changed the morphology of HL-60 cells and caused the significant time-dependent downregulation of CRT. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CRT expression significantly inhibited proliferation, decreased invasion ability, increased the expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)11b and reduced the expression of CD33 in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. DADS also significantly affected cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in CRT-overexpressed HL-60 cells. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction assays showed decreased NBT reduction activity in the CRT overexpression group and increased NBT reduction in the CRT siRNA group. Following treatment with DADS, the NBT reduction abilities in all groups were increased. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the downregulation of CRT during DADS-induced differentiation in HL-60 cells and indicates that CRT is involved in cell proliferation, invasion and differentiation in DADS-treated HL-60 cells. PMID:27588133

  3. Shear-induced volume decrease in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jinseok; Sachs, Frederick; Wang, Jianbin; Hua, Susan Z

    2012-01-01

    Using a microfluidic cell volume sensor we measured the change in the cell volume of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells induced by shear stress. An increase in shear stress from 0.2 to 2.0 dyn/cm(2) resulted in a volume decrease to a steady state volume ∼ 20 - 30 % smaller than the initial resting cell volume. Independent experiments based on fluorescence quenching confirmed the volume reduction. This shear-induced cell shrinkage was irreversible on the time scale of the experiment (∼ 30 min). Treatment of 0.1 µM Hg(2+) significantly inhibited the volume decrease, suggesting that the shear-induced cell shrinkage is associated with water efflux through aquaporins. The volume decrease cannot be inhibited by 75 mM TEA, 100 µM DIDS, or 100 µM Gd(3+) suggesting that volume reduction is not directly mediated by K(+) and Cl(-)channels that typically function during regulatory volume decrease (RVD), nor is it through cationic stretch-activated ion channels (SACs). The process also appears to be Ca(2+) independent because it was insensitive to intracellular Ca(2+) level. Since cell volume is determined by the intracellular water content, we postulate that the shear induced reductions in cell volume may arise from increased intracellular hydrostatic pressure as the cell is deformed under flow, which promotes the efflux of water. The increase in internal pressure in a deformable object under the flow is supported by the finite element mechanical model.

  4. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  5. Intracellular Expression of PAI-1 Specific Aptamers Alters Breast Cancer Cell Migration, Invasion and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fortenberry, Yolanda M.; Brandal, Stephanie M.; Carpentier, Gilles; Hemani, Malvi; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2016-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is elevated in various cancers, where it has been shown to effect cell migration and invasion and angiogenesis. While, PAI-1 is a secreted protein, its intercellular levels are increased in cancer cells. Consequently, intracellular PAI-1 could contribute to cancer progression. While various small molecule inhibitors of PAI-1 are currently being investigated, none specifically target intracellular PAI-1. A class of inhibitors, termed aptamers, has been used effectively in several clinical applications. We previously generated RNA aptamers that target PAI-1 and demonstrated their ability to inhibit extracellular PAI-1. In the current study we explored the effect of these aptamers on intracellular PAI-1. We transiently transfected the PAI-1 specific aptamers into both MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and studied their effects on cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis. Aptamer expressing MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited a decrease in cell migration and invasion. Additionally, intracellular PAI-1 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) protein levels decreased, while the PAI-1/uPA complex increased. Moreover, a significant decrease in endothelial tube formation in HUVECs transfected with the aptamers was observed. In contrast, conditioned media from aptamer transfected MDA-MB-231 cells displayed a slight pro-angiogenic effect. Collectively, our study shows that expressing functional aptamers inside breast and endothelial cells is feasible and may exhibit therapeutic potential. PMID:27755560

  6. Inhibition of TRPM7 by carvacrol suppresses glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Liang; Barszczyk, Andrew; Turlova, Ekaterina; Deurloo, Marielle; Liu, Baosong; Yang, Burton B.; Rutka, James T.; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Sun, Hong-Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas are progressive brain tumors with devastating proliferative and invasive characteristics. Ion channels are the second largest target class for drug development. In this study, we investigated the effects of the TRPM7 inhibitor carvacrol on the viability, resistance to apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness of the human U87 glioblastoma cell line. The expression levels of TRPM7 mRNA and protein in U87 cells were detected by RT-PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence. TRPM7 currents were recorded using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. An MTT assay was used to assess cell viability and proliferation. Wound healing and transwell experiments were used to evaluate cell migration and invasion. Protein levels of p-Akt/t-Akt, p-ERK1/2/t-ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, MMP-2 and phosphorylated cofilin were also detected. TRPM7 mRNA and protein expression in U87 cells is higher than in normal human astrocytes. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording showed that carvacrol blocks recombinant TRPM7 current in HEK293 cells and endogenous TRPM7-like current in U87 cells. Carvacrol treatment reduced the viability, migration and invasion of U87 cells. Carvacrol also decreased MMP-2 protein expression and promoted the phosphorylation of cofilin. Furthermore, carvacrol inhibited the Ras/MEK/MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Therefore, carvacrol may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of glioblastomas through its inhibition of TRPM7 channels. PMID:25965832

  7. Downregulation of L1CAM inhibits proliferation, invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ben, Qiwen; An, Wei; Fei, Jian; Xu, Maojin; Li, Guixiang; Li, Zhaoshen; Yuan, Yaozong

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the effect of silencing L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) on the proliferation, invasion, cell cycle progression and apoptosis of pancreatic cancer cells, and to determine the potential molecular mechanisms that are involved. The human Capan-2 pancreatic cancer cell line was infected with lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to target L1CAM. Cell proliferation and invasion were analyzed using cell counting kit-8 and Transwell assays, respectively, and cell cycle progression and apoptosis were analyzed using flow cytometry. L1CAM protein expression in Capan-2 cells decreased following shRNA-L1CAM infection. Furthermore, knockdown of L1CAM significantly inhibited cell proliferation and reduced the number of invasive cells, while increasing the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase (P<0.05). However, the effect on apoptosis was not identified to be statistically significant. In addition, L1CAM silencing may induce activation of p38/extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2. Downregulation of L1CAM may inhibit proliferation, invasion and arrests cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer via p38/ERK1/2 signal pathway, and therefore, L1CAM may serve as a potential target for gene therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24660028

  8. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  9. Benzyl isothiocyanate inhibits HNSCC cell migration and invasion, and sensitizes HNSCC cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M Allison; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis and chemoresistance represent two detrimental events that greatly hinder the outcome for those suffering with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Herein, we investigated benzyl isothiocyanate's (BITC) ability to inhibit HNSCC migration and invasion and enhance chemotherapy. Our data suggests that treatment with BITC 1) induced significant reductions in the viability of multiple HNSCC cell lines tested (HN12, HN8, and HN30) after 24 and 48 h, 2) decreased migration and invasion of the HN12 cells in a dose dependent manner, and 3) inhibited expression and altered localization of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker, vimentin. We also observed that a pretreatment of BITC followed by cisplatin treatment 1) induced a greater decrease in HN12, HN30, and HN8 cell viability and total cell count than either treatment alone and 2) significantly increased apoptosis when compared to either treatment alone. Taken together these data suggest that BITC has the capacity to inhibit processes involved in metastasis and enhance the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Consequently, the results indicate that further investigation, including in vivo studies, are warranted.

  10. Autophagy induction impairs migration and invasion by reversing EMT in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Myriam; D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; Lepore, Francesca; Corazzari, Marco; Caldarola, Sara; Valacca, Cristina; Faienza, Fiorella; Esposito, Vincenzo; Limatola, Cristina; Cecconi, Francesco; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina

    2015-10-01

    Cell migration and invasion are highly regulated processes involved in both physiological and pathological conditions. Here we show that autophagy modulation regulates the migration and invasion capabilities of glioblastoma (GBM) cells. We observed that during autophagy occurrence, obtained by nutrient deprivation or by pharmacological inhibition of the mTOR complexes, GBM migration and chemokine-mediated invasion were both impaired. We also observed that SNAIL and SLUG, two master regulators of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT process), were down-regulated upon autophagy stimulation and, as a consequence, we found a transcriptional and translational up-regulation of N- and R-cadherins. Conversely, in BECLIN 1-silenced GBM cells, an increased migration capability and an up-regulation of SNAIL and SLUG was observed, with a resulting decrease in N- and R-cadherin mRNAs. ATG5 and ATG7 down-regulation also resulted in an increased migration and invasion of GBM cells combined to an up-regulation of the two EMT regulators. Finally, experiments performed in primary GBM cells from patients largely confirmed the results obtained in established cell cultures. Overall, our results indicate that autophagy modulation triggers a molecular switch from a mesenchymal phenotype to an epithelial-like one in GBM cellular models. Since the aggressiveness and lethality of GBM is defined by local invasion and resistance to chemotherapy, we believe that our evidence provides a further rationale for including autophagy/mTOR-based targets in the current therapeutical regimen of GBM patients. PMID:26022108

  11. Effects of X-irradiation on artificial blood vessel wall degradation by invasive tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heisel, M.A.; Laug, W.E.; Stowe, S.M.; Jones, P.A.

    1984-06-01

    Artificial vessel wall cultures, constructed by growing arterial endothelial cells on preformed layers of rat smooth muscle cells, were used to evaluate the effects of X-irradiation on tumor cell-induced tissue degradation. Bovine endothelial cells had radiation sensitivities similar to those of rat smooth muscle cells. Preirradiation of smooth muscle cells, before the addition of human fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells, did not increase the rate of degradation and destruction by the invasive cells. However, the degradation rate was decreased if the cultures were irradiated after the addition of HT 1080 cells. The presence of bovine endothelial cells markedly inhibited the destructive abilities of fibrosarcoma cells, but preirradiation of artificial vessel walls substantially decreased their capabilities to resist HT 1080-induced lysis. These findings suggest that the abilities of blood vessels to limit extravasation may be compromised by ionizing radiation.

  12. Effects of X-irradiation on artificial blood vessel wall degradation by invasive tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Heisel, M A; Laug, W E; Stowe, S M; Jones, P A

    1984-06-01

    Artificial vessel wall cultures, constructed by growing arterial endothelial cells on preformed layers of rat smooth muscle cells, were used to evaluate the effects of X-irradiation on tumor cell-induced tissue degradation. Bovine endothelial cells had radiation sensitivities similar to those of rat smooth muscle cells. Preirradiation of smooth muscle cells, before the addition of human fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells, did not increase the rate of degradation and destruction by the invasive cells. However, the degradation rate was decreased if the cultures were irradiated after the addition of HT 1080 cells. The presence of bovine endothelial cells markedly inhibited the destructive abilities of fibrosarcoma cells, but preirradiation of artificial vessel walls substantially decreased their capabilities to resist HT 1080-induced lysis. These findings suggest that the abilities of blood vessels to limit extravasation may be compromised by ionizing radiation.

  13. Endothelial cell sensing, restructuring, and invasion in collagen hydrogel structures.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Y; Agah, M; Verbridge, S S

    2015-11-01

    Experimental tools to model cell-tissue interactions will likely lead to new ways to both understand and treat cancer. While the mechanical properties and regulation of invasion have been recently studied for tumor cells, they have received less attention in the context of tumor vascular dynamics. In this article, we have investigated the interaction between the surfaces of structures encountered by endothelial cells invading their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during angiogenesis. For this purpose, we have fabricated round and sharp geometries with various curvature and sharpness indices in collagen hydrogel over a wide range of stiffness to mimic different microenvironments varying from normal to tumor tissues. We have then cultured endothelial cells on these structures to investigate the bi-directional interaction between the cells and ECM. We have observed that cell invasion frequency is higher from the structures with the highest sharpness and curvature index, while interestingly the dependence of invasion on the local micro-geometry is strongest for the highest density matrices. Notably, structures with the highest invasion length are linked with higher deformation of side structures, which may be related to traction force-activated signaling suggesting further investigation. We have noted that round structures are more favorable for cell adhesion and in some cases round structures drive cell invasion faster than sharp ones. These results highlight the ability of endothelial cells to sense small variations in ECM geometry, and respond with a balance of matrix invasion as well as deformation, with potential implications for feedback mechanisms that may enhance vascular abnormality in response to tumor-induced ECM alterations.

  14. Endothelial cell sensing, restructuring, and invasion in collagen hydrogel structures.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Y; Agah, M; Verbridge, S S

    2015-11-01

    Experimental tools to model cell-tissue interactions will likely lead to new ways to both understand and treat cancer. While the mechanical properties and regulation of invasion have been recently studied for tumor cells, they have received less attention in the context of tumor vascular dynamics. In this article, we have investigated the interaction between the surfaces of structures encountered by endothelial cells invading their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during angiogenesis. For this purpose, we have fabricated round and sharp geometries with various curvature and sharpness indices in collagen hydrogel over a wide range of stiffness to mimic different microenvironments varying from normal to tumor tissues. We have then cultured endothelial cells on these structures to investigate the bi-directional interaction between the cells and ECM. We have observed that cell invasion frequency is higher from the structures with the highest sharpness and curvature index, while interestingly the dependence of invasion on the local micro-geometry is strongest for the highest density matrices. Notably, structures with the highest invasion length are linked with higher deformation of side structures, which may be related to traction force-activated signaling suggesting further investigation. We have noted that round structures are more favorable for cell adhesion and in some cases round structures drive cell invasion faster than sharp ones. These results highlight the ability of endothelial cells to sense small variations in ECM geometry, and respond with a balance of matrix invasion as well as deformation, with potential implications for feedback mechanisms that may enhance vascular abnormality in response to tumor-induced ECM alterations. PMID:26379187

  15. Assaying Wnt5A-mediated invasion in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Michael P; French, Amanda D; Leotlela, Poloko D; Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2008-01-01

    Wnt5A has been implicated in melanoma metastasis, and the progression of other cancers including pancreatic, gastric, prostate, and lung cancers. Assays to test motility and invasion include both in vivo assays and in vitro assays. The in vivo assays include the use of tail vein or footpad injections of metastatic cells, and are often laborious and expensive. In vitro invasion assays provide quick readouts that can help to establish conditions that either activate or inhibit melanoma cell motility, and to assess whether the conditions in question are worth translating into an in vivo model. Here we describe two standard methods for assaying motility and invasion in vitro including wound healing assays and Matrigel invasion assays (Boyden chamber assays). In addition, we and several other laboratories have previously shown that melanoma cells require matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 for their invasion, and have recently shown that Wnt5A treatment can increase the levels of this enzyme in melanoma cells, as demonstrated by gelatin zymography. The use of these techniques can help to assess the migratory capacity of melanoma cells in response to Wnt treatment.

  16. Anomalous droughts, not invasion, decrease persistence of native fishes in a desert river.

    PubMed

    Ruhí, Albert; Holmes, Elizabeth E; Rinne, John N; Sabo, John L

    2015-04-01

    Changing climate extremes and invasion by non-native species are two of the most prominent threats to native faunas. Predicting the relationships between global change and native faunas requires a quantitative toolkit that effectively links the timing and magnitude of extreme events to variation in species abundances. Here, we examine how discharge anomalies--unexpected floods and droughts--determine covariation in abundance of native and non-native fish species in a highly variable desert river in Arizona. We quantified stochastic variation in discharge using Fourier analyses on >15,000 daily observations. We subsequently coupled maximum annual spectral anomalies with a 15-year time series of fish abundances (1994-2008), using Multivariate Autoregressive State-Space (MARSS) models. Abiotic drivers (discharge anomalies) were paramount in determining long-term fish abundances, whereas biotic drivers (species interactions) played only a secondary role. As predicted, anomalous droughts reduced the abundances of native species, while floods increased them. However, in contrast to previous studies, we observed that the non-native assemblage was surprisingly unresponsive to extreme events. Biological trait analyses showed that functional uniqueness was higher in native than in non-native fishes. We also found that discharge anomalies influenced diversity patterns at the meta-community level, with nestedness increasing after anomalous droughts due to the differential impairment of native species. Overall, our results advance the notion that discharge variation is key in determining community trajectories in the long term, predicting the persistence of native fauna even in the face of invasion. We suggest this variation, rather than biotic interactions, may commonly underlie covariation between native and non-native faunas, especially in highly variable environments. If droughts become increasingly severe due to climate change, and floods increasingly muted due to

  17. A Prognostic Dilemma of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Intravascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Niumsawatt, Vachara; Castley, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy; however, it very rarely metastasizes. Despite the low mortality caused by this cancer, once it spreads, it has dim prognosis. We report a case of basal cell carcinoma with rare intravascular invasion and review the literature for risk factors and management of metastasis.

  18. Securin promotes migration and invasion via matrix metalloproteinases in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    YAN, HAICHENG; WANG, WEI; DOU, CHANGWU; TIAN, FUMING; QI, SONGTAO

    2015-01-01

    Human securin, encoded by pituitary tumor transforming gene 1, is implicated in several oncogenic processes in the pathogenesis of brain tumors, including glioma. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of securin on the migration and invasion of glioma cells. The results revealed that the overexpression of securin in glioma LN-229 cells significantly increased the invasion and transmigration abilities. By contrast, these abilities were significantly reduced by the downregulation of securin in glioma U373 cells. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that securin overexpression and downregulation significantly increased and decreased the levels of matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9, respectively. These findings indicate a promotive role for securin in glioma migration and invasion, which may involve the action of matrix metalloproteinases. PMID:26137166

  19. SNAIL transcription factor increases the motility and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    OSORIO, LUIS A.; FARFÁN, NANCY M.; CASTELLÓN, ENRIQUE A.; CONTRERAS, HÉCTOR R.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are increasing, and PCa is almost the second-leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in men. During tumor progression, epithelial cells decrease the number of adhesion molecules, change their polarity and position, rearrange their cytoskeleton and increase their migratory and invasive capacities. These changes are known under the concept of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is characterized by an upregulation of certain transcription factors, including SNAIL1, which represses genes that are characteristic of an epithelial phenotype, including E-cadherin, and indirectly increase the expression levels of genes, which are associated with the mesenchymal phenotype. It has been suggested that the transcription factor, SNAIL1, decreases the proliferation and increases the migratory and invasive capacities of PCa cell lines. The present study was performed using LNCaP and PC3 cell lines, in which the expression levels of SNAIL1 were increased or silenced through the use of lentiviral vectors. The expression levels of EMT markers were quantified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, cell survival was analyzed using an MTS assay; cell proliferation was examined using an antibody targeting Ki-67; migration on plates with 8 µm pores to allow the passage of cells; and invasiveness was analyzed using a membrane chamber covered in dried basement membrane matrix solution. The levels of apoptosis were determined using a Caspase 3/7 assay containing a substrate modified by caspases 3 and 7. The results demonstrated that the overexpression and silencing of SNAIL1 decreased cell proliferation and survival. However, the overexpression of SNAIL1 decreased apoptosis, compared with cells with the SNAIL1-silenced cells, in which cell apoptosis increased. The migration and invasive capacities increased in the cells overexpressing SNAIL1, and

  20. SNAIL transcription factor increases the motility and invasive capacity of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Luis A; Farfán, Nancy M; Castellón, Enrique A; Contreras, Héctor R

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and mortality rates of prostate cancer (PCa) are increasing, and PCa is almost the second‑leading cause of cancer‑associated mortality in men. During tumor progression, epithelial cells decrease the number of adhesion molecules, change their polarity and position, rearrange their cytoskeleton and increase their migratory and invasive capacities. These changes are known under the concept of epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT is characterized by an upregulation of certain transcription factors, including SNAIL1, which represses genes that are characteristic of an epithelial phenotype, including E‑cadherin, and indirectly increase the expression levels of genes, which are associated with the mesenchymal phenotype. It has been suggested that the transcription factor, SNAIL1, decreases the proliferation and increases the migratory and invasive capacities of PCa cell lines. The present study was performed using LNCaP and PC3 cell lines, in which the expression levels of SNAIL1 were increased or silenced through the use of lentiviral vectors. The expression levels of EMT markers were quantified using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. In addition, cell survival was analyzed using an MTS assay; cell proliferation was examined using an antibody targeting Ki‑67; migration on plates with 8 µm pores to allow the passage of cells; and invasiveness was analyzed using a membrane chamber covered in dried basement membrane matrix solution. The levels of apoptosis were determined using a Caspase 3/7 assay containing a substrate modified by caspases 3 and 7. The results demonstrated that the overexpression and silencing of SNAIL1 decreased cell proliferation and survival. However, the overexpression of SNAIL1 decreased apoptosis, compared with cells with the SNAIL1‑silenced cells, in which cell apoptosis increased. The migration and invasive capacities increased in the cells overexpressing

  1. Minimization of thermodynamic costs in cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liyu; Duclos, Guillaume; Sun, Bo; Lee, Jeongseog; Wu, Amy; Kam, Yoonseok; Sontag, Eduardo D.; Stone, Howard A.; Sturm, James C.; Gatenby, Robert A.; Austin, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis, the truly lethal aspect of cancer, occurs when metastatic cancer cells in a tumor break through the basement membrane and penetrate the extracellular matrix. We show that MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cells cooperatively invade a 3D collagen matrix while following a glucose gradient. The invasion front of the cells is a dynamic one, with different cells assuming the lead on a time scale of 70 h. The front cell leadership is dynamic presumably because of metabolic costs associated with a long-range strain field that precedes the invading cell front, which we have imaged using confocal imaging and marker beads imbedded in the collagen matrix. We suggest this could be a quantitative assay for an invasive phenotype tracking a glucose gradient and show that the invading cells act in a cooperative manner by exchanging leaders in the invading front. PMID:23319630

  2. Sortilin is associated with breast cancer aggressiveness and contributes to tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Séverine; Pundavela, Jay; Demont, Yohann; Faulkner, Sam; Keene, Sheridan; Attia, John; Jiang, Chen Chen; Zhang, Xu Dong; Walker, Marjorie M.; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal membrane protein sortilin has been reported in a few cancer cell lines, but its expression and impact in human tumors is unclear. In this study, sortilin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a series of 318 clinically annotated breast cancers and 53 normal breast tissues. Sortilin was detected in epithelial cells, with increased levels in cancers, as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.0088). It was found in 79% of invasive ductal carcinomas and 54% of invasive lobular carcinomas (p < 0.0001). There was an association between sortilin expression and lymph node involvement (p = 0.0093), suggesting a relationship with metastatic potential. In cell culture, sortilin levels were higher in cancer cell lines compared to non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells and siRNA knockdown of sortilin inhibited cancer cell adhesion, while proliferation and apoptosis were not affected. Breast cancer cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by sortilin knockdown, with a decrease in focal adhesion kinase and SRC phosphorylation. In conclusion, sortilin participates in breast tumor aggressiveness and may constitute a new therapeutic target against tumor cell invasion. PMID:25871389

  3. Management of periorbital basal cell carcinoma with orbital invasion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Albert; Figueira, Edwin; Huilgol, Shyamala; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common eyelid malignancy; however, orbital invasion by periocular BCC is rare, and management remains challenging. Established risk factors for orbital invasion by BCC include male gender, advanced age, medial canthal location, previous recurrences, large tumor size, aggressive histologic subtype and perineural invasion. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach with orbital exenteration remaining the treatment of choice. Globe-sparing treatment may be appropriate in selected patients and radiotherapy and chemotherapy are often used as adjuvant therapies for advanced or inoperable cases, although the evidence remains limited. We aim to summarize the presentation and treatment of BCC with orbital invasion to better guide the management of this complex condition. PMID:26437207

  4. Double-layered collagen gel hemisphere for cell invasion assay: successful visualization and quantification of cell invasion activity.

    PubMed

    Takata, Masahiko; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Doi, Takefumi; Tanaka, Yugo; Okada, Kenji; Nishio, Wataru; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Okita, Yutaka

    2007-10-01

    Although various methods for collagen gel-based cell invasion assays have been described, there continues to be a need for a simpler and more objective assay. Here, we describe an easy-to-prepare double-layered collagen gel hemisphere (DL-CGH) system that satisfies these requirements, and we demonstrate the advantages of this new system for visualizing cell movements during invasion. DL-CGH consists of a central core collagen layer surrounded by an outer cover collagen layer. A droplet of collagen I solution (containing cells to be examined) naturally forms a small hemisphere on the bottom of the culture dish. After this central core layer gels, a second droplet is placed atop the first gel, encapsulating it completely. The hemisphere is submerged in the medium and cultured. The invasive activity of cells that infiltrate from the inner to the outer layer can be evaluated optically. Using this in vitro system, we measured the inhibitory effect of E-cadherin expression on cancer cell invasion. DL-CGH also allowed visualization of interactions between invading cancer cells and the stroma. Cancer cells, which lack the proteases required for direct entrance into the three-dimensional collagen matrix, were seen to slip like amoebas through matrix gaps generated by the pericellular proteolytic activity of fibroblasts. [Supplementary materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of Cell Communication and Adhesion for the following free supplemental resources: Movies 1-3; 4a and b]. PMID:17957531

  5. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  6. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic acid enhanced Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Helix pomatia (HPA) and Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA) lectin binding reactivity to cell surface of lymphoma cells suggesting that neuraminidase removes cell surface sialic acid. In cell adhesion and invasion assays treatment with neuraminidase markedly enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1 and decreased cell invasive capacity through galectin-1. α2,6-linked sialic acid may be involved in masking the effect of the interaction between galectin-1 and cell surface glycans. H-ALCL cells expressed the β-galactoside-α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6Gal1. On resialylation assay by recombinant ST6Gal1 with CMP-Neu5Ac, α2,6-resialylation of L-PHA reactive oligosaccharide by ST6Gal1 resulted in inhibition of H-ALCL cell adhesion to galectin-1 compared to the desialylated H-ALCL cells. On knockdown experiments, knockdown of ST6Gal1 dramatically enhanced cell adhesion to galectin-1. N-glycosylation inhibitor swainsonine treatment resulted in enhancement of cell adhesion to galectin-1. In glycomic analysis using the lectin blocking assay treatment with PNA, Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin), Glycine max (SBA), Helix pomatia (HPA), Vicia villosa (VVA), Ulex europaeus (UEA-1), Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), Phaseolus vulgaris-L (L-PHA), Phaseolus vulgaris-E4 (E-PHA), Datura stramonium (DSA) lectins resulted in modulation of lymphoma cell to galectin-1 suggesting that several types of glycans may regulate cell adhesion to galectin-1 by

  7. Dpp signaling directs cell motility and invasiveness during epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ninov, Nikolay; Menezes-Cabral, Sofia; Prat-Rojo, Carla; Manjón, Cristina; Weiss, Alexander; Pyrowolakis, George; Affolter, Markus; Martín-Blanco, Enrique

    2010-03-23

    Tissue remodeling in development and disease involves the coordinated invasion of neighboring territories and/or the replacement of entire cell populations. Cell guidance, cell matching, transitions from passive to migratory epithelia, cell growth and death, and extracellular matrix remodeling all impinge on epithelial spreading. Significantly, the extracellular signals that direct these activities and the specific cellular elements and mechanisms regulated by these signals remain in most cases to be identified. To address these issues, we performed an analysis of histoblasts (Drosophila abdominal epithelial founder cells) on their transition from a dormant state to active migration replacing obsolete larval epidermal cells (LECs). We found that during expansion, Decapentaplegic (Dpp) secreted from surrounding LECs leads to graded pathway activation in cells at the periphery of histoblast nests. Across nests, Dpp activity confers differential cellular behavior and motility by modulating cell-cell contacts, the organization and activity of the cytoskeleton, and histoblast attachment to the substrate. Furthermore, Dpp also prevents the premature death of LECs, allowing the coordination of histoblast expansion to LEC delamination. Dpp signaling activity directing histoblast spreading and invasiveness mimics transforming growth factor-beta and bone morphogenetic proteins' role in enhancing the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells, resulting in the promotion of metastasis. PMID:20226662

  8. Decreasing Outer Hair Cell Membrane Cholesterol Increases Cochlear Electromechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, William E.; Jacob, Stefan; Hakizimana, Pierre; Ulfendahl, Mats; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    The effect of decreasing membrane cholesterol on the mechanical response of the cochlea to acoustic and/or electrical stimulation was monitored using laser interferometry. In contrast to pharmacological interventions that typically decrease cochlear electromechanics, reducing membrane cholesterol increased the response. The electromechanical response in untreated preparations was asymmetric with greater displacements in response to positive currents and cholesterol depletion increased the asymmetry. The results confirm that outer hair cell electromotility is enhanced by low membrane cholesterol. The asymmetry of the response indicates the outer hair cell resting membrane potential is hyperpolarized relative to the voltage of maximum gain for the outer hair cell voltage-displacement function. The magnitude of the response increase suggests a non-uniform distribution of cholesterol along the lateral wall of normal adult outer hair cells.

  9. Galectin 3 Regulates HCC cell invasion by RhoA and MLCK activation

    PubMed Central

    Serizawa, Nobuko; Tian, Jijiang; Fukada, Hiroo; Baghy, Kornelia; Scott, Fiona; Chen, Xiangling; Kiss, Zsofia; Olson, Kristin; Hsu, Dan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Török, Natalie J; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Joy X.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) carries a poor prognosis with no effective treatment available other than liver transplantation for selected patients. Vascular invasion of HCC is one of the most important negative predictor of survival. As the regulation of invasion of HCC cells is not well understood, our aim was to study the mechanisms by which galectin 3, a β-galactosidase binding lectin mediates HCC cell migration. HCC was induced by N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in wild type and galectin 3−/− mice, and tumor formation, histology, and tumor cell invasion were assessed. The galectin 3−/− mice developed significantly smaller tumor burden with a less invasive phenotype than the wild type animals. Galectin 3 was upregulated in the wild type HCC tumor tissue, but not in the surrounding parenchyma. Galectin 3 expression in HCC was induced by NF-κB transactivation as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In vitro studies assessed the pro-migratory effects of galectin 3. The migration of hepatoma cells was significantly decreased after transfection by the galectin 3 siRNA and also after using the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632. The reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, RhoA GTP ase activity and the phosphorylation of MLC2 were decreased in the galectin 3 siRNA-transfected cells. In addition, in vitro and in vivo evidence showed that galectin 3 deficiency reduced hepatoma cell proliferation and increased their apoptosis rate. In conclusion, galectin 3 is an important lectin that is induced in HCC cells, and promotes hepatoma cell motility and invasion by an autocrine pathway. Targeting galectin 3 therefore could be an important novel treatment strategy to halt disease progression. PMID:26146960

  10. Melanotransferrin induces human melanoma SK-Mel-28 cell invasion in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bertrand, Yanick . E-mail: oncomol@nobel.si.uqam.ca

    2007-02-09

    The expression of melanotransferrin (MTf), a membrane-bound glycoprotein highly expressed in melanomas, is correlated with tumor vascularization and progression, suggesting a proinvasive function associated with MTf in malignant tumors. To test this hypothesis, we silenced MTf in human melanoma SK-MEL-28 cells using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and examined the plasmin activity and invasiveness of MTf-silenced melanoma. In vitro, the siRNA-mediated MTf knockdown inhibited by 58% the cell surface activation of plasminogen into plasmin. In addition, decreased expression of MTf in melanoma cells reduced cell migration. In vivo, we used a nude mice invasion model in which tissue factor (TF) induces vascular [{sup 125}I]-fibrin deposition following injection. Using this metastasis model, the invasive potential of MTf-silenced cells into the lungs was reduced by fivefold. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that MTf overexpression in melanoma cells contributes to tumor progession by stimulating plasmin generation as well as cell migration and invasion.

  11. Fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitors confer anti-invasive and antimetastatic effects on lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Katrin; Ramer, Robert; Dithmer, Sophie; Ivanov, Igor; Merkord, Jutta; Hinz, Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of endocannabinoid degradation has been suggested as tool for activation of endogenous tumor defense. One of these strategies lies in blockade of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide [AEA], 2-arachidonoylglycerol [2-AG]) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine [OEA], N-palmitoylethanolamine [PEA]). This study addressed the impact of two FAAH inhibitors (arachidonoyl serotonin [AA-5HT], URB597) on A549 lung cancer cell metastasis and invasion. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of FAAH substrates (AEA, 2-AG, OEA, PEA) in cells incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. In athymic nude mice FAAH inhibitors were shown to elicit a dose-dependent antimetastatic action yielding a 67% and 62% inhibition of metastatic lung nodules following repeated administration of 15 mg/kg AA-5HT and 5 mg/kg URB597, respectively. In vitro, a concentration-dependent anti-invasive action of either FAAH inhibitor was demonstrated, accompanied with upregulation of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1). Using siRNA approaches, a causal link between the TIMP-1-upregulating and anti-invasive action of FAAH inhibitors was confirmed. Moreover, knockdown of FAAH by siRNA was shown to confer decreased cancer cell invasiveness and increased TIMP-1 expression. Inhibitor experiments point toward a role of CB2 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in conferring anti-invasive effects of FAAH inhibitors and FAAH siRNA. Finally, antimetastatic and anti-invasive effects were confirmed for all FAAH substrates with AEA and OEA causing a TIMP-1-dependent anti-invasive action. Collectively, the present study provides first-time proof for an antimetastatic action of FAAH inhibitors. As mechanism of its anti-invasive properties an upregulation of TIMP-1 was identified. PMID:26930716

  12. Staurosporine induces apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) in ECV304 cells.

    PubMed

    Porcelli, A M; Ghelli, A; Zanna, C; Valente, P; Ferroni, S; Rugolo, M

    2003-12-01

    Incubation of ECV304 cells with 1 micro M staurosporine (STS) causes apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we investigate whether a significant apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) was apparent during the very early times (1 h) of the apoptotic process. Our data suggest that upregulation of Cl(-) (and possibly K(+)) channels by STS may be a very early primary event required for the subsequent onset of AVD, which results in apoptosis.

  13. Differential effects of MTSS1 on invasion and proliferation in subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Dong-Jin; Chen, Zhong-Shu; Liao, Qian-De; Feng, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Yin, Ta-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for >80% of all cases of lung cancer and can be divided into lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), large-cell carcinoma (LCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Accumulating evidence suggests that MTSS1, which is a newly discovered protein associated with tumor progression and metastasis, may have differential roles in cancer malignancy. As it has been demonstrated that MTSS1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and may be an independent prognostic factor in patients with SCC, the present study explored the differential roles of MTSS1 in the invasion and proliferation of different subtypes of NSCLC. Stable overexpression and knockdown of MTSS1 was performed in human NSCLC H920 (LAC), H1581 (LCC) and SW900 cell lines (SCC), and western blot, cell invasion, proliferation and FAK activity analyses were used to investigate the effects. Overexpression of MTSS1 enhanced the invasion and proliferation abilities of H920 and H1581 cells, and these effects were abolished by treatment with selective FAK inhibitor 14, which did not affect the expression of MTSS1. Notably, overexpression of MTSS1 inhibited invasion and proliferation in SW900 cells, and this effect was enhanced by the selective FAK inhibitor. Knockdown of MTSS1 decreased the invasion and proliferation abilities of H920 and H1581 cells, whereas knockdown increased invasion and proliferation in SW900 cells. Furthermore, while overexpression of MTSS1 induced FAK phosphorylation and activity in H920 and H1581 cells, MTSS1 overexpression inhibited FAK phosphorylation/activity in SW900 cells. Knockdown of MTSS1 decreased FAK phosphorylation/activity in H920 and H1581 cells, whereas knockdown increased these processes in SW900 cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to demonstrate that MTSS1 has differential roles in various subtypes of NSCLC, acting via a FAK-dependent mechanism. The results indicated that MTSS1 may enhance invasion and proliferation in LAC and LCC

  14. Milk Modulates Campylobacter Invasion into Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Louwen, Rogier; van Neerven, R J Joost

    2015-09-01

    Raw milk is a recognized source of Campylobacter outbreaks, but pasteurization is an effective way to eliminate the causative agent of Campylobacteriosis. Whereas breastfeeding is protective against infectious diseases, consumption of formula milk is thought to be not. However, in relation to Campylobacter, such data is currently unavailable. Although both pasteurized and formula milk are pathogen free and prepared in a quality controlled manner, the effect they have on the virulence of Campylobacter species is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of cow, goat, horse, and formula milk on Campylobacter invasion into intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, a pathogenic feature of this bacterial species, using a gentamicin exclusion invasion assay. We found that all milk products modulated the invasion of Campylobacter species into the Caco-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Control experiments showed that the milks were not toxic for the Caco-2 cells and that the effect on invasion is caused by heat labile (e.g., milk proteins) or heat stable (e.g., sugar/lipids) components depending on the Campylobacter species studied. This in vitro study shows for the first time that pasteurized and formula milk affect the invasion of Campylobacter. We recommend a prospective study to examine whether pasteurized and formula milk affect Campylobacteriosis. PMID:26495128

  15. Milk Modulates Campylobacter Invasion into Caco-2 Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Louwen, Rogier; van Neerven, R. J. Joost

    2015-01-01

    Raw milk is a recognized source of Campylobacter outbreaks, but pasteurization is an effective way to eliminate the causative agent of Campylobacteriosis. Whereas breastfeeding is protective against infectious diseases, consumption of formula milk is thought to be not. However, in relation to Campylobacter, such data is currently unavailable. Although both pasteurized and formula milk are pathogen free and prepared in a quality controlled manner, the effect they have on the virulence of Campylobacter species is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of cow, goat, horse, and formula milk on Campylobacter invasion into intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells, a pathogenic feature of this bacterial species, using a gentamicin exclusion invasion assay. We found that all milk products modulated the invasion of Campylobacter species into the Caco-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Control experiments showed that the milks were not toxic for the Caco-2 cells and that the effect on invasion is caused by heat labile (e.g., milk proteins) or heat stable (e.g., sugar/lipids) components depending on the Campylobacter species studied. This in vitro study shows for the first time that pasteurized and formula milk affect the invasion of Campylobacter. We recommend a prospective study to examine whether pasteurized and formula milk affect Campylobacteriosis. PMID:26495128

  16. Cell Invasion in Collagen Scaffold Architectures Characterized by Percolation Theory.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G; Best, Serena M; Cameron, Ruth E

    2015-06-24

    The relationship between biological scaffold interconnectivity and cell migration is an important but poorly understood factor in tissue regeneration. Here a scale-independent technique for characterization of collagen scaffold interconnectivity is presented, using a combination of X-ray microcomputed tomography and percolation theory. Confocal microscopy of connective tissue cells reveals this technique as highly relevant for determining the extent of cell invasion. PMID:25881025

  17. MEK-dependent IL-8 induction regulates the invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeongmin; Jeon, Myeongjin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) serves as a prognostic marker for breast cancer, and its expression level correlates with metastatic breast cancer and poor prognosis. Here, we investigated the levels of IL-8 expression in a variety of breast cancer cells and the regulatory mechanism of IL-8 in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Our results showed that IL-8 expression correlated positively with overall survival in basal-type breast cancer patients. The levels of IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion were significantly increased in TNBC cells compared with non-TNBC cells. In addition, the invasiveness of the TNBC cells was dramatically increased by IL-8 treatment and then augmented invasion-related proteins such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 or MMP-9. We observed that elevated IL-8 mRNA expression and protein secretion were suppressed by a specific MEK1/2 inhibitor, UO126. In contrast, the overexpression of constitutively active MEK significantly increased the level of IL-8 mRNA expression in BT474 non-TNBC cells. Finally, we investigated the effect of UO126 on the tumorigenecity of TNBC cells. Our results showed that anchorage-independent growth, cell invasion, and cell migration were also decreased by UO126 in TNBC cells. As such, we demonstrated that IL-8 expression is regulated through MEK/ERK-dependent pathways in TNBC cells. A diversity of MEK blockers, including UO126, may be promising for treating TNBC patients.

  18. Thymidine phosphorylase in cancer cells stimulates human endothelial cell migration and invasion by the secretion of angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Bijnsdorp, I V; Capriotti, F; Kruyt, F A E; Losekoot, N; Fukushima, M; Griffioen, A W; Thijssen, V L; Peters, G J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is often overexpressed in tumours and has a role in tumour aggressiveness and angiogenesis. Here, we determined whether TP increased tumour invasion and whether TP-expressing cancer cells stimulated angiogenesis. Methods: Angiogenesis was studied by exposing endothelial cells (HUVECs) to conditioned medium (CM) derived from cancer cells with high (Colo320TP1=CT-CM, RT112/TP=RT-CM) and no TP expression after which migration (wound-healing-assay) and invasion (transwell-assay) were determined. The involvement of several angiogenic factors were examined by RT–PCR, ELISA and blocking antibodies. Results: Tumour invasion was not dependent on intrinsic TP expression. The CT-CM and RT-CM stimulated HUVEC-migration and invasion by about 15 and 40%, respectively. Inhibition by 10 μ TPI and 100 μ L-dR, blocked migration and reduced the invasion by 50–70%. Thymidine phosphorylase activity in HUVECs was increased by CT-CM. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed a higher mRNA expression of bFGF (Colo320TP1), IL-8 (RT112/TP) and TNF-α, but not VEGF. Blocking antibodies targeting these factors decreased the migration and invasion that was induced by the CT-CM and RT-CM, except for IL-8 in CT-CM and bFGF in RT-CM. Conclusion: In our cell line panels, TP did not increase the tumour invasion, but stimulated the migration and invasion of HUVECs by two different mechanisms. Hence, TP targeting seems to provide a potential additional strategy in the field of anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:21386840

  19. T cell immunity and vaccines against invasive fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ito, James Isami

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades much has been learned about the immunology of invasive fungal infection, especially invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Although quite different in their pathogenesis, the major common protective host response is Th1 mediated. It is through Th1 cytokine production that the effector cells, phagocytes, are activated to kill the fungus. A more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of disease, the elicited protective Th1 immune response, the T cell antigen(s) which elicit this response, and the mechanism(s) whereby one can enhance, reconstitute, or circumvent the immunosuppressed state will, hopefully, lead to the development of a vaccine(s) capable of protecting even the most immunocompromised of hosts.

  20. Chinese herbal formula QHF inhibits liver cancer cell invasion and migration

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, TAO; WANG, QUAN; LI, YUNXIAO; HUANG, HEFEI; HU, WEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of the Chinese herbal formula QHF (Q, Qingrejiedu; H, Huoxuehuayu; and F, Fuzhengguben) on the migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells and to elucidate the potential molecular mechanisms involved. HepG2 cells were treated with various concentrations of QHF, and scratch and Transwell® migration assays were used to qualitatively analyze differences in the migration and invasion activity of these cells. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitors were subsequently introduced in order to study the association between QHF and the invasion of HepG2 cells. The protein expression levels of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in HepG2 cells in the presence and absence of QHF were additionally determined using western blot analysis. The results showed that QHF significantly inhibited the proliferation of the HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, in addition to inhibiting cell movement, which reduced the ability of the cells to invade and migrate. Western blot analysis indicated that the effects of QHF on HCC HepG2 cells after 24 h were to significantly decrease the expression of phosphorylated- (p-)ERK and to increase the expression of p-p38 and p-JNK; however, the total quantity of ERK, p38 and JNK protein remained unchanged. The administration of an inhibitor of ERK altered p38 and JNK expression and promoted the anti-invasion effects of QHF, whereas p38 and JNK inhibitors only partially reversed this effect. The results of the present study indicate, therefore, that QHF is able to inhibit the migratory and invasive activity of HepG2 cells. A possible underlying mechanism involves the activation of the p38 and JNK MAPK signaling pathway and the attenuation of the ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27284329

  1. Knockdown of Legumain Suppresses Cervical Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading type of cancer in women living in less developed countries. The pathological and molecular mechanisms of cervical cancer are not comprehensively known. Though legumain has been found to be highly expressed in various types of solid tumors, its expression and biological function in cervical cancer remain unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate legumain expression and functions in cervical cancer. We found that legumain was highly expressed in cervical cancer cells. When knocked down, legumain expression in HeLa and SiHa cells significantly reduced its migration and invasion abilities compared with control cells. Furthermore, legumain silencing suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteases (MMP2 and MMP3) in cervical cancer cells. This study indicates that legumain might play an important role in cervical cancer cell migration and invasion. Legumain might be a potential therapeutic target for cervical cancer therapy.

  2. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Nicole E; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H; Norton, Jeanette M

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant-soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant-microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant-soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m(-2). Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant-microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  3. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nicole E.; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H.; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant–soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m−2. Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant–microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  4. Diversin Is Overexpressed in Breast Cancer and Accelerates Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinmiao; Wang, Minghao; Dong, Qianze; Jin, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Diversin was recently reported to play roles in Wnt and JNK pathways. However, the expression pattern and biological roles of diversin in human breast cancer have not been reported. In the present study, we found that diversin was overexpressed in breast cancer specimens by immunohistochemistry and western blot. Significant association was observed between diversin overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0036), nodal metastasis (p = 0.0033), negative estrogen receptor expression (p = 0.0012) and triple-negative status (p = 0.0017). Furthermore, colony formation assay and matrigel invasion assay showed that knockdown of diversin expression in MDA-MB-231 cell line with high endogenous expression decreased cell proliferation and cell invasion. Transfection of diversin plasmid in MCF-7 cell line increased cell proliferation and invasion. Further analysis showed that diversin depletion downregulated JNK phosphorylation while its overexpression upregulated JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that diversin was overexpressed in human breast cancers. Diversin could contribute to breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. PMID:24858714

  5. Strain-specific probiotic (Lactobacillus helveticus) inhibition of Campylobacter jejuni invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wine, Eytan; Gareau, Mélanie G; Johnson-Henry, Kathene; Sherman, Philip M

    2009-11-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common bacterial cause of enterocolitis in humans, leading to diarrhoea and chronic extraintestinal diseases. Although probiotics are effective in preventing other enteric infections, beneficial microorganisms have not been extensively studied with C. jejuni. The aim of this study was to delineate the ability of selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains to reduce epithelial cell invasion by C. jejuni. Human colon T84 and embryonic intestine 407 epithelial cells were pretreated with Lactobacillus strains and then infected with two prototypic C. jejuni pathogens. Lactobacillus helveticus, strain R0052 reduced C. jejuni invasion into T84 cells by 35-41%, whereas Lactobacillus rhamnosus R0011 did not reduce pathogen invasion. Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 also decreased invasion of one C. jejuni isolate (strain 11168) into intestine 407 cells by 55%. Lactobacillus helveticus R0052 adhered to both epithelial cell types, which suggest that competitive exclusion could contribute to protection by probiotics. Taken together, these findings indicate that the ability of selected probiotics to prevent C. jejuni-mediated disease pathogenesis depends on the pathogen strain, probiotic strain and the epithelial cell type selected. The data support the concept of probiotic strain selectivity, which is dependent on the setting in which it is being evaluated and tested.

  6. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Angela M. Jimenez; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N.; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X.; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix. PMID:26528856

  7. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Valencia, Angela M; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-12-22

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix.

  8. Collective cancer cell invasion induced by coordinated contractile stresses.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Valencia, Angela M; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Yogurtcu, Osman N; Rao, Pranay; DiGiacomo, Josh; Godet, Inês; He, Lijuan; Lee, Meng-Horng; Gilkes, Daniele; Sun, Sean X; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-12-22

    The physical underpinnings of fibrosarcoma cell dissemination from a tumor in a surrounding collagen-rich matrix are poorly understood. Here we show that a tumor spheroid embedded in a 3D collagen matrix exerts large contractile forces on the matrix before invasion. Cell invasion is accompanied by complex spatially and temporally dependent patterns of cell migration within and at the surface of the spheroids that are fundamentally different from migratory patterns of individual fibrosarcoma cells homogeneously distributed in the same type of matrix. Cells display a continuous transition from a round morphology at the spheroid core, to highly aligned elongated morphology at the spheroid periphery, which depends on both β1-integrin-based cell-matrix adhesion and myosin II/ROCK-based cell contractility. This isotropic-to-anisotropic transition corresponds to a shift in migration, from a slow and unpolarized movement at the core, to a fast, polarized and persistent one at the periphery. Our results also show that the ensuing collective invasion of fibrosarcoma cells is induced by anisotropic contractile stresses exerted on the surrounding matrix. PMID:26528856

  9. Iron, inflammation and invasion of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FISCHER-FODOR, EVA; MIKLASOVA, NATALIA; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; SAHA, BHASKAR

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with the metastasis of tumor cells evolving from a benign tumor to disseminating cancer. Such a metastatic progression is fostered by the angiogenesis propelled by various mediators interacting at the site of tumor growth. Angiogenesis causes two major changes that are assisted by altered glycosylation and neo-antigen presentation by the cancer cells. The angiogenesis-promoted pathological changes include enhanced inflammation and degradation of tissue matrices releasing tumor cells from the site of its origin. The degraded tumor cells release the neo-antigens resulting from altered glycosylation. Presentation of neo-antigens to T cells escalates metastasis and inflammation. Inflammasome activation and inflammation in several infections are regulated by iron. Based on the discrete reports, we propose a link between iron, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor growth. Knowing the link better may help us formulate a novel strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26609256

  10. CT-scan prediction of thyroid cartilage invasion for early laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Dana M; Landry, Guillaume; Bidault, François; Hans, Stéphane; Julieron, Morbize; Mamelle, Gérard; Janot, François; Brasnu, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    Treatment choice for laryngeal cancer may be influenced by the diagnosis of thyroid cartilage invasion on preoperative computed tomography (CT). Our objective was to determine the predictive value of CT for thyroid cartilage invasion in early- to mid-stage laryngeal cancer. Retrospective study (1992-2008) of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with open partial laryngectomy and resection of at least part of the thyroid cartilage. Previous laser surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and second primaries were excluded. CT prediction of thyroid cartilage invasion was determined by specialized radiologists. Tumor characteristics and pathologic thyroid cartilage invasion were compared to the radiologic assessment. 236 patients were treated by vertical (20 %), supracricoid (67 %) or supraglottic partial laryngectomy (13 %) for tumors staged cT1 (26 %), cT2 (55 %), and cT3 (19 %). The thyroid cartilage was invaded on pathology in 19 cases (8 %). CT's sensitivity was 10.5 %, specificity 94 %, positive predictive value 13 %, and negative predictive value 92 %. CT correctly predicted thyroid cartilage invasion in only two cases for an overall accuracy of 87 %. Among the false-positive CT's, tumors involving the anterior commissure were significantly over-represented (61.5 % vs. 27 %, p = .004). Tumors with decreased vocal fold (VF) mobility were significantly over-represented in the group of false-negatives (41 vs. 13 %, p = .0035). Preoperative CT was not effective in predicting thyroid cartilage invasion in these early- to mid-stage lesions, overestimating cartilage invasion for AC lesions and underestimating invasion for lesions with decreased VF mobility.

  11. HOXC6 promotes gastric cancer cell invasion by upregulating the expression of MMP9.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Zhi-Feng; Wang, Hai-Ping; Shi, Yi; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Wen-Jian; Wang, Ping; Li, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the homoebox C6 (HOXC6) gene is highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues and is associated with the depth of tumor invasion, and is associated with poor prognosis of gastric cancer patients expressing HOXC6. The present study investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of HOXC6 on the proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer cells in vitro. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain (PCR) reaction was used to investigate the expression levels of HOXC6 in different gastric cancer cell lines and the effect of different levels of expression on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells was determined by cell growth curve and plate colony formation. The effect of HOXC6 on the anchorage‑independent proliferation of gastric cancer cells was determined by soft agar colony formation assay while the Transwell invasion assay was used to investigate the effect of different levels of HOXC6 expression on the invasive and metastatic abilities of gastric cancer cells. Semi‑quantitative PCR was used to detect the effect of different levels of HOXC6 expression on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 in gastric cancer cells. Immunoblotting was used to assess MMP9 signaling in the gastric cancer cells. The HOXC6 gene is highly expressed in the majority of the gastric cancer cell lines. Overexpression of HOXC6 promoted gastric cancer cell proliferation and colony formation ability while HOXC6 downregulation inhibited cell proliferation and clone forming ability. HOXC6 overexpression also enhanced the soft agar colony formation ability of gastric cancer cells while HOXC6 downregulation decreased the colony formation ability. Upregulated HOXC6 increased the migration and invasion abilities of gastric cancer cells while interfering with HOXC6 expression inhibited the migration and invasion of the gastric cancer cells. The expression of MMP9 was enhanced with an upregulation of HOXC6 expression

  12. Effect of 3-bromopyruvate acid on the redox equilibrium in non-invasive MCF-7 and invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Wojtala, Martyna; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Soszyński, Mirosław; Bartosz, Grzegorz; Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela

    2016-02-01

    Novel approaches to cancer chemotherapy employ metabolic differences between normal and tumor cells, including the high dependence of cancer cells on glycolysis ("Warburg effect"). 3-Bromopyruvate (3-BP), inhibitor of glycolysis, belongs to anticancer drugs basing on this principle. 3-BP was tested for its capacity to kill human non-invasive MCF-7 and invasive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. We found that 3-BP was more toxic for MDA-MB-231 cells than for MCF-7 cells. In both cell lines, a statistically significant decrease of ATP and glutathione was observed in a time- and 3-BP concentration-dependent manner. Transient increases in the level of reactive oxygen species and reactive oxygen species was observed, more pronounced in MCF-7 cells, followed by a decreasing tendency. Activities of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) decreased in 3-BP treated MDA-MB-231 cells. For MCF-7 cells decreases of GR and GST activities were noted only at the highest concentration of 3-BP.These results point to induction of oxidative stress by 3-BP via depletion of antioxidants and inactivation of antioxidant enzymes, more pronounced in MDA-MB-231 cells, more sensitive to 3-BP.

  13. Tetraspanin 1 promotes invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hölters, Sebastian; Anacker, Jelena; Jansen, Lars; Beer-Grondke, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Rubio, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Tetraspanins are a heterogeneous group of 4-transmembrane proteins that segregate into so-called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) along with other cell surface proteins such as integrins. TEMs of various types are reportedly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration and invasion of several tumour cell types, both as suppressors or supporting structures. Tetraspanin 1 (Tspan1, NET-1), a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) of tetraspanins, is overexpressed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and terminal carcinomas but its precise function in the context of carcinoma of the cervix uteri is not known. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the role of tetraspanin 1 in the cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and HeLa. We document that tetraspanin 1 increases the invasive potential of cervical cancer cells, whereas proliferation, growth in soft agar and adhesion are largely unaffected. In line with the latter findings, our data exclude the participation of testraspanin in integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and in EGFR-dependent signalling to the Ras/Erk pathway. In conclusion, our data argue against a role for tetraspanin 1 as a genuine mediator of cell surface receptor signalling but rather document a role for tetraspanin 1 in the control of cervical cancer cell motility and invasion.

  14. Tetraspanin 1 promotes invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hölters, Sebastian; Anacker, Jelena; Jansen, Lars; Beer-Grondke, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Rubio, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Tetraspanins are a heterogeneous group of 4-transmembrane proteins that segregate into so-called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) along with other cell surface proteins such as integrins. TEMs of various types are reportedly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration and invasion of several tumour cell types, both as suppressors or supporting structures. Tetraspanin 1 (Tspan1, NET-1), a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) of tetraspanins, is overexpressed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and terminal carcinomas but its precise function in the context of carcinoma of the cervix uteri is not known. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the role of tetraspanin 1 in the cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and HeLa. We document that tetraspanin 1 increases the invasive potential of cervical cancer cells, whereas proliferation, growth in soft agar and adhesion are largely unaffected. In line with the latter findings, our data exclude the participation of testraspanin in integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and in EGFR-dependent signalling to the Ras/Erk pathway. In conclusion, our data argue against a role for tetraspanin 1 as a genuine mediator of cell surface receptor signalling but rather document a role for tetraspanin 1 in the control of cervical cancer cell motility and invasion. PMID:23754316

  15. Age-associated decrease in muscle precursor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lees, Simon J; Rathbone, Christopher R; Booth, Frank W

    2006-02-01

    Muscle precursor cells (MPCs) are required for the regrowth, regeneration, and/or hypertrophy of skeletal muscle, which are deficient in sarcopenia. In the present investigation, we have addressed the issue of age-associated changes in MPC differentiation. MPCs, including satellite cells, were isolated from both young and old rat skeletal muscle with a high degree of myogenic purity (>90% MyoD and desmin positive). MPCs isolated from skeletal muscle of 32-mo-old rats exhibited decreased differentiation into myotubes and demonstrated decreased myosin heavy chain (MHC) and muscle creatine kinase (CK-M) expression compared with MPCs isolated from 3-mo-old rats. p27(Kip1) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that has been shown to enhance muscle differentiation in culture. Herein we describe our finding that p27(Kip1) protein was lower in differentiating MPCs from skeletal muscle of 32-mo-old rats than in 3-mo-old rat skeletal muscle. Although MHC and CK-M expression were approximately 50% lower in differentiating MPCs isolated from 32-mo-old rats, MyoD protein content was not different and myogenin protein concentration was twofold higher. These data suggest that there are inherent differences in cell signaling during the transition from cell cycle arrest to the formation of myotubes in MPCs isolated from sarcopenic muscle. Furthermore, there is an age-associated decrease in muscle-specific protein expression in differentiating MPCs despite normal MyoD and elevated myogenin levels. PMID:16192302

  16. Zerumbone suppresses IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion by inhibiting IL-8 and MMP-3 expression in human triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghun; Bae, Soo Youn; Oh, Soo-Jin; Lee, Jeongmin; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Hyun-Chul; Lee, Se Kyung; Kil, Won Ho; Kim, Seok Won; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Sangmin; Lee, Jeong Eon

    2014-11-01

    Inflammation is a key regulatory process in cancer development. Prolonged exposure of breast tumor cells to inflammatory cytokines leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, which is the principal mechanism involved in metastasis and tumor invasion. Interleukin (IL)-1β is a major inflammatory cytokine in a variety of tumors. To date, the regulatory mechanism of IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of zerumbone (ZER) on IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. The levels of IL-8 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 mRNA were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The levels of secreted IL-8 and MMP-3 protein were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blot analysis, respectively. Cell invasion and migration was detected by Boyden chamber assay. The levels of IL-8 and MMP-3 expression were significantly increased by IL-1β treatment in Hs578T and MDA-MB231 cells. On the other hand, IL-1β-induced IL-8 and MMP-3 expression was decreased by ZER. Finally, IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion were decreased by ZER in Hs578T and MDA-MB231 cells. ZER suppresses IL-1β-induced cell migration and invasion by inhibiting IL-8 expression and MMP-3 expression in TNBC cells. ZER could be a promising therapeutic drug for treatment of triple-negative breast cancer patients.

  17. Daucus carota Pentane/Diethyl Ether Fraction Inhibits Motility and Reduces Invasion of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Perla; Daher, Costantine F; Mroueh, Mohamad; Nasrallah, Anita; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2014-01-01

    Daucus carota (DC) is a herb used in folklore medicine in Lebanon to treat numerous diseases including cancer. Recent studies in our laboratory on DC oil and its fractions revealed potent anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the most potent DC fraction, pentane/diethyl ether (50:50), on lung, skin, breast and glioblastoma cancer cell motility and invasion. Upon treatment, a pronounced decrease in cancer cell motility was observed in the 4 cell lines. The treatment also led to a decrease in cancer cell invasion and an increased cell adhesion. Additionally, the DC fraction caused a decrease in the activation of the ρ-GTPases Rac and CDC42, a finding that may partially explain the treatment-induced decrease in cell motility. The current study demonstrates a crucial effect of the DC pentane/diethyl ether fraction on cancer cell motility and metastasis, making it a potential candidate for cancer therapy specifically targeting cancer motility and metastasis.

  18. Daucus carota Pentane/Diethyl Ether Fraction Inhibits Motility and Reduces Invasion of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zgheib, Perla; Daher, Costantine F; Mroueh, Mohamad; Nasrallah, Anita; Taleb, Robin I; El-Sibai, Mirvat

    2014-01-01

    Daucus carota (DC) is a herb used in folklore medicine in Lebanon to treat numerous diseases including cancer. Recent studies in our laboratory on DC oil and its fractions revealed potent anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the most potent DC fraction, pentane/diethyl ether (50:50), on lung, skin, breast and glioblastoma cancer cell motility and invasion. Upon treatment, a pronounced decrease in cancer cell motility was observed in the 4 cell lines. The treatment also led to a decrease in cancer cell invasion and an increased cell adhesion. Additionally, the DC fraction caused a decrease in the activation of the ρ-GTPases Rac and CDC42, a finding that may partially explain the treatment-induced decrease in cell motility. The current study demonstrates a crucial effect of the DC pentane/diethyl ether fraction on cancer cell motility and metastasis, making it a potential candidate for cancer therapy specifically targeting cancer motility and metastasis. PMID:26088465

  19. Inhibition by Tyroserleutide (YSL) on the Invasion and Adhesion of the Mouse Melanoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhi; Che, Xu-chun; Lu, Rong; Zheng, Min-na; Zhu, Zhi-feng; Li, Jin-ping; Jian, Xu; Shi, Lin-xi; Liu, Jun-yan; Gao, Wen-yuan

    2007-01-01

    Tyroserleutide (YSL) is an active, low-molecular-weight polypeptide, comprised of three amino acids, that has shown antitumor effects on human hepatocarcinoma BEL-7402 in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the inhibition of YSL on invasion and adhesion of the mouse B16-F10 melanoma cell line by injecting B16-F10 cells into the tail veins of C57BL/6 mice to establish an experimental lung metastasis model. YSL inhibited B16-F10 cell metastasis to lung, reducing the number and area of metastasis lesions. When we treated B16-F10 cells with YSL (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg/mL) in vitro, we found that YSL inhibited the proliferation of B16-F10 cells with a 28.11% rate of inhibition. YSL significantly decreased the adhesiveness of B16-F10 cells to Matrigel with a 29.15% inhibition rate; YSL also significantly inhibited the invasion of B16-F10 cells, producing an inhibition of 35.31%. By analyses with Western blot and real-time RT-PCR, we found that YSL markedly inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 in B16-F10 cells. These data suggest that YSL inhibits the growth, invasion, and adhesion of B16-F10 cells. PMID:17515953

  20. Hypoxia promotes HO-8910PM ovarian cancer cell invasion via Snail-mediated MT1-MMP upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lijun; Lin, Ping; Qin, Zhuo; Liu, Yusi; Deng, Li-Li

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of ovarian cancer cell invasion under hypoxia remain unclear. Here we employed a 3D collagen model and chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) invasion assay to explore the influence of hypoxia on ovarian cancer cell invasion. Hypoxia (both 1% O2 and CoCl2 150 and 250 µM) induced HO-8910PM ovarian cancer cell invasion in 3D collagen and collagenolysis determined by hydroxyproline. Pretreatment with a hypoxia inducible factor-1α inhibitor, YC-1, or MMP inhibitor, GM6001, significantly inhibited 3D collagen invasion and degradation and cell proliferation. Hypoxia stimulated both mRNA and protein expressions of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and promoted MT1-MMP translocation to the cell surface in an YC-1 sensitive manner. MT1-siRNA transfection inhibited hypoxia-induced invasion, proliferation, and collagen degradation of cells in 3D collagen. Hypoxia stimulated Snail mRNA and protein expression as well as translocation to nucleus in an YC-1 sensitive manner. Overexpression of Snail with a recombinant plasmid in HO-8910PM cells resulted in an enhanced invasion in 3D collagen. Transfection with Snail-specific siRNA significantly decreased MT1-MMP expression and 3D collagen invasion. Hypoxia-treated cells significantly broke the upper CAM surface of 11-day-old chick embryos and infiltrated interstitial tissue, completely blocked in the presence of YC-1 or GM6001, or after MT1-MMP siRNA or Snail siRNA transfection. Together, these data suggest that hypoxia promotes HO-8910PM ovarian cancer cell traffic through 3D matrix via Snail-mediated MT1-MMP upregulation, a possible molecular mechanism of ovarian cancer cell invasion under hypoxia. PMID:25681470

  1. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits voltage-gated sodium channels and invasiveness in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, T; Kubota, N; Tsutsumi, T; Oguri, A; Imuta, H; Jo, T; Oonuma, H; Soma, M; Meguro, K; Takano, H; Nagase, T; Nagata, T

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The voltage-gated Na+ channels (Nav) and their corresponding current (INa) are involved in several cellular processes, crucial to metastasis of cancer cells. We investigated the effects of eicosapentaenoic (EPA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, on INa and metastatic functions (cell proliferation, endocytosis and invasion) in human and rat prostate cancer cell lines (PC-3 and Mat-LyLu cells). Experimental approach: The whole-cell voltage clamp technique and conventional/quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis were used. The presence of Nav proteins was shown by immunohistochemical methods. Alterations in the fatty acid composition of phospholipids after treatment with EPA and metastatic functions were also examined. Key results: A transient inward Na+ current (INa), highly sensitive to tetrodotoxin, and NaV proteins were found in these cells. Expression of NaV1.6 and NaV1.7 transcripts (SCN8A and SCN9A) was predominant in PC-3 cells, while NaV1.7 transcript (SCN9A) was the major component in Mat-LyLu cells. Tetrodotoxin or synthetic small interfering RNA targeted for SCN8A and SCN9A inhibited metastatic functions (endocytosis and invasion), but failed to inhibit proliferation in PC-3 cells. Exposure to EPA produced a rapid and concentration-dependent suppression of INa. In cells chronically treated (up to 72h) with EPA, the EPA content of cell lipids increased time-dependently, while arachidonic acid content decreased. Treatment of PC-3 cells with EPA decreased levels of mRNA for SCN9A and SCN8A, cell proliferation, invasion and endocytosis. Conclusion and implications: Treatment with EPA inhibited INa directly and also indirectly, by down-regulation of Nav mRNA expression in prostate cancer cells, thus inhibiting their metastatic potential. PMID:19154441

  2. Involvement of ephrin receptor A4 in pancreatic cancer cell motility and invasion

    PubMed Central

    LIU, CHENGLI; HUANG, HUI; WANG, CHENG; KONG, YALIN; ZHANG, HONGYI

    2014-01-01

    Ephrin (EPH) receptors can be classified into EPHA and EPHB receptors and are important in diverse cellular processes. EPHA4, a member of the EPHA receptors, has been demonstrated to be elevated in various human cancers and involved in the tumor progression. However, the role of EPHA4 in pancreatic cancer cells remains unclear. Therefore, the present study transfected Panc-1 and BxPC-3 cells with small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knockdown the expression of EPHA4. Wound healing and invasion assays were then performed to assess the effect of EPHA4 knockdown on the motility and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. The results demonstrated that the knockdown of EPHA4 by siRNA inhibits the motility and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. Furthermore, gelatin zymography assay showed that EPHA4 may regulate the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2. In addition, the knockdown of EPHA4 increased the expression of epithelial (E)-cadherin, as well as decreased the expression of Snail. Overall, these results suggested that EPHA4 may promote the motility and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells via the upregulation of MMP-2 and Snail, as well as the downregulation of E-cadherin. Thus, EPHA4 may act as a useful target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24932309

  3. The role of annexin A1 in expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and invasion of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Hyereen; Ko, Jesang; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of ANXA1 on promoting migration and invasion in MDA-MB-231 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 siRNA inhibits invasion and migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANXA1 regulates MMP-9 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANX-1 siRNA inhibits the activation of NF-{kappa}B in MDA-MB-231 cells. -- Abstract: Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. However, the regulatory mechanism of MMP-9 expression and its biological effects on breast cancer development remain obscure. In the current study, we examined the potential role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in regulating migration and invasion in breast cancer cell lines. Both ANXA1 mRNA and protein are expressed in the highly invasive, hormone-insensitive human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and SKBr3, but not in the hormone-responsive cell lines MCF-7 and T47D. Downregulation of ANXA1 expression with specific small interfering RNAs (ANXA1 siRNA) in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in decreased cancer cell migration and invasion. Ablation of ANXA1 expression decreases the expression of MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels and also reduces the proteolytic activity of MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, silencing ANXA1 also decreases the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by the suppression of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-{kappa}B) activity. Collectively, these results indicate that ANXA1 functions as a positive regulator of MMP-9 expression and invasion of breast cancer cells through specific activation of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway.

  4. Loss of GATA3 in bladder cancer promotes cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Izumi, Koji; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is known as a breast tumor suppressor as well as a urothelial marker, and its loss is often seen in high-grade invasive bladder cancer. Nonetheless, GATA3 functions in bladder cancer cells remain largely unknown. In this study, we assessed the effects of GATA3 silencing via RNA interference on cell migration, invasion, and proliferation of bladder cancer. GATA3 expression was downregulated in all four bladder cancer lines examined, compared with a non-neoplastic urothelial line SVHUC. Knockdown of GATA3 in the bladder cancer lines (5637, TCC-SUP, J82) resulted in promotion of cell migration and invasion as well as increases in the expression of their related molecules, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9, and the activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. GATA3 loss was also associated with an increasing level of a mesenchymal marker N-cadherin and a decreasing level of an epithelial marker β-catenin. Consistent with these findings, enforced expression of GATA3 in UMUC3 inhibited cell migration and invasion. However, GATA3 showed marginal effects on bladder cancer cell viability and the expression of cell cycle- or apoptosis-related molecules. Additionally, in contrast to bladder cancer lines, no significant effects of GATA3 silencing on cell migration were seen in SVHUC. These findings suggest that GATA3 plays an important role in the prevention of bladder cancer progression and metastasis by inhibiting cell migration and invasion as well as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  5. Cancer cell glycocalyx mediates mechanotransduction and flow-regulated invasion.

    PubMed

    Qazi, Henry; Palomino, Rocio; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Munn, Lance L; Tarbell, John M

    2013-11-01

    Mammalian cells are covered by a surface proteoglycan (glycocalyx) layer, and it is known that blood vessel-lining endothelial cells use the glycocalyx to sense and transduce the shearing forces of blood flow into intracellular signals. Tumor cells in vivo are exposed to forces from interstitial fluid flow that may affect metastatic potential but are not reproduced by most in vitro cell motility assays. We hypothesized that glycocalyx-mediated mechanotransduction of interstitial flow shear stress is an un-recognized factor that can significantly enhance metastatic cell motility and play a role in augmentation of invasion. Involvement of MMP levels, cell adhesion molecules (CD44, α3 integrin), and glycocalyx components (heparan sulfate and hyaluronan) was investigated in a cell/collagen gel suspension model designed to mimic the interstitial flow microenvironment. Physiological levels of flow upregulated MMP levels and enhanced the motility of metastatic cells. Blocking the flow-enhanced expression of MMP activity or adhesion molecules (CD44 and integrins) resulted in blocking the flow-enhanced migratory activity. The presence of a glycocalyx-like layer was verified around tumor cells, and the degradation of this layer by hyaluronidase and heparinase blocked the flow-regulated invasion. This study shows for the first time that interstitial flow enhancement of metastatic cell motility can be mediated by the cell surface glycocalyx - a potential target for therapeutics.

  6. How does cancer cell metabolism affect tumor migration and invasion?

    PubMed

    Han, Tianyu; Kang, De; Ji, Daokun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Zhan, Weihua; Fu, Minggui; Xin, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death. Accordingly, identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control whether or not tumor cells become "directed walkers" is a crucial issue of cancer research. The deregulation of cell migration during cancer progression determines the capacity of tumor cells to escape from the primary tumors and invade adjacent tissues to finally form metastases. The ability to switch from a predominantly oxidative metabolism to glycolysis and the production of lactate even when oxygen is plentiful is a key characteristic of cancer cells. This metabolic switch, known as the Warburg effect, was first described in 1920s, and affected not only tumor cell growth but also tumor cell migration. In this review, we will focus on the recent studies on how cancer cell metabolism affects tumor cell migration and invasion. Understanding the new aspects on molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways controlling tumor cell migration is critical for development of therapeutic strategies for cancer patients.

  7. Cathepsin B promotes colorectal tumorigenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Benjamin; Mongrain, Sébastien; Cagnol, Sébastien; Langlois, Marie‐Josée; Boulanger, Jim; Bernatchez, Gérald; Carrier, Julie C.; Boudreau, François

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a cysteine proteinase that primarily functions as an endopeptidase within endolysosomal compartments in normal cells. However, during tumoral expansion, the regulation of cathepsin B can be altered at multiple levels, thereby resulting in its overexpression and export outside of the cell. This may suggest a possible role of cathepsin B in alterations leading to cancer progression. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intracellular and extracellular cathepsin B in growth, tumorigenesis, and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Results show that mRNA and activated levels of cathepsin B were both increased in human adenomas and in CRCs of all stages. Treatment of CRC cells with the highly selective and non‐permeant cathepsin B inhibitor Ca074 revealed that extracellular cathepsin B actively contributed to the invasiveness of human CRC cells while not essential for their growth in soft agar. Cathepsin B silencing by RNAi in human CRC cells inhibited their growth in soft agar, as well as their invasion capacity, tumoral expansion, and metastatic spread in immunodeficient mice. Higher levels of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1 were observed in cathepsin B‐deficient tumors as well as an increase in cyclin B1. Finally, cathepsin B colocalized with p27Kip1 within the lysosomes and efficiently degraded the inhibitor. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate that cathepsin B is a significant factor in colorectal tumor development, invasion, and metastatic spreading and may, therefore, represent a potential pharmacological target for colorectal tumor therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808857

  8. Raddeanoside R13 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yingchun; Xu, Xiaojie; Yu, Haiming; Li, Ling; Hong, Tian; Ji, Quanbo; Feng, Yulin; Jin, Shuai; Song, Yeqiong; Guo, Jing; Zheng, Zhibing; Ye, Qinong; Yang, Shilin

    2016-07-01

    Pulsatilla chinensis is one of the 50 famous fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine. Saponins are the main components of P. chinensis. Although the anti-proliferative function of saponins has been established in plenty types of cancer, the role of saponins on tumor invasion and metastasis has not been reported, and the mechanisms of how saponins exert the anti-tumor functions are still poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that, in breast cancer (BC) cells, raddeanoside R13, a component of saponins extracted from P. chinensis, exhibits strong anti-proliferative and anti-metastasis ability, accompanied by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy, and reversion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Raddeanoside R13 (R13) inhibits BC cell proliferation via the activation of G1/S checkpoint transitions, concomitant with a marked decrease of the positive cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1. R13 induces BC cell apoptosis accompanied by the increased levels of cleaved PARP and caspase-3. R13 inhibits BC cell migration and invasion and regulates the expression of the markers of EMT, which plays a critical role in cancer cell migration and invasion. Moreover, R13 suppresses BC tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. These data highlight the important role of R13 in BC cell proliferation and progression and suggest that R13 may be a useful drug for BC therapy.

  9. Raddeanoside R13 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yingchun; Xu, Xiaojie; Yu, Haiming; Li, Ling; Hong, Tian; Ji, Quanbo; Feng, Yulin; Jin, Shuai; Song, Yeqiong; Guo, Jing; Zheng, Zhibing; Ye, Qinong; Yang, Shilin

    2016-07-01

    Pulsatilla chinensis is one of the 50 famous fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine. Saponins are the main components of P. chinensis. Although the anti-proliferative function of saponins has been established in plenty types of cancer, the role of saponins on tumor invasion and metastasis has not been reported, and the mechanisms of how saponins exert the anti-tumor functions are still poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that, in breast cancer (BC) cells, raddeanoside R13, a component of saponins extracted from P. chinensis, exhibits strong anti-proliferative and anti-metastasis ability, accompanied by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, autophagy, and reversion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Raddeanoside R13 (R13) inhibits BC cell proliferation via the activation of G1/S checkpoint transitions, concomitant with a marked decrease of the positive cell cycle regulators, including cyclin D1, cyclin A, and cyclin B1. R13 induces BC cell apoptosis accompanied by the increased levels of cleaved PARP and caspase-3. R13 inhibits BC cell migration and invasion and regulates the expression of the markers of EMT, which plays a critical role in cancer cell migration and invasion. Moreover, R13 suppresses BC tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. These data highlight the important role of R13 in BC cell proliferation and progression and suggest that R13 may be a useful drug for BC therapy. PMID:26810189

  10. Neural crest cells: a model for invasive behavior.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Richard P

    2004-02-01

    Neural crest cells are the embryonic precursors of the neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, pigment cells, and connective tissue in the face, neck and heart. They are induced near the junction of the neural plate and embryonic ectoderm and undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Neural crest cells then display invasive behavior and migrate into the surrounding tissues along specific pathways. Neural crest cells are amenable to study in tissue culture, and the molecules that regulate their development can be studied in vivo with antisense techniques as well as with the expression of gain and loss-of-function constructs. Mutations in factors that regulate neural crest cell survival or differentiation can lead to cell death or the premature cessation of their migration, resulting in craniofacial abnormalities, pigmentation defects and the absence of enteric neurons. This paper reviews recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell induction and migration, emphasizing both avian and amphibian models. Cell facts: The embryonic progenitors of pigment cells, the neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, as well as connective tissue in the face, neck and heart. Induced to form at the boundary of the neuroepithelium and embryonic ectoderm. Expression of the transcription factors Snail, Slug and FoxD3 leads to delamination from the neural tube. Invasive motility not unlike that of tumor cells can be studied in vitro. Express proteases, distinctive cell surface receptors and glycoproteins to acquire an invasive phenotype. Mutations of transcription factors expressed by the neural crest or in other factors that inhibit their premature differentiation can lead to survival and migration-associated birth defects.

  11. FOXL2 suppresses proliferation, invasion and promotes apoptosis of cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xing-Long; Meng, Yu-Han; Wang, Jian-Li; Yang, Biao-Bing; Zhang, Fan; Tang, Sheng-Jian

    2014-01-01

    FOXL2 is a transcription factor that is essential for ovarian function and maintenance, the germline mutations of which give rise to the blepharophimosis ptosis epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES), often associated with premature ovarian failure. Recently, its mutations have been found in ovarian granulosa cell tumors (OGCTs). In this study, we measured the expression of FOXL2 in cervical cancer by immunohistochemistry and its mRNA level in cervical cancer cell lines Hela and Siha by RT-PCR. Then we overexpressed FOXL2 in Hela cells and silenced it in Siha cells by plasmid transfection and verified using western blotting. When FOXL2 was overexpressed or silenced, cells proliferation and apoptosis were determined by Brdu assay and Annexin V/PI detection kit, respectively. In addition, we investigated the effects of FOXL2 on the adhesion and invasion of Hela and Siha cells. Finally, we analyzed the influences of FOXL2 on Ki67, PCNA and FasL by flow cytometry. The results showed that FOXL2 was highly expressed in cervical squamous cancer. Overexpressing FOXL2 suppressed Hela proliferation and facilitated its apoptosis. Silencing FOXL2 enhanced Siha proliferation and inhibited its apoptosis. Meanwhile, silencing FOXL2 promoted Siha invasion, but it had no effect on cells adhesion. In addition, overexpressing FOXL2 decreased the expression of Ki67 in Hela and Siha cells. Therefore, our results suggested that FOXL2 restrained cells proliferation and enhanced cells apoptosis mainly through decreasing Ki67 expression. PMID:24817949

  12. Non-invasive microsensors for studying cell/tissue physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Taguchi, M.; Chaturvedi, P.; Burrs, S.; McLamore, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    Non-invasive tools that allow real-time quantification of molecules relevant to metabolism, homeostasis, and cell signaling in cells and tissue are of great importance for studying physiology. Several microsensor technologies have been developed to monitor concentration of molecules such as ions, oxygen, electroactive molecules (e.g., nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide), and biomolecules (e.g., sugars, hormones). The major challenges for microsensors are overcoming relatively low sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio. Modern approaches for enhancing microsensor performance focus on the incorporation of catalytic nanomaterials to increase sensitivity, reduce response time, and increase operating range. To improve signal-to-noise ratio, a non-invasive microsensor modality called self-referencing (SR) is being applied. The SR technique allows measurement of temporal and spatial transport dynamics at the cell, tissue, organ, and organismal level.

  13. miR-940 Suppresses Tumor Cell Invasion and Migration via Regulation of CXCR2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dong; Zhang, Yaodong; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Xing; Ji, Guwei; Huo, Liqun; Shao, Zicheng

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the expression of miR-940 in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on function and biological mechanism in the HCC cells. Methods. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to quantify miR-940 expression in 46 cases of tissues and cells. Transfection of HCC cell lines was performed by miR-940 mimics; the abilities of invasion and migration were assessed through Transwell array. Western blot represents the alteration in expression of CXCR2 by miR-940 mimics. Results. miR-940 expression was decreased significantly in the HCC tissues and the relevant cell lines. miR-940 upregulation suppressed the invasion and migration of HCC cells in vitro. Furthermore, the CXCR2 was downregulated to suppress invasion and migration after miR-940 mimics. Moreover, decreased miR-940 expression was negatively correlated with Edmondson grade (P = 0.008), tumor microsatellite or multiple tumors (P = 0.04), vascular invasion (P = 0.035), and recurrence and metastasis (P = 0.038). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-940 expression contributed to poor overall survival (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Our findings present that miR-940 acts as a pivotal adaptor of CXCR2 and its transcription downregulated CXCR2 expression to decrease HCC invasion and migration in vitro. Our study suggests that miR-940 may be a novel poor prognostic biomarker for HCC. PMID:27807540

  14. Downregulation of CCR1 inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaofeng; Fan Jia; E-mail: jiafan99@yahoo.com; Wang Xiaoying; Zhou Jian; Qiu Shuangjian; Yu Yao; Liu Yinkun; Tang Zhaoyou

    2007-04-20

    CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) has an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes to the site of inflammation. The migration and metastasis of tumor cells shares many similarities with leukocyte trafficking, which is mainly regulated by chemokine receptor-ligand interactions. CCR1 is highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and tissues with unknown functions. In this study, we silenced CCR1 expression in the human HCC cell line HCCLM3 using artificial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) and examined the invasiveness and proliferation of CCR1-silenced HCCLM3 cells and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The miRNA-mediated knockdown expression of CCR1 significantly inhibited the invasive ability of HCCLM3 cells, but had only a minor effect on the cellular proliferation rate. Moreover, CCR1 knockdown significantly reduced the secretion of MMP-2. Together, these findings indicate that CCR1 has an important role in HCCLM3 invasion and that CCR1 might be a new target of HCC treatment.

  15. Downregulation of p57kip² promotes cell invasion via LIMK/cofilin pathway in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chow, Shu-Er; Wang, Jong-Shyan; Lin, Ming-Rung; Lee, Chien Lin

    2011-11-01

    The members of Rho family are well known for their regulation of actin cytoskeleton to control cell migration. The Cip/kip members of cyclin-dependent (CDK) inhibitors have shown to implicate in cell migration and cytoskeletal dynamics. p57(kip2) , a CDK inhibitor, is frequently down-regulated in several malignancy tumors. However, its biological roles in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells remained to be investigated. Here, we found p57(kip2) has nuclear and cytoplasm distributions and depletion of endogenous p57(kip2) did not change the cell-cycle progression. Inhibition of cell proliferation by mitomycin C promoted FBS-mediated cell migration and accompanied with the downregulation of ΔNp63α and p57(kip2), but did not change the level of p27(kip1) , another CDK inhibitor. By using siRNA transfection and cell migration/invasion assays, we found that knockdown of p57(kip2) , but not ΔNp63α, involved in promotion of NPC cell migration and invasion via decrease of phospho-cofilin (p-cofilin). Treatment with Y-27632, a specific ROCK inhibitor, we found that dysregulation of ROCK/cofilin pathway decreased p-cofilin expression and induced cell migration. This change of p-cofilin induced actin remodeling and pronounced increase of membrane protrusions. Further, silence of p57(kip2) not only decreased the interaction between p57(kip2) and LIMK-1 assayed by immunoprecipitation but also reduced the level of phospho-LIMK1/2. Therefore, this study indicated that dysregulation of p57(kip2) promoted cell migration and invasion through modulation of LIMK/cofilin signaling and suggested this induction of inappropriate cell motility might contribute to promoting tumor cell for metastasis.

  16. Decreased stability of DNA in cells treated with alkylating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Frankfurt, O.S. )

    1990-12-01

    A modified highly sensitive procedure for the evaluation of DNA damage in individual cells treated with alkylating agents is reported. The new methodology is based on the amplification of single-strandedness in alkylated DNA by heating in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}. Human ovarian carcinoma cells A2780 were treated with nitrogen mustard (HN2), fixed in methanol, and stained with monoclonal antibody (MOAB) F7-26 generated against HN2-treated DNA. Binding of MOAB was measured by flow cytometry with indirect immunofluorescence. Intensive binding of MOAB to control and drug-treated cells was observed after heating in Tris buffer supplemented with MgCl{sub 2}. Thus, the presence of phosphates and MgCl{sub 2} during heating was necessary for the detection of HN2-induced changes in DNA stability. Fluorescence of HN2-treated cells decreased to background levels after treatment with single-strand-specific S{sub 1} nuclease. MOAB F7-26 interacted with single-stranded regions in DNA and did not bind to dsDNA or other cellular antigens. It is suggested that alkylation of guanines decreased the stability of the DNA molecule and increased the access of MOAB F7-26 to deoxycytidines on the opposite DNA strand.

  17. Nanomimics of host cell membranes block invasion and expose invasive malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Wu, Dalin; Bieri, Andrej; Brand, Françoise; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-23

    The fight against most infectious diseases, including malaria, is often hampered by the emergence of drug resistance and lack or limited efficacies of vaccines. Therefore, new drugs, vaccines, or other strategies to control these diseases are needed. Here, we present an innovative nanotechnological strategy in which the nanostructure itself represents the active substance with no necessity to release compounds to attain therapeutic effect and which might act in a drug- and vaccine-like dual function. Invasion of Plasmodium falciparum parasites into red blood cells was selected as a biological model for the initial validation of this approach. Stable nanomimics-polymersomes presenting receptors required for parasite attachment to host cells-were designed to efficiently interrupt the life cycle of the parasite by inhibiting invasion. A simple way to build nanomimics without postformation modifications was established. First, a block copolymer of the receptor with a hydrophobic polymer was synthesized and then mixed with a polymersome-forming block copolymer. The resulting nanomimics bound parasite-derived ligands involved in the initial attachment to host cells and they efficiently blocked reinvasion of malaria parasites after their egress from host cells in vitro. They exhibited efficacies of more than 2 orders of magnitude higher than the soluble form of the receptor, which can be explained by multivalent interactions of several receptors on one nanomimic with multiple ligands on the infective parasite. In the future, our strategy might offer interesting treatment options for severe malaria or a way to modulate the immune response. PMID:25435059

  18. Klotho inhibits the capacity of cell migration and invasion in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Boogi; Kim, Jinsun; Jeong, Dongjun; Jeong, Yujun; Jeon, Seob; Jung, Sam-Il; Yang, Young; Kim, Keun Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Changjin; Lee, Myeong-Sok

    2012-09-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is common in human cervical cancers. However, the mechanisms of Wnt activation in cervical cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that Klotho, a Wnt antagonist, is downregulated in invasive human cervical tumors and in a cell line we analyzed. Our data demonstrated that in vivo Klotho expression was not observed in invasive cervical carcinoma. In vitro restoration of Klotho expression in SiHa cells resulted in a decreased cell motility and invasiveness through upregulation of E-cadherin, downregulation of N-cadherin and reduced expression of MMP7 and -9. Ectopic expression of Klotho also reduced the expression of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factors Slug and Twist. Furthermore, Klotho causes a significant inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cervical cancer cells, as supported by the expression of Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target genes such as c-Myc and cyclin D1. Consequently, our findings demonstrate for the first time that Klotho regulates tumor invasion through the EMT process and provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of Klotho in cervical cancer progression and contribute to treatment for metastatic cervical cancer patients.

  19. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  20. Ubc9 promotes invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Niu, Huiyan; Peng, Yang; Wang, Jiahe; He, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The mortality is high mainly due to the lack of known effective screening procedures; there is a high tendency for early spread and systemic therapies do not cure metastatic disease. Thus, it is important to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer development and, specifically, to identify an effective method by which to inhibit the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9), the sole conjugating enzyme for sumoylation, regulates protein function and plays a key role in tumorigenesis. Whether Ubc9 is involved in the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer remains unknown. Herein, we report that Ubc9 exhibits an important role in lung cancer invasion and metastasis. We first investigated the biological effect of Ubc9 on lung cancer by cloning the Ubc9 gene into a eukaryotic expression plasmid and stably expressing it in the human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 in order to observe any biological changes. We further analyzed the effect of Ubc9 in an in vivo experiment, injecting NCI-H446 cells stably overexpressing Ubc9 into nude mice and analyzing their metastatic ability. Our results demonstrated that Ubc9 is expressed at higher levels in primary lung cancer tissue and metastatic nodules as compared to premalignant and/or normal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrated that upregulation of Ubc9 expression promotes migration and invasion. Ubc9 likely plays an important role in cancer progression by promoting invasion and metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:23381475

  1. TGFβ loss activates ADAMTS-1-mediated EGF-dependent invasion in a model of esophageal cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bras, Grégoire F.; Taylor, Chase; Koumangoye, Rainelli B.; Revetta, Frank; Loomans, Holli A.; Andl, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is essential to epithelial homeostasis and is often inhibited during progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Recently, an important role for TGFβ signaling has been described in the crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells regulating squamous tumor cell invasion in mouse models of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Loss of TGFβ signaling, in either compartment, leads to HNSCC however, the mechanisms involved are not well understood. Using organotypic reconstruct cultures (OTC) to model the interaction between epithelial and stromal cells that occur in dysplastic lesions, we show that loss of TGFβ signaling promotes an invasive phenotype in both fibroblast and epithelial compartments. Employing immortalized esophageal keratinocytes established to reproduce common mutations of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, we show that treatment of OTC with inhibitors of TGFβ signaling (A83-01 or SB431542) enhances invasion of epithelial cells into a fibroblast-embedded Matrigel/collagen I matrix. Invasion induced by A83-01 is independent of proliferation but relies on protease activity and expression of ADAMTS-1 and can be altered by matrix density. This invasion was associated with increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL1 and EGFR ligands HB-EGF and TGFα. Altering EGF signaling prevented or induced epithelial cell invasion in this model. Loss of expression of the TGFβ target gene ROBO1 suggested that chemorepulsion may regulate keratinocyte invasion. Taken together, our data show increased invasion through inhibition of TGFβ signaling altered epithelial-fibroblasts interactions, repressing markers of activated fibroblasts, and altering integrin-fibronectin interactions. These results suggest that inhibition of TGFβ signaling modulates an array of pathways that combined promote multiple aspects of tumor invasion. - Highlights: • Chemical inhibition of TGFβ signaling advances collective invasion

  2. Rho1-Wnd signaling regulates loss-of-cell polarity-induced cell invasion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Chen, Y; Zhang, S; Xu, W; Shao, Y; Yang, Y; Li, W; Li, M; Xue, L

    2016-02-18

    Both cell polarity and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity are essential to the maintenance of tissue homeostasis, and disruption of either is commonly seen in cancer progression. Despite the established connection between loss-of-cell polarity and JNK activation, much less is known about the molecular mechanism by which aberrant cell polarity induces JNK-mediated cell migration and tumor invasion. Here we show results from a genetic screen using an in vivo invasion model via knocking down cell polarity gene in Drosophila wing discs, and identify Rho1-Wnd signaling as an important molecular link that mediates loss-of-cell polarity-triggered JNK activation and cell invasion. We show that Wallenda (Wnd), a protein kinase of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase family, by forming a complex with the GTPase Rho1, is both necessary and sufficient for Rho1-induced JNK-dependent cell invasion, MMP1 activation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Furthermore, Wnd promotes cell proliferation and tissue growth through wingless production when apoptosis is inhibited by p35. Finally, Wnd shows oncogenic cooperation with Ras(V12) to trigger tumor growth in eye discs and causes invasion into the ventral nerve cord. Together, our data not only provides a novel mechanistic insight on how cell polarity loss contributes to cell invasion, but also highlights the value of the Drosophila model system to explore human cancer biology.

  3. VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, inhibits migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fanni; Li, Chenglin; Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Zhijian; Li, Zhiyu; You, Qidong; Lu, Na; Guo, Qinglong

    2012-06-01

    It has been well characterized that flavonoids possess pronounced anticancer potentials including anti-angiogenesis, anti-metastasis, and pro-apoptosis. Herein, we report, for the first time, that VI-14, a novel flavonoid derivative, possesses anti-cancer properties. The purpose of this study is to investigate the anti-migration and anti-invasion activities of VI-14 in breast cancer cells. Our data indicate that VI-14 inhibits adhesion, migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells. MDA-MB-231 cells treated with VI-14 display reduced activities and expressions of ECM degradation-associated proteins including matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) at both the protein and mRNA levels. Meanwhile, VI-14 treatment induces an up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) and 2 (TIMP-2) in MDA-MB-231 cells. Western blotting results show that phosphorylation levels of critical components of the MAPK signaling pathway, including ERK, JNK and P38, are dramatically decreased in VI-14-treated MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, treatment of VI-14 significantly decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Taken together, our data suggest that VI-14 treatment suppresses migration and motility of breast cancer cells, and VI-14 may be a potential compound for cancer therapy. Highlights: ► We report for the first time that VI-14 possesses anti-cancer properties. ► VI-14 weakens the adhesion, migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells. ► VI-14 decreases the activities and expressions of MMP-2/9. ► VI-14 suppresses the phosphorylation levels of the MAPK signaling pathway. ► VI-14 decreases the nuclear levels and the binding ability of NF-κB and AP-1.

  4. Sinomenine inhibits A549 human lung cancer cell invasion by mediating the STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shulong; Gao, Yebo; Hou, Wei; Liu, Rui; Qi, Xin; Xu, Xia; Li, Jie; Bao, Yanju; Zheng, Honggang; Hua, Baojin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the failure of lung cancer treatment may occur as a result of tumor invasion and metastasis. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor, is a key signaling molecule involved in the proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. Sinomenine is an alkaloid compound with an antineoplastic potential against a variety of cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the antitumor mechanisms of sinomenine in the A549 human lung cancer cell line. The results demonstrated that sinomenine manifested dose-dependent cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. The protein expression of Janus kinase 2, STAT3, phosphorylated-STAT3, Snail, N-cadherin and vimentin decreased in sinomenine-treated cells, while E-cadherin protein expression increased. The regulation of STAT3, N-cadherin and E-cadherin by sinomenine was further confirmed by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescent staining. It was demonstrated that sinomenine exerts inhibitory effects on A549 human lung cancer cell invasion, possibly through the inhibition of STAT3 signaling. These results provide a novel insight into the role of sinomenine in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:27446441

  5. Invasion of human cells by a bacterial pathogen.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Andrew M; Massey, Ruth C

    2011-03-21

    Here we will describe how we study the invasion of human endothelial cells by bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus . The general protocol can be applied to the study of cell invasion by virtually any culturable bacterium. The stages at which specific aspects of invasion can be studied, such as the role of actin rearrangement or caveolae, will be highlighted. Host cells are grown in flasks and when ready for use are seeded into 24-well plates containing Thermanox coverslips. Using coverslips allows subsequent removal of the cells from the wells to reduce interference from serum proteins deposited onto the sides of the wells (to which S. aureus would attach). Bacteria are grown to the required density and washed to remove any secreted proteins (e.g. toxins). Coverslips with confluent layers of endothelial cells are transferred to new 24-well plates containing fresh culture medium before the addition of bacteria. Bacteria and cells are then incubated together for the required amount of time in 5% CO(2) at 37°C. For S. aureus this is typically between 15-90 minutes. Thermanox coverslips are removed from each well and dip-washed in PBS to remove unattached bacteria. If total associated bacteria (adherent and internalised) are to be quantified, coverslips are then placed in a fresh well containing 0.5% Triton X-100 in PBS. Gentle pipetting leads to complete cell lysis and bacteria are enumerated by serial dilution and plating onto agar. If the number of bacteria that have invaded the cells is needed, coverslips are added to wells containing 500 μl tissue culture medium supplemented with gentamicin and incubation continued for 1 h, which will kill all external bacteria. Coverslips can then be washed, cells lysed and bacteria enumerated by plating onto agar as described above. If the experiment requires direct visualisation, coverslips can be fixed and stained for light, fluorescence or confocal microscopy or prepared for electron microscopy.

  6. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I.; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Parra, Columba de la; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J.; Wade, Paul A.; Saxton, Arnold M.; Donnell, Robert M.; Pestell, Richard G.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer. - Highlights: • BAD and p-BAD expressions are decreased in breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. • BAD impedes breast cancer invasion and migration. • BAD inhibits the EMT and transcription factors that promote cancer cell migration. • Invasion and migration functions of BAD are distinct from the BAD's role in apoptosis.

  7. miR-135a Inhibits the Invasion of Cancer Cells via Suppression of ERRα

    PubMed Central

    Tribollet, Violaine; Barenton, Bruno; Kroiss, Auriane; Vincent, Séverine; Zhang, Ling; Forcet, Christelle; Cerutti, Catherine; Périan, Séverine; Allioli, Nathalie; Samarut, Jacques; Vanacker, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-135a (miR-135a) down-modulates parameters of cancer progression and its expression is decreased in metastatic breast cancers (as compared to non-metastatic tumors) as well as in prostate tumors relative to normal tissue. These expression and activity patterns are opposite to those of the Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα), an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family. Indeed high expression of ERRα correlates with poor prognosis in breast and prostate cancers, and the receptor promotes various traits of cancer aggressiveness including cell invasion. Here we show that miR-135a down-regulates the expression of ERRα through specific sequences of its 3’UTR. As a consequence miR-135a also reduces the expression of downstream targets of ERRα. miR-135a also decreases cell invasive potential in an ERRα-dependent manner. Our results suggest that the decreased expression of miR-135a in metastatic tumors leads to elevated ERRα expression, resulting in increased cell invasion capacities. PMID:27227989

  8. SENP1 regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Xiang-Ming, Yan; Zhi-Qiang, Xu; Ting, Zhang; Jian, Wang; Jian, Pan; Li-Qun, Yuan; Ming-Cui, Fu; Hong-Liang, Xia; Xu, Cao; Yun, Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is an embryonic solid tumor derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, and accounts for 11% of childhood cancers and around 15% of cancer deaths in children. SUMOylation and deSUMOylation are dynamic mechanisms regulating a spectrum of protein activities. The SUMO proteases (SENP) remove SUMO conjugate from proteins, and their expression is deregulated in diverse cancers. However, nothing is known about the role of SENPs in NBL. In the present study, we found that SENP1 expression was significantly high in metastatic NB tissues compared with primary NB tissues. Overexpression of SENP1 promoted NB cells migration and invasion. Inhibition of SENP1 could significantly suppress NB cell migration and invasion. Moreover, we found that SENP1 could regulate the expression of CDH1, MMP9, and MMP2. In summary, the data presented here indicate a significant role of SENP1 in the regulation of cell migration and invasion in NB and suppress SENP1 expression as promising candidates for novel treatment strategies of NB.

  9. Protein kinase D2 regulates migration and invasion of U87MG glioblastoma cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; DeVaney, Trevor; Zimmer, Andreas; Raynham, Tony; Ireson, Christopher; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor, which, despite combined modality treatment, reoccurs and is invariably fatal for affected patients. Recently, a member of the serine/threonine protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was shown to be a potent mediator of glioblastoma growth. Here we studied the role of PRKD2 in U87MG glioblastoma cell migration and invasion in response to sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an activator of PRKD2 and a GBM mitogen. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that random cell migration was significantly diminished in response to PRKD2 silencing. The pharmacological PRKD family inhibitor CRT0066101 decreased chemotactic migration and invasion across uncoated or matrigel-coated Transwell inserts. Silencing of PRKD2 attenuated migration and invasion of U87MG cells even more effectively. In terms of downstream signaling, CRT0066101 prevented PRKD2 autophosphorylation and inhibited p44/42 MAPK and to a smaller extent p54/46 JNK and p38 MAPK activation. PRKD2 silencing impaired activation of p44/42 MAPK and p54/46 JNK, downregulated nuclear c-Jun protein levels and decreased c-Jun{sup S73} phosphorylation without affecting the NFκB pathway. Finally, qPCR array analyses revealed that silencing of PRKD2 downregulates mRNA levels of integrin alpha-2 and -4 (ITGA2 and -4), plasminogen activator urokinase (PLAU), plasminogen activator urokinase receptor (PLAUR), and matrix metallopeptidase 1 (MMP1). Findings of the present study identify PRKD2 as a potential target to interfere with glioblastoma cell migration and invasion, two major determinants contributing to recurrence of glioblastoma after multimodality treatment. Highlights: • Sphingosine-1-phosphate induces glioma cell migration and invasion. • Part of the effects is mediated by protein kinase D2 (PRKD2) activation. • Inactivation of PRKD2 attenuates glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • Both, RNAi and pharmacological inhibition of PRKD2 inhibits MAPK

  10. Matrine inhibits the invasive properties of human glioma cells by regulating epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongwei; Wu, Yi; Wang, Yali; Jin, Yingying; Ma, Xiulong; Zhang, Yang; Ren, Hongtao

    2015-05-01

    Matrine is reported to be effective in tumor therapies; however, the anti‑metastatic effect and molecular mechanism(s) of matrine on glioma remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effects of matrine on glioma and the associated mechanism(s). In the study, we demonstrated that matrine inhibited the proliferation of glioma cells. We also observed that matrine inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells at non‑toxic concentrations. Matrine also decreased the expression of E‑cadherin and increased the expression of N‑cadherin. These results suggest that the anti‑metastatic effect of matrine may be correlated with epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition (EMT). Moreover, matrine could reduce the phosphorylation levels of p38 and AKT proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest matrine may be a potential alternative against invasive glioma cells via the p38 MAPK and AKT signaling‑dependent inhibition of EMT.

  11. Proteolytic and non-proteolytic regulation of collective cell invasion: tuning by ECM density and organization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kapoor, Aastha; Desai, Sejal; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Sen, Shamik

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells manoeuvre through extracellular matrices (ECMs) using different invasion modes, including single cell and collective cell invasion. These modes rely on MMP-driven ECM proteolysis to make space for cells to move. How cancer-associated alterations in ECM influence the mode of invasion remains unclear. Further, the sensitivity of the two invasion modes to MMP dynamics remains unexplored. In this paper, we address these open questions using a multiscale hybrid computational model combining ECM density-dependent MMP secretion, MMP diffusion, ECM degradation by MMP and active cell motility. Our results demonstrate that in randomly aligned matrices, collective cell invasion is more efficient than single cell invasion. Although increase in MMP secretion rate enhances invasiveness independent of cell–cell adhesion, sustenance of collective invasion in dense matrices requires high MMP secretion rates. However, matrix alignment can sustain both single cell and collective cell invasion even without ECM proteolysis. Similar to our in-silico observations, increase in ECM density and MMP inhibition reduced migration of MCF-7 cells embedded in sandwich gels. Together, our results indicate that apart from cell intrinsic factors (i.e., high cell–cell adhesion and MMP secretion rates), ECM density and organization represent two important extrinsic parameters that govern collective cell invasion and invasion plasticity. PMID:26832069

  12. Guggulsterone decreases proliferation and metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating JAK/STAT and Src/FAK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Macha, Muzafar A.; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Gupta, Suprit; Pai, Priya; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Batra, Surinder K.; Jain, Maneesh

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate efficacy, high toxicity and drug resistance associated with existing chemotherapeutic agents mandate a need for novel therapeutic strategies for highly aggressive pancreatic cancer (PC). Guggulsterone (GS) exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects against various cancer cells and has emerged as an attractive candidate for use in complementary or preventive cancer therapies. However, the knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of GS in PC is still limited and needs to be explored. We studied the effect of GS on PC cell growth, motility and invasion and elucidated the molecular mechanisms associated with its anti-tumor effects. Treatment of Capan1 and CD18/HPAF PC cells with GS resulted in dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition and decreased colony formation. Further, GS treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest as assessed by Annexin-V assay and FACS analysis. Increased apoptosis following GS treatment was accompanied with Bad dephosphorylation and its translocation to the mitochondria, increased Caspase-3 activation, decreased Cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and xIAP expression. Additionally, GS treatment decreased motility and invasion of PC cells by disrupting cytoskeletal organization, inhibiting activation of FAK and Src signaling and decreased MMP9 expression. More importantly, GS treatment decreased mucin MUC4 expression in Capan1 and CD18/HPAF cells through transcriptional regulation by inhibiting Jak/STAT pathway. In conclusion, our results support the utility of GS as a potential therapeutic agent for lethal PC. PMID:23920124

  13. Guggulsterone decreases proliferation and metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells by modulating JAK/STAT and Src/FAK signaling.

    PubMed

    Macha, Muzafar A; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Gupta, Suprit; Pai, Priya; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Batra, Surinder K; Jain, Maneesh

    2013-12-01

    Inadequate efficacy, high toxicity and drug resistance associated with existing chemotherapeutic agents mandate a need for novel therapeutic strategies for highly aggressive Pancreatic Cancer (PC). Guggulsterone (GS) exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects against various cancer cells and has emerged as an attractive candidate for use in complementary or preventive cancer therapies. However, the knowledge regarding the therapeutic potential of GS in PC is still limited and needs to be explored. We studied the effect of GS on PC cell growth, motility and invasion and elucidated the molecular mechanisms associated with its anti-tumor effects. Treatment of Capan1 and CD18/HPAF PC cells with GS resulted in dose- and time-dependent growth inhibition and decreased colony formation. Further, GS treatment induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest as assessed by Annexin-V assay and FACS analysis. Increased apoptosis following GS treatment was accompanied with Bad dephosphorylation and its translocation to the mitochondria, increased Caspase-3 activation, decreased Cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and xIAP expression. Additionally, GS treatment decreased motility and invasion of PC cells by disrupting cytoskeletal organization, inhibiting activation of FAK and Src signaling and decreased MMP9 expression. More importantly, GS treatment decreased mucin MUC4 expression in Capan1 and CD18/HPAF cells through transcriptional regulation by inhibiting Jak/STAT pathway. In conclusion, our results support the utility of GS as a potential therapeutic agent for lethal PC. PMID:23920124

  14. Putrescine importer PlaP contributes to swarming motility and urothelial cell invasion in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Shin; Sakai, Yumi; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Muth, Aaron; Phanstiel, Otto; Rather, Philip N

    2013-05-31

    Previously, we reported that the speA gene, encoding arginine decarboxylase, is required for swarming in the urinary tract pathogen Proteus mirabilis. In addition, this previous study suggested that putrescine may act as a cell-to-cell signaling molecule (Sturgill, G., and Rather, P. N. (2004) Mol. Microbiol. 51, 437-446). In this new study, PlaP, a putative putrescine importer, was characterized in P. mirabilis. In a wild-type background, a plaP null mutation resulted in a modest swarming defect and slightly decreased levels of intracellular putrescine. In a P. mirabilis speA mutant with greatly reduced levels of intracellular putrescine, plaP was required for the putrescine-dependent rescue of swarming motility. When a speA/plaP double mutant was grown in the presence of extracellular putrescine, the intracellular levels of putrescine were greatly reduced compared with the speA mutant alone, indicating that PlaP functioned as the primary putrescine importer. In urothelial cell invasion assays, a speA mutant exhibited a 50% reduction in invasion when compared with wild type, and this defect could be restored by putrescine in a PlaP-dependent manner. The putrescine analog Triamide-44 partially inhibited the uptake of putrescine by PlaP and decreased both putrescine stimulated swarming and urothelial cell invasion in a speA mutant.

  15. Endothelial Cells Enhance Tumor Cell Invasion through a Crosstalk Mediated by CXC Chemokine Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Kristy A; Miyazawa, Marta; Cordeiro, Mabel M R; Love, William J; Pinsky, Matthew S; Neiva, Kathleen G; Spalding, Aaron C; Nör, Jacques E

    2008-01-01

    Field cancerization involves the lateral spread of premalignant or malignant disease and contributes to the recurrence of head and neck tumors. The overall hypothesis underlying this work is that endothelial cells actively participate in tumor cell invasion by secreting chemokines and creating a chemotactic gradient for tumor cells. Here we demonstrate that conditioned medium from head and neck tumor cells enhance Bcl-2 expression in neovascular endothelial cells. Oral squamous cell carcinoma-3 (OSCC3) and Kaposi's sarcoma (SLK) show enhanced invasiveness when cocultured with pools of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells stably expressing Bcl-2 (HDMEC-Bcl-2), compared to cocultures with empty vector controls (HDMEC-LXSN). Xenografted OSCC3 tumors vascularized with HDMEC-Bcl-2 presented higher local invasion than OSCC3 tumors vascularized with control HDMEC-LXSN. CXCL1 and CXCL8 were upregulated in primary endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as well as in HDMEC-Bcl-2. Notably, blockade of CXCR2 signaling, but not CXCR1, inhibited OSCC3 and SLK invasion toward endothelial cells. These data demonstrate that CXC chemokines secreted by endothelial cells induce tumor cell invasion and suggest that the process of lateral spread of tumor cells observed in field cancerization is guided by chemotactic signals that originated from endothelial cells. PMID:18283335

  16. CD44-related chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, a cell surface receptor implicated with tumor cell invasion, mediates endothelial cell migration on fibrinogen and invasion into a fibrin matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Henke, C A; Roongta, U; Mickelson, D J; Knutson, J R; McCarthy, J B

    1996-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cell invasion into the fibrin provisional matrix is an integral component of angiogenesis during wound repair. Cell surface receptors which interact with extracellular matrix proteins participate in cell migration and invasion. Malignant cells use CD44-related chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) as a matrix receptor to mediate migration and invasion. In this study, we examine whether cell surface CSPG can mediate similar events in nonmalignant wound microvascular endothelial cells or whether use of CSPG for migration and invasion is a property largely restricted to malignant cells. After inhibiting CSPG synthesis with p-nitrophenyl beta-d xylopyranoside (beta-d xyloside), wound microvascular endothelial cells were capable of attaching and spreading on the surface of a fibrin gel; however, their ability to invade the fibrin matrix was virtually eliminated. To begin to examine the mechanism by which endothelial cells use CSPG to invade fibrin matrices, cell adhesion and migration on fibrinogen was examined. Endothelial cell adhesion and migration on fibrinogen were inhibited by both beta-d xyloside and after cleavage of chondroitin sulfate from the core protein by chondroitinase ABC. We have determined that wound microvascular endothelial cells express the majority of their proteoglycan as CSPG and that the CSPG core protein is immunologically related to CD44. PCR studies show that these cells express both the "standard" (CD44H) isoform and an isoform containing the variably spliced exon V3. In addition, anti-CD44 antibody blocks endothelial cell migration on fibrinogen. Affinity chromatography studies reveal that partially purified microvascular endothelial cell CSPG binds fibrinogen. These findings suggest that CD44-related CSPG, a molecule implicated in the invasive behavior of tumor cells, is capable of binding fibrinogen/fibrin, thereby mediating endothelial cell migration and invasion into the fibrin provisional matrix during wound

  17. RNA interference targeting CD147 inhibits the invasion of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells by downregulating MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaobin; Wu, Weiguang; Shi, Haixia; Han, Jianqiu

    2013-07-01

    Cervical squamous carcinoma is a highly invasive tumour that has a great capacity to metastasise. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN or CD147), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein. It is highly expressed on malignant tumour cell surfaces, including human cervical squamous carcinoma. It also plays a critical role in the invasive and metastatic activity of malignant cells by stimulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The anti-invasive effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against CD147 on human cervical squamous carcinoma cells and its possible pathways has been investigated. The downregulation of CD147 by transfection with siRNA resulted in MMP-9 expression and decreased activity in the cervical squamous carcinoma cell line SiHa. In vitro analysis showed that the invasive capacity of SiHa cells decreased. Thus CD147 inhibition and subsequent MMP-9 deletion may have anti-tumour effects by inhibiting the invasiveness of human cervical squamous carcinoma cells.

  18. RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell migration and invasion via interaction with N-WASP and hnRNPK

    PubMed Central

    Ziv-Av, Amotz; Giladi, Nissim David; Lee, Hae Kyung; Cazacu, Simona; Finniss, Susan; Xiang, Cunli; Pauker, Maor H.; Barda-Saad, Mira; Poisson, Laila; Brodie, Chaya

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) are characterized by increased invasion into the surrounding normal brain tissue. RTVP-1 is highly expressed in GBM and regulates the migration and invasion of glioma cells. To further study RTVP-1 effects we performed a pull-down assay using His-tagged RTVP-1 followed by mass spectrometry and found that RTVP-1 was associated with the actin polymerization regulator, N-WASP. This association was further validated by co-immunoprecipitation and FRET analysis. We found that RTVP-1 increased cell spreading, migration and invasion and these effects were at least partly mediated by N-WASP. Another protein which was found by the pull-down assay to interact with RTVP-1 is hnRNPK. This protein has been recently reported to associate with and to inhibit the effect of N-WASP on cell spreading. hnRNPK decreased cell migration, spreading and invasion in glioma cells. Using co-immunoprecipitation we validated the interactions of hnRNPK with N-WASP and RTVP-1 in glioma cells. In addition, we found that overexpression of RTVP-1 decreased the association of N-WASP and hnRNPK. In summary, we report that RTVP-1 regulates glioma cell spreading, migration and invasion and that these effects are mediated via interaction with N-WASP and by interfering with the inhibitory effect of hnRNPK on the function of this protein. PMID:26305187

  19. Fluid flow plate for decreased density of fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Vitale, Nicholas G.

    1999-01-01

    A fluid flow plate includes first and second outward faces. Each of the outward faces has a flow channel thereon for carrying respective fluid. At least one of the fluids serves as reactant fluid for a fuel cell of a fuel cell assembly. One or more pockets are formed between the first and second outward faces for decreasing density of the fluid flow plate. A given flow channel can include one or more end sections and an intermediate section. An interposed member can be positioned between the outward faces at an interface between an intermediate section, of one of the outward faces, and an end section, of that outward face. The interposed member can serve to isolate the reactant fluid from the opposing outward face. The intermediate section(s) of flow channel(s) on an outward face are preferably formed as a folded expanse.

  20. Inhibitory effect of Trolox on the migration and invasion of human lung and cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ho Joong; Kim, Yoonseo; Kang, Hyereen; Sull, Jae Woong; Kim, Yoon Suk; Jang, Sung-Wuk; Ko, Jesang

    2012-02-01

    The antioxidant 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox) is implicated in migration and invasion of metastatic tumors. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of Trolox on metastatic cancer cells is not known. We found that a non-cytotoxic dose of Trolox decreased phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced invasion and migration of both A549 and HeLa cancer cells. We also found that Trolox suppressed both the expression and the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and that the promoter activity of PMA-induced MMP-9 was inhibited by Trolox. Our results show that Trolox inhibits the transcriptional activity of MMP-9 by suppression of NF-κB transactivation. These results indicate that Trolox inhibits NF-κB-mediated MMP-9 expression, leading to the suppression of migration and invasion in lung and cervical cancer cells. Trolox is a potential agent for clinical use in preventing the invasion and metastasis of human malignant lung and cervical cancers.

  1. MicroRNA-3713 regulates bladder cell invasion via MMP9

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Wei; Du, Yi-Heng; Li, Hao; Xia, Shu-Jie; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer but its carcinogenesis remains not completely elucidated. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is well known to be involved in the development of various cancers, including TCC, whereas a role of miR-3713 in the pathogenesis of TCC has not been appreciated. Here, we reported that significantly higher levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and significantly lower levels of miR-3713 were detected in TCC tissue, compared to the adjacent non-tumor tissue, and were inversely correlated. Moreover, the low miR-3713 levels in TCC specimens were associated with poor survival of the patients. In vitro, overexpression of miR-3713 significantly decreased cell invasion, and depletion of miR-3713 increased cell invasion in TCC cells. The effects of miR-3713 on TCC cell growth appeared to result from its modification of MMP9 levels, in which miR-3713 was found to bind to the 3′-UTR of MMP9 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in TCC cells. This study highlights miR-3713 as a previously unrecognized factor that controls TCC invasiveness, which may be important for developing innovative therapeutic targets for TCC treatment. PMID:27577949

  2. MicroRNA-3713 regulates bladder cell invasion via MMP9.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Wei; Du, Yi-Heng; Li, Hao; Xia, Shu-Jie; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2016-08-31

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer but its carcinogenesis remains not completely elucidated. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is well known to be involved in the development of various cancers, including TCC, whereas a role of miR-3713 in the pathogenesis of TCC has not been appreciated. Here, we reported that significantly higher levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and significantly lower levels of miR-3713 were detected in TCC tissue, compared to the adjacent non-tumor tissue, and were inversely correlated. Moreover, the low miR-3713 levels in TCC specimens were associated with poor survival of the patients. In vitro, overexpression of miR-3713 significantly decreased cell invasion, and depletion of miR-3713 increased cell invasion in TCC cells. The effects of miR-3713 on TCC cell growth appeared to result from its modification of MMP9 levels, in which miR-3713 was found to bind to the 3'-UTR of MMP9 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in TCC cells. This study highlights miR-3713 as a previously unrecognized factor that controls TCC invasiveness, which may be important for developing innovative therapeutic targets for TCC treatment.

  3. MicroRNA-3713 regulates bladder cell invasion via MMP9.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Bo; Wang, Wei; Du, Yi-Heng; Li, Hao; Xia, Shu-Jie; Liu, Hai-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer but its carcinogenesis remains not completely elucidated. Dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is well known to be involved in the development of various cancers, including TCC, whereas a role of miR-3713 in the pathogenesis of TCC has not been appreciated. Here, we reported that significantly higher levels of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9), and significantly lower levels of miR-3713 were detected in TCC tissue, compared to the adjacent non-tumor tissue, and were inversely correlated. Moreover, the low miR-3713 levels in TCC specimens were associated with poor survival of the patients. In vitro, overexpression of miR-3713 significantly decreased cell invasion, and depletion of miR-3713 increased cell invasion in TCC cells. The effects of miR-3713 on TCC cell growth appeared to result from its modification of MMP9 levels, in which miR-3713 was found to bind to the 3'-UTR of MMP9 mRNA to inhibit its protein translation in TCC cells. This study highlights miR-3713 as a previously unrecognized factor that controls TCC invasiveness, which may be important for developing innovative therapeutic targets for TCC treatment. PMID:27577949

  4. Peroxisome-proliferator activator receptor-gamma activation decreases attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion.

    PubMed

    Kavoussi, S K; Witz, C A; Binkley, P A; Nair, A S; Lebovic, D I

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma activation has an effect on the attachment of endometrial cells to peritoneal mesothelial cells in a well-established in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. The endometrial epithelial cell line EM42 and mesothelial cell line LP9 were used for this study. EM42 cells, LP9 cells or both were treated with the PPAR-gamma agonist ciglitazone (CTZ) at varying concentrations (10, 20 and 40 microM) x 48 h with subsequent co-culture of EM42 and LP9 cells. The rate of EM42 attachment and invasion through LP9 cells was then assessed and compared with control (EM42 and LP9 cells co-cultured without prior treatment with CTZ). Next, attachment of CTZ-treated and untreated EM42 cells to hyaluronic acid (HA), a cell adhesion molecule (CAM) on peritoneal mesothelial cells, were assessed. Although there was no difference in EM42 attachment when LP9 cells alone were treated with CTZ, treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells by 27% (P < 0.01). Treatment of both EM42 and LP9 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 by 37% (P < 0.01). Treatment of EM42 cells with 40 microM CTZ decreased attachment to HA by 66% (P = 0.056). CTZ did not decrease invasion of EM42 cells through the LP9 monolayer. CTZ may inhibit EM42 cell proliferation. In conclusion, CTZ significantly decreased EM42 attachment to LP9 cells and HA in an in vitro model of the early endometriotic lesion. PMID:19643817

  5. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by modulating matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Han, Yu Kyeong; Han, Jeong Yoon; Lee, Chang Geun

    2016-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is a conjugated form of UDCA that modulates several signaling pathways and acts as a chemical chaperone to relieve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The present study showed that TUDCA reduced the invasion of the MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using an in vitro invasion assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that the reduced invasion following TUDCA treatment was associated with a decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and −13, which play important roles in invasion and metastasis. Inhibitors and short hairpin RNAs were used to show that the effect of TUDCA in the reduction of invasion appeared to be dependent on the protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway, a downstream ER stress signaling pathway. Thus, TUDCA is a candidate anti-metastatic agent to target the ER stress pathway.

  6. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by modulating matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Han, Yu Kyeong; Han, Jeong Yoon; Lee, Chang Geun

    2016-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is a conjugated form of UDCA that modulates several signaling pathways and acts as a chemical chaperone to relieve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The present study showed that TUDCA reduced the invasion of the MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using an in vitro invasion assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that the reduced invasion following TUDCA treatment was associated with a decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and −13, which play important roles in invasion and metastasis. Inhibitors and short hairpin RNAs were used to show that the effect of TUDCA in the reduction of invasion appeared to be dependent on the protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway, a downstream ER stress signaling pathway. Thus, TUDCA is a candidate anti-metastatic agent to target the ER stress pathway. PMID:27602168

  7. Ets-1 controls breast cancer cell balance between invasion and growth.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Alessandro; Vercamer, Chantal; Bouali, Fatima; Damour, Isabelle; Chotteau-Lelievre, Anne; Wernert, Nicolas; Desbiens, Xavier; Pourtier, Albin

    2014-11-15

    Ets-1 overexpression in human breast cancers is associated with invasiveness and poor prognosis. By overexpressing Ets-1 or a dominant negative mutant in MMT breast cancer cells, we previously highlighted the key role of Ets-1 in coordinating multiple invasive features of these cells. Interestingly, we also noticed that Ets-1 decreased the density of breast cancer cells cultured in three-dimensional extracellular matrix gels. The 3D context was instrumental to this phenomenon, as such downregulation was not observed in cells grown on two-dimensional plastic or matrix-coated dishes. Ets-1 overexpression was deleterious to anchorage-independent growth of MMT cells in soft agar, a standard model for in vitro tumorigenicity. The relevance of this mechanism was confirmed in vivo, during primary tumor growth and in a metastatic assay of lung colonization. In these models, Ets-1 was associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition features and modulated the ratio of Ki67-positive cells, while hardly affecting in vivo apoptotic cell death. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Ets-1 in human breast cancer cell lines also decreased colony growth, both in anchorage-independent assays and 3D extracellular matrix cultures. These in vitro and in vivo observations shed light on an unsuspected facet of Ets-1 in breast tumorigenesis. They show that while promoting malignancy through the acquisition of invasive features, Ets-1 also attenuates breast tumor cell growth and could therefore repress the growth of primary tumors and metastases. This work also demonstrates that 3D models may reveal mechanisms of tumor biology that are cryptic in standard 2D models.

  8. Nuclear stiffening inhibits migration of invasive melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J.S.; Khanna, Payal; Sukumar, Aishwarya; Dong, Cheng; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2014-01-01

    During metastasis, melanoma cells must be sufficiently deformable to squeeze through extracellular barriers with small pore sizes. We visualize and quantify deformability of single cells using micropipette aspiration and examine the migration potential of a population of melanoma cells using a flow migration apparatus. We artificially stiffen the nucleus with recombinant overexpression of Δ50 lamin A, which is found in patients with Hutchison Gilford progeria syndrome and in aged individuals. Melanoma cells, both WM35 and Lu1205, both show reduced nuclear deformability and reduced cell invasion with the expression of Δ50 lamin A. These studies suggest that cellular aging including expression of Δ50 lamin A and nuclear stiffening may reduce the potential for metastatic cancer migration. Thus, the pathway of cancer metastasis may be kept in check by mechanical factors in addition to known chemical pathway regulation. PMID:25544862

  9. Silencing of phosphoglucose isomerase/autocrine motility factor decreases U87 human glioblastoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wei, Zhenqing; Dong, Bin; Lian, Zhigang; Xu, Yinghui

    2016-04-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase/autocrine motility factor (PGI/AMF) is secreted by tumors and influences tumor growth and metastasis. In order to investigate the effects of silencing PGI/AMF on the migration and the sphere forming abilities of human glioblastoma U87 cells, as well as on the side population cells (SPCs), PGI/AMF was silenced using siRNA. Western blot analysis and RT-qPCR were used to assess the expression of PGI/AMF, Akt and SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2). Wound healing, migration and tumorsphere formation assays were performed to assess invasion and metastatic potential. The proportion of SPCs was determined using Hoechst 33342 dye and flow cytometric analysis. PGI/AMF silencing inhibited the wound healing capacity and migration ability of U87 cells by 52.6 and 80.4%, respectively, compared with the scrambled siRNA (both P<0.001). Silencing of PGI/AMF decreased the proportion of SPCs in the U87 cells by 80.9% (P<0.01). The silencing of PGI/AMF decreased the number and size of tumorspheres by 53.1 and 39.9%, respectively, compared with the scrambled siRNA (both P<0.01). The silencing of PGI/AMF decreased the levels of phosphorylated Akt (-71.9%, P<0.001) compared with the scrambled siRNA, as well as the levels of the stemness marker, SOX2 (-61.7%, P<0.01). Taken together, these findings suggest that PGI/AMF silencing decreases migration, tumorsphere formation as well as the proportion of SPCs in glioblastoma U87 cells. We suggest that the Akt pathway is involved, and our results provide a potential new target for the treatment of glioblastoma.

  10. Decrease of fibrinolytic activity in human endothelial cells by arsenite.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shinn-Jong; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wu, Hua-Lin; Han, Huai-Song; Shi, Guey-Yueh

    2002-01-01

    Blackfoot disease (BFD) is an endemic peripheral vascular occlusive disease that occurred in the southwest coast of Taiwan. It is believed that arsenic in the drinking water from artesian wells plays an important role in the development of the disease. We have previously shown that BFD patients had significant lower tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) antigen level and higher plasminogen activator inhibitor, Type 1 (PAI-1) antigen level than normal controls. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of arsenite on the fibrinolytic and anticoagulant activities of cultured macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells. Incubation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1), but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), with arsenite caused a decrease of t-PA mRNA level, a rise of both PAI-1 mRNA level and PAI activity. Arsenite could also inhibit the thrombomodulin (TM) mRNA expression and reduce the TM antigen level in HMEC-1. In conclusion, arsenite had a greater effect on HMEC-1 as compared to HUVECs in lowering the fibrinolytic activity and may be responsible for the reduced capacity of fibrinolysis associated with BFD.

  11. Matrine inhibits the migratory and invasive properties of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Xu, Min

    2015-06-01

    Matrine is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine that has historically been used in the treatment of inflammation and cancer. However, the antimetastatic effects and associated molecular mechanisms of matrine on nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remain to be elucidated. Therefore, the aims of the present study were to assess the antimetastatic effects of matrine on NPC, and identify the underlying mechanisms. Matrine inhibited the proliferation of NPC cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, matrine inhibited the migration and invasion of NPC tumor cells at doses below the toxic range. Following treatment with matrine for 24 h, there was a decrease in the protein expression levels and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in NPC‑039 cells. In addition, matrine markedly reduced the expression levels of p65 and p50 in the nuclei. Combined treatment of matrine with helenalin, a nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) inhibitor resulted in a synergistic reduction in MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 expression levels, and the invasive capabilities of the NPC‑039 cells were also reduced. In conclusion, matrine inhibits NPC cell migration and invasion by suppressing the NF‑κB pathway. These results suggest that matrine may be a potential therapeutic agent for NPC.

  12. Overexpression of transcriptional coactivator AIB1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma progression by enhancing cell proliferation and invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Chen, Q; Li, W; Su, X; Chen, T; Liu, Y; Zhao, Y; Yu, C

    2010-06-10

    Amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) is a transcriptional coactivator for nuclear receptors and other transcription factors. AIB1 has an important role in malignancy of several cancers such as breast and prostate cancers. However, its involvement in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression remains unclear. Here, we found that AIB1 protein was overexpressed in 23 of 34 human HCC specimens (68%). Down-regulation of AIB1 reduced HCC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation ability and tumorigenic potential in nude mice. These phenotypic changes caused by AIB1 knockdown correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1/Waf1) and decreased Akt activation and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and matrix metallopeptidase MMP-9. In agreement with these findings, clinical AIB1-positive HCC expressed higher levels of PCNA than AIB1-negative HCC. A positive correlation was established between the levels of AIB1 protein and PCNA protein in HCC, suggesting that AIB1 may contribute to HCC cell proliferation. In addition, MMP-9 expression in AIB1-postive HCC was significantly higher than that in AIB1-negative HCC, suggesting that AIB1-postive HCC may be more invasive. Collectively, our results show that overexpression of AIB1 promotes human HCC progression by enhancing cell proliferation and invasiveness. Therefore, AIB1 is a master regulator of human HCC growth and might be a useful molecular target for HCC prognosis and treatment.

  13. Lycopene inhibits the cell proliferation and invasion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Wu, Qundan; Zhang, Min; Huang, Jinbei

    2016-01-01

    Lycopene has been shown to be associated with anticancer effects in numerous tumor types. However, the underlying mechanisms of lycopene in human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remain to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the involvement of lycopene overload and the cytotoxic effects of lycopene on HNSCC cells, and to determine the possible mechanisms involved. Treatment with lycopene at a dose of >10 µM for >24 h inhibited the growth of FaDu and Cal27 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The clearest increase in growth inhibition was due to the apoptotic population being significantly increased. The invasion abilities decreased with 25 µM lycopene exerting significant inhibitory effects (P<0.01). Mechanistic studies revealed that lycopene induced the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein, B-cell lymphoma-associated X protein, and therefore, resulted in the inhibition of the protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. These data provided insights into the antitumor activity of lycopene in HNSCC cells. PMID:27510325

  14. Exogenous expression of N-cadherin in breast cancer cells induces cell migration, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hazan, R B; Phillips, G R; Qiao, R F; Norton, L; Aaronson, S A

    2000-02-21

    E- and N-cadherin are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules that mediate cell-cell adhesion and also modulate cell migration and tumor invasiveness. The loss of E-cadherin-mediated adhesion has been shown to play an important role in the transition of epithelial tumors from a benign to an invasive state. However, recent evidence indicates that another member of the cadherin family, N-cadherin, is expressed in highly invasive tumor cell lines that lacked E-cadherin expression. These findings have raised the possibility that N-cadherin contributes to the invasive phenotype. To determine whether N-cadherin promotes invasion and metastasis, we transfected a weakly metastatic and E-cadherin-expressing breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, with N-cadherin and analyzed the effects on cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Transfected cells expressed both E- and N-cadherin and exhibited homotypic cell adhesion from both molecules. In vitro, N-cadherin-expressing cells migrated more efficiently, showed an increased invasion of Matrigel, and adhered more efficiently to monolayers of endothelial cells. All cells produced low levels of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-9, which was dramatically upregulated by treatment with FGF-2 only in N-cadherin-expressing cells. Migration and invasion of Matrigel were also greatly enhanced by this treatment. When injected into the mammary fat pad of nude mice, N-cadherin-expressing cells, but not control MCF-7 cells, metastasized widely to the liver, pancreas, salivary gland, omentum, lung, lymph nodes, and lumbar spinal muscle. The expression of both E- and N-cadherin was maintained both in the primary tumors and metastatic lesions. These results demonstrate that N-cadherin promotes motility, invasion, and metastasis even in the presence of the normally suppressive E-cadherin. The increase in MMP-9 production by N-cadherin-expressing cells in response to a growth factor may endow them with a greater ability to penetrate matrix protein

  15. Stimulators of Mineralization Limit the Invasive Phenotype of Human Osteosarcoma Cells by a Mechanism Involving Impaired Invadopodia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cmoch, Anna; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Palczewska, Malgorzata; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Groves, Patrick; Pikula, Slawomir

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma (OS) is a highly aggressive bone cancer affecting children and young adults. Growing evidence connects the invasive potential of OS cells with their ability to form invadopodia (structures specialized in extracellular matrix proteolysis). Results In this study, we tested the hypothesis that commonly used in vitro stimulators of mineralization limit the invadopodia formation in OS cells. Here we examined the invasive potential of human osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) and osteolytic-like (143B) OS cells treated with the stimulators of mineralization (ascorbic acid and B-glycerophosphate) and observed a significant difference in response of the tested cells to the treatment. In contrast to 143B cells, osteoblast-like cells developed a mineralization phenotype that was accompanied by a decreased proliferation rate, prolongation of the cell cycle progression and apoptosis. On the other hand, stimulators of mineralization limited osteolytic-like OS cell invasiveness into collagen matrix. We are the first to evidence the ability of 143B cells to degrade extracellular matrix to be driven by invadopodia. Herein, we show that this ability of osteolytic-like cells in vitro is limited by stimulators of mineralization. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that mineralization competency determines the invasive potential of cancer cells. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which stimulators of mineralization regulate and execute invadopodia formation would reveal novel clinical targets for treating osteosarcoma. PMID:25314307

  16. Invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast showing partial reversed cell polarity are associated with lymphatic tumor spread and may represent part of a spectrum of invasive micropapillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Acs, Geza; Esposito, Nicole N; Rakosy, Zsuzsa; Laronga, Christine; Zhang, Paul J

    2010-11-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinomas (IMPC) of the breast are aggressive tumors frequently associated with lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis even when micropapillary (MP) differentiation is very focal within the tumors. We have noticed that some breast carcinomas showing lymphatic spread but lacking histologic features of IMPC have occasional tumor cell clusters reminiscent of those of IMPC without the characteristic prominent retraction artifact. To study the clinicopathologic significance of such features, we prospectively selected 1323 invasive ductal carcinomas and determined the presence and extent of MP differentiation and retraction artifact in the tumors. One representative tumor block per case was used for immunostaining for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Partial reverse cell polarity (PRCP) was defined as prominent linear EMA reactivity on at least part of the periphery of tumor cell clusters usually associated with decreased cytoplasmic staining. The clinicopathologic features of carcinomas with PRCP were compared with IMPC and invasive ductal (no special type) carcinomas without this feature. Of the 1323 cases, 96 (7.3%) and 92 (7.0%) showed MP features and the presence of PRCP, respectively. We found that the presence of both PRCP and MP features were strongly associated with decreased cytoplasmic EMA immunoreactivity and the presence of lymphatic invasion and nodal metastasis, even if such features were present only very focally. Our results suggest that breast carcinomas with PRCP may have the same implication as MP differentiation and these tumors may represent part of a spectrum of IMPC. Complete or partial reversal of cell polarity may play a significant role in lymphatic tumor spread.

  17. Enantioselective Effects of o,p'-DDT on Cell Invasion and Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells: Chirality in Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    He, Xiangming; Dong, Xiaowu; Zou, Dehong; Yu, Yang; Fang, Qunying; Zhang, Quan; Zhao, Meirong

    2015-08-18

    The o,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) with a chiral center possesses enantioselective estrogenic activity, in which R-(-)-o,p'-DDT exerts a more potent estrogenic effect than S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. Although concern regarding DDT exposure and breast cancer has increased in recent decades, the mode of enantioselective action of o,p'-DDT in breast cancer development is still unknown. Herein, we conducted a systematic study of the effect of o,p'-DDT on stereoselective breast tumor cell progression in a widely used in vitro breast tumor cell model, MCF-7 cells. We demonstrated that R-(-)-o,p'-DDT promoted more cancer cell invasion mediated by the human estrogen receptor (ER) by inducing invasion-promoted genes (matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and human telomerase reverse transcriptase) and inhibiting invasion-inhibited genes (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and -4). Molecular docking verified that the binding affinity between R-(-)-o,p'-DDT and human ER was stronger than that of S-(+)-o,p'-DDT. The enantioselective-induced decrease in cell-to-cell adhesion may involve the downregulation of adhesion-promoted genes (E-cadherin and β-catenin). For the first time, these results reveal that estrogenic-like chiral compounds are of significant concern in the progression of human cancers and that human health risk assessment of chiral chemicals should consider enantioselectivity.

  18. Globular adiponectin enhances invasion in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FALK LIBBY, EMILY; LIU, JIANZHONG; LI, YI; LEWIS, MONICA J.; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; HURST, DOUGLAS R.

    2016-01-01

    Every year, a large number of women succumb to metastatic breast cancer due to a lack of curative approaches for this disease. Adiponectin (AdipoQ) is the most abundant of the adipocyte-secreted adipokines. In recent years, there has been an interest in the use of AdipoQ and AdipoQ receptor agonists as therapeutic agents for the treatment of breast cancer. However, while multiple epidemiological studies have previously indicated that low levels of circulating plasma AdipoQ portend poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer, recent studies have reported that elevated expression levels of AdipoQ in breast tissue are correlated with advanced stages of the disease. Thus, the aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which AdipoQ in breast tissue acts directly on tumor cells to regulate the early steps of breast cancer metastasis. In the present study, the effects of different AdipoQ isoforms on the metastatic potential of human breast cancer cells were investigated. The results revealed that globular adiponectin (gAd) promoted invasive cell morphology and significantly increased the migration and invasion abilities of breast cancer cells, whereas full-length adiponectin (fAd) had no effect on these cells. Additionally, gAd, but not fAd, increased the expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 beta (LC3B)-II and intracellular LC3B puncta, which are indicators of autophagosome formation, thus suggesting autophagic induction by gAd. Furthermore, the inhibition of autophagic function by autophagy-related protein 7 knockdown attenuated the gAd-induced increase in invasiveness in breast cancer cells. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that a specific AdipoQ isoform may enhance breast cancer invasion, possibly via autophagic induction. Understanding the roles of the different AdipoQ isoforms as microenvironmental regulatory molecules may aid the development of effective AdipoQ-based treatments for breast cancer

  19. Prelamin A causes progeria through cell-extrinsic mechanisms and prevents cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Jorge; Freije, José M. P.; Cabanillas, Rubén; Osorio, Fernando G.; Fraga, Mario F.; Fernández-García, M. Soledad; Rad, Roland; Fanjul, Víctor; Ugalde, Alejandro P.; Liang, Qi; Prosser, Haydn M.; Bradley, Allan; Cadiñanos, Juan; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Defining the relationship between ageing and cancer is a crucial but challenging task. Mice deficient in Zmpste24, a metalloproteinase mutated in human progeria and involved in nuclear prelamin A maturation, recapitulate multiple features of ageing. However, their short lifespan and serious cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic alterations restrict the application and interpretation of carcinogenesis protocols. Here we present Zmpste24 mosaic mice that lack these limitations. Zmpste24 mosaic mice develop normally and keep similar proportions of Zmpste24-deficient (prelamin A accumulating) and Zmpste24-proficient (mature lamin A containing) cells throughout life, revealing that cell-extrinsic mechanisms are preeminent for progeria development. Moreover, prelamin A accumulation does not impair tumour initiation and growth, but it decreases the incidence of infiltrating oral carcinomas. Accordingly, silencing of ZMPSTE24 reduces human cancer cell invasiveness. Our results support the potential of cell-based and systemic therapies for progeria and highlight ZMPSTE24 as a new anticancer target. PMID:23917225

  20. Relationship between expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 and invasion ability of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yasuhito; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Mutsuo

    2002-01-01

    Constitutive overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is frequently observed in malignant tumors. MMPs are a family of zinc endopeptidases consisting of at least 20 different members. In particular, MMP-2 and MMP-9 are reported to be closely associated with invasion and metastasis in several cancers. We investigated whether expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 is associated with invasion ability of seven cervical cancer cells by administration of o-phenanthroline as MMP inhibitor. In two cell lines, Siha and Caski, MMP-2 mRNA and protein were expressed at high levels. After treatment with o-phenanthroline, the rate of invasion in these two cell lines was significantly decreased. In contrast, in the other two cell lines, HT-3 and Caski, high levels of MMP-9 mRNA and protein were expressed but there was no decrease in the rate of invasion in these cells after treatment with o-phenanthroline. The data suggest that expression level of MMP-2 mRNA may regulate with invasion ability of cervical cancer.

  1. Invasive oral cancer stem cells display resistance to ionising radiation.

    PubMed

    Gemenetzidis, Emilios; Gammon, Luke; Biddle, Adrian; Emich, Helena; Mackenzie, Ian C

    2015-12-22

    There is a significant amount of evidence to suggest that human tumors are driven and maintained by a sub-population of cells, known as cancer stem cells (CSC). In the case of head and neck cancer, such cells have been characterised by high expression levels of CD44 cell surface glycoprotein, while we have previously shown the presence of two diverse oral CSC populations in vitro, with different capacities for cell migration and proliferation. Here, we examined the response of oral CSC populations to ionising radiation (IR), a front-line measure for the treatment of head and neck tumors. We show that oral CSC initially display resistance to IR-induced growth arrest as well as relative apoptotic resistance. We propose that this is a result of preferential activation of the DNA damagerepair pathway in oral CSC with increased activation of ATM and BRCA1, elevated levels of DNA repair proteins RAD52, XLF, and a significantly faster rate of DNA double-strand-breaks clearance 24 hours following IR. By visually identifying CSC sub-populations undergoing EMT, we show that EMT-CSC represent the majority of invasive cells, and are more radio-resistant than any other population in re-constructed 3D tissues. We provide evidence that IR is not sufficient to eliminate CSC in vitro, and that sensitization of CD44hi/ESAlow cells to IR, followed by secondary EMT blockade, could be critical in order to reduce primary tumor recurrence, but more importantly to be able to eradicate cells capable of invasion and distant metastasis.

  2. Inhibition of pentraxin 3 in glioma cells impairs proliferation and invasion in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tung, Jai-Nien; Ko, Chung-Po; Yang, Shun-Fa; Cheng, Chun-Wen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Chang, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chia-Liang; Yang, Te-Fang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Chen, Kun-Chung

    2016-09-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is an inflammatory molecule that is involved in immune responses, inflammation, and cancer. Recent evidence suggests that PTX3 plays a critical role in tumor progression; however, its impact on the biological function of gliomas remains unknown. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining showed that patients with high-grade gliomas exhibited increased expression levels of PTX3 compared to those with low-grade gliomas (P < 0.001). Furthermore, knockdown of PTX3 in GBM8401 cells inhibits proliferation, increases p21 protein levels, and decreases cyclin D1 protein levels, resulting in cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase. In addition, knockdown of PTX3 significantly decreases GBM8401 cell migration and invasion through the downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -2 (MMP-1 and MMP-2) expression. In a GBM8401 xenograft animal model, PTX3 knockdown decreases tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, PTX3 plays an important role in glioma cell proliferation and invasion, and may thus serve as a novel potential therapeutic target in the treatment of gliomas.

  3. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  4. GM130 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of gastric cancer cells via snail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianquan; Yang, Chun; Guo, Shujun; Wu, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of digestive tract tumor. Despite of recent advances in surgical techniques and development of adjuvant therapy, the underlying mechanisms of gastric cancer remain poorly understood and relevant insight into novel treatment strategies using gene target remains incomplete. Recently, several studies report that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are unknown. As a cis-Golgi matrix protein, GM130 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, we found that GM130 expression has a positive correlation with the pathological differentiation and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage of gastric cancer. High GM130 expression levels also predict shorter overall survival of gastric cancer patients. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GM130 expression increased epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and decreased mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression in gastric cancer cells, suppressing cell invasion, and tumor formation. Furthermore, we found that GM130 upregulated expression of the key EMT regulator Snail (SNAI1), which mediated EMT activation and cell invasion by GM130. Taken together, our study indicates GM130 may be a promising therapeutic biomarker for gastric cancer. PMID:26617790

  5. GM130 regulates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion of gastric cancer cells via snail.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianquan; Yang, Chun; Guo, Shujun; Wu, Yonggang

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common causes of digestive tract tumor. Despite of recent advances in surgical techniques and development of adjuvant therapy, the underlying mechanisms of gastric cancer remain poorly understood and relevant insight into novel treatment strategies using gene target remains incomplete. Recently, several studies report that epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial process for the invasion and metastasis of epithelial tumors; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition are unknown. As a cis-Golgi matrix protein, GM130 plays an important role in cell cycle progression and transport of protein in the secretory pathway. In this study, we found that GM130 expression has a positive correlation with the pathological differentiation and tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage of gastric cancer. High GM130 expression levels also predict shorter overall survival of gastric cancer patients. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of GM130 expression increased epithelial marker (E-cadherin) and decreased mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and vimentin) expression in gastric cancer cells, suppressing cell invasion, and tumor formation. Furthermore, we found that GM130 upregulated expression of the key EMT regulator Snail (SNAI1), which mediated EMT activation and cell invasion by GM130. Taken together, our study indicates GM130 may be a promising therapeutic biomarker for gastric cancer. PMID:26617790

  6. Assessment of the anti-invasion potential and mechanism of select cinnamic acid derivatives on human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chiung-Man; Yen, Gow-Chin; Sun, Fang-Ming; Yang, Shun-Fa; Weng, Chia-Jui

    2013-05-01

    Patients with lung adenocarcinoma are often diagnosed with metastasizing symptoms and die of early and distal metastasis. Metastasis is made up of a cascade of interrelated and sequential steps, including cell adhesion, extracellular matrix degradation, cell movement, and invasion. Hence, substances carrying the ability to stop one of the metastasis-associated steps could be a potential candidate for preventing tumor cells from metastasizing and prolonging the life of cancer patients. Cinnamic acid (CA) was demonstrated to be such a candidate for human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of CA derivatives on invasion of lung cancer cells is still unclear. The aims of this study were to explore the mechanisms underlying several select CA derivatives against invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. The results revealed that caffeic acid (CAA), chlorogenic acid (CHA), and ferulic acid (FA) can inhibit phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated invasion of A549 cells at a concentration of ≥100 μM. The MMP-9 activity was suppressed by these compounds through regulating urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, and PAI-2; the cell-matrix adhesion was decreased by CAA only. The proposed molecular mechanism involved not only decreasing the signaling of MAPK and PI3K/Akt but also inactivating NF-κB, AP-1, and STAT3. In the present study, we selected CAA, CHA, and FA as potential inhibitors for invasive behaviors of human lung adenocarcinoma cells and disclosed the possible mechanisms. The association between structural features and anti-invasive activity of these compounds cannot be determined here and needs to be further verified.

  7. Isoginkgetin inhibits tumor cell invasion by regulating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sang-Oh; Shin, Sejeong; Lee, Ho-Jae; Chun, Hyo-Kon; Chung, An-Sik

    2006-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 plays a key role in tumor invasion. Inhibitors of MMP-9 were screened from Metasequoia glyptostroboides (Dawn redwood) and one potent inhibitor, isoginkgetin, a biflavonoid, was identified. Noncytotoxic levels of isoginkgetin decreased MMP-9 production profoundly, but up-regulated the level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, an inhibitor of MMP-9, in HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells. The major mechanism of Ras-dependent MMP-9 production in HT1080 cells was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation. Expression of dominant-active H-Ras and p85 (a subunit of PI3K) increased MMP-9 activity, whereas dominant-negative forms of these molecules decreased the level of MMP-9. H-Ras did not increase MMP-9 in the presence of a PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, and a NF-kappaB inhibitor, SN50. Further studies showed that isoginkgetin regulated MMP-9 production via PI3K/Akt/NF-kappaB pathway, as evidenced by the findings that isoginkgetin inhibited activities of both Akt and NF-kappaB. PI3K/Akt is a well-known key pathway for cell invasion, and isoginkgetin inhibited HT1080 tumor cell invasion substantially. Isoginkgetin was also quite effective in inhibiting the activities of Akt and MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 breast carcinomas and B16F10 melanoma. Moreover, isoginkgetin treatment resulted in marked decrease in invasion of these cells. In summary, PI3K/Akt is a major pathway for MMP-9 expression and isoginkgetin markedly decreased MMP-9 expression and invasion through inhibition of this pathway. This suggests that isoginkgetin could be a potential candidate as a therapeutic agent against tumor invasion.

  8. Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone inhibits proliferation, migration, and invasion of human lung carcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Liangrui; Zheng, Junxian; Sun, Qianqian; Wei, Kemin; Hu, Yijuan

    2016-01-01

    Radix Tetrastigma hemsleyani flavone (RTHF) is widely used as a traditional herb and has detoxification and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of RTHF on the growth and metastasis of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and evaluated its mechanisms. A549 cells were treated with RTHF at various concentrations for different periods. In vitro Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and colony formation methods showed that RTHF had dose- and time-dependent antiproliferation effects on A549 cells. A cell adhesion assay showed that RTHF decreased A549 cell adhesion in a dose-dependent manner. Cell invasion and migration were investigated using the Transwell assay and observed using an inverted microscope; the results showed that cell metastasis was significantly lower in the treatment group than that in the control group (P<0.01). Expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The results showed that the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 decreased, while that of TIMP-2 increased significantly in the RTHF group when compared with the results of the control group. These results show that RTHF exhibits antigrowth and antimetastasis activity in lung cancer A549 cells by decreasing the expression of MMP-2/-9 and TIMP-1 and increasing that of TIMP-2. PMID:26893573

  9. Use of mixed infections to study cell invasion and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella enterica in eukaryotic cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Segura, Ignacio; Casadesús, Josep; Ramos-Morales, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Epithelial cell lines are widely used as an in vitro model to study cell invasion by Salmonella. In turn, phagocytic cell lines are used to study Salmonella intracellular survival and proliferation. We describe a novel method, derived from the classical mixed infection procedure, to quantify invasion and proliferation defects in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. A eukaryotic cell culture is infected with two strains (e.g., a mutant and the wild-type). After infection, bacterial cells that remain extracellular are eliminated with gentamicin. At the end of the trial, intracellular bacteria are recovered and plated. Colonies from each strain are then counted for the calculation of a competitive index. Strain discrimination can be achieved either with antibiotic resistance markers or using plasmids encoding color markers (e.g., fluorescent proteins). Because both strains are exposed to the same conditions throughout the process, the procedure decreases the variability between independent trials and allows a direct measurement of the impairment of the mutant in invasion or intracellular proliferation.

  10. Increase in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Children with Sickle Cell Disease since Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Licensure

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Quinn, Charles T.; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Rogers, Zora R.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased with prophylactic penicillin, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV7) usage. We report 10 IPD cases since PCV7 licensure, including a recent surge of non-vaccine serotypes. IPD continues to be a serious risk in SCD. PMID:21193205

  11. The effect of ROCK-1 activity change on the adhesive and invasive ability of Y79 retinoblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common intraocular tumor in childhood worldwide. It is a deadly pediatric eye cancer. The main cause of death in Rb patients is intracranial and systemic metastasis. ROCK is the main downstream effector of Ras-homologous (Rho) family of GTPases which are involved in many cellular functions, such as cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis. Overexpression of ROCK promotes invasion and metastasis of many solid tumors. However, the effect of ROCK in Rb is largely unknown. Methods ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 mRNA expression in Y79 cell lines were examined by RT-PCR. Protein expression in the Y79 cell line were examined by western blot analyses. ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 siRNA were transfected into Y79 cells with Lipofectamine 2000. Cell proliferation was evaluated by CCK-8 assay after exposure to ROCK inhibitor (Y-27632). We examined the effect of ROCK inhibitors (Y-27632, ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 siRNA) on Y79 cell adhesive capacity by cell adhesion assay. Cell invasion assay through matrigel was used to study the effect of ROCK inhibitors on Y79 cell invasive capacity. Results The expression of mRNA of ROCK-1 was more than that of ROCK-2 in the Y79 cell line. The protein expression levels of ROCK-1 and ROCK-2 were downregulated in the cells transfected with siRNA. Y-27632 treatment didn’t lead to any changes of Y79 cells proliferation. Adhesive ability of Y79 cells was enhanced following Y-27632 or ROCK-1 siRNA treatment. The invasive capacity of Y79 cells showed an inverse relationship with increasing Y-27632 concentration. Invasiveness of Y79 cells also decreased in Y79 cells transfected with ROCK-1 siRNA. However, there was no change in adhesive ability or invasive capacity in Y79 cells transfected with siRNA against ROCK-2. Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate that ROCK-1 protein plays a key role in regulating metastasis and invasion of Y79 cells, suggesting that the ROCK-1 dependent pathway may be a potential target for

  12. Intermediate filaments in cell migration and invasion: the unusual suspects.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Cécile; Etienne-Manneville, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Cell migration is a multistep process which relies on the coordination of cytoskeletal structures in space and time. While the roles of actin and microtubules have been investigated in great details, the lack of inhibitors and visualizing tools and the large number of proteins forming intermediate filaments (IFs) have delayed the characterization of IF functions during migration. However, a large body of evidence has progressively pointed to changes in IF composition as an important parameter in the regulation of cell migratory properties both during development and tumor invasion. More recent in-depth analyses show that IFs are dynamically reorganized to participate, together with microfilaments and microtubules, to the key steps leading to cell migration.

  13. Caveolin-1 regulates cell apoptosis and invasion ability in paclitaxel-induced multidrug-resistant A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhang, Long; Zhou, Yongxin; Yi, Xianghua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect and potential mechanism of caveolin-1 (Cav1) knockdown in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells. The human paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cell line A549/Taxol was transfected with a Cav1 shRNA lentiviral vector. Interference efficiency for Cav1 was detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. A MTT assay was used to determine cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to detect the cell cycle stage and apoptosis. Cell migration and invasion capability were detected by a transwell assay. Protein levels of related signaling molecules were detected by Western blotting. We successfully constructed a stable A549/Taxol cell line expressing low levels of Cav1. Cav1 knockdown significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced G0/G1 arrest and cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, these effects correlated significantly with a reduction in cyclin D1 expression and activation of the Bcl-2/Bax-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Furthermore, knockdown of Cav1 inhibited cell migration and invasion, and this may be related to the inhibition of AKT and the subsequent decreased protein expression of MMP2, MMP7 and MMP9. PMID:26464635

  14. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hun; Koh, Minsoo; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras promotes proliferation and malignant phenotypic conversion of cells in cancer. Ras protein must be associated with cellular membranes for its oncogenic activities through post-translational modifications, including farnesylation. Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is essential for H-Ras membrane targeting, and H-Ras, but not N-Ras, has been demonstrated to cause an invasive phenotype in MCF10A breast epithelial cells. In the present study, it was observed that an FTase inhibitor (FTI), FTI-277, blocked epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced H-Ras activation, but not N-Ras activation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which express wild-type H-Ras and N-Ras. FTI-277 exerted a more potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of H-Ras-MCF10A cells and Hs578T breast cancer cells expressing an active mutant of H-Ras than that of MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasive/migratory phenotypes of the H-Ras-MCF10A and Hs578T cells were effectively inhibited by FTI-277 treatment. By contrast, FTI-277 did not affect the invasive/migratory phenotypes of MDA-MB-231 cells. However, the EGF-induced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by FTI-277, implicating that FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FTase inhibition by FTI-277 may be an effective strategy for targeting H-Ras-mediated proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells. PMID:27602167

  15. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hun; Koh, Minsoo; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras promotes proliferation and malignant phenotypic conversion of cells in cancer. Ras protein must be associated with cellular membranes for its oncogenic activities through post-translational modifications, including farnesylation. Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is essential for H-Ras membrane targeting, and H-Ras, but not N-Ras, has been demonstrated to cause an invasive phenotype in MCF10A breast epithelial cells. In the present study, it was observed that an FTase inhibitor (FTI), FTI-277, blocked epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced H-Ras activation, but not N-Ras activation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which express wild-type H-Ras and N-Ras. FTI-277 exerted a more potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of H-Ras-MCF10A cells and Hs578T breast cancer cells expressing an active mutant of H-Ras than that of MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasive/migratory phenotypes of the H-Ras-MCF10A and Hs578T cells were effectively inhibited by FTI-277 treatment. By contrast, FTI-277 did not affect the invasive/migratory phenotypes of MDA-MB-231 cells. However, the EGF-induced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by FTI-277, implicating that FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FTase inhibition by FTI-277 may be an effective strategy for targeting H-Ras-mediated proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells.

  16. Pepper seed extract suppresses invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon-A; Kim, Min-Sook; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the antimetastatic activities of chili pepper seed on human breast cancer cells. The water extract of chili pepper seeds was prepared and it contained a substantial amount of phenols (131.12 mg%) and no capsaicinoids. Pepper seed extract (PSE) suppressed the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 10, 25, and 50 μg/ml (MDA-MB-231: IC50 = 20.1 μg/ml, MCF-7: IC50 = 14.7 μg/ml). PSE increased the expression level of E-cadherin up to 1.2-fold of the control in MCF-7 cells. PSE also decreased the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells at the concentration of 25 and 50 μg/ml. PSE treatment significantly suppressed the invasion of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The motility of cancer cells was apparently retarded in the wound healing assay by the PSE treatment. Although our data collectively demonstrate that PSE inhibits invasion and migration of breast cancer cells, further study is needed to identify specific mechanisms and bioactive components contributing to antimetastatic effects of chili pepper seed. PMID:24341783

  17. Murine matrix metalloproteinase-20 overexpression stimulates cell invasion into the enamel layer via enhanced Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masashi; Suzuki, Maiko; Guan, Xiaomu; Smith, Charles E.; Bartlett, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (MMP20) is expressed by ameloblasts in developing teeth and MMP20 mutations cause enamel malformation. We established a stably transfected Tet-Off Mmp20-inducible ameloblast-lineage cell line and found that MMP20 expression promoted cell invasion. Previously, we engineered transgenic mice (Tg) that drive Mmp20 expression and showed that Mmp20+/+Tg mice had soft enamel. Here we asked if Mmp20 overexpression disrupts ameloblast function. Incisors from Mmp20+/+ mice expressing the Mmp20 Tg had a striking cell infiltrate which nearly replaced the entire enamel layer. A thin layer of enamel-like material remained over the dentin and at the outer tooth surface, but between these regions were invading fibroblasts and epithelial cells that surrounded ectopic bone-like calcifications. Mmp20+/+Tg mice had decreased enamel organ cadherin levels compared to the Mmp20 ablated and WT mice and, instead of predominantly locating adjacent to the ameloblast cell membrane, β-catenin was predominantly present within the nuclei of invading cells. Our data suggest that increased cadherin cleavage by transgenic MMP20 in the WT background releases excess β-catenin, which translocates to ameloblast nuclei to promote cell migration/invasion. Therefore, we conclude that MMP20 plays a role in normal ameloblast migration through tightly controlled Wnt signaling and that MMP20 overexpression disrupts this process. PMID:27403713

  18. Reduced Parasite Motility and Micronemal Protein Secretion by a p38 MAPK Inhibitor Leads to a Severe Impairment of Cell Invasion by the Apicomplexan Parasite Eimeria tenella

    PubMed Central

    Bussière, Françoise I.; Le Vern, Yves; Niepceron, Alisson; Silvestre, Anne; de Sablet, Thibaut; Lacroix-Lamandé, Sonia; Laurent, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    E. tenella infection is associated with a severe intestinal disease leading to high economic losses in poultry industry. Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are implicated in early response to infection and are divided in three pathways: p38, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Our objective was to determine the importance of these kinases on cell invasion by E. tenella. We evaluated the effect of specific inhibitors (ERK: PD98059, JNKII: SP600125, p38 MAPK: SB203580) on the invasion of epithelial cells. Incubation of SP600125 and SB203580 with epithelial cells and parasites significantly inhibited cell invasion with the highest degree of inhibition (90%) for SB203580. Silencing of the host p38α MAPK expression by siRNA led to only 20% decrease in cell invasion. In addition, when mammalian epithelial cells were pre-treated with SB203580, and washed prior infection, a 30% decrease in cell invasion was observed. This decrease was overcome when a p38 MAPK activator, anisomycin was added during infection. This suggests an active but limited role of the host p38 MAPK in this process. We next determined whether SB203580 has a direct effect on the parasite. Indeed, parasite motility and secretion of micronemal proteins (EtMIC1, 2, 3 and 5) that are involved in cell invasion were both decreased in the presence of the inhibitor. After chasing the inhibitor, parasite motility and secretion of micronemal proteins were restored and subsequently cell invasion. SB203580 inhibits cell invasion by acting partly on the host cell and mainly on the parasite. PMID:25689363

  19. BCL-2 family protein, BAD is down-regulated in breast cancer and inhibits cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Cekanova, Maria; Fernando, Romaine I; Siriwardhana, Nalin; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; De la Parra, Columba; Woraratphoka, Jirayus; Malone, Christine; Ström, Anders; Baek, Seung J; Wade, Paul A; Saxton, Arnold M; Donnell, Robert M; Pestell, Richard G; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie; Wimalasena, Jay

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-apoptotic protein BAD is expressed in normal human breast tissue and shown that BAD inhibits expression of cyclin D1 to delay cell-cycle progression in breast cancer cells. Herein, expression of proteins in breast tissues was studied by immunohistochemistry and results were analyzed statistically to obtain semi-quantitative data. Biochemical and functional changes in BAD-overexpressing MCF7 breast cancer cells were evaluated using PCR, reporter assays, western blotting, ELISA and extracellular matrix invasion assays. Compared to normal tissues, Grade II breast cancers expressed low total/phosphorylated forms of BAD in both cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments. BAD overexpression decreased the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, and phosphorylation of STATs. BAD inhibited Ras/MEK/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, without affecting the p38 signaling pathway. Expression of the metastasis-related proteins, MMP10, VEGF, SNAIL, CXCR4, E-cadherin and TlMP2 was regulated by BAD with concomitant inhibition of extracellular matrix invasion. Inhibition of BAD by siRNA increased invasion and Akt/p-Akt levels. Clinical data and the results herein suggest that in addition to the effect on apoptosis, BAD conveys anti-metastatic effects and is a valuable prognostic marker in breast cancer.

  20. DJ-1 Is Upregulated in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Promotes Oral Cancer Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuaimei; Ma, Dandan; Zhuang, Rui; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Ying; Wen, Jun; Cui, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: The development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a multistep process that involves in both genetic alterations and epigenetic modifications. DJ-1, a negative regulator of tumor suppressor PTEN, functions as an oncogene in many types of cancers. However, its role in OSCC is poorly known. Methods: Immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting were performed to evaluate the expression level of DJ-1 in oral leukoplakia (OLK) and OSCC tissues respectively. Then lentiviral mediated DJ-1 shRNA was constructed and used to infect the OSCC cell lines (Tca8113 and CAL-27). MTT, cell counting, and Matrigel invasion assay were utilized to examine the effects of DJ-1 down-regulation on proliferation and invasion capacity of oral cancer cells. Results: The immunoreactivity and expression level of DJ-1 protein was significantly increased in OLK and OSCC tissues compared with the controls. Lentiviral-delivered shRNA targeting DJ-1 could effectively knock down DJ-1 at mRNA and protein level (P<0.01). The proliferative and invasion ability of OSCC cell lines was significantly suppressed following DJ-1 inhibition (P<0.01). Conclusions: Our study indicated that DJ-1 is over-expressed in both oral precancer and cancer tissues and shRNA inhibition of DJ-1 expression led to decreased proliferation and invasion capability of oral cancer cells. These findings suggest that DJ-1 might be actively involved in the development of OSCC. Future studies will investigate the potential of DJ-1 as a biomarker for early detection of OSCC. PMID:27313793

  1. A novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro assay for the study of tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The induction of tumor cell invasion is an important step in tumor progression. Due to the cost and slowness of in-vivo invasion assays, there is need for quantitative in-vitro invasion assays that mimic as closely as possible the tumor environment and in which conditions can be rigorously controlled. Methods We have established a novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro invasion assay by embedding a monolayer of tumor cells between two layers of collagen. The cells were then allowed to invade the upper and lower layers of collagen. To visualize invading cells the gels were sectioned perpendicular to the monolayer so that after seeding the monolayer appears as a thin line precisely defining the origin of invasion. The number of invading tumor cells, their proliferation rate, the distance they traverse and the direction of invasion could then be determined quantitatively. Results The assay was used to compare the invasive properties of several tumor cell types and the results compare well with those obtained by previously described assays. Lysyl-oxidase like protein-2 (Loxl2) is a potent inducer of invasiveness. Using our assay we show for the first time that inhibition of endogenous Loxl2 expression in several types of tumor cells strongly inhibits their invasiveness. We also took advantage of the asymmetric nature of the assay in order to show that fibronectin enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells more potently than laminin. The asymmetric properties of the assay were also used to demonstrate that soluble factors derived from fibroblasts can preferentially attract invading breast cancer cells. Conclusion Our assay displays several advantages over previous invasion assays as it is allows the quantitative analysis of directional invasive behavior of tumor cells in a 3D environment mimicking the tumor microenvironment. It should be particularly useful for the study of the effects of components of the tumor microenvironment on tumor cell invasiveness. PMID

  2. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  3. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research. PMID:27150137

  4. Overexpression of WISP-1 down-regulated motility and invasion of lung cancer cells through inhibition of Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Soon, Lilian L; Yie, Ting-An; Shvarts, Anita; Levine, Arnold J; Su, Fei; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng

    2003-03-28

    Wnt-induced-secreted-protein-1 (WISP-1) is a cysteine-rich, secreted factor belonging to the CCN family. These proteins have been implicated in the inhibition of metastasis; however, the mechanisms involved have not been described. We demonstrated that overexpression of WISP-1 in H460 lung cancer cells inhibited lung metastasis and in vitro cell invasion and motility. We investigated the possibility that WISP-1 may regulate activation of Rac, a small GTPase important for cytoskeletal reorganizations during motility. In an indirect assay, WISP-1-expressing cells exhibited marked reduction in Rac activation compared with control cells. Blocking antibodies to alpha(v)beta(5) and alpha(1) integrins restored Rac activation in WISP-1 cells, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of WISP-1 on Rac lies downstream of integrins. Constitutively activated Rac mutant (RacG12V) was transfected into WISP-1 cells to restore Rac activation and these WISP-1/RacG12V transfectants were used for further studies. We performed microarray and real-time PCR analyses to identify genes involved in invasion that may be differentially regulated by WISP-1. Here, we showed decreased expression of metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in WISP-1 cells compared with controls but increased expression in WISP-1/RacG12V cells. In an invasion assay across collagen I, an MMP-1 target matrix, WISP-1 cells were significantly less invasive compared with controls, whereas WISP-1/RacG12V cells showed elevated invasion levels. This work illustrates a negatively regulated pathway by WISP-1 involving integrins and Rac in the down-regulation of invasion.

  5. miR-1179 promotes cell invasion through SLIT2/ROBO1 axis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Wang, Yongfang; Rong, Yaxiong; Xu, Lianhong; Chu, Ying; Zhang, Ying; Yao, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    MiR-1179, a new identified miRNA highly associated with metastasis of colorectal cancer which was never reported in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Here we measured the expression levels of miR-1179 and the candidate target gene in tissues from 40 patients with ESCC. Transwell, Dual-luciferase reporter assay and immunocytochemistry assay were employed to detect the function role of miR-1179 in vitro. We found that miR-1179 was up-regulated in human ESCC tumor tissues. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that SLIT2 acting as a new potential target of miR-1179 which was confirmed by luciferase reporter assay. Down-regulation of miR-1179 suppressed cell invasion in vitro with an increasing level of SLIT2 and ROBO1, besides, the up-regulation of SLIT2 decreased cell invasion through ROBO1. Taken together, these findings will shed light the role to mechanism of miR-1179 in regulating cell invasion via SLIT2/ROBO1 axis.

  6. Curcumin inhibits invasive capabilities through epithelial mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Marcela; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane) is an antioxidant that exerts antiproliferative and apoptotic effects and has anti-invasive and anti-metastatic properties. Evidence strongly implicates that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in malignant progression affecting genes such as Slug, AXL and Twist1. These genes are abnormally expressed in many tumors and favor metastasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential effect of curcumin on EMT, migration and invasion. Triple-positive and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and HER/neu were used: i) MCF-10F, a normal immortalized breast epithelial cell line (negative), ii) Tumor2, a malignant and tumorigenic cell line (positive) derived from Alpha5 cell line injected into the immunologically depressed mice and transformed by 60/60 cGy doses of high LET (linear energy transfer) α particles (150 keV/µm) of radiation and estrogen, and iii) a commercially available MDA-MB‑231 (negative). The effect of curcumin (30 µM for 48 h) was evaluated on expression of EMT-related genes by RT-qPCR. Results showed that curcumin decreased E-cadherin, N-cadherin, β-catenin, Slug, AXL, Twist1, Vimentin and Fibronectin protein expression, independently of the positivity of the markers in the cell lines. Curcumin also decreased migration and invasive capabilities in comparison to their own controls. It can be concluded that curcumin influenced biochemical changes associated with EMT-related genes that seems to promote such transition and are at the core of several signaling pathways that mediate the transition. Thus, it can be suggested that curcumin is able to prevent or delay cancer progression through the interruption of this process. PMID:27573203

  7. Curcumin inhibits invasive capabilities through epithelial mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Marcela; Calaf, Gloria M

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin (diferuloyl methane) is an antioxidant that exerts antiproliferative and apoptotic effects and has anti-invasive and anti-metastatic properties. Evidence strongly implicates that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in malignant progression affecting genes such as Slug, AXL and Twist1. These genes are abnormally expressed in many tumors and favor metastasis. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential effect of curcumin on EMT, migration and invasion. Triple-positive and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR) and HER/neu were used: i) MCF-10F, a normal immortalized breast epithelial cell line (negative), ii) Tumor2, a malignant and tumorigenic cell line (positive) derived from Alpha5 cell line injected into the immunologically depressed mice and transformed by 60/60 cGy doses of high LET (linear energy transfer) α particles (150 keV/µm) of radiation and estrogen, and iii) a commercially available MDA-MB‑231 (negative). The effect of curcumin (30 µM for 48 h) was evaluated on expression of EMT-related genes by RT-qPCR. Results showed that curcumin decreased E-cadherin, N-cadherin, β-catenin, Slug, AXL, Twist1, Vimentin and Fibronectin protein expression, independently of the positivity of the markers in the cell lines. Curcumin also decreased migration and invasive capabilities in comparison to their own controls. It can be concluded that curcumin influenced biochemical changes associated with EMT-related genes that seems to promote such transition and are at the core of several signaling pathways that mediate the transition. Thus, it can be suggested that curcumin is able to prevent or delay cancer progression through the interruption of this process.

  8. Inhibition of Fatty Acid Synthase Decreases Expression of Stemness Markers in Glioma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yasumoto, Yuki; Miyazaki, Hirofumi; Vaidyan, Linda Koshy; Kagawa, Yoshiteru; Ebrahimi, Majid; Yamamoto, Yui; Ogata, Masaki; Katsuyama, Yu; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Owada, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolic changes, especially to lipid metabolism, have recently been recognized as a hallmark of various cancer cells. However, little is known about the significance of cellular lipid metabolism in the regulation of biological activity of glioma stem cells (GSCs). In this study, we examined the expression and role of fatty acid synthase (FASN), a key lipogenic enzyme, in GSCs. In the de novo lipid synthesis assay, GSCs exhibited higher lipogenesis than differentiated non-GSCs. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses revealed that FASN is strongly expressed in multiple lines of patient-derived GSCs (G144 and Y10), but its expression was markedly reduced upon differentiation. When GSCs were treated with 20 μM cerulenin, a pharmacological inhibitor of FASN, their proliferation and migration were significantly suppressed and de novo lipogenesis decreased. Furthermore, following cerulenin treatment, expression of the GSC markers nestin, Sox2 and fatty acid binding protein (FABP7), markers of GCSs, decreased while that of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression increased. Taken together, our results indicate that FASN plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of GSC stemness, and FASN-mediated de novo lipid biosynthesis is closely associated with tumor growth and invasion in glioblastoma. PMID:26808816

  9. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity. PMID:25362512

  10. Loss of the lac operon contributes to Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through derepression of flagellar synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lingyan; Ni, Zhiwei; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu; Liu, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella, a genus that is closely related to Escherichia coli, includes many pathogens of humans and other animals. A notable feature that distinguishes Salmonella from E. coli is lactose negativity, because the lac operon is lost in most Salmonella genomes. Here, we expressed the lac operon in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and compared the virulence of the Lac(+) strain to that of the wild-type strain in a murine model, invasion assays, and macrophage replication assays. We showed that the Lac(+) strain is attenuated in vivo and the attenuation of virulence is caused by its defect in epithelial cell invasion. However, the invasion-defective phenotype is unrelated to lactose utilization. Through sequencing and the comparison of the transcriptome profile between the Lac(+) and wild-type strains during invasion, we found that most flagellar genes were markedly downregulated in the Lac(+) strain, while other genes associated with invasion, such as the majority of genes encoded in Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, were not differentially expressed. Moreover, we discovered that lacA is the major repressor of flagellar gene expression in the lac operon. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the lac operon decreases Salmonella invasion of epithelial cells through repression of flagellar biosynthesis. As the ability to invade epithelial cells is a critical virulence determinant of Salmonella, our results provide important evidence that the loss of the lac operon contributes to the evolution of Salmonella pathogenicity.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates from South America Use an Atypical Red Blood Cell Invasion Pathway Associated with Invasion Ligand Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Perez, Mary; Villasis, Elizabeth; Machado, Ricardo L. D.; Póvoa, Marinete M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Blair, Silvia; Gamboa, Dionicia; Lustigman, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Studies of Plasmodium falciparum invasion pathways in field isolates have been limited. Red blood cell (RBC) invasion is a complex process involving two invasion protein families; Erythrocyte Binding-Like (EBL) and the Reticulocyte Binding-Like (PfRh) proteins, which are polymorphic and not fully characterized in field isolates. To determine the various P. falciparum invasion pathways used by parasite isolates from South America, we studied the invasion phenotypes in three regions: Colombia, Peru and Brazil. Additionally, polymorphisms in three members of the EBL (EBA-181, EBA-175 and EBL-1) and five members of the PfRh (PfRh1, PfRh2a, PfRh2b, PfRh4, PfRh5) families were determined. We found that most P. falciparum field isolates from Colombia and Peru invade RBCs through an atypical invasion pathway phenotypically characterized as resistant to all enzyme treatments (NrTrCr). Moreover, the invasion pathways and the ligand polymorphisms differed substantially among the Colombian and Brazilian isolates while the Peruvian isolates represent an amalgam of those present in the Colombian and Brazilian field isolates. The NrTrCr invasion profile was associated with the presence of the PfRh2a pepC variant, the PfRh5 variant 1 and EBA-181 RVNKN variant. The ebl and Pfrh expression levels in a field isolate displaying the NrTrCr profile also pointed to PfRh2a, PfRh5 and EBA-181 as being possibly the major players in this invasion pathway. Notably, our studies demonstrate the uniqueness of the Peruvian P. falciparum field isolates in terms of their invasion profiles and ligand polymorphisms, and present a unique opportunity for studying the ability of P. falciparum parasites to expand their invasion repertoire after being reintroduced to human populations. The present study is directly relevant to asexual blood stage vaccine design focused on invasion pathway proteins, suggesting that regional invasion variants and global geographical variation are likely to preclude a simple

  12. Cytoplasmic Expression of Pontin in Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Tumor Invasion, Metastasis and Patients’ Survival

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Ren, Juchao; Yan, Lei; Tang, Yueqing; Zhang, Wenhua; Li, Dawei; Zang, Yuanwei; Kong, Feng; Xu, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most lethal of all genitourinary malignancies. Distant metastasis represents the major cause of death in patients with RCC. Recent studies have implicated the AAA+ ATPase pontin in many cellular activities that are highly relevant to carcinogenesis. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that pontin was up-regulated in RCC, and plays a previously unknown pro-invasive role in the metastatic progression of RCC through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. 28 pairs of freshly frozen clear cell RCC samples and the matched normal renal tissues analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting demonstrated that pontin was up-regulated in clear cell RCC tissues than in normal renal tissues. In addition, immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate subcellular pontin expression in 95 RCC patients, and found that overexpression of pontin in cytoplasm positively correlated with the metastatic features, predicting unfavorable outcomes of RCC patients. Furthermore, in vitro experiments show pontin was predominantly expressed in cytoplasm of RCC cell lines, and a significant suppression of cell migration and invasion in pontin siRNA treated RCC cell lines was observed. Mechanistic studies show that pontin depletion up-regulated the E-cadherin protein and down-regulated vimentin protein, and decreased nuclear β-catenin expression, suggesting the involvement of EMT in pontin induced metastatic progression. Together, our data suggest pontin as a potential prognostic biomarker in RCC, and provide new promising therapeutic targets for clinical intervention of kidney cancers. PMID:25751257

  13. Decreased sensitivity of drug-resistant cells towards T cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Classen, C F; Fulda, S; Friesen, C; Debatin, K M

    1999-03-01

    Killing of target cells by cytotoxic T cells is mediated by induction of apoptosis requiring functional death pathways. Kill is mediated either by the CD95 or the perforin/granzyme pathway. We found that SH-EP neuroblastoma cells are preferentially killed via CD95, while in the T leukemia cell line CEM CD95 and perforin/granzyme are involved. In both types of cell lines, cells resistant to CD95- and drug-induced apoptosis are crossresistant to cytotoxic T cell kill. Resistant cells show decreased apoptosis and deficient activation of caspases indicated by decreased cleavage of the prototype caspase substrate PARP. Preincubation with the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk strongly decreased LAK cell kill in sensitive cells. Although parental CEM cells could be sensitized for LAK kill by preincubation with doxorubicin, resistance could not be reverted in doxorubicin or CD95 resistant CEM cells. These data demonstrate the crossresistance in induction of apoptosis by different cytotoxic regimens in tumor cells and may have implications for the immunotherapy of tumors in which apoptosis resistance was induced by previous chemotherapy.

  14. Silencing of stat4 gene inhibits cell proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J M; Yao, M R; Zhu, Q; Wu, X Y; Zhou, J; Tan, W L; Zhan, S H

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) play critical roles in development, proliferation, and immune defense. However the consequences of STAT hyperactivity can predispose to diseases, including colorectal cancer. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the function of STAT4 in human colorectal cancer (CRC). The expression of STAT4 was examined by immunohistochemical assay using a tissue microarray procedure. A loss-of-function experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of lentivirus-mediated STAT4 shRNA (Lv-shSTAT4) on cell proliferation and invasive potential indicated by MTT and Transwell assays in CRC cell lines (SW480 and Caco2). As a consequence, it was found that the expression of STAT4 protein was significantly increased in CRC tissues compared with that in adjacent non-cancerous tissues (ANCT) (71.1% vs 44.4%, P=0.015), and was related with the Duke’s staging and depth of invasion in CRC patients (P=0.022; P=0.001). Silencing of STAT4 gene suppressed cell proliferation and invasion of CRC cells. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that increased expression of STAT4 is positively correlated with the depth of invasion in CRC patients, and inhibition of STAT4 expression represses the growth and invasion of CRC cells, suggesting that STAT4 may be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of CRC.

  15. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary lesion were examined. We used flow cytometry to identify different DCs subtypes—including BDCA1-positive myeloid DCs (mDCs), BDCA3-positive mDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs)—and determine their maturation markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) in all participants. We also identified follicular DCs (fDCs), Langerhans DCs (LDCs), and pDCs in 42 patients by immunohistochemistry. Results COPD was diagnosed in 43 patients (16 current smokers and 27 former smokers), whereas the remaining 32 subjects were classified as non-COPD (11 current smokers, 13 former smokers, and 8 never smokers). The number and maturation of DCs did not differ significantly between COPD and non-COPD patients. However, the results of flow cytometry indicated that maturation markers CD40 and CD83 of BDCA1-positive mDCs were significantly decreased in smokers than in non-smokers (P = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively). Immunohistochemistry also revealed a lower number of LDCs in COPD patients than in non-COPD subjects. Conclusions Cigarette smoke, rather than airflow limitation, is the main determinant of impaired DCs maturation in the lung. PMID:27058955

  16. MicroRNA-101 regulates the viability and invasion of cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Huang, Fei; Shen, Guqun; Yiming, Adilijiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer has the second highest morbidity and mortality rates of any malignancy in women worldwide, and it is one of the leading causes of death in Uygur women in Xinjiang China. MicroRNAs are involved in cancer development and progression. Previously, we found that miR-101 is significantly down-regulated in cervical cancer tissues from Uyghur women. The underlying pathophysiology and relevance to tumorigenesis of miR-101 is still largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of miR-101 regulation of cervical cancer cell viability and invasion. Materials and methods: The expression of miR-101 in cervical cancer cell line (SiHa) was detected by real-time PCR. A miR-101 mimic was overexpressed in SiHa cells, and MTT assays were performed to determine the impact on cell proliferation. Cell would heal assays and flow cytometry were used to detect migratory ability and cellular apoptosis, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess protein expression of the miR-101 target gene COX-2. Results: MiR-101 was endogenously expressed in SiHa cells, and alterations in its expression had profound effects on cellular migration and invasion efficiency. Overexpression of miR-101 decreased proliferation in the MTT assay (the mimics at 490 nm absorbance is lower 60% than normal, and decreased cellular motility in the cell would healing assay (transfected: 37 ± 2 m, pre-transfected 184 ± 2 m). Apoptosis rate was significantly higher with overexpression of miR-101 relative to control (transfected: 76.6%, pre-transfected: 3.5%) (P < 0.05). The expression of Cox-2 was decreased in transfected cells. Conclusions: MiR-101 likely acts as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer. Overexpression of miR-101 decreased expression of its target gene Cox-2 and inhibited proliferation and invasion, and promoted apoptosis to suppress tumorigenicity. MiR-101 is a promising new target for the development of therapeutic strategies

  17. Use of a Tissue Engineered Human Skin Model to Investigate the Effects of Wounding and of an Anti-Inflammatory on Melanoma Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Marques, Claudia Mirian de Godoy; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest inflammation stimulates tumour invasion. In melanoma, despite recent advances in targeted therapy and immunomodulatory therapies, this cancer remains difficult to treat. Our previous studies show melanoma cells interact with skin cells in their invasion into tissue engineered skin and suggest inflammation stimulates invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of an anti-inflammatory on melanoma invasion. To do this we developed a wounded and inflamed in vitro 3D melanoma model in which to investigate the use of an anti-inflammatory on melanoma invasion. The tissue engineered skin model was based on human de-epidermised acellular dermis to which keratinocytes, fibroblasts and three different melanoma cell lines were added in various combinations. A simple incisional wound was made in the model and TNF-α and fibrin were added to simulate conditions of inflammation. Topical ibuprofen in a hydrogel was added and the extent of melanoma invasion into the dermis was assessed under the various conditions. The results showed that penetration of two of the cell lines (HBL and A375SM) into the tissue engineered skin was exacerbated by wounding and ibuprofen significantly decreased invasion of A375SM cells and slightly reduced invasion of HBL cells. A third cell line, C8161, was aggressively invasive under all conditions to an extent that was not influenced by wounding, TNF-α or the addition of ibuprofen. In summary, the results for one these cell lines (and a trend for a second cell line) support the hypothesis that a wound environment is conducive to melanoma invasion but the local addition of an anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen may attenuate invasion.

  18. Use of a Tissue Engineered Human Skin Model to Investigate the Effects of Wounding and of an Anti-Inflammatory on Melanoma Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Claudia Mirian de Godoy; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest inflammation stimulates tumour invasion. In melanoma, despite recent advances in targeted therapy and immunomodulatory therapies, this cancer remains difficult to treat. Our previous studies show melanoma cells interact with skin cells in their invasion into tissue engineered skin and suggest inflammation stimulates invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of an anti-inflammatory on melanoma invasion. To do this we developed a wounded and inflamed in vitro 3D melanoma model in which to investigate the use of an anti-inflammatory on melanoma invasion. The tissue engineered skin model was based on human de-epidermised acellular dermis to which keratinocytes, fibroblasts and three different melanoma cell lines were added in various combinations. A simple incisional wound was made in the model and TNF-α and fibrin were added to simulate conditions of inflammation. Topical ibuprofen in a hydrogel was added and the extent of melanoma invasion into the dermis was assessed under the various conditions. The results showed that penetration of two of the cell lines (HBL and A375SM) into the tissue engineered skin was exacerbated by wounding and ibuprofen significantly decreased invasion of A375SM cells and slightly reduced invasion of HBL cells. A third cell line, C8161, was aggressively invasive under all conditions to an extent that was not influenced by wounding, TNF-α or the addition of ibuprofen. In summary, the results for one these cell lines (and a trend for a second cell line) support the hypothesis that a wound environment is conducive to melanoma invasion but the local addition of an anti-inflammatory drug such as ibuprofen may attenuate invasion. PMID:27270229

  19. FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiong; Song, Xu; Wang, Jun; Gu, Jia; Zhang, Weijian; Hu, Jinxia; Zhou, Xiuping; Yu, Rutong

    2015-01-01

    Fyn-related kinase (FRK), a member of Src-related tyrosine kinases, is recently reported to function as a potent tumor suppressor in several cancer types. Our previous study has also shown that FRK over-expression inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. However, the mechanism of FRK effect on glioma cell migration and invasion, a feature of human malignant gliomas, is still not clear. In this study, we found that FRK over-expression increased the protein level of N-cadherin, but not E-cadherin. Meanwhile, FRK over-expression promoted β-catenin translocation to the plasma membrane, where it formed complex with N-cadherin, while decreased β-catenin level in the nuclear fraction. In addition, down-regulation of N-cadherin by siRNA promoted the migration and invasion of glioma U251 and U87 cells and abolished the inhibitory effect of FRK on glioma cell migration and invasion. In summary, these results indicate that FRK inhibits migration and invasion of human glioma cells by promoting N-cadherin/β-catenin complex formation.

  20. S100P interacts with integrin α7 and increases cancer cell migration and invasion in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Ling; Hung, Jen-Yu; Liang, Yung-Yu; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Tsai, Ming-Ju; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Lu, Chi-Yu; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2015-10-01

    S100P, a Ca2+ binding protein, has been shown to be overexpressed in various cancers. However, its functional character in lung cancer remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that S100P increases cancer migration, invasion and metastasis in lung cancer cells. Ectopic expression of S100P increases migration, invasion and EMT in less invasive CL1-0 lung cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of S100P suppressed migration and invasion, and caused a reversion of EMT in highly invasive lung cancer cells. These effects were transduced by increasing the interaction of S100P with integrin α7, which activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and AKT. Blocking FAK significantly decreased S100P-induced migration by decreasing Src and AKT activation, whereas inhibiting AKT reduced S100P upregulation on ZEB1 expression. Further study has indicated that S100P knockdown prevents the spread of highly metastatic human lung cancer in animal models. This study therefore suggests that S100P represents a critical activator of lung cancer metastasis. Detection and targeted treatment of S100P-expressing cancer is an attractive therapeutic strategy in treating lung cancer. PMID:26320193

  1. miR-1 Inhibits Cell Growth, Migration, and Invasion by Targeting VEGFA in Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Junjie; Guo, Qiaoge; Niu, Dongju; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs and have been shown to play a crucial role in the osteosarcoma (OS) tumorigenesis and progression. VEGFA is a key regulator of angiogenesis and plays an important role in regulation of tumor metastasis. The objective of this study was to determine whether VEGFA was involved in miR-1-mediated suppression of proliferation, migration, and invasion of OS cells. The expression levels of miR-1 were significantly lower in OS tumor tissues than those in adjacent normal tissues and in SAOS-2 and U2OS cell lines compared to a normal osteoblast (NHOst) cell line. VEGFA was upregulated in OS tumor tissues and SAOS-2 and U2OS cell lines. The results of CCK-8 assay and transwell assay showed that miR-1 acted as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in U2OS cells. Dual luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that VEGFA was a direct and functional target gene of miR-1. miR-1 directly inhibits the protein expression of VEGFA via its 3′-UTR. Knockdown of VEGFA by siRNA inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion of U2OS cells. Our study suggested the potential inhibitory function of miR-1 in OS cell proliferation, migration, and invasion via inhibiting VEGFA. PMID:27777493

  2. Endostatin induces proliferation of oral carcinoma cells but its effect on invasion is modified by the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Alahuhta, Ilkka; Aikio, Mari; Väyrynen, Otto; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Suojanen, Juho; Teppo, Susanna; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Salo, Tuula; Nyberg, Pia

    2015-08-01

    The turnover of extracellular matrix liberates various cryptic molecules with novel biological activities. Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that is derived from the non-collagenous domain of collagen XVIII. Although there are a large number of studies on its anti-tumor effects, the molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood, and the reasons why endostatin has not been successful in clinical trials are unclear. Research has mostly focused on its anti-angiogenic effect in tumors. Here, we aimed to elucidate how endostatin affects the behavior of aggressive tongue HSC-3 carcinoma cells that were transfected to overproduce endostatin. Endostatin inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells in a 3D collagen–fibroblast model. However, it had no effect on invasion in a human myoma organotypic model, which lacks vital fibroblasts. Recombinant endostatin was able to reduce the Transwell migration of normal fibroblasts, but had no effect on carcinoma associated fibroblasts. Surprisingly, endostatin increased the proliferation and decreased the apoptosis of cancer cells in organotypic models. Also subcutaneous tumors overproducing endostatin grew bigger, but showed less local invasion in nude mice xenografts. We conclude that endostatin affects directly to HSC-3 cells increasing their proliferation, but its net effect on cancer invasion seem to depend on the cellular composition and interactions of tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Endostatin affects not only angiogenesis, but also carcinoma cells and fibroblasts. • Endostatin increased carcinoma cell proliferation, but decreased 3D invasion. • The invasion inhibitory effect was sensitive to the microenvironment composition. • Fibroblasts may be a factor regulating the fluctuating roles of endostatin.

  3. Epb41l3 suppresses esophageal squamous cell carcinoma invasion and inhibits MMP2 and MMP9 expression.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Huang, Jun-Peng; Li, Xu Feng; Xiong, Wei-Bin; Wu, Gang; Jiang, Zhao-Jing; Song, Shu-Jie; Li, Ji-Qiang; Zheng, Yan-Fang; Zhang, Ji-Ren

    2016-04-01

    EPB41L3 may play a role as a metastasis suppressor by supporting regular arrangements of actin stress fibres and alleviating the increase in cell motility associated with enhanced metastatic potential. Downregulation of epb41l3 has been observed in many cancers, but the role of this gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) remains unclear. Our study aimed to determine the effect of epb41l3 on ESCC cell migration and invasion. We investigated epb41l3 protein expression in tumour and non-tumour tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Expression in the non-neoplastic human esophageal cell line Het-1a and four ESCC cell lines - Kyse150, Kyse510, Kyse450 and Caes17 - was assessed by quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting. Furthermore, an EPB41L3 overexpression plasmid and EPB41L3-specific small interfering RNA were used to upregulate EPB41L3 expression in Kyse150 cells and to downregulate EPB41L3 expression in Kyse450 cells, respectively. Cell migration and invasion were evaluated by wound healing and transwell assays, respectively. The expression levels of p-AKT, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and MMP9 were evaluated. Expression of epb41l3 was significantly lower in tumour tissues than in non-tumour tissues and in ESCC cell lines compared with the Het-1a cell line. Kyse450 and Caes17 cells exhibited higher expression of epb41l3 than Kyse150 and Kyse510 cells. Overexpressing epb41l3 decreased Kyse150 cell migration and invasion, whereas EPB41L3-specific small interfering RNA silencing increased these functions in Kyse450 cells. Furthermore, overexpressing epb41l3 led to downregulation of MMP2 and MMP9 in Kyse150 and Kyse510 cells. Our findings reveal that EPB41L3 suppresses tumour cell invasion and inhibits MMP2 and MMP9 expression in ESCC cells.

  4. Deguelin inhibits the migration and invasion of lung cancer A549 and H460 cells via regulating actin cytoskeleton rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Honggang; Jiao, Yan; Zhang, Zuncheng

    2015-01-01

    Deguelin, the main components from Mundulea sericea, was reported to suppress the growth of various cancer cells. However, the effect of Deguelin on tumor cell invasion and metastasis and its mechanism still unclear so far. In this study, we investigated the effects of Deguelin on the cell invasion in human lung cancer A549 and H460 cells. Our results demonstrate that Deguelin can significantly inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell invasion. Moreover, Deguelin could also affected reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton and decreased filopodia and lamellipodia formation. Furthermore, deguelin-treated tumors showed decreased the tumor metastasis related genes such as CD44, MMP2 and MMP9 at protein and mRNA levels and the content of CEA, SCC, NSE, CYFAR21-1. In addition, Deguelin down-regulated protein expression of Rac1 and Rock1, which are impotent in actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and cell motility. Together, our results suggest that Deguelin inhibit tumor growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells and might be a candidate compound for curing lung cancer. PMID:26884827

  5. Amygdalin blocks the in vitro adhesion and invasion of renal cell carcinoma cells by an integrin-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Afschar, Masud; Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Tsaur, Igor; Mani, Jens; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-03-01

    Information about the natural compound amygdalin, which is employed as an antitumor agent, is sparse and thus its efficacy remains controversial. In this study, to determine whether amygdalin exerts antitumor effects on renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells, its impact on RCC metastatic activity was investigated. The RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, were exposed to amygdalin from apricot kernels, and adhesion to human vascular endothelium, immobilized collagen or fibronectin was investigated. The influence of amygdalin on chemotactic and invasive activity was also determined, as was the influence of amygdalin on surface and total cellular α and β integrin expression, which are involved in metastasis. We noted that amygdalin caused significant reductions in chemotactic activity, invasion and adhesion to endothelium, collagen and fibronectin. Using FACScan analysis, we noted that amygdalin also induced reductions, particularly in integrins α5 and α6, in all three cell lines. Functional blocking of α5 resulted in significantly diminished adhesion of KTC-26 and A498 to collagen and also in decreased chemotactic behavior in all three cell lines. Blocking α6 integrin significantly reduced chemotactic activity in all three cell lines. Thus, we suggest that exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibits metastatic spread and is associated with downregulation of α5 and α6 integrins. Therefore, we posit that amygdalin exerts antitumor activity in vitro, and this may be linked to integrin regulation. PMID:26781971

  6. A Modified In vitro Invasion Assay to Determine the Potential Role of Hormones, Cytokines and/or Growth Factors in Mediating Cancer Cell Invasion.

    PubMed

    Bagati, Archis; Koch, Zethan; Bofinger, Diane; Goli, Haneesha; Weiss, Laura S; Dau, Rosie; Thomas, Megha; Zucker, Shoshanna N

    2015-04-24

    Blood serum serves as a chemoattractant towards which cancer cells migrate and invade, facilitating their intravasation into microvessels. However, the actual molecules towards which the cells migrate remain elusive. This modified invasion assay has been developed to identify targets which drive cell migration and invasion. This technique compares the invasion index under three conditions to determine whether a specific hormone, growth factor, or cytokine plays a role in mediating the invasive potential of a cancer cell. These conditions include i) normal fetal bovine serum (FBS), ii) charcoal-stripped FBS (CS-FBS), which removes hormones, growth factors, and cytokines and iii) CS-FBS + molecule (denoted "X"). A significant change in cell invasion with CS-FBS as compared to FBS, indicates the involvement of hormones, cytokines or growth factors in mediating the change. Individual molecules can then be added back to CS-FBS to assay their ability to reverse or rescue the invasion phenotype. Furthermore, two or more factors can be combined to evaluate the additive or synergistic effects of multiple molecules in driving or inhibiting invasion. Overall, this method enables the investigator to determine whether hormones, cytokines, and/or growth factors play a role in cell invasion by serving as chemoattractants or inhibitors of invasion for a particular type of cancer cell or a specific mutant. By identifying specific chemoattractants and inhibitors, this modified invasion assay may help to elucidate signaling pathways that direct cancer cell invasion.

  7. SRCIN1 Suppressed Osteosarcoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Hu; Li, Xiaotao; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Chengbin; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    SRCIN1 (SRC kinase signalling inhibitor 1) is a new tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies showed that SRCIN1 played a tumor suppressor role in the development of lung cancer and breast cancer. However, the role of SRCIN1 in osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma cell lines compared with osteoblastic cell line. Moreover, SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues compared with the adjacent tissues. Further investigation revealed that overexpression of SRCIN1 inhibited the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 proliferation. This effect was confirmed by measuring the ki-67 and PCNA expression. SRCIN1 overexpression promoted E-cadherin expression and suppressed N-cadherin, Vimentin and Snail expression, suggesting that SRCIN1 overexpression inhibited EMT of the osteosarcoma cell. In addition, ectopic expression of SRCIN1 inhibited the MG-63 cell colony formation and invasion. These data suggested that SRCIN1 acted as a tumor suppressor gene in the development of osteosarcoma. PMID:27513473

  8. SRCIN1 Suppressed Osteosarcoma Cell Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Hu; Li, Xiaotao; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Chengbin; Zhu, Daling

    2016-01-01

    SRCIN1 (SRC kinase signalling inhibitor 1) is a new tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies showed that SRCIN1 played a tumor suppressor role in the development of lung cancer and breast cancer. However, the role of SRCIN1 in osteosarcoma is still unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma cell lines compared with osteoblastic cell line. Moreover, SRCIN1 was downregulated in osteosarcoma tissues compared with the adjacent tissues. Further investigation revealed that overexpression of SRCIN1 inhibited the osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 proliferation. This effect was confirmed by measuring the ki-67 and PCNA expression. SRCIN1 overexpression promoted E-cadherin expression and suppressed N-cadherin, Vimentin and Snail expression, suggesting that SRCIN1 overexpression inhibited EMT of the osteosarcoma cell. In addition, ectopic expression of SRCIN1 inhibited the MG-63 cell colony formation and invasion. These data suggested that SRCIN1 acted as a tumor suppressor gene in the development of osteosarcoma. PMID:27513473

  9. Raf kinase inhibitor protein suppresses nuclear factor-κB-dependent cancer cell invasion at the level of matrix metalloproteinase expression but not cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Beshir, Anwar B.; Ren, Gang; Magpusao, Anniefer N.; Barone, Lauren M.; Yeung, Kam C.; Fenteany, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), which negatively regulates multiple signaling cascades including the Raf and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways, functions as a metastasis suppressor. However, the basis for this activity is not clear. We investigated this question in a panel of breast cancer, colon cancer and melanoma cell lines. We found that RKIP negatively regulated the invasion of the different cancer cells through three-dimensional extracellular matrix barriers by controlling the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly, MMP-1 and MMP-2. Silencing of RKIP expression resulted in a highly invasive phenotype and dramatically increased levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2 expression, while overexpression of RKIP decreased cancer cell invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo of murine tumor allografts. Knockdown of MMP-1 or MMP-2 in RKIP-knockdown cells reverted their invasiveness to normal. In contrast, when examining migration of the different cancer cells in a two-dimensional, barrier-less environment, we found that RKIP had either a positive regulatory activity or no activity, but in no case a negative one (as would be expected if RKIP suppressed metastasis at the level of cell migration itself). Therefore, RKIP’s function as a metastasis suppressor appears to arise from its ability to negatively regulate expression of specific MMPs, and thus invasion through barriers, and not from a direct effect on the raw capacity of cells to move. The NF-κB pathway, but not the Raf pathway, appeared to positively control the invasion of breast cancer cells. A regulatory loop involving an opposing relationship between RKIP and the NF-κB pathway may control the level of MMP expression and cell invasion. PMID:20855151

  10. [Knockdown of dachshund homolog 1 (DACH1) promotes cell apoptosis and inhibits the invasion and migration abilities of Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells].

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiaona; Wang, Chuan; Jiang, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of the decreased expression of dachshund homolog 1 (DACH1) on cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration of Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells. Methods After four pairs of DACH1 siRNA were designed and synthesized, double-stranded short hairpin RNA (shRNA) were annealed and inserted into pGenesil-1 vector. The product was then confirmed by enzyme digestion and sequencing analysis. The recombinant plasmids were transfected into Capan-1 cells via Lipofectamine(TM) 2000. Fluorescence microscopy, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to detect the transfection efficiency. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle were tested by flow cytometry. Transwell(TM) assay was used to monitor the invasion and migration abilities of Capan-1 cells. Results Recombinant plasmid pshRNA-DACH1 was successfully constructed and transfected into Capan-1 cells. After transfection, the expression of DACH1 was reduced to some extent. Flow cytometry revealed that cell apoptosis was promoted in the pshRNA-DACH1 transfected group compared with control groups, whereas cell cycle had no significant differences among the groups. Transwell(TM) assay validated that the abilities of migration and invasion were inhibited in the pshRNA-DACH1 transfected group. Conclusion Knockdown of DACH1 expression can remarkably enhance the cell apoptosis, restrain the proliferation, migration and invasion of Capan-1 cells. PMID:27609579

  11. Polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE) shows in vitro and in vivo biological activity against invasive breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Amatori, Stefano; Mazzoni, Luca; Alvarez-Suarez, Josè Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Yuliett; Afrin, Sadia; Errico Provenzano, Alfredo; Persico, Giuseppe; Mezzetti, Bruno; Amici, Augusto; Fanelli, Mirco; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We describe the biological effects of a polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE), obtained from the “Alba” variety, on the highly aggressive and invasive basal-like breast cancer cell line A17. Dose-response and time-course experiments showed that PRSE is able to decrease the cellular viability of A17 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PRSE effect on cell survival was investigated in other tumor and normal cell lines of both mouse and human origin, demonstrating that PRSE is more active against breast cancer cells. Cytofluorimetric analysis of A17 cells demonstrated that sub-lethal doses of PRSE reduce the number of cells in S phase, inducing the accumulation of cells in G1 phase of cell cycle. In addition, the migration of A17 cells was studied monitoring the ability of PRSE to inhibit cellular mobility. Gene expression analysis revealed the modulation of 12 genes playing different roles in the cellular migration, adhesion and invasion processes. Finally, in vivo experiments showed the growth inhibition of A17 cells orthotopically transplanted into FVB syngeneic mice fed with PRSE. Overall, we demonstrated that PRSE exerts important biological activities against a highly invasive breast cancer cell line both in vitro and in vivo suggesting the strawberry extracts as preventive/curative food strategy. PMID:27498973

  12. Polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE) shows in vitro and in vivo biological activity against invasive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Amatori, Stefano; Mazzoni, Luca; Alvarez-Suarez, Josè Miguel; Giampieri, Francesca; Gasparrini, Massimiliano; Forbes-Hernandez, Tamara Yuliett; Afrin, Sadia; Errico Provenzano, Alfredo; Persico, Giuseppe; Mezzetti, Bruno; Amici, Augusto; Fanelli, Mirco; Battino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    We describe the biological effects of a polyphenol-rich strawberry extract (PRSE), obtained from the "Alba" variety, on the highly aggressive and invasive basal-like breast cancer cell line A17. Dose-response and time-course experiments showed that PRSE is able to decrease the cellular viability of A17 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. PRSE effect on cell survival was investigated in other tumor and normal cell lines of both mouse and human origin, demonstrating that PRSE is more active against breast cancer cells. Cytofluorimetric analysis of A17 cells demonstrated that sub-lethal doses of PRSE reduce the number of cells in S phase, inducing the accumulation of cells in G1 phase of cell cycle. In addition, the migration of A17 cells was studied monitoring the ability of PRSE to inhibit cellular mobility. Gene expression analysis revealed the modulation of 12 genes playing different roles in the cellular migration, adhesion and invasion processes. Finally, in vivo experiments showed the growth inhibition of A17 cells orthotopically transplanted into FVB syngeneic mice fed with PRSE. Overall, we demonstrated that PRSE exerts important biological activities against a highly invasive breast cancer cell line both in vitro and in vivo suggesting the strawberry extracts as preventive/curative food strategy. PMID:27498973

  13. Slit2 inhibits glioma cell invasion in the brain by suppression of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yiin, Jia-Jean; Hu, Bo; Jarzynka, Michael J; Feng, Haizhong; Liu, Kui-Wei; Wu, Jane Y; Ma, Hsin-I; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    Acquisition of insidious invasiveness by malignant glioma cells involves multiple genetic alterations in signaling pathways. Slit2, a chemorepulsive factor, controls cell migration of neuronal and glial cells during development and inhibits chemotaxic migration of various types of cells in vitro. However, the role of Slit2 in vitro remains controversial, and the biological significance of Slit2 expression in cancer cell invasion in vivo has not yet been determined. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Slit2 expression on the migration and invasion of invasive glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. By reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses, Slit2 was found to be expressed at lower levels in primary glioma specimens and invasive glioma cells compared with normal human brain cells and astrocytes. Ectopic expression of Slit2 or treatment with recombinant Slit2 on glioma cells attenuates cell migration and invasion through inhibition of Cdc42 activity in vitro. Cellular depletion of Robo1, a cognate receptor for Slit2, prevented Slit2 inhibition of Cdc42 activity and glioma cell migration. In vivo, expression of Slit2 by invasive SNB19 glioma cells markedly inhibited glioma cell infiltration into the brain of mice. Moreover, impediment of glioma cell invasion by Slit2 did not affect the expression of N-cadherin and beta-catenin in glioma cells. These results provide the first evidence demonstrating that Slit2-Robo1 inhibits glioma invasion through attenuating Cdc42 activity in vitro and in the brain. Understanding the mechanisms of Slit2-Robo1 inhibition of glioma cell invasion will foster new treatments for malignant gliomas.

  14. The hydration state of human red blood cells and their susceptibility to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L; Ginsburg, Hagai; Krugliak, Miriam; Croisille, Laure; Mohandas, Narla

    2005-06-15

    In most inherited red blood cell (RBC) disorders with high gene frequencies in malaria-endemic regions, the distribution of RBC hydration states is much wider than normal. The relationship between the hydration state of circulating RBCs and protection against severe falciparum malaria remains unexplored. The present investigation was prompted by a casual observation suggesting that falciparum merozoites were unable to invade isotonically dehydrated normal RBCs. We designed an experimental model to induce uniform and stable isotonic volume changes in RBC populations from healthy donors by increasing or decreasing their KCl contents through a reversible K(+) permeabilization pulse. Swollen and mildly dehydrated RBCs were able to sustain Plasmodium falciparum cultures with similar efficiency to untreated RBCs. However, parasite invasion and growth were progressively reduced in dehydrated RBCs. In a parallel study, P falciparum invasion was investigated in density-fractionated RBCs from healthy subjects and from individuals with inherited RBC abnormalities affecting primarily hemoglobin (Hb) or the RBC membrane (thalassemias, hereditary ovalocytosis, xerocytosis, Hb CC, and Hb CS). Invasion was invariably reduced in the dense cell fractions in all conditions. These results suggest that the presence of dense RBCs is a protective factor, additional to any other protection mechanism prevailing in each of the different pathologies. PMID:15728121

  15. The hydration state of human red blood cells and their susceptibility to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L.; Ginsburg, Hagai; Krugliak, Miriam; Croisille, Laure; Mohandas, Narla

    2005-01-01

    In most inherited red blood cell (RBC) disorders with high gene frequencies in malaria-endemic regions, the distribution of RBC hydration states is much wider than normal. The relationship between the hydration state of circulating RBCs and protection against severe falciparum malaria remains unexplored. The present investigation was prompted by a casual observation suggesting that falciparum merozoites were unable to invade isotonically dehydrated normal RBCs. We designed an experimental model to induce uniform and stable isotonic volume changes in RBC populations from healthy donors by increasing or decreasing their KCl contents through a reversible K+ permeabilization pulse. Swollen and mildly dehydrated RBCs were able to sustain Plasmodium falciparum cultures with similar efficiency to untreated RBCs. However, parasite invasion and growth were progressively reduced in dehydrated RBCs. In a parallel study, P falciparum invasion was investigated in density-fractionated RBCs from healthy subjects and from individuals with inherited RBC abnormalities affecting primarily hemoglobin (Hb) or the RBC membrane (thalassemias, hereditary ovalocytosis, xerocytosis, Hb CC, and Hb CS). Invasion was invariably reduced in the dense cell fractions in all conditions. These results suggest that the presence of dense RBCs is a protective factor, additional to any other protection mechanism prevailing in each of the different pathologies. (Blood. 2005; 105:4853-4860) PMID:15728121

  16. Cancer Cell Invasion in Three-dimensional Collagen Is Regulated Differentially by Gα13 Protein and Discoidin Domain Receptor 1-Par3 Protein Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chow, Christina R; Ebine, Kazumi; Knab, Lawrence M; Bentrem, David J; Kumar, Krishan; Munshi, Hidayatullah G

    2016-01-22

    Cancer cells can invade in three-dimensional collagen as single cells or as a cohesive group of cells that require coordination of cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton. To examine the role of Gα13, a G12 family heterotrimeric G protein, in regulating cellular invasion in three-dimensional collagen, we established a novel method to track cell invasion by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-expressing cancer cells. We show that knockdown of Gα13 decreased membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-driven proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen and enhanced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin knockdown reversed Gα13 siRNA-induced cell-cell adhesion but failed to reverse the effect of Gα13 siRNA on proteolytic invasion. Instead, concurrent knockdown of E-cadherin and Gα13 led to an increased number of single cells rather than groups of cells. Significantly, knockdown of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-binding protein that also co-localizes to cell-cell junctions, reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Knockdown of the polarity protein Par3, which can function downstream of DDR1, also reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, we show that Gα13 and DDR1-Par3 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton to mediate invasion in three-dimensional collagen.

  17. Histone-lysine methyltransferase EHMT2 is involved in proliferation, apoptosis, cell invasion, and DNA methylation of human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ziyan; Tian, Yufeng; Salwen, Helen R; Chlenski, Alexandre; Godley, Lucy A; Raj, J Usha; Yang, Qiwei

    2013-06-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), a childhood neoplasm arising from neural crest cells, is characterized by a diversity of clinical behaviors ranging from spontaneous remission to rapid tumor progression and death. In addition to genetic abnormalities, recent studies have indicated that epigenetic aberrations also contribute toward NB pathogenesis. However, the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of NB are largely unknown. Inhibition of euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 2 (EHMT2) was evaluated through the measurement of H3K9Me2 levels. Cell proliferation was examined by cell counting in human NB cell lines (LA1-55n, IMR-5, and NMB). The RNA expression of EHMT2, MYCN, and p21 was measured by real-time PCR. The expression of PCNA, MYCN, p53, cyclinD1, H3, H3K27M2, and H3K9Me2 was examined by western blot analysis. In-vitro invasion and the effects of the EHMT2 inhibitor (BIX-01294) were assessed in the Transwell chamber assay. Caspase 3 and 8 activities were measured using a Caspase-Glo assay kit. The level of overall DNA methylation was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. BIX-01294, a specific inhibitor of EHMT2 (a key enzyme for histone H3 dimethylation at lysine-9), specifically decreases the overall H3K9Me2 level but not H3K27Me2. The inhibition of EHMT2 decreased the proliferation of NB cells and induced apoptosis by increasing caspase 8/caspase 3 activity. BIX-01294 inhibited NB cell mobility and invasion. This was accompanied by a decreased expression of the MYCN oncogene. Inhibition of EHMT2 enhanced a doxorubicin-induced inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Finally, EHMT2 inhibition modulated overall DNA methylation levels in NB cells. Our results show that histone-lysine methylation is involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell invasion, and overall DNA methylation in human NB cells. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide an insight into the pathogenesis of NB progression and lead to novel treatment

  18. Metronidazole Decreases Viability of DLD-1 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Sadowska, Anna; Krętowski, Rafał; Szynaka, Beata; Cechowska-Pasko, Marzanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of metronidazole (MTZ) on DLD-1 colorectal cancer cell (CRC) line. Toxicity of MTZ was determined by MTT test. Cells were incubated with MTZ used in different concentrations for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The effect of MTZ on DNA synthesis was measured as [3H]-thymidine incorporation. The morphological changes in human DLD-1 cell line were defined by transmission electron microscope OPTON 900. The influence of MTZ on the apoptosis of DLD-1 cell lines was detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, while cell concentration, volume, and diameter were displayed by Scepter Cell Counter from Millipore. Our results show that cell viability was diminished in all experimental groups in comparison with the control, and the differences were statistically significant. We did not find any significant differences in [3H]-thymidine incorporation in all experimental groups and times of observation. Cytofluorimetric assays demonstrated a statistically significant increase of apoptotic rate in MTZ concentrations 10 and 50 μg/mL after 24 hours; 0.1, 10, 50, and 250 μg/mL after 48 hours; and in all concentrations after 72 hours compared with control groups. In the ultrastructural studies, necrotic or apoptotic cells were occasionally seen. In conclusion, MTZ affects human CRC cell line viability. The reduction of cell viability was consistent with the apoptotic test. PMID:23777253

  19. Low dynamin 2 expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in invasive squamous cell carcinoma of cervix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo-Young; Do, In-Gu; Park, Young Ae; Choi, Jung-Joo; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Chul Jung; Kim, Min Kyu; Song, Tae Jong; Park, Hwang Shin; Choi, Chel Hun; Kim, Tae-Joong; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2010-08-15

    Dynamin 2 is known as a protein involved in cell migration and endocytosis. We aimed to investigate the association between dynamin 2 expressions and tumor progression in early cervical carcinoma (IB1-IIA). Dynamin 2 expression was evaluated at protein level in thirty seven paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed tissues including four normal cervix tissues and compared with pathologic risk factors for recurrence after surgery in thirty three patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. The expression of dynamin 2 was not different according to clinical stage and lympho-vascular space invasion. However, there were inverse correlations between dynamin 2 expression and the depth of invasion in cervix (p = 0.003) and lymph node (LN) metastasis (p = 0.001). To evaluate the mechanism of dynamin 2 in tumor invasion and metastasis, we performed an in vitro experiment with dynamin 2 siRNA using several cervical carcinoma cell lines such as HeLa, MS751 and SiHa cells. We found the inhibition of dynamin 2 using specific siRNA enhanced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2. These results suggested that dynamin 2 might be involved in preventing tumor invasion and LN metastasis, possibly in relation with extracellular matrix degradation, and may be a prognostic marker for these risk factors in early squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

  20. miR-544a promotes the invasion of lung cancer cells by targeting cadherina 1 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Xiaomei; Zhang, Fenghua; Liang, Hui; Liu, Ming; Li, Huahui; Xia, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out the effect of miR-544a on the invasion of lung cancer cells and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Micro-ribonucleic acid (miRNA) expression in two different invasive lung cancer cell lines 95C (low invasive ability) and 95D (high invasive ability) was analyzed by miRNA microarray and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR); miR-544a mimic was transfected to 95C, and its invasion ability was detected by transwell migration assay; we predicted the candidate miRNA target genes by TargetScan (Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA, USA) software and verified the target genes by Western blot. Results The expression of miR-544a was significantly increased in 95D in miRNA microarray and quantitative PCR tests (P<0.05). After being transfected with miR-544a mimic, the invasion ability of 95C was enhanced (P<0.01). Moreover, transfection with miR-544a inhibitor decreased the invasion ability of 95D (P<0.01). miR-544a possibly combined with CDH1 (E-cadherin) predicted by the TargetScan analysis. 95C with miR-544a mimic reduced the expression of CDH1 and improved the expression of vimentin, while 95D with miR-544a inhibitor improved the expression of CDH1 and reduced the expression of vimentin. Conclusion miR-544a can promote the invasion of non-small cell lung cancer by downregulation of CDH1 and upregulation of vimentin. PMID:24940073

  1. Chlorotoxin inhibits glioma cell invasion via matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Deshane, Jessy; Garner, Craig C; Sontheimer, Harald

    2003-02-01

    Primary brain tumors (gliomas) have the unusual ability to diffusely infiltrate the normal brain thereby evading surgical treatment. Chlorotoxin is a scorpion toxin that specifically binds to the surface of glioma cells and impairs their ability to invade. Using a recombinant His-Cltx we isolated and identified the principal Cltx receptor on the surface of glioma cells as matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). MMP-2 is specifically up-regulated in gliomas and related cancers, but is not normally expressed in brain. We demonstrate that Cltx specifically and selectively interacts with MMP-2 isoforms, but not with MMP-1, -3, and -9, which are also expressed in malignant glioma cells. Importantly, we show that the anti-invasive effect of Cltx on glioma cells can be explained by its interactions with MMP-2. Cltx exerts a dual effect on MMP-2: it inhibits the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and causes a reduction in the surface expression of MMP-2. These findings suggest that Cltx is a specific MMP-2 inhibitor with significant therapeutic potential for gliomas and other diseases that invoke the activity of MMP-2.

  2. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  3. Endothelial cell phagocytosis of senescent neutrophils decreases procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Xie, Rui; Li, Wen; Zhou, Jin; Liu, Shuchuan; Cao, Fenglin; Liu, Yue; Ma, Ruishuang; Si, Yu; Liu, Yan; Bi, Yayan; Gilbert, Gary E; Shi, Jialan

    2013-06-01

    Abundant senescent neutrophils traverse the vascular compartment and may contribute to pathologic conditions. For example, they become procoagulant when undergoing apoptosis and may contribute to thrombosis or inflammation. Our previous studies demonstrated a dominant clearance pathway in which the neutrophils can be phagocytosed by liver macrophages. The aim of this study was to explore an alternate pathway of neutrophil clearance by endothelial cells. Phagocytosis of the neutrophils by endothelial cells was performed using various experimental approaches includingflow cytometry, confocal microscopy and electron microscopy assays in vitro and in vivo. Procoagulant activity of cultured neutrophils was evaluated by coagulation time, factor Xase and prothrombinase assays. Lactadherin functioned as a novel probe for the detection of phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cells, an opsonin (bridge) between apoptotic cell and phagocyte for promoting phagocytosis, and an efficient anticoagulant for inhibition of factor Xase and thrombin formation. When cultured, purified human neutrophils spontaneously entered apoptosis and developed procoagulant activity that was directly related to the degree of phosphatidylserine exposure. Co-culture of aged neutrophils and endothelial cells resulted in phagocytosis of the neutrophils and prolonged coagulation time. Lactadherin diminished the procoagulant activity and increased the rate of neutrophil clearance. In vivo, neutrophils were sequestered by endothelial cells after blockade of Kupffer cells, a process that was dependent upon both phosphatidylserine exposure and P-selectin expression. Thus, the ability of endothelial cells to clear senescent neutrophils may limit the procoagulant and/or inflammatory impact of these cells.

  4. CSF-1R as an inhibitor of apoptosis and promoter of proliferation, migration and invasion of canine mammary cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) have high impact on the cancer development because they can facilitate matrix invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor cell motility. It gives cancer cells the capacity to invade normal tissues and metastasize. The signaling of colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) which is an important regulator of proliferation and differentiation of monocytes and macrophages regulates most of the tissue macrophages. However, CSF-1R is expressed also in breast epithelial tissue during some physiological stages i.g.: pregnancy and lactation. Its expression has been also detected in various cancers. Our previous study has showed the expression of CSF-1R in all examined canine mammary tumors. Moreover, it strongly correlated with grade of malignancy and ability to metastasis. This study was therefore designed to characterize the role of CSF-1R in canine mammary cancer cells proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. As far as we know, the study presented hereby is a pioneering experiment in this field of veterinary medicine. Results We showed that csf-1r silencing significantly increased apoptosis (Annexin V test), decreased proliferation (measured as Ki67 expression) and decreased migration (“wound healing” assay) of canine mammary cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with CSF-1 caused opposite effect. Moreover, csf-1r knock-down changed growth characteristics of highly invasive cell lines on Matrigel matrix, and significantly decreased the ability of these cells to invade matrix. CSF-1 treatment increased invasion of cancer cells. Conclusion The evidence of the expression and functional role of the CSF-1R in canine mammary cancer cells indicate that CSF-1R targeting may be a good therapeutic approach. PMID:23561040

  5. Voltage-gated Sodium Channel Activity Promotes Cysteine Cathepsin-dependent Invasiveness and Colony Growth of Human Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Gillet, Ludovic; Roger, Sébastien; Besson, Pierre; Lecaille, Fabien; Gore, Jacques; Bougnoux, Philippe; Lalmanach, Gilles; Le Guennec, Jean-Yves

    2009-03-27

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Na(V)) are functionally expressed in highly metastatic cancer cells derived from nonexcitable epithelial tissues (breast, prostate, lung, and cervix). MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express functional sodium channel complexes, consisting of Na(V)1.5 and associated auxiliary beta-subunits, that are responsible for a sustained inward sodium current at the membrane potential. Although these channels do not regulate cellular multiplication or migration, their inhibition by the specific blocker tetrodotoxin impairs both the extracellular gelatinolytic activity (monitored with DQ-gelatin) and cell invasiveness leading to the attenuation of colony growth and cell spreading in three-dimensional Matrigel-composed matrices. MDA-MB-231 cells express functional cysteine cathepsins, which we found play a predominant role ( approximately 65%) in cancer invasiveness. Matrigel invasion is significantly decreased in the presence of specific inhibitors of cathepsins B and S (CA-074 and Z-FL-COCHO, respectively), and co-application of tetrodotoxin does not further reduce cell invasion. This suggests that cathepsins B and S are involved in invasiveness and that their proteolytic activity partly depends on Na(V) function. Inhibiting Na(V) has no consequence for cathepsins at the transcription, translation, and secretion levels. However, Na(V) activity leads to an intracellular alkalinization and a perimembrane acidification favorable for the extracellular activity of these acidic proteases. We propose that Na(v) enhance the invasiveness of cancer cells by favoring the pH-dependent activity of cysteine cathepsins. This general mechanism could lead to the identification of new targets allowing the therapeutic prevention of metastases. PMID:19176528

  6. MicroRNA-200b Impacts Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Regulating Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hong; Yu, Haizhong; Yuan, Jianfen; Guo, Chunyan; Cao, Hongyan; Li, Weibing; Xiao, Chunhong

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) plays an important role in multiple links of tumors. It also involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis, and might be a potential biomarker of breast cancer. Another study suggested that ERM expression was regulated directly by miR-200c, and had a critical role in miR-200c suppressing cell migration. This study aimed to investigate the effect of miR-200b on ERM expression in a breast cancer cell line and its influence on invasion and metastasis ability in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS Breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with different metastatic potentials were selected as a model. MiR-200b overexpression or inhibition was achieved by Lipofectamine™ 2000-mediated miRNA transfection. RT-PCR was used to test miR-200b level, while Western blot was selected to detect ERM protein expression. Wound healing assay and Transwell assay were performed to determine cell migration and invasion ability. RESULTS RT-PCR revealed that miR-200b level in MDA-MB-231 was obviously lower than that in MCF-7, while Western blot analysis showed that ERM expression was significantly higher. MiR-200b inhibition by transfection in MCF-7 markedly decreased miR-200b level, elevated ERM expression, and enhanced cell migration and invasion. MiR-200b overexpression in MDA-MB-231 obviously increased miR-200b level, reduced ERM expression, and weakened cell migration and invasion. CONCLUSIONS MiR-200b participates in breast cancer cell migration and invasion through regulating ERM in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. PMID:27276064

  7. Changes in soil diversity and global activities following invasions of the exotic invasive plant, Amaranthus viridis L., decrease the growth of native sahelian Acacia species.

    PubMed

    Sanon, Arsene; Béguiristain, Thierry; Cébron, Aurelie; Berthelin, Jacques; Ndoye, Ibrahima; Leyval, Corinne; Sylla, Samba; Duponnois, Robin

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether the invasive plant Amaranthus viridis influenced soil microbial and chemical properties and to assess the consequences of these modifications on native plant growth. The experiment was conducted in Senegal at two sites: one invaded by A. viridis and the other covered by other plant species. Soil nutrient contents as well as microbial community density, diversity and functions were measured. Additionally, five sahelian Acacia species were grown in (1) soil disinfected or not collected from both sites, (2) uninvaded soil exposed to an A. viridis plant aqueous extract and (3) soil collected from invaded and uninvaded sites and inoculated or not with the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. The results showed that the invasion of A. viridis increased soil nutrient availability, bacterial abundance and microbial activities. In contrast, AM fungi and rhizobial development and the growth of Acacia species were severely reduced in A. viridis-invaded soil. Amaranthus viridis aqueous extract also exhibited an inhibitory effect on rhizobial growth, indicating an antibacterial activity of this plant extract. However, the inoculation of G. intraradices was highly beneficial to the growth and nodulation of Acacia species. These results highlight the role of AM symbiosis in the processes involved in plant coexistence and in ecosystem management programs that target preservation of native plant diversity.

  8. Γ-Ionizing radiation-induced activation of the EGFR-p38/ERK-STAT3/CREB-1-EMT pathway promotes the migration/invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells and is inhibited by podophyllotoxin acetate.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong Hyun; Hong, Wan Gi; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jaeseok; Lee, Eunah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a new intracellular signaling pathway involved in γ-ionizing radiation (IR)-induced migration/invasion and show that podophyllotoxin acetate (PA) inhibits the IR-induced invasion and migration of A549 cells (a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line). Our results revealed that IR increased the invasion/migration of A549 cells, and this effect was decreased by 10 nM PA treatment. PA also inhibited the expressions/activities of matrix metalloprotase (MMP) -2, MMP-9, and vimentin, suggesting that PA could block the IR-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The IR-induced increases in invasion/migration were associated with the activation of EGFR-AKT, and PA inhibited this effect. P38 and p44/42 ERK were also involved in IR-induced invasion/migration, and combined treatments with PA plus inhibitors of each MAPK synergistically blocked this invasion/migration. In terms of transcription factors (TFs), IR-induced increases in cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-1 (CREB-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) increased invasion/migration and EMT. PA also inhibited these transcription factors and then blocked IR-induced invasion/migration. Collectively, these results indicate that IR induces cancer cell invasion/migration by activating the EGFR-p38/ERK-CREB-1/STAT3-EMT pathway and that PA blocks this pathway to inhibit IR-induced invasion/migration.

  9. Downregulation of VEGFA inhibits proliferation, promotes apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of renal clear cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Chang; Zeng, Ming-Qiang; Huang, Liang; Li, Yong-Lin; Gao, Ben-Min; Chen, Jun-Jie; Xue, Rui-Zhi; Tang, Zheng-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) on cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion in renal clear cell carcinoma (RCCC). Methods Between June 2012 and June 2015, RCCC tissues were obtained for the experimental group, and RCCC adjacent tumor-free kidney parenchyma tissues were obtained for the control group. VEGFA mRNA and protein expressions and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, serine/threonine-specific protein kinase (AKT), and phosphorylated-AKT protein expressions were detected. The chemically synthesized specific siRNA using RNA interference technology was used to inhibit VEGFA gene expression in human RCCC 786-O cells. The negative control (NC) group was transfected with NC sequence, and the blank group was transfected with no sequence. Flow cytometry, scratch test, and cell-penetrating experiment were used to detect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion of 786-O cells. Results Positive expression of VEGFA protein was 60.62% in RCCC tissue and 18.34% in adjacent tissue with statistically significant difference (P<0.001). VEGFA protein and mRNA expressions were higher in RCCC tissue than those in adjacent tissue (both P<0.01). VEGF expression in RCCC tissue was associated with Fuhrman grading and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (both P<0.05). After RCCC 786-O cells transfecting the VEGFA siRNA, the VEGFA mRNA and protein expressions and phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphorylated-AKT protein expressions were significantly decreased, cell proliferation was remarkably inhibited, cell apoptotic ratio was obviously increased, and migration distance and invasive cell number were markedly decreased compared to those in the NC group and the blank group (all P<0.05). Conclusion Inhibition of VEGFA inhibited proliferation, promoted apoptosis, and suppressed migration and invasion of RCCC 786-O cells. VEGF has a potential role in diagnosis and therapy of RCCC

  10. Intestinal trefoil factor promotes invasion in non-tumorigenic Rat-2 fibroblast cell.

    PubMed

    Chan, Victor Y W; Chan, Michael W Y; Leung, Wai-Keung; Leung, Po-Sing; Sung, Joseph J Y; Chan, Francis K L

    2005-04-15

    Intestinal trefoil factor (TFF3) is essential in regulating cell migration and maintaining mucosal integrity in gastrointestinal tract. We previously showed that TFF3 was overexpressed in gastric carcinoma. Whether TFF3 possesses malignant potential is not fully elucidated. We sought to investigate the effects of inducting TFF3 expression in a non-malignant rat fibroblast cell line (Rat-2) on the cell proliferation, invasion and the genes regulating cell invasion. Invasiveness and proliferation of transfected Rat-2 cell line were assessed using in vitro invasion chamber assay and colorimetric MTS assay. Differential mRNA expressions of invasion-related genes, namely, metalloproteinases (MMP-9), tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP-1), beta-catenin and E-cadherin, were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We showed that TFF3 did not inhibit the proliferation of Rat-2 cells. We also demonstrated that transfection of TFF3 significantly promoted invasion of Rat-2 cells by 1.4- to 2.2-folds. There was an upregulation of beta-catenin (13.1-23.0%) and MMP-9 (43.4-92.2%) mRNA expression levels, and downregulation of E-cadherin (25.6-33.8%) and TIMP-1 (31.5-37.8%) in TFF3-transfected cells compared to controls during 48-h incubation. Our results suggested that TFF3 possesses malignant potential through promotion of cell invasiveness and alteration of invasion-related genes.

  11. Resveratrol causes cell cycle arrest, decreased collagen synthesis, and apoptosis in rat intestinal smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Patricia; Schmiedlin-Ren, Phyllissa; Mathias, Jason S; Tang, Huaijing; Christman, Gregory M; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2012-02-01

    One of the most difficult and treatment-resistant complications of Crohn's disease is the development of fibrotic intestinal strictures due to mesenchymal cell hyperplasia and collagen deposition. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin found in berries, peanuts, grapes, and red wine, has been shown to inhibit fibrosis in vasculature, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and esophagus in animal models. Resveratrol has also been shown to inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and cell proliferation and to decrease collagen synthesis in several cell types or animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether resveratrol has antifibrotic effects on intestinal smooth muscle cells. Responses to resveratrol by cultured smooth muscle cells isolated from colons of untreated Lewis rats were examined; this rat strain is used in a model of Crohn's disease with prominent intestinal fibrosis. A relative decrease in cell numbers following treatment with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol was evident at 24 h (P ≤ 0.005). This effect was largely due to cell cycle arrest, with an increase in the percent of cells in S phase from 8 to 25-35% (P < 0.05). Cell viability was unchanged until 2-3 days of treatment when there was a 1.2- to 5.0-fold increase in the percent of apoptotic cells, depending on the assay (P < 0.05). Expression of collagen type I protein was decreased following treatment with resveratrol for 24 h (to 44 and 25% of control levels with 50 and 100 μM resveratrol, respectively; P < 0.05). Expression of procollagen types I and III mRNA was also decreased with resveratrol treatment. Resveratrol (50 μM) diminished the proliferative response to TGF-β₁ (P = 0.02) as well as IGF-I-stimulated collagen production (P = 0.02). Thus resveratrol decreases intestinal smooth muscle cell numbers through its effects on cell cycle arrest and apoptosis and also decreases collagen synthesis by the cells. These effects could be useful in preventing the smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and collagen

  12. Bromelain reversibly inhibits invasive properties of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Tysnes, B B; Maurer, H R; Porwol, T; Probst, B; Bjerkvig, R; Hoover, F

    2001-01-01

    Bromelain is an aqueous extract from pineapple stem that contains proteinases and exhibits pleiotropic therapeutic effects, i.e., antiedematous, antiinflammatory, antimetastatic, antithrombotic, and fibrinolytic activities. In this study, we tested bromelain's effects on glioma cells to assess whether bromelain could be a potential contributor to new antiinvasive strategies for gliomas. Several complementary assays demonstrated that bromelain significantly and reversibly reduced glioma cell adhesion, migration, and invasion without affecting cell viability, even after treatment periods extending over several months. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that alpha3 and beta1 integrin subunits and hyaluronan receptor CD44 protein levels were reduced within 24 hours of bromelain treatment. These effects were not reflected at the RNA level because RNA profiling did not show any significant effects on gene expression. Interestingly, metabolic labelling with 35-S methionine demonstrated that de novo protein synthesis was greatly attenuated by bromelain, in a reversible manner. By using a transactivating signaling assay, we found that CRE-mediated signaling processes were suppressed. These results indicate that bromelain exerts its antiinvasive effects by proteolysis, signaling cascades, and translational attenuation.

  13. Bromelain Reversibly Inhibits Invasive Properties of Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tysnes, Berit B; Maurer, H Rainer; Porwol, Torsten; Probst, Beatrice; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Hoover, Frank

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Bromelain is an aqueous extract from pineapple stem that contains proteinases and exhibits pleiotropic therapeutic effects, i.e., antiedematous, antiinflammatory, antimetastatic, antithrombotic, and fibrinolytic activities. In this study, we tested bromelain's effects on glioma cells to assess whether bromelain could be a potential contributor to new antiinvasive strategies for gliomas. Several complementary assays demonstrated that bromelain significantly and reversibly reduced glioma cell adhesion, migration, and invasion without affecting cell viability, even after treatment periods extending over several months. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that α3 and β1 integrin subunits and hyaluronan receptor CD44 protein levels were reduced within 24 hours of bromelain treatment. These effects were not reflected at the RNA level because RNA profiling did not show any significant effects on gene expression. Interestingly, metabolic labelling with 35-S methionine demonstrated that de novo protein synthesis was greatly attenuated by bromelain, in a reversible manner. By using a trans-activating signaling assay, we found that CRE-mediated signaling processes were suppressed. These results indicate that bromelain exerts its antiinvasive effects by proteolysis, signaling cascades, and translational attenuation. PMID:11774029

  14. Decreased Ferroportin Promotes Myeloma Cell Growth and Osteoclast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell–induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  15. In vitro invasion of small-cell lung cancer cell lines correlates with expression of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Damstrup, L.; Rude Voldborg, B.; Spang-Thomsen, M.; Brünner, N.; Skovgaard Poulsen, H.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of metastasis is a multistep process involving attachment to the basement membrane, local proteolysis and migration into surrounding tissues, lymph or bloodstream. In the present study, we have analysed the correlation between in vitro invasion and presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a panel of 21 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines. We have previously reported that ten of these cell lines expressed EGFR protein detected by radioreceptor and affinity labelling assays. In 11 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, EGFR mRNA was detected by Northern blot analysis. In vitro invasion in a Boyden chamber assay was found in all EGFR-positive cell lines, whereas no invasion was detected in the EGFR-negative cell lines. Quantification of the in vitro invasion in 12 selected SCLC cell lines demonstrated that, in the EGFR-positive cell lines, between 5% and 16% of the cells added to the upper chamber were able to traverse the Matrigel membrane. Expression of several matrix metalloproteases (MMP), of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP) and of cathepsin B was evaluated by immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, in vitro invasive SCLC cell lines could not be distinguished from non-invasive cell lines based on the expression pattern of these molecules. In six SCLC cell lines, in vitro invasion was also determined in the presence of the EGFR-neutralizing monoclonal antibody mAb528. The addition of this antibody resulted in a significant reduction of the in vitro invasion in three selected EGFR-positive cell lines. Our results show that only EGFR-positive SCLC cell lines had the in vitro invasive phenotype, and it is therefore suggested that the EGFR might play an important role for the invasion potential of SCLC cell lines. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9744504

  16. Time-dependent traction force microscopy for cancer cells as a measure of invasiveness.

    PubMed

    Peschetola, Valentina; Laurent, Valérie M; Duperray, Alain; Michel, Richard; Ambrosi, Davide; Preziosi, Luigi; Verdier, Claude

    2013-04-01

    The migration of tumor cells of different degrees of invasivity is studied, on the basis of the traction forces exerted in time on soft substrates (Young modulus∼10 kPa). It is found that the outliers of the traction stresses can be an effective indicator to distinguish cancer cell lines of different invasiveness. Here, we test two different epithelial bladder cancer cell lines, one invasive (T24), and a less invasive one (RT112). Invasive cancer cells move in a nearly periodic motion, with peaks in velocity corresponding to higher traction forces exerted on the substrate, whereas less invasive cells develop traction stresses almost constant in time. The dynamics of focal adhesions (FAs) as well as cytoskeleton features reveals that different mechanisms are activated to migrate: T24 cells show an interconnected cytoskeleton linked to mature adhesion sites, leading to small traction stresses, whereas less invasive cells (RT112) show a less-structured cytoskeleton and unmature adhesions corresponding to higher traction stresses. Migration velocities are smaller in the case of less invasive cells. The mean squared displacement shows super-diffusive motion in both cases with higher exponent for the more invasive cancer cells. Further correlations between traction forces and the actin cytoskeleton reveal an unexpected pattern of a large actin rim at the RT112 cell edge where higher forces are colocalized, whereas a more usual cytoskeleton structure with stress fibers and FAs are found for T24 cancer cells. We conjecture that this kind of analysis can be useful to classify cancer cell invasiveness.

  17. Decreased brain dopamine cell numbers in human cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Little, Karley Y; Ramssen, Eric; Welchko, Ryan; Volberg, Vitaly; Roland, Courtney J; Cassin, Bader

    2009-08-15

    Cocaine use diminishes striatal and midbrain dopamine neuronal components in both post-mortem and in vivo human experiments. The diffuse nature of these declines suggests the possibility that cocaine use might cause a loss of dopamine neurons in humans. Previous rodent studies have not detected cocaine-induced dopamine cell damage. The present experiment involved counting midbrain dopamine neurons utilizing both melanin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity. Well-preserved blocks ranging from +38 mm obex to +45 mm obex were examined in 10 cocaine users and 9 controls. Sections were also examined for signs of acute pathological injury by counting activated macrophages and microglia. Melanized cells at six midbrain levels were significantly reduced in cocaine users by both drug exposures. The estimated total number of melanized dopamine cells in the anterior midbrain was significantly reduced in cocaine users by 16%. Results with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity were less conclusive because of variability in staining. Both activated macrophages and activated microglia were significantly increased among cocaine users. Cocaine exposure may have neurotoxic effects on dopamine neurons in humans. The infiltration of phagocytic cells suggests that the lower number of dopamine cells found in cocaine users was a relatively recent effect. The loss of dopamine cells could contribute to and intensify cocaine dependence, as well as anhedonic and depressive symptoms, in some cocaine users. Further efforts at clarifying the pathophysiological mechanisms involved may help explain treatment refractoriness, and identify targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:19233481

  18. Irradiation Decreases the Neuroendocrine Biomarker Pro-Opiomelanocortin in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Suzanne L.; Bryant, Jennifer L.; Babur, Muhammad; Riddell, Philip W.; Behrouzi, Roya; Williams, Kaye J.; White, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive disease, commonly displaying therapy-resistant relapse. We have previously identified neuroendocrine and epithelial phenotypes in SCLC tumours and the neuroendocrine marker, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), correlated with worse overall survival in patients. However, the effect of treatment on these phenotypes is not understood. The current study aimed to determine the effect of repeated irradiation treatment on SCLC cell phenotype, focussing on the neuroendocrine marker, POMC. Results Human SCLC cells (DMS 79) were established as subcutaneous xenograft tumours in CBA nude mice and then exposed to repeated 2Gy irradiation. In untreated animals, POMC in the blood closely mirrored tumour growth; an ideal characteristic for a circulating biomarker. Following repeated localised irradiation in vivo, circulating POMC decreased (p< 0.01), in parallel with a decrease in tumour size, but remained low even when the tumours re-established. The excised tumours displayed reduced and distinctly heterogeneous expression of POMC compared to untreated tumours. There was no difference in the epithelial marker, cytokeratin. However, there were significantly more N-cadherin positive cells in the irradiated tumours. To investigate the tumour response to irradiation, DMS79 cells were repeatedly irradiated in vitro and the surviving cells selected. POMC expression was reduced, while mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, β1-integrin, fibroblast-specific protein 1, β-catenin and Zeb1 expression were amplified in the more irradiation-primed cells. There were no consistent changes in epithelial marker expression. Cell morphology changed dramatically with repeatedly irradiated cells displaying a more elongated shape, suggesting a switch to a more mesenchymal phenotype. Conclusions In summary, POMC biomarker expression and secretion were reduced in SCLC tumours which regrew after irradiation and in repeatedly irradiation (irradiation

  19. Membrane Cholesterol Regulates Lysosome-Plasma Membrane Fusion Events and Modulates Trypanosoma cruzi Invasion of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hissa, Bárbara; Duarte, Jacqueline G.; Kelles, Ludmila F.; Santos, Fabio P.; del Puerto, Helen L.; Gazzinelli-Guimarães, Pedro H.; de Paula, Ana M.; Agero, Ubirajara; Mesquita, Oscar N.; Guatimosim, Cristina; Chiari, Egler; Andrade, Luciana O.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi are able to invade several types of non-phagocytic cells through a lysosomal dependent mechanism. It has been shown that, during invasion, parasites trigger host cell lysosome exocytosis, which initially occurs at the parasite-host contact site. Acid sphingomyelinase released from lysosomes then induces endocytosis and parasite internalization. Lysosomes continue to fuse with the newly formed parasitophorous vacuole until the parasite is completely enclosed by lysosomal membrane, a process indispensable for a stable infection. Previous work has shown that host membrane cholesterol is also important for the T. cruzi invasion process in both professional (macrophages) and non-professional (epithelial) phagocytic cells. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol-enriched microdomains participate in this process has remained unclear. Methodology/Principal Finding In the present work we show that cardiomyocytes treated with MβCD, a drug able to sequester cholesterol from cell membranes, leads to a 50% reduction in invasion by T. cruzi trypomastigotes, as well as a decrease in the number of recently internalized parasites co-localizing with lysosomal markers. Cholesterol depletion from host membranes was accompanied by a decrease in the labeling of host membrane lipid rafts, as well as excessive lysosome exocytic events during the earlier stages of treatment. Precocious lysosomal exocytosis in MβCD treated cells led to a change in lysosomal distribution, with a reduction in the number of these organelles at the cell periphery, and probably compromises the intracellular pool of lysosomes necessary for T. cruzi invasion. Conclusion/Significance Based on these results, we propose that cholesterol depletion leads to unregulated exocytic events, reducing lysosome availability at the cell cortex and consequently compromise T. cruzi entry into host cells. The results also suggest that two different pools of lysosomes are

  20. Lipocalin 2 promotes the migration and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells through a novel positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Du, Ze-Peng; Wu, Bing-Li; Xie, Yang-Min; Zhang, Ying-Li; Liao, Lian-Di; Zhou, Fei; Xie, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fa-Min; Xu, Xiu-E; Fang, Wang-Kai; Li, En-Min; Xu, Li-Yan

    2015-10-01

    Lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is a poor prognostic factor in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), however its functional roles and molecular mechanisms of action remain to be clarified. Here, we described the functions and signaling pathways for LCN2 in ESCC. Overexpression of LCN2 in ESCC cells accelerated cell migration and invasion in vitro, and promoted lung metastasis in vivo. Blocking LCN2 expression inhibited its pro-oncogenic effect. Either overexpression of LCN2 or treatment with recombinant human LCN2 protein enhanced the activation of MEK/ERK pathway, which in turn increases endogenous LCN2 to increase MMP-9 activity. The decreased p-cofilin and increased p-ERM induced by pERK1/2 cause the cytoskeleton F-actin rearrangement and alter the behavior of ESCC cells mediated by LCN2. As a consequence, activation of MMP-9 and the rearrangement of F-actin throw light on the mechanisms for LCN2 in ESCC. These results imply that LCN2 promotes the migration and invasion of ESCC cells through a novel positive feedback loop.

  1. Phosphorylation of FOXP3 by LCK Downregulates MMP9 Expression and Represses Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Nakahira, Kumiko; Morita, Akihiro; Kim, Nam-Soon; Yanagihara, Itaru

    2013-01-01

    Forkhead Box P3 (FOXP3) is a member of the forkhead/winged helix family of the transcription factors and plays an important role not only as a master gene in T-regulatory cells, but also as a tumor suppressor. In this study, we identified lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK), which correlates with cancer malignancy, as a binding partner of FOXP3. FOXP3 downregulated LCK-induced MMP9, SKP2, and VEGF-A expression. We observed that LCK phosphorylated Tyr-342 of FOXP3 by immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assay, and the replacement of Tyr-342 with phenylalanine (Y342F) abolished the ability to suppress MMP9 expression. Although FOXP3 decreased the invasive ability induced by LCK in MCF-7 cells, Y342F mutation in FOXP3 diminished this suppressive effect. Thus we demonstrate for the first time that LCK upregulates FOXP3 by tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting in decreased MMP9, SKP2, and VEGF-A expression, and suppressed cellular invasion. We consider that further clarification of transcriptional mechanism of FOXP3 may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches to suppress cancer malignancy. PMID:24155921

  2. Inhibition of invasion and metastasis of MHCC97H cells by expression of snake venom cystatin through reduction of proteinases activity and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nanhong; Xie, Qun; Wang, Xiaoqian; Li, Xiujin; Chen, Yanlin; Lin, Xu; Lin, Jianyin

    2011-05-01

    Snake venom cystatin (sv-cystatin) is a member of the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors. To further evaluate the possibility of sv-cystatin in cancer therapy, this study examined the effects of sv-cystatin on the invasion and metastasis of liver cancer cells (MHCC97H) in vitro and in vivo as well as the underlying mechanism. sv-cystatin cDNA was transfected into MHCC97H cells and the anti-invasion and antimetastasis effects of sv-cystatin were determined using migration and matrigel invasion assays and a lung-metastasis mice model. The results suggest that sv-cyst clone (sv-cystatin expression in MHCC97H cells) delayed the invasion and metastasis in vitro and in vivo compared to the parental, mock and si-sv-cyst clone cells (inhibited sv-cystatin expression by siRNA). The decreased activities of cathepsin B, MMP-2 and MMP-9 and EMT change index including higher E-cadherin, lower N-cadherin and decreased Twist activity were observed in the sv-cyst clone, which contributes to the change in invasion and metastasis ability of MHCC97H cells. This study provides evidence that expression of the sv-cystatin gene in MHCC97H cells inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis through the reduction of the proteinases activity and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), which might contribute to the anticancer research of the sv-cystatin protein.

  3. Effect of epithelial cell type on in vitro invasion of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Kunde, Dale A; Tristram, Stephen G

    2016-10-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) have been shown to have variable ability for in vitro invasion with a range of epithelial cells, and increased invasion of BEAS-2B cells has been associated with altered penicillin binding protein3 (PBP3), which is concerning as these strains are increasing worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of respiratory cell type and the presence of altered PBP3 on the in vitro invasion of NTHi. A collection of 16 clinical NTHi isolates was established, 7 had normal PBP3, and 9 had altered PBP3 as defined by an N526K substitution. The isolates were tested for invasion of BEAS-2B, NHBE, A549 and NCI-H292 respiratory epithelial cells in vitro using a gentamicin survival assay, with invasion measured as the percentage of intracellular organisms relative to the initial inoculum. The overall median invasion for the 16 NTHi isolates for cell types BEAS-2B, NHBE, A549 and NCI-H292 cells were 3.17, 2.31, 0.11 and 1.52 respectively. The differences were statistically significant for BEAS-2B compared to A549 (P=0.015) and A549 compared to NCI-H292 (P=0.015), and there were also very marked differences in invasion for some individual isolates depending on the cell type used. There was a consistent bias for invasion of isolates with normal versus abnormal PBP3: and this was statistically significant for BEAS-2B (0.07 to 9.90, P=0.031) and A549 cells (0.02 to 1.68, P=0.037). These results show that NTHi invasion of respiratory epithelial cells in vitro is both strain dependant and influenced significantly by the cell line used, and that the association between altered PBP3 and increased invasion is conserved across multiple cell lines.

  4. Tetrabromobisphenol A Decreases Cell Surface Proteins Involved in Human Natural Killer (NK) Cell-Dependent Target Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Tasia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2011-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) lymphocytes are able to destroy tumor cells and virally-infected cells. Interference with their function can leave an individual with increased susceptibility to cancer development and/or viral infection. We have shown that the tumor destroying (lytic) function of NK cells can be dramatically decreased by exposure to the environmental contaminant tetra-bromobisphenol A (TBBPA). TBBPA is a flame retardant used in a variety of materials including circuit boards, carpeting, and upholstery and has been found in human blood samples. TBBPA interferes with NK cell lytic function, in part, by decreasing the ability of NK cells to bind to target cells. This study examines the effects of exposures to concentrations of TBBPA (i.e., that were able to decrease the binding capacity of NK cells) on the expression of cell-surface proteins (CD2, CD11a, CD16, CD18, and CD56) that are needed for NK cells to bind target cells. NK cells were exposed to TBBPA for 24 hr, 48 hr, and 6 d or for 1 hr followed by 24 hr, 48 hr, and 6 d in TBBPA-free media. Twenty-four hr exposures to 5 µM TBBPA caused decreases in four of the cell surface proteins examined. CD16 was decreased by > 35%. The decreases in cell surface proteins after a 48 hr exposure were similar to those seen after 24 hr. The results indicate that TBBPA exposures that decrease the binding function of human NK cells do so by decreasing the expression of cell surface proteins needed for attachment of NK cells to targets cells. PMID:21623697

  5. Gasdermin-B Promotes Invasion and Metastasis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hergueta-Redondo, Marta; Sarrió, David; Molina-Crespo, Ángela; Megias, Diego; Mota, Alba; Rojo-Sebastian, Alejandro; García-Sanz, Pablo; Morales, Saleta; Abril, Sandra; Cano, Amparo; Peinado, Héctor; Moreno-Bueno, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Gasdermin B (GSDMB) belongs to the Gasdermin protein family that comprises four members (GSDMA-D). Gasdermin B expression has been detected in some tumor types such as hepatocarcinomas, gastric and cervix cancers; and its over-expression has been related to tumor progression. At least four splicing isoforms of GSDMB have been identified, which may play differential roles in cancer. However, the implication of GSDMB in carcinogenesis and tumor progression is not well understood. Here, we uncover for the first time the functional implication of GSDMB in breast cancer. Our data shows that high levels of GSDMB expression is correlated with reduced survival and increased metastasis in breast cancer patients included in an expression dataset (>1,000 cases). We demonstrate that GSDMB is upregulated in breast carcinomas compared to normal breast tissue, being the isoform 2 (GSDMB-2) the most differentially expressed. In order to evaluate the functional role of GSDMB in breast cancer two GSDMB isoforms were studied (GSDMB-1 and GSDMB-2). The overexpression of both isoforms in the MCF7 breast carcinoma cell line promotes cell motility and invasion, while its silencing in HCC1954 breast carcinoma cells decreases the migratory and invasive phenotype. Importantly, we demonstrate that both isoforms have a differential role on the activation of Rac-1 and Cdc-42 Rho-GTPases. Moreover, our data support that GSMDB-2 induces a pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic behavior in mouse xenograft models as compared to GSDMB-1. Finally, we observed that although both GSDMB isoforms interact in vitro with the chaperone Hsp90, only the GSDMB-2 isoform relies on this chaperone for its stability. Taken together, our results provide for the first time evidences that GSDMB-2 induces invasion, tumor progression and metastasis in MCF7 cells and that GSDMB can be considered as a new potential prognostic marker in breast cancer. PMID:24675552

  6. Targeting Notch1 inhibits invasion and angiogenesis of human breast cancer cells via inhibition Nuclear Factor-κB signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Su, Chuanfu; Shan, Yuqing; Yang, Shouxiang; Ma, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Notch-1, a type-1 transmembrane protein, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies, including breast cancer; however, the precise mechanism by which Notch-1 causes tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis remain unclear. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are critically involved in the processes of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we investigated whether targeting Notch-1 could be mechanistically associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB, IL-8, VEGF, and MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. Our data showed that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation of NF-κB activity and inhibits the expression of its target genes, such as IL-8, VEGF and MMP-9. We also found that down-regulation of Notch-1 decreased cell invasion, and vice versa Consistent with these results, we also found that the down-regulation of Notch-1 not only decreased MMP-9 mRNA and its protein expression but also inhibited MMP-9 active form. Moreover, conditioned medium from Notch-1 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed reduced levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Notch-1 cDNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed increased levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, promoted the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that Notch-1 overexpression leads to the promotion of angiogenesis.We therefore concluded that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation NF-κB and its target genes (IL-8, MMP-9 and VEGF), resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis.

  7. Targeting Notch1 inhibits invasion and angiogenesis of human breast cancer cells via inhibition Nuclear Factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Su, Chuanfu; Shan, Yuqing; Yang, Shouxiang; Ma, Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Notch-1, a type-1 transmembrane protein, plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of human malignancies, including breast cancer; however, the precise mechanism by which Notch-1 causes tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis remain unclear. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are critically involved in the processes of tumor cell invasion and metastasis, we investigated whether targeting Notch-1 could be mechanistically associated with the down-regulation of NF-κB, IL-8, VEGF, and MMP-9, resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis of breast cancer cells. Our data showed that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation of NF-κB activity and inhibits the expression of its target genes, such as IL-8, VEGF and MMP-9. We also found that down-regulation of Notch-1 decreased cell invasion, and vice versa Consistent with these results, we also found that the down-regulation of Notch-1 not only decreased MMP-9 mRNA and its protein expression but also inhibited MMP-9 active form. Moreover, conditioned medium from Notch-1 siRNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed reduced levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, inhibited the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, conditioned medium from Notch-1 cDNA-transfected breast cancer cells showed increased levels of IL-8 and VEGF and, in turn, promoted the tube formation of HUVECs, suggesting that Notch-1 overexpression leads to the promotion of angiogenesis.We therefore concluded that down-regulation of Notch-1 leads to the inactivation NF-κB and its target genes (IL-8, MMP-9 and VEGF), resulting in the inhibition of invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:27398151

  8. Nestin regulates proliferation and invasion of gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells by altering mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Cai, J; Huang, Y; Ke, Q; Wu, B; Wang, S; Han, X; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Li, W; Lao, C; Song, W; Xiang, A P

    2016-06-16

    Nestin is widely expressed in numerous tumors and has become a diagnostic and prognostic indicator. However, the exact mechanism by which nestin contributes to tumor malignancy remains poorly understood. Here, we found marked upregulation of nestin expression in highly proliferative and invasive gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) specimens. Nestin knockdown in GIST cells reduced the proliferative and invasive activity owing to a decrease of mitochondrial intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Furthermore, nestin was co-localized with mitochondria, and knockdown of nestin increased mitochondrial elongation and influenced the mitochondrial function, including oxygen consumption rates, ATP generation and mitochondrial membrane potential and so on. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we demonstrated nestin knockdown inhibited the mitochondrial recruitment of Dynamin-related protein1 and induced the change of mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, nestin may have an important role in GIST malignancy by regulating mitochondrial dynamics and altering intracellular ROS levels. The findings provide new clues to reveal mechanisms by which nestin mediates the proliferation and invasion of GISTs.

  9. Non-invasive optical detection of glucose in cell culture nutrient medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cote, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed research was to begin the development of a non-invasive optical sensor for measuring glucose concentration in the output medium of cell cultures grown in a unique NASA bioreactor referred to as an integrated rotating-wall vessel (IRWV). The input, a bovine serum based nutrient media, has a known glucose concentration. The cells within the bioreactor digest a portion of the glucose. Thus, the non-invasive optical sensor is needed to monitor the decrease in glucose due to cellular consumption since the critical parameters for sustained cellular productivity are glucose and pH. Previous glucose sensing techniques have used chemical reactions to quantify the glucose concentration. Chemical reactions, however, cannot provide for continuous, real time, non-invasive measurement as is required in this application. Our effort while in the fellowship program was focused on the design, optical setup, and testing of one bench top prototype non-invasive optical sensor using a mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy technique. Glucose has a fundamental vibrational absorption peak in the mid-infrared wavelength range at 9.6 micron. Preliminary absorption data using a CO2 laser were collected at this wavelength for water based glucose solutions at different concentrations and one bovine serum based nutrient medium (GTSF) with added glucose. The results showed near linear absorption responses for the glucose-in-water data with resolutions as high at 108 mg/dl and as low as 10 mg/dl. The nutrient medium had a resolution of 291 mg/dl. The variability of the results was due mainly to thermal and polarization drifts of the laser while the decrease in sensitivity to glucose in the nutrient medium was expected due to the increase in the number of confounders present in the nutrient medium. A multispectral approach needs to be used to compensate for these confounders. The CO2 laser used for these studies was wavelength tunable (9.2 to 10.8 micrometers), however

  10. SKI-606 (bosutinib), a novel Src kinase inhibitor, suppresses migration and invasion of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vultur, Adina; Buettner, Ralf; Kowolik, Claudia; Liang, Wei; Smith, David; Boschelli, Frank; Jove, Richard

    2008-05-01

    Src family kinase activity is elevated in many human tumors, including breast cancer, and is often associated with aggressive disease. We examined the effects of SKI-606 (bosutinib), a selective Src family kinase inhibitor, on human cancer cells derived from breast cancer patients to assess its potential for breast cancer treatment. Our results show that SKI-606 caused a decrease in cell motility and invasion of breast cancer cell lines with an IC50 of approximately 250 nmol/L, which was also the IC50 for inhibition of cellular Src kinase activity in intact tumor cells. These changes were accompanied by an increase in cell-to-cell adhesion and membrane localization of beta-catenin. By contrast, cell proliferation and survival were unaffected by SKI-606 at concentrations sufficient to block cell migration and invasion. Analysis of downstream effectors of Src revealed that SKI-606 inhibits the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas), with an IC50 similar to inhibition of cellular Src kinase. Our findings indicate that SKI-606 inhibits signaling pathways involved in controlling tumor cell motility and invasion, suggesting that SKI-606 is a promising therapeutic for breast cancer.

  11. A Toxoplasma gondii Ortholog of Plasmodium GAMA Contributes to Parasite Attachment and Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Vern B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii and its Plasmodium kin share a well-conserved invasion process, including sequential secretion of adhesive molecules for host cell attachment and invasion. However, only a few orthologs have been shown to be important for efficient invasion by both genera. Bioinformatic screening to uncover potential new players in invasion identified a previously unrecognized T. gondii ortholog of Plasmodium glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored micronemal antigen (TgGAMA). We show that TgGAMA localizes to the micronemes and is processed into several proteolytic products within the parasite prior to secretion onto the parasite surface during invasion. TgGAMA from parasite lysate bound to several different host cell types in vitro, suggesting a role in parasite attachment. Consistent with this function, tetracycline-regulatable TgGAMA and TgGAMA knockout strains showed significant reductions in host cell invasion at the attachment step, with no defects in any of the other stages of the parasite lytic cycle. Together, the results of this work reveal a new conserved component of the adhesive repertoire of apicomplexan parasites. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma gondii is a successful human pathogen in the same phylum as malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites. Invasion of a host cell is an essential process that begins with secretion of adhesive proteins onto the parasite surface for attachment and subsequent penetration of the host cell. Conserved invasion proteins likely play roles that were maintained through the divergence of these parasites. Here, we identify a new conserved invasion protein called glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored micronemal antigen (GAMA). Tachyzoites lacking TgGAMA were partially impaired in parasite attachment and invasion of host cells, yielding the first genetic evidence of a specific role in parasite entry into host cells. These findings widen our appreciation of the repertoire of conserved proteins that apicomplexan parasites employ for

  12. Stimulation of Hepatoma Cell Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential by Proteins Secreted From Irradiated Nonparenchymal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Leyuan; Wang Zhiming; Gao Yabo; Wang Lingyan; Zeng Zhaochong

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether factors secreted by irradiated liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) may influence invasiveness and/or metastatic potential of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to elucidate a possible mechanism for such effect. Methods and Materials: Primary rat NPCs were cultured and divided into irradiated (10-Gy X-ray) and nonirradiated groups. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, conditioned medium from irradiated (SR) or nonirradiated (SnonR) cultures were collected and added to sublethally irradiated cultures of the hepatoma McA-RH7777 cell line. Then, hepatoma cells were continuously passaged for eight generations (RH10Gy-SR and RH10Gy-SnonR). The invasiveness and metastatic potential of McA-RH7777, RH10Gy-SnonR, and RH10Gy-SR cells were evaluated using an in vitro gelatinous protein (Matrigel) invasion and an in vivo metastasis assay. In addition, SR and SnonR were tested using rat cytokine antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In vitro gelatinous protein invasion assay indicated that the numbers of invading cells was significantly higher in RH10Gy-SR (40 {+-} 4.74) than in RH10Gy-SnonR (30.6 {+-} 3.85) cells, and lowest in McA-RH7777 (11.4 {+-} 3.56) cells. The same pattern was observed in vivo in a lung metastasis assay, as evaluated by number of metastatic lung nodules seen with RH10Gy-SR (28.83 {+-} 5.38), RH10Gy-SnonR (22.17 {+-} 4.26), and McA-RH7777 (8.3 {+-} 3.8) cells. Rat cytokine antibody arrays and ELISA demonstrated that metastasis-promoting cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6), circulating growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor), and metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were upregulated in SR compared with SnonR. Conclusions: Radiation can increase invasiveness and metastatic potential of sublethally irradiated hepatoma cells, and soluble mediators released from irradiated NPCs promote this potential. Increased secretion of

  13. Ionizing Radiation Promotes Migration and Invasion of Cancer Cells Through Transforming Growth Factor-Beta-Mediated Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yongchun; Liu Junye; Li Jing; Zhang Jie; Xu Yuqiao; Zhang Huawei; Qiu Lianbo; Ding Guirong; Su Xiaoming; Mei Shi; Guo Guozhen

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To examine whether ionizing radiation enhances the migratory and invasive abilities of cancer cells through transforming growth factor (TGF-{beta})-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Methods and Materials: Six cancer cell lines originating from different human organs were irradiated by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, and the changes associated with EMT, including morphology, EMT markers, migration and invasion, were observed by microscope, Western blot, immunofluorescence, scratch assay, and transwell chamber assay, respectively. Then the protein levels of TGF-{beta} in these cancer cells were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the role of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in the effect of ionizing radiation on EMT was investigate by using the specific inhibitor SB431542. Results: After irradiation with {gamma}-ray at a total dose of 2 Gy, cancer cells presented the mesenchymal phenotype, and compared with the sham-irradiation group the expression of epithelial markers was decreased and of mesenchymal markers was increased, the migratory and invasive capabilities were strengthened, and the protein levels of TGF-{beta} were enhanced. Furthermore, events associated with EMT induced by IR in A549 could be reversed through inhibition of TGF-{beta} signaling. Conclusions: These results suggest that EMT mediated by TGF-{beta} plays a critical role in IR-induced enhancing of migratory and invasive capabilities in cancer cells.

  14. Active invasion of bacteria into living fungal cells

    PubMed Central

    Moebius, Nadine; Üzüm, Zerrin; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Lackner, Gerald; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The rice seedling blight fungus Rhizopus microsporus and its endosymbiont Burkholderia rhizoxinica form an unusual, highly specific alliance to produce the highly potent antimitotic phytotoxin rhizoxin. Yet, it has remained a riddle how bacteria invade the fungal cells. Genome mining for potential symbiosis factors and functional analyses revealed that a type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of the bacterial endosymbiont is required for the formation of the endosymbiosis. Comparative proteome analyses show that the T2SS releases chitinolytic enzymes (chitinase, chitosanase) and chitin-binding proteins. The genes responsible for chitinolytic proteins and T2SS components are highly expressed during infection. Through targeted gene knock-outs, sporulation assays and microscopic investigations we found that chitinase is essential for bacteria to enter hyphae. Unprecedented snapshots of the traceless bacterial intrusion were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy. Beyond unveiling the pivotal role of chitinolytic enzymes in the active invasion of a fungus by bacteria, these findings grant unprecedented insight into the fungal cell wall penetration and symbiosis formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03007.001 PMID:25182414

  15. Kisspeptin regulation of genes involved in cell invasion and angiogenesis in first trimester human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, Víctor A; Abera, Aron B; Matjila, Mushi; Millar, Robert P; Katz, Arieh A

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of extravillous trophoblast invasion of the uterine wall is a key process in successful pregnancies. Kisspeptin (KP) has been shown to inhibit cancer cell metastasis and placental trophoblast cell migration. In this study primary cultures of first trimester human trophoblast cells have been utilized in order to study the regulation of invasion and angiogenesis-related genes by KP. Trophoblast cells were isolated from first trimester placenta and their identity was confirmed by immunostaining for cytokeratin-7. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that primary trophoblast cells express higher levels of GPR54 (KP receptor) and KP mRNA than the trophoblast cell line HTR8Svneo. Furthermore, trophoblast cells also expressed higher GPR54 and KP protein levels. Treating primary trophoblast cells with KP induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, while co-treating the cells with a KP antagonist almost completely blocked the activation of ERK1/2 and demonstrated that KP through its cognate GPR54 receptor can activate ERK1/2 in trophoblast cells. KP reduced the migratory capability of trophoblast cells in a scratch-migration assay. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that KP treatment reduced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10, 14 and VEGF-A, and increased the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 1 and 3. These results suggest that KP can inhibit first trimester trophoblast cells invasion via inhibition of cell migration and down regulation of the metalloproteinase system and VEGF-A. PMID:24923321

  16. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Yijing; Tang, Huijuan; Guo, Yan; Guo, Jing; Huang, Bangxing; Fang, Fang; Cai, Jing Wang, Zehua

    2015-09-10

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs.

  17. Transketolase Serves a Poor Prognosticator in Esophageal Cancer by Promoting Cell Invasion via Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yin-Kai; Peng, Ta-Lun; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Li, Yan-Liang; Lu, Ya-Ching; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: To characterize the potential function and clinical significance of Transketolase (TKT) in esophageal cancer. Methods: High invasive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell line CE48T/VGH was used. Cellular functions in response to TKT modulation were examined, including cell growth, migration and invasion. The underlying molecules involved in the TKT regulatory mechanism were determined by western blot and confocal microscopic analysis. Clinically, TKT expressions in 76 ESCC patients were assessed by immunohistochemical (IHC) method, and the association with treatment outcome was determined. Results: TKT silencing inhibited cell migration and invasion but had a minimal effect on cell growth. This TKT silencing also induced the reversion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as evidenced by the spindle to cuboidal morphological change, increased the expression of epithelial markers (γ-catenin), and decreased the levels of mesenchymal markers (fibronectin and N-cadherin). Mechanically, TKT was shown to modulate the EMT through the pERK-Slug/Snail-associated signaling pathway. Clinically, a high level of TKT in the cancer tissues of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was associated with poor survival (P = 0.042). In the multivariate analysis, a high TKT level was also shown to be an independent unfavorable prognostic factor (Odds ratio: 1.827, 95% confidence interval: 1.045-3.196, P = 0.035). Conclusions: TKT contributes to esophageal cancer by promoting cell invasion via meditating EMT process. Clinically, the over-expression of TKT in ESCC patients predicts poorer survival. TKT inhibition may be a useful strategy to intervene in cancer cell invasion and metastasis, which may lead to better prognosis for ESCC patients. PMID:27698919

  18. Transketolase Serves a Poor Prognosticator in Esophageal Cancer by Promoting Cell Invasion via Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yin-Kai; Peng, Ta-Lun; Chuang, Wen-Yu; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Li, Yan-Liang; Lu, Ya-Ching; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2016-01-01

    Background: To characterize the potential function and clinical significance of Transketolase (TKT) in esophageal cancer. Methods: High invasive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell line CE48T/VGH was used. Cellular functions in response to TKT modulation were examined, including cell growth, migration and invasion. The underlying molecules involved in the TKT regulatory mechanism were determined by western blot and confocal microscopic analysis. Clinically, TKT expressions in 76 ESCC patients were assessed by immunohistochemical (IHC) method, and the association with treatment outcome was determined. Results: TKT silencing inhibited cell migration and invasion but had a minimal effect on cell growth. This TKT silencing also induced the reversion of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as evidenced by the spindle to cuboidal morphological change, increased the expression of epithelial markers (γ-catenin), and decreased the levels of mesenchymal markers (fibronectin and N-cadherin). Mechanically, TKT was shown to modulate the EMT through the pERK-Slug/Snail-associated signaling pathway. Clinically, a high level of TKT in the cancer tissues of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was associated with poor survival (P = 0.042). In the multivariate analysis, a high TKT level was also shown to be an independent unfavorable prognostic factor (Odds ratio: 1.827, 95% confidence interval: 1.045-3.196, P = 0.035). Conclusions: TKT contributes to esophageal cancer by promoting cell invasion via meditating EMT process. Clinically, the over-expression of TKT in ESCC patients predicts poorer survival. TKT inhibition may be a useful strategy to intervene in cancer cell invasion and metastasis, which may lead to better prognosis for ESCC patients.

  19. Berberine Inhibits Human Hepatoma Cell Invasion without Cytotoxicity in Healthy Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xuediao; Yang, Zhicheng; Zang, Linquan

    2011-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy fails to cure metastatic hepatoma mainly due to its high hepatotoxicity. Many plant-derived agents have been accepted to effectively inhibit hepatoma cell invasion. However, the investigation that whether effectual plant-derived agents against invasive hepatoma cells exert unexpected cytotoxicity in healthy hepatocytes has been ignored. This study demonstrated that berberine exhibited significant cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells mainly through upregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production but was ineffective in normal Chang liver cells. Berberine exerted anti-invasive effect on HepG2 cells through suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. Moreover, berberine could significantly inhibit the activity of PI3K-AKT and ERK pathways. Combination treatment of ERK pathway inhibitor PD98059 or AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002 and berberine could result in a synergistic reduction on MMP-9 expression along with an inhibition of cell invasion. Enhancement of ROS production by berberine had no influence on its suppressive effects on the activity of PI3K-AKT and ERK pathways, as well as MMP-9 expression and HepG2 cell invasion. In conclusion, our results suggest that berberine may be a potential alternative against invasive hepatoma cells through PI3K-AKT and ERK pathways-dependent downregulation of MMP-9 expression. This study also provides a previously neglected insight into the investigation of plant-derived agents-based therapy against tumor invasion with the consideration of damage to healthy cells. PMID:21738655

  20. Cells activated for wound repair have the potential to direct collective invasion of an epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bleaken, Brigid M.; Menko, A. Sue; Walker, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms regulating how groups of cells are signaled to move collectively from their original site and invade surrounding matrix are poorly understood. Here we develop a clinically relevant ex vivo injury invasion model to determine whether cells involved in directing wound healing have invasive function and whether they can act as leader cells to direct movement of a wounded epithelium through a three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) environment. Similar to cancer invasion, we found that the injured cells invade into the ECM as cords, involving heterotypical cell–cell interactions. Mesenchymal cells with properties of activated repair cells that typically locate to a wound edge are present in leader positions at the front of ZO-1–rich invading cords of cells, where they extend vimentin intermediate filament–enriched protrusions into the 3D ECM. Injury-induced invasion depends on both vimentin cytoskeletal function and MMP-2/9 matrix remodeling, because inhibiting either of these suppressed invasion. Potential push and pull forces at the tips of the invading cords were revealed by time-lapse imaging, which showed cells actively extending and retracting protrusions into the ECM. This 3D injury invasion model can be used to investigate mechanisms of leader cell–directed invasion and understand how mechanisms of wound healing are hijacked to cause disease. PMID:26658613

  1. Genomic profiling of invasive melanoma cell lines by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Koroknai, Viktória; Ecsedi, Szilvia; Vízkeleti, Laura; Kiss, Tímea; Szász, István; Lukács, Andrea; Papp, Orsolya; Ádány, Róza; Balázs, Margit

    2016-04-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive human cancers. Invasion of cells is the first step in metastasis, resulting in cell migration through tissue compartments. We aimed to evaluate genomic alterations specifically associated with the invasive characteristics of melanoma cells. Matrigel invasion assays were used to determine the invasive properties of cell lines that originated from primary melanomas. Array comparative genomic hybridization analyses were carried out to define the chromosome copy number alterations (CNAs). Several recurrent CNAs were identified by array comparative genomic hybridization that affected melanoma-related genes. Invasive primary cell lines showed high frequencies of CNAs, including the loss of 7q and gain of 12q chromosomal regions targeting PTPN12, ADAM22, FZD1, TFPI2, GNG11, COL1A2, SMURF1, VGF, RELN and GLIPR1 genes. Gain of the GDNF (5p13.1), GPAA1, PLEC and SHARPIN (8q24.3) genes was significantly more frequent in invasive cell lines compared with the noninvasive ones. Importantly, copy number gains of these genes were also found in cell lines that originated from metastases, suggesting their role in melanoma metastasis formation. The present study describes genomic differences between invasive and noninvasive melanoma cell lines that may contribute toward the aggressive phenotype of human melanoma cells. PMID:26656572

  2. Effect of N-CAM on in vitro invasion of human adenoid cystic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    França, C M; Jaeger, R G; Freitas, V M; Araújo, N S; Jaeger, M M

    2001-12-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma of salivary glands is characterised by aggressive behaviour, high rate of local recurrences, neurotropism and late metastasis. In a previous work we demonstrated that adenoid cystic carcinoma cultured cells (CAC2 cells) expressed N-CAM. It was suggested that this expression, modulated by extracellular matrix, would be correlated to cell movement. The aim of our study was to verify whether CAC2 cells presented invasion capacity. Moreover, we tested whether the neural adhesion molecule (N-CAM) would participate in this process. CAC2 cells were either previously treated, or not (control), with a monoclonal antibody against N-CAM. Invasion assays were carried out using a modified Boyden chamber (Transwell chamber). CAC2 cells (10(5)) were dispensed into Transwell upper chamber on the top of Matrigel coated filter. The cells that invaded the filters in the first 8 h were counted under light microscopy, yielding data for the invasion rates (%). Control CAC2 cells presented an invasion rate of 5.28+/-0.04%. The invasion rate raised to 6.53+/-0.2% when N-CAM was blocked with monoclonal antibody. N-CAM impaired the adenoid cystic carcinoma cell invasion in vitro. Therefore, we suggest an anti-invasive role for N-CAM in adenoid cystic carcinoma.

  3. Human milk oligosaccharides protect bladder epithelial cells against uropathogenic Escherichia coli invasion and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ann E; Autran, Chloe A; Espanola, Sophia D; Bode, Lars; Nizet, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The invasive pathogen uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the primary cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Recurrent infection that can progress to life-threatening renal failure has remained as a serious global health concern in infants. UPEC adheres to and invades bladder epithelial cells to establish infection. Studies have detected the presence of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) in urine of breast-fed, but not formula-fed, neonates. We investigated the mechanisms HMOs deploy to elicit protection in human bladder epithelial cells infected with UPEC CFT073, a prototypic urosepsis-associated strain. We found a significant reduction in UPEC internalization into HMO-pretreated epithelial cells without observing any significant effect in UPEC binding to these cells. This event coincides with a rapid decrease in host cell cytotoxicity, recognized by LIVE/DEAD staining and cell detachment, but independent of caspase-mediated or mitochondrial-mediated programmed cell death pathways. Further investigation revealed HMOs, and particularly the sialic acid-containing fraction, reduced UPEC-mediated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Collectively, our results indicate that HMOs can protect bladder epithelial cells from deleterious cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects of UPEC infection, and may be one contributing mechanism underlying the epidemiological evidence of reduced UTI incidence in breast-fed infants.

  4. Connexin 32 and its derived homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication inhibit the migration and invasion of transfected HeLa cells via enhancement of intercellular adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qin; Yuan, Dongdong; Hong, Xiaoting; Yang, Yan; Tao, Liang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of connexin (Cx) and its derived homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) between tumor cells on the invasion of metastatic cancers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of Cx32 and the homotypic GJIC mediated by this Cx on the migration, invasion and intercellular adhesion of transfected HeLa cells. The expression of Cx32 significantly increased cell adhesion and inhibited migration and invasion. The inhibition of GJIC by oleamide, a widely used GJIC inhibitor, reduced the enhanced adhesion and partly reversed the decreased migration and invasion that had been induced by Cx32 expression. Blockage of the p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 MAPKs) pathways using their specific inhibitors attenuated the effects of Cx32, but not those of GJIC, on cell adhesion, migration and invasion. These results indicate that the homotypic GJIC mediated by Cx32, as well as the Cx itself, inhibit cell migration and invasion, most likely through the elevation of intercellular adhesion. The suppressive effect of Cx32 on the migration and invasion of cancer cells, but not that of its derived homotypic GJIC, partly depends on the activation of the p38 and the ERK1/2 MAPKs pathways.

  5. Transforming Growth Factor-β Is an Upstream Regulator of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Dependent Bladder Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sounak; Hau, Andrew M; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Harwalkar, Jyoti; Shoskes, Aaron C; Elson, Paul; Beach, Jordan R; Hussey, George S; Schiemann, William P; Egelhoff, Thomas T; Howe, Philip H; Hansel, Donna E

    2016-05-01

    Our prior work identified the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) as a key regulator of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion, although upstream growth factor mediators of this pathway in bladder cancer have not been well delineated. We tested whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, which can function as a promotility factor in bladder cancer cells, could regulate mTORC2-dependent bladder cancer cell motility and invasion. In human bladder cancers, the highest levels of phosphorylated SMAD2, a TGF-β signaling intermediate, were present in high-grade invasive bladder cancers and associated with more frequent recurrence and decreased disease-specific survival. Increased expression of TGF-β isoforms, receptors, and signaling components was detected in invasive high-grade bladder cancer cells that expressed Vimentin and lacked E-cadherin. Application of TGF-β induced phosphorylation of the Ser473 residue of AKT, a selective target of mTORC2, in a SMAD2- and SMAD4-independent manner and increased bladder cancer cell migration in a modified scratch wound assay and invasion through Matrigel. Inhibition of TGF-β receptor I using SB431542 ablated TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. A similar effect was seen when Rictor, a key mTORC2 component, was selectively silenced. Our results suggest that TGF-β can induce bladder cancer cell invasion via mTORC2 signaling, which may be applicable in most bladder cancers.

  6. TR4 nuclear receptor increases prostate cancer invasion via decreasing the miR-373-3p expression to alter TGFβR2/p-Smad3 signals.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaofu; Zhu, Jin; Sun, Yin; Fan, Kun; Yang, Dong-Rong; Li, Gonghui; Yang, Guosheng; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-06-20

    Testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, may play important roles to modulate the metabolic diseases and prostate tumorigenesis. Here we found TR4 could increase prostate cancer (PCa) cell invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed that TR4 might increase PCa cell invasion via decreasing the miR-373-3p expression that resulted in the activation of the TGFβR2/p-Smad3 signals. The in vivo mouse model using orthotopically xenografted CWR22Rv1 cell line transfected with luciferase-reporter confirmed in vitro cell line studies showing TR4 increased PCa metastasis via decreasing the miR-373-3p expression. Together, these data suggest that TR4 may increase PCa metastasis via a newly identified signal and targeting these TR4/miR-473-3p/TGFβR2/p-Smad3 signals using TR4 antagonist or TR4-siRNA or miR-373-3p may allow us to develop a new potential therapeutic approach to better suppress PCa metastasis.

  7. Hypoxia regulates SOX2 expression to promote prostate cancer cell invasion and sphere formation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Kyung-Mi; Dai, Yao; Vieweg, Johannes; Siemann, Dietmar W

    2016-01-01

    SOX2 is an embryonic stem cell marker that in prostate cancer has been associated not only with tumorigenesis but also metastasis. Furthermore hypoxia in primary tumors has been linked to poor prognosis and outcomes in this disease. The goal of the present study was to investigate the impact of hypoxia on SOX2 expression and metastasis-associated functions in prostate cancer cells. A tissue microarray of 80 samples from prostate cancer patients or healthy controls was employed to examine the expression of HIF-1α and its correlation with SOX2. The role of SOX2 and HIF-1/2α in the regulation of cell invasion and sphere formation capacity under hypoxic conditions was investigated in vitro using short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown in three human prostate cancer cell lines. HIF-1α expression was significantly elevated in malignant prostate tissue compared to benign or normal tissue, and in tumor samples its expression was highly correlated with SOX2. In prostate cancer cells, acute and chronic exposures to hypoxia that resulted in elevated expression levels of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, respectively, also induced SOX2. Genetic depletion of SOX2 attenuated hypoxia-induced cell functions. Knockdown of HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, decreased acute hypoxia-mediated cell invasion and SOX2 up-regulation, whereas only HIF-2α gene silencing reduced sphere formation capacity and chronic hypoxia-mediated SOX2 up-regulation. Enhanced SOX2 expression and HIF-1α or HIF-2α associated phenotypes are dependent on the time duration of exposure to hypoxia. The present results indicate that SOX2 may be a key mediator of hypoxia-induced metastasis-associated functions and hence may serve as a potential target for therapeutic interventions for metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:27294000

  8. HOXB5 Promotes the Proliferation and Invasion of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Hur, Ho; Yun, Hyo Jung; Kim, Yeejeong; Yang, Seoyeon; Kim, Seung Il; Kim, Myoung Hee

    2015-01-01

    HOX transcription factors play an important role in determining body patterning and cell fate during embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has shown that these genes act as positive and/or negative modulators in many types of cancer, including breast cancer, in a tissue-specific manner. We have previously reported that HOXB5 is aberrantly overexpressed in breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Here, we investigated the biological roles and clinical relevance of HOXB5 in breast cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of HOXB5 on tissue microarray (TMA) including 34 normal and 67 breast cancer specimens revealed that HOXB5 was highly expressed in cancer tissues, particularly from estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer patients. An online survival analysis confirmed the correlation between HOXB5 expression and poor distant metastasis-free survival in ER-positive, but not in ER-negative, breast cancer. In vitro studies indicated that HOXB5 silencing in ER-positive cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth. In contrast, overexpression of HOXB5 displayed EMT characteristics with a greater invasive ability, higher cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar. HOXB5 knockdown or overexpression led to changes in the expression levels of RET, ERBB2, and EGFR, but not of ESR1. In conclusion, we suggest that HOXB5 acts as a positive modulator most likely by promoting cell proliferative response and invasiveness in ER-positive breast cancer. These results would help predict prognosis of breast cancer and identify a new valuable therapeutic target. PMID:25999793

  9. Increased cholesterol and decreased fluidity of red cell membranes (spur cell anemia) in progressive intrahepatic cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Balistreri, W F; Leslie, M H; Cooper, R A

    1981-04-01

    Progressive hemolytic anemia occurred in a 4 1/2-year-old girl with familial intrahepatic cholestasis; a peripheral smear contained bizarre spiculated "spur" red cells. Analysis of this patient's fresh red cells revealed a 59% increase in cholesterol content with a normal phospholipid content and therefore an increase in the cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio to 1.35 (normal = 0.92). A similar abnormality of lipid composition was present in serum lipoproteins. The lipid abnormality in red cell membrane was associated with a decrease in membrane fluidity, as assessed by the fluorescence polarization of the hydrophobic probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Following incubation with patient's plasma, normal cells acquired a spur-shaped morphology with an associated decrease in osmotic fragility and a 25% increase in cholesterol content. The patient's cells, during incubation with normal plasma, acquired morphologic features of spiculated spherocytes with an increase in osmotic fragility and a 21% decrease in cholesterol content. Chenodeoxycholate and lithocholate were present in markedly elevated concentrations in serum. These studies show that a process identical to spur cell anemia in alcoholic cirrhosis may accompany severe liver disease in children with intrahepatic cholestasis.

  10. Feruloyl-L-arabinose attenuates migration, invasion and production of reactive oxygen species in H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Wang, Hui-Min; Chang, Kuo-Feng; Hu, Huei-Ting; Hwang, Lian-Je; Fu, Tzu-Fun; Lin, Yin-Chieh; Chang, Wei-Chiao; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Fong, Yao; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2013-08-01

    Ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, is an abundant dietary antioxidant and exerts the mitogenic effect on cells. Recently, we isolated an active FA derivative, namely feruloyl-L-arabinose (FAA), from coba husk. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of FAA on the proliferation, migration and invasion of H1299 human lung cancer cells. Our results showed a strong antioxidant potential of FAA. Additionally, FAA inhibited the migration and invasion ability, while causing a significant accumulation of G2/M-population, of H1299 tumor cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas no significant change on cell proliferation was observed. Results from the wound healing assay revealed that cell migration ability was markedly inhibited by FAA treatments. Similarly, results of gelatin zymography study showed that FAA treatments significantly decreased the activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, suggesting that FAA-mediated inhibition on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells may be achieved by the down-regulation of the MMPs activities. Taken together, our present work provides a new insight into the novel inhibitory function of FAA on cell migration in H1299 cells, suggesting its promising role in the chemoprevention of lung cancer.

  11. Silencing of SOX12 by shRNA suppresses migration, invasion and proliferation of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hanzhi; Quan, Hong; Yan, Weiguo; Han, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Sex determining region Y-box protein 12 (SOX12) is essential for embryonic development and cell-fate determination. The role of SOX12 in tumorigenesis of breast cancer is not well-understood. Here, we found that SOX12 mRNA expression was up-regulated in human breast cancer tissues. To clarify the roles of SOX12 in breast cancer, we used lentiviral shRNAs to suppress its expression in two breast cancer cells with relatively higher expression of SOX12 (BT474 and MCF-7). Our findings strongly suggested that SOX12 was critical for cell migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. We found that silencing of SOX12 significantly decreased the mRNA and protein levels of MMP9 and Twist, while notably increased E-cadherin. Moreover, SOX12 knockdown significantly inhibited the proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro and the growth of xenograft tumours in vivo. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that breast cancer cells with SOX12 knockdown showed cell cycle arrest and decreased mRNA and protein levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), CDK2 and Cyclin D1. Taken together, SOX12 plays an important role in growth inhibition through cell-cycle arrest, as well as migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. PMID:27582508

  12. Matrine inhibits the invasive properties of human osteosarcoma cells by downregulating the ERK-NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhen-Ni; Zhao, Hong-Mou; Tong, Zhi-Chao; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hu; Liang, Xiao-Jun

    2014-10-01

    Matrine has been used in anti-inflammatory and anticancer therapies for a long time. However, the antimetastatic effect and molecular mechanism(s) of matrine on osteosarcoma are still unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effects of matrine and related mechanism(s) on osteosarcoma cells. In the study, we found that matrine inhibited the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells in vivo and in vitro and inhibited tumor cell metastasis in vitro at cytotoxic doses. Matrine also decreased the expression of the matrix metalloproteinases-2 and 9, decreased p50 and p65 nuclear translocation, and decreased the phosphorylated level of I-κ-B (IκB)-β. In addition, matrine reduced the phosphorylated levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 proteins, which regulate the invasion of poorly differentiated cancer cells. Finally, when U2OS cells were grown as xenografts in nude mice, intragastric administration of matrine induced a significant dose-dependent decrease in tumor growth. These results show the anticancer properties of matrine, which include the inhibition of invasion and proliferation of human osteosarcoma cells.

  13. Management of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Arslanoğlu, Seçil; Eren, Erdem; Özkul, Yılmaz; Ciğer, Ejder; Kopar, Aylin; Önal, Kazım; Etit, Demet; Tütüncü, G Yazgı

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of thyroid gland invasion in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma; and the association between clinicopathological parameters and thyroid gland invasion. Medical records of 75 patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who underwent total laryngectomy with thyroidectomy were reviewed, retrospectively. Preoperative computed tomography scans, clinical and operative findings, and histopathological data of the specimens were evaluated. There were 73 male and two female patients with an age range of 41-88 years (mean 60.4 years). Hemithyroidectomy was performed in 62 (82.7 %) and total thyroidectomy was performed in 13 patients (17.3 %). Four patients had histopathologically proven thyroid gland invasion (5.3 %). In three patients, thyroid gland involvement was by means of direct invasion. Thyroid gland invasion was significantly correlated with thyroid cartilage invasion. Therefore, prophylactic thyroidectomy should not be a part of the treatment policy for these tumors.

  14. MiR-153 inhibits migration and invasion of human non-small-cell lung cancer by targeting ADAM19

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Nianxi; Shen, Liangfang; Wang, Jun; He, Dan; Duan, Chaojun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Decreased miR-153 and up-regulated ADAM19 are correlated with NSCLC pathology. • MiR-153 inhibits the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro. • ADAM19 is a direct target of miR-153. • ADAM19 is involved in miR-153-suppressed migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. - Abstract: MiR-153 was reported to be dysregulated in some human cancers. However, the function and mechanism of miR-153 in lung cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-153 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that miR-153 was significantly decreased in clinical NSCLC tissues and cell lines, and downregulation of miR-153 was significantly correlated with lymph node status. We further found that ectopic expression of miR-153 significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration and invasion of NSCLC cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-153 may be a novel tumor suppressor in NSCLC. Further integrated analysis revealed that ADAM19 is as a direct and functional target of miR-153. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-153 directly targeted 3′UTR of ADAM19, and correlation analysis revealed an inverse correlation between miR-153 and ADAM19 mRNA levels in clinical NSCLC tissues. Knockdown of ADAM19 inhibited migration and invasion of NSCLC cells which was similar with effects of overexpression of miR-153, while overexpression of ADAM19 attenuated the function of miR-153 in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results highlight the significance of miR-153 and ADAM19 in the development and progression of NSCLC.

  15. Thymus vulgaris (thyme) inhibits proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Menhali, Afnan; Al-Rumaihi, Aisha; Al-Mohammed, Hana; Al-Mazrooey, Hana; Al-Shamlan, Maryam; AlJassim, Meaad; Al-Korbi, Noof; Eid, Ali Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Its prognosis remains poor for patients with several grades of this disease. This underscores the need for alternative modalities, such as herbal medicines, to treat this disease. A commonly used plant that appears to be of high medicinal value is Thymus vulgaris L. However, the effects of this plant on the malignant behavior of human CRC cells remains poorly investigated. This study was undertaken to determine the anticancer efficacy of T. vulgaris extract (TVE) in CRC cells. Our results show that TVE inhibits proliferation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This decreased proliferation was concomitant with increased apoptotic cell death as evidenced by increased caspase3/7 activity. Moreover, TVE also decreased adhesion to fibronectin in a concentration-dependent manner. The migratory and invasive capacities of HCT116 cells were significantly inhibited by TVE. Taken together, these data suggest that the TVE inhibits malignant phenotype of colon cancer cells. Therefore, T. vulgaris could have an anticancer effect and that some of its bioactive compounds may prove to be effective treatment modalities for human CRC.

  16. A complex mechanism for HDGF-mediated cell growth, migration, invasion, and TMZ chemosensitivity in glioma.

    PubMed

    Song, Ye; Hu, Zheng; Long, Hao; Peng, Yuping; Zhang, Xi'an; Que, Tianshi; Zheng, Shihao; Li, Zhiyong; Wang, Gang; Yi, Liu; Liu, Zhen; Fang, Weiyi; Qi, Songtao

    2014-09-01

    HDGF is overexpressed in gliomas as compared to normal brain. We therefore analyzed the molecular mechanisms of HDGF action in gliomas. HDGF was downregulated in normal brain tissue as compared to glioma specimens at both the mRNA and the protein levels. In glioma samples, increased HDGF expression was associated with disease progression. Knocking down HDGF expression not only significantly decreased cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis, but also markedly enhanced TMZ-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in glioma cells. Mechanistic analyses revealed that CCND1, c-myc, and TGF-β were downregulated after stable HDGF knockdown in the U251 and U87 glioma cells. HDGF knockdown restored E-cadherin expression and suppressed mesenchymal cell markers such as vimentin, β-catenin, and N-cadherin. The expression of cleaved caspase-3 increased, while Bcl-2 decreased in each cell line following treatment with shHDGF and TMZ, as compared to TMZ alone. Furthermore, RNAi-based knockdown study revealed that HDGF is probably involved in the activation of both the PI3K/Akt and the TGF-β signaling pathways. Together, our data suggested that HDGF regulates glioma cell growth, apoptosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) probably through the Akt and the TGF-β signaling pathways. These results provide evidence that targeting HDGF or its downstream targets may lead to novel therapies for gliomas.

  17. Plasticity of Cancer Cell Invasion-Mechanisms and Implications for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Te Boekhorst, V; Friedl, P

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is a plastic and adaptive process integrating cytoskeletal dynamics, cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell adhesion, as well as tissue remodeling. In response to molecular and physical microenvironmental cues during metastatic dissemination, cancer cells exploit a versatile repertoire of invasion and dissemination strategies, including collective and single-cell migration programs. This diversity generates molecular and physical heterogeneity of migration mechanisms and metastatic routes, and provides a basis for adaptation in response to microenvironmental and therapeutic challenge. We here summarize how cytoskeletal dynamics, protease systems, cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion pathways control cancer cell invasion programs, and how reciprocal interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment contributes to plasticity of invasion and dissemination strategies. We discuss the potential and future implications of predicted "antimigration" therapies that target cytoskeletal dynamics, adhesion, and protease systems to interfere with metastatic dissemination, and the options for integrating antimigration therapy into the spectrum of targeted molecular therapies. PMID:27613134

  18. CNK1 promotes invasion of cancer cells through NF-kappaB-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Rafael D; Radziwill, Gerald

    2010-03-01

    Hallmarks of cancer cells are uncontrolled proliferation, evasion of apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis, which are driven by oncogenic activation of signaling pathways. Herein, we identify the scaffold protein CNK1 as a mediator of oncogenic signaling that promotes invasion in human breast cancer and cervical cancer cells. Downregulation of CNK1 diminishes the invasiveness of cancer cells and correlates with reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and membrane-type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP). Ectopic expression of CNK1 elevates MT1-MMP promoter activity in a NF-kappaB-dependent manner. Moreover, CNK1 cooperates with the NF-kappaB pathway, but not with the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway, to promote cell invasion. Mechanistically, CNK1 regulates the alternative branch of the NF-kappaB pathway because knockdown of CNK1 interferes with processing of NF-kappaB2 p100 to p52 and its localization to the nucleus. In agreement with this, the invasion of CNK1-depleted cells is less sensitive to RelB downregulation compared with the invasion of control cells. Moreover, CNK1-dependent MT1-MMP promoter activation is blocked by RelB siRNA. Thus, CNK1 is an essential mediator of an oncogenic pathway involved in invasion of breast and cervical cancer cells and is therefore a putative target for cancer therapy.

  19. Breast Cancer Cell Invasion into a Three Dimensional Tumor-Stroma Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Danh; Puleo, Julieann; Llave, Alison; Mouneimne, Ghassan; Kamm, Roger D.; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to model 3D chemotactic tumor-stroma invasion in vitro, we developed an innovative microfluidic chip allowing side-by-side positioning of 3D hydrogel-based matrices. We were able to (1) create a dual matrix architecture that extended in a continuous manner, thus allowing invasion from one 3D matrix to another, and (2) establish distinct regions of tumor and stroma cell/ECM compositions, with a clearly demarcated tumor invasion front, thus allowing us to quantitatively analyze progression of cancer cells into the stroma at a tissue or single-cell level. We showed significantly enhanced cancer cell invasion in response to a transient gradient of epidermal growth factor (EGF). 3D tracking at the single-cell level displayed increased migration speed and persistence. Subsequently, we analyzed changes in expression of EGF receptors, cell aspect ratio, and protrusive activity. These findings show the unique ability of our model to quantitatively analyze 3D chemotactic invasion, both globally by tracking the progression of the invasion front, and at the single-cell level by examining changes in cellular behavior and morphology using high-resolution imaging. Taken together, we have shown a novel model recapitulating 3D tumor-stroma interactions for studies of real-time cell invasion and morphological changes within a single platform. PMID:27678304

  20. Genomic Recombination Leading to Decreased Virulence of Group B Streptococcus in a Mouse Model of Adult Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Lemire, Paul; Dewar, Ken; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Calzas, Cynthia; Mallo, Gustavo V.; Li, Aimin; Athey, Taryn B.T.; Segura, Mariela; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    Adult invasive disease caused by Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is increasing worldwide. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) now permits rapid identification of recombination events, a phenomenon that occurs frequently in GBS. Using WGS, we described that strain NGBS375, a capsular serotype V GBS isolate of sequence type (ST)297, has an ST1 genomic background but has acquired approximately 300 kbp of genetic material likely from an ST17 strain. Here, we examined the virulence of this strain in an in vivo model of GBS adult invasive infection. The mosaic ST297 strain showed intermediate virulence, causing significantly less systemic infection and reduced mortality than a more virulent, serotype V ST1 isolate. Bacteremia induced by the ST297 strain was similar to that induced by a serotype III ST17 strain, which was the least virulent under the conditions tested. Yet, under normalized bacteremia levels, the in vivo intrinsic capacity to induce the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was similar between the ST297 strain and the virulent ST1 strain. Thus, the diminished virulence of the mosaic strain may be due to reduced capacity to disseminate or multiply in blood during a systemic infection which could be mediated by regulatory factors contained in the recombined region. PMID:27527222

  1. ILs-3, 6 and 11 increase, but ILs-10 and 24 decrease stemness of human prostate cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dandan; Zhong, Yali; Li, Xiaoran; Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoli; Cao, Jing; Fan, Huijie; Yuan, Yuan; Ji, Zhenyu; Qiao, Baoping; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Kvalheim, Gunnar; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are associated with cancer recurrence and metastasis. Prostate cancer cells often metastasize to the bone with a complex microenvironment of cytokines favoring cell survival. In this study, the cell stemness influence of a group of interleukins including IL-3, 6, 10, 11 and 24 on human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and PC-3 was explored in vitro. Sulforhodamine B(SRB) and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) assays were applied to examine the effect on cell proliferation, and wound healing and transwell assays were used for migration and invasion studies, in addition to colony formation, Western blotting and flowcytometry for the expression of stemness factors and chemotherapy sensitivity. We observed that ILs-3, 6 and 11 stimulated while ILs-10 and 24 inhibited the growth, invasion and migration of both cell lines. Interestingly, ILs-3, 6 and 11 significantly promoted colony formation and increased the expression of SOX2, CD44 and ABCG2 in both prostate cancer cell lines. However, ILs-10 and 24 showed the opposite effect on the expression of these factors. In line with the above findings, treatment with either IL-3 or IL-6 or IL-11 decreased the chemosensitivity to docetaxel while treatment with either IL-10 or IL-24 increased the sensitivity of docetaxel chemotherapy. In conclusion, our results suggest that ILs-3, 6 and 11 function as tumor promoters while ILs-10 and 24 function as tumor suppressors in the prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP in vitro, and such differences may attribute to their different effect on the stemness of PCa cells. PMID:26528857

  2. The activation of protease-activated receptor 1 mediates proliferation and invasion of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qingyao; Luo, Jianchao; Wang, Tao; Ren, Jinghua; Hu, Kai; Wu, Gang

    2012-07-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) is a G-coupled membrane protein, which is involved in physiological and malignant invasion processes. It is activated by serine proteases such as thrombin through a unique form or by specific synthetic peptides. In this study, we determined the expression of PAR-1 in five nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines with different characteristics of invasiveness and metastasis, and found that the levels of PAR-1 expression were higher in invasive or metastatic cell lines than those in low invasive or metastatic ones. Of the five NPC cell lines, CNE1-LMP1 cells had the highest expression levels of PAR-1, which was mainly distributed at the membrane and in the cytoplasm of tumor cells. Further study showed that the thrombin receptor synthetic activating peptide SFLLRN could stimulate the growth of CNE1-LMP1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. However, thrombin itself had a dual effect on the proliferation of NPC cells. Concentrations of thrombin in the range of 0.1-0.5 U/ml promoted cell growth, but concentrations higher than 0.5 U/ml impaired cell growth. Moreover, thrombin and SFLLRN also enhanced the invasive capabilities of CNE1-LMP1 cells in vitro, and this was partly due to enhancing the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our findings suggest that PAR-1 may contribute to the growth and invasive potential of NPC cells. PMID:22562397

  3. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  4. ATRA mechanically reprograms pancreatic stellate cells to suppress matrix remodelling and inhibit cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulos, Antonios; Robinson, Benjamin; Sarper, Muge; Cortes, Ernesto; Auernheimer, Vera; Lachowski, Dariusz; Attwood, Simon; García, Rebeca; Ghassemi, Saba; Fabry, Ben; Del Río Hernández, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with a dismal survival rate. Persistent activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) can perturb the biomechanical homoeostasis of the tumour microenvironment to favour cancer cell invasion. Here we report that ATRA, an active metabolite of vitamin A, restores mechanical quiescence in PSCs via a mechanism involving a retinoic acid receptor beta (RAR-β)-dependent downregulation of actomyosin (MLC-2) contractility. We show that ATRA reduces the ability of PSCs to generate high traction forces and adapt to extracellular mechanical cues (mechanosensing), as well as suppresses force-mediated extracellular matrix remodelling to inhibit local cancer cell invasion in 3D organotypic models. Our findings implicate a RAR-β/MLC-2 pathway in peritumoural stromal remodelling and mechanosensory-driven activation of PSCs, and further suggest that mechanical reprogramming of PSCs with retinoic acid derivatives might be a viable alternative to stromal ablation strategies for the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27600527

  5. High level of MT-MMP expression is associated with invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gilles, C; Polette, M; Piette, J; Munaut, C; Thompson, E W; Birembaut, P; Foidart, J M

    1996-01-17

    MMP-2 (gelatinase A) has been associated with the invasive potential of many cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. It is now becoming clear that the activation of this enzyme might be a key step in tumor invasion. This activation process has been shown to be a membrane-associated pathway inducible by various agents such as collagen type I, concanavalin A or TGF-beta, but its physiological regulation is still largely unresolved. MT-MMP was recently discovered and described as a potential gelatinase-A activator. In the present study, we investigated the expression of MT-MMP (membrane-type metalloproteinase) in cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Comparing several in vitro-transformed cervical cell lines, previously shown to display different invasive potentials, our results showed that the ability of cells to overexpress MT-MMP mRNA following ConA induction correlated with their ability to activate gelatinase A and with a highly invasive behavior. Moreover, using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we found a higher level of MT-MMP expression in invasive cervical carcinoma and lymph node metastases compared to its expression in non-invasive CIN III lesions. Our in vivo observations also clearly demonstrated a cooperation between stromal and tumor cells for the production of MT-MMP. Taken together, our results clearly correlated high level MT-MMP expression with invasiveness, and thus suggested that MT-MMP might play a crucial role in cervical tumor invasion.

  6. Multiplex profiling of cellular invasion in 3D cell culture models.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Gerald; Oehrle, Bettina; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    To-date, most invasion or migration assays use a modified Boyden chamber-like design to assess migration as single-cell or scratch assays on coated or uncoated planar plastic surfaces. Here, we describe a 96-well microplate-based, high-content, three-dimensional cell culture assay capable of assessing invasion dynamics and molecular signatures thereof. On applying our invasion assay, we were able to demonstrate significant effects on the invasion capacity of fibroblast cell lines, as well as primary lung fibroblasts. Administration of epidermal growth factor resulted in a substantial increase of cellular invasion, thus making this technique suitable for high-throughput pharmacological screening of novel compounds regulating invasive and migratory pathways of primary cells. Our assay also correlates cellular invasiveness to molecular events. Thus, we argue of having developed a powerful and versatile toolbox for an extensive profiling of invasive cells in a 96-well format. This will have a major impact on research in disease areas like fibrosis, metastatic cancers, or chronic inflammatory states. PMID:23671660

  7. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gang; Chen, Jiawei; Deng, Yanqiu; Gao, Feng; Zhu, Jiwei; Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong; Zhao, Zheng

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  8. Restoration of miR-20a expression suppresses cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang Shun; Zhou, Ning; Li, Jie-Qun; Li, Ting; Zhang, Zhong-Qiang; Si, Zhong-Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study microRNA (miR)-20a expression in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its effects on the proliferation, migration, and invasion of HepG2. Methods The real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the expression of miR-20a in HCC tissue and normal tissue, as well as in HCC cell lines and normal liver cells. miR-20a mimic and miR negative control (NC) were transfected into HepG2 cells. MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay was used to detect cell proliferation. Annexin fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay was run to examine the early apoptosis of cells. Transwell chamber assay was carried out to investigate the cell invasion and migration abilities. Results miR-20a was lowly expressed both in HCC tissues and HCC cell lines. After transfection of exogenous miR-20 mimics, miR-20a expression in HepG2 cells was significantly increased by 61.29% compared to the blank group (P<0.01). MTT assay showed that the growth of HepG2 cells in the miR-20a mimics group was significantly inhibited, and optical density values during the 36–96 hour time period were dramatically decreased compared to the blank group (P<0.01). Apoptosis rates of the miR-20a mimics group were higher than those of the blank and NC groups (both P<0.01). The number of HCC cells after transfection by miR-20a mimics in the G1 and S phases were 15.88% and 7.89%, respectively, which were lower than in the blank and NC groups (both P<0.05). Transwell assay showed that in the miR-20a mimics group the number of cell migration and invasion were 0.459 and 0.501 times that of the blank group (both P<0.01), and the migration and inhibition rates were 54.1% and 51.4%, respectively. After closing target gene CCND1 in HepG2 cells, the number of cell migration and invasion in the small interfering (si)-CCND1 group were 0.444 and 0.435 times that of the si-NC group (P<0.05); and compared to the si-NC group, the migration and inhibition rates

  9. Soluble extracellular Klotho decreases sensitivity to cigarette smoke induced cell death in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blake, David J; Reese, Caitlyn M; Garcia, Mario; Dahlmann, Elizabeth A; Dean, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the third leading cause of death in the US and is associated with an abnormal inflammatory response to cigarette smoke (CS). Exposure to CS induces oxidative stress and can result in cellular senescence in the lung. Cellular senescence can then lead to decreased proliferation of epithelial cells, the destruction of alveolar structure and pulmonary emphysema. The anti-aging gene, klotho, encodes a membrane bound protein that has been shown to be a key regulator of oxidative stress and cellular senescence. In this study the role of Klotho (KL) with regard to oxidative stress and cellular senescence was investigated in human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke. Individual clones that stably overexpress Klotho were generated through retroviral transfection and geneticin selection. Klotho overexpression was confirmed through RT-qPCR, Western blotting and ELISA. Compared to control cells, constitutive Klotho overexpression resulted in decreased sensitivity to cigarette smoke induced cell death in vitro via a reduction of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the expression of p21. Our results suggest that increasing Klotho level in pulmonary epithelial cells may be a promising strategy to reduce cellular senescence and mitigate the risk for the development of COPD.

  10. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  11. Inhibition of metastasis by HEXIM1 through effects on cell invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ketchart, Wannarasmi; Smith, Kerri M.; Krupka, Tianyi; Wittmann, Bryan M.; Hu, Yanduan; Rayman, Patricia A.; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Bai, Xiadong; Finke, James H.; Xu, Yan; Exner, Agata A.; Montano, Monica M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the role of Hexamethylene-bis-acetamide-inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1) as an inhibitor of metastasis. HEXIM1 expression is decreased in human metastatic breast cancers when compared to matched primary breast tumors. Similarly we observed decreased expression of HEXIM1 in lung metastasis when compared to primary mammary tumors in a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, the Polyoma Middle-T antigen (PyMT) transgenic mouse. Re-expression of HEXIM1 (through transgene expression or localized delivery of a small molecule inducer of HEXIM1 expression, Hexamethylene-bis-acetamide) in PyMT mice resulted in inhibition of metastasis to the lung. Our present studies indicate that HEXIM1 downregulation of HIF-1α protein allows not only for inhibition of VEGF-regulated angiogenesis, but also inhibition of compensatory pro-angiogenic pathways and recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs). Another novel finding is that HEXIM1 inhibits cell migration and invasion, that can be partly attributed to decreased membrane localization of the 67kDa laminin receptor, 67LR, and inhibition of the functional interaction of 67LR with laminin. Thus HEXIM1 re-expression in breast cancer has therapeutic advantages by simultaneously targeting more than one pathway involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results also support the potential for HEXIM1 to indirectly act on multiple cell types to suppress metastatic cancer. PMID:22964639

  12. Aldo-keto reductase 1C1 induced by interleukin-1β mediates the invasive potential and drug resistance of metastatic bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryuji; Tsuda, Masumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanino, Mishie; Kimura, Taichi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Abe, Takashige; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In treating bladder cancer, determining the molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance are urgent to improving long-term patient survival. One of the metabolic enzymes, aldo-keto reductase 1C1 (AKR1C1), plays an essential role in cancer invasion/metastasis and chemoresistance. In orthotopic xenograft models of a human bladder cancer cell line, UM-UC-3, metastatic sublines were established from tumors in the liver, lung, and bone. These cells possessed elevated levels of EMT-associated markers, such as Snail, Slug, or CD44, and exhibited enhanced invasion. By microarray analysis, AKR1C1 was found to be up-regulated in metastatic lesions, which was verified in metastatic human bladder cancer specimens. Decreased invasion caused by AKR1C1 knockdown suggests a novel role of AKR1C1 in cancer invasion, which is probably due to the regulation of Rac1, Src, or Akt. An inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β, was found to increase AKR1C1 in bladder cancer cell lines. One particular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flufenamic acid, antagonized AKR1C1 and decreased the cisplatin-resistance and invasion potential of metastatic sublines. These data uncover the crucial role of AKR1C1 in regulating both metastasis and drug resistance; as a result, AKR1C1 should be a potent molecular target in invasive bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27698389

  13. Loss of P53 facilitates invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Zhang, Y X; Kong, C Z; Zhang, Z; Zhu, Y Y

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a lethal cancer for the invasion and metastasis in its earlier period. P53 is a tumor suppressor gene which plays a critical role on safeguarding the integrity of genome. However, loss of P53 facilitates or inhibits the invasion and metastasis of tumor is still suspended. In this study, we are going to explain whether loss of P53 affect the invasion and metastasis of prostate cancer cells. To explore whether loss of P53 influences the invasion and metastasis ability of prostate cancer cells, we first compared the invasion ability of si-P53 treated cells and control cells by wound healing, transwell assay, and adhesion assay. We next tested the activity of MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-14 by western blot and gelatin zymography. Moreover, we employed WB and IF to identify the EMT containing E-cad, N-cad, vimentin, etc. We also examined the expression of cortactin, cytoskeleton, and paxillin by immunofluorescence, and tested the expression of ERK and JNK by WB. Finally, we applied WB to detect the expression of FAK, Src, and the phosphorylation of them to elucidate the mechanism of si-P53 influencing invasion and metastasis. According to the inhibition rate of si-P53, we choose the optimized volume of si-P53. With the volume, we compare the invasion and metastasis ability of Du145 and si-P53 treated cells. We find si-P53 promotes the invasion and metastasis in prostate cancer cells, increases the expression and activity of MMP-2/9 and MMP-14. Also, si-P53 promotes EMT and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Further analyses explain that this effect is associated with FAK-Src signaling pathway. Loss of P53 promotes the invasion and metastasis ability of prostate cancer cells and the mechanism is correlated with FAK-Src signaling pathway. P53 is involved in the context of invasion and metastasis. PMID:23982184

  14. The Chick Embryo as an Experimental System for Melanoma Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Christian; Krochmann, Jelena; Drews, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Background A primary cutaneous melanoma will not kill the patient, but its metastases. Since in vitro studies on melanoma cells in 2-D cultures do often not reflect reality, 3-D models might come closer to the physiological situation in the patient during cancer initiation and progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we describe the chick embryo model for in vivo studies of melanoma cell migration and invasion. After transplantation of neural crest-derived melanoma cells into the neural tube, the melanoma cells resume neural crest cell migration along the medial and lateral pathways and finally undergo apoptosis in the target areas. Upon transplantation into ectopic areas such as the hindbrain or the optic cup malignant invasion and local tissue destruction occurs. In contrast, melanocytes are not able to spontaneously resume neural crest cell migration. However, malignant invasion can be induced in melanocytes by pre-treatment with the TGF-beta family members bone morphegenetic protein-2 or nodal. Transplantation of MCF7 breast cancer cells yields a different growth pattern in the rhombencephalon than melanoma cells. Conclusions/Significance The chick embryo model is a feasible, cost-effective in vivo system to study invasion by cancer cells in an embryonic environment. It may be useful to study invasive behavior induced by embryonic oncogenes and for targeted manipulation of melanoma or breast cancer cells aiming at ablation of invasive properties. PMID:23342051

  15. Vital fluorescent labeling for confocal scanning microscopic study of living cell invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Allan Z.; Chen, Jian M.; Fisher, Gregory W.; Wang, Jane C.

    1997-07-01

    Invasion by cells with malignant or transformed phenotypes precedes destruction of adjacent tissue and fatal cell metastasis. State-of-the-art confocal laser scanning technology facilitates both in vitro and in vivo research into cell invasion and metastasis. In particular, studies performed with living cells yield more precise information than those with fixed cells, giving new insight into cell invasion and metastasis. We have tested a variety of vital florescent dyes and fluorogenic protease substrates in our studies of invasion of cartilage by transformed synoviocytes or osteosarcoma cells. The fluorescent dyes tested include Calcein acetoxy methyl-FITC (Calcein), Hoechst 33342 (Hoechst), CellTracker, DiI, DiO, DiD, and ethidium bromide (EB). The fluorogenic protease substrate used Meoxysuccinyl-Gly-Pro-Leu-Gly-Pro-AFC (MOS-GPLGP-AFC) for detection of collagenase activity. We found that Calcein-FITC labeling permitted the clearest direct observation of the penetration of transformed synoviocytes and osteosarcoma cells into cartilage. Even better results were obtained when chondrocyte nuclei were counter-stained with Hoechst 33342. During the invasion process, collagenase activity was observed around the synoviocyte in the cartilage matrix labeled with the fluorogenic collagenase substrate. We concluded that of the vital fluorescent dyes tested, a combined application of Calcein-FITC, Hoechst 23223, and MOS- GPLGP-AFC is most appropriate for the study of the cell invasion process.

  16. Dihydromyricetin inhibits migration and invasion of hepatoma cells through regulation of MMP-9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Li, Ran; Zeng, Guo-Fang; Liu, Bin; Liu, Jie; Shu, Yang; Liu, Zhong-Kao; Qiu, Zhi-Dong; Wang, Dong-Jun; Miao, Hui-Lai; Li, Ming-Yi; Zhu, Run-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of dihydromyricetin (DHM) on the migration and invasion of human hepatic cancer cells. METHODS: The hepatoma cell lines SK-Hep-1 and MHCC97L were used in this study. The cells were cultured in RPIM-1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum at 37 °C in a humidified 5% CO2 incubator. DHM was dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide and diluted to various concentrations in medium before applying to cells. MTT assays were performed to measure the viability of the cells after DHM treatment. Wound healing and Boyden transwell assays were used to assess cancer cell motility. The invasive capacity of cancer cells was measured using Matrigel-coated transwell chambers. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 activity was examined by fluorescence analysis. Western blot was carried out to analyze the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, p-38, JNK, ERK1/2 and PKC-δ proteins. All data were analyzed by Student’s t tests in GraphPad prism 5.0 software and are presented as mean ± SD. RESULTS: DHM was found to strongly inhibit the migration of the hepatoma cell lines SK-Hep-1 (without DHM, 24 h: 120 ± 8 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 65 ± 10 μmol/L, P < 0.001) and MHCC97L (without DHM, 24 h: 126 ± 7 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 74 ± 6 μmol/L, P < 0.001). The invasive capacity of the cells was reduced by DHM treatment (SK-Hep-1 cells without DHM, 24 h: 67 ± 4 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 9 ± 3 μmol/L, P < 0.001; MHCC97L cells without DHM, 24 h: 117 ± 8 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 45 ± 2 μmol/L, P < 0.001). MMP2/9 activity was also inhibited by DHM exposure (SK-Hep-1 cells without DHM, 24 h: 600 ± 26 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM, 24 h: 100 ± 6 μmol/L, P < 0.001; MHCC97L cells without DHM, 24 h: 504 ± 32 μmol/L vs 100 μmol/L DHM 24 h: 156 ± 10 μmol/L, P < 0.001). Western blot analysis showed that DHM decreased the expression level of MMP-9 but had little effect on MMP-2. Further investigation indicated that DHM markedly

  17. The effect of fibrillar matrix architecture on tumor cell invasion of physically challenging environments.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Asja; Ziperstein, Michelle J; Kaufman, Laura J

    2014-08-01

    Local invasion by and dissemination of cancer cells from a primary tumor are key initial steps of metastasis, the most lethal aspect of cancer. To study these processes in vitro, the invasion of cells from multicellular breast cancer aggregates embedded in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix culture systems was studied. This work showed that in 3D fibrillar environments composed of collagen I, pore size--not the viscoelastic properties of the matrix--was the biophysical characteristic controlling breast cancer cell invasion efficiency. Furthermore, it was shown that fibrillar matrix architecture is a crucial factor that allows for efficient 3D invasion. In a 3D non-fibrillar environment composed of basement membrane extract (BME), invasion efficiency was greatly diminished, the mesenchymal individual mode of 3D invasion was abolished, and establishment of cell polarity and protrusions was compromised. These effects were seen even though the BME matrix has invasion permissive viscoelasticity and suitable adhesion ligands. The altered and limited invasive behavior observed in BME was rescued through introduction of fibrillar collagen into the non-fibrillar matrix. The biophysical cues of fibrillar collagen facilitated efficient invasion of sterically disadvantageous environments through assisting cell polarization and formation of stable cell protrusions. Finally, we suggest the composite matrices employed in this study consisting of fibrillar collagen I and BME in either a liquid-like or gelled state are suitable for a wide range of 3D cell studies, as these matrices combine fibrillar features that require cells to deploy integrin-dependent mechanotransduction machinery and a tunable non-fibrillar component that may require cells to adopt alternative migratory modes.

  18. Establishment and Characterization of a Tumor Stem Cell-Based Glioblastoma Invasion Model

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Stine Skov; Meyer, Morten; Halle, Bo; Rosager, Ann Mari; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Thomassen, Mads; Burton, Mark; Kruse, Torben A.; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther

    2016-01-01

    Aims Glioblastoma is the most frequent and malignant brain tumor. Recurrence is inevitable and most likely connected to tumor invasion and presence of therapy resistant stem-like tumor cells. The aim was therefore to establish and characterize a three-dimensional in vivo-like in vitro model taking invasion and tumor stemness into account. Methods Glioblastoma stem cell-like containing spheroid (GSS) cultures derived from three different patients were established and characterized. The spheroids were implanted in vitro into rat brain slice cultures grown in stem cell medium and in vivo into brains of immuno-compromised mice. Invasion was followed in the slice cultures by confocal time-lapse microscopy. Using immunohistochemistry, we compared tumor cell invasion as well as expression of proliferation and stem cell markers between the models. Results We observed a pronounced invasion into brain slice cultures both by confocal time-lapse microscopy and immunohistochemistry. This invasion closely resembled the invasion in vivo. The Ki-67 proliferation indexes in spheroids implanted into brain slices were lower than in free-floating spheroids. The expression of stem cell markers varied between free-floating spheroids, spheroids implanted into brain slices and tumors in vivo. Conclusion The established invasion model kept in stem cell medium closely mimics tumor cell invasion into the brain in vivo preserving also to some extent the expression of stem cell markers. The model is feasible and robust and we suggest the model as an in vivo-like model with a great potential in glioma studies and drug discovery. PMID:27454178

  19. Decoding the regulatory landscape of melanoma reveals TEADS as regulators of the invasive cell state.

    PubMed

    Verfaillie, Annelien; Imrichova, Hana; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Dewaele, Michael; Rambow, Florian; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Luciani, Flavie; Van den Mooter, Laura; Claerhout, Sofie; Fiers, Mark; Journe, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem-Elias; Herrmann, Carl; Halder, Georg; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2015-04-09

    Transcriptional reprogramming of proliferative melanoma cells into a phenotypically distinct invasive cell subpopulation is a critical event at the origin of metastatic spreading. Here we generate transcriptome, open chromatin and histone modification maps of melanoma cultures; and integrate this data with existing transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles from tumour biopsies to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying this key reprogramming event. This shows thousands of genomic regulatory regions underlying the proliferative and invasive states, identifying SOX10/MITF and AP-1/TEAD as regulators, respectively. Knockdown of TEADs shows a previously unrecognized role in the invasive gene network and establishes a causative link between these transcription factors, cell invasion and sensitivity to MAPK inhibitors. Using regulatory landscapes and in silico analysis, we show that transcriptional reprogramming underlies the distinct cellular states present in melanoma. Furthermore, it reveals an essential role for the TEADs, linking it to clinically relevant mechanisms such as invasion and resistance.

  20. Decoding the regulatory landscape of melanoma reveals TEADS as regulators of the invasive cell state

    PubMed Central

    Verfaillie, Annelien; Imrichova, Hana; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Dewaele, Michael; Rambow, Florian; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Luciani, Flavie; Van den Mooter, Laura; Claerhout, Sofie; Fiers, Mark; Journe, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem-Elias; Herrmann, Carl; Halder, Georg; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming of proliferative melanoma cells into a phenotypically distinct invasive cell subpopulation is a critical event at the origin of metastatic spreading. Here we generate transcriptome, open chromatin and histone modification maps of melanoma cultures; and integrate this data with existing transcriptome and DNA methylation profiles from tumour biopsies to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying this key reprogramming event. This shows thousands of genomic regulatory regions underlying the proliferative and invasive states, identifying SOX10/MITF and AP-1/TEAD as regulators, respectively. Knockdown of TEADs shows a previously unrecognized role in the invasive gene network and establishes a causative link between these transcription factors, cell invasion and sensitivity to MAPK inhibitors. Using regulatory landscapes and in silico analysis, we show that transcriptional reprogramming underlies the distinct cellular states present in melanoma. Furthermore, it reveals an essential role for the TEADs, linking it to clinically relevant mechanisms such as invasion and resistance. PMID:25865119

  1. miR-129 suppresses tumor cell growth and invasion by targeting PAK5 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Jian; Qu, Shuping; Li, Xiaowei; Zhong, Jiaming; Chen, Xiaoxia; Qu, Zengqiang; Wu, Dong

    2015-08-14

    Emerging evidence suggests that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating HCC development and progression; however, the mechanisms by which their specific functions and mechanisms remained to be further explored. miR-129 has been reported in gastric cancers, lung cancer and colon cancer. In this study, we disclosed a new tumor suppresser function of miR-129 in HCC. We also found the downregulation of miR-129 occurred in nearly 3/4 of the tumors examined (56/76) compared with adjacent nontumorous tissues, which was more importantly, correlated to the advanced stage and vascular invasion. We then demonstrated that miR-129 overexpression attenuated HCC cells proliferation and invasion, inducing apoptosis in vitro. Moreover, we used miR-129 antagonist and found that anti-miR-129 promoted HCC cells malignant phenotypes. Mechanistically, our further investigations revealed that miR-129 suppressed cell proliferation and invasion by targeting the 3’-untranslated region of PAK5, as well as miR-129 silencing up-regulated PAK5 expression. Moreover, miR-129 expression was inversely correlated with PAK5 expression in 76 cases of HCC samples. RNA interference of PAK5 attenuated anti-miR-129 mediated cell proliferation and invasion in HCC cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that miR-129 suppressed tumorigenesis and progression by directly targeting PAK5, defining miR-129 as a potential treatment target for HCC. - Highlights: • Decreased of miR-129 is found in HCC and associated with advanced stage and metastasis. • miR-129 suppresses proliferation and invasion of HCC cells. • miR-129 directly targets the 3′ UTR of PAK5 and diminishes PAK5 expression. • PAK5 is involved in miR-129 mediated suppression functions.

  2. The matricellular protein CCN6 (WISP3) decreases Notch1 and suppresses breast cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Martin, Emily E; Burman, Boris; Gonzalez, Maria E; Kleer, Celina G

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence supports that the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells generates tumor initiating cells (TICs) but the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to these programs needs further elucidation. CCN6 (WISP3) is a secreted matrix-associated protein (36.9 kDa) of the CCN family (named after CTGF, Cyr61 and Nov) that is reduced or lost in invasive carcinomas of the breast with lymph node metastasis and in inflammatory breast cancer. CCN6 exerts breast cancer growth and invasion inhibitory functions, but the mechanisms remain to be defined. In the present study we discovered that ectopic CCN6 overexpression in triple negative (TN) breast cancer cells and in cells derived from patients is sufficient to induce a mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) and to reduce TICs. In vivo, CCN6 overexpression in the TIC population of MDA-MB-231 cells delayed tumor initiation, reduced tumor volume, and inhibited the development of metastasis. Our studies reveal a novel CCN6/Slug signaling axis that regulates Notch1 signaling activation, epithelial cell phenotype and breast TICs, which requires the conserved thrombospondin type 1 (TSP1) motif of CCN6. The relevance of these data to human breast cancer is highlighted by the finding that CCN6 protein levels are inversely correlated with Notch1 intracellular activated form (NICD1) in 69.5% of invasive breast carcinomas. These results demonstrate that CCN6 regulates epithelial and mesenchymal states transition and TIC programs, and pinpoint one responsible mechanism.

  3. Cyclin Y regulates the proliferation, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyuan; Shi, Honghui; Fan, Qingbo; Sun, Xiangxiu

    2016-08-01

    This study is designated to investigate the roles of cyclin Y (CCNY) and Wnt signaling pathway in regulating ovarian cancer (OC) cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot, MTT assay, cell scratch, and transwell test were used in our study, and transplanted tumor model was constructed on nude mice. C-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, OGT, and β-catenin protein expressions in tumor tissues were detected. CCNY was significantly upregulated in OC cell lines and tissues (both P < 0.05); significant association was observed between CCNY expression and clinicopathological stage, lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P < 0.05); and the CCNY expression in stages III to IV was higher than that in stages I to II, and patients with LNM had higher CCNY expression when compared with those in patients without LNM (P < 0.05); expressions of c-Myc, cyclin D, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT were upregulated in OC tissues compared with ovarian benign tissues, suggesting that these expressions were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05); CCNY significantly exacerbated proliferation, migration, and invasion of A2780 cells; c-Myc and cyclin D1 protein expressions increased as the expression of CCNY increased (P < 0.001); β-catenin expressions in A2780 cells with over-expression of CCNY were significantly increased in the nucleus, but significantly decreased in the cytoplasm (both P < 0.05); high expressions of CCNY exacerbated the proliferation of A2780 cells in nude mice and significantly increased c-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT protein expressions in tumor tissues which were transplanted into nude mice (P < 0.01). CCNY might exacerbate the proliferation, migration, and invasion of OC cells via activating the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, this study provides a theoretical foundation for the development of therapeutic drugs that are able to cure OC by targeting CCNY. PMID:26831658

  4. Epigenetic modification suppresses proliferation, migration and invasion of urothelial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic approaches offer additional therapeutic options, including apoptosis induction, modification of cell cycle regulating proteins and the re-expression of pharmaceutical targets, such as hormone receptors. The present study analyzed the effect of the epigenetic modifiers 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and Trichostatin A on the proliferative, migratory and invasive behavior of four urinary bladder cancer cell lines (RT-4, RT-112, VMCUB-1 and T-24), and the expression of various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays revealed that treatment with the two epigenetic modifiers resulted in proliferation inhibition in all cell lines, and migration and invasion inhibition in RT-4, RT-112 and T-24 cell lines. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the mRNA expression of a broad selection of MMPs and their TIMPs was induced in all cell lines, and MMP-14 mRNA expression was suppressed in all cell lines, with the exception of RT-4. In conclusion, epigenetic modifications suppressed the motility and invasiveness of three out of four urothelial cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect on cell motility appears to be crucial for reduced invasive properties. However, even a broad spectrum of mRNA analysis does not sufficiently explain the loss of invasiveness, as it does not allow for functional conclusions. Further complex urothelial tumour models should be applied to investigate whether epigenetic therapeutic approaches may be an option in urothelial cancer.

  5. Epigenetic modification suppresses proliferation, migration and invasion of urothelial cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Brockmeyer, Phillipp; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic approaches offer additional therapeutic options, including apoptosis induction, modification of cell cycle regulating proteins and the re-expression of pharmaceutical targets, such as hormone receptors. The present study analyzed the effect of the epigenetic modifiers 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and Trichostatin A on the proliferative, migratory and invasive behavior of four urinary bladder cancer cell lines (RT-4, RT-112, VMCUB-1 and T-24), and the expression of various matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion assays revealed that treatment with the two epigenetic modifiers resulted in proliferation inhibition in all cell lines, and migration and invasion inhibition in RT-4, RT-112 and T-24 cell lines. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that the mRNA expression of a broad selection of MMPs and their TIMPs was induced in all cell lines, and MMP-14 mRNA expression was suppressed in all cell lines, with the exception of RT-4. In conclusion, epigenetic modifications suppressed the motility and invasiveness of three out of four urothelial cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect on cell motility appears to be crucial for reduced invasive properties. However, even a broad spectrum of mRNA analysis does not sufficiently explain the loss of invasiveness, as it does not allow for functional conclusions. Further complex urothelial tumour models should be applied to investigate whether epigenetic therapeutic approaches may be an option in urothelial cancer. PMID:27602104

  6. Normal mammary epithelial cells promote carcinoma basement membrane invasion by inducing microtubule-rich protrusions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Gilkes, Daniele; Aifuwa, Ivie; Wirtz, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the dissemination of tumor cells may occur in parallel with, and even preceed, tumor growth. The mechanism for this early invasion is largely unknown. Here, we find that mammary epithelial cells (MECs) induce neighboring breast carcinoma cells (BCCs) to cross the basement membrane by secreting soluble laminin. Laminin continuously produced by MECs induce long membrane cellular protrusions in BCCs that promote their contractility and invasion into the surrounding matrix. These protrusions depend on microtubule bundles assembled de novo through laminin-integrin β1 signaling. These results describe how non-cancerous MECs can actively participate in the invasive process of BCCs. PMID:26334095

  7. Impaired T cell responsiveness to interleukin-6 in hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Jose F; Bhimji, Alyajahan; Kumar, Deepali; Kaul, Rupert; Pavan, Rhea; Schuh, Andre; Seftel, Matthew; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Gupta, Vikas; Humar, Atul; Husain, Shahid

    2015-01-01

    Invasive mold infections (IMI) are among the most devastating complications following chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), with high mortality rates. Yet, the molecular basis for human susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis (IA) and mucormycosis remain poorly understood. Herein, we aimed to characterize the immune profile of individuals with hematological malignancies (n = 18) who developed IMI during the course of chemotherapy or HSCT, and compared it to that of hematological patients who had no evidence of invasive fungal infection (n = 16). First, we measured the expression of the pattern recognition receptors pentraxin 3, dectin-1, and Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 in peripheral blood of chemotherapy and HSCT recipients with IMI. Compared to hematological controls, individuals with IA and mucormycosis had defective expression of dectin-1; in addition, patients with mucormycosis had decreased TLR2 and increased TLR4 expression. Since fungal recognition via dectin-1 favors T helper 17 responses and the latter are highly dependent on activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, we next used phospho-flow cytometry to measure the phosphorylation of the transcription factors STAT1 and STAT3 in response to interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-6, respectively. While IFN-γ/STAT1 signaling was similar between groups, naïve T cells from patients with IA, but not those with mucormycosis, exhibited reduced responsiveness to IL-6 as measured by STAT3 phosphorylation. Furthermore, IL-6 increased Aspergillus-induced IL-17 production in culture supernatants from healthy and hematological controls but not in patients with IA. Altogether, these observations suggest an important role for dectin-1 and the IL-6/STAT3 pathway in protective immunity against Aspergillus.

  8. Invasion of Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates into lung epithelial cells involves glycolipid receptors.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Tracy; Callaghan, Máire; McClean, Siobhán

    2010-12-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) is a group of opportunistic cystic fibrosis (CF) pathogens that invade lung epithelial cells. The mechanisms of invasion are poorly understood, in particular, the receptors utilised by this bacterium in the invasion process have not been identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the epithelial receptors involved in the invasion of Bcc isolates. We confirmed that invasion into two lung epithelial cell lines (16HBE14o- and CFBE41o-) which have a non-CF and CF phenotype, respectively, is receptor mediated and showed that pre-treatment of these epithelial cell lines with α- or β-galactosidase reduced invasion of isolates of two species of Bcc, Burkholderia multivorans and Burkholderia cenocepacia. In contrast, removal of mucin had no significant effect. Biotinylated Bcc strains were shown to bind to purified glycolipids separated by thin layer chromatography, albeit different patterns of binding were associated with different strains. Invasion of CF lung epithelial cells (CFBE41o-) by all three Bcc strains examined was significantly reduced by treatment of cells with inhibitors of glycolipid biosynthesis. Although the specific glycolipid involved in each case has not been elucidated, it is apparent that invasion of lung epithelial cells is mediated via binding to glycosphingolipid receptors.

  9. Effects of anaesthesia on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis of LoVo colon cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y J; Li, S Y; Cheng, Q; Chen, W K; Wang, S L; Ren, Y; Miao, C H

    2016-02-01

    Tumour cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis are crucial steps in tumour metastasis. We evaluated the effect of serum from patients undergoing colon cancer surgery receiving thoracic epidural and propofol anaesthesia on colon cancer cell biology. Patients were randomly assigned to receive propofol anaesthesia with a concomitant thoracic epidural (PEA, n = 20) or sevoflurane anaesthesia with opioid analgesia (SGA, n = 20). Venous blood was obtained before induction of anaesthesia and 24 hours postoperatively. The LoVo colon cancer cells were cultured with patient serum from both groups and the effects on proliferation, invasion and apoptosis were measured. Twenty-four hours after surgery, the absorbance value of LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was decreased when compared with SGA (0.302 (0.026) vs 0.391 (0.066), p = 0.005). The inhibitory rate of LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was higher than that from SGA (p = 0.004) 24 h after surgery. The number of invasive LoVo cells at 10% serum concentration from PEA was reduced when compared with SGA (44 (4) vs 62 (4), p < 0.001). Exposure of LoVo cells to postoperative serum from patients receiving PEA led to a higher luminescence ratio (apoptosis) than those receiving SGA (0.36 (0.04) vs 0.27 (0.05), p < 0.001). Serum from patients receiving PEA for colon cancer surgery inhibited proliferation and invasion of LoVo cells and induced apoptosis in vitro more than that from patients receiving SGA. Anaesthetic technique might influence the serum milieu in a way that affects cancer cell biology and, thereby, tumour metastastasis.

  10. Pancreatic Cancer Cell Glycosylation Regulates Cell Adhesion and Invasion through the Modulation of α2β1 Integrin and E-Cadherin Function

    PubMed Central

    Bassagañas, Sònia; Carvalho, Sandra; Dias, Ana M.; Pérez-Garay, Marta; Ortiz, M. Rosa; Figueras, Joan; Reis, Celso A.; Pinho, Salomé S.; Peracaula, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    In our previous studies we have described that ST3Gal III transfected pancreatic adenocarcinoma Capan-1 and MDAPanc-28 cells show increased membrane expression levels of sialyl-Lewis x (SLex) along with a concomitant decrease in α2,6-sialic acid compared to control cells. Here we have addressed the role of this glycosylation pattern in the functional properties of two glycoproteins involved in the processes of cancer cell invasion and migration, α2β1 integrin, the main receptor for type 1 collagen, and E-cadherin, responsible for cell-cell contacts and whose deregulation determines cell invasive capabilities. Our results demonstrate that ST3Gal III transfectants showed reduced cell-cell aggregation and increased invasive capacities. ST3Gal III transfected Capan-1 cells exhibited higher SLex and lower α2,6-sialic acid content on the glycans of their α2β1 integrin molecules. As a consequence, higher phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase tyrosine 397, which is recognized as one of the first steps of integrin-derived signaling pathways, was observed in these cells upon adhesion to type 1 collagen. This molecular mechanism underlies the increased migration through collagen of these cells. In addition, the pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines as well as human pancreatic tumor tissues showed colocalization of SLex and E-cadherin, which was higher in the ST3Gal III transfectants. In conclusion, changes in the sialylation pattern of α2β1 integrin and E-cadherin appear to influence the functional role of these two glycoproteins supporting the role of these glycans as an underlying mechanism regulating pancreatic cancer cell adhesion and invasion. PMID:24878505

  11. The effect of catalase on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells by regulating the activities of cathepsin S, L, and K.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Lee, Mon-Juan; Dah-Tsyr Chang, Margaret; Huang, Haimei

    2014-04-15

    Abundant clinical evidences indicate that up-regulation of several cathepsins in many human cancers is correlated with malignant progression and poor patient prognosis. In addition, a decrease in catalase activity or accumulation of hydrogen peroxide correlates with cancer metastasis. Recent studies indicate that cathepsin activation and expression can be modulated via H2O2 treatment. However, the actual relationship between catalase and cathepsins is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we found that catalase expression (or activity) was higher, while intracellular and extracellular Cat S, Cat L, and Cat K activities were lower in the non-invasive CL1-0 cells compared to the highly invasive CL1-5 cells. After CL1-0 cells were transfected with catalase-shRNA, the corresponding ROS (H2O2) level and Cat S, Cat L, or Cat K expression (or activity) was up-regulated, accompanied by an increase in cell migration and invasion. On the other hand, ROS (H2O2) level, cathepsin S, L, and K activities, cell migration and invasion were decreased in catalase-overexpressed CL1-5 cells. It is suggested that catalase may regulate cathepsin activity by controlling the production of ROS (H2O2), leading to variation in migration and invasion ability of lung cancer cells.

  12. Pilus phase variation switches gonococcal adherence to invasion by caveolin-1-dependent host cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Faulstich, Michaela; Böttcher, Jan-Peter; Meyer, Thomas F; Fraunholz, Martin; Rudel, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria cause local infections but occasionally invade into the blood stream, often with fatal outcome. Very little is known about the mechanism underlying the switch from local to invasive infection. In the case of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, phase variable type 4 pili (T4P) stabilize local infection by mediating microcolony formation and inducing anti-invasive signals. Outer membrane porin PorB(IA), in contrast, is associated with disseminated infection and facilitates the efficient invasion of gonococci into host cells. Here we demonstrate that loss of pili by natural pilus phase variation is a prerequisite for the transition from local to invasive infection. Unexpectedly, both T4P-mediated inhibition of invasion and PorB(IA)-triggered invasion utilize membrane rafts and signaling pathways that depend on caveolin-1-Y14 phosphorylation (Cav1-pY14). We identified p85 regulatory subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K) and phospholipase Cγ1 as new, exclusive and essential interaction partners for Cav1-pY14 in the course of PorBIA-induced invasion. Active PI3K induces the uptake of gonococci via a new invasion pathway involving protein kinase D1. Our data describe a novel route of bacterial entry into epithelial cells and offer the first mechanistic insight into the switch from local to invasive gonococcal infection. PMID:23717204

  13. Cell adhesion and invasion inhibitory effect of an ovarian cancer targeting peptide selected via phage display in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pu, Ximing; Ma, Chuying; Yin, Guangfu; You, Fei; Wei, Yan

    2014-01-17

    Organ-specific metastasis is of great importance since most of the cancer deaths are caused by spread of the primary cancer to distant sites. Therefore, targeted anti-metastases therapies are needed to prevent cancer cells from metastasizing to different organs. The phage clone pc3-1 displaying peptide WSGPGVWGASVK selected by phage display had been identified which have high binding efficiency and remarkable cell specificity to SK-OV-3 cells. In the present work, the effects of selected cell-binding phage and cognate peptide on the cell adhesion and invasion of targeted cells were investigated. Results showed that the adhesive ability of SK-OV-3 to extracellular matrix was inhibited by pc3-1 and peptide WSGPGVWGASVK, and pc3-1 blocked SK-OV-3 cells attachment more effective than the cognate peptide. The peptide WSGPGVWGASVK suppressed the cell number of SK-OV-3 that attached to HUVECs monolayer up to 24% and could block the spreading of the attaching cells. Forthermore, the cognate peptide could inhibit the invasion of SK-OV-3 significantly. The number of invaded SK-OV-3 cells and invaded SK-OV-3-activated HUVECs pretreated with peptide WSGPGVWGASVK was decreased by 24.3% and 36.6%, respectively. All these results suggested that peptide WSGPGVWGASVK might possess anti-metastasis against SK-OV-3 cells. PMID:24342617

  14. Role of manganese superoxide dismutase on growth and invasive properties of human estrogen-independent breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kattan, Zilal; Minig, Vanessa; Leroy, Pierre; Dauça, Michel; Becuwe, Philippe

    2008-03-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is known to play a role in cancer. MnSOD exerts a tumor suppressive effect in estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cells. In the present study we investigated the in vitro role of MnSOD in the growth of some aggressive and highly metastatic estrogen-independent breast cancer cells, i.e., MDA-MB231 and SKBR3 cells. We show that estrogen-independent cells expressed a significantly higher basal MnSOD level compared to estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and T47D). For MDA-MB231 cells, the high-MnSOD level was accompanied by an overproduction of intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and by a low expression of the major H2O2-detoxifying enzymes, catalase, and peroxiredoxin 3, compared to MCF-7 cells. Suppression of MnSOD expression by antisense RNA was associated with a decrease of H2O2 content and caused a stimulation of growth with a reduced cell doubling time but induced a decrease of colony formation. Furthermore, treatment of MDA-MB231 cells with H2O2 scavengers markedly reduced tumor cell growth and colony formation. In addition, MnSOD suppression or treatment with H2O2 scavengers reduced the invasive properties of MDA-MB231 cells up to 43%, with a concomitant decrease of metalloproteinase-9 activity. We conclude that MnSOD plays a role in regulating tumor cell growth and invasive properties of estrogen-independent metastatic breast cancer cells. These action are mediated by MnSOD-dependent H2O2 production. In addition, these results suggest that MnSOD up-regulation may be one mechanism that contributes to the development of metastatic breast cancers.

  15. Iodine-125 irradiation inhibits invasion of gastric cancer cells by reactivating microRNA-181c expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Ma, Zhen-Huan; Li, Xiao-Gang; Zhang, Wan-Fu; Wan, Jia; Du, Ling-Juan; Li, Guo-Jian; Yang, Guo-Kai; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation has been widely used for the treatment of unresectable advanced tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumor-suppressive effects of 125I irradiation have not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that 125I irradiation suppresses cell viability and inhibits cell invasiveness of gastric cancer KATO-III and MKN45 cells. Further mechanistic analysis suggested the involvement of microRNA (miR)-181c in the inhibitory effects induced by 125I irradiation. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled with quantitative-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that treatment with 125I irradiation, at the dose of 4 Gy, induced promoter demethylation of the miR-181c gene in KATO-III and MKN45 cells. Following irradiation, the expression of miR-181c was significantly increased, which may be attributed to the demethylation caused by 125I irradiation. In addition, upregulation of miR-181c by administration of miR-181c mimics decreased cell invasion, suggesting the role of miR-181c as a tumor suppressor. More importantly, the tumor-suppressive effects of 125I irradiation were significantly compromised by the introduction of miR-181c inhibitors. Overall, these results reveal that 125I irradiation inhibits invasiveness of gastric cancer cells by reactivating miR-181c at the epigenetic level, thereby providing important molecular evidence for the anticancer effects of 125I irradiation. PMID:27698859

  16. Iodine-125 irradiation inhibits invasion of gastric cancer cells by reactivating microRNA-181c expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Ma, Zhen-Huan; Li, Xiao-Gang; Zhang, Wan-Fu; Wan, Jia; Du, Ling-Juan; Li, Guo-Jian; Yang, Guo-Kai; Lu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation has been widely used for the treatment of unresectable advanced tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumor-suppressive effects of 125I irradiation have not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that 125I irradiation suppresses cell viability and inhibits cell invasiveness of gastric cancer KATO-III and MKN45 cells. Further mechanistic analysis suggested the involvement of microRNA (miR)-181c in the inhibitory effects induced by 125I irradiation. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled with quantitative-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated that treatment with 125I irradiation, at the dose of 4 Gy, induced promoter demethylation of the miR-181c gene in KATO-III and MKN45 cells. Following irradiation, the expression of miR-181c was significantly increased, which may be attributed to the demethylation caused by 125I irradiation. In addition, upregulation of miR-181c by administration of miR-181c mimics decreased cell invasion, suggesting the role of miR-181c as a tumor suppressor. More importantly, the tumor-suppressive effects of 125I irradiation were significantly compromised by the introduction of miR-181c inhibitors. Overall, these results reveal that 125I irradiation inhibits invasiveness of gastric cancer cells by reactivating miR-181c at the epigenetic level, thereby providing important molecular evidence for the anticancer effects of 125I irradiation.

  17. Decreased small mammal and on-host tick abundance in association with invasive red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta).

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Adrian A; Medeiros, Matthew C I; Hamer, Gabriel L; Morrow, Michael E; Eubanks, Micky D; Teel, Pete D; Hamer, Sarah A; Light, Jessica E

    2016-09-01

    Invasive species may impact pathogen transmission by altering the distributions and interactions among native vertebrate reservoir hosts and arthropod vectors. Here, we examined the direct and indirect effects of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) on the native tick, small mammal and pathogen community in southeast Texas. Using a replicated large-scale field manipulation study, we show that small mammals were more abundant on treatment plots where S. invicta populations were experimentally reduced. Our analysis of ticks on small mammal hosts demonstrated a threefold increase in the ticks caught per unit effort on treatment relative to control plots, and elevated tick loads (a 27-fold increase) on one common rodent species. We detected only one known human pathogen (Rickettsia parkeri), present in 1.4% of larvae and 6.7% of nymph on-host Amblyomma maculatum samples but with no significant difference between treatment and control plots. Given that host and vector population dynamics are key drivers of pathogen transmission, the reduced small mammal and tick abundance associated with S. invicta may alter pathogen transmission dynamics over broader spatial scales. PMID:27651533

  18. Decreased small mammal and on-host tick abundance in association with invasive red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta)

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Matthew C. I.; Hamer, Gabriel L.; Morrow, Michael E.; Eubanks, Micky D.; Teel, Pete D.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species may impact pathogen transmission by altering the distributions and interactions among native vertebrate reservoir hosts and arthropod vectors. Here, we examined the direct and indirect effects of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) on the native tick, small mammal and pathogen community in southeast Texas. Using a replicated large-scale field manipulation study, we show that small mammals were more abundant on treatment plots where S. invicta populations were experimentally reduced. Our analysis of ticks on small mammal hosts demonstrated a threefold increase in the ticks caught per unit effort on treatment relative to control plots, and elevated tick loads (a 27-fold increase) on one common rodent species. We detected only one known human pathogen (Rickettsia parkeri), present in 1.4% of larvae and 6.7% of nymph on-host Amblyomma maculatum samples but with no significant difference between treatment and control plots. Given that host and vector population dynamics are key drivers of pathogen transmission, the reduced small mammal and tick abundance associated with S. invicta may alter pathogen transmission dynamics over broader spatial scales. PMID:27651533

  19. Decreased small mammal and on-host tick abundance in association with invasive red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta).

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Adrian A; Medeiros, Matthew C I; Hamer, Gabriel L; Morrow, Michael E; Eubanks, Micky D; Teel, Pete D; Hamer, Sarah A; Light, Jessica E

    2016-09-01

    Invasive species may impact pathogen transmission by altering the distributions and interactions among native vertebrate reservoir hosts and arthropod vectors. Here, we examined the direct and indirect effects of the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) on the native tick, small mammal and pathogen community in southeast Texas. Using a replicated large-scale field manipulation study, we show that small mammals were more abundant on treatment plots where S. invicta populations were experimentally reduced. Our analysis of ticks on small mammal hosts demonstrated a threefold increase in the ticks caught per unit effort on treatment relative to control plots, and elevated tick loads (a 27-fold increase) on one common rodent species. We detected only one known human pathogen (Rickettsia parkeri), present in 1.4% of larvae and 6.7% of nymph on-host Amblyomma maculatum samples but with no significant difference between treatment and control plots. Given that host and vector population dynamics are key drivers of pathogen transmission, the reduced small mammal and tick abundance associated with S. invicta may alter pathogen transmission dynamics over broader spatial scales.

  20. Akt2 knock-down reveals its contribution to human lung cancer cell proliferation, growth, motility, invasion and endothelial cell tube formation.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Hammadi, Nasseredine Kamel; Mester, Jan; Gaben, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Akt/PKB serine/threonine protein kinase consists of three isoforms: Akt-1, -2 and -3. Their overexpression has been detected in human cancers, but their roles in cancer progression are unclear. We investigated the impact of specific silencing of Akt1 and Akt2 on human lung cancer cell proliferation, colony growth, motility, and invasion in vitro as well as tumor growth in vivo using human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer cells LNM35, and on the vascular tube formation using HUVEC cells. Although silencing of Akt1 decreased cellular invasion at least in part via COX-2 inhibition, it had almost no effect on cell motility, proliferation, colony formation, and angiogenesis. Transient as well as stable silencing of Akt2 resulted in a strong inhibition of Rb phosphorylation associated with a decrease in cellular proliferation and colony formation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in the xenograft model. Silencing of Akt2 also reduced cellular motility and invasion in vitro, presumably via COX-2 inhibition. Moreover, silencing of Akt2 in the HUVEC cells resulted in the inhibition of their spontaneous angiogenic phenotype. Altogether, these results indicate that Akt2 plays an important role in lung cancer progression and can be a promising target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26234648

  1. Akt2 knock-down reveals its contribution to human lung cancer cell proliferation, growth, motility, invasion and endothelial cell tube formation

    PubMed Central

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Kamel Hammadi, Nasseredine; Mester, Jan; Gaben, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Akt/PKB serine/threonine protein kinase consists of three isoforms: Akt-1, −2 and −3. Their overexpression has been detected in human cancers, but their roles in cancer progression are unclear. We investigated the impact of specific silencing of Akt1 and Akt2 on human lung cancer cell proliferation, colony growth, motility, and invasion in vitro as well as tumor growth in vivo using human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer cells LNM35, and on the vascular tube formation using HUVEC cells. Although silencing of Akt1 decreased cellular invasion at least in part via COX-2 inhibition, it had almost no effect on cell motility, proliferation, colony formation, and angiogenesis. Transient as well as stable silencing of Akt2 resulted in a strong inhibition of Rb phosphorylation associated with a decrease in cellular proliferation and colony formation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in the xenograft model. Silencing of Akt2 also reduced cellular motility and invasion in vitro, presumably via COX-2 inhibition. Moreover, silencing of Akt2 in the HUVEC cells resulted in the inhibition of their spontaneous angiogenic phenotype. Altogether, these results indicate that Akt2 plays an important role in lung cancer progression and can be a promising target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26234648

  2. Suppression of SOX18 by siRNA inhibits cell growth and invasion of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianxiang; Ma, Yanmei; Wang, Shoujun; Chen, Fu; Gu, Yuanting

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world, and its incidence and mortality rates are still rising. An increasing number of studies have reported that SOX18 plays an important role in various cancers. However, the role of SOX18 in breast cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the biological role and potential molecular mechanism of SOX18 in breast cancer. We found that the mRNA and protein expression levels of SOX18 were prevalently and significantly overexpressed in human breast cancer cell lines. Next, we performed loss-of-function experiments by transfection of two breast cancer cell lines, BT-474 and MCF-7, with SOX18 small interfering RNAs (siRNA). Results showed that SOX18 siRNA transfection significantly suppressed mRNA and protein expression of SOX18 in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, knockdown of SOX18 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and invasion, but promoted apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Importantly, several oncogenic proteins, including the Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA), platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB), Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), were markedly decreased by SOX18 siRNA. Taken together, the results of our study suggest that knockdown of SOX18 inhibits breast cancer cell growth and invasion, possibly by downregulating downstream oncogenic proteins, providing novel insights into the development of breast cancer therapy through targeting of SOX18. PMID:27108946

  3. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3.

  4. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3. PMID:27429858

  5. MicroRNA-373 promotes migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma by inhibiting TIMP3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhi; Li, Mengkao; Chen, Xiangming; Zhang, Dakai; Wei, Lin; Zhang, Zicheng; Wang, Shuang; Meng, Li; Zhu, Shan; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the predominant pathological type of esophageal carcinoma in Asia. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of 19-22-nucleotide non-coding RNAs acting on target mRNAs that function as either oncogenes or anti-oncogenes. It has been confirmed that miR-373 expression varies among different tumor types. However, its mechanism is still unclear in ESCC. In our current study, we found that miR-373 expression was upregulated in ESCC tissues compared with matched adjacent normal tissues, as well as in the plasma of ESCC patients compared with that of healthy volunteers. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 cells enhanced proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion. On the other hand, suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 cells decreased proliferation, G1-phase cell proportion, migration, and invasion and also improved cell apoptosis. Moreover, we found that TIMP3, which was reported to suppress invasion and metastasis of ESCC, was a direct target of miR-373. Overexpression of miR-373 in ECA109 caused a reduction of TIMP3 mRNA and protein, whereas suppression of miR-373 in KYSE410 led to an increase of TIMP3 mRNA and protein. Introducing TIMP3 in miR-373 over-expressed cells or knocking down TIMP3 in miR-373 suppressed cells could partially abrogate the effect of miR-373 on migration and invasion. Therefore, these results prove that as an oncogene, miRNA-373 would be an important and reliable biomarker for ESCC diagnosis and treatment by targeting TIMP3. PMID:27073718

  6. Decreased tumorigenicity correlates with expression of altered cell surface carbohydrates in Lec9 CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, J; Shin, S; Stanley, P

    1986-01-01

    To investigate a role for surface carbohydrates in cellular malignancy, 15 different glycosylation-defective CHO cell mutants were examined for their tumorigenic and metastatic capacities after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Most of the glycosylation mutants displayed similar or slightly decreased tumorigenicity compared with parental CHO cells. Neither parental CHO cells nor any of the mutants were observed to metastasize. However, independent isolates of one mutant type, Lec9, showed a dramatic reduction in tumor formation. The altered carbohydrates expressed at the surface of Lec9 cells appeared to be responsible for their loss of tumorigenicity, because revertants for lectin resistance were able to form tumors, and a double mutant (Lec9.Lec1) that expressed a Lec1 glycosylation phenotype also formed tumors. Finally, Lec9 cells were able to form tumors in gamma-irradiated nude mice, suggesting that recognition by an irradiation-sensitive host cell(s) was responsible for their reduced tumorigenicity in untreated nude mice. PMID:3785164

  7. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling.

    PubMed

    Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell-cell interaction with integrins-based cell-matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells' interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50-200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and cleaved caspase 3), EMT (E-cadherin and β-catenin), and cell survival (survivin and Akt) related signaling molecules in PC3 cells. Furthermore, PC3-xenograft tissue analyses confirmed the inhibitory effect of silibinin on fibronectin and integrins expression. Together, these

  8. Delphinidin inhibits cell proliferation and invasion via modulation of Met receptor phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Deeba N.; Afaq, Farrukh; Sarfaraz, Sami; Khan, Naghma; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2008-08-15

    The HGF/Met signaling pathway is deregulated in majority of cancers and is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. Delphinidin, present in pigmented fruits and vegetables possesses potent anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic properties. Here, we assessed the anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects of delphinidin on HGF-mediated responses in the immortalized MCF-10A breast cell line. Treatment of cells with delphinidin prior to exposure to exogenous HGF resulted in the inhibition of HGF-mediated (i) tyrosyl-phosphorylation and increased expression of Met receptor, (ii) phosphorylation of downstream regulators such as FAK and Src and (iii) induction of adaptor proteins including paxillin, Gab-1 and GRB-2. In addition, delphinidin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of HGF-activated (i) Ras-ERK MAPKs and (ii) PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathways. Delphinidin was found to repress HGF-activated NF{kappa}B transcription with a decrease in (i) phosphorylation of IKK{alpha}/{beta} and I{kappa}B{alpha}, and (ii) activation and nuclear translocation of NF{kappa}B/p65. Inhibition of HGF-mediated membrane translocation of PKC{alpha} as well as decreased phosphorylation of STAT3 was further observed in delphinidin treated cells. Finally, decreased cell viability of Met receptor expressing breast cancer cells treated with delphinidin argues for a potential role of the agent in the prevention of HGF-mediated activation of various signaling pathways implicated in breast cancer.

  9. Effect of enteroviruses on adherence to and invasion of HEp-2 cells by Campylobacter isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Konkel, M E; Joens, L A

    1990-01-01

    Coinfection of HEp-2 epithelial cells with coxsackievirus B3, echovirus 7, poliovirus (LSc type 1), porcine enterovirus, and Campylobacter isolates was performed to determine if a synergistic effect could be obtained. The invasiveness of Campylobacter jejuni ATCC 33560 was significantly increased for HEp-2 cells preinfected with echovirus 7, coxsackievirus B3, and UV-inactivated (noninfectious) coxsackievirus B3 particles. Additionally, the invasiveness of C. jejuni M96, a clinical isolate, was significantly increased for HEp-2 cells preinfected with coxsackievirus B3. Poliovirus and porcine enterovirus had no effect on C. jejuni ATCC 33560 adherence and invasiveness. Furthermore, poliovirus had no effect on the ability of C. jejuni M96 to adhere to and invade HEp-2 cells. Campylobacter hyointestinalis and Campylobacter mucosalis, two noninvasive isolates, did not invade virus-infected HEp-2 cells. The increase in the invasiveness of C. jejuni appeared to be the result of specific interactions between the virus and the HEp-2 cell membrane. The data suggest that the invasiveness of Campylobacter spp. is dependent upon the inherent properties of the organism. Virus-induced cell alterations can potentiate the invasiveness of virulent Campylobacter spp. but are not sufficient to allow internalization of noninvasive bacteria. PMID:2156779

  10. Suppression of adhesion and invasion of hepatoma cells in culture by tea compounds through antioxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Miura, Y; Yagasaki, K

    2000-10-31

    To determine the actions of tea components on the invasion of a rat ascites hepatoma cell line of AH109A and to understand their modes of action, the cancer cells were co-cultured with a rat mesentery-derived mesothelial cell monolayer in the presence of tea components. The synergistic effects of (-)-epicatechin (EC) with (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) on AH109A invasion were demonstrated. Further study showed that 10 microM of EGCG or theaflavins, or 2.5 microM of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic (EDTA) entirely abolished the increase in AH109A adhesion and invasion stimulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system. Our results suggest that (.)OH(-)- and other ROS-scavenging activity of EGCG and theaflavins may be responsible for the inhibition of (.)OH(-)- and related ROS-potentiated AH109A adhesion and invasion to the cultured rat mesothelial cell monolayer. PMID:10996728

  11. NME2 reduces proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells to limit metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-fei; Yang, Aijun; Liu, Wei; Wang, Chenyu; Wang, Min; Zhang, Lihan; Wang, Dongcang; Dong, Jing-fei; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignancies and has a high rate of metastasis. We hypothesize that NME2 (Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase 2), which has previously been considered as an anti-metastatic gene, plays a role in the invasiveness of gastric cancer cells. Using a tissue chip technology and immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that NME2 expression was associated with levels of differentiation of gastric cancer cells and their metastasis into the lymph nodes. When the NME2 gene product was over-expressed by ;in vitro stable transfection, cells from BGC823 and MKN45 gastric cancer cell lines had reduced rates of proliferation, migration, and invasion through the collagen matrix, suggesting an inhibitory activity of NME2 in the propagation and invasion of gastric cancer. NME2 could, therefore, severe as a risk marker for gastric cancer invasiveness and a potential new target for gene therapy to enhance or induce NME2 expression. PMID:25700270

  12. CMTM3 inhibits cell migration and invasion and correlates with favorable prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu; Lin, Yi; Zhang, Lianhai; Liu, Baocai; Yuan, Wanqiong; Mo, Xiaoning; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Henan; Xing, Xiaofang; Cheng, Xiaojing; Dong, Bin; Hu, Ying; Du, Hong; Zhu, Yubing; Ding, Ning; Li, Jiyou; Liu, Weili; Ma, Yongzhen; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Jiafu; Han, Wenling

    2014-01-01

    The CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain containing 3 (CMTM3) gene is a novel tumor suppressor with frequent epigenetic inactivation. In this study, we showed the role played by CMTM3 in gastric cancer cells as a tumor suppressor gene, and examined the correlation between CMTM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters using immunohistochemistry in gastric cancer patients with different pathological stages (n = 350). We found that CMTM3 expression was reduced or silenced by epigenetic regulation in gastric cell lines, and dramatically downregulated in primary gastric cancer tissues. Restoration of CMTM3 significantly affected migration and invasion of AGS and SGC-7901 cells (P < 0.001). In vivo experiments showed that peritoneal disseminated metastases were significantly suppressed by CMTM3 (P < 0.001). We further showed that the expression of MMP2 and the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 were decreased when CMTM3 was restored. In addition, by immunohistochemical staining, we found that the expression of CMTM3 was remarkably weaker in gastric cancer tissues than in normal mucosae (P = 0.008), and was significantly correlated with gender (P = 0.033), tumor depth (P = 0.049), stage (P = 0.021), and histological grade (P = 0.022). More importantly, CMTM3 expression was associated with prognosis in gastric cancer patients (P = 0.041), and was a significant independent prognostic indicator (hazard ratio = 0.704, 95% confidence interval, 0.498–0.994; P = 0.046). Our findings indicate that CMTM3 regulates migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Moreover, CMTM3 is a candidate marker for prognosis of gastric cancer in the clinic. PMID:24131472

  13. Simple non-invasive analysis of embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes beating in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radaszkiewicz, Katarzyna Anna; Sýkorová, Dominika; Karas, Pavel; Kudová, Jana; Kohút, Lukáš; Binó, Lucia; Večeřa, Josef; Víteček, Jan; Kubala, Lukáš; Pacherník, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of digital video output enables the non-invasive screening of various active biological processes. For the monitoring and computing of the beating parameters of cardiomyocytes in vitro, CB Analyser (cardiomyocyte beating analyser) software was developed. This software is based on image analysis of the video recording of beating cardiomyocytes. CB Analyser was tested using cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells at different stages of cardiomyogenesis. We observed that during differentiation (from day 18), the beat peak width decreased, which corresponded to the increased speed of an individual pulse. However, the beating frequency did not change. Further, the effects of epinephrine modulating mature cardiomyocyte functions were tested to validate the CB Analyser analysis. In conclusion, data show that CB Analyser is a useful tool for evaluating the functions of both developing and mature cardiomyocytes under various conditions in vitro.

  14. Correlation between IL-6 and invasiveness of ectoderm cells of embryo in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X Y; Lu, T M; Shu, W H; Zhou, H Y

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the correlation between Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and invasiveness of ectoderm cells of embryo in early pregnancy, in order to further discuss whether IL-6 can enhance invasiveness of ectoderm cells. The study lays the foundation for determination of pathogenesis of some gestation period-related diseases. Differences in mRNA and protein expression of trophoblastic cell line JEG-3 cells in IL-6, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 were analyzed; the regulating effect of different concentrations of IL-6 on invasive ability of trophoblast cells was studied by Transwell assay; the effect of IL-6 on proliferation of ectodermal cell line JEG-3 of embryo was analyzed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay. The invasive number of JEG-3 cells incubated by IL-6 (10 ng/ml) was higher than that of the control group, and the difference had statistical significance (p < 0.05). Results of using MMT assay to detect the effect of IL-6 on proliferation of trophoblastic cell line JEG-3 showed that JEG-3 cells before and after processing had no significant difference from the control group (p >0.05). Therefore, IL-6 can enhance invasiveness of ectoderm cells of embryo through activation of MMP-2. PMID:27358148

  15. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  16. α-Solanine inhibits human melanoma cell migration and invasion by reducing matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kun; Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chang Chien, Tzu-Tsung; Fang, Li-Heng; Huang, Hsiang-Ching; Chen, Pin-Shern

    2010-01-01

    α-Solanine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts, was found to possess anti-carcinogenic properties, such as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the effect of α-solanine on cancer metastasis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of α-solanine on metastasis in vitro. Data demonstrated that α-solanine inhibited proliferation of human melanoma cell line A2058 in a dose-dependent manner. When treated with non-toxic doses of α-solanine, cell migration and invasion were markedly suppressed. Furthermore, α-solanine reduced the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, which are involved in the migration and invasion of cancer cells. Our biochemical assays indicated that α-solanine potently suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and Akt, while it did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK). In addition, α-solanine significantly decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), suggesting that α-solanine inhibited NF-κB activity. Taken together, the results suggested that α-solanine inhibited migration and invasion of A2058 cells by reducing MMP-2/9 activities. It also inhibited JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways as well as NF-κB activity. These findings reveal new therapeutic potential for α-solanine in anti-metastatic therapy.

  17. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  18. Gelsolin Induces Colorectal Tumor Cell Invasion via Modulation of the Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Jingli; Tan, Ee Hong; Yan, Benedict; Tochhawng, Lalchhandami; Jayapal, Manikandan; Koh, Shiuan; Tay, Hwee Kee; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Hooi, Shing Chuan; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Kumar, Alan Prem; Goh, Yaw Chong; Lim, Yaw Chyn; Yap, Celestial T.

    2012-01-01

    Gelsolin is a cytoskeletal protein which participates in actin filament dynamics and promotes cell motility and plasticity. Although initially regarded as a tumor suppressor, gelsolin expression in certain tumors correlates with poor prognosis and therapy-resistance. In vitro, gelsolin has anti-apoptotic and pro-migratory functions and is critical for invasion of some types of tumor cells. We found that gelsolin was highly expressed at tumor borders infiltrating into adjacent liver tissues, as examined by immunohistochemistry. Although gelsolin contributes to lamellipodia formation in migrating cells, the mechanisms by which it induces tumor invasion are unclear. Gelsolin’s influence on the invasive activity of colorectal cancer cells was investigated using overexpression and small interfering RNA knockdown. We show that gelsolin is required for invasion of colorectal cancer cells through matrigel. Microarray analysis and quantitative PCR indicate that gelsolin overexpression induces the upregulation of invasion-promoting genes in colorectal cancer cells, including the matrix-degrading urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Conversely, gelsolin knockdown reduces uPA levels, as well as uPA secretion. The enhanced invasiveness of gelsolin-overexpressing cells was attenuated by treatment with function-blocking antibodies to either uPA or its receptor uPAR, indicating that uPA/uPAR activity is crucial for gelsolin-dependent invasion. In summary, our data reveals novel functions of gelsolin in colorectal tumor cell invasion through its modulation of the uPA/uPAR cascade, with potentially important roles in colorectal tumor dissemination to metastatic sites. PMID:22927998

  19. Invasion of HeLa 229 cells by virulent Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Ewanowich, C A; Melton, A R; Weiss, A A; Sherburne, R K; Peppler, M S

    1989-01-01

    Phase-dependent invasive behavior of Bordetella pertussis was demonstrated by recovery of viable organisms from gentamicin-treated HeLa cell monolayers and by transmission electron microscopy. Several mutants of B. pertussis with Tn5 or Tn5 lac inserted into various vir-regulated genes were evaluated for differences in their invasive abilities. Mutants lacking filamentous hemagglutinin, pertussis toxin, and two as yet uncharacterized vir-regulated products had levels of invasion significantly lower than that of the parent strain BP338. In contrast, invasion by mutants lacking adenylate cyclase toxin was significantly increased compared with that of wild-type B. pertussis. This increase in invasion was eliminated when concentrations of intracellular cyclic 3'-5' AMP were stimulated by treating HeLa cells with cholera toxin or forskolin. Entry of B. pertussis occurred through a microfilament-dependent phagocytic process, as evidenced by the marked reduction in uptake following treatment of HeLa cells with cytochalasin D. Invasion was inhibited with polyclonal anti-B. pertussis and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antisera. In addition, a monoclonal antibody against lipooligosaccharide A reduced uptake by 65.5%. The preservation of HeLa cell integrity and the limited replication of intracellular bacteria suggest that invasion may represent a means by which B. pertussis evades an active host immune response. Images PMID:2547718

  20. FAK competes for Src to promote migration against invasion in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolli-Bouhafs, K; Sick, E; Noulet, F; Gies, J-P; De Mey, J; Rondé, P

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most deadly cancers because of its high propensity to metastasis, a process that requires migration and invasion of tumor cells driven by the regulated formation of adhesives structures like focal adhesions (FAs) and invasive structures like invadopodia. FAK, the major kinase of FAs, has been implicated in many cellular processes, including migration and invasion. In this study, we investigated the role of FAK in the regulation of invasion. We report that suppression of FAK in B16F10 melanoma cells led to increased invadopodia formation and invasion through Matrigel, but impaired migration. These effects are rescued by FAK WT but not by FAKY397F reexpression. Invadopodia formation requires local Src activation downstream of FAK and in a FAK phosphorylation-dependant manner. FAK deletion correlates with increased phosphorylation of Tks-5 (tyrosine kinase substrate with five SH3 domain) and reactive oxygen species production. In conclusion, our data show that FAK is able to mediate opposite effects on cell migration and invasion. Accordingly, beneficial effects of FAK inhibition are context dependent and may depend on the cell response to environmental cues and/or on the primary or secondary changes that melanoma experienced through the invasion cycle. PMID:25118939

  1. The Killer Cell Ig-like Receptor 2DL4 Expression in Human Mast Cells and Its Potential Role in Breast Cancer Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ueshima, Chiyuki; Kataoka, Tatsuki R; Hirata, Masahiro; Furuhata, Ayako; Suzuki, Eiji; Toi, Masakazu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Okayama, Yoshimichi; Haga, Hironori

    2015-08-01

    The killer-cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) 2DL4 (CD158d) acts as a receptor for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G and is expressed on almost all human natural killer (NK) cells. The expression and function of KIR2DL4 in other hematopoietic cells is poorly understood. Here, we focused on human mast cells, which exhibit cytotoxic activity similar to that of NK cells. KIR2DL4 was detected in all examined human cultured mast cells established from peripheral blood derived from healthy volunteers (PB-mast), the human mast cell line LAD2, and human nonneoplastic mast cells, including those on pathologic specimens. An agonistic antibody against KIR2DL4 decreased KIT-mediated and IgE-triggered responses, and enhanced the granzyme B production by PB-mast and LAD2 cells, by activating Src homology 2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2). Next, we performed a coculture assay between LAD2 cells and the HLA-G(+) cancer cells, MCF-7 and JEG-3, and showed that KIR2DL4 on LAD2 cells enhanced MMP-9 production and the invasive activity of both cell lines via HLA-G. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the direct interaction between HLA-G(+) breast cancer cells and KIR2DL4(+) tissue mast cells (observed in 12 of 36 cases; 33.3%) was statistically correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis or lymph-vascular invasion (observed in 11 of 12 cases; 91.7%; χ(2) = 7.439; P < 0.01; degrees of freedom, 1) in the clinical samples. These findings suggest that the KIR2DL4 on human mast cells facilitates HLA-G-expressing cancer invasion and the subsequent metastasis.

  2. Expression of complete keratin filaments in mouse L cells augments cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Y W; Runyan, R B; Oshima, R G; Hendrix, M J

    1993-01-01

    Intermediate filament proteins have been used to diagnose the origin of specific cells. Classically, vimentin is found in mesenchymal cells, and keratins are present in epithelial cells. However, recent evidence suggests that the coexpression of these phenotype-specific proteins augments tumor cell motility, and hence, metastasis. In the present study, we used the mouse L-cell model to determine if a direct correlation exists between the expression of additional keratins in these cells, which normally express only vimentin, and their migratory ability. Mouse L cells were transfected with human keratins 8, 18, and both 8 and 18. The results indicate that the cells expressing complete keratin filaments have a higher migratory and invasive ability (through extracellular matrix-coated filters) compared with the parental and control-transfected clones. Furthermore, there is an enrichment of keratin-positive cells from a heterogeneous population of L clones selected over serial migrations. This migratory activity was directly correlated with the spreading ability of the cells on Matrigel matrix, in which the keratin-positive transfectants maintain a round morphology for a longer duration, compared with the other L-cell populations. Collectively, these data suggest that keratins may play an important role(s) in migration, through a special interaction with the extracellular environment, thereby influencing cell shape. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7683431

  3. Trespassing cancer cells: ‘fingerprinting’ invasive protrusions reveals metastatic culprits

    PubMed Central

    Klemke, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer cells produce invasive membrane protrusions called invadopodia and pseudopodia, which play a central role in driving cancer cell dissemination in the body. Malignant cells use these structures to attach to and degrade extracellular matrix proteins, generate force for cell locomotion, and to penetrate the vasculature. Recent work using unique subcellular fractionation methodologies combined with spatial genomic, proteomic, and phosphoproteomic profiling has provided insight into the invadopodiome and pseudopodiome signaling networks that control the protrusion of invasive membranes. Here I highlight how these powerful spatial “omics” approaches reveal important signatures of metastatic cancer cells and possible new therapeutic targets aimed at treating metastatic disease. PMID:22980730

  4. Protein kinase D2 induces invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Wille, Christoph; Köhler, Conny; Armacki, Milena; Jamali, Arsia; Gössele, Ulrike; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer cell invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis are major challenges for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are involved in controlling tumor cell motility, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In particular PKD2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is lowered. We report that both kinases control pancreatic cancer cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific manner. PKD2 enhances invasion in three-dimensional extracellular matrix (3D-ECM) cultures by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 9 (MMP7/9), by which MMP7 is likely to act upstream of MMP9. Knockdown of MMP7/9 blocks PKD2-mediated invasion in 3D-ECM assays and in vivo using tumors growing on chorioallantois membranes. Furthermore, MMP9 enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis by releasing extracellular matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor A, increasing its bioavailability and angiogenesis. Of interest, specific knockdown of PKD1 in PKD2-expressing pancreatic cancer cells further enhanced the invasive properties in 3D-ECM systems by generating a high-motility phenotype. Loss of PKD1 thus may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In conclusion, we define for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion and angiogenesis, in vitro and in vivo, addressing PKD isoform specificity as a major factor for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24336522

  5. Tetraspanin CD9 determines invasiveness and tumorigenicity of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Karbanová, Jana; Corbeil, Denis; Lorico, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of breast cancer cells (BCCs) with stromal components is critical for tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we assessed the role of CD9 in adhesion, migration and invasiveness of BCCs. We used co-cultures of BCCs and bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), and analyzed their behavior and morphology by dynamic total internal reflection fluorescence, confocal and scanning electron microscopy. 83, 16 and 10% of contacts between MDA-MB-231 (MDA), MA-11 or MCF-7 cells and MSCs, respectively, resulted in MSC invasion. MDA cells developed long magnupodia, lamellipodia and dorsal microvilli, whereas long microvilli emerged from MA-11 cells. MCF-7 cells displayed large dorsal ruffles. CD9 knockdown and antibody blockage in MDA cells inhibited MSC invasion by 95 and 70%, respectively, suggesting that CD9 is required for this process. Remarkably, CD9-deficient MDA cells displayed significant alteration of their plasma membrane, harboring numerous peripheral and dorsal membrane ruffles instead of intact magnupodium/lamellipodium and microvillus, respectively. Such modification might explain the delayed adhesion, and hence MSC invasion. In agreement with this hypothesis, CD9-knockdown suppressed the metastatic capacity of MDA cells in mouse xenografts. Our data indicate that CD9 is implicated in BCC invasiveness and metastases by cellular mechanisms that involve specific CD9+ plasma membrane protrusions of BCCs. PMID:25762645

  6. Effect of IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 blockade of Notch signaling pathway on the invasive capability of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, H Ch; Zhang, Y X; Liu, Y; Wang, Q Sh

    2016-07-14

    We investigated the effect of the IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 in the blockade of the Notch signaling pathway on the invasive capability of hepatoma cells. We examined the effects of IL-17 antibody or IL-35 treatment alone or in combination on cell invasion and migration capabilities with Transwell chambers. The mRNA levels of Hes1, Hes5, and Hey1 were tested using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of N1ICD, Snail, and E-cadherin protein expressions were measured with western blot. The expression of Hes1, Hes5, Hey1 and N1ICD were all very high in hepatoma cell lines, and were positively correlated with the invasive migration capabilities of the cells. The combination of IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab with IL-35 could effectively inhibit the Notch signaling pathway, as well as the invasive migration of the cells. Snail and E-cadherin are involved in the migration of hepatoma cells, and it has been established that Snail can regulate the expression of E-cadherin. IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 can increase E-cadherin and decrease Snail expression, which are positively correlated with cell invasive migration capabilities. Overall, treatment with both IL-17 antibody and IL-35 is more effective than each treatment alone. Notch signaling is activated in hepatoma cell lines and increases with the enhancement of cell invasive migration capabilities. IL-17 monoclonal antibody Secukinumab combined with IL-35 can block the Notch signaling pathway, simultaneously reducing the invasive migration capability of hepatoma cells.

  7. Phosphorylated Heat Shock Protein 20 (HSPB6) Regulates Transforming Growth Factor-α-Induced Migration and Invasion of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Toyoda, Hidenori; Nagasawa, Tomoaki; Yasuda, Eisuke; Chiba, Naokazu; Okuda, Seiji; Maeda, Atsuyuki; Kaneoka, Yuji; Kumada, Takashi; Kozawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major malignancies in the world. Small heat shock proteins (HSPs) are reported to play an important role in the regulation of a variety of cancer cell functions, and the functions of small HSPs are regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation. We previously reported that protein levels of a small HSP, HSP20 (HSPB6), decrease in vascular invasion positive HCC compared with those in the negative vascular invasion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated whether HSP20 is implicated in HCC cell migration and the invasion using human HCC-derived HuH7 cells. The transforming growth factor (TGF)-α-induced migration and invasion were suppressed in the wild-type-HSP20 overexpressed cells in which phosphorylated HSP20 was detected. Phospho-mimic-HSP20 overexpression reduced the migration and invasion compared with unphosphorylated HSP20 overexpression. Dibutyryl cAMP, which enhanced the phosphorylation of wild-type-HSP20, significantly reduced the TGF-α-induced cell migration of wild-type HSP20 overexpressed cells. The TGF-α-induced cell migration was inhibited by SP600125, a c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) inhibitor. In phospho-mimic-HSP20 overexpressed HuH7 cells, TGF-α-stimulated JNK phosphorylation was suppressed compared with the unphosphorylated HSP20 overexpressed cells. Moreover, the level of phospho-HSP20 protein in human HCC tissues was significantly correlated with tumor invasion. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that phosphorylated HSP20 inhibits TGF-α-induced HCC cell migration and invasion via suppression of the JNK signaling pathway. PMID:27046040

  8. CRP2, a new invadopodia actin bundling factor critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dieterle, Monika; Moreau, Flora; Al Absi, Antoun; Steinmetz, André; Oudin, Anaïs; Berchem, Guy; Janji, Bassam; Thomas, Clément

    2016-01-01

    A critical process underlying cancer metastasis is the acquisition by tumor cells of an invasive phenotype. At the subcellular level, invasion is facilitated by actin-rich protrusions termed invadopodia, which direct extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. Here, we report the identification of a new cytoskeletal component of breast cancer cell invadopodia, namely cysteine-rich protein 2 (CRP2). We found that CRP2 was not or only weakly expressed in epithelial breast cancer cells whereas it was up-regulated in mesenchymal/invasive breast cancer cells. In addition, high expression of the CRP2 encoding gene CSRP2 was associated with significantly increased risk of metastasis in basal-like breast cancer patients. CRP2 knockdown significantly reduced the invasive potential of aggressive breast cancer cells, whereas it did not impair 2D cell migration. In keeping with this, CRP2-depleted breast cancer cells exhibited a reduced capacity to promote ECM degradation, and to secrete and express MMP-9, a matrix metalloproteinase repeatedly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In turn, ectopic expression of CRP2 in weakly invasive cells was sufficient to stimulate cell invasion. Both GFP-fused and endogenous CRP2 localized to the extended actin core of invadopodia, a structure primarily made of actin bundles. Purified recombinant CRP2 autonomously crosslinked actin filaments into thick bundles, suggesting that CRP2 contributes to the formation/maintenance of the actin core. Finally, CRP2 depletion significantly reduced the incidence of lung metastatic lesions in two xenograft mouse models of breast cancer. Collectively, our data identify CRP2 as a new cytoskeletal component of invadopodia that critically promotes breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis. PMID:26883198

  9. Suppressing effect of resveratrol on the migration and invasion of human metastatic lung and cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Suk; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong

    2012-09-01

    The antioxidant 3,4',5 tri-hydroxystilbene (resveratrol), a phytoalexin found in grapes, shows cancer preventive activities, including inhibition of migration and invasion of metastatic tumors. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of resveratrol on tumor metastasis, especially in human metastatic lung and cervical cancers is not clear. A non-cytotoxic dosage of resveratrol causes a reduction in the generation of reactive oxygen species, and suppresses phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced invasion and migration in both A549 and HeLa cells. Resveratrol also decreases both the expression and the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and the promoter activity of PMA-stimulated MMP-9 is also inhibited. However, resveratrol does not affect either the expression or the proteolytic activity of MMP-2. Our results also show that resveratrol suppresses the transcription of MMP-9 by the inhibition of both NF-κB and AP-1 transactivation. These results indicate that resveratrol inhibits both NF-κB and AP-1 mediated MMP-9 expression, leading to suppression of migration and invasion of human metastatic lung and cervical cancer cells. Resveratrol has potential for clinical use in preventing invasion by human metastatic lung and cervical cancers.

  10. Decrease of miR-146a is associated with the aggressiveness of human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zonggao; Johnson, Jeffrey J.; Jiang, Rong; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to identify microRNAs that may contribute to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) progression, we compared the microRNA expression profiles of two related cell lines that form tumors with differential aggressiveness. A panel of 28 microRNAs was found to be more than 1.5-fold altered, among which miR-146a was the most significantly changed (-4.6-fold). Loss of miR-146a expression was validated in human high-grade tumors, while normal oral mucosa retained expression, using fluorescence in situ hybridization on a tissue microarray. Restoration of miR-146a in SCC25 and UMSCC1 cells decreased in vitro invasive activity, suppressed tumor growth in vivo, and decreased the incidence of UMSCC1 lung metastasis. The transcription factor Sox2 was found to be a putative target of miR-146a. In conclusion, the loss or decrease of miR-146a is a new feature that is associated with more aggressive behavior in oral squamous carcinoma. PMID:26159827

  11. Melatonin decreases cell proliferation, impairs myogenic differentiation and triggers apoptotic cell death in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Codenotti, Silvia; Battistelli, Michela; Burattini, Sabrina; Salucci, Sara; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Rezzani, Rita; Faggi, Fiorella; Colombi, Marina; Monti, Eugenio; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    Melatonin is a small indole produced by the pineal gland and other tissues, and has numerous functions that aid in the maintenance of the whole body homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of circadian rhythms and sleep to protection from oxidative stress. Melatonin has also been reported to counteract cell growth and chemoresistance in different types of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the effects of exogenous melatonin administration on different human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the most frequent soft tissue sarcoma affecting childhood. The results showed that melatonin significantly affected the behavior of RMS cells, leading to inhibition of cell proliferation and impairment of myogenic differentiation followed by increased apoptotic cell death, as observed by immunoblotting analysis of apoptosis-related markers including Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3. Similar findings were observed using a combination of microscopy techniques, including scanning/transmission electron and confocal microscopy. Furthermore, melatonin in combination with doxorubicin or cisplatin, two compounds commonly used for the treatment of solid tumors, increased the sensitivity of RMS cells to apoptosis. These data indicated that melatonin may be effective in counteracting RMS tumor growth and chemoresistance.

  12. Recombinant snake venom cystatin inhibits the growth, invasion and metastasis of B16F10 cells and MHCC97H cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qun; Tang, Nanhong; Wan, Rong; Qi, Yuanlin; Lin, Xu; Lin, Jianyin

    2011-04-01

    Studies have shown that expression of snake venom cystatin (sv-cystatin) in mouse melanoma cells and human gastric carcinoma cells can inhibit their invasion and metastasis. To advance the research into the biological features and pharmaceutical applications of sv-cystatin, we investigated the expression of recombinant sv-cystatin in an optimized Pichia pastoris system. Approximately 5 mg/L of bioactive sv-cystatin was obtained with a purity of 95.08%. Kinetic analyses of recombinant sv-cystatin revealed highly effective inhibitory efficiency against papain (Ki = 2.67 nM). We further investigated the effects of recombinant sv-cystatin on the invasion and metastasis of B16F10 cells and MHCC97H cells in vitro and in vivo. Matrigel invasion assays showed significant inhibition of recombinant sv-cystatin on the tumor cells in vitro. For experimental lung colonization assays, C57BL/6 mice inoculated in the lateral tai