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Sample records for cells integral proteins

  1. Type II integral membrane protein, TM of J paramyxovirus promotes cell-to-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuo; Hung, Cher; Paterson, Reay G; Michel, Frank; Fuentes, Sandra; Place, Ryan; Lin, Yuan; Hogan, Robert J; Lamb, Robert A; He, Biao

    2015-10-06

    Paramyxoviruses include many important animal and human pathogens. Most paramyxoviruses have two integral membrane proteins: fusion protein (F) and attachment proteins hemagglutinin, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase, or glycoprotein (G), which are critical for viral entry into cells. J paramyxovirus (JPV) encodes four integral membrane proteins: F, G, SH, and transmembrane (TM). The function of TM is not known. In this work, we have generated a viable JPV lacking TM (JPV∆TM). JPV∆TM formed opaque plaques compared with JPV. Quantitative syncytia assays showed that JPV∆TM was defective in promoting cell-to-cell fusion (i.e., syncytia formation) compared with JPV. Furthermore, cells separately expressing F, G, TM, or F plus G did not form syncytia whereas cells expressing F plus TM formed some syncytia. However, syncytia formation was much greater with coexpression of F, G, and TM. Biochemical analysis indicates that F, G, and TM interact with each other. A small hydrophobic region in the TM ectodomain from amino acid residues 118 to 132, the hydrophobic loop (HL), was important for syncytial promotion, suggesting that the TM HL region plays a critical role in cell-to-cell fusion.

  2. Integrative proteomic profiling of ovarian cancer cell lines reveals precursor cell associated proteins and functional status

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, F.; Watters, K. M.; Curtis, M.; Eckert, M. A.; Chiang, C. Y.; Tyanova, S.; Montag, A.; Lastra, R. R.; Lengyel, E.; Mann, M.

    2016-01-01

    A cell line representative of human high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) should not only resemble its tumour of origin at the molecular level, but also demonstrate functional utility in pre-clinical investigations. Here, we report the integrated proteomic analysis of 26 ovarian cancer cell lines, HGSOC tumours, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells and fallopian tube epithelial cells via a single-run mass spectrometric workflow. The in-depth quantification of >10,000 proteins results in three distinct cell line categories: epithelial (group I), clear cell (group II) and mesenchymal (group III). We identify a 67-protein cell line signature, which separates our entire proteomic data set, as well as a confirmatory publicly available CPTAC/TCGA tumour proteome data set, into a predominantly epithelial and mesenchymal HGSOC tumour cluster. This proteomics-based epithelial/mesenchymal stratification of cell lines and human tumours indicates a possible origin of HGSOC either from the fallopian tube or from the ovarian surface epithelium. PMID:27561551

  3. Virus-Mimetic Fusogenic Exosomes for Direct Delivery of Integral Membrane Proteins to Target Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yoosoo; Hong, Yeonsun; Nam, Gi-Hoon; Chung, Jin Hwa; Koh, Eunee; Kim, In-San

    2017-02-06

    An efficient system for direct delivery of integral membrane proteins is successfully developed using a new biocompatible exosome-based platform. Fusogenic exosomes harboring viral fusogen, vascular stomatitis virus (VSV)-G protein, can fuse with and modify plasma membranes in a process called "membrane editing." This can facilitate the transfer of biologically active membrane proteins into the target cell membranes both in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Coating cells with cationic silica-magnetite nanocomposites for rapid purification of integral plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Chao; Wang, Sheng; Fang, Caiyun; Xu, Yawei; Lu, Haojie; Yang, Pengyuan

    2011-09-01

    This study developed a simple and rapid purification method for plasma membrane with high yields from adherent cells. The plasma membrane (PM) sheets could be absorbed specifically by the cationic silica-magnetite nanocomposites (CSMN) under acidic conditions, and recovered directly in cell-lysis-buffer with no need for precipitation. The binding between CSMN and PM sheets was confirmed by electron microscopy. Western blot analysis demonstrated a >10-fold relative enrichment factor. Up to 422 integral membrane proteins were identified from 10(7) Huh7 cells. Notably, we found 29 Ras family proteins by classification according to their biological functions. The whole enrichment procedure took <30 min. The CSMN-based procedure demonstrates a simple, economical and efficient enrichment of integral PM proteins in proteomic study.

  5. Integral Membrane Protein Sorting to Vacuoles in Plant Cells: Evidence for Two Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liwen; Rogers, John C.

    1998-01-01

    Plant cells may contain two functionally distinct vacuolar compartments. Membranes of protein storage vacuoles (PSV) are marked by the presence of α-tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP), whereas lytic vacuoles (LV) are marked by the presence of γ-TIP. Mechanisms for sorting integral membrane proteins to the different vacuoles have not been elucidated. Here we study a chimeric integral membrane reporter protein expressed in tobacco suspension culture protoplasts whose traffic was assessed biochemically by following acquisition of complex Asn-linked glycan modifications and proteolytic processing, and whose intracellular localization was determined with confocal immunofluorescence. We show that the transmembrane domain of the plant vacuolar sorting receptor BP-80 directs the reporter protein via the Golgi to the LV prevacuolar compartment, and attaching the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of γ-TIP did not alter this traffic. In contrast, the α-TIP CT prevented traffic of the reporter protein through the Golgi and caused it to be localized in organelles separate from ER and from Golgi and LV prevacuolar compartment markers. These organelles had a buoyant density consistent with vacuoles, and α-TIP protein colocalized in them with the α-TIP CT reporter protein when the two were expressed together in protoplasts. These results are consistent with two separate pathways to vacuoles for membrane proteins: a direct ER to PSV pathway, and a separate pathway via the Golgi to the LV. PMID:9832548

  6. The unfolded protein response governs integrity of the haematopoietic stem-cell pool during stress.

    PubMed

    van Galen, Peter; Kreso, Antonija; Mbong, Nathan; Kent, David G; Fitzmaurice, Timothy; Chambers, Joseph E; Xie, Stephanie; Laurenti, Elisa; Hermans, Karin; Eppert, Kolja; Marciniak, Stefan J; Goodall, Jane C; Green, Anthony R; Wouters, Bradly G; Wienholds, Erno; Dick, John E

    2014-06-12

    The blood system is sustained by a pool of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are long-lived due to their capacity for self-renewal. A consequence of longevity is exposure to stress stimuli including reactive oxygen species (ROS), nutrient fluctuation and DNA damage. Damage that occurs within stressed HSCs must be tightly controlled to prevent either loss of function or the clonal persistence of oncogenic mutations that increase the risk of leukaemogenesis. Despite the importance of maintaining cell integrity throughout life, how the HSC pool achieves this and how individual HSCs respond to stress remain poorly understood. Many sources of stress cause misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) enables the cell to either resolve stress or initiate apoptosis. Here we show that human HSCs are predisposed to apoptosis through strong activation of the PERK branch of the UPR after ER stress, whereas closely related progenitors exhibit an adaptive response leading to their survival. Enhanced ER protein folding by overexpression of the co-chaperone ERDJ4 (also called DNAJB9) increases HSC repopulation capacity in xenograft assays, linking the UPR to HSC function. Because the UPR is a focal point where different sources of stress converge, our study provides a framework for understanding how stress signalling is coordinated within tissue hierarchies and integrated with stemness. Broadly, these findings reveal that the HSC pool maintains clonal integrity by clearance of individual HSCs after stress to prevent propagation of damaged stem cells.

  7. Reporter Proteins in Whole-Cell Optical Bioreporter Detection Systems, Biosensor Integrations, and Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Close, Dan M.; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell, genetically modified bioreporters are designed to emit detectable signals in response to a target analyte or related group of analytes. When integrated with a transducer capable of measuring those signals, a biosensor results that acts as a self-contained analytical system useful in basic and applied environmental, medical, pharmacological, and agricultural sciences. Historically, these devices have focused on signaling proteins such as green fluorescent protein, aequorin, firefly luciferase, and/or bacterial luciferase. The biochemistry and genetic development of these sensor systems as well as the advantages, challenges, and common applications of each one will be discussed. PMID:22291559

  8. An integrated cell-free metabolic platform for protein production and synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C; Calhoun, Kara A; Voloshin, Alexei; Wuu, Jessica J; Swartz, James R

    2008-01-01

    Cell-free systems offer a unique platform for expanding the capabilities of natural biological systems for useful purposes, i.e. synthetic biology. They reduce complexity, remove structural barriers, and do not require the maintenance of cell viability. Cell-free systems, however, have been limited by their inability to co-activate multiple biochemical networks in a single integrated platform. Here, we report the assessment of biochemical reactions in an Escherichia coli cell-free platform designed to activate natural metabolism, the Cytomim system. We reveal that central catabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and protein synthesis can be co-activated in a single reaction system. Never before have these complex systems been shown to be simultaneously activated without living cells. The Cytomim system therefore promises to provide the metabolic foundation for diverse ab initio cell-free synthetic biology projects. In addition, we describe an improved Cytomim system with enhanced protein synthesis yields (up to 1200 mg/l in 2 h) and lower costs to facilitate production of protein therapeutics and biochemicals that are difficult to make in vivo because of their toxicity, complexity, or unusual cofactor requirements. PMID:18854819

  9. F-actin binding protein, anillin, regulates integrity of intercellular junctions in human epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Feygin, Alex; Ivanov, Andrei I.

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJ) and adherens junctions (AJ) are key morphological features of differentiated epithelial cells that regulate the integrity and permeability of tissue barriers. Structure and remodeling of epithelial junctions depends on their association with the underlying actomyosin cytoskeleton. Anillin is a unique scaffolding protein interacting with different cytoskeletal components, including actin filaments and myosin motors. Its role in the regulation of mammalian epithelial junctions remains unexplored. Downregulation of anillin expression in human prostate, colonic, and lung epithelial cells triggered AJ and TJ disassembly without altering the expression of junctional proteins. This junctional disassembly was accompanied by dramatic disorganization of the perijunctional actomyosin belt; while the general architecture of the actin cytoskeleton, and activation status of non-muscle myosin II, remained unchanged. Furthermore, loss of anillin disrupted the adducin-spectrin membrane skeleton at the areas of cell-cell contact, selectively decreased γ-adducin expression, and induced cytoplasmic aggregation of αII-spectrin. Anillin knockdown activated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and JNK inhibition restored AJ and TJ integrity and cytoskeletal organization in anillin-depleted cells. These findings suggest a novel role for anillin in regulating intercellular adhesion in model human epithelia by mechanisms involving the suppression of JNK activity and controlling the assembly of the perijunctional cytoskeleton. PMID:25809162

  10. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  11. Integral membrane protease fibroblast activation protein sensitizes fibrosarcoma to chemotherapy and alters cell death mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baird, Sarah K; Rigopoulos, Angela; Cao, Diana; Allan, Laura; Renner, Christoph; Scott, Fiona E; Scott, Andrew M

    2015-11-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP), an integral membrane serine protease, is found on fibro- and osteo-sarcoma and on myofibroblasts in epithelial carcinoma, but rarely on other adult tissue. FAP has been demonstrated to be an excellent target for tumor imaging in clinical trials, and antibodies and other FAP-targeting drugs are in development. Here we have shown that FAP overexpression increased the growth of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo, and found that the expression of FAP affects response to chemotherapy. When treated with doxorubicin, expression of FAP increased susceptibility to the drug. In spite of this, FAP-HT1080 cells had fewer markers of classical apoptosis than HT1080 cells and neither necrosis nor necroptosis were enhanced. However, levels of early mitochondrial and lysosomal membrane permeability markers were increased, and autophagy switched from a protective function in HT1080 cells to part of the cell death mechanism with FAP expression. Therefore, FAP may affect how the tumor responds to chemotherapeutic drugs overall, which should be considered in targeted drug development. The overexpression of FAP also alters cell signaling and responses to the environment in this cell line. This includes cell death mechanisms, changing the response of HT1080 cells to doxorubicin from classical apoptosis to an organelle membrane permeability-dependent form of cell death.

  12. Defects in Protein Folding Machinery Affect Cell Wall Integrity and Reduce Ethanol Tolerance in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Aswathy; Pullepu, Dileep; Reddy, Praveen Kumar; Uddin, Wasim; Kabir, M Anaul

    2016-07-01

    The chaperonin complex CCT/TRiC (chaperonin containing TCP-1/TCP-1 ring complex) participates in the folding of many crucial proteins including actin and tubulin in eukaryotes. Mutations in genes encoding its subunits can affect protein folding and in turn, the physiology of the organism. Stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is important in fermentation reactions and operates through overexpression and underexpression of genes, thus altering the protein profile. Defective protein folding machinery can disturb this process. In this study, the response of cct mutants to stress conditions in general and ethanol in specific was investigated. CCT1 mutants showed decreased resistance to different conditions tested including osmotic stress, metal ions, surfactants, reducing and oxidising agents. Cct1-3 mutant with the mutation in the conserved ATP-binding region showed irreversible defects than other mutants. These mutants were found to have inherent cell wall defects and showed decreased ethanol tolerance. This study reveals that cell wall defects and ethanol sensitivity are linked. Genetic and proteomic analyses showed that the yeast genes RPS6A (ribosomal protein), SCL1 (proteasomal subunit) and TDH3 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) on overexpression, improved the growth of cct1-3 mutant on ethanol. We propose the breakdown of common stress response pathways caused by mutations in CCT complex and the resulting scarcity of functional stress-responsive proteins, affecting the cell's defence against different stress agents in cct mutants. Defective cytoskeleton and perturbed cell wall integrity reduce the ethanol tolerance in the mutants which are rescued by the extragenic suppressors.

  13. Surfactant Protein A integrates activation signal strength to differentially modulate T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sambuddho; Giamberardino, Charles; Thomas, Joseph; Evans, Kathy; Goto, Hisatsugu; Ledford, Julie G; Hsia, Bethany; Pastva, Amy M; Wright, Jo Rae

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lipoproteins lower the surface tension at the alveolar:airway interface of the lung and participate in host defense. Previous studies reported that surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits lymphocyte proliferation. We hypothesized that SP-A mediated modulation of T cell activation depends upon the strength, duration and type of lymphocyte activating signals. Modulation of T cell signal strength imparted by different activating agents ex and in vivo in different mouse models, and in vitro with human T cells show a strong correlation between strength of signal (SoS) and functional effects of SP-A interactions. T cell proliferation is enhanced in the presence of SP-A at low SoS imparted by exogenous mitogens, specific antibodies, APCs or in homeostatic proliferation. Proliferation is inhibited at higher SoS imparted by different doses of the same T cell mitogens, or indirect stimuli such as LPS. Importantly, reconstitution with exogenous SP-A into the lungs of SP-A-/- mice stimulated with a strong signal also resulted in suppression of T cell proliferation, while elevating baseline proliferation in unstimulated T cells. These signal strength and SP-A dependent effects are mediated by changes in intracellular Ca2+ levels over time, involving extrinsic Ca2+ activated channels late during activation. These effects are intrinsic to the global T cell population, and are manifested in vivo in naïve as well as memory phenotype T cells. Thus, SP-A appears to integrate signal thresholds to control T cell proliferation. PMID:22219327

  14. Interleukin-34 restores blood-brain barrier integrity by upregulating tight junction proteins in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood-brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood-brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Interleukin-34 Restores Blood–Brain Barrier Integrity by Upregulating Tight Junction Proteins in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shijie; Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Yue; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a newly discovered cytokine as an additional ligand for colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), and its functions are expected to overlap with colony stimulating factor-1/macrophage-colony stimulating factor. We have previously shown that the IL-34 is primarily produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and induces proliferation and neuroprotective properties of microglia which express CSF1R. However, the functions of IL-34 in the CNS are still elucidative. Here we show that CNS capillary endothelial cells also express CSF1R. IL-34 protected blood–brain barrier integrity by restored expression levels of tight junction proteins, which were downregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines. The novel function of IL-34 on the blood–brain barrier may give us a clue for new therapeutic strategies in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25535736

  16. Stress-activated protein kinase-mediated down-regulation of the cell integrity pathway mitogen-activated protein kinase Pmk1p by protein phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2007-11-01

    Fission yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p is involved in morphogenesis, cytokinesis, and ion homeostasis as part of the cell integrity pathway, and it becomes activated under multiple stresses, including hyper- or hypotonic conditions, glucose deprivation, cell wall-damaging compounds, and oxidative stress. The only protein phosphatase known to dephosphorylate and inactivate Pmk1p is Pmp1p. We show here that the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway and its main effector, Sty1p MAPK, are essential for proper deactivation of Pmk1p under hypertonic stress in a process regulated by Atf1p transcription factor. We demonstrate that tyrosine phosphatases Pyp1p and Pyp2p, and serine/threonine phosphatase Ptc1p, that negatively regulate Sty1p activity and whose expression is dependent on Sty1p-Atf1p function, are involved in Pmk1p dephosphorylation under osmostress. Pyp1p and Ptc1p, in addition to Pmp1p, also control the basal level of MAPK Pmk1p activity in growing cells and associate with, and dephosphorylate Pmk1p both in vitro and in vivo. Our results with Ptc1p provide the first biochemical evidence for a PP2C-type phosphatase acting on more than one MAPK in yeast cells. Importantly, the SAPK-dependent down-regulation of Pmk1p through Pyp1p, Pyp2p, and Ptc1p was not complete, and Pyp1p and Ptc1p phosphatases are able to negatively regulate MAPK Pmk1p activity by an alternative regulatory mechanism. Our data also indicate that Pmk1p phosphorylation oscillates as a function of the cell cycle, peaking at cell separation during cytokinesis, and that Pmp1p phosphatase plays a main role in regulating this process.

  17. Stress-activated Protein Kinase-mediated Down-Regulation of the Cell Integrity Pathway Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pmk1p by Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Madrid, Marisa; Núñez, Andrés; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Cansado, José

    2007-01-01

    Fission yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p is involved in morphogenesis, cytokinesis, and ion homeostasis as part of the cell integrity pathway, and it becomes activated under multiple stresses, including hyper- or hypotonic conditions, glucose deprivation, cell wall-damaging compounds, and oxidative stress. The only protein phosphatase known to dephosphorylate and inactivate Pmk1p is Pmp1p. We show here that the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway and its main effector, Sty1p MAPK, are essential for proper deactivation of Pmk1p under hypertonic stress in a process regulated by Atf1p transcription factor. We demonstrate that tyrosine phosphatases Pyp1p and Pyp2p, and serine/threonine phosphatase Ptc1p, that negatively regulate Sty1p activity and whose expression is dependent on Sty1p-Atf1p function, are involved in Pmk1p dephosphorylation under osmostress. Pyp1p and Ptc1p, in addition to Pmp1p, also control the basal level of MAPK Pmk1p activity in growing cells and associate with, and dephosphorylate Pmk1p both in vitro and in vivo. Our results with Ptc1p provide the first biochemical evidence for a PP2C-type phosphatase acting on more than one MAPK in yeast cells. Importantly, the SAPK-dependent down-regulation of Pmk1p through Pyp1p, Pyp2p, and Ptc1p was not complete, and Pyp1p and Ptc1p phosphatases are able to negatively regulate MAPK Pmk1p activity by an alternative regulatory mechanism. Our data also indicate that Pmk1p phosphorylation oscillates as a function of the cell cycle, peaking at cell separation during cytokinesis, and that Pmp1p phosphatase plays a main role in regulating this process. PMID:17761528

  18. Proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingxin; Zhang, Wei; Kho, Yoonjung; Zhao, Yingming

    2004-04-01

    Efficient methods for profiling proteins integral to the plasma membrane are highly desirable for the identification of overexpressed proteins in disease cells. Such methods will aid in both understanding basic biological processes and discovering protein targets for the design of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Avoiding contamination by subcellular organelles and cytosolic proteins is crucial to the successful proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins. Here we report a biotin-directed affinity purification (BDAP) method for the preparation of integral plasma membrane proteins, which involves (1) biotinylation of cell surface membrane proteins in viable cells, (2) affinity enrichment using streptavidin beads, and (3) depletion of plasma membrane-associated cytosolic proteins by harsh washes with high-salt and high-pH buffers. The integral plasma membrane proteins are then extracted and subjected to SDS-PAGE separation and HPLC/MS/MS for protein identification. We used the BDAP method to prepare integral plasma membrane proteins from a human lung cancer cell line. Western blotting analysis showed that the preparation was almost completely devoid of actin, a major cytosolic protein. Nano-HPLC/MS/MS analysis of only 30 microg of protein extracted from the affinity-enriched integral plasma membrane preparation led to the identification of 898 unique proteins, of which 781 were annotated with regard to their plasma membrane localization. Among the annotated proteins, at least 526 (67.3%) were integral plasma membrane proteins. Notable among them were 62 prenylated proteins and 45 Ras family proteins. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive proteomic analysis of integral plasma membrane proteins in mammalian cells to date. Given the importance of integral membrane proteins for drug design, the described approach will expedite the characterization of plasma membrane subproteomes and the discovery of plasma membrane protein drug targets.

  19. Cutting Edge: Regulation of Exosome Secretion by the Integral MAL Protein in T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Martínez-Alonso, Emma; Antón, Olga M; Guerra, Milagros; Martínez-Menárguez, José Angel; Andrés, Germán; Alonso, Miguel A

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes secreted by T cells play an important role in coordinating the immune response. HIV-1 Nef hijacks the route of exosome secretion of T cells to modulate the functioning of uninfected cells. Despite the importance of the process, the protein machinery involved in exosome biogenesis is yet to be identified. In this study, we show that MAL, a tetraspanning membrane protein expressed in human T cells, is present in endosomes that travel toward the plasma membrane for exosome secretion. In the absence of MAL, the release of exosome particles and markers was greatly impaired. This effect was accompanied by protein sorting defects at multivesicular endosomes that divert the exosomal marker CD63 to autophagic vacuoles. Exosome release induced by HIV-1 Nef was also dependent on MAL expression. Therefore, MAL is a critical element of the machinery for exosome secretion and may constitute a target for modulating exosome secretion by human T cells.

  20. Integration of cell line and process development to overcome the challenge of a difficult to express protein.

    PubMed

    Alves, Christina S; Gilbert, Alan; Dalvi, Swati; St Germain, Bryan; Xie, Wenqi; Estes, Scott; Kshirsagar, Rashmi; Ryll, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This case study addresses the difficulty in achieving high level expression and production of a small, very positively charged recombinant protein. The novel challenges with this protein include the protein's adherence to the cell surface and its inhibitory effects on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell growth. To overcome these challenges, we utilized a multi-prong approach. We identified dextran sulfate as a way to simultaneously extract the protein from the cell surface and boost cellular productivity. In addition, host cells were adapted to grow in the presence of this protein to improve growth and production characteristics. To achieve an increase in productivity, new cell lines from three different CHO host lines were created and evaluated in parallel with new process development workflows. Instead of a traditional screen of only four to six cell lines in bioreactors, over 130 cell lines were screened by utilization of 15 mL automated bioreactors (AMBR) in an optimal production process specifically developed for this protein. Using the automation, far less manual intervention is required than in traditional bench-top bioreactors, and much more control is achieved than typical plate or shake flask based screens. By utilizing an integrated cell line and process development incorporating medium optimized for this protein, we were able to increase titer more than 10-fold while obtaining desirable product quality. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to predict the optimal number of cell lines to screen in future cell line development work with the goal of systematically increasing titer through enhanced cell line screening.

  1. Dengue virus NS1 protein activates cells via Toll-like receptor 4 and disrupts endothelial cell monolayer integrity.

    PubMed

    Modhiran, Naphak; Watterson, Daniel; Muller, David A; Panetta, Adele K; Sester, David P; Liu, Lidong; Hume, David A; Stacey, Katryn J; Young, Paul R

    2015-09-09

    Complications arising from dengue virus infection include potentially fatal vascular leak, and severe disease has been linked with excessive immune cell activation. An understanding of the triggers of this activation is critical for the development of appropriately targeted disease control strategies. We show here that the secreted form of the dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). Highly purified NS1 devoid of bacterial endotoxin activity directly activated mouse macrophages and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), leading to the induction and release of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In an in vitro model of vascular leak, treatment with NS1 alone resulted in the disruption of endothelial cell monolayer integrity. Both NS1-mediated activation of PBMCs and NS1-induced vascular leak in vitro were inhibited by a TLR4 antagonist and by anti-TLR4 antibody treatment. The importance of TLR4 activation in vivo was confirmed by the reduction in capillary leak by a TLR4 antagonist in a mouse model of dengue virus infection. These results pinpoint NS1 as a viral toxin counterpart of the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Similar to the role of LPS in septic shock, NS1 might contribute to vascular leak in dengue patients, which highlights TLR4 antagonists as a possible therapeutic option.

  2. Quantitative analysis of glycans, related genes, and proteins in two human bone marrow stromal cell lines using an integrated strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Dongliang; Pang, Xingchen; Yang, Ganglong; Deeg, H Joachim; Guan, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Altered expression of glycans is associated with cell-cell signal transduction and regulation of cell functions in the bone marrow micro-environment. Studies of this micro-environment often use two human bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS5 and HS27a, co-cultured with myeloid cells. We hypothesized that differential protein glycosylation between these two cell lines may contribute to functional differences in in vitro co-culture models. In this study, we applied an integrated strategy using genomic, proteomic, and functional glycomic techniques for global expression profiling of N-glycans and their related genes and enzymes in HS5 cells versus HS27a cells. HS5 cells had significantly enhanced levels of bisecting N-glycans (catalyzed by MGAT3 [β-1,4-mannosyl-glycoprotein 4-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase]), whereas HS27a cells had enhanced levels of Galβ1,4GlcNAc (catalyzed by β4GalT1 [β4-galactosyltransferase I]). This integrated strategy provides useful information regarding the functional roles of glycans and their related glycogenes and glycosyltransferases in the bone marrow microenvironment, and a basis for future studies of crosstalk among stromal cells and myeloma cells in co-culture.

  3. The actin-related protein Sac1 is required for morphogenesis and cell wall integrity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Yu, Qilin; Jia, Chang; Wang, Yuzhou; Xiao, Chenpeng; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Wang, Lei; Li, Mingchun

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a common pathogenic fungus and has aroused widespread attention recently. Actin cytoskeleton, an important player in polarized growth, protein secretion and organization of cell shape, displays irreplaceable role in hyphal development and cell integrity. In this study, we demonstrated a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sac1, in C. albicans. It is a potential PIP phosphatase with Sac domain which is related to actin organization, hyphal development, biofilm formation and cell wall integrity. Deletion of SAC1 did not lead to insitiol-auxotroph phenotype in C. albicans, but this gene rescued the growth defect of S. cerevisiae sac1Δ in the insitiol-free medium. Hyphal induction further revealed the deficiency of sac1Δ/Δ in hyphal development and biofilm formation. Fluorescence observation and real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis suggested both actin and the hyphal cell wall protein Hwp1 were overexpressed and mislocated in this mutant. Furthermore, cell wall integrity (CWI) was largely affected by deletion of SAC1, due to the hypersensitivity to cell wall stress, changed content and distribution of chitin in the mutant. As a result, the virulence of sac1Δ/Δ was seriously attenuated. Taken together, this study provides evidence that Sac1, as a potential PIP phosphatase, is essential for actin organization, hyphal development, CWI and pathogenicity in C. albicans.

  4. Integrated single-cell analysis shows Pichia pastoris secretes protein stochastically.

    PubMed

    Love, Kerry Routenberg; Panagiotou, Vasiliki; Jiang, Bo; Stadheim, Terrance A; Love, J Christopher

    2010-06-01

    The production of heterologous proteins by secretion from cellular hosts is an important determinant for the cost of biotherapeutics. A single-cell analytical method called microengraving was used to examine the heterogeneity in secretion by the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris. We show that constitutive secretion of a human Fc fragment by P. pastoris is not cell-cycle dependent, but rather fluctuates between states of high and low productivity in a stochastic manner.

  5. Ultrasound exposure in the presence of hematoporphyrin induced loss of membrane integral proteins and inactivity of cell proliferation associated enzymes in sarcoma 180 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Pan; Mi, Na

    2008-07-01

    Ultrasonically induced effects of hematoporphyrin (HPD) on cell damage and membrane protein alteration of S180 isolated tumor cells in vitro were investigated, and the potential mechanisms of sonodynamic therapy (SDT) inhibiting tumor growth were discussed. Tumor cells suspended in air-saturated PBS (pH 7.2) were exposed to ultrasound at 1.8 MHz for up to 180s in the presence and absence of HPD. The viability of cells was determined by a trypan blue exclusion test. To estimate the damage effects of SDT on plasma membrane of tumor cells primarily, membrane integral proteins (EGFR, Ras, Fas, FasL) and cell proliferation associated enzymes (adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase) were checked with immunochemical methods. The results indicated that the intensity threshold for ultrasonically induced cell damage at 1.8 MHz was 3 W/cm2. At this condition, the expression of the integral proteins was obviously inhibited and the activity of the enzymes was decreased post ultrasound treatment in the presence of 20 microg/ml HPD. Loss of the membrane proteins and inactivity of AC and GC post SDT was time-dependent. This paper reveals SDT can cause the loss of tumor cell membrane integral proteins and inactivity of the enzymes associated with cell proliferation which might be attributed to a sonochemical activation mechanism. The mechanisms by that tumor growth is inhibited by SDT can be understood as that the growth signaling pathway is partially interdicted and the resistance of tumor cells to the specifically activated immune cells is weakened.

  6. Use of granzyme B-based fluorescent protein reporters to monitor granzyme distribution and granule integrity in live cells.

    PubMed

    Bird, Catherina H; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Harper, Ian; Prescott, Mark; Bird, Phillip I

    2010-08-01

    Reporter proteins comprising granzyme B (GrB) fused to eGFP, ecliptic pHluorin or mCherry, were generated and used to study granule (lysosome) distribution and properties in COS-1 cells and natural killer cells. The reporters resembled native GrB in biosynthesis and localization, and accumulated in granules. In live cells both the eGFP and pHluorin reporters were dark in lysosomes, but fluoresced when the granule integrity or pH was perturbed by Leu-Leu methyl ester, hydrogen peroxide, naphthazarin, or sphingosine treatment. By contrast, fluorescence of the mCherry reporter was not pH-dependent. The quenching of eGFP within granules indicates that this commonly-used fluorescent protein is not appropriate as a vital intra-lysosomal marker.

  7. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    SciTech Connect

    FLANAGAN,J.M.; BEWLEY,M.C.

    2001-12-03

    /or misfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  8. PROTEIN QUALITY CONTROL IN BACTERIAL CELLS: INTEGRATED NETWORKS OF CHAPERONES AND ATP-DEPENDENT PROTEASES.

    SciTech Connect

    FLANAGAN,J.M.BEWLEY,M.C.

    2002-10-01

    aggregation and/or mislfolding. Thus it is not surprising that, in cells, the protein folding process is error prone and organisms have evolved ''editing'' or quality control (QC) systems to assist in the folding, maintenance and, when necessary, selective removal of damaged proteins. In fact, there is growing evidence that failure of these QC-systems contributes to a number of disease states (5-8). This chapter describes our current understanding of the nature and mechanisms of the protein quality control systems in the cytosol of bacteria. Parallel systems are exploited in the cytosol and mitochondria of eukaryotes to prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  9. Role of Protein Glycosylation in Candida parapsilosis Cell Wall Integrity and Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Luis A.; Csonka, Katalin; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Estrada-Mata, Eine; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; Németh, Tibor; López-Ramírez, Luz A.; Toth, Renata; López, Mercedes G.; Vizler, Csaba; Marton, Annamaria; Tóth, Adél; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Gácser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is an important, emerging opportunistic fungal pathogen. Highly mannosylated fungal cell wall proteins are initial contact points with host immune systems. In Candida albicans, Och1 is a Golgi α1,6-mannosyltransferase that plays a key role in the elaboration of the N-linked mannan outer chain. Here, we disrupted C. parapsilosis OCH1 to gain insights into the contribution of N-linked mannosylation to cell fitness and to interactions with immune cells. Loss of Och1 in C. parapsilosis resulted in cellular aggregation, failure of morphogenesis, enhanced susceptibility to cell wall perturbing agents and defects in wall composition. We removed the cell wall O-linked mannans by β-elimination, and assessed the relevance of mannans during interaction with human monocytes. Results indicated that O-linked mannans are important for IL-1β stimulation in a dectin-1 and TLR4-dependent pathway; whereas both, N- and O-linked mannans are equally important ligands for TNFα and IL-6 stimulation, but neither is involved in IL-10 production. Furthermore, mice infected with C. parapsilosis och1Δ null mutant cells had significantly lower fungal burdens compared to wild-type (WT)-challenged counterparts. Therefore, our data are the first to demonstrate that C. parapsilosis N- and O-linked mannans have different roles in host interactions than those reported for C. albicans. PMID:27014229

  10. Live-cell and super-resolution imaging reveal that the distribution of wall-associated protein A is correlated with the cell chain integrity of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Liu, Z; Zhang, Y; Su, Q P; Xue, B; Shao, S; Zhu, Y; Xu, X; Wei, S; Sun, Y

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a primary pathogen responsible for dental caries. It has an outstanding ability to form biofilm, which is vital for virulence. Previous studies have shown that knockout of Wall-associated protein A (WapA) affects cell chain and biofilm formation of S. mutans. As a surface protein, the distribution of WapA remains unknown, but it is important to understand the mechanism underlying the function of WapA. This study applied the fluorescence protein mCherry as a reporter gene to characterize the dynamic distribution of WapA in S. mutans via time-lapse and super-resolution fluorescence imaging. The results revealed interesting subcellular distribution patterns of WapA in single, dividing and long chains of S. mutans cells. It appears at the middle of the cell and moves to the poles as the cell grows and divides. In a cell chain, after each round of cell division, such dynamic relocation results in WapA distribution at the previous cell division sites, resulting in a pattern where WapA is located at the boundary of two adjacent cell pairs. This WapA distribution pattern corresponds to the breaking segmentation of wapA deletion cell chains. The dynamic relocation of WapA through the cell cycle increases our understanding of the mechanism of WapA in maintaining cell chain integrity and biofilm formation.

  11. HNdb: an integrated database of gene and protein information on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Henrique, Tiago; José Freitas da Silveira, Nelson; Henrique Cunha Volpato, Arthur; Mioto, Mayra Mataruco; Carolina Buzzo Stefanini, Ana; Bachir Fares, Adil; Gustavo da Silva Castro Andrade, João; Masson, Carolina; Verónica Mendoza López, Rossana; Daumas Nunes, Fabio; Paulo Kowalski, Luis; Severino, Patricia; Tajara, Eloiza Helena

    2016-01-01

    The total amount of scientific literature has grown rapidly in recent years. Specifically, there are several million citations in the field of cancer. This makes it difficult, if not impossible, to manually retrieve relevant information on the mechanisms that govern tumor behavior or the neoplastic process. Furthermore, cancer is a complex disease or, more accurately, a set of diseases. The heterogeneity that permeates many tumors is particularly evident in head and neck (HN) cancer, one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. In this study, we present HNdb, a free database that aims to provide a unified and comprehensive resource of information on genes and proteins involved in HN squamous cell carcinoma, covering data on genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, literature citations and also cross-references of external databases. Different literature searches of MEDLINE abstracts were performed using specific Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms) for oral, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas. A curated gene-to-publication assignment yielded a total of 1370 genes related to HN cancer. The diversity of results allowed identifying novel and mostly unexplored gene associations, revealing, for example, that processes linked to response to steroid hormone stimulus are significantly enriched in genes related to HN carcinomas. Thus, our database expands the possibilities for gene networks investigation, providing potential hypothesis to be tested. Database URL: http://www.gencapo.famerp.br/hndb PMID:27013077

  12. The F-box protein Fbp1 functions in the invasive growth and cell wall integrity mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Rojas, Cristina; Hera, Concepcion

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins determine substrate specificity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous work has demonstrated that the F-box protein Fbp1, a component of the SCF(Fbp1) E3 ligase complex, is essential for invasive growth and virulence of the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. Here, we show that, in addition to invasive growth, Fbp1 also contributes to vegetative hyphal fusion and fungal adhesion to tomato roots. All of these functions have been shown previously to require the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fmk1. We found that Fbp1 is required for full phosphorylation of Fmk1, indicating that Fbp1 regulates virulence and invasive growth via the Fmk1 pathway. Moreover, the Δfbp1 mutant is hypersensitive to sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and calcofluor white (CFW) and shows reduced phosphorylation levels of the cell wall integrity MAPK Mpk1 after SDS treatment. Collectively, these results suggest that Fbp1 contributes to both the invasive growth and cell wall integrity MAPK pathways of F. oxysporum.

  13. Integrated cell and process engineering for improved transient production of a "difficult-to-express" fusion protein by CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Johari, Yusuf B; Estes, Scott D; Alves, Christina S; Sinacore, Marty S; James, David C

    2015-12-01

    Based on an optimized electroporation protocol, we designed a rapid, milliliter-scale diagnostic transient production assay to identify limitations in the ability of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to produce a model "difficult-to-express" homodimeric Fc-fusion protein, Sp35Fc, that exhibited very low volumetric titer and intracellular formation of disulfide-bonded oligomeric aggregates post-transfection. As expression of Sp35Fc induced an unfolded protein response in transfected host cells, we utilized the transient assay to compare, in parallel, multiple functionally diverse strategies to engineer intracellular processing of Sp35Fc in order to increase production and reduce aggregation as two discrete design objectives. Specifically, we compared the effect of (i) co-expression of ER-resident molecular chaperones (BiP, PDI, CypB) or active forms of UPR transactivators (ATF6c, XBP1s) at varying recombinant gene load, (ii) addition of small molecules known to act as chemical chaperones (PBA, DMSO, glycerol, betaine, TMAO) or modulate UPR signaling (PERK inhibitor GSK2606414) at varying concentration, (iii) a reduction in culture temperature to 32°C. Using this information, we designed a biphasic, Sp35Fc-specific transient manufacturing process mediated by lipofection that utilized CypB co-expression at an optimal Sp35Fc:CypB gene ratio of 5:1 to initially maximize transfected cell proliferation, followed by addition of a combination of PBA (0.5 mM) and glycerol (1% v/v) at the onset of stationary phase to maximize cell specific production and eliminate Sp35Fc aggregation. Using this optimal, engineered process transient Sp35Fc production was significantly increased sixfold over a 12 day production process with no evidence of disulfide-bonded aggregates. Finally, transient production in clonally derived sub-populations (derived from parental CHO host) screened for a heritably improved capability to produce Sp35Fc was also significantly improved by the optimized

  14. CpsA, a LytR-CpsA-Psr Family Protein in Mycobacterium marinum, Is Required for Cell Wall Integrity and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinglan; Zhu, Lin; Jones, Victoria; Wang, Chuan; Hua, Yifei; Shi, Xujun; Feng, Xia; Jackson, Mary; Niu, Chen

    2015-01-01

    LytR-CpsA-Psr family proteins play an important role in bacterial cell wall integrity. Although the pathogenic relevance of LytR-CpsA-Psr family proteins has been studied in a few bacterial pathogens, their function in mycobacteria remains uncharacterized. In this work, a transposon insertion mutant (cpsA::Tn) of Mycobacterium marinum was studied. We found that inactivation of CpsA altered bacterial colony morphology, sliding motility, cell surface hydrophobicity, and cell wall permeability. Besides, the cpsA mutant exhibited a decreased arabinogalactan content, indicating that CpsA plays a role in cell wall assembly. Moreover, the mutant shows impaired growth within macrophage cell lines and is severely attenuated in zebrafish larvae and adult zebrafish. Taken together, our results indicated that CpsA, a previously uncharacterized protein, is important for mycobacterial cell wall integrity and is required for mycobacterial virulence. PMID:25939506

  15. Retroviral DNA Integration Directed by HIV Integration Protein in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Fujiwara, Tamio; Craigie, Robert

    1990-09-01

    Efficient retroviral growth requires integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. As a first step in analyzing the mechanism of integration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) DNA, a cell-free system was established that models the integration reaction. The in vitro system depends on the HIV integration (IN) protein, which was partially purified from insect cells engineered to express IN protein in large quantities. Integration was detected in a biological assay that scores the insertion of a linear DNA containing HIV terminal sequences into a λ DNA target. Some integration products generated in this assay contained five-base pair duplications of the target DNA at the recombination junctions, a characteristic of HIV integration in vivo; the remaining products contained aberrant junctional sequences that may have been produced in a variation of the normal reaction. These results indicate that HIV IN protein is the only viral protein required to insert model HIV DNA sequences into a target DNA in vitro.

  16. Increased expression of the integral membrane proteins EGFR and FGFR3 in anti-apoptotic Chinese hamster ovary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ohsfeldt, Erika; Huang, Szu-Han; Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Kristoffersen, Linda; Le, Thuy-My T; Li, Edwin; Hristova, Kalina; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Membrane proteins such as receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have a vital role in many cellular functions, making them potential targets for therapeutic research. In this study, we investigated the coexpression of the anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-x(L) with model membrane proteins as a means of increasing membrane protein expression in mammalian cells. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing heterologous Bcl-x(L) and wild-type CHO cells were transfected with either epidermal growth factor receptor or fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. The CHO-Bcl-x(L) cell lines showed increased expression of both RTK proteins as compared with the wild-type CHO cell lines in transient expression analysis, as detected by Western blot and flow cytometry after 15 days of antibiotic selection in stable expression pools. Increased expression was also seen in clonal isolates from the CHO-Bcl-x(L) cell lines, whereas the clonal cell line expression was minimal in wild-type CHO cell lines. Our results demonstrate that application of the anti-apoptosis gene Bcl-x(L) can increase expression of RTK proteins in CHO cells. This approach may be applied to improve stable expression of other membrane proteins in the future using mammalian cell lines with Bcl-x(L) or perhaps other anti-apoptotic genes.

  17. Integrated circuit cell library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    According to the invention, an ASIC cell library for use in creation of custom integrated circuits is disclosed. The ASIC cell library includes some first cells and some second cells. Each of the second cells includes two or more kernel cells. The ASIC cell library is at least 5% comprised of second cells. In various embodiments, the ASIC cell library could be 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, 40% or more, 50% or more, 60% or more, 70% or more, 80% or more, 90% or more, or 95% or more comprised of second cells.

  18. Actin Immobilization on Chitin for Purifying Myosin II: A Laboratory Exercise That Integrates Concepts of Molecular Cell Biology and Protein Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Souza, Marcelle Gomes; Grossi, Andre Luiz; Pereira, Elisangela Lima Bastos; da Cruz, Carolina Oliveira; Mendes, Fernanda Machado; Cameron, Luiz Claudio; Paiva, Carmen Lucia Antao

    2008-01-01

    This article presents our experience on teaching biochemical sciences through an innovative approach that integrates concepts of molecular cell biology and protein chemistry. This original laboratory exercise is based on the preparation of an affinity chromatography column containing F-actin molecules immobilized on chitin particles for purifying…

  19. Liposome chaperon in cell-free membrane protein synthesis: one-step preparation of KcsA-integrated liposomes and electrophysiological analysis by the planar bilayer method.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Akiyama, M; Okuno, D; Hirano, M; Ide, T; Sawada, S; Sasaki, Y; Akiyoshi, K

    2016-02-01

    Chaperoning functions of liposomes were investigated using cell-free membrane protein synthesis. KcsA potassium channel-reconstituted liposomes were prepared directly using cell-free protein synthesis. In the absence of liposomes, all synthesized KcsA protein aggregated. In the presence of liposomes, however, synthesized KcsA spontaneously integrated into the liposome membrane. The KscA-reconstituted liposomes were transferred to the planar bilayer across a small hole in a thin plastic sheet and the channel function of KcsA was examined. The original electrophysiological activities, such as voltage- and pH-dependence, were observed. These results suggested that in cell-free membrane protein synthesis, liposomes act as chaperones, preventing aggregation and assisting in folding and tetrameric formation, thereby allowing full channel activity.

  20. Gene induction during differentiation of human monocytes into dendritic cells: an integrated study at the RNA and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Angénieux, Catherine; Fricker, Dominique; Strub, Jean-Marc; Luche, Sylvie; Bausinger, Huguette; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Hanau, Daniel; de la Salle, Henri; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2001-01-01

    Changes in gene expression occurring during differentiation of human monoytes into dendritic cells were studied at the RNA and protein levels. These studies showed the induction of several gene classes corresponding to various biological functions. These functions encompass of course antigen processing and presentation, cytoskeleton, cell signalling and signal transduction, but also an increase of mitochondrial function and of the protein synthesis machinery, including some, but not all, chaperones. These changes put in perspective the events occurring during this differentiation process. On a more technical point, it appears that the studies carried out at the RNA and protein levels are highly complementary. PMID:11793251

  1. The importance of connections between the cell wall integrity pathway and the unfolded protein response in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Malavazi, Iran; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique; Brown, Neil Andrew

    2014-11-01

    In the external environment, or within a host organism, filamentous fungi experience sudden changes in nutrient availability, osmolality, pH, temperature and the exposure to toxic compounds. The fungal cell wall represents the first line of defense, while also performing essential roles in morphology, development and virulence. A polarized secretion system is paramount for cell wall biosynthesis, filamentous growth, nutrient acquisition and interactions with the environment. The unique ability of filamentous fungi to secrete has resulted in their industrial adoption as fungal cell factories. Protein maturation and secretion commences in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) maintains ER functionality during exposure to secretion and cell wall stress. UPR, therefore, influences secretion and cell wall homeostasis, which in turn impacts upon numerous fungal traits important to pathogenesis and biotechnology. Subsequently, this review describes the relevance of the cell wall and UPR systems to filamentous fungal pathogens or industrial microbes and then highlights interconnections between the two systems. Ultimately, the possible biotechnological applications of an enhanced understanding of such regulatory systems in combating fungal disease, or the removal of natural bottlenecks in protein secretion in an industrial setting, are discussed.

  2. Novel proteins, putative membrane transporters, and an integrated metabolic network are revealed by quantitative proteomic analysis of Arabidopsis cell culture peroxisomes.

    PubMed

    Eubel, Holger; Meyer, Etienne H; Taylor, Nicolas L; Bussell, John D; O'Toole, Nicholas; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Castleden, Ian; Small, Ian D; Smith, Steven M; Millar, A Harvey

    2008-12-01

    Peroxisomes play key roles in energy metabolism, cell signaling, and plant development. A better understanding of these important functions will be achieved with a more complete definition of the peroxisome proteome. The isolation of peroxisomes and their separation from mitochondria and other major membrane systems have been significant challenges in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) model system. In this study, we present new data on the Arabidopsis peroxisome proteome obtained using two new technical advances that have not previously been applied to studies of plant peroxisomes. First, we followed density gradient centrifugation with free-flow electrophoresis to improve the separation of peroxisomes from mitochondria. Second, we used quantitative proteomics to identify proteins enriched in the peroxisome fractions relative to mitochondrial fractions. We provide evidence for peroxisomal localization of 89 proteins, 36 of which have not previously been identified in other analyses of Arabidopsis peroxisomes. Chimeric green fluorescent protein constructs of 35 proteins have been used to confirm their localization in peroxisomes or to identify endoplasmic reticulum contaminants. The distribution of many of these peroxisomal proteins between soluble, membrane-associated, and integral membrane locations has also been determined. This core peroxisomal proteome from nonphotosynthetic cultured cells contains a proportion of proteins that cannot be predicted to be peroxisomal due to the lack of recognizable peroxisomal targeting sequence 1 (PTS1) or PTS2 signals. Proteins identified are likely to be components in peroxisome biogenesis, beta-oxidation for fatty acid degradation and hormone biosynthesis, photorespiration, and metabolite transport. A considerable number of the proteins found in peroxisomes have no known function, and potential roles of these proteins in peroxisomal metabolism are discussed. This is aided by a metabolic network analysis that reveals a

  3. An Analog-sensitive Version of the Protein Kinase Slt2 Allows Identification of Novel Targets of the Yeast Cell Wall Integrity Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Rodríguez, Esmeralda; Fernández-Piñar, Pablo; Sacristán-Reviriego, Almudena; Molina, María; Martín, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    The yeast cell wall integrity MAPK Slt2 mediates the transcriptional response to cell wall alterations through phosphorylation of transcription factors Rlm1 and SBF. However, the variety of cellular functions regulated by Slt2 suggests the existence of a significant number of still unknown substrates for this kinase. To identify novel Slt2 targets, we generated and characterized an analog-sensitive mutant of Slt2 (Slt2-as) that can be specifically inhibited by bulky kinase inhibitor analogs. We demonstrated that Slt2-as is able to use adenosine 5′-[γ-thio]triphosphate analogs to thiophosphorylate its substrates in yeast cell extracts as well as when produced as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Taking advantage of this chemical-genetic approach, we found that Slt2 phosphorylates the MAPK phosphatase Msg5 both in the N-terminal regulatory and C-terminal catalytic domains. Moreover, we identified the calcineurin regulator Rcn2, the 4E-BP (translation initiation factor eIF4E-binding protein) translation repressor protein Caf20, and the Golgi-associated adaptor Gga1 as novel targets for Slt2. The Slt2 phosphorylation sites on Rcn2 and Caf20 were determined. We also demonstrated that, in the absence of SLT2, the GGA1 paralog GGA2 is essential for cells to survive under cell wall stress and for proper protein sorting through the carboxypeptidase Y pathway. Therefore, Slt2-as provides a powerful tool that can expand our knowledge of the outputs of the cell wall integrity MAPK pathway. PMID:26786099

  4. Nitric oxide and protein S-nitrosylation are integral to hydrogen peroxide-induced leaf cell death in rice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Aihong; Wang, Yiqin; Tang, Jiuyou; Xue, Peng; Li, Chunlai; Liu, Linchuan; Hu, Bin; Yang, Fuquan; Loake, Gary J; Chu, Chengcai

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key redox-active, small molecule involved in various aspects of plant growth and development. Here, we report the identification of an NO accumulation mutant, nitric oxide excess1 (noe1), in rice (Oryza sativa), the isolation of the corresponding gene, and the analysis of its role in NO-mediated leaf cell death. Map-based cloning revealed that NOE1 encoded a rice catalase, OsCATC. Furthermore, noe1 resulted in an increase of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) in the leaves, which consequently promoted NO production via the activation of nitrate reductase. The removal of excess NO reduced cell death in both leaves and suspension cultures derived from noe1 plants, implicating NO as an important endogenous mediator of H(2)O(2)-induced leaf cell death. Reduction of intracellular S-nitrosothiol (SNO) levels, generated by overexpression of rice S-nitrosoglutathione reductase gene (GSNOR1), which regulates global levels of protein S-nitrosylation, alleviated leaf cell death in noe1 plants. Thus, S-nitrosylation was also involved in light-dependent leaf cell death in noe1. Utilizing the biotin-switch assay, nanoliquid chromatography, and tandem mass spectrometry, S-nitrosylated proteins were identified in both wild-type and noe1 plants. NO targets identified only in noe1 plants included glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and thioredoxin, which have been reported to be involved in S-nitrosylation-regulated cell death in animals. Collectively, our data suggest that both NO and SNOs are important mediators in the process of H(2)O(2)-induced leaf cell death in rice.

  5. A small heat shock protein enables Escherichia coli to grow at a lethal temperature of 50°C conceivably by maintaining cell envelope integrity.

    PubMed

    Ezemaduka, Anastasia N; Yu, Jiayu; Shi, Xiaodong; Zhang, Kaiming; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Fu, Xinmiao; Chang, Zengyi

    2014-06-01

    It is essential for organisms to adapt to fluctuating growth temperatures. Escherichia coli, a model bacterium commonly used in research and industry, has been reported to grow at a temperature lower than 46.5°C. Here we report that the heterologous expression of the 17-kDa small heat shock protein from the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CeHSP17, enables E. coli cells to grow at 50°C, which is their highest growth temperature ever reported. Strikingly, CeHSP17 also rescues the thermal lethality of an E. coli mutant deficient in degP, which encodes a protein quality control factor localized in the periplasmic space. Mechanistically, we show that CeHSP17 is partially localized in the periplasmic space and associated with the inner membrane of E. coli, and it helps to maintain the cell envelope integrity of the E. coli cells at the lethal temperatures. Together, our data indicate that maintaining the cell envelope integrity is crucial for the E. coli cells to grow at high temperatures and also shed new light on the development of thermophilic bacteria for industrial application.

  6. APRIN is a cell cycle specific BRCA2-interacting protein required for genome integrity and a predictor of outcome after chemotherapy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Rachel; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Vatcheva, Radost; Natrajan, Rachael; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA2 confer an increased risk of cancer development, at least in part because the BRCA2 protein is required for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here, we use proteomic profiling to identify APRIN (PDS5B), a cohesion-associated protein, as a BRCA2-associated protein. After exposure of cells to hydroxyurea or aphidicolin, APRIN and other cohesin components associate with BRCA2 in early S-phase. We demonstrate that APRIN expression is required for the normal response to DNA-damaging agents, the nuclear localisation of RAD51 and BRCA2 and efficient homologous recombination. The clinical significance of these findings is indicated by the observation that the BRCA2/APRIN interaction is compromised by BRCA2 missense variants of previously unknown significance and that APRIN expression levels are associated with histological grade in breast cancer and the outcome of breast cancer patients treated with DNA-damaging chemotherapy. PMID:22293751

  7. Integrated proteomic and N-glycoproteomic analyses of doxorubicin sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cells reveal glycoprotein alteration in protein abundance and glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yanlong; Wei, Shasha; Hou, Junjie; Zhang, Chengqian; Xue, Peng; Wang, Jifeng; Chen, Xiulan; Guo, Xiaojing; Yang, Fuquan

    2017-01-06

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common cancer among women in the world, and chemotherapy remains the principal treatment for patients. However, drug resistance is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancers and the underlying mechanism is not clear. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of drug resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics and diagnostic. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of the doxorubicin sensitive OVCAR8 cells and its doxorubicin-resistant variant NCI/ADR-RES cells using integrated global proteomics and N-glycoproteomics. A total of 1525 unique N-glycosite-containing peptides from 740 N-glycoproteins were identified and quantified, of which 253 N-glycosite-containing peptides showed significant change in the NCI/ADR-RES cells. Meanwhile, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) based comparative proteomic analysis of the two ovarian cancer cells led to the quantification of 5509 proteins. As about 50% of the identified N-glycoproteins are low-abundance membrane proteins, only 44% of quantified unique N-glycosite-containing peptides had corresponding protein expression ratios. The comparison and calibration of the N-glycoproteome versus the proteome classified 14 change patterns of N-glycosite-containing peptides, including 8 up-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the increased glycosylation sites occupancy, 35 up-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the unchanged glycosylation sites occupancy, 2 down-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the decreased glycosylation sites occupancy, 46 down-regulated N-glycosite-containing peptides with the unchanged glycosylation sites occupancy. Integrated proteomic and N-glycoproteomic analyses provide new insights, which can help to unravel the relationship of N-glycosylation and multidrug resistance (MDR), understand the mechanism of MDR, and discover the new diagnostic and

  8. Integrative proteomics and tissue microarray profiling indicate the association between overexpressed serum proteins and non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yansheng; Luo, Xiaoyang; Hu, Haichuan; Wang, Rui; Sun, Yihua; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA) and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases.

  9. A novel specificity protein 1 (SP1)-like gene regulating protein kinase C-1 (Pkc1)-dependent cell wall integrity and virulence factors in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Adler, Amos; Park, Yoon-Dong; Larsen, Peter; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Wollenberg, Kurt; Qiu, Jin; Myers, Timothy G; Williamson, Peter R

    2011-06-10

    Eukaryotic cells utilize complex signaling systems to detect their environments, responding and adapting as new conditions arise during evolution. The basidiomycete fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is a leading cause of AIDS-related death worldwide and utilizes the calcineurin and protein kinase C-1 (Pkc1) signaling pathways for host adaptation and expression of virulence. In the present studies, a C-terminal zinc finger transcription factor, homologous both to the calcineurin-responsive zinc fingers (Crz1) of ascomycetes and to the Pkc1-dependent specificity protein-1 (Sp1) transcription factors of metazoans, was identified and named SP1 because of its greater similarity to the metazoan factors. Structurally, the Cryptococcus neoformans Sp1 (Cn Sp1) protein was found to have acquired an additional zinc finger motif from that of Crz1 and showed Pkc1-dependent phosphorylation, nuclear localization, and whole genome epistatic associations under starvation conditions. Transcriptional targets of Cn Sp1 shared functional similarities with Crz1 factors, such as cell wall synthesis, but gained the regulation of processes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, including trehalose metabolism, and lost others, such as the induction of autophagy. In addition, overexpression of Cn Sp1 in a pkc1Δ mutant showed restoration of altered phenotypes involved in virulence, including cell wall stability, nitrosative stress, and extracellular capsule production. Cn Sp1 was also found to be important for virulence of the fungus using a mouse model. In summary, these data suggest an evolutionary shift in C-terminal zinc finger proteins during fungal evolution, transforming them from calcineurin-dependent to PKC1-dependent transcription factors, helping to shape the role of fungal pathogenesis of C. neoformans.

  10. Rga4 modulates the activity of the fission yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway by acting as a Rho2 GTPase-activating protein.

    PubMed

    Soto, Teresa; Villar-Tajadura, Maria Antonia; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente, Jero; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar; Cansado, José

    2010-04-09

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are responsible for the inactivation of Rho GTPases, which are involved in the regulation of critical biological responses in eukaryotic cells, ranging from cell cycle control to cellular morphogenesis. The genome of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains six genes coding for putative Rho GTPases, whereas nine genes code for predicted Rho GAPs (Rga1 to Rga9). One of them, Rga4, has been recently described as a Cdc42 GAP, involved in the control of cell diameter and symmetry in fission yeast. In this work we show that Rga4 is also a Rho2 GAP that negatively modulates the activity of the cell integrity pathway and its main effector, MAPK Pmk1. The DYRK-type protein kinase Pom1, which regulates both the localization and phosphorylation state of Rga4, is also a negative regulator of the Pmk1 pathway, but this control is not dependent upon the Rga4 role as a Rho2-GAP. Hence, two subsets of Rga4 negatively regulate Cdc42 and Rho2 functions in a specific and unrelated way. Finally, we show that Rga7, another Rho2 GAP, down-regulates the Pmk1 pathway in addition to Rga4. These results reinforce the notion of the existence of complex mechanisms determining the selectivity of Rho GAPs toward Rho GTPases and their functions.

  11. Label-free study of the function of ion channel protein on a microfluidic optical sensor integrated with artificial cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Tang, Yanyan; Zhang, Ling; Wu, Jianmin

    2014-01-21

    A label-free optical sensor was constructed by integrating pH sensing material and supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) in a microfluidic chip. The pH sensing material was composed of a double layer structure consisting of chitosan hydrogel and electrochemically etched porous silicon. The pH change in the microchip could induce a reversible swelling of the chitosan hydrogel layer and consequently caused a shift in effective optical thickness (EOT) of the double layer, which could be observed by Fourier transformed reflectometric interference spectroscopy (FT-RIS). After phospholipid bilayers (PLBs) were self-assembled on the sensing layer, the EOT almost remained constant during the cycling of pH from 7.4 to 6.2, indicating the blockage of H(+) translocation by the PLBs. For studying the behavior of ion channel protein, gramicidin A, a typical ion channel protein, was inserted in the SPBs for mimicking the ion transportation function of cell membrane. Due to the H(+) transportation capability of gramicidin A, the optical response to pH change could partially recover. In the presence of Ca(2+), the pore of the ion channel protein was blocked, causing a significant decrease in the EOT response upon pH change. The bio-functionalized microfluidic sensor fabricated in this work will provide a reliable platform for studying the function of ion channel protein, which is an important class of drug targets.

  12. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  13. Fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Daniel Aaron; Melikov, Rustamzhon; Conkar, Deniz; Nur Firat-Karalar, Elif; Nizamoglu, Sedat

    2016-11-01

    The usage time of displays (e.g., TVs, mobile phones, etc) is in general shorter than their functional life time, which worsens the electronic waste (e-waste) problem around the world. The integration of biomaterials into electronics can help to reduce the e-waste problem. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescent protein integrated white LEDs to use as a backlight source for liquid crystal (LC) displays for the first time. We express and purify enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and monomeric Cherry protein (mCherry), and afterward we integrate these proteins as a wavelength-converter on a blue LED chip. The protein-integrated backlight exhibits a high luminous efficacy of 248 lm/Wopt and the area of the gamut covers 80% of the NTSC color gamut. The resultant colors and objects in the image on the display can be well observed and distinguished. Therefore, fluorescent proteins show promise for display applications.

  14. The Arabidopsis Lipid Transfer Protein 2 (AtLTP2) Is Involved in Cuticle-Cell Wall Interface Integrity and in Etiolated Hypocotyl Permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacq, Adélaïde; Pernot, Clémentine; Martinez, Yves; Domergue, Frédéric; Payré, Bruno; Jamet, Elisabeth; Burlat, Vincent; Pacquit, Valérie B

    2017-01-01

    Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) belong to a complex multigenic family implicated in diverse physiological processes. However, their function and mode of action remain unclear probably because of functional redundancy. Among the different roles proposed for nsLTPs, it has long been suggested that they could transport cuticular precursor across the cell wall during the formation of the cuticle, which constitutes the first physical barrier for plant interactions with their aerial environment. Here, we took advantage of the Arabidopsis thaliana etiolated hypocotyl model in which AtLTP2 was previously identified as the unique and abundant nsLTP member in the cell wall proteome, to investigate its function. AtLTP2 expression was restricted to epidermal cells of aerial organs, in agreement with the place of cuticle deposition. Furthermore, transient AtLTP2-TagRFP over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells resulted in its localization to the cell wall, as expected, but surprisingly also to the plastids, indicating an original dual trafficking for a nsLTP. Remarkably, in etiolated hypocotyls, the atltp2-1 mutant displayed modifications in cuticle permeability together with a disorganized ultra-structure at the cuticle-cell wall interface completely recovered in complemented lines, whereas only slight differences in cuticular composition were observed. Thus, AtLTP2 may not play the historical purported nsLTP shuttling role across the cell wall, but we rather hypothesize that AtLTP2 could play a major structural role by maintaining the integrity of the adhesion between the mainly hydrophobic cuticle and the hydrophilic underlying cell wall. Altogether, these results gave new insights into nsLTP functions.

  15. The Arabidopsis Lipid Transfer Protein 2 (AtLTP2) Is Involved in Cuticle-Cell Wall Interface Integrity and in Etiolated Hypocotyl Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, Adélaïde; Pernot, Clémentine; Martinez, Yves; Domergue, Frédéric; Payré, Bruno; Jamet, Elisabeth; Burlat, Vincent; Pacquit, Valérie B.

    2017-01-01

    Plant non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) belong to a complex multigenic family implicated in diverse physiological processes. However, their function and mode of action remain unclear probably because of functional redundancy. Among the different roles proposed for nsLTPs, it has long been suggested that they could transport cuticular precursor across the cell wall during the formation of the cuticle, which constitutes the first physical barrier for plant interactions with their aerial environment. Here, we took advantage of the Arabidopsis thaliana etiolated hypocotyl model in which AtLTP2 was previously identified as the unique and abundant nsLTP member in the cell wall proteome, to investigate its function. AtLTP2 expression was restricted to epidermal cells of aerial organs, in agreement with the place of cuticle deposition. Furthermore, transient AtLTP2-TagRFP over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf epidermal cells resulted in its localization to the cell wall, as expected, but surprisingly also to the plastids, indicating an original dual trafficking for a nsLTP. Remarkably, in etiolated hypocotyls, the atltp2-1 mutant displayed modifications in cuticle permeability together with a disorganized ultra-structure at the cuticle-cell wall interface completely recovered in complemented lines, whereas only slight differences in cuticular composition were observed. Thus, AtLTP2 may not play the historical purported nsLTP shuttling role across the cell wall, but we rather hypothesize that AtLTP2 could play a major structural role by maintaining the integrity of the adhesion between the mainly hydrophobic cuticle and the hydrophilic underlying cell wall. Altogether, these results gave new insights into nsLTP functions. PMID:28289427

  16. Pkh1 and Pkh2 Differentially Phosphorylate and Activate Ypk1 and Ykr2 and Define Protein Kinase Modules Required for Maintenance of Cell Wall Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Roelants, Françoise M.; Torrance, Pamela D.; Bezman, Natalie; Thorner, Jeremy

    2002-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pkh1 and Pkh2 are functionally redundant homologs of mammalian protein kinase, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1. They activate two closely related, functionally redundant enzymes, Ypk1 and Ykr2 (homologs of mammalian protein kinase, serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase). We found that Ypk1 has a more prominent role than Ykr2 in mediating their shared essential function. Considerable evidence demonstrated that Pkh1 preferentially activates Ypk1, whereas Pkh2 preferentially activates Ykr2. Loss of Pkh1 (but not Pkh2) reduced Ypk1 activity; conversely, Pkh1 overexpression increased Ypk1 activity more than Pkh2 overexpression. Loss of Pkh2 reduced Ykr2 activity; correspondingly, Pkh2 overexpression increased Ykr2 activity more than Pkh1 overexpression. When overexpressed, a catalytically active C-terminal fragment (kinase domain) of Ypk1 was growth inhibitory; loss of Pkh1 (but not Pkh2) alleviated toxicity. Loss of Pkh2 (but not Pkh1) exacerbated the slow growth phenotype of a ypk1Δ strain. This Pkh1-Ypk1 and Pkh2-Ykr2 dichotomy is not absolute because all double mutants (pkh1Δ ypk1Δ, pkh2Δ ypk1Δ, pkh1Δ ykr2Δ, and pkh2Δ ykr2Δ) were viable. Compartmentation contributes to selectivity because Pkh1 and Ypk1 were located exclusively in the cytosol, whereas Pkh2 and Ykr2 entered the nucleus. At restrictive temperature, ypk1-1ts ykr2Δ cells lysed rapidly, but not in medium containing osmotic support. Dosage and extragenic suppressors were selected. Overexpression of Exg1 (major exoglucanase), or loss of Kex2 (endoprotease involved in Exg1 processing), rescued growth at high temperature. Viability was also maintained by PKC1 overexpression or an activated allele of the downstream protein kinase (BCK1-20). Conversely, absence of Mpk1 (distal mitogen-activated protein kinase of the PKC1 pathway) was lethal in ypk1-1ts ykr2Δ cells. Thus, Pkh1-Ypk1 and Pkh2-Ykr2 function in a novel pathway for cell wall integrity that

  17. Disruption of the ESX-5 system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis causes loss of PPE protein secretion, reduction of cell wall integrity and strong attenuation.

    PubMed

    Bottai, Daria; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Majlessi, Laleh; Frigui, Wafa; Simeone, Roxane; Sayes, Fadel; Bitter, Wilbert; Brennan, Michael J; Leclerc, Claude; Batoni, Giovanna; Campa, Mario; Brosch, Roland; Esin, Semih

    2012-03-01

    The chromosome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes five type VII secretion systems (ESX-1-ESX-5). While the role of the ESX-1 and ESX-3 systems in M. tuberculosis has been elucidated, predictions for the function of the ESX-5 system came from data obtained in Mycobacterium marinum, where it transports PPE and PE_PGRS proteins and modulates innate immune responses. To define the role of the ESX-5 system in M. tuberculosis, in this study, we have constructed five M. tuberculosis H37Rv ESX-5 knockout/deletion mutants, inactivating eccA(5), eccD(5), rv1794 and esxM genes or the ppe25-pe19 region. Whereas the Mtbrv1794ko displayed no obvious phenotype, the other four mutants showed defects in secretion of the ESX-5-encoded EsxN and PPE41, a representative member of the large PPE protein family. Strikingly, the MtbeccD(5) ko mutant also showed enhanced sensitivity to detergents and hydrophilic antibiotics. When the virulence of the five mutants was evaluated, the MtbeccD(5) ko and MtbΔppe25-pe19 mutants were found attenuated both in macrophages and in the severe combined immune-deficient mouse infection model. Altogether these findings indicate an essential role of ESX-5 for transport of PPE proteins, cell wall integrity and full virulence of M. tuberculosis, thereby opening interesting new perspectives for the study of this human pathogen.

  18. Bruton's tyrosine kinase--an integral protein of B cell development that also has an essential role in the innate immune system.

    PubMed

    López-Herrera, Gabriela; Vargas-Hernández, Alexander; González-Serrano, Maria Edith; Berrón-Ruiz, Laura; Rodríguez-Alba, Juan Carlos; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo

    2014-02-01

    Btk is the protein affected in XLA, a disease identified as a B cell differentiation defect. Btk is crucial for B cell differentiation and activation, but its role in other cells is not fully understood. This review focuses on the function of Btk in monocytes, neutrophils, and platelets and the receptors and signaling cascades in such cells with which Btk is associated.

  19. Integrated system for extraction, purification, and digestion of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiying; Yan, Guoquan; Gao, Mingxia; Deng, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2016-05-01

    An integrated system was developed for directly processing living cells into peptides of membrane proteins. Living cells were directly injected into the system and cracked in a capillary column by ultrasonic treatment. Owing to hydrophilicity for broken pieces of the cell membrane, the obtained membranes were retained in a well-designed bi-filter. While cytoplasm proteins were eluted from the bi-filter, the membranes were dissolved and protein released by flushing 4% SDS buffer through the bi-filter. The membrane proteins were subsequently transferred into a micro-reactor and covalently bound in the reactor for purification and digestion. As the system greatly simplified the whole pretreatment processes and minimized both sample loss and contamination, it could be used to analyze the membrane proteome samples of thousand-cell-scales with acceptable reliability and stability. We totally identified 1348 proteins from 5000 HepG2 cells, 615 of which were annotated as membrane proteins. In contrast, with conventional method, only 233 membrane proteins were identified. It is adequately demonstrated that the integrated system shows promising practicability for the membrane proteome analysis of small amount of cells.

  20. FET proteins regulate lifespan and neuronal integrity

    PubMed Central

    Therrien, Martine; Rouleau, Guy A.; Dion, Patrick A.; Parker, J. Alex

    2016-01-01

    The FET protein family includes FUS, EWS and TAF15 proteins, all of which have been linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons. Here, we show that a reduction of FET proteins in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans causes synaptic dysfunction accompanied by impaired motor phenotypes. FET proteins are also involved in the regulation of lifespan and stress resistance, acting partially through the insulin/IGF-signalling pathway. We propose that FET proteins are involved in the maintenance of lifespan, cellular stress resistance and neuronal integrity. PMID:27117089

  1. Membrane stiffness is modified by integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Philip W; Hélie, Jean; Duncan, Anna; Chavent, Matthieu; Koldsø, Heidi; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-09-20

    The ease with which a cell membrane can bend and deform is important for a wide range of biological functions. Peripheral proteins that induce curvature in membranes (e.g. BAR domains) have been studied for a number of years. Little is known, however, about the effect of integral membrane proteins on the stiffness of a membrane (characterised by the bending rigidity, Kc). We demonstrate by computer simulation that adding integral membrane proteins at physiological densities alters the stiffness of the membrane. First we establish that the coarse-grained MARTINI forcefield is able to accurately reproduce the bending rigidity of a small patch of 1500 phosphatidyl choline lipids by comparing the calculated value to both experiment and an atomistic simulation of the same system. This enables us to simulate the dynamics of large (ca. 50 000 lipids) patches of membrane using the MARTINI coarse-grained description. We find that altering the lipid composition changes the bending rigidity. Adding integral membrane proteins to lipid bilayers also changes the bending rigidity, whilst adding a simple peripheral membrane protein has no effect. Our results suggest that integral membrane proteins can have different effects, and in the case of the bacterial outer membrane protein, BtuB, the greater the density of protein, the larger the reduction in stiffness.

  2. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  3. Vacuolar degradation of two integral plasma membrane proteins, AtLRR84A and OsSCAMP1, is cargo ubiquitination-independent and prevacuolar compartment-mediated in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Wang, Junqi; Wang, Hao; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Gao, Caiji; Wang, Xiangfeng; Jiang, Liwen

    2012-07-01

    In plant cells, how integral plasma membrane (PM) proteins are degraded in a cargo ubiquitination-independent manner remains elusive. Here, we studied the degradative pathway of two plant PM proteins: AtLRR84A, a type I integral membrane protein belonging to the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase protein family, and OsSCAMP1 (rice secretory carrier membrane protein 1), a tetraspan transmembrane protein located on the PM and trans-Golgi network (TGN) or early endosome (EE). Using wortmannin and ARA7(Q69L) mutant that could enlarge the multivesicular body (MVB) or prevacuolar compartment (PVC) as tools, we demonstrated that, when expressed as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions in tobacco BY-2 or Arabidopsis protoplasts, both AtLRR84A and OsSCAMP1 were degraded in the lytic vacuole via the internal vesicles of MVB/PVC in a cargo ubiquitination-independent manner. Such MVB/PVC-mediated vacuolar degradation of PM proteins was further supported by immunocytochemical electron microscopy (immunoEM) study showing the labeling of the fusions on the internal vesicles of the PVC/MVB. Thus, cargo ubiquitination-independent and PVC-mediated degradation of PM proteins in the vacuole is functionally operated in plant cells.

  4. [NESPRINS--nuclear envelope proteins ensuring integrity].

    PubMed

    Pershina, E G; Morozova, K N; Kiseleva, E V

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the nesprins (nuclear envelope spectrin-repeat proteins), which are recently discovered family of nuclear envelope proteins. These proteins play an important role in maintaining the cellular architecture and establish the link between the nucleus and other sub-cellular compartments. Many tissue-specific diseases including lipodystrophies, hearing loss, cardiac and skeletal myopathies are associated with nesprins mutations. These proteins comprise of multiple tissue specific isoforms which contain spectrin repeats providing interaction of nesprins with other nuclear membrane proteins, cytoskeleton and intranuclear matrix. We summarize recent findings and suggestions about nesprins structural organization and function inside the cell. Human diseases caused by abnormal nesprins expression are also described.

  5. Integrated photovoltaic electrolytic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, T.

    1982-10-05

    A photovoltaic-electrolytic unit is provided to produce an electric current from solar energy and utilize the current to produce hydrogen by the electrolysis of water. The unit floats in an aqueous medium so that photoelectric cells are exposed to solar radiation, and electrodes submerged in the medium produce oxygen which is vented and hydrogen which is collected in the unit.

  6. A Conserved Non-Canonical Docking Mechanism Regulates the Binding of Dual Specificity Phosphatases to Cell Integrity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Budding and Fission Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Sacristán-Reviriego, Almudena; Madrid, Marisa; Cansado, José; Martín, Humberto; Molina, María

    2014-01-01

    Dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases (MKPs) are essential for the negative regulation of MAPK pathways. Similar to other MAPK-interacting proteins, most MKPs bind MAPKs through specific docking domains known as D-motifs. However, we found that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MKP Msg5 binds the MAPK Slt2 within the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway through a distinct motif (IYT). Here, we demonstrate that the IYT motif mediates binding of the Msg5 paralogue Sdp1 to Slt2 as well as of the MKP Pmp1 to its CWI MAPK counterpart Pmk1 in the evolutionarily distant yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. As a consequence, removal of the IYT site in Msg5, Sdp1 and Pmp1 reduces MAPK trapping caused by the overexpression of catalytically inactive versions of these phosphatases. Accordingly, an intact IYT site is necessary for inactive Sdp1 to prevent nuclear accumulation of Slt2. We also show that both Ile and Tyr but not Thr are essential for the functionality of the IYT motif. These results provide mechanistic insight into MKP-MAPK interplay and stress the relevance of this conserved non-canonical docking site in the regulation of the CWI pathway in fungi. PMID:24465549

  7. Rho2 Palmitoylation Is Required for Plasma Membrane Localization and Proper Signaling to the Fission Yeast Cell Integrity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Martín-García, Rebeca; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Soto, Teresa; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The fission yeast small GTPase Rho2 regulates morphogenesis and is an upstream activator of the cell integrity pathway, whose key element, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1, becomes activated by multiple environmental stimuli and controls several cellular functions. Here we demonstrate that farnesylated Rho2 becomes palmitoylated in vivo at cysteine-196 within its carboxyl end and that this modification allows its specific targeting to the plasma membrane. Unlike that of other palmitoylated and prenylated GTPases, the Rho2 control of morphogenesis and Pmk1 activity is strictly dependent upon plasma membrane localization and is not found in other cellular membranes. Indeed, artificial plasma membrane targeting bypassed the Rho2 need for palmitoylation in order to signal. Detailed functional analysis of Rho2 chimeras fused to the carboxyl end from the essential GTPase Rho1 showed that GTPase palmitoylation is partially dependent on the prenylation context and confirmed that Rho2 signaling is independent of Rho GTP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) function. We further demonstrate that Rho2 is an in vivo substrate for DHHC family acyltransferase Erf2 palmitoyltransferase. Remarkably, Rho3, another Erf2 target, negatively regulates Pmk1 activity in a Rho2-independent fashion, thus revealing the existence of cross talk whereby both GTPases antagonistically modulate the activity of this MAPK cascade. PMID:24820419

  8. The Proteins API: accessing key integrated protein and genome information.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Andrew; Antunes, Ricardo; Alpi, Emanuele; Bursteinas, Borisas; Gonzales, Leonardo; Liu, Wudong; Luo, Jie; Qi, Guoying; Turner, Edd; Martin, Maria

    2017-04-05

    The Proteins API provides searching and programmatic access to protein and associated genomics data such as curated protein sequence positional annotations from UniProtKB, as well as mapped variation and proteomics data from large scale data sources (LSS). Using the coordinates service, researchers are able to retrieve the genomic sequence coordinates for proteins in UniProtKB. This, the LSS genomics and proteomics data for UniProt proteins is programmatically only available through this service. A Swagger UI has been implemented to provide documentation, an interface for users, with little or no programming experience, to 'talk' to the services to quickly and easily formulate queries with the services and obtain dynamically generated source code for popular programming languages, such as Java, Perl, Python and Ruby. Search results are returned as standard JSON, XML or GFF data objects. The Proteins API is a scalable, reliable, fast, easy to use RESTful services that provides a broad protein information resource for users to ask questions based upon their field of expertise and allowing them to gain an integrated overview of protein annotations available to aid their knowledge gain on proteins in biological processes. The Proteins API is available at (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/proteins/api/doc).

  9. Colletotrichum higginsianum Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase ChMK1: Role in Growth, Cell Wall Integrity, Colony Melanization, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Xiong, Ying; Zhu, Wenjun; Wang, Nancong; Yang, Guogen; Peng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. To facilitate the efficient control of anthracnose disease, it will be important to understand the mechanism by which the cruciferous crops and C. higginsianum interact. A key step in understanding this interaction is characterizing the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway of C. higginsianum. MAPK plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. In this study, a Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK gene, ChMK1, from C. higginsianum was analyzed. The results showed that the Fus3/Kss1-related MAPK ChMK1 plays a significant role in cell wall integrity. Targeted deletion of ChMK1 resulted in a hypersensitivity to cell wall inhibitors, reduced conidiation and albinistic colonies. Further, the deletion mutant was also unable to form melanized appressorium, a specialized infection structure that is necessary for successful infection. Therefore, the deletion mutant loses pathogenicity on A. thaliana leaves, demonstrating that ChMK1 plays an essential role in the early infection step. In addition, the ChMK1 deletion mutant showed an attenuated growth rate that is different from that of its homolog in Colletotrichum lagenarium, indicating the diverse roles that Fus3/Kss1-related MAPKs plays in phytopathogenic fungi. Furthermore, the expression level of three melanin synthesis associated genes were clearly decreased in the albinistic ChMK1 mutant compared to that of the wild type strain, suggesting that ChMK1 is also required for colony melanization in C. higginsianum. PMID:27536296

  10. The Cyclic AMP-binding protein CbpB in Brucella melitensis and its role in cell envelope integrity, resistance to detergent and virulence.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Juan; Dong, Hao; Peng, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Qing-Min

    2014-07-01

    Brucella melitensis possesses an operon with two components: the response regulator OtpR and a putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit encoded by the BMEI0067 gene. In the previous study, the function of OtpR has been studied, while little is known about the function of the BMEI0067 gene. Using a bioinformatics approach, we showed that the BMEI0067 gene encodes an additional putative cAMP-binding protein, which we refer to as CbpB. Structural modeling predicted that CbpB has a cAMP-binding protein (CAP) domain and is structurally similar to eukaryotic protein kinase A regulatory subunits. Here, we report the characterization of CbpB, a cAMP-binding protein in Brucella melitensis, showed to be involved in mouse persistent infections. ∆cbpB::km possessed cell elongation, bubble-like protrusions on cell surface and its resistance to environmental stresses (temperature, osmotic stress and detergent). Interestingly, comparative real-time qPCR assays, the cbpB mutation resulted in significantly different expression of aqpX and several penicillin-binding proteins and cell division proteins in Brucella. Combined, these results demonstrated characterization of CbpB in B. melitensis and its key role for intracellular multiplication.

  11. Type 2C protein phosphatase Ptc6 participates in activation of the Slt2-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from an equilibrium between the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important aspect of signal transduction that regulate many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes 40 PPases, including seven members of the protein phosphatase 2C subfamily (PTC1 to PTC7). In contrast to other PPases, the cellular roles of PTCs have not been investigated in detail. Here, we sought to determine the cellular role of PTC6 in S. cerevisiae with disruption of PTC genes. We found that cells with Δptc6 disruption were tolerant to the cell wall-damaging agents Congo red (CR) and calcofluor white (CFW); however, cells with simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 were very sensitive to these agents. Thus, simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 gave a synergistic response to cell wall damaging agents. The level of phosphorylated Slt2 increased significantly after CR treatment in Δptc1 cells and more so in Δptc1Δptc6 cells; therefore, deletion of PTC6 enhanced Slt2 phosphorylation in the Δptc1 disruptant. The level of transcription of KDX1 upon exposure to CR increased to a greater extent in the Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant than the Δptc1 single disruptant. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant cells showed normal vacuole formation under standard growth conditions, but fragmented vacuoles were present in the presence of CR or CFW. Our analyses indicate that S. cerevisiae PTC6 participates in the negative regulation of Slt2 phosphorylation and vacuole morphogenesis under cell wall stress conditions.

  12. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Andreu, José M; Monasterio, Octavio

    2014-08-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of proteins and the availability of crystal structures has increased our knowledge on bacterial cell division considerably in this century. Consequently, bacterial cell division proteins are more and more recognized as potential new antibiotic targets. An international effort to find small molecules that inhibit the cell division initiating protein FtsZ has yielded many compounds of which some are promising as leads for preclinical use. The essential transglycosylase activity of peptidoglycan synthases has recently become accessible to inhibitor screening. Enzymatic assays for and structural information on essential integral membrane proteins such as MraY and FtsW involved in lipid II (the peptidoglycan building block precursor) biosynthesis have put these proteins on the list of potential new targets. This review summarises and discusses the results and approaches to the development of lead compounds that inhibit bacterial cell division.

  13. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery.

    PubMed

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research.

  14. Integrated Microfluidics for Protein Modification Discovery*

    PubMed Central

    Noach-Hirsh, Meirav; Nevenzal, Hadas; Glick, Yair; Chorni, Evelin; Avrahami, Dorit; Barbiro-Michaely, Efrat; Gerber, Doron; Tzur, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications mediate dynamic cellular processes with broad implications in human disease pathogenesis. There is a large demand for high-throughput technologies supporting post-translational modifications research, and both mass spectrometry and protein arrays have been successfully utilized for this purpose. Protein arrays override the major limitation of target protein abundance inherently associated with MS analysis. This technology, however, is typically restricted to pre-purified proteins spotted in a fixed composition on chips with limited life-time and functionality. In addition, the chips are expensive and designed for a single use, making complex experiments cost-prohibitive. Combining microfluidics with in situ protein expression from a cDNA microarray addressed these limitations. Based on this approach, we introduce a modular integrated microfluidic platform for multiple post-translational modifications analysis of freshly synthesized protein arrays (IMPA). The system's potency, specificity and flexibility are demonstrated for tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination in quasicellular environments. Unlimited by design and protein composition, and relying on minute amounts of biological material and cost-effective technology, this unique approach is applicable for a broad range of basic, biomedical and biomarker research. PMID:26276765

  15. An inhibitor of yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase plays an important role in ensuring the genomic integrity of daughter cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nugroho, T T; Mendenhall, M D

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding a 40-kDa protein, previously studied as a substrate and inhibitor of the yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28, has been cloned. The DNA sequence reveals that p40 is a highly charged protein of 32,187 Da with no significant homology to other proteins. Overexpression of the gene encoding p40, SIC1, produces cells with an elongated but morphology similar to that of cells with depleted levels of the CLB gene products, suggesting that p40 acts as an inhibitor of Cdc28-Clb complexes in vivo. A SIC1 deletion is viable and has highly increased frequencies of broken and lost chromosomes. The deletion strain segregates out many dead cells that are primarily arrested at the G2 checkpoint in an asymmetric fashion. Only daughters and young mothers display the lethal defect, while experienced mothers appear to grow normally. These results suggest that negative regulation of Cdc28 protein kinase activity by p40 is important for faithful segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Images PMID:8164683

  16. Protein folding in the cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gething, Mary-Jane; Sambrook, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    In the cell, as in vitro, the final conformation of a protein is determined by its amino-acid sequence. But whereas some isolated proteins can be denatured and refolded in vitro in the absence of other macromolecular cellular components, folding and assembly of polypeptides in vivo involves other proteins, many of which belong to families that have been highly conserved during evolution.

  17. The bcl-2 candidate proto-oncogene product is a 24-kilodalton integral-membrane protein highly expressed in lymphoid cell lines and lymphomas carrying the t(14;18) translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Levy, Z; Nourse, J; Cleary, M L

    1989-01-01

    We have identified a 24-kilodalton protein that is the product of the human bcl-2 gene, implicated as an oncogene because of its presence at the site of t(14;18) translocation breakpoints. The Bcl-2 protein was detected by specific, highly sensitive rabbit antibodies and was shown to be present in a number of human lymphoid cell lines and tissues, as well as in mouse B cells transfected with a bcl-2 cDNA construct. Characterization of the Bcl-2 protein demonstrated that it has a lipophilic nature and is associated with membrane structures, probably by means of its hydrophobic carboxy-terminal membrane-spanning domain. In t(14;18)-carrying cell lines, the protein is predominantly localized to the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum, with a minor fraction in the plasma membrane. These properties, together with the observations that Bcl-2 does not have a characteristic signal peptide and is not glycosylated, suggest that it is an integral-membrane protein that spans the bilayer at its C-terminal hydrophobic region but is exposed only at the cytoplasmic surface. The relative abundance of the Bcl-2 protein in various human lymphoid cell lines correlated with transcription of the bcl-2 gene. The protein was abundant in all t(14;18)-carrying cell lines and lymphomas and was also found at lower levels in pre-B-cell lines and nonmalignant lymphoid tissues that do not carry t(14;18) translocations. These results suggest that the Bcl-2 protein is functional in normal B lymphocytes and that a quantitative difference in its expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of lymphomas carrying the t(14;18) translocation. Images PMID:2651903

  18. A Type 2C Protein Phosphatase FgPtc3 Is Involved in Cell Wall Integrity, Lipid Metabolism, and Virulence in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinhua; Yun, Yingzi; Yang, Qianqian; Shim, Won-Bo; Wang, Zhengyi; Ma, Zhonghua

    2011-01-01

    Type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) play important roles in regulating many biological processes in eukaryotes. Currently, little is known about functions of PP2Cs in filamentous fungi. The causal agent of wheat head blight, Fusarium graminearum, contains seven putative PP2C genes, FgPTC1, -3, -5, -5R, -6, -7 and -7R. In order to investigate roles of these PP2Cs, we constructed deletion mutants for all seven PP2C genes in this study. The FgPTC3 deletion mutant (ΔFgPtc3-8) exhibited reduced aerial hyphae formation and deoxynivalenol (DON) production, but increased production of conidia. The mutant showed increased resistance to osmotic stress and cell wall-damaging agents on potato dextrose agar plates. Pathogencity assays showed that ΔFgPtc3-8 is unable to infect flowering wheat head. All of the defects were restored when ΔFgPtc3-8 was complemented with the wild-type FgPTC3 gene. Additionally, the FgPTC3 partially rescued growth defect of a yeast PTC1 deletion mutant under various stress conditions. Ultrastructural and histochemical analyses showed that conidia of ΔFgPtc3-8 contained an unusually high number of large lipid droplets. Furthermore, the mutant accumulated a higher basal level of glycerol than the wild-type progenitor. Quantitative real-time PCR assays showed that basal expression of FgOS2, FgSLT2 and FgMKK1 in the mutant was significantly higher than that in the wild-type strain. Serial analysis of gene expression in ΔFgPtc3-8 revealed that FgPTC3 is associated with various metabolic pathways. In contrast to the FgPTC3 mutant, the deletion mutants of FgPTC1, FgPTC5, FgPTC5R, FgPTC6, FgPTC7 or FgPTC7R did not show aberrant phenotypic features when grown on PDA medium or inoculated on wheat head. These results indicate FgPtc3 is the key PP2C that plays a critical role in a variety of cellular and biological functions, including cell wall integrity, lipid and secondary metabolisms, and virulence in F. graminearum. PMID:21980420

  19. Integral Membrane Protein Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Boswell-Casteel, Rebba C; Johnson, Jennifer M; Stroud, Robert M; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic integral membrane proteins are challenging targets for crystallography or functional characterization in a purified state. Since expression is often a limiting factor when studying this difficult class of biological macromolecules, the intent of this chapter is to focus on the expression of eukaryotic integral membrane proteins (IMPs) using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae is a prime candidate for the expression of eukaryotic IMPs because it offers the convenience of using episomal expression plasmids, selection of positive transformants, posttranslational modifications, and it can properly fold and target IMPs. Here we present a generalized protocol and insights based on our collective knowledge as an aid to overcoming the challenges faced when expressing eukaryotic IMPs in S. cerevisiae.

  20. A Link Between Integral Membrane Protein Expression and Simulated Integration Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Axel; Tiemann, Katrin; Saladi, Shyam M.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Zhang, Bin; Clemons, William M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMP) control the flow of information and nutrients across cell membranes, yet IMP mechanistic studies are hindered by difficulties in expression. We investigate this issue by addressing the connection between IMP sequence and observed expression levels. For homologs of the IMP TatC, observed expression levels widely vary and are affected by small changes in protein sequence. The effect of sequence changes on experimentally observed expression levels strongly correlates with the simulated integration efficiency obtained from coarse-grained modeling, which is directly confirmed using an in vivo assay. Furthermore, mutations that improve the simulated integration efficiency likewise increase the experimentally observed expression levels. Demonstration of these trends in both Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium smegmatis suggests that the results are general to other expression systems. This work suggests that IMP integration is a determinant for successful expression, raising the possibility of controlling IMP expression via rational design. PMID:27524616

  1. Correlations Between Single Cell Signaling Dynamics and Protein Expressions Profiles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-16

    the need for fluorescent or radioactive labels. These deter- minations have been performed within picoliter volumes using microfluidic channels...developments are addressing this. Future efforts will fully integrate the microfluidic nanophysiometer, OCIBD analyte detection system, MALDI-TOF protein...upon full integration of the microfluidic nanophysiometer, OCIBD analyte detection system, MALDI-TOF protein traps, and cell loading (for internalization

  2. iPDA: integrated protein disorder analyzer.

    PubMed

    Su, Chung-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Chen-Ming

    2007-07-01

    This article presents a web server iPDA, which aims at identifying the disordered regions of a query protein. Automatic prediction of disordered regions from protein sequences is an important problem in the study of structural biology. The proposed classifier DisPSSMP2 is different from several existing disorder predictors by its employment of position-specific scoring matrices with respect to physicochemical properties (PSSMP), where the physicochemical properties adopted here especially take the disorder propensity of amino acids into account. The web server iPDA integrates DisPSSMP2 with several other sequence predictors in order to investigate the functional role of the detected disordered region. The predicted information includes sequence conservation, secondary structure, sequence complexity and hydrophobic clusters. According to the proportion of the secondary structure elements predicted, iPDA dynamically adjusts the cutting threshold of determining protein disorder. Furthermore, a pattern mining package for detecting sequence conservation is embedded in iPDA for discovering potential binding regions of the query protein, which is really helpful to uncovering the relationship between protein function and its primary sequence. The web service is available at http://biominer.bime.ntu.edu.tw/ipda and mirrored at http://biominer.cse.yzu.edu.tw/ipda.

  3. iPDA: integrated protein disorder analyzer

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chung-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Yu; Hsu, Chen-Ming

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a web server iPDA, which aims at identifying the disordered regions of a query protein. Automatic prediction of disordered regions from protein sequences is an important problem in the study of structural biology. The proposed classifier DisPSSMP2 is different from several existing disorder predictors by its employment of position-specific scoring matrices with respect to physicochemical properties (PSSMP), where the physicochemical properties adopted here especially take the disorder propensity of amino acids into account. The web server iPDA integrates DisPSSMP2 with several other sequence predictors in order to investigate the functional role of the detected disordered region. The predicted information includes sequence conservation, secondary structure, sequence complexity and hydrophobic clusters. According to the proportion of the secondary structure elements predicted, iPDA dynamically adjusts the cutting threshold of determining protein disorder. Furthermore, a pattern mining package for detecting sequence conservation is embedded in iPDA for discovering potential binding regions of the query protein, which is really helpful to uncovering the relationship between protein function and its primary sequence. The web service is available at http://biominer.bime.ntu.edu.tw/ipda and mirrored at http://biominer.cse.yzu.edu.tw/ipda. PMID:17553839

  4. Integrally covered silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Somberg, H.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-beam technique for evaporating dielectric materials onto solar cells has been examined and developed. Titanium oxide cell antireflection coatings have been obtained which compare to silicon monoxide in environmental capabilities and which provide 3 to 4% improvement over SiO for glass covered cells. Evaporation processes have been obtained which provide a 50 to 100 micromil thick transparent (0.5 to 1.0% absorption per mil), low stressed integral cover capable of surviving space type qualification testing. Irradiation with 10 to the 15th power 1-MeV electrons shows 2% darkening, and long term UV irradiation incurs approximately 1.3% cover darkening for 50 micromil thick covers.

  5. Cell polarity proteins and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Mruk, Dolores; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-11-01

    When the cross-section of a seminiferous tubule from an adult rat testes is examined microscopically, Sertoli cells and germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium are notably polarized cells. For instance, Sertoli cell nuclei are found near the basement membrane. On the other hand, tight junction (TJ), basal ectoplasmic specialization (basal ES, a testis-specific actin-rich anchoring junction), gap junction (GJ) and desmosome that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) are also located near the basement membrane. The BTB, in turn, divides the epithelium into the basal and the adluminal (apical) compartments. Within the epithelium, undifferentiated spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes restrictively reside in the basal compartment whereas spermatocytes and post-meiotic spermatids reside in the adluminal compartment. Furthermore, the heads of elongating/elongated spermatids point toward the basement membrane with their elongating tails toward the tubule lumen. However, the involvement of polarity proteins in this unique cellular organization, in particular the underlying molecular mechanism(s) by which polarity proteins confer cellular polarity in the seminiferous epithelium is virtually unknown until recent years. Herein, we discuss latest findings regarding the role of different polarity protein complexes or modules and how these protein complexes are working in concert to modulate Sertoli cell and spermatid polarity. These findings also illustrate polarity proteins exert their effects through the actin-based cytoskeleton mediated by actin binding and regulatory proteins, which in turn modulate adhesion protein complexes at the cell-cell interface since TJ, basal ES and GJ utilize F-actin for attachment. We also propose a hypothetical model which illustrates the antagonistic effects of these polarity proteins. This in turn provides a unique mechanism to modulate junction remodeling in the testis to support germ cell transport across the epithelium in

  6. Vaccination with NY-ESO-1 protein and CpG in Montanide induces integrated antibody/Th1 responses and CD8 T cells through cross-priming.

    PubMed

    Valmori, Danila; Souleimanian, Naira E; Tosello, Valeria; Bhardwaj, Nina; Adams, Sylvia; O'Neill, David; Pavlick, Anna; Escalon, Juliet B; Cruz, Crystal M; Angiulli, Angelica; Angiulli, Francesca; Mears, Gregory; Vogel, Susan M; Pan, Linda; Jungbluth, Achim A; Hoffmann, Eric W; Venhaus, Ralph; Ritter, Gerd; Old, Lloyd J; Ayyoub, Maha

    2007-05-22

    The use of recombinant tumor antigen proteins is a realistic approach for the development of generic cancer vaccines, but the potential of this type of vaccines to induce specific CD8(+) T cell responses, through in vivo cross-priming, has remained unclear. In this article, we report that repeated vaccination of cancer patients with recombinant NY-ESO-1 protein, Montanide ISA-51, and CpG ODN 7909, a potent stimulator of B cells and T helper type 1 (Th1)-type immunity, resulted in the early induction of specific integrated CD4(+) Th cells and antibody responses in most vaccinated patients, followed by the development of later CD8(+) T cell responses in a fraction of them. The correlation between antibody and T cell responses, together with the ability of vaccine-induced antibodies to promote in vitro cross-presentation of NY-ESO-1 by dendritic cells to vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells, indicated that elicitation of NY-ESO-1-specific CD8(+) T cell responses by cross-priming in vivo was associated with the induction of adequate levels of specific antibodies. Together, our data provide clear evidence of in vivo cross-priming of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes by a recombinant tumor antigen vaccine, underline the importance of specific antibody induction for the cross-priming to occur, and support the use of this type of formulation for the further development of efficient cancer vaccines.

  7. Integrated proteomics identified up-regulated focal adhesion-mediated proteins in human squamous cell carcinoma in an orthotopic murine model.

    PubMed

    Granato, Daniela C; Zanetti, Mariana R; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R; Aragão, Annelize Z; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Vidal, Ramon O; Flores, Isadora L; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K; Silva, Alan R S; Coletta, Ricardo D; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E; Paes Leme, Adriana F

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules.

  8. Integrated Proteomics Identified Up-Regulated Focal Adhesion-Mediated Proteins in Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Granato, Daniela C.; Zanetti, Mariana R.; Kawahara, Rebeca; Yokoo, Sami; Domingues, Romênia R.; Aragão, Annelize Z.; Agostini, Michelle; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Flores, Isadora L.; Korvala, Johanna; Cervigne, Nilva K.; Silva, Alan R. S.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Graner, Edgard; Sherman, Nicholas E.; Leme, Adriana F. Paes

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances in diagnostics, prognostics, effective treatment, and outcome of oral cancer. Hence, in this study we have investigated the proteomic and peptidomic profiles by combining an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biological network analysis. Our results indicated the up-regulation of proteins involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell-cell junction assembly events and their expression was validated in human OSCC tissues. In addition, the functional relevance of talin-1 in OSCC adhesion, migration and invasion was demonstrated. Taken together, this study identified specific processes deregulated in oral cancer and provided novel refined OSCC-targeting molecules. PMID:24858105

  9. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analysis identifies protein kinase CK2 as a key signaling node in an inflammatory cytokine network in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kulbe, Hagen; Iorio, Francesco; Chakravarty, Probir; Milagre, Carla S.; Moore, Robert; Thompson, Richard G.; Everitt, Gemma; Canosa, Monica; Montoya, Alexander; Drygin, Denis; Braicu, Ioana; Sehouli, Jalid; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Cutillas, Pedro R.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed how key pathways in cancer-related inflammation and Notch signaling are part of an autocrine malignant cell network in ovarian cancer. This network, which we named the “TNF network”, has paracrine actions within the tumor microenvironment, influencing angiogenesis and the immune cell infiltrate. The aim of this study was to identify critical regulators in the signaling pathways of the TNF network in ovarian cancer cells that might be therapeutic targets. To achieve our aim, we used a systems biology approach, combining data from phospho-proteomic mass spectrometry and gene expression array analysis. Among the potential therapeutic kinase targets identified was the protein kinase Casein kinase II (CK2). Knockdown of CK2 expression in malignant cells by siRNA or treatment with the specific CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 significantly decreased Notch signaling and reduced constitutive cytokine release in ovarian cancer cell lines that expressed the TNF network as well as malignant cells isolated from high grade serous ovarian cancer ascites. The expression of the same cytokines was also inhibited after treatment with CX-4945 in a 3D organotypic model. CK2 inhibition was associated with concomitant inhibition of proliferative activity, reduced angiogenesis and experimental peritoneal ovarian tumor growth. In conclusion, we have identified kinases, particularly CK2, associated with the TNF network that may play a central role in sustaining the cytokine network and/or mediating its effects in ovarian cancer. PMID:26871292

  10. Network motifs in integrated cellular networks of transcription-regulation and protein-protein interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Sattath, Shmuel; Kashtan, Nadav; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Milo, Ron; Pinter, Ron Y.; Alon, Uri; Margalit, Hanah

    2004-04-01

    Genes and proteins generate molecular circuitry that enables the cell to process information and respond to stimuli. A major challenge is to identify characteristic patterns in this network of interactions that may shed light on basic cellular mechanisms. Previous studies have analyzed aspects of this network, concentrating on either transcription-regulation or protein-protein interactions. Here we search for composite network motifs: characteristic network patterns consisting of both transcription-regulation and protein-protein interactions that recur significantly more often than in random networks. To this end we developed algorithms for detecting motifs in networks with two or more types of interactions and applied them to an integrated data set of protein-protein interactions and transcription regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found a two-protein mixed-feedback loop motif, five types of three-protein motifs exhibiting coregulation and complex formation, and many motifs involving four proteins. Virtually all four-protein motifs consisted of combinations of smaller motifs. This study presents a basic framework for detecting the building blocks of networks with multiple types of interactions.

  11. Purification of basolateral integral membrane proteins by cationic colloidal silica-based apical membrane subtraction.

    PubMed

    Goode, Robert J A; Simpson, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cell polarity mediates many essential biological functions and perturbation of the apical/basolateral divide is a hallmark of epithelial to mesenchymal transition in carcinoma. Therefore, correct targeting of proteins to the apical and basolateral surfaces is essential to proper epithelial cell function. However, proteomic characterisation of apical/basolateral sorting has been largely ignored, due to ineffectual separation techniques and contamination of plasma-membrane preparations with housekeeping proteins. Here we describe a method that strips the apical membrane from the adherent cells and releases the intracellular contents, thereby leaving the basolateral membrane available for stringent washes and collection. Analysis of the basolateral membrane of an adherent colon adenocarcinoma cell line resulted in 66% of identified proteins being integral membrane proteins, which possessed either a transmembrane domain or lipid modification, including 35 CD antigens. Based on the abundance of peptides from basolateral marker proteins, this method efficiently captures basolateral integral membrane proteins, with minimal contamination from other membranes and basic proteins.

  12. Structural assemblies of the di- and oligomeric G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 in live cells: an MFIS-FRET and integrative modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Greife, Annemarie; Felekyan, Suren; Ma, Qijun; Gertzen, Christoph G. W.; Spomer, Lina; Dimura, Mykola; Peulen, Thomas O.; Wöhler, Christina; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger; Keitel, Verena; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    2016-01-01

    TGR5 is the first identified bile acid-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. So far, structural and multimerization properties are largely unknown for TGR5. We used a combined strategy applying cellular biology, Multiparameter Image Fluorescence Spectroscopy (MFIS) for quantitative FRET analysis, and integrative modelling to obtain structural information about dimerization and higher-order oligomerization assemblies of TGR5 wildtype (wt) and Y111 variants fused to fluorescent proteins. Residue 111 is located in transmembrane helix 3 within the highly conserved ERY motif. Co-immunoprecipitation and MFIS-FRET measurements with gradually increasing acceptor to donor concentrations showed that TGR5 wt forms higher-order oligomers, a process disrupted in TGR5 Y111A variants. From the concentration dependence of the MFIS-FRET data we conclude that higher-order oligomers – likely with a tetramer organization - are formed from dimers, the smallest unit suggested for TGR5 Y111A variants. Higher-order oligomers likely have a linear arrangement with interaction sites involving transmembrane helix 1 and helix 8 as well as transmembrane helix 5. The latter interaction is suggested to be disrupted by the Y111A mutation. The proposed model of TGR5 oligomer assembly broadens our view of possible oligomer patterns and affinities of class A GPCRs. PMID:27833095

  13. Structural assemblies of the di- and oligomeric G-protein coupled receptor TGR5 in live cells: an MFIS-FRET and integrative modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greife, Annemarie; Felekyan, Suren; Ma, Qijun; Gertzen, Christoph G. W.; Spomer, Lina; Dimura, Mykola; Peulen, Thomas O.; Wöhler, Christina; Häussinger, Dieter; Gohlke, Holger; Keitel, Verena; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    2016-11-01

    TGR5 is the first identified bile acid-sensing G-protein coupled receptor, which has emerged as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. So far, structural and multimerization properties are largely unknown for TGR5. We used a combined strategy applying cellular biology, Multiparameter Image Fluorescence Spectroscopy (MFIS) for quantitative FRET analysis, and integrative modelling to obtain structural information about dimerization and higher-order oligomerization assemblies of TGR5 wildtype (wt) and Y111 variants fused to fluorescent proteins. Residue 111 is located in transmembrane helix 3 within the highly conserved ERY motif. Co-immunoprecipitation and MFIS-FRET measurements with gradually increasing acceptor to donor concentrations showed that TGR5 wt forms higher-order oligomers, a process disrupted in TGR5 Y111A variants. From the concentration dependence of the MFIS-FRET data we conclude that higher-order oligomers – likely with a tetramer organization - are formed from dimers, the smallest unit suggested for TGR5 Y111A variants. Higher-order oligomers likely have a linear arrangement with interaction sites involving transmembrane helix 1 and helix 8 as well as transmembrane helix 5. The latter interaction is suggested to be disrupted by the Y111A mutation. The proposed model of TGR5 oligomer assembly broadens our view of possible oligomer patterns and affinities of class A GPCRs.

  14. Recombinant protein production from stable mammalian cell lines and pools.

    PubMed

    Hacker, David L; Balasubramanian, Sowmya

    2016-06-01

    We highlight recent developments for the production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted mammalian cell lines. We discuss the generation of stable cell lines using transposons and lentivirus vectors (non-targeted transgene integration) and site-specific recombinases (targeted transgene integration). Each of these methods results in the generation of cell lines with protein yields that are generally superior to those achievable through classical plasmid transfection that depends on the integration of the transfected DNA by non-homologous DNA end-joining. This is the main reason why these techniques can also be used for the generation of stable cell pools, heterogenous populations of recombinant cells generated by gene delivery and genetic selection without resorting to single cell cloning. This allows the time line from gene transfer to protein production to be reduced.

  15. Screening somatic cell nuclear transfer parameters for generation of transgenic cloned cattle with intragenomic integration of additional gene copies that encode bovine adipocyte-type fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP).

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; Li, Hejuan; Wang, Ying; Yan, Xingrong; Sheng, Xihui; Chang, Di; Qi, Xiaolong; Wang, Xiangguo; Liu, Yunhai; Li, Junya; Ni, Hemin

    2017-02-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is frequently used to produce transgenic cloned livestock, but it is still associated with low success rates. To our knowledge, we are the first to report successful production of transgenic cattle that overexpress bovine adipocyte-type fatty acid binding proteins (A-FABPs) with the aid of SCNT. Intragenomic integration of additional A-FABP gene copies has been found to be positively correlated with the intramuscular fat content in different farm livestock species. First, we optimized the cloning parameters to produce bovine embryos integrated with A-FABP by SCNT, such as applied voltage field strength and pulse duration for electrofusion, morphology and size of donor cells, and number of donor cells passages. Then, bovine fibroblast cells from Qinchuan cattle were transfected with A-FABP and used as donor cells for SCNT. Hybrids of Simmental and Luxi local cattle were selected as the recipient females for A-FABP transgenic SCNT-derived embryos. The results showed that a field strength of 2.5 kV/cm with two 10-μs duration electrical pulses was ideal for electrofusion, and 4-6th generation circular smooth type donor cells with diameters of 15-25 μm were optimal for producing transgenic bovine embryos by SCNT, and resulted in higher fusion (80%), cleavage (73%), and blastocyst (27%) rates. In addition, we obtained two transgenic cloned calves that expressed additional bovine A-FABP gene copies, as detected by PCR-amplified cDNA sequencing. We proposed a set of optimal protocols to produce transgenic SCNT-derived cattle with intragenomic integration of ectopic A-FABP-inherited exon sequences.

  16. The Penicillium digitatum protein O-mannosyltransferase Pmt2 is required for cell wall integrity, conidiogenesis, virulence and sensitivity to the antifungal peptide PAF26.

    PubMed

    Harries, Eleonora; Gandía, Mónica; Carmona, Lourdes; Marcos, Jose F

    2015-09-01

    The activity of protein O-mannosyltransferases (Pmts) affects the morphogenesis and virulence of fungal pathogens. Recently, PMT genes have been shown to determine the sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the antifungal peptide PAF26. This study reports the identification and characterization of the three Pdpmt genes in the citrus post-harvest pathogen Penicillium digitatum. The Pdpmt genes are expressed during fungal growth and fruit infection, with the highest induction for Pdpmt2. Pdpmt2 complemented the growth defect of the S. cerevisiae Δpmt2 strain. The Pdpmt2 gene mutation in P. digitatum caused pleiotropic effects, including a reduction in fungal growth and virulence, whereas its constitutive expression had no phenotypic effect. The Pdpmt2 null mutants also showed a distinctive colourless phenotype with a strong reduction in the number of conidia, which was associated with severe alterations in the development of conidiophores. Additional effects of the Pdpmt2 mutation were hyphal morphological alterations, increased sensitivity to cell wall-interfering compounds and a blockage of invasive growth. In contrast, the Pdpmt2 mutation increased tolerance to oxidative stress and to the antifungal activity of PAF26. These data confirm the role of protein O-glycosylation in the PAF26-mediated antifungal mechanism present in distantly related fungal species. Important to future crop protection strategies, this study demonstrates that a mutation rendering fungi more resistant to an antifungal peptide results in severe deleterious effects on fungal growth and virulence.

  17. The fission yeast cell wall stress sensor-like proteins Mtl2 and Wsc1 act by turning on the GTPase Rho1p but act independently of the cell wall integrity pathway.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Sandra; Muñoz, Sofía; Manjón, Elvira; García, Patricia; Sanchez, Yolanda

    2013-10-01

    Sensing stressful conditions that affect the cell wall reorganization is important for yeast survival. Here, we studied two proteins SpWsc1p and SpMtl2p with structural features indicative of plasma membrane-associated cell wall sensors. We found that Mtl2p and Wsc1p act by turning on the Rho1p GTPase. Each gene could be deleted individually without affecting viability, but the deletion of both was lethal and this phenotype was rescued by overexpression of the genes encoding either Rho1p or its GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs). In addition, wsc1Δ and mtl2Δ cells showed a low level of Rho1p-GTP under cell wall stress. Mtl2p-GFP (green fluorescent protein) localized to the cell periphery and was necessary for survival under different types of cell wall stress. Wsc1p-GFP was concentrated in patches at the cell tips, it interacted with the Rho-GEF Rgf2p, and its overexpression activated cell wall biosynthesis. Our results are consistent with the notion that cell wall assembly is regulated by two different networks involving Rho1p. One includes signaling from Mtl2p through Rho1p to Pck1p, while the second one implicates signaling from Wsc1p and Rgf2p through Rho1p to activate glucan synthase (GS). Finally, signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1p remained active in mtl2Δ and wsc1Δ disruptants exposed to cell wall stress, suggesting that the cell wall stress-sensing spectrum of Schizosaccharomyces pombe sensor-like proteins differs from that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  18. Integrated bioprocessing for plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Cho, G H; Byun, S Y; Kim, D I

    2001-01-01

    Plant cell suspension culture has become the focus of much attention as a tool for the production of secondary metabolites including paclitaxel, a well-known anticancer agent. Recently, it has also been regarded as one of the host systems for the production of recombinant proteins. In order to produce phytochemicals using plant cell cultures, efficient processes must be developed with adequate bioreactor design. Most of the plant secondary metabolites are toxic to cells at the high concentrations required during culture. Therefore, if the product could be removed in situ during culture, productivity might be enhanced due to the alleviation of this toxicity. In situ removal or extractive bioconversion of such products can be performed by in situ extraction with various kinds of organic solvents. In situ adsorption using polymeric resins is another possibility. Using the fact that secondary metabolites are generally hydrophobic, various integrated bioprocessing techniques can be designed not only to lower toxicity, but also to enhance productivity. In this article, in situ extraction, in situ adsorption, utilization of cyclodextrins, and the application of aqueous two-phase systems in plant cell cultures are reviewed.

  19. Essential protein identification based on essential protein-protein interaction prediction by Integrated Edge Weights.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuexu; Wang, Yan; Pang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Sun, Huiyan; Liang, Yanchun; Blanzieri, Enrico

    2015-07-15

    Essential proteins play a crucial role in cellular survival and development process. Experimentally, essential proteins are identified by gene knockouts or RNA interference, which are expensive and often fatal to the target organisms. Regarding this, an alternative yet important approach to essential protein identification is through computational prediction. Existing computational methods predict essential proteins based on their relative densities in a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Degree, betweenness, and other appropriate criteria are often used to measure the relative density. However, no matter what criterion is used, a protein is actually ordered by the attributes of this protein per se. In this research, we presented a novel computational method, Integrated Edge Weights (IEW), to first rank protein-protein interactions by integrating their edge weights, and then identified sub PPI networks consisting of those highly-ranked edges, and finally regarded the nodes in these sub networks as essential proteins. We evaluated IEW on three model organisms: Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The experimental results showed that IEW achieved better performance than the state-of-the-art methods in terms of precision-recall and Jackknife measures. We had also demonstrated that IEW is a robust and effective method, which can retrieve biologically significant modules by its highly-ranked protein-protein interactions for S. cerevisiae, E. coli, and C. elegans. We believe that, with sufficient data provided, IEW can be used to any other organisms' essential protein identification. A website about IEW can be accessed from http://digbio.missouri.edu/IEW/index.html.

  20. Cell Stress Proteins in Atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Fernandez-Garcia, Carlos Ernesto; Ramos-Mozo, Priscila; Burillo, Elena; Egido, Jesus; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    Cell stress proteins (CSPs) are a large and heterogenous family of proteins, sharing two main characteristics: their levels and/or location are modified under stress and most of them can exert a chaperon function inside the cells. Nonetheless, they are also involved in the modulation of several mechanisms, both at the intracellular and the extracellular compartments. There are more than 100 proteins belonging to the CSPs family, among them the thioredoxin (TRX) system, which is the focus of the present paper. TRX system is composed of several proteins such as TRX and peroxiredoxin (PRDX), two thiol-containing enzymes that are key players in redox homeostasis due to their ability to scavenge potential harmful reactive oxygen species. In addition to their main role as antioxidants, recent data highlights their function in several processes such as cell signalling, immune inflammatory responses, or apoptosis, all of them key mechanisms involved in atherothrombosis. Moreover, since TRX and PRDX are present in the pathological vascular wall and can be secreted under prooxidative conditions to the circulation, several studies have addressed their role as diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). PMID:22792412

  1. Integrating computational methods and experimental data for understanding the recognition mechanism and binding affinity of protein-protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Yugandhar, K

    2017-01-07

    Protein-protein interactions perform several functions inside the cell. Understanding the recognition mechanism and binding affinity of protein-protein complexes is a challenging problem in experimental and computational biology. In this review, we focus on two aspects (i) understanding the recognition mechanism and (ii) predicting the binding affinity. The first part deals with computational techniques for identifying the binding site residues and the contribution of important interactions for understanding the recognition mechanism of protein-protein complexes in comparison with experimental observations. The second part is devoted to the methods developed for discriminating high and low affinity complexes, and predicting the binding affinity of protein-protein complexes using three-dimensional structural information and just from the amino acid sequence. The overall view enhances our understanding of the integration of experimental data and computational methods, recognition mechanism of protein-protein complexes and the binding affinity.

  2. Dynamic proteomics in modeling of the living cell. Protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Terentiev, A A; Moldogazieva, N T; Shaitan, K V

    2009-12-01

    This review is devoted to describing, summarizing, and analyzing of dynamic proteomics data obtained over the last few years and concerning the role of protein-protein interactions in modeling of the living cell. Principles of modern high-throughput experimental methods for investigation of protein-protein interactions are described. Systems biology approaches based on integrative view on cellular processes are used to analyze organization of protein interaction networks. It is proposed that finding of some proteins in different protein complexes can be explained by their multi-modular and polyfunctional properties; the different protein modules can be located in the nodes of protein interaction networks. Mathematical and computational approaches to modeling of the living cell with emphasis on molecular dynamics simulation are provided. The role of the network analysis in fundamental medicine is also briefly reviewed.

  3. Activities of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Integration Protein In vitro: Specific Cleavage and Integration of HIV DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushman, Frederic D.; Craigie, Robert

    1991-02-01

    Growth of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) after infection requires the integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into a chromosome of the host. Here we present a simple in vitro system that carries out the integration reaction and the use of this system to probe the mechanism of integration. The only HIV protein necessary is the integration (IN) protein, which has been overexpressed in insect cells and then partially purified. DNA substrates are supplied as oligonucleotides that match the termini of the linear DNA product of reverse transcription. In the presence of HIV IN protein, oligonucleotide substrates are cleaved to generate the recessed 3' ends that are the precursor for integration, and the cleaved molecules are efficiently inserted into a DNA target. Analysis of reaction products reveals that HIV IN protein joins 3' ends of the viral DNA to 5' ends of cuts made by IN protein in the DNA target. We have also used this assay to characterize the sequences at the ends of the viral DNA involved in integration. The assay provides a simple screen for testing candidate inhibitors of HIV IN protein; some such inhibitors might have useful antiviral activity.

  4. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  5. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C.; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3′-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486–5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  6. Integrated bioethanol and protein production from brown seaweed Laminaria digitata.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiaoru; Hansen, Jonas Høeg; Bjerre, Anne-Belinda

    2015-12-01

    A wild-growing glucose-rich (i.e. 56.7% glucose content) brown seaweed species Laminaria digitata, collected from the North Coast of Denmark in August 2012, was used as the feedstock for an integrated bioethanol and protein production. Glutamic acid and aspartic acid are the two most abundant amino acids in the algal protein, both with proportional content of 10% in crude protein. Only minor pretreatment of milling was used on the biomass to facilitate the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. The Separate Hydrolysis and Fermentation (SHF) resulted in obviously higher ethanol yield than the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). High conversion rate at maximum of 84.1% glucose recovery by enzymatic hydrolysis and overall ethanol yield at maximum of 77.7% theoretical were achieved. Protein content in the solid residues after fermentation was enriched by 2.7 fold, with similar distributions of amino acids, due to the hydrolysis of polymers in the seaweed cell wall matrix.

  7. Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.; Whelan, James A.

    1987-01-01

    A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

  8. Protective effect of black tea on integral membrane proteins in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Szachowicz-Petelska, Barbara; Skrzydlewska, Elżbieta; Figaszewski, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Ethanol intoxication is accompanied by oxidative stress formation. Consequently, it leads to disturbances in cellular metabolism that can alter the structure and function of cell membrane components. Black tea displays antioxidant properties, protects membrane phospholipids and may protect integral membrane proteins. In the present study, we examined whether black tea induces changes in the liver integral membrane proteins of 12-months old rats chronically intoxicated with ethanol. To estimate qualitatively and quantitatively the levels of the liver integral membrane proteins, the proteins were selectively hydrolyzed by trypsin, the obtained peptides were resolved by HPLC and the levels of specific amino acids within the individual peptides were determined. All of the obtained peptides contained phenylalanine (Phe), cysteine (Cys) and lysine (Lys). Compared to the control group, rats in the ethanol intoxication group showed decreased liver levels of integral membrane proteins as well as fewer trypsin-hydrolyzed peptides and amino acids in the hydrolyzed peptides. Administration of black tea to ethanol-intoxicated rats partially protected proteins against the structural changes caused by ethanol. Black tea prevented decreases in the levels of cysteine (in about 90% of cases), lysine (in about 60% of cases), phenylalanine (in about 70% of cases) and examined peptides (in about 60% of cases). The liver protein level was higher (by about 18%) in rats who received black tea and ethanol than in those who received ethanol alone. In conclusion, black tea partially protects the composition and level of rat liver cell integral membrane proteins against changes caused by ethanol intoxication.

  9. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  10. Protein-Mediated Interactions of Pancreatic Islet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans collectively form the endocrine pancreas, the organ that is soley responsible for insulin secretion in mammals, and which plays a prominent role in the control of circulating glucose and metabolism. Normal function of these islets implies the coordination of different types of endocrine cells, noticeably of the beta cells which produce insulin. Given that an appropriate secretion of this hormone is vital to the organism, a number of mechanisms have been selected during evolution, which now converge to coordinate beta cell functions. Among these, several mechanisms depend on different families of integral membrane proteins, which ensure direct (cadherins, N-CAM, occludin, and claudins) and paracrine communications (pannexins) between beta cells, and between these cells and the other islet cell types. Also, other proteins (integrins) provide communication of the different islet cell types with the materials that form the islet basal laminae and extracellular matrix. Here, we review what is known about these proteins and their signaling in pancreatic β-cells, with particular emphasis on the signaling provided by Cx36, given that this is the integral membrane protein involved in cell-to-cell communication, which has so far been mostly investigated for effects on beta cell functions. PMID:24278783

  11. Integrated Protein-Crystal-Growing Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Snyder, Robert S.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for research on growth of protein crystals dispenses drops of protein and precipitating solutions, provides controlled environment for crystalization, and stores crystals. Intended for use in microgravity of outer space, concept of apparatus also useful in design of self-contained terrestrial experiments for remote and/or automatic execution.

  12. A widespread family of bacterial cell wall assembly proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Marles-Wright, Jon; Cleverley, Robert M; Emmins, Robyn; Ishikawa, Shu; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Heinz, Nadja; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hoyland, Christopher N; Ogasawara, Naotake; Lewis, Richard J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Daniel, Richard A; Errington, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Teichoic acids and acidic capsular polysaccharides are major anionic cell wall polymers (APs) in many bacteria, with various critical cell functions, including maintenance of cell shape and structural integrity, charge and cation homeostasis, and multiple aspects of pathogenesis. We have identified the widespread LytR–Cps2A–Psr (LCP) protein family, of previously unknown function, as novel enzymes required for AP synthesis. Structural and biochemical analysis of several LCP proteins suggest that they carry out the final step of transferring APs from their lipid-linked precursor to cell wall peptidoglycan (PG). In Bacillus subtilis, LCP proteins are found in association with the MreB cytoskeleton, suggesting that MreB proteins coordinate the insertion of the major polymers, PG and AP, into the cell wall. PMID:21964069

  13. A nascent membrane protein is located adjacent to ER membrane proteins throughout its integration and translation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The immediate environment of nascent membrane proteins undergoing integration into the ER membrane was investigated by photocrosslinking. Nascent polypeptides of different lengths, each containing a single IgM transmembrane sequence that functions either as a stop-transfer or a signal-anchor sequence, were synthesized by in vitro translation of truncated mRNAs in the presence of N epsilon-(5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyl)- Lys-tRNA, signal recognition particle, and microsomal membranes. This yielded nascent chains with photoreactive probes at one end of the transmembrane sequence where two lysine residues are located. When irradiated, these nascent chains reacted covalently with several ER proteins. One prominent crosslinking target was a glycoprotein similar in size to a protein termed mp39, shown previously to be situated adjacent to a secretory protein during its translocation across the ER membrane (Krieg, U. C., A. E. Johnson, and P. Walter. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 109:2033-2043; Wiedmann, M., D. Goerlich, E. Hartmann, T. V. Kurzchalia, and T. A. Rapoport. 1989. FEBS (Fed. Eur. Biochem. Soc.) Lett. 257:263-268) and likely to be identical to a protein previously designated the signal sequence receptor (Wiedmann, M., T. V. Kurzchalia, E. Hartmann, and T. A. Rapoport. 1987. Nature (Lond.). 328:830-833). Changing the orientation of the transmembrane domain in the bilayer, or making the transmembrane domain the first topogenic sequence in the nascent chain instead of the second, did not significantly alter the identities of the ER proteins that were the primary crosslinking targets. Furthermore, the nascent chains crosslinked to the mp39-like glycoprotein and other microsomal proteins even after the cytoplasmic tail of the nascent chain had been lengthened by nearly 100 amino acids beyond the stop-transfer sequence. Yet when the nascent chain was allowed to terminate normally, the major photocrosslinks were no longer observed, including in particular that to the mp39-like

  14. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Matthew C.; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E.; Maerkl, Sebastian J.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3–4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF–DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering. PMID:26704969

  15. Integrating gene synthesis and microfluidic protein analysis for rapid protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Matthew C; Petrova, Ekaterina; Correia, Bruno E; Maerkl, Sebastian J

    2016-04-20

    The capability to rapidly design proteins with novel functions will have a significant impact on medicine, biotechnology and synthetic biology. Synthetic genes are becoming a commodity, but integrated approaches have yet to be developed that take full advantage of gene synthesis. We developed a solid-phase gene synthesis method based on asymmetric primer extension (APE) and coupled this process directly to high-throughput, on-chip protein expression, purification and characterization (via mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions, MITOMI). By completely circumventing molecular cloning and cell-based steps, APE-MITOMI reduces the time between protein design and quantitative characterization to 3-4 days. With APE-MITOMI we synthesized and characterized over 400 zinc-finger (ZF) transcription factors (TF), showing that although ZF TFs can be readily engineered to recognize a particular DNA sequence, engineering the precise binding energy landscape remains challenging. We also found that it is possible to engineer ZF-DNA affinity precisely and independently of sequence specificity and that in silico modeling can explain some of the observed affinity differences. APE-MITOMI is a generic approach that should facilitate fundamental studies in protein biophysics, and protein design/engineering.

  16. Synaptic integration by NG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjing; Dietrich, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    NG2 expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells stand out from other types of glial cells by receiving classical synaptic contacts from many neurons. This unconventional form of signaling between neurons and glial cells enables NG2 cells to receive information about the activity of presynaptic neurons with high temporal and spatial precision and has been postulated to be involved in activity-dependent myelination. While this still unproven concept is generally compelling, how NG2 cells may integrate synaptic input has hardly been addressed to date. Here we review the biophysical characteristics of synaptic currents and membrane properties of NG2 cells and discuss their capabilities to perform complex temporal and spatial signal integration and how this may be important for activity-dependent myelination. PMID:24391539

  17. Symplectic integrator for molecular dynamics of a protein in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hisashi; Nagai, Yoshinori; Kidera, Akinori

    1998-01-01

    The symplectic integrator is an algorithm for solving equations of motion, preserving the volume in phase space and ensuring a stable simulation. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and a protein in water using several variations of symplectic integrators. It was found that a fourth-order symplectic integrator of Calvo and Sanz-Serna generated a trajectory of much higher accuracy than the conventional Verlet and Gear methods with the same requirements for CPU time.

  18. 14-3-3 Proteins in Guard Cell Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cotelle, Valérie; Leonhardt, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells are specialized cells located at the leaf surface delimiting pores which control gas exchanges between the plant and the atmosphere. To optimize the CO2 uptake necessary for photosynthesis while minimizing water loss, guard cells integrate environmental signals to adjust stomatal aperture. The size of the stomatal pore is regulated by movements of the guard cells driven by variations in their volume and turgor. As guard cells perceive and transduce a wide array of environmental cues, they provide an ideal system to elucidate early events of plant signaling. Reversible protein phosphorylation events are known to play a crucial role in the regulation of stomatal movements. However, in some cases, phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to achieve complete protein regulation, but is necessary to mediate the binding of interactors that modulate protein function. Among the phosphopeptide-binding proteins, the 14-3-3 proteins are the best characterized in plants. The 14-3-3s are found as multiple isoforms in eukaryotes and have been shown to be involved in the regulation of stomatal movements. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about 14-3-3 roles in the regulation of their binding partners in guard cells: receptors, ion pumps, channels, protein kinases, and some of their substrates. Regulation of these targets by 14-3-3 proteins is discussed and related to their function in guard cells during stomatal movements in response to abiotic or biotic stresses. PMID:26858725

  19. Integrated regulation of motor-driven organelle transport by scaffolding proteins.

    PubMed

    Fu, Meng-meng; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2014-10-01

    Intracellular trafficking pathways, including endocytosis, autophagy, and secretion, rely on directed organelle transport driven by the opposing microtubule motor proteins kinesin and dynein. Precise spatial and temporal targeting of vesicles and organelles requires the integrated regulation of these opposing motors, which are often bound simultaneously to the same cargo. Recent progress demonstrates that organelle-associated scaffolding proteins, including Milton/TRAKs (trafficking kinesin-binding protein), JIP1, JIP3 (JNK-interacting proteins), huntingtin, and Hook1, interact with molecular motors to coordinate activity and sustain unidirectional transport. Scaffolding proteins also bind to upstream regulatory proteins, including kinases and GTPases, to modulate transport in the cell. This integration of regulatory control with motor activity allows for cargo-specific changes in the transport or targeting of organelles in response to cues from the complex cellular environment.

  20. Function of nuclear membrane proteins in shaping the nuclear envelope integrity during closed mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-08

    The nuclear envelope (NE) not only protects the genome from being directly accessed by detrimental agents but also regulates genome organization. Breaches in NE integrity threaten genome stability and impede cellular function. Nonetheless, the NE constantly remodels, and NE integrity is endangered in dividing or differentiating cells. Specifically, in unicellular eukaryotes undergoing closed mitosis, the NE expands instead of breaking down during chromosome segregation. The newly assembling nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) penetrate the existing NE in interphase. A peculiar example of NE remodeling during nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena involves formation of the redundant NE and clustered NPCs. Even under these conditions, the NE remains intact. Many recent studies on unicellular organisms have revealed that nuclear membrane proteins, such as LEM-domain proteins, play a role in maintaining NE integrity. This review summarizes and discusses how nuclear membrane proteins participate in NE integrity.

  1. Medium-throughput production of recombinant human proteins: protein production in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Pravin; Strain-Damerell, Claire; Gileadi, Opher; Burgess-Brown, Nicola A

    2014-01-01

    This chapter describes the step-by-step methods employed by the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) for screening and producing proteins in the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). This eukaryotic expression system was selected and a screening process established in 2007 as a measure to tackle the more challenging kinase, RNA-DNA processing and integral membrane protein families on our target list. Here, we discuss our platform for identifying soluble proteins from 3 ml of insect cell culture and describe the procedures involved in producing protein from liter-scale cultures. Although not discussed in this chapter, the same process can also be applied to integral membrane proteins (IMPs) with slight adaptations to the purification procedure.

  2. SAS-1 is a C2 domain protein critical for centriole integrity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    von Tobel, Lukas; Mikeladze-Dvali, Tamara; Delattre, Marie; Balestra, Fernando R; Blanchoud, Simon; Finger, Susanne; Knott, Graham; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome.

  3. SAS-1 Is a C2 Domain Protein Critical for Centriole Integrity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Marie; Balestra, Fernando R.; Blanchoud, Simon; Finger, Susanne; Knott, Graham; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome. PMID:25412110

  4. Isolation of plant cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Boudart, Georges; Borderies, Giséle; Charmont, Stephane; Lafitte, Claude; Rossignol, Michel; Canut, Herve; Pont-Lezica, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The quality of a proteomic analysis of a cell compartment strongly depends on the reliability of the isolation procedure for the cell compartment of interest. Plant cell walls possess specific drawbacks: (1) the lack of a surrounding membrane may result in the loss of cell wall proteins (CWP) during the isolation procedure; (2) polysaccharide networks of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectins form potential traps for contaminants such as intracellular proteins; (3) the presence of proteins interacting in many different ways with the polysaccharide matrix require different procedures to elute them from the cell wall. Three categories of CWP are distinguished: labile proteins that have little or no interactions with cell wall components, weakly bound proteins extractable with salts, and strongly bound proteins. Two alternative protocols are decribed for cell wall proteomics: (1) nondestructive techniques allowing the extraction of labile or weakly bound CWP without damaging the plasma membrane; (2) destructive techniques to isolate cell walls from which weakly or strongly bound CWP can be extracted. These protocols give very low levels of contamination by intracellular proteins. Their application should lead to a realistic view of the cell wall proteome at least for labile and weakly bound CWP extractable by salts.

  5. Arf proteins in cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Casalou, Cristina; Faustino, Alexandra; Barral, Duarte C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of small GTP-binding (G) proteins regulate several aspects of membrane trafficking, such as vesicle budding, tethering and cytoskeleton organization. Arf family members, including Arf-like (Arl) proteins have been implicated in several essential cellular functions, like cell spreading and migration. These functions are used by cancer cells to disseminate and invade the tissues surrounding the primary tumor, leading to the formation of metastases. Indeed, Arf and Arl proteins, as well as their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) have been found to be abnormally expressed in different cancer cell types and human cancers. Here, we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of Arf family proteins and their GEFs and GAPs in cancer progression, focusing on 3 different mechanisms: cell-cell adhesion, integrin internalization and recycling, and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:27589148

  6. Integrated process for high conversion and high yield protein PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decades, PEGylation has become a powerful technique to increase the in vivo circulation half-life of therapeutic proteins while maintaining their activity. The development of new therapeutic proteins is likely to require further improvement of the PEGylation methods to reach even better selectivity and yield for reduced costs. The intensification of the PEGylation process was investigated through the integration of a chromatographic step in order to increase yield and conversion for the production of mono-PEGylated protein. Lysozyme was used as a model protein to demonstrate the feasibility of such approach. In the integrated reaction/separation process, chromatography was used as fractionation technique in order to isolate and recycle the unreacted protein from the PEGylated products. This allows operating the reactor with short reaction times so as to minimize the production of multi-PEGylated proteins (i.e., conjugated to more than one polymer). That is, the reaction is stopped before the desired product (i.e., the mono-PEGylated protein) can further react, thus leading to limited conversion but high yield. The recycling of the unreacted protein was then considered to drive the protein overall conversion to completion. This approach has great potential to improve processes whose yield is limited by the further reaction of the product leading to undesirable by-products. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1711-1718. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. MALDI tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins from ocular tissues.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Danielle B; Gillam, Christopher J; Grey, Angus C; Han, Jun; Schey, Kevin L

    2008-06-01

    MALDI tissue profiling and imaging have become valuable tools for rapid, direct analysis of tissues to investigate spatial distributions of proteins, potentially leading to an enhanced understanding of the molecular basis of disease. Sample preparation methods developed to date for these techniques produce protein expression profiles from predominantly hydrophilic, soluble proteins. The ability to obtain information about the spatial distribution of integral membrane proteins is critical to more fully understand their role in physiological processes, including transport, adhesion, and signaling. In this article, a sample preparation method for direct tissue profiling of integral membrane proteins is presented. Spatially resolved profiles for the abundant lens membrane proteins aquaporin 0 (AQP0) and MP20, and the retinal membrane protein opsin, were obtained using this method. MALDI tissue profiling results were validated by analysis of dissected tissue prepared by traditional membrane protein processing methods. Furthermore, direct tissue profiling of lens membrane proteins revealed age related post-translational modifications, as well as a novel modification that had not been detected using conventional tissue homogenization methods.

  8. Integrated regenerative fuel cell experimental evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of an integrated regenerative fuel cell (IRFC) concept. The IRFC consists of a separate fuel cell unit and electrolysis cell unit in the same structure, with internal storage of fuel cell product water and external storage of electrolysis cell produced hydrogen and oxygen. The fuel cell unit incorporates an enhanced Orbiter-type cell capable of improved performance at reduced weight. The electrolysis cell features a NiCo2O4 catalyst oxygen evolution eletrode with a porous Teflon cover to retard electrolyte loss. Six complete IRFC assemblies were assembled and performance tested at an operating temperature of 200 F (93.3 C) and reactant pressures up to 170 psia (117.2 n/cu cm) on IRFC No. 4. Anomalous pressure charge/discharge characteristics were encountered during performance evaluation. A reversible fuel cell incorporating a proprietary bi-functional oxygen electrode operated satisfactory at 200 F (93.3 C) at reactant pressures up to 50 psia (41.4 n/cu cm) as a regenerative fuel cell for one cycle, before developing an electrical short in the fuel cell mode. Electrolysis cell 300-hour endurance tests demonstrated the electrolyte retention capability of the electrode Teflon cover and the performance stability of the bi-functional oxygen electrode at high potential.

  9. Phase separation of integral membrane proteins in Triton X-114 solution.

    PubMed

    Bordier, C

    1981-02-25

    A solution of the nonionic detergent Triton X-114 is homogeneous at 0 degrees C but separates in an aqueous phase and a detergent phase above 20 degrees C. The extent of this detergent phase separation increases with the temperature and is sensitive to the presence of other surfactants. The partition of proteins during phase separation in solutions of Triton X-114 is investigated. Hydrophilic proteins are found exclusively in the aqueous phase, and integral membrane proteins with an amphiphilic nature are recovered in the detergent phase. Triton X-114 is used to solubilize membranes and whole cells, and the soluble material is submitted to phase separation. Integral membrane proteins can thus be separated from hydrophilic proteins and identified as such in crude membrane or cellular detergent extracts.

  10. Senescent cells communicate via intercellular protein transfer

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Anat; Perelmutter, Meirav; Gal, Hilah; Burton, Dominick G.A.; Ovadya, Yossi; Vadai, Ezra; Geiger, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells mostly rely on extracellular molecules to transfer signals to other cells. However, in stress conditions, more robust mechanisms might be necessary to facilitate cell–cell communications. Cellular senescence, a stress response associated with permanent exit from the cell cycle and the development of an immunogenic phenotype, limits both tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Paradoxically, the long-term presence of senescent cells can promote tissue damage and aging within their microenvironment. Soluble factors secreted from senescent cells mediate some of these cell-nonautonomous effects. However, it is unknown whether senescent cells impact neighboring cells by other mechanisms. Here we show that senescent cells directly transfer proteins to neighboring cells and that this process facilitates immune surveillance of senescent cells by natural killer (NK) cells. We found that transfer of proteins to NK and T cells is increased in the murine preneoplastic pancreas, a site where senescent cells are present in vivo. Proteomic analysis and functional studies of the transferred proteins revealed that the transfer is strictly dependent on cell–cell contact and CDC42-regulated actin polymerization and is mediated at least partially by cytoplasmic bridges. These findings reveal a novel mode of intercellular communication by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance and might impact tumorigenesis and tissue aging. PMID:25854920

  11. Genome integrity, stem cells and hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Balazs, Endre A.

    2012-01-01

    Faithful preservation of genome integrity is the critical mission of stem cells as well as of germ cells. Reviewed are the following mechanisms involved in protecting DNA in these cells: (a) The efflux machinery that can pump out variety of genotoxins in ATP-dependent manner; (b) the mechanisms maintaining minimal metabolic activity which reduces generation of reactive oxidants, by-products of aerobic respiration; (c) the role of hypoxic niche of stem cells providing a gradient of variable oxygen tension; (d) (e) the presence of hyaluronan (HA) and HA receptors on stem cells and in the niche; (f) the role of HA in protecting DNA from oxidative damage; (g) the specific function of HA in protecting DNA in stem cells; (h) the interactions of HA with sperm cells and oocytes that also may shield their DNA from oxidative damage, and (e) mechanisms by which HA exerts the anti-oxidant activity. While HA has multitude of functions its anti-oxidant capabilities are often overlooked but may be of significance in preservation of integrity of stem and germ cells genome. PMID:22383371

  12. Association of lipids with integral membrane surface proteins of Mycoplasma hyorhinis

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, T.M.; Boyer, M.J.; Keith, J.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.S.

    1988-02-01

    Triton X-114 (TX-114)-phase fractionation was used to identify and characterize integral membrane surface proteins of the wall-less procaryote Mycoplasma hyorhinis GDL. Phase fractionation of mycoplasmas followed by analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed selective partitioning of approximately 30 (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled intrinsic membrane proteins into the TX-114 phase. Similar analysis of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled cells showed that approximately 20 proteins of this organism were associated with lipid, all of which also efficiently partitioned as integral membrane components into the detergent phase. Immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation of TX-114-phase proteins from /sup 125/I-surface-labeled cells with four monoclonal antibodies to distinct surface epitopes of M. hyorhinis identified surface proteins p120, p70, p42, and p23 as intrinsic membrane components. Immunoprecipitation of (/sup 3/H)palmitate-labeled TX-114-phase proteins further established that surface proteins p120, p70, and p23 (a molecule that mediates complement-dependent mycoplasmacidal monoclonal antibody activity) were among the lipid-associated proteins of this organism. Two of these proteins, p120 and p123, were acidic (pI less than or equal to 4.5), as shown by two-dimensional isoelectric focusing. This study established that M. hyorhinis contains an abundance of integral membrane proteins tightly associated with lipids and that many of these proteins are exposed at the external surface of the single limiting plasma membrane. Monoclonal antibodies are reported that will allow detailed analysis of the structure and processing of lipid-associated mycoplasma proteins.

  13. Protein synthesis as an integral quality control mechanism during ageing.

    PubMed

    Charmpilas, Nikolaos; Daskalaki, Ioanna; Papandreou, Margarita Elena; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2015-09-01

    Ageing is manifested as functional and structural deterioration that affects cell and tissue physiology. mRNA translation is a central cellular process, supplying cells with newly synthesized proteins. Accumulating evidence suggests that alterations in protein synthesis are not merely a corollary but rather a critical factor for the progression of ageing. Here, we survey protein synthesis regulatory mechanisms and focus on the pre-translational regulation of the process exerted by non-coding RNA species, RNA binding proteins and alterations of intrinsic RNA properties. In addition, we discuss the tight relationship between mRNA translation and two central pathways that modulate ageing, namely the insulin/IGF-1 and TOR signalling cascades. A thorough understanding of the complex interplay between protein synthesis regulation and ageing will provide critical insights into the pathogenesis of age-related disorders, associated with impaired proteostasis and protein quality control.

  14. PROSNET: INTEGRATING HOMOLOGY WITH MOLECULAR NETWORKS FOR PROTEIN FUNCTION PREDICTION

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng; Qu, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Automated annotation of protein function has become a critical task in the post-genomic era. Network-based approaches and homology-based approaches have been widely used and recently tested in large-scale community-wide assessment experiments. It is natural to integrate network data with homology information to further improve the predictive performance. However, integrating these two heterogeneous, high-dimensional and noisy datasets is non-trivial. In this work, we introduce a novel protein function prediction algorithm ProSNet. An integrated heterogeneous network is first built to include molecular networks of multiple species and link together homologous proteins across multiple species. Based on this integrated network, a dimensionality reduction algorithm is introduced to obtain compact low-dimensional vectors to encode proteins in the network. Finally, we develop machine learning classification algorithms that take the vectors as input and make predictions by transferring annotations both within each species and across different species. Extensive experiments on five major species demonstrate that our integration of homology with molecular networks substantially improves the predictive performance over existing approaches. PMID:27896959

  15. Integral membrane proteins in proteomics. How to break open the black box?

    PubMed

    Vit, O; Petrak, J

    2017-02-05

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are coded by 20-30% of human genes and execute important functions - transmembrane transport, signal transduction, cell-cell communication, cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, and many other processes. Due to their hydrophobicity, low expression and lack of trypsin cleavage sites in their transmembrane segments, IMPs have been generally under-represented in routine proteomic analyses. However, the field of membrane proteomics has changed markedly in the past decade, namely due to the introduction of filter assisted sample preparation (FASP), the establishment of cell surface capture (CSC) protocols, and the development of methods that enable analysis of the hydrophobic transmembrane segments. This review will summarize the recent developments in the field and outline the most successful strategies for the analysis of integral membrane proteins.

  16. Cultivating Insect Cells To Produce Recombinant Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn; Goodwin, Thomas; Prewett, Tacey; Andrews, Angela; Francis, Karen; O'Connor, Kim

    1996-01-01

    Method of producing recombinant proteins involves growth of insect cells in nutrient solution in cylindrical bioreactor rotating about cylindrical axis, oriented horizontally and infecting cells with viruses into which genes of selected type cloned. Genes in question those encoding production of desired proteins. Horizontal rotating bioreactor preferred for use in method, denoted by acronym "HARV", described in "High-Aspect-Ratio Rotating Cell-Culture Vessel" (MSC-21662).

  17. Piscine reovirus encodes a cytotoxic, non-fusogenic, integral membrane protein and previously unrecognized virion outer-capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Key, Tim; Read, Jolene; Nibert, Max L; Duncan, Roy

    2013-05-01

    Piscine reovirus (PRV) is a tentative new member of the family Reoviridae and has been linked to heart and skeletal muscle inflammation in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Recent sequence-based evidence suggests that PRV is about equally related to members of the genera Orthoreovirus and Aquareovirus. Sequence similarities have also suggested that PRV might encode a fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein, which in turn suggests that PRV might be the prototype of a new genus with syncytium-inducing potential. In previous support of this designation has been the absence of identifiable PRV-encoded homologues of either the virion outer-clamp protein of ortho- and aquareoviruses or the virion outer-fibre protein of most orthoreoviruses. In the current report, we have provided experimental evidence that the putative p13 FAST protein of PRV lacks the defining feature of the FAST protein family - the ability to induce syncytium formation. Instead, p13 is the first example of a cytosolic, integral membrane protein encoded by ortho- or aquareoviruses, and induces cytotoxicity in the absence of cell-cell fusion. Sequence analysis also identified signature motifs of the outer-clamp and outer-fibre proteins of other reoviruses in two of the predicted PRV gene products. Based on these findings, we conclude that PRV does not encode a FAST protein and is therefore unlikely to be a new fusogenic reovirus. The presence of a novel integral membrane protein and two previously unrecognized, essential outer-capsid proteins has important implications for the biology, evolution and taxonomic classification of this virus.

  18. Predicting Protein Function via Semantic Integration of Multiple Networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoxian; Fu, Guangyuan; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Hailong

    2016-01-01

    Determining the biological functions of proteins is one of the key challenges in the post-genomic era. The rapidly accumulated large volumes of proteomic and genomic data drives to develop computational models for automatically predicting protein function in large scale. Recent approaches focus on integrating multiple heterogeneous data sources and they often get better results than methods that use single data source alone. In this paper, we investigate how to integrate multiple biological data sources with the biological knowledge, i.e., Gene Ontology (GO), for protein function prediction. We propose a method, called SimNet, to Semantically integrate multiple functional association Networks derived from heterogenous data sources. SimNet firstly utilizes GO annotations of proteins to capture the semantic similarity between proteins and introduces a semantic kernel based on the similarity. Next, SimNet constructs a composite network, obtained as a weighted summation of individual networks, and aligns the network with the kernel to get the weights assigned to individual networks. Then, it applies a network-based classifier on the composite network to predict protein function. Experiment results on heterogenous proteomic data sources of Yeast, Human, Mouse, and Fly show that, SimNet not only achieves better (or comparable) results than other related competitive approaches, but also takes much less time. The Matlab codes of SimNet are available at https://sites.google.com/site/guoxian85/simnet.

  19. Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells.

    PubMed

    Danielsson, Jens; Mu, Xin; Lang, Lisa; Wang, Huabing; Binolfi, Andres; Theillet, François-Xavier; Bekei, Beata; Logan, Derek T; Selenko, Philipp; Wennerström, Håkan; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2015-10-06

    Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a β-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 °C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein's interplay with the functionally optimized "interaction landscape" of the cellular interior.

  20. Cell surface engineering with edible protein nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Drachuk, Irina; Shchepelina, Olga; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Stone, Morley; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-09-23

    Natural protein (silk fibroin) nanoshells are assembled on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells without compromising their viability. The nanoshells facilitate initial protection of the cells and allow them to function in encapsulated state for some time period, afterwards being completely biodegraded and consumed by the cells. In contrast to a traditional methanol treatment, the gentle ionic treatment suggested here stabilizes the shell silk fibroin structure but does not compromise the viability of the cells, as indicated by the fast response of the encapsulated cells, with an immediate activation by the inducer molecules. Extremely high viability rates (up to 97%) and preserved activity of encapsulated cells are facilitated by cytocompatibility of the natural proteins and the formation of highly porous shells in contrast to traditional polyelectrolyte-based materials. Moreover, in a high contrast to traditional synthetic shells, the silk proteins are biodegradable and can be consumed by cells at a later stage of growth, thus releasing the cells from their temporary protective capsules. These on-demand encapsulated cells can be considered a valuable platform for biocompatible and biodegradable cell encapsulation, controlled cell protection in a synthetic environment, transfer to a device environment, and cell implantation followed by biodegradation and consumption of protective protein shells.

  1. Modifications of wheat germ cell-free system for functional proteomics of plant membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Functional proteomics of plant membrane proteins is an important approach to understand the comprehensive architecture of each metabolic pathway in plants. One bottleneck in the characterization of membrane proteins is the difficulty in producing sufficient quantities of functional protein for analysis. Here, we describe three methods for membrane protein production utilizing a wheat germ cell-free protein expression system. Owing to the open nature of cell-free synthesis reaction, protein synthesis can be modified with components necessary to produce functional protein. In this way we have developed modifications to a wheat germ cell-free system for the production of functional membrane proteins. Supplementation of liposomes or detergents allows the synthesis of functional integral membrane proteins. Furthermore, supplementation of myristic acid enables synthesis of N-myristylated peripheral membrane proteins. These modified cell-free synthesis methods facilitate the preparation and subsequent functional analyses of a wide variety of membrane proteins.

  2. Integrating Protein Engineering and Bioorthogonal Click Conjugation for Extracellular Vesicle Modulation and Intracellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming; Altinoglu, Sarah; Takeda, Yuji S.; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are small, cell-secreted vesicles that transfer proteins and genetic information between cells. This intercellular transmission regulates many physiological and pathological processes. Therefore, exosomes have emerged as novel biomarkers for disease diagnosis and as nanocarriers for drug delivery. Here, we report an easy-to-adapt and highly versatile methodology to modulate exosome composition and conjugate exosomes for intracellular delivery. Our strategy combines the metabolic labeling of newly synthesized proteins or glycan/glycoproteins of exosome-secreting cells with active azides and bioorthogonal click conjugation to modify and functionalize the exosomes. The azide-integrated can be conjugated to a variety of small molecules and proteins and can efficiently deliver conjugates into cells. The metabolic engineering of exosomes diversifies the chemistry of exosomes and expands the functions that can be introduced into exosomes, providing novel, powerful tools to study the roles of exosomes in biology and expand the biomedical potential of exosomes. PMID:26529317

  3. The role of adapter proteins in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Koretzky, G A; Boerth, N J

    1999-12-01

    Engagement of antigen receptors on lymphocytes leads to a myriad of complex signal transduction cascades. Recently, work from several laboratories has led to the identification and characterization of novel adapter molecules, proteins with no intrinsic enzymatic activity but which integrate signal transduction pathways by mediating protein-protein interactions. Interestingly, it appears that many of these adapter proteins play as critical a role as the effector enzymes themselves in both lymphocyte development and activation. This review describes some of the biochemical and molecular features of several of these newly identified hematopoietic cell-specific adapter molecules highlighting their importance in regulating (both positively and negatively) signal transduction mediated by the T cell antigen receptor.

  4. Fibrous parylene-C thin-film substrates for implant integration and protein assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lai

    Polymeric biomaterials are used in medical devices that can be surgically implanted in human beings. Long-term bio-compatibility and strong tissue integration are essential to the longevity of implanted prosthesis. Surface roughness and wettability are essential for effective cellular attachment and integration. Therefore, materials should be tailored so that their surface conditions are optimal for excellent integration with selected proteins and cells. This dissertation investigates the development of parylene-C thin films with good control over surface roughness and surface wettability. Based on these qualities, different degrees of cell and protein adhesion have been achieved, depending on surface properties and the cell/protein type. In addition, a morphology-composition gradient panel has been developed with a wide range of surface roughness and wettability, which can be used to optimize tissue growth with high-throughput screening assays and with gradient surfaces. The effects of the surface roughness and wettability of parylene-C thin films on the adhesion of human fibroblast cells and biotinylated serum proteins have been investigated. In addition, a simple method of fabricating nano-/micro-textured, free-standing, parylene-C thin-film substrate has been developed, which has been demonstrated to support cellular attachment and growth.

  5. Lrp4 Modulates Extracellular Integration of Cell Signaling Pathways in Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohazama, Atsushi; Johnson, Eric B.; Ota, Masato S.; Choi, Hong J.; Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Oommen, Shelly; Itoh, Nobuyuki; Eto, Kazuhiro; Gritli-Linde, Amel; Herz, Joachim; Sharpe, Paul T.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which cell signaling is integrated outside the cell is not currently appreciated. We show that a member of the low-density receptor-related protein family, Lrp4 modulates and integrates Bmp and canonical Wnt signalling during tooth morphogenesis by binding the secreted Bmp antagonist protein Wise. Mouse mutants of Lrp4 and Wise exhibit identical tooth phenotypes that include supernumerary incisors and molars, and fused molars. We propose that the Lrp4/Wise interaction acts as an extracellular integrator of epithelial-mesenchymal cell signaling. Wise, secreted from mesenchyme cells binds to BMP's and also to Lrp4 that is expressed on epithelial cells. This binding then results in the modulation of Wnt activity in the epithelial cells. Thus in this context Wise acts as an extracellular signaling molecule linking two signaling pathways. We further show that a downstream mediator of this integration is the Shh signaling pathway. PMID:19116665

  6. Protein-Protein Interactions: Gene Acronym Redundancies and Current Limitations Precluding Automated Data Integration

    PubMed Central

    Casado-Vela, Juan; Matthiesen, Rune; Sellés, Susana; Naranjo, José Ramón

    2013-01-01

    Understanding protein interaction networks and their dynamic changes is a major challenge in modern biology. Currently, several experimental and in silico approaches allow the screening of protein interactors in a large-scale manner. Therefore, the bulk of information on protein interactions deposited in databases and peer-reviewed published literature is constantly growing. Multiple databases interfaced from user-friendly web tools recently emerged to facilitate the task of protein interaction data retrieval and data integration. Nevertheless, as we evidence in this report, despite the current efforts towards data integration, the quality of the information on protein interactions retrieved by in silico approaches is frequently incomplete and may even list false interactions. Here we point to some obstacles precluding confident data integration, with special emphasis on protein interactions, which include gene acronym redundancies and protein synonyms. Three human proteins (choline kinase, PPIase and uromodulin) and three different web-based data search engines focused on protein interaction data retrieval (PSICQUIC, DASMI and BIPS) were used to explain the potential occurrence of undesired errors that should be considered by researchers in the field. We demonstrate that, despite the recent initiatives towards data standardization, manual curation of protein interaction networks based on literature searches are still required to remove potential false positives. A three-step workflow consisting of: (i) data retrieval from multiple databases, (ii) peer-reviewed literature searches, and (iii) data curation and integration, is proposed as the best strategy to gather updated information on protein interactions. Finally, this strategy was applied to compile bona fide information on human DREAM protein interactome, which constitutes liable training datasets that can be used to improve computational predictions. PMID:28250396

  7. Protein-Protein Interactions: Gene Acronym Redundancies and Current Limitations Precluding Automated Data Integration.

    PubMed

    Casado-Vela, Juan; Matthiesen, Rune; Sellés, Susana; Naranjo, José Ramón

    2013-05-31

    Understanding protein interaction networks and their dynamic changes is a major challenge in modern biology. Currently, several experimental and in silico approaches allow the screening of protein interactors in a large-scale manner. Therefore, the bulk of information on protein interactions deposited in databases and peer-reviewed published literature is constantly growing. Multiple databases interfaced from user-friendly web tools recently emerged to facilitate the task of protein interaction data retrieval and data integration. Nevertheless, as we evidence in this report, despite the current efforts towards data integration, the quality of the information on protein interactions retrieved by in silico approaches is frequently incomplete and may even list false interactions. Here we point to some obstacles precluding confident data integration, with special emphasis on protein interactions, which include gene acronym redundancies and protein synonyms. Three human proteins (choline kinase, PPIase and uromodulin) and three different web-based data search engines focused on protein interaction data retrieval (PSICQUIC, DASMI and BIPS) were used to explain the potential occurrence of undesired errors that should be considered by researchers in the field. We demonstrate that, despite the recent initiatives towards data standardization, manual curation of protein interaction networks based on literature searches are still required to remove potential false positives. A three-step workflow consisting of: (i) data retrieval from multiple databases, (ii) peer-reviewed literature searches, and (iii) data curation and integration, is proposed as the best strategy to gather updated information on protein interactions. Finally, this strategy was applied to compile bona fide information on human DREAM protein interactome, which constitutes liable training datasets that can be used to improve computational predictions.

  8. Affinity Monolith-Integrated Microchips for Protein Purification and Concentration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Changlu; Sun, Xiuhua; Wang, Huaixin; Qiao, Wei; Hu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is a valuable method to purify and concentrate minute amount of proteins. Monoliths with epoxy groups for affinity immobilization were prepared by direct in-situ photopolymerization of glycidyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate in porogenic solvents consisting of 1-dodecanol and cyclohexanol. By integrating affinity monoliths onto a microfluidic system, targeted biomolecules can be captured and retained on affinity column, while other biomolecules having no specific interactions toward the immobilized ligands flow through the microchannel. Therefore, proteins which remain on the affinity column are purified and concentrated, and then eluted by appropriate solutions and finally, separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis. This integrated microfluidic device has been applied to the purification and separation of specific proteins (FITC-labeled human serum albumin and IgG) in a mixture.

  9. Isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Skora, Lukasz; Shrestha, Binesh; Gossert, Alvar D

    2015-01-01

    Protein targets of contemporary research are often membrane proteins, multiprotein complexes, secreted proteins, or other proteins of human origin. These are difficult to express in the standard expression host used for most nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, Escherichia coli. Insect cells represent an attractive alternative, since they have become a well-established expression system and simple solutions have been developed for generation of viruses to efficiently introduce the target protein DNA into cells. Insect cells enable production of a larger fraction of the human proteome in a properly folded way than bacteria, as insect cells have a very similar set of cytosolic chaperones and a closely related secretory pathway. Here, the limited and defined glycosylation pattern that insect cells produce is an advantage for structural biology studies. For these reasons, insect cells have been established as the most widely used eukaryotic expression host for crystallographic studies. In the past decade, significant advancements have enabled amino acid type-specific as well as uniform isotope labeling of proteins in insect cells, turning them into an attractive expression host for NMR studies.

  10. Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa Balan; Debashis Dey; Sukru-Alper Eker; Max Peter; Pavel Sokolov; Greg Wotzak

    2004-01-31

    This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by gasified coal. System concepts that integrate a coal gasifier with a SOFC, a gas turbine, and a steam turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. The initial cost of both selected configurations was found to be comparable with the IGCC system costs at approximately $1700/kW. An absorption-based CO2 isolation scheme was developed, and its penalty on the system performance and cost was estimated to be less approximately 2.7% and $370/kW. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  11. Tumor cell metabolism: an integral view.

    PubMed

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Báez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto

    2011-12-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism.

  12. Targeting Cell Survival Proteins for Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Manoj K.; Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit Kumar; Deb, Lokesh; Huang, Jiamin; Karelia, Deepkamal N.; Amin, Shantu G.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Escaping from cell death is one of the adaptations that enable cancer cells to stave off anticancer therapies. The key players in avoiding apoptosis are collectively known as survival proteins. Survival proteins comprise the Bcl-2, inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP), and heat shock protein (HSP) families. The aberrant expression of these proteins is associated with a range of biological activities that promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, and resistance to therapy. Several therapeutic strategies that target survival proteins are based on mimicking BH3 domains or the IAP-binding motif or competing with ATP for the Hsp90 ATP-binding pocket. Alternative strategies, including use of nutraceuticals, transcriptional repression, and antisense oligonucleotides, provide options to target survival proteins. This review focuses on the role of survival proteins in chemoresistance and current therapeutic strategies in preclinical or clinical trials that target survival protein signaling pathways. Recent approaches to target survival proteins-including nutraceuticals, small-molecule inhibitors, peptides, and Bcl-2-specific mimetic are explored. Therapeutic inventions targeting survival proteins are promising strategies to inhibit cancer cell survival and chemoresistance. However, complete eradication of resistance is a distant dream. For a successful clinical outcome, pretreatment with novel survival protein inhibitors alone or in combination with conventional therapies holds great promise. PMID:26927133

  13. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  14. Integral membrane protein interaction with Triton cytoskeletons of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P

    1979-10-19

    The organization of erythrocyte membrane lipids and proteins has been studied following the release of cytoplasmic components with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. After detergent extraction, a detergent-resistant complex called the erythrocyte cytoskeleton is separated from detergent, solubilized lipid and protein by sucrose buoyant density sedimentation. In cytoskeletons prepared under isotonic conditions all of the major erythrocyte membrane proteins are retained except for the integral protein, glycophorin, which is quantitatively solubilized and another integral glycoprotein, band 3, which is only 60% removed. When cytoskeletons are prepared in hypertonic KCl solutions, band 3 is fully solubilized along with bands 2.1 and 4.2 and several minor components. The resulting cytoskeletons have the same morphology as those prepared in isotonic buffer but they are composed of only three major peripheral proteins, spectrin, actin and band 4.1. We have designated this peripheral protein complex the 'shell' of the erythrocyte membrane, and have shown that the attachment of band 3 to the shell satisfies the criteria for a specific interaction. Although Triton did affect erythrocyte shape, cytoskeleton lipid content and the activity of membrane proteases, there was no indication that Triton altered the attachment of band 3 to the shell. We suggest that band 3 attaches to the shell as part of a ternary complex of bands 2.1, 3 and 4.2.

  15. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells transdifferentiate in vitro and integrate into the retina in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Guan, Liping; Huang, Bing; Li, Weihua; Su, Qiao; Yu, Minbin; Xu, Xiaoping; Luo, Ting; Lin, Shaochun; Sun, Xuerong; Chen, Mengfei; Chen, Xigu

    2011-06-01

    Adult peripheral blood-derived cells are able to differentiate into a variety of cell types, including nerve cells, liver-like cells and epithelial cells. However, their differentiation into retina-like cells is controversial. In the present study, transdifferentiation potential of human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells into retina-like cells and integration into the retina of mice were investigated. Freshly isolated adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells were divided into two groups: cells in group I were cultured in neural stem cell medium, and cells in group II were exposed to conditioned medium from rat retinal tissue culture. After 5 days, several distinct cell morphologies were observed, including standard mononuclear, neurons with one or two axons and elongated glial-like cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of neural stem cell, neuron and retina cell markers demonstrated that cells in both groups were nestin-, MAP2 (microtubule-associated protein)- and GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein)-positive. Flow cytometry results suggested a significant increase in nestin-, MAP2- and CD16-positive cells in group I and nestin-, GFAP-, MAP2-, vimentin- and rhodopsin-positive cells in group II. To determine survival, migration and integration in vivo, cell suspensions (containing group I or group II cells) were injected into the vitreous or the peritoneum. Tissue specimens were obtained and immunostained 4 weeks after transplantation. We found that cells delivered by intravitreal injection integrated into the retina. Labelled cells were not detected in the retina of mice receiving differentiated cells by intraperitoneal injection, but cells (groups I and II) were detected in the liver and spleen. Our findings revealed that human adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells could be induced to transdifferentiate into neural precursor cells and retinal progenitor cells in vitro, and the differentiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells can migrate and integrate

  16. Coal Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell System Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Wotzak; Chellappa Balan; Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-08-01

    The pre-baseline configuration for an Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) system has been developed. This case uses current gasification, clean-up, gas turbine, and bottoming cycle technologies together with projected large planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology. This pre-baseline case will be used as a basis for identifying the critical factors impacting system performance and the major technical challenges in implementing such systems. Top-level system requirements were used as the criteria to evaluate and down select alternative sub-systems. The top choice subsystems were subsequently integrated to form the pre-baseline case. The down-selected pre-baseline case includes a British Gas Lurgi (BGL) gasification and cleanup sub-system integrated with a GE Power Systems 6FA+e gas turbine and the Hybrid Power Generation Systems planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) sub-system. The overall efficiency of this system is estimated to be 43.0%. The system efficiency of the pre-baseline system provides a benchmark level for further optimization efforts in this program.

  17. 'Unite and conquer': enhanced prediction of protein subcellular localization by integrating multiple specialized tools

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao Qing; Burger, Gertraud

    2007-01-01

    Background Knowing the subcellular location of proteins provides clues to their function as well as the interconnectivity of biological processes. Dozens of tools are available for predicting protein location in the eukaryotic cell. Each tool performs well on certain data sets, but their predictions often disagree for a given protein. Since the individual tools each have particular strengths, we set out to integrate them in a way that optimally exploits their potential. The method we present here is applicable to various subcellular locations, but tailored for predicting whether or not a protein is localized in mitochondria. Knowledge of the mitochondrial proteome is relevant to understanding the role of this organelle in global cellular processes. Results In order to develop a method for enhanced prediction of subcellular localization, we integrated the outputs of available localization prediction tools by several strategies, and tested the performance of each strategy with known mitochondrial proteins. The accuracy obtained (up to 92%) surpasses by far the individual tools. The method of integration proved crucial to the performance. For the prediction of mitochondrion-located proteins, integration via a two-layer decision tree clearly outperforms simpler methods, as it allows emphasis of biologically relevant features such as the mitochondrial targeting peptide and transmembrane domains. Conclusion We developed an approach that enhances the prediction accuracy of mitochondrial proteins by uniting the strength of specialized tools. The combination of machine-learning based integration with biological expert knowledge leads to improved performance. This approach also alleviates the conundrum of how to choose between conflicting predictions. Our approach is easy to implement, and applicable to predicting subcellular locations other than mitochondria, as well as other biological features. For a trial of our approach, we provide a webservice for mitochondrial protein

  18. The adaptor protein Cindr regulates JNK activity to maintain epithelial sheet integrity.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Hannah W R; van Rensburg, Samuel H; Feiler, Christina E; Johnson, Ruth I

    2016-02-15

    Epithelia are essential barrier tissues that must be appropriately maintained for their correct function. To achieve this a plethora of protein interactions regulate epithelial cell number, structure and adhesion, and differentiation. Here we show that Cindr (the Drosophila Cin85 and Cd2ap ortholog) is required to maintain epithelial integrity. Reducing Cindr triggered cell delamination and movement. Most delaminating cells died. These behaviors were consistent with JNK activation previously associated with loss of epithelial integrity in response to ectopic oncogene activity. We confirmed a novel interaction between Cindr and Drosophila JNK (dJNK), which when perturbed caused inappropriate JNK signaling. Genetically reducing JNK signaling activity suppressed the effects of reducing Cindr. Furthermore, ectopic JNK signaling phenocopied loss of Cindr and was partially rescued by concomitant cindr over-expression. Thus, correct Cindr-dJNK stoichiometry is essential to maintain epithelial integrity and disturbing this balance may contribute to the pathogenesis of disease states, including cancer.

  19. An automatic system for multidimensional integrated protein chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yingjun; Li, Xiunan; Bai, Gaoying; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2010-10-29

    An automatic system for multidimensional integrated protein chromatography was designed for simultaneous separation of multiple proteins from complex mixtures, such as human plasma and tissue lysates. This computer-controlled system integrates several chromatographic columns that work independently or cooperatively with one another to achieve efficient high throughputs. The pipelines can be automatically switched either to another column or to a collection container for each UV-detected elution fraction. Environmental contamination is avoided due to the closed fluid paths and elimination of manual column change. This novel system was successfully used for simultaneous preparation of five proteins from the precipitate of human plasma fraction IV (fraction IV). The system involved gel filtration, ion exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and heparin affinity chromatography. Human serum albumin (HSA), transferrin (Tf), antithrombin-III (AT-III), alpha 1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), and haptoglobin (Hp) were purified within 3 h. The following recovery and purity were achieved: 95% (RSD, 2.8%) and 95% for HSA, 80% (RSD, 2.0%) and 99% for Tf, 70% (RSD, 2.1%) and 99% for AT-III, 65% (RSD, 2.0%) and 94% for α1-AT, and 50% (RSD, 1.0%) and 90% for Hp. The results demonstrate that this novel multidimensional integrated chromatography system is capable of simultaneously separating multiple protein products from the same raw material with high yield and purity and it has the potential for a wide range of multi-step chromatography separation processes.

  20. Generation of a fluorescently labeled endogenous protein library in living human cells.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Alex; Danon, Tamar; Cohen, Ariel; Milo, Ron; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Lustig, Gila; Liron, Yuvalal; Alon, Uri; Perzov, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    We present a protocol to tag proteins expressed from their endogenous chromosomal locations in individual mammalian cells using central dogma tagging. The protocol can be used to build libraries of cell clones, each expressing one endogenous protein tagged with a fluorophore such as the yellow fluorescent protein. Each round of library generation produces 100-200 cell clones and takes about 1 month. The protocol integrates procedures for high-throughput single-cell cloning using flow cytometry, high-throughput cDNA generation and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, semi-automatic protein localization screening using fluorescent microscopy and freezing cells in 96-well format.

  1. Toward an integrated pipeline for protein biomarker development.

    PubMed

    Drabovich, Andrei P; Martínez-Morillo, Eduardo; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2015-06-01

    Protein biomarker development is a multidisciplinary task involving basic, translational and clinical research. Integration of multidisciplinary efforts in a single pipeline is challenging, but crucial to facilitate rational discovery of protein biomarkers and alleviate existing disappointments in the field. In this review, we discuss in detail individual phases of biomarker development pipeline, such as biomarker candidate identification, verification and validation. We focus on mass spectrometry as a principal technique for protein identification and quantification, and discuss complementary -omics approaches for selection of biomarker candidates. Proteomic samples, protein-based clinical laboratory tests and limitations of biomarker development are reviewed in detail, and critical assessment of all phases of biomarker development pipeline is provided. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Medical Proteomics.

  2. Imaging proteins inside cells with fluorescent tags

    PubMed Central

    Crivat, Georgeta; Taraska, Justin W.

    2011-01-01

    Watching biological molecules provides clues to their function and regulation. Some of the most powerful methods of labeling proteins for imaging use genetically encoded fluorescent fusion tags. There are four standard genetic methods of covalently tagging a protein with a fluorescent probe for cellular imaging. These use I) auto-fluorescent proteins, II) self-labeling enzymes, III) enzymes that catalyze the attachment of a probe to a target sequence, and IV) biarsenical dyes that target tetracysteine motifs. Each of these techniques has advantages and disadvantages. In this review, we cover new developments in these methods and discuss practical considerations for their use in imaging proteins inside living cells. PMID:21924508

  3. Pachytene spermatocytes regulate the secretion of Sertoli cell protein(s) which stimulate Leydig cell steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Djakiew, D; Papadopoulos, V

    1991-05-01

    The influence of germ cells (pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids) on the secretion by Sertoli cells of the proteinaceous factor(s) which stimulates Leydig cell steroid biosynthesis was investigated. Sertoli cells from immature rats were cultured on plastic dishes or on Millipore filters impregnated with reconstituted basement membrane in bicameral chambers. Immature rat Sertoli cell secreted proteins (rSCSP; MW greater than 10,000), from conventional cultures, stimulated 4- to 5-fold steroid biosynthesis in normal rat and MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells, respectively. MA-10 cells were then used as a bioassay system for most studies, although purified rat Leydig cells were used in some cases to further confirm results obtained with MA-10 cells. rSCSP collected from both the apical and basal compartment of the chambers were examined for their ability to stimulate Leydig cell steroidogenesis. The Leydig cell stimulatory activity from Sertoli cells was found to be secreted in a polarized manner, with 80% of the total bioactivity found in the basal rSCSP. Addition of pachytene spermatocyte proteins (PSP) in the apical compartment of the chambers inhibited, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, the basally directed Sertoli cell secretion of the Leydig cell stimulatory protein(s) by 85%. Similar results were obtained when freshly isolated pachytene spermatocytes were directly added on top of Sertoli cell epithelial sheets in the apical compartment of the chambers. In contrast, round spermatid proteins (RSP) did not exhibit a comparable effect to that of PSP in regulating the Sertoli cell secretion of the Leydig cell stimulatory activity. These results demonstrate that the Sertoli cell secreted protein(s) which stimulates Leydig cell steroid biosynthesis is secreted in a basally polarized direction, and its secretion is specifically modulated by pachytene spermatocytes.

  4. Protein diffusion in mammalian cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Thomas; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Hyväluoma, Jari; Dross, Nicolas; Willman, Sami F; Langowski, Jörg; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija; Timonen, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new method for mesoscopic modeling of protein diffusion in an entire cell. This method is based on the construction of a three-dimensional digital model cell from confocal microscopy data. The model cell is segmented into the cytoplasm, nucleus, plasma membrane, and nuclear envelope, in which environment protein motion is modeled by fully numerical mesoscopic methods. Finer cellular structures that cannot be resolved with the imaging technique, which significantly affect protein motion, are accounted for in this method by assigning an effective, position-dependent porosity to the cell. This porosity can also be determined by confocal microscopy using the equilibrium distribution of a non-binding fluorescent protein. Distinction can now be made within this method between diffusion in the liquid phase of the cell (cytosol/nucleosol) and the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm. Here we applied the method to analyze fluorescence recovery after photobleach (FRAP) experiments in which the diffusion coefficient of a freely-diffusing model protein was determined for two different cell lines, and to explain the clear difference typically observed between conventional FRAP results and those of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A large difference was found in the FRAP experiments between diffusion in the cytoplasm/nucleoplasm and in the cytosol/nucleosol, for all of which the diffusion coefficients were determined. The cytosol results were found to be in very good agreement with those by FCS.

  5. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  6. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  7. Microfabrication of integrated atomic vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conkey, Donald B.; Brenning, Rebecca L.; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Yang, Wenge; Wu, Bin; Schmidt, Holger

    2007-02-01

    The integration of hollow anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguides (ARROWs) with vapor cells on silicon chips provides a compact platform for a number of optical applications, including the study of quantum coherence effects such as electromagnetically induced transparency and single-photon nonlinearities, as well as frequency stabilization standards. The use of hollow waveguides allows for light propagation in low index (vapor) media with compact mode areas. ARROWs make particularly attractive waveguides for this purpose because they can be interfaced with solid core waveguides, microfabricated on a planar substrate, and are effectively single mode. ARROW fabrication utilizes an acidremoved sacrificial core surrounded by alternating plasma deposited dielectric layers, which act as Fabry-Perot reflectors. A demonstration platform consisting of solid and hollow core waveguides integrated with rubidium vapor cells has been constructed. Rubidium was used because it is of particular interest for studying quantum coherence effects. Liquefied rubidium was transferred from a bulk supply into an on-chip vapor cell in an anaerobic atmosphere glovebox. Optical absorption measurements confirmed the presence of rubidium vapor within the hollow waveguide platform. Coherence dephasing in the small dimensions of the ARROW (quantum coherence effect) can be addressed by adding a buffer gas and passivation coatings to the ARROW walls.

  8. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D; Marshall, Wallace F; Weissman, Jonathan S; Huang, Bo

    2016-03-18

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications.

  9. Versatile protein tagging in cells with split fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Kamiyama, Daichi; Sekine, Sayaka; Barsi-Rhyne, Benjamin; Hu, Jeffrey; Chen, Baohui; Gilbert, Luke A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the popular method of fluorescent protein fusion, live cell protein imaging has now seen more and more application of epitope tags. The small size of these tags may reduce functional perturbation and enable signal amplification. To address their background issue, we adapt self-complementing split fluorescent proteins as epitope tags for live cell protein labelling. The two tags, GFP11 and sfCherry11 are derived from the eleventh β-strand of super-folder GFP and sfCherry, respectively. The small size of FP11-tags enables a cost-effective and scalable way to insert them into endogenous genomic loci via CRISPR-mediated homology-directed repair. Tandem arrangement FP11-tags allows proportional enhancement of fluorescence signal in tracking intraflagellar transport particles, or reduction of photobleaching for live microtubule imaging. Finally, we show the utility of tandem GFP11-tag in scaffolding protein oligomerization. These experiments illustrate the versatility of FP11-tag as a labelling tool as well as a multimerization-control tool for both imaging and non-imaging applications. PMID:26988139

  10. The irre cell recognition module (IRM) proteins.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Linneweber, Gerit Arne; Andlauer, Till Felix Malte; Hertenstein, Alexander; Bonengel, Bernhard; Chaudhary, Kokil

    2009-01-01

    One of the most challenging problems in developmental neurosciences is to understand the establishment and maintenance of specific membrane contacts between axonal, dendritic, and glial processes in the neuropils, which eventually secure neuronal connectivity. However, underlying cell recognition events are pivotal in other tissues as well. This brief review focuses on the pleiotropic functions of a small, evolutionarily conserved group of proteins of the immunoglobulin superfamily involved in cell recognition. In Drosophila, this protein family comprises Irregular chiasm C/Roughest (IrreC/Rst), Kin of irre (Kirre), and their interacting protein partners, Sticks and stones (SNS) and Hibris (Hbs). For simplicity, we propose to name this ensemble of proteins the irre cell recognition module (IRM) after the first identified member of this family. Here, we summarize evidence that the IRM proteins function together in various cellular interactions, including myoblast fusion, cell sorting, axonal pathfinding, and target recognition in the optic neuropils of Drosophila. Understanding IRM protein function will help to unravel the epigenetic rules by which the intricate neurite networks in sensory neuropils are formed.

  11. Investigating citrullinated proteins in tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of arginine into citrulline, termed citrullination, has important consequences for the structure and function of proteins. Studies have found PADI4, an enzyme performing citrullination, to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumours and have shown that PADI4 participates in the process of tumorigenesis. However, as citrullinated proteins have not been systematically investigated in tumours, the present study aimed to identify novel citrullinated proteins in tumours by 2-D western blotting (2-D WB). Methods Two identical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels were prepared using extracts from ECA, H292, HeLa, HEPG2, Lovo, MCF-7, PANC-1, SGC, and SKOV3 tumour cell lines. The expression profiles on a 2-DE gel were trans-blotted to PVDF membranes, and the blots were then probed with an anti-citrulline antibody. By comparing the 2-DE profile with the parallel 2-D WB profile at a global level, protein spots with immuno-signals were collected from the second 2-DE gel and identified using mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitation was used to verify the expression and citrullination of the targeted proteins in tumour cell lines. Results 2-D WB and mass spectrometry identified citrullinated α-enolase (ENO1), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), keratin 8 (KRT8), tubulin beta (TUBB), T cell receptor chain and vimentin in these cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses verified the expression and citrullination of ENO1, HSP60, KRT8, and TUBB in the total protein lysates of the tumour cell lines. Conclusions The citrullination of these proteins suggests a new mechanism in the tumorigenic process. PMID:24099319

  12. Transparent antennas for solar cell integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tursunjan

    Transparent patch antennas are microstrip patch antennas that have a certain level of optical transparency. Highly transparent patch antennas are potentially suitable for integration with solar panels of small satellites, which are becoming increasingly important in space exploration. Traditional patch antennas employed on small satellites compete with solar cells for surface area. However, a transparent patch antenna can be placed directly on top of solar cells and resolve the issue of competing for limited surface real estate. For such an integration, a high optical transparency of the patch antenna is required from the solar cells' point of view. On the other hand, the antenna should possess at least acceptable radiation properties at the same time. This dissertation focuses on some of the most important concerns from the perspective of small satellite applications. For example, an optimization method to simultaneously improve both optical transparency and radiation efficiency of the antenna is studied. Active integrated antenna design method is extended to meshed patch applications in an attempt to improve the overall power efficiency of the front end communication subsystem. As is well known, circular polarization is immune from Faraday rotation effect in the ionosphere and thus can avoid a 3-dB loss in geo-satellite communication. Therefore, this research also aims to present design methods for circularly polarized meshed patch antennas. Moreover, a meshed patch antenna capable of supporting a high communication data rate is investigated. Lastly, other types of transparent patch antennas are also analyzed and compared to meshed patches. In summary, many properties of transparent patch antennas are examined in order to meet different design requirements.

  13. Performance benchmarking of four cell-free protein expression systems.

    PubMed

    Gagoski, Dejan; Polinkovsky, Mark E; Mureev, Sergey; Kunert, Anne; Johnston, Wayne; Gambin, Yann; Alexandrov, Kirill

    2016-02-01

    Over the last half century, a range of cell-free protein expression systems based on pro- and eukaryotic organisms have been developed and have found a range of applications, from structural biology to directed protein evolution. While it is generally accepted that significant differences in performance among systems exist, there is a paucity of systematic experimental studies supporting this notion. Here, we took advantage of the species-independent translation initiation sequence to express and characterize 87 N-terminally GFP-tagged human cytosolic proteins of different sizes in E. coli, wheat germ (WGE), HeLa, and Leishmania-based (LTE) cell-free systems. Using a combination of single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and Western blot analysis, we assessed the expression yields, the fraction of full-length translation product, and aggregation propensity for each of these systems. Our results demonstrate that the E. coli system has the highest expression yields. However, we observe that high expression levels are accompanied by production of truncated species-particularly pronounced in the case of proteins larger than 70 kDa. Furthermore, proteins produced in the E. coli system display high aggregation propensity, with only 10% of tested proteins being produced in predominantly monodispersed form. The WGE system was the most productive among eukaryotic systems tested. Finally, HeLa and LTE show comparable protein yields that are considerably lower than the ones achieved in the E. coli and WGE systems. The protein products produced in the HeLa system display slightly higher integrity, whereas the LTE-produced proteins have the lowest aggregation propensity among the systems analyzed. The high quality of HeLa- and LTE-produced proteins enable their analysis without purification and make them suitable for analysis of multi-domain eukaryotic proteins.

  14. The Protein Information Resource: an integrated public resource of functional annotation of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cathy H.; Huang, Hongzhan; Arminski, Leslie; Castro-Alvear, Jorge; Chen, Yongxing; Hu, Zhang-Zhi; Ledley, Robert S.; Lewis, Kali C.; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Orcutt, Bruce C.; Suzek, Baris E.; Tsugita, Akira; Vinayaka, C. R.; Yeh, Lai-Su L.; Zhang, Jian; Barker, Winona C.

    2002-01-01

    The Protein Information Resource (PIR) serves as an integrated public resource of functional annotation of protein data to support genomic/proteomic research and scientific discovery. The PIR, in collaboration with the Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences (MIPS) and the Japan International Protein Information Database (JIPID), produces the PIR-International Protein Sequence Database (PSD), the major annotated protein sequence database in the public domain, containing about 250 000 proteins. To improve protein annotation and the coverage of experimentally validated data, a bibliography submission system is developed for scientists to submit, categorize and retrieve literature information. Comprehensive protein information is available from iProClass, which includes family classification at the superfamily, domain and motif levels, structural and functional features of proteins, as well as cross-references to over 40 biological databases. To provide timely and comprehensive protein data with source attribution, we have introduced a non-redundant reference protein database, PIR-NREF. The database consists of about 800 000 proteins collected from PIR-PSD, SWISS-PROT, TrEMBL, GenPept, RefSeq and PDB, with composite protein names and literature data. To promote database interoperability, we provide XML data distribution and open database schema, and adopt common ontologies. The PIR web site (http://pir.georgetown.edu/) features data mining and sequence analysis tools for information retrieval and functional identification of proteins based on both sequence and annotation information. The PIR databases and other files are also available by FTP (ftp://nbrfa.georgetown.edu/pir_databases). PMID:11752247

  15. Isofunctional Protein Subfamily Detection Using Data Integration and Spectral Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Boari de Lima, Elisa; Meira, Wagner; de Melo-Minardi, Raquel Cardoso

    2016-01-01

    As increasingly more genomes are sequenced, the vast majority of proteins may only be annotated computationally, given experimental investigation is extremely costly. This highlights the need for computational methods to determine protein functions quickly and reliably. We believe dividing a protein family into subtypes which share specific functions uncommon to the whole family reduces the function annotation problem’s complexity. Hence, this work’s purpose is to detect isofunctional subfamilies inside a family of unknown function, while identifying differentiating residues. Similarity between protein pairs according to various properties is interpreted as functional similarity evidence. Data are integrated using genetic programming and provided to a spectral clustering algorithm, which creates clusters of similar proteins. The proposed framework was applied to well-known protein families and to a family of unknown function, then compared to ASMC. Results showed our fully automated technique obtained better clusters than ASMC for two families, besides equivalent results for other two, including one whose clusters were manually defined. Clusters produced by our framework showed great correspondence with the known subfamilies, besides being more contrasting than those produced by ASMC. Additionally, for the families whose specificity determining positions are known, such residues were among those our technique considered most important to differentiate a given group. When run with the crotonase and enolase SFLD superfamilies, the results showed great agreement with this gold-standard. Best results consistently involved multiple data types, thus confirming our hypothesis that similarities according to different knowledge domains may be used as functional similarity evidence. Our main contributions are the proposed strategy for selecting and integrating data types, along with the ability to work with noisy and incomplete data; domain knowledge usage for detecting

  16. Boundary Integral Corrected Particle In Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew, Christlieb; Keith, Cartwright

    2007-11-01

    Numerical heating is a serous problem in PIC modeling of cross field Diffusion. Recent work by the author has shown that for, electrostatic problems, the Boundary Integral Treecode (BIT) has far less numerical heating than traditional PIC and that numerical heating can be nearly eliminated if regularization is added to the BIT field solver. In this work we consider the application of BIT as a sub-cell method within each PIC cell, where the boundary conditions on BIT come from the fields computed on the PIC mesh. The goal is to minimize numerical heating in PIC while allowing for mesh spacing in PIC to be much greater than a Debye length. Our overall objective is to inherit the parallel capability of legacy PIC codes while providing high accuracy.

  17. Designing specific protein-protein interactions using computation, experimental library screening, or integrated methods.

    PubMed

    Chen, T Scott; Keating, Amy E

    2012-07-01

    Given the importance of protein-protein interactions for nearly all biological processes, the design of protein affinity reagents for use in research, diagnosis or therapy is an important endeavor. Engineered proteins would ideally have high specificities for their intended targets, but achieving interaction specificity by design can be challenging. There are two major approaches to protein design or redesign. Most commonly, proteins and peptides are engineered using experimental library screening and/or in vitro evolution. An alternative approach involves using protein structure and computational modeling to rationally choose sequences predicted to have desirable properties. Computational design has successfully produced novel proteins with enhanced stability, desired interactions and enzymatic function. Here we review the strengths and limitations of experimental library screening and computational structure-based design, giving examples where these methods have been applied to designing protein interaction specificity. We highlight recent studies that demonstrate strategies for combining computational modeling with library screening. The computational methods provide focused libraries predicted to be enriched in sequences with the properties of interest. Such integrated approaches represent a promising way to increase the efficiency of protein design and to engineer complex functionality such as interaction specificity.

  18. Host cell protein adsorption characteristics during protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, Richard D R; Velez-Suberbie, M Lourdes; Tait, Andrew S; Smales, C Mark; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2012-07-01

    Protein A chromatography is a critical and 'gold-standard' step in the purification of monoclonal antibody (mAb) products. Its ability to remove >98% of impurities in a single step alleviates the burden on subsequent process steps and facilitates the implementation of platform processes, with a minimal number of chromatographic steps. Here, we have evaluated four commercially available protein A chromatography matrices in terms of their ability to remove host cell proteins (HCPs), a complex group of process related impurities that must be removed to minimal levels. SELDI-TOF MS was used as a screening tool to generate an impurity profile fingerprint for each resin and indicated a number of residual impurities present following protein A chromatography, agreeing with HCP ELISA. Although many of these were observed for all matrices there was a significantly elevated level of impurity binding associated with the resin based on controlled pore glass under standard conditions. Use of null cell line supernatant with and without spiked purified mAb demonstrated the interaction of HCPs to be not only with the resin back-bone but also with the bound mAb. A null cell line column overload and sample enrichment method before 2D-PAGE was then used to determine individual components associated with resin back-bone adsorption. The methods shown allow for a critical analysis of HCP removal during protein A chromatography. Taken together they provide the necessary process understanding to allow process engineers to identify rational approaches for the removal of prominent HCPs.

  19. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs.

  20. Integrating protein-protein interaction networks with phenotypes reveals signs of interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Zirin, Jonathan; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Yilmazel, Bahar; Samsonova, Anastasia A.; Neumüller, Ralph A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    A major objective of systems biology is to organize molecular interactions as networks and to characterize information-flow within networks. We describe a computational framework to integrate protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and genetic screens to predict the “signs” of interactions (i.e. activation/inhibition relationships). We constructed a Drosophila melanogaster signed PPI network, consisting of 6,125 signed PPIs connecting 3,352 proteins that can be used to identify positive and negative regulators of signaling pathways and protein complexes. We identified an unexpected role for the metabolic enzymes Enolase and Aldo-keto reductase as positive and negative regulators of proteolysis, respectively. Characterization of the activation/inhibition relationships between physically interacting proteins within signaling pathways will impact our understanding of many biological functions, including signal transduction and mechanisms of disease. PMID:24240319

  1. Cell-Free Synthesis of SecYEG Translocon as the Fundamental Protein Transport Machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, Hideaki; Kuruma, Yutetsu; Ueda, Takuya

    2014-12-01

    The cell membrane has many indispensable functions for sustaining cell alive besides a role as merely outer envelope. The most of such functions are implemented by membrane embedded proteins that are emerged through the membrane integration machinery, SecYEG translocon. Here, we synthesized SecYEG by expressing the corresponding gene in vitro to study the process of functionalization of the cell membrane.

  2. Integrative radiogenomic profiling of squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Adams, Drew J.; Hurov, Kristen E.; Tamayo, Pablo; Creighton, Chad J.; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Du, Charles; Fries, Daniel F.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Mesirov, Jill P.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the mainstays of anti-cancer treatment, but the relationship between the radiosensitivity of cancer cells and their genomic characteristics is still not well-defined. Here we report the development of a high-throughput platform for measuring radiation survival in vitro and its validation by comparison to conventional clonogenic radiation survival analysis. We combined results from this high-throughput assay with genomic parameters in cell lines from squamous cell lung carcinoma, which is standardly treated by radiation therapy, to identify parameters that predict radiation sensitivity. We showed that activation of NFE2L2, a frequent event in lung squamous cancers, confers radiation resistance. An expression-based, in silico screen nominated inhibitors of PI3K as NFE2L2 antagonists. We showed that the selective PI3K inhibitor, NVP-BKM120, both decreased NRF2 protein levels and sensitized NFE2L2 or KEAP1 mutant cells to radiation. We then combined results from this high-throughput assay with single-sample gene set enrichment analysis (ssGSEA) of gene expression data. The resulting analysis identified pathways implicated in cell survival, genotoxic stress, detoxification, and innate and adaptive immunity as key correlates of radiation sensitivity. The integrative, high-throughput methods shown here for large-scale profiling of radiation survival and genomic features of solid-tumor derived cell lines should facilitate tumor radiogenomics and the discovery of genotype-selective radiation sensitizers and protective agents. PMID:23980093

  3. Integrated strategy reveals the protein interface between cancer targets Bcl-2 and NAF-1

    PubMed Central

    Tamir, Sagi; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Katz, Chen; Morcos, Faruck; Hailey, Kendra L.; Zuris, John A.; Wang, Charles; Conlan, Andrea R.; Lipper, Colin H.; Paddock, Mark L.; Mittler, Ron; Onuchic, José N.; Jennings, Patricia A.; Friedler, Assaf; Nechushtai, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Life requires orchestrated control of cell proliferation, cell maintenance, and cell death. Involved in these decisions are protein complexes that assimilate a variety of inputs that report on the status of the cell and lead to an output response. Among the proteins involved in this response are nutrient-deprivation autophagy factor-1 (NAF-1)- and Bcl-2. NAF-1 is a homodimeric member of the novel Fe-S protein NEET family, which binds two 2Fe-2S clusters. NAF-1 is an important partner for Bcl-2 at the endoplasmic reticulum to functionally antagonize Beclin 1-dependent autophagy [Chang NC, Nguyen M, Germain M, Shore GC (2010) EMBO J 29(3):606–618]. We used an integrated approach involving peptide array, deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS), and functional studies aided by the power of sufficient constraints from direct coupling analysis (DCA) to determine the dominant docked conformation of the NAF-1–Bcl-2 complex. NAF-1 binds to both the pro- and antiapoptotic regions (BH3 and BH4) of Bcl-2, as demonstrated by a nested protein fragment analysis in a peptide array and DXMS analysis. A combination of the solution studies together with a new application of DCA to the eukaryotic proteins NAF-1 and Bcl-2 provided sufficient constraints at amino acid resolution to predict the interaction surfaces and orientation of the protein–protein interactions involved in the docked structure. The specific integrated approach described in this paper provides the first structural information, to our knowledge, for future targeting of the NAF-1–Bcl-2 complex in the regulation of apoptosis/autophagy in cancer biology. PMID:24706857

  4. Integration of latex protein sequence data provides comprehensive functional overview of latex proteins.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Chu, Hyosub; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-03-01

    The laticiferous system is one of the most important conduit systems in higher plants, which produces a milky-like sap known as latex. Latex contains diverse secondary metabolites with various ecological functions. To obtain a comprehensive overview of the latex proteome, we integrated available latex proteins sequences and constructed a comprehensive dataset composed of 1,208 non-redundant latex proteins from 20 various latex-bearing plants. The results of functional analyses revealed that latex proteins are involved in various biological processes, including transcription, translation, protein degradation and the plant response to environmental stimuli. The results of the comparative analysis showed that the functions of the latex proteins are similar to those of phloem, suggesting the functional conservation of plant vascular proteins. The presence of latex proteins in mitochondria and plastids suggests the production of diverse secondary metabolites. Furthermore, using a BLAST search, we identified 854 homologous latex proteins in eight plant species, including three latex-bearing plants, such as papaya, caster bean and cassava, suggesting that latex proteins were newly evolved in vascular plants. Taken together, this study is the largest and most comprehensive in silico analysis of the latex proteome. The results obtained here provide useful resources and information for characterizing the evolution of the latex proteome.

  5. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-06-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics.

  6. Human Protein Subcellular Localization with Integrated Source and Multi-label Ensemble Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Fulin; Ju, Ying; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Predicting protein subcellular location is necessary for understanding cell function. Several machine learning methods have been developed for computational prediction of primary protein sequences because wet experiments are costly and time consuming. However, two problems still exist in state-of-the-art methods. First, several proteins appear in different subcellular structures simultaneously, whereas current methods only predict one protein sequence in one subcellular structure. Second, most software tools are trained with obsolete data and the latest new databases are missed. We proposed a novel multi-label classification algorithm to solve the first problem and integrated several latest databases to improve prediction performance. Experiments proved the effectiveness of the proposed method. The present study would facilitate research on cellular proteomics. PMID:27323846

  7. Integrating kinetics with thermodynamics to study the alkaline extraction of protein from Caragana korshinskii Kom.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cheng; Zhou, Zhao; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Jia, Shi-Ru; Sun, Zhuo; Dale, Bruce E

    2014-09-01

    Extraction and recovery of protein from abundant plant biomass is one potential way to improve the economic feasibility of biorefineries. However, valorization of the protein fraction is challenging due to its low yield (kg protein extraction/kg biomass). In order to reveal the limiting operation parameters, the alkaline extraction process of protein from Caragana korshinskii Kom. was investigated by an integrative analysis of kinetics and thermodynamics. Both a two-site kinetic extraction model and a second-order model indicated that particle size is the most pivotal factor affecting protein extraction yield. In a two-site model, most proteins are extracted quickly from broken cells, while protein removal from the intact cells takes much longer; these are the faster and slower processes, respectively. A decrease of particle size from 20-40 to 60-80 mesh resulted in a decrease of C2 (protein yield in the slower process) from 14.02 to 7.32 mg g(-1), but a great increase of C1 (protein yield in the faster process) from 20.61 to 59.07 mg g(-1) . However, the protein yield was dominated by the faster process when the average particle size is under 80 mesh. The maximum initial extraction rate was 72.20 mg g(-1) min(-1) with the particle size of 60-80 mesh, almost ninefold of that with 20-40 mesh. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) in the protein extraction process were calculated as 21.08 kJ mol(-1) and 84.76 J K(-1), respectively. The standard free energy (ΔG) had a magnitude from -3.77 to -5.46, suggesting that the extraction process was spontaneous and physically feasible.

  8. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence D2 protein is responsible for precise integration of T-DNA into the plant genome.

    PubMed Central

    Tinland, B; Schoumacher, F; Gloeckler, V; Bravo-Angel, A M; Hohn, B

    1995-01-01

    The VirD2 protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was shown to pilot T-DNA during its transfer to the plant cell nucleus. We analyze here its participation in the integration of T-DNA by using a virD2 mutant. This mutation reduces the efficiency of T-DNA transfer, but the efficiency of integration of T-DNA per se is unaffected. Southern and sequence analyses of integration events obtained with the mutated VirD2 protein revealed an aberrant pattern of integration. These results indicate that the wild-type VirD2 protein participates in ligation of the 5'-end of the T-strand to plant DNA and that this ligation step is not rate limiting for T-DNA integration. Images PMID:7628458

  9. Thermodynamics of protein destabilization in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Danielsson, Jens; Mu, Xin; Lang, Lisa; Wang, Huabing; Binolfi, Andres; Theillet, François-Xavier; Bekei, Beata; Logan, Derek T.; Selenko, Philipp; Wennerström, Håkan; Oliveberg, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Although protein folding and stability have been well explored under simplified conditions in vitro, it is yet unclear how these basic self-organization events are modulated by the crowded interior of live cells. To find out, we use here in-cell NMR to follow at atomic resolution the thermal unfolding of a β-barrel protein inside mammalian and bacterial cells. Challenging the view from in vitro crowding effects, we find that the cells destabilize the protein at 37 °C but with a conspicuous twist: While the melting temperature goes down the cold unfolding moves into the physiological regime, coupled to an augmented heat-capacity change. The effect seems induced by transient, sequence-specific, interactions with the cellular components, acting preferentially on the unfolded ensemble. This points to a model where the in vivo influence on protein behavior is case specific, determined by the individual protein’s interplay with the functionally optimized “interaction landscape” of the cellular interior. PMID:26392565

  10. Integrated optics ring-resonator sensors for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Ksendzov, A; Lin, Y

    2005-12-15

    Using an integrated optics ring-resonator biosensor, we have demonstrated the detection of protein in low concentrations. We detected 0.3 nM of avidin in a buffered saline solution; the calculated detection limit is 0.1 nM (6.8 ng/ml) for avidin, which compares favorably with those of other optical protein detection techniques. Further improvement is possible. Our ring resonator utilizes Si(x)N(y)/SiO2 waveguides, which, owing to evanescent field interaction, change the effective refractive index when target molecules are immobilized on their surfaces. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the biotin surface coating, which causes the specific binding and immobilization of avidin.

  11. Identification of two integral membrane proteins of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Smythe, J A; Coppel, R L; Brown, G V; Ramasamy, R; Kemp, D J; Anders, R F

    1988-01-01

    We describe the isolation and cloning of two integral membrane protein antigens of Plasmodium falciparum. The antigens were isolated by Triton X-114 temperature-dependent phase separation, electrophoretically transferred to nitrocellulose, and used to affinity-purify monospecific human antibodies. These antibodies were used to isolate the corresponding cDNA clones from a phage lambda gt11-Amp3 cDNA expression library. Clone Ag512 corresponds to a Mr 55,000 merozoite rhoptry antigen, and clone Ag513 corresponds to a Mr 45,000 merozoite surface antigen. Both proteins can be biosynthetically labeled with [3H]glucosamine and [3H]myristic acid, suggesting that they may be anchored in membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol moiety. Similarities in the C-terminal sequences of the Mr 45,000 merozoite surface antigen and the Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoproteins provides further evidence that this antigen has a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. Images PMID:3293051

  12. Integrated optics ring-resonator sensors for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksendzov, A.; Lin, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Using an integrated optics ring-resonator biosensor, we have demonstrated the detection of protein in low concentrations. We detected 0.3 nM of avidin in a buffered saline solution; the calculated detection limit is 0.1 nM (6.8ng/ml) for avidin, which compares favorably with those of other optical protein detection techniques. Further improvement is possible. Our ring resonator utilizes SixNy/SiO2 waveguides, which, owing to evanescent field interaction, change the effective refractive index when target molecules are immobilized on their surfaces. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the biotin surface coating, which causes the specific binding and immobilization of avidin.

  13. 4D Imaging of Protein Aggregation in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaganovich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    One of the key tasks of any living cell is maintaining the proper folding of newly synthesized proteins in the face of ever-changing environmental conditions and an intracellular environment that is tightly packed, sticky, and hazardous to protein stability1. The ability to dynamically balance protein production, folding and degradation demands highly-specialized quality control machinery, whose absolute necessity is observed best when it malfunctions. Diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and certain forms of Cystic Fibrosis have a direct link to protein folding quality control components2, and therefore future therapeutic development requires a basic understanding of underlying processes. Our experimental challenge is to understand how cells integrate damage signals and mount responses that are tailored to diverse circumstances. The primary reason why protein misfolding represents an existential threat to the cell is the propensity of incorrectly folded proteins to aggregate, thus causing a global perturbation of the crowded and delicate intracellular folding environment1. The folding health, or "proteostasis," of the cellular proteome is maintained, even under the duress of aging, stress and oxidative damage, by the coordinated action of different mechanistic units in an elaborate quality control system3,4. A specialized machinery of molecular chaperones can bind non-native polypeptides and promote their folding into the native state1, target them for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system5, or direct them to protective aggregation inclusions6-9. In eukaryotes, the cytosolic aggregation quality control load is partitioned between two compartments8-10: the juxtanuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ) and the insoluble protein deposit (IPOD) (Figure 1 - model). Proteins that are ubiquitinated by the protein folding quality control machinery are delivered to the JUNQ, where they are processed for degradation by the proteasome. Misfolded

  14. The Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Minor Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Schowalter, Rachel M.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2013-01-01

    The surface of polyomavirus virions is composed of pentameric knobs of the major capsid protein, VP1. In previously studied polyomavirus species, such as SV40, two interior capsid proteins, VP2 and VP3, emerge from the virion to play important roles during the infectious entry process. Translation of the VP3 protein initiates at a highly conserved Met-Ala-Leu motif within the VP2 open reading frame. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV or MCPyV) is a member of a divergent clade of polyomaviruses that lack the conserved VP3 N-terminal motif. Consistent with this observation, we show that VP3 is not detectable in MCV-infected cells, VP3 is not found in native MCV virions, and mutation of possible alternative VP3-initiating methionine codons did not significantly affect MCV infectivity in culture. In contrast, VP2 knockout resulted in a >100-fold decrease in native MCV infectivity, despite normal virion assembly, viral DNA packaging, and cell attachment. Although pseudovirus-based experiments confirmed that VP2 plays an essential role for infection of some cell lines, other cell lines were readily transduced by pseudovirions lacking VP2. In cell lines where VP2 was needed for efficient infectious entry, the presence of a conserved myristoyl modification on the N-terminus of VP2 was important for its function. The results show that a single minor capsid protein, VP2, facilitates a post-attachment stage of MCV infectious entry into some, but not all, cell types. PMID:23990782

  15. An integrated microfluidic chip system for single-cell secretion profiling of rare circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuliang; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Shuai; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Minjiao; Yu, Beiqin; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Liu, Bingya; Li, Yan; Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui

    2014-12-16

    Genetic and transcriptional profiling, as well as surface marker identification of single circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been demonstrated. However, quantitatively profiling of functional proteins at single CTC resolution has not yet been achieved, owing to the limited purity of the isolated CTC populations and a lack of single-cell proteomic approaches to handle and analyze rare CTCs. Here, we develop an integrated microfluidic system specifically designed for streamlining isolation, purification and single-cell secretomic profiling of CTCs from whole blood. Key to this platform is the use of photocleavable ssDNA-encoded antibody conjugates to enable a highly purified CTC population with <75 'contaminated' blood cells. An enhanced poly-L-lysine barcode pattern is created on the single-cell barcode chip for efficient capture rare CTC cells in microchambers for subsequent secreted protein profiling. This system was extensively evaluated and optimized with EpCAM-positive HCT116 cells seeded into whole blood. Patient blood samples were employed to assess the utility of the system for isolation, purification and single-cell secretion profiling of CTCs. The CTCs present in patient blood samples exhibit highly heterogeneous secretion profile of IL-8 and VEGF. The numbers of secreting CTCs are found not in accordance with CTC enumeration based on immunostaining in the parallel experiments.

  16. Barrier-protective effects of activated protein C in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Ferranda; Fuster, Gemma; Adda, Mélanie; Blanch, Lluís; Farre, Ramon; Navajas, Daniel; Artigas, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a clinical manifestation of respiratory failure, caused by lung inflammation and the disruption of the alveolar-capillary barrier. Preservation of the physical integrity of the alveolar epithelial monolayer is of critical importance to prevent alveolar edema. Barrier integrity depends largely on the balance between physical forces on cell-cell and cell-matrix contacts, and this balance might be affected by alterations in the coagulation cascade in patients with ALI. We aimed to study the effects of activated protein C (APC) on mechanical tension and barrier integrity in human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) exposed to thrombin. Cells were pretreated for 3 h with APC (50 µg/ml) or vehicle (control). Subsequently, thrombin (50 nM) or medium was added to the cell culture. APC significantly reduced thrombin-induced cell monolayer permeability, cell stiffening, and cell contraction, measured by electrical impedance, optical magnetic twisting cytometry, and traction microscopy, respectively, suggesting a barrier-protective response. The dynamics of the barrier integrity was also assessed by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis of the tight junction ZO-1. Thrombin resulted in more elongated ZO-1 aggregates at cell-cell interface areas and induced an increase in ZO-1 membrane protein content. APC attenuated the length of these ZO-1 aggregates and reduced the ZO-1 membrane protein levels induced by thrombin. In conclusion, pretreatment with APC reduced the disruption of barrier integrity induced by thrombin, thus contributing to alveolar epithelial barrier protection.

  17. Kinase Pathway Database: An Integrated Protein-Kinase and NLP-Based Protein-Interaction Resource

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Asako; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Takagi, Toshihisa

    2003-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in the regulation of cellular functions. Various kinds of information about these molecules are important for understanding signaling pathways and organism characteristics. We have developed the Kinase Pathway Database, an integrated database involving major completely sequenced eukaryotes. It contains the classification of protein kinases and their functional conservation, ortholog tables among species, protein–protein, protein–gene, and protein–compound interaction data, domain information, and structural information. It also provides an automatic pathway graphic image interface. The protein, gene, and compound interactions are automatically extracted from abstracts for all genes and proteins by natural-language processing (NLP).The method of automatic extraction uses phrase patterns and the GENA protein, gene, and compound name dictionary, which was developed by our group. With this database, pathways are easily compared among species using data with more than 47,000 protein interactions and protein kinase ortholog tables. The database is available for querying and browsing at http://kinasedb.ontology.ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp/. PMID:12799355

  18. A Cell-Free Translocation System Using Extracts of Cultured Insect Cells to Yield Functional Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ezure, Toru; Nanatani, Kei; Sato, Yoko; Suzuki, Satomi; Aizawa, Keishi; Souma, Satoshi; Ito, Masaaki; Hohsaka, Takahiro; von Heijine, Gunnar; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Abe, Keietsu; Ando, Eiji; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis is a powerful method to explore the structure and function of membrane proteins and to analyze the targeting and translocation of proteins across the ER membrane. Developing a cell-free system based on cultured cells for the synthesis of membrane proteins could provide a highly reproducible alternative to the use of tissues from living animals. We isolated Sf21 microsomes from cultured insect cells by a simplified isolation procedure and evaluated the performance of the translocation system in combination with a cell-free translation system originating from the same source. The isolated microsomes contained the basic translocation machinery for polytopic membrane proteins including SRP-dependent targeting components, translocation channel (translocon)-dependent translocation, and the apparatus for signal peptide cleavage and N-linked glycosylation. A transporter protein synthesized with the cell-free system could be functionally reconstituted into a lipid bilayer. In addition, single and double labeling with non-natural amino acids could be achieved at both the lumen side and the cytosolic side in this system. Moreover, tail-anchored proteins, which are post-translationally integrated by the guided entry of tail-anchored proteins (GET) machinery, were inserted correctly into the microsomes. These results showed that the newly developed cell-free translocation system derived from cultured insect cells is a practical tool for the biogenesis of properly folded polytopic membrane proteins as well as tail-anchored proteins. PMID:25486605

  19. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  20. Protein signaling networks from single cell fluctuations and information theory profiling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2011-05-18

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network.

  1. Nuclear Nonhistone Proteins in Murine Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wikswo, Muriel A.; Mcguire, Joseph S.; Shansky, Janet E.; Boshes, Roger A.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear nonhistone proteins (NHP's) have been implicated as regulatory agents involved in controlling genetic expression. Utilizing murine melanoma cells, we describe a method for isolating and fractionating NHP's which greatly increases the yield of these proteins as well as the level of resolution required for detecting small differences in particular NHP's. Mouse melanoma cells were grown in medium labeled with [3H]leucine. Following 48 hr of incubation, the cells were harvested and nuclei isolated. The NHP's were extracted from the nuclei in a series of steps which yielded four major fractions: NHP1, NHP2, NHP3, NHP4. This method solubilized 80-90% of the protein from the nuclear homogenate. The NHP fractions were then separated on DEAE-cellulose columns in a series of salt steps increasing in concentration from 0.05 to 0.50 M NaCl, followed by steps of 2 M NaCl and 4 and 7 M guanidine-hydrochloride. The 40 NHP fractions eluted from these columns were further separated on polyacrylamide-SDS gels and ranged in molecular weight from 9000 to 110,000 daltons. Differences were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of each of these 40 fractions. The high resolution of these fractionation procedures greatly enhances the possibility of observing small changes in proteins which may play a role in gene regulation. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 5 PMID:997593

  2. The Late S-Phase Transcription Factor Hcm1 Is Regulated through Phosphorylation by the Cell Wall Integrity Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takahiro; Veis, Jiri; Hollenstein, David; Sekiya, Mizuho; Ammerer, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) checkpoint in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae coordinates cell wall construction and cell cycle progression. In this study, we showed that the regulation of Hcm1, a late-S-phase transcription factor, arrests the cell cycle via the cell wall integrity checkpoint. Although the HCM1 mRNA level remained unaffected when the cell wall integrity checkpoint was induced, the protein level decreased. The overproduction of Hcm1 resulted in the failure of the cell wall integrity checkpoint. We identified 39 Hcm1 phosphorylation sites, including 26 novel sites, by tandem mass spectrometry analysis. A mutational analysis revealed that phosphorylation of Hcm1 at S61, S65, and S66 is required for the proper onset of the cell wall integrity checkpoint by regulating the timely decrease in its protein level. Hyperactivation of the CWI mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway significantly reduced the Hcm1 protein level, and the deletion of CWI MAPK Slt2 resulted in a failure to decrease Hcm1 protein levels in response to stress, suggesting that phosphorylation is regulated by CWI MAPK. In conclusion, we suggest that Hcm1 is regulated negatively by the cell wall integrity checkpoint through timely phosphorylation and degradation under stress to properly control budding yeast proliferation. PMID:26729465

  3. Enhancing interacting residue prediction with integrated contact matrix prediction in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H

    2016-12-01

    Identifying the residues in a protein that are involved in protein-protein interaction and identifying the contact matrix for a pair of interacting proteins are two computational tasks at different levels of an in-depth analysis of protein-protein interaction. Various methods for solving these two problems have been reported in the literature. However, the interacting residue prediction and contact matrix prediction were handled by and large independently in those existing methods, though intuitively good prediction of interacting residues will help with predicting the contact matrix. In this work, we developed a novel protein interacting residue prediction system, contact matrix-interaction profile hidden Markov model (CM-ipHMM), with the integration of contact matrix prediction and the ipHMM interaction residue prediction. We propose to leverage what is learned from the contact matrix prediction and utilize the predicted contact matrix as "feedback" to enhance the interaction residue prediction. The CM-ipHMM model showed significant improvement over the previous method that uses the ipHMM for predicting interaction residues only. It indicates that the downstream contact matrix prediction could help the interaction site prediction.

  4. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  5. Protein folding in the cell envelope of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Geyter, Jozefien; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Zorzini, Valentina; Economou, Anastassios; Karamanou, Spyridoula

    2016-07-26

    While the entire proteome is synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes, almost half associates with, localizes in or crosses the bacterial cell envelope. In Escherichia coli a variety of mechanisms are important for taking these polypeptides into or across the plasma membrane, maintaining them in soluble form, trafficking them to their correct cell envelope locations and then folding them into the right structures. The fidelity of these processes must be maintained under various environmental conditions including during stress; if this fails, proteases are called in to degrade mislocalized or aggregated proteins. Various soluble, diffusible chaperones (acting as holdases, foldases or pilotins) and folding catalysts are also utilized to restore proteostasis. These responses can be general, dealing with multiple polypeptides, with functional overlaps and operating within redundant networks. Other chaperones are specialized factors, dealing only with a few exported proteins. Several complex machineries have evolved to deal with binding to, integration in and crossing of the outer membrane. This complex protein network is responsible for fundamental cellular processes such as cell wall biogenesis; cell division; the export, uptake and degradation of molecules; and resistance against exogenous toxic factors. The underlying processes, contributing to our fundamental understanding of proteostasis, are a treasure trove for the development of novel antibiotics, biopharmaceuticals and vaccines.

  6. An Integrated Metabolic Atlas of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, A Ari; Reznik, Ed; Lee, Chung-Han; Creighton, Chad J; Brannon, A Rose; Luna, Augustin; Aksoy, B Arman; Liu, Eric Minwei; Shen, Ronglai; Lee, William; Chen, Yang; Stirdivant, Steve M; Russo, Paul; Chen, Ying-Bei; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E; Cheng, Emily H; Sander, Chris; Hsieh, James J

    2016-01-11

    Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, manifested through alterations in metabolites. We performed metabolomic profiling on 138 matched clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC)/normal tissue pairs and found that ccRCC is characterized by broad shifts in central carbon metabolism, one-carbon metabolism, and antioxidant response. Tumor progression and metastasis were associated with metabolite increases in glutathione and cysteine/methionine metabolism pathways. We develop an analytic pipeline and visualization tool (metabolograms) to bridge the gap between TCGA transcriptomic profiling and our metabolomic data, which enables us to assemble an integrated pathway-level metabolic atlas and to demonstrate discordance between transcriptome and metabolome. Lastly, expression profiling was performed on a high-glutathione cluster, which corresponds to a poor-survival subgroup in the ccRCC TCGA cohort.

  7. Identification of shed proteins from Chinese hamster ovary cells: Application of statistical confidence using human and mouse protein databases

    SciTech Connect

    Ahram, Mamoun; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Hunter, Joel C.; Miller, John H.; Springer, David L.

    2005-05-01

    The shedding process releases ligands, receptors, and other proteins from the surface of the cell and is a mechanism whereby cells communicate. Even though altered regulation of this process has been implicated in several diseases, global approaches to evaluate shed proteins have not been developed. A goal of this study was to identify global changes in shed proteins in media taken from cells exposed to low-doses of radiation in an effort to develop a fundamental understanding of the bystander response. CHO cells were chosen for this study because they have been widely used for radiation studies and since they have been reported to respond to radiation by releasing factors into the media that cause genomic instability and cytotoxicity in unexposed cells, i.e., a bystander effect. Media samples taken for irradiated cells were evaluated using a combination of tandem- and FTICR-mass spectrometry analysis. Since the hamster genome has not been sequenced, mass spectrometry data was searched against the mouse and human proteins databases. Nearly 150 proteins that were identified by tandem mass spectrometry were confirmed by FTICR. When both types of mass spectrometry data were evaluated with a new confidence scoring tool, which is based on discriminant analyses, about 500 protein were identified. Approximately 20% of these identifications were either integral membrane proteins or membrane associated proteins, suggesting that they were derived from the cell surface, hence were likely shed. However, estimates of quantitative changes, based on two independent mass spectrometry approaches, did not identify any protein abundance changes attributable to the bystander effect. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of global evaluation of shed proteins using mass spectrometry in conjunction with cross-species protein databases and that significant improvement in peptide/protein identifications is provided by the confidence scoring tool.

  8. A Rab escort protein integrates the secretion system with TOR signaling and ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaspal; Tyers, Mike

    2009-08-15

    The coupling of environmental conditions to cell growth and division is integral to cell fitness. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Sfp1 couples nutrient status to cell growth rate by controlling the expression of ribosome biogenesis (Ribi) and ribosomal protein (RP) genes. Sfp1 is localized to the nucleus in rich nutrients, but upon nutrient limitation or target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway inhibition by rapamycin, Sfp1 rapidly exits the nucleus, leading to repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. Through systematic cell-based screens we found that many components of the secretory system influence Sfp1 localization. Notably, the essential Rab escort protein Mrs6 exhibited a nutrient-sensitive interaction with Sfp1. Overexpression of Mrs6 prevented nuclear localization of Sfp1 in rich nutrients, whereas loss of Mrs6 resulted in nuclear Sfp1 localization in poor nutrients. These effects were specific to Sfp1 and independent of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway, suggesting that Mrs6 lies in a distinct branch of TOR and ribosome biogenesis regulation. Rapamycin-resistant alleles of MRS6 were defective in the cytoplasmic retention of Sfp1, the control of cell size, and in the repression of the Ribi/RP regulons. The Sfp1-Mrs6 interaction is a nexus for growth regulation that links the secretory system and TOR-dependent nutrient signaling to ribosome biogenesis.

  9. Cell-free protein synthesis as a promising expression system for recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xumeng; Xu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has major advantages over traditional cell-based methods in the capability of high-throughput protein synthesis and special protein production. During recent decades, CFPS has become an alternative protein production platform for both fundamental and applied purposes. Using Renilla luciferase as model protein, we describe a typical process of CFPS in wheat germ extract system, including wheat germ extract preparation, expression vector construction, in vitro protein synthesis (transcription/translation), and target protein assay.

  10. General theory for integrated analysis of growth, gene, and protein expression in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyu; Pabst, Breana; Klapper, Isaac; Stewart, Philip S

    2013-01-01

    A theory for analysis and prediction of spatial and temporal patterns of gene and protein expression within microbial biofilms is derived. The theory integrates phenomena of solute reaction and diffusion, microbial growth, mRNA or protein synthesis, biomass advection, and gene transcript or protein turnover. Case studies illustrate the capacity of the theory to simulate heterogeneous spatial patterns and predict microbial activities in biofilms that are qualitatively different from those of planktonic cells. Specific scenarios analyzed include an inducible GFP or fluorescent protein reporter, a denitrification gene repressed by oxygen, an acid stress response gene, and a quorum sensing circuit. It is shown that the patterns of activity revealed by inducible stable fluorescent proteins or reporter unstable proteins overestimate the region of activity. This is due to advective spreading and finite protein turnover rates. In the cases of a gene induced by either limitation for a metabolic substrate or accumulation of a metabolic product, maximal expression is predicted in an internal stratum of the biofilm. A quorum sensing system that includes an oxygen-responsive negative regulator exhibits behavior that is distinct from any stage of a batch planktonic culture. Though here the analyses have been limited to simultaneous interactions of up to two substrates and two genes, the framework applies to arbitrarily large networks of genes and metabolites. Extension of reaction-diffusion modeling in biofilms to the analysis of individual genes and gene networks is an important advance that dovetails with the growing toolkit of molecular and genetic experimental techniques.

  11. Evaluation of the electroinjection method for introducing proteins into living cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A K; Horwitz, J; De Lanerolle, P

    1991-02-01

    The introduction of impermeant probes such as antibodies and other proteins into living cells without compromising physiological function is an important approach for studying cellular regulatory mechanisms. Many techniques including direct microinjection, liposome-mediated delivery, fusion of red cell ghosts, and osmotic lysis of pinocytic vesicles have been used to introduce proteins into intact cells. We have used a modification of the voltage-discharge technique to introduce antibodies and other proteins into living physiologically responsive pheochromocytoma and other cultured cells. In this technique, called electroinjection, a single discharge of relatively low field strength is used to transiently permeabilize the plasma membrane. Our experiments demonstrate that electroinjection permits the introduction of large amounts (microM) of probe into 2-5 x 10(6) cells simultaneously without compromising cell viability or physiological responsiveness when performed under carefully defined conditions. They also demonstrate that electroinjection results in a single population of loaded cells and that protein incorporation is a function of field strength, capacitance, molecular weight of the protein, and the concentration of the protein in the electroinjection buffer. Interestingly, a significant fraction of the protein electroinjected into cells is trapped in the plasma membrane when cells are shocked at high capacitance. These results demonstrate that electroinjection appears to be an efficient method for loading exogenous proteins into cells while maintaining the integrity of the physiological properties of the cell.

  12. Integrated nanoscale tools for interrogating living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgolli, Marsela

    The development of next-generation, nanoscale technologies that interface biological systems will pave the way towards new understanding of such complex systems. Nanowires -- one-dimensional nanoscale structures -- have shown unique potential as an ideal physical interface to biological systems. Herein, we focus on the development of nanowire-based devices that can enable a wide variety of biological studies. First, we built upon standard nanofabrication techniques to optimize nanowire devices, resulting in perfectly ordered arrays of both opaque (Silicon) and transparent (Silicon dioxide) nanowires with user defined structural profile, densities, and overall patterns, as well as high sample consistency and large scale production. The high-precision and well-controlled fabrication method in conjunction with additional technologies laid the foundation for the generation of highly specialized platforms for imaging, electrochemical interrogation, and molecular biology. Next, we utilized nanowires as the fundamental structure in the development of integrated nanoelectronic platforms to directly interrogate the electrical activity of biological systems. Initially, we generated a scalable intracellular electrode platform based on vertical nanowires that allows for parallel electrical interfacing to multiple mammalian neurons. Our prototype device consisted of 16 individually addressable stimulation/recording sites, each containing an array of 9 electrically active silicon nanowires. We showed that these vertical nanowire electrode arrays could intracellularly record and stimulate neuronal activity in dissociated cultures of rat cortical neurons similar to patch clamp electrodes. In addition, we used our intracellular electrode platform to measure multiple individual synaptic connections, which enables the reconstruction of the functional connectivity maps of neuronal circuits. In order to expand and improve the capability of this functional prototype device we designed

  13. Cell-based assays in practice: cell markers from autofluorescent proteins of the GFP-family.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Michael; Kredel, Simone; Wiedenmann, Jörg; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Heilker, Ralf

    2008-09-01

    The more recently discovered anthozoan fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the classic Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (avGFP) as well as their derivatives have become versatile tools as live cell markers in fluorescence microscopy. In this review, we show the use of these FPs in drug discovery assays. Assay examples are given for the application of FPs in multiplexed imaging, as photosensitizers, as fluorescent timers, as pulse-chase labels and for robotically integrated compound testing. The development of fast microscopic imaging devices has enabled the application of automated fluorescence microscopy combined with image analysis to pharmaceutical high throughput drug discovery assays, generally referred to as High Content Screening (HCS).

  14. Quantitative proteomics analysis integrated with microarray data reveals that extracellular matrix proteins, catenins, and p53 binding protein 1 are important for chemotherapy response in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng; Cheng, Lihua; White, James T; Lu, Wei; Utleg, Angelita G; Yan, Xiaowei; Urban, Nicole D; Drescher, Charles W; Hood, Leroy; Lin, Biaoyang

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel is the standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients. Although most patients initially respond to this treatment, few are cured. Resistance to chemotherapy is the major cause of treatment failure. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on ICAT/MS/MS technology to analyze tissues harvested at primary debulking surgery before the initiation of combination chemotherapy in order to identify potential naive or intrinsic chemotherapy response proteins in ovarian cancers. We identified 44 proteins that are overexpressed, and 34 proteins that are underexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue compared to the chemoresistant tissue. The overexpressed proteins identified in the chemoresistant tissue include 10 proteins (25.6%) belonging to the extracellular matrix (ECM), including decorin, versican, basigin (CD147), fibulin-1, extracellular matrix protein 1, biglycan, fibronectin 1, dermatopontin, alpha-cardiac actin (smooth muscle actin), and an EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1. Interesting proteins identified as overexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue include gamma-catenin (junction plakoglobin) and delta-catenin, tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), annexin A11, and 53 kDa selenium binding protein 1. Integrative analysis with expression profiling data of eight chemoresistant tissues and 13 chemosensitive tissues revealed that 16 proteins showed consistent changes at both the protein and the RNA levels. These include P53 binding protein 1, catenin delta 1 and plakoglobin, EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1. Our results suggest that chemotherapy response may be determined by multiple and complex system properties involving extracellular-matrix, cell adhesion and junction proteins.

  15. Functional dissection of SseF, a membrane-integral effector protein of intracellular Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Müller, Petra; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Hensel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    During intracellular life, the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica translocates a complex cocktail of effector proteins by means of the SPI2-encoded type III secretions system. The effectors jointly modify the endosomal system and vesicular transport in host cells. SseF and SseG are two effectors encoded by genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 and both effector associate with endosomal membranes and microtubules and are involved in the formation of Salmonella-induced filaments. Our previous deletional analyses identified protein domains of SseF required for the effector function. Here we present a detailed mutational analysis that identifies a short hydrophobic motif as functionally essential. We demonstrate that SseF and SseG are still functional if translocated as a single fusion protein, but also mediate effector function if translocated in cells co-infected with sseF and sseG strains. SseF has characteristics of an integral membrane protein after translocation into host cells.

  16. Cell-free protein synthesis: applications in proteomics and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    He, Mingyue

    2008-01-01

    Protein production is one of the key steps in biotechnology and functional proteomics. Expression of proteins in heterologous hosts (such as in E. coli) is generally lengthy and costly. Cell-free protein synthesis is thus emerging as an attractive alternative. In addition to the simplicity and speed for protein production, cell-free expression allows generation of functional proteins that are difficult to produce by in vivo systems. Recent exploitation of cell-free systems enables novel development of technologies for rapid discovery of proteins with desirable properties from very large libraries. This article reviews the recent development in cell-free systems and their application in the large scale protein analysis.

  17. Combined affinity labelling and mass spectrometry analysis of differential cell surface protein expression in normal and prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Claire; Saxton, Malcolm; Akpan, Akunna; Cramer, Rainer; Masters, John R; Naaby-Hansen, Soren

    2005-09-01

    Differences in the expression of cell surface proteins between a normal prostate epithelial (1542-NP2TX) and a prostate cancer cell line (1542-CP3TX) derived from the same patient were investigated. A combination of affinity chromatographic purification of biotin-tagged surface proteins with mass spectrometry analysis identified 26 integral membrane proteins and 14 peripheral surface proteins. The findings confirm earlier reports of altered expression in prostate cancer for several cell surface proteins, including ALCAM/CD166, the Ephrin type A receptor, EGFR and the prostaglandin F2 receptor regulatory protein. In addition, several novel findings of differential expression were made, including the voltage-dependent anion selective channel proteins Porin 1 and 2, ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) and Scavenger receptor B1. Cell surface protein expression changed both qualitatively and quantitatively when the cells were grown in the presence of either or both interferon INFalpha and INFgamma. Costimulation with type I and II interferons had additive or synergistic effects on the membrane density of several, mainly peripherally attached surface proteins. Concerted upregulation of surface exposed antigens may be of benefit in immuno-adjuvant-based treatment of interferon-responsive prostate cancer. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that differences in the expression of membrane proteins between normal and prostate cancer cells are reproducibly detectable following vectorial labelling with biotin, and that detailed analysis of extracellular-induced surface changes can be achieved by combining surface-specific labelling with high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

  18. 9. Exterior view, Test Cell 7, Systems Integration Laboratory Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Exterior view, Test Cell 7, Systems Integration Laboratory Building (T-28), looking southwest. The enclosure discussed in CO-88-B-8 is at the right. - Air Force Plant PJKS, Systems Integration Laboratory, Systems Integration Laboratory Building, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integration Protein Expressed in Escherichia Coli Possesses Selective DNA Cleaving Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Paula A.; Fyfe, James A.

    1990-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration protein, a potential target for selective antiviral therapy, was expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein, free of detectable contaminating endonucleases, selectively cleaved double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides that mimic the U3 and the U5 termini of linear HIV DNA. Two nucleotides were removed from the 3' ends of both the U5 plus strand and the U3 minus strand; in both cases, cleavage was adjacent to a conserved CA dinucleotide. The reaction was metal-ion dependent, with a preference for Mn2+ over Mg2+. Reaction selectivity was further demonstrated by the lack of cleavage of an HIV U5 substrate on the complementary (minus) strand, an analogous substrate that mimics the U3 terminus of an avian retrovirus, and an HIV U5 substrate in which the conserved CA dinucleotide was replaced with a TA dinucleotide. Such an integration protein-mediated cleavage reaction is expected to occur as part of the integration event in the retroviral life cycle, in which a double-stranded DNA copy of the viral RNA genome is inserted into the host cell DNA.

  20. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Mushegian, Arcady R.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  1. Integrated continuous processing of proteins expressed as inclusion bodies: GCSF as a case study.

    PubMed

    Kateja, Nikhil; Agarwal, Harshit; Hebbi, Vishwanath; Rathore, Anurag S

    2016-12-15

    Affordability of biopharmaceuticals continues to be a challenge, particularly in developing economies. This has fuelled advancements in manufacturing that can offer higher productivity and better economics without sacrificing product quality in the form of an integrated continuous manufacturing platform. While platform processes for monoclonal antibodies have existed for more than a decade, development of an integrated continuous manufacturing process for bacterial proteins has received relatively scant attention. In this study, we propose an end-to-end integrated continuous downstream process (from inclusion bodies to unformulated drug substance) for a therapeutic protein expressed in Escherichia coli as inclusion body. The final process consisted of a continuous refolding in a coiled flow inverter reactor directly coupled to a three-column periodic counter-current chromatography for capture of the product followed by a three-column con-current chromatography for polishing. The continuous bioprocessing train was run uninterrupted for 26 h to demonstrate its capability and the resulting output was analyzed for the various critical quality attributes, namely product purity (>99%), high molecular weight impurities (<0.5%), host cell proteins (<100 ppm), and host cell DNA (<10 ppb). All attributes were found to be consistent over the period of operation. The developed assembly offers smaller facility footprint, higher productivity, fewer hold steps, and significantly higher equipment and resin utilization. The complexities of process integration in the context of continuous processing have been highlighted. We hope that the study presented here will promote development of highly efficient, universal, end-to-end, fully continuous platforms for manufacturing of biotherapeutics. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2017.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus integration in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, V; Abrams, H; Roe, T; Lifson, J; Brown, P

    1990-01-01

    Integration of the viral genome into the nuclear DNA of a host cell plays a pivotal role in the replication of retroviruses. We have developed an in vitro method for studying the biochemistry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integration by using extracts from HIV-infected cells. Analysis of the reaction products showed that HIV integration in vitro accurately reproduces the in vivo process. Integration occurred without apparent specificity for the target sequence, and the integrated provirus was directly flanked by a 5-base-pair duplication of DNA from the target site. HIV integration did not require a high-energy cofactor, and the enzymatic activities required for integration were recovered with the viral DNA when cell extracts were fractionated by gel exclusion chromatography. Images PMID:2335814

  3. Xenopus LAP2β protein knockdown affects location of lamin B and nucleoporins and has effect on assembly of cell nucleus and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Machowska, Magdalena; Hutchison, Christopher J; Goldberg, Martin W; Rzepecki, Ryszard

    2016-05-01

    Xenopus LAP2β protein is the single isoform expressed in XTC cells. The protein localizes on heterochromatin clusters both at the nuclear envelope and inside a cell nucleus. The majority of XLAP2β fraction neither colocalizes with TPX2 protein during interphase nor can be immunoprecipitated with XLAP2β antibody. Knockdown of the XLAP2β protein expression in XTC cells by synthetic siRNA and plasmid encoded siRNA resulted in nuclear abnormalities including changes in shape of nuclei, abnormal chromatin structure, loss of nuclear envelope, mislocalization of integral membrane proteins of INM such as lamin B2, mislocalization of nucleoporins, and cell death. Based on timing of cell death, we suggest mechanism associated with nucleus reassembly or with entry into mitosis. This confirms that Xenopus LAP2 protein is essential for the maintenance of cell nucleus integrity and the process of its reassembly after mitosis.

  4. Dr. PIAS: an integrative system for assessing the druggability of protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The amount of data on protein-protein interactions (PPIs) available in public databases and in the literature has rapidly expanded in recent years. PPI data can provide useful information for researchers in pharmacology and medicine as well as those in interactome studies. There is urgent need for a novel methodology or software allowing the efficient utilization of PPI data in pharmacology and medicine. Results To address this need, we have developed the 'Druggable Protein-protein Interaction Assessment System' (Dr. PIAS). Dr. PIAS has a meta-database that stores various types of information (tertiary structures, drugs/chemicals, and biological functions associated with PPIs) retrieved from public sources. By integrating this information, Dr. PIAS assesses whether a PPI is druggable as a target for small chemical ligands by using a supervised machine-learning method, support vector machine (SVM). Dr. PIAS holds not only known druggable PPIs but also all PPIs of human, mouse, rat, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) proteins identified to date. Conclusions The design concept of Dr. PIAS is distinct from other published PPI databases in that it focuses on selecting the PPIs most likely to make good drug targets, rather than merely collecting PPI data. PMID:21303559

  5. Integrated Bioinformatics Approach Reveals Crosstalk Between Tumor Stroma and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Lang; Wang, Dan; Wei, Na; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Cancer progression is driven not only by cancer cell intrinsic alterations and interactions with tumor microenvironment, but also by systemic effects. Integration of multiple profiling data may provide insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of complex systemic processes. We performed a bioinformatic analysis of two public available microarray datasets for breast tumor stroma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, featuring integrated transcriptomics data, protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and protein subcellular localization, to identify genes and biological pathways that contribute to dialogue between tumor stroma and the peripheral circulation. Genes of the integrin family as well as CXCR4 proved to be hub nodes of the crosstalk network and may play an important role in response to stroma-derived chemoattractants. This study pointed to potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target systemic signals travelling through the circulation and interdict tumor cell recruitment.

  6. Membrane proteins of dense lysosomes from Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, S.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this work membrane proteins from lysosomes were studied in order to gain more information on the biogenesis and intracellular sorting of this class of membrane proteins. Membrane proteins were isolated from a purified population of lysosomes. These proteins were then examined for various co- and post-translational modifications which could serve as potential intracellular sorting signals. Biochemical analysis using marker enzymatic activities detected no plasma membrane, Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, mitochondria, or cytosol. Analysis after incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine or ({sup 3}H)uridine detected no nuclei or ribosomes. A fraction containing integral membrane proteins was obtained from the dense lysosomes by extraction with Triton X-114. Twenty-three polypeptides which incorporated both ({sup 35}S)methionine and ({sup 3}H)leucine were detected by SDS PAGE in this membrane fraction, and ranged in molecular weight from 30-130 kDa. After incorporation by cells of various radioactive metabolic precursors, the membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was examined and was found to be enriched in mannose, galactose, fucose, palmitate, myristate, and sulfate, but was depleted in phosphate. The membrane fraction from dense lysosomes was then analyzed by SDS PAGE to determine the apparent molecular weights of modified polypepties.

  7. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  8. Cell wall proteins: a new insight through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2006-01-01

    Cell wall proteins are essential constituents of plant cell walls; they are involved in modifications of cell wall components, wall structure, signaling and interactions with plasma membrane proteins at the cell surface. The application of proteomic approaches to the cell wall compartment raises important questions: are there technical problems specific to cell wall proteomics? What kinds of proteins can be found in Arabidopsis walls? Are some of them unexpected? What sort of post-translational modifications have been characterized in cell wall proteins to date? The purpose of this review is to discuss the experimental results obtained to date using proteomics, as well as some of the new questions challenging future research.

  9. Single-cell protein from waste cellulose

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, C. E.; Callihan, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The recycle, reuse, or reclamation of single cell protein from liquid and solid agricultural waste fibers by a fermentation process is reported. It is shown that cellulose comprises the bulk of the fibers at 50% to 55% of the dry weight of the refuse and that its biodegradability is of prime importance in the choice of a substrate. The application of sodium hydroxide followed by heat and pressure serves to de-polymerize and disrupt lignin structure while swelling the cellulose to increase water uptake and pore volume. Some of the lignin, hemi-celluloses, ash, and cellulose of the material is hydrolized and solubilized. Introduction of microorganisms to the substrate fibers mixed with nutrients produces continuous fermentation of cellulose for further protein extraction and purification.

  10. Proteomic analysis of membrane proteins of vero cells: exploration of potential proteins responsible for virus entry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Donghua; Zhu, Qinghe; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Dongbo

    2014-01-01

    Vero cells are highly susceptible to many viruses in humans and animals, and its membrane proteins (MPs) are responsible for virus entry. In our study, the MP proteome of the Vero cells was investigated using a shotgun LC-MS/MS approach. Six hundred twenty-seven proteins, including a total of 1839 peptides, were identified in MP samples of the Vero cells. In 627 proteins, 307 proteins (48.96%) were annotated in terms of biological process of gene ontology (GO) categories; 356 proteins (56.78%) were annotated in terms of molecular function of GO categories; 414 proteins (66.03%) were annotated in terms of cellular components of GO categories. Of 627 identified proteins, seventeen proteins had been revealed to be virus receptor proteins. The resulting protein lists and highlighted proteins may provide valuable information to increase understanding of virus infection of Vero cells.

  11. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information.

    PubMed

    Rose, Peter W; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R; Christie, Cole H; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M; Burley, Stephen K

    2017-01-04

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a 'Structural View of Biology.' Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive.

  12. Integrated Management Strategies Increase Cottonseed, Oil and Protein Production: The Key Role of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongkun; Zhang, Xinyue; Chen, Binglin; Meng, Yali; Wang, Youhua; Zhao, Wenqing; Zhou, Zhiguo

    2017-01-01

    Cottonseed, oil, and protein, as the by-products of cotton production, have the potential to provide commodities to meet the increasing demand of renewable bio-fuels and ruminant feed. An increase in crop yield per unit area requires high-yielding cultivar management with an economic nitrogen (N) rate, an optimal N application schedule, high-yielding plant populations and strong seedlings. Whether the integration of these agronomic practices into a coherent management system can increase the productivity of cotton fiber, embryo oil and protein requires experimental elucidation. In this 2-year study, conventional management practices (CM) were used as a control, and two integrated management strategies (IMS1 and IMS2) were considered at two soil fertility levels (high soil fertility and low soil fertility) to analyze the metabolic and biochemical traits of cotton embryos. The results illustrate that the cottonseed, oil, and protein yields for IMS1 and IMS2 were significantly higher than those under CM at both soil fertility levels and the fiber yield increased as well. The IMS regulated the maternal photo thermal environment by delaying the flowering date, resulting in increases in the seed weight. In developing cotton embryos, the IMS increased the embryo weight accumulation rate and biomass partitioning into oil and protein, which were associated with high activities of H+-ATPase, H+-PPase, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and cell wall invertase (C-INV) and low activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and vacuole invertase (V-INV). Increased hexoses (D-fructose, D-glucose) content contributed to the oil and protein contents. These results suggest that increased sucrose/H+ symport, sucrose hydrolysis, hexoses synthesis, and cumulative photo-thermal product (PTP), especially in the early stage of embryo growth, play a dominant role in the high productivity of cotton oil and protein. PMID:28194156

  13. Haematopoietic stem cells require a highly regulated protein synthesis rate.

    PubMed

    Signer, Robert A J; Magee, Jeffrey A; Salic, Adrian; Morrison, Sean J

    2014-05-01

    Many aspects of cellular physiology remain unstudied in somatic stem cells, for example, there are almost no data on protein synthesis in any somatic stem cell. Here we set out to compare protein synthesis in haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and restricted haematopoietic progenitors. We found that the amount of protein synthesized per hour in HSCs in vivo was lower than in most other haematopoietic cells, even if we controlled for differences in cell cycle status or forced HSCs to undergo self-renewing divisions. Reduced ribosome function in Rpl24(Bst/+) mice further reduced protein synthesis in HSCs and impaired HSC function. Pten deletion increased protein synthesis in HSCs but also reduced HSC function. Rpl24(Bst/+) cell-autonomously rescued the effects of Pten deletion in HSCs; blocking the increase in protein synthesis, restoring HSC function, and delaying leukaemogenesis. Pten deficiency thus depletes HSCs and promotes leukaemia partly by increasing protein synthesis. Either increased or decreased protein synthesis impairs HSC function.

  14. Studying host cell protein interactions with monoclonal antibodies using high throughput protein A chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sisodiya, Vikram N; Lequieu, Joshua; Rodriguez, Maricel; McDonald, Paul; Lazzareschi, Kathlyn P

    2012-10-01

    Protein A chromatography is typically used as the initial capture step in the purification of monoclonal antibodies produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Although exploiting an affinity interaction for purification, the level of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent varies significantly with different feedstocks. Using a batch binding chromatography method, we performed a controlled study to assess host cell protein clearance across both MabSelect Sure and Prosep vA resins. We individually spiked 21 purified antibodies into null cell culture fluid generated with a non-producing cell line, creating mock cell culture fluids for each antibody with an identical composition of host cell proteins and antibody concentration. We demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions are primarily responsible for the variable levels of host cell proteins in the protein A eluent for both resins when antibody is present. Using the additives guanidine HCl and sodium chloride, we demonstrated that antibody-host cell protein interactions may be disrupted, reducing the level of host cell proteins present after purification on both resins. The reduction in the level of host cell proteins differed between antibodies suggesting that the interaction likely varies between individual antibodies but encompasses both an electrostatic and hydrophobic component.

  15. Patterning proteins and cells using soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Kane, R S; Takayama, S; Ostuni, E; Ingber, D E; Whitesides, G M

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the pattering of proteins and cells using a non-photolithographic microfabrication technology, which we call 'soft lithography' because it consists of a set of related techniques, each of which uses stamps or channels fabricated in an elastomeric ('soft') material for pattern transfer. The review covers three soft lithographic techniques: microcontact printing, patterning using microfluidic channels, and laminar flow patterning. These soft lithographic techniques are inexpensive, are procedurally simple, and can be used to pattern a variety of planar and non-planar substrates. Their successful application does not require stringent regulation of the laboratory environment, and they can be used to pattern surfaces with delicate ligands. They provide control over both the surface chemistry and the cellular environment. We discuss both the procedures for patterning based on these soft lithographic techniques, and their applications in biosensor technology, in tissue engineering, and for fundamental studies in cell biology.

  16. Modularity and functional plasticity of scaffold proteins as p(l)acemakers in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Sudol, Marius; Sheetz, Michael; Low, Boon Chuan

    2012-11-01

    Cells coordinate and integrate various functional modules that control their dynamics, intracellular trafficking, metabolism and gene expression. Such capacity is mediated by specific scaffold proteins that tether multiple components of signaling pathways at plasma membrane, Golgi apparatus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and in more specialized subcellular structures such as focal adhesions, cell-cell junctions, endosomes, vesicles and synapses. Scaffold proteins act as "pacemakers" as well as "placemakers" that regulate the temporal, spatial and kinetic aspects of protein complex assembly by modulating the local concentrations, proximity, subcellular dispositions and biochemical properties of the target proteins through the intricate use of their modular protein domains. These regulatory mechanisms allow them to gate the specificity, integration and crosstalk of different signaling modules. In addition to acting as physical platforms for protein assembly, many professional scaffold proteins can also directly modify the properties of their targets while they themselves can be regulated by post-translational modifications and/or mechanical forces. Furthermore, multiple scaffold proteins can form alliances of higher-order regulatory networks. Here, we highlight the emerging themes of scaffold proteins by analyzing their common and distinctive mechanisms of action and regulation, which underlie their functional plasticity in cell signaling. Understanding these mechanisms in the context of space, time and force should have ramifications for human physiology and for developing new therapeutic approaches to control pathological states and diseases.

  17. Serum proteins are extracted along with monolayer cells in plasticware and interfere with protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; Meng, Yuling; Kalkanis, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Washing and lysing monolayer cells directly from cell culture plasticware is a commonly used method for protein extraction. We found that multiple protein bands were enriched in samples with low cell numbers from the 6-well plate cultures. These proteins contributed to the overestimation of cell proteins and led to the uneven protein loading in Western blotting analysis. In Coomassie blue stained SDS-PAGE gels, the main enriched protein band is about 69 kDa and it makes up 13.6% of total protein from 104 U251n cells. Analyzed by mass spectrometry, we identified two of the enriched proteins: bovine serum albumin and bovine serum transferrin. We further observed that serum proteins could be extracted from other cell culture plates, dishes and flasks even after washing the cells 3 times with PBS. A total of 2.3 mg of protein was collected from a single well of the 6-well plate. A trace amount of the protein band was still visible after washing the cells 5 times with PBS. Thus, serum proteins should be considered if extracting proteins from plasticware, especially for samples with low cell numbers. PMID:27631018

  18. Integrated Fuel Cell/Coal Gasifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrall, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    Powerplant design with low-temperature coal gasifier coupled to highly-exothermic fuel cell for efficient production of dc power eliminates need for oxygen in gasifier and achieves high fuel efficiency with recycling of waste heat from fuel cell.

  19. Improvement of hydrophobic integral membrane protein identification by mild performic acid oxidation-assisted digestion.

    PubMed

    Cao, Rui; Liu, Yisong; Chen, Ping; Lv, Rong; Song, Qin; Sheng, Tingting; He, Quanyuan; Wang, Yin; Wang, Xianchun; Liang, Songping

    2010-12-15

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) are critical for the maintenance of biological systems and represent important targets for the treatment of disease. The hydrophobicity and low abundance of IMPs make them difficult to analyze. In proteomic analyses, hydrophobic peptides including transmembrane domains are often underrepresented, and this reduces the sequence coverage and reliability of the identified IMPs. Here we report a new strategy, mild performic acid oxidation treatment (mPAOT), for improvement of IMP identification. In the mPAOT strategy, the hydrophobicity of IMPs is significantly decreased by oxidizing their methionine and cysteine residues with performic acid, thereby improving the solubility and enzymolysis of these proteins. The application of the mPAOT strategy to the analysis of IMPs from human nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 cell line demonstrated that many IMPs, including those with high hydrophobicity, could be reliably identified.

  20. Integrated photoelectrochemical cell and system having a liquid electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming; Xu, Liwei

    2010-07-06

    An integrated photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell generates hydrogen and oxygen from water while being illuminated with radiation. The PEC cell employs a liquid electrolyte, a multi-junction photovoltaic electrode, and a thin ion-exchange membrane. A PEC system and a method of making such PEC cell and PEC system are also disclosed.

  1. Fuel cell/gas turbine integration

    SciTech Connect

    Knickerbocker, T.

    1995-10-19

    The Allison Engine Company`s very high efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle program is discussed. The power cycle has the following advantages: high system efficiency potential, reduced emissions inherent to fuel cells, unmanned operation(no boiler) particularly suited for distributed power, and existing product line matches fuel cell operating environment. Cost effectiveness, estimates, and projections are given.

  2. Integrative omics analysis. A study based on Plasmodium falciparum mRNA and protein data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Technological improvements have shifted the focus from data generation to data analysis. The availability of large amounts of data from transcriptomics, protemics and metabolomics experiments raise new questions concerning suitable integrative analysis methods. We compare three integrative analysis techniques (co-inertia analysis, generalized singular value decomposition and integrative biclustering) by applying them to gene and protein abundance data from the six life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. Co-inertia analysis is an analysis method used to visualize and explore gene and protein data. The generalized singular value decomposition has shown its potential in the analysis of two transcriptome data sets. Integrative Biclustering applies biclustering to gene and protein data. Results Using CIA, we visualize the six life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum, as well as GO terms in a 2D plane and interpret the spatial configuration. With GSVD, we decompose the transcriptomic and proteomic data sets into matrices with biologically meaningful interpretations and explore the processes captured by the data sets. IBC identifies groups of genes, proteins, GO Terms and life cycle stages of Plasmodium falciparum. We show method-specific results as well as a network view of the life cycle stages based on the results common to all three methods. Additionally, by combining the results of the three methods, we create a three-fold validated network of life cycle stage specific GO terms: Sporozoites are associated with transcription and transport; merozoites with entry into host cell as well as biosynthetic and metabolic processes; rings with oxidation-reduction processes; trophozoites with glycolysis and energy production; schizonts with antigenic variation and immune response; gametocyctes with DNA packaging and mitochondrial transport. Furthermore, the network connectivity underlines the separation of the intraerythrocytic cycle from the gametocyte and

  3. Functional assessment of SLC4A11, an integral membrane protein mutated in corneal dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Schneider, Hans-Peter; Morgan, Patricio E; Deitmer, Joachim W; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-11-01

    SLC4A11, a member of the SLC4 family of bicarbonate transporters, is a widely expressed integral membrane protein, abundant in kidney and cornea. Mutations of SLC4A11 cause some cases of the blinding corneal dystrophies, congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy, and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy. These diseases are marked by fluid accumulation in the corneal stroma, secondary to defective fluid reabsorption by the corneal endothelium. The role of SLC4A11 in these corneal dystrophies is not firmly established, as SLC4A11 function remains unclear. To clarify the normal function(s) of SLC4A11, we characterized the protein following expression in the simple, low-background expression system Xenopus laevis oocytes. Since plant and fungal SLC4A11 orthologs transport borate, we measured cell swelling associated with accumulation of solute borate. The plant water/borate transporter NIP5;1 manifested borate transport, whereas human SLC4A11 did not. SLC4A11 supported osmotically driven water accumulation that was electroneutral and Na(+) independent. Studies in oocytes and HEK293 cells could not detect Na(+)-coupled HCO3(-) transport or Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange by SLC4A11. SLC4A11 mediated electroneutral NH3 transport in oocytes. Voltage-dependent OH(-) or H(+) movement was not measurable in SLC4A11-expressing oocytes, but SLC4A11-expressing HEK293 cells manifested low-level cytosolic acidification at baseline. In mammalian cells, but not oocytes, OH(-)/H(+) conductance may arise when SLC4A11 activates another protein or itself is activated by another protein. These data argue against a role of human SLC4A11 in bicarbonate or borate transport. This work provides additional support for water and ammonia transport by SLC4A11. When expressed in oocytes, SLC4A11 transported NH3, not NH3/H().

  4. Cell surface expression of glycosylated, nonglycosylated, and truncated forms of a cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Hiebert, S W; Lamb, R A

    1988-09-01

    The soluble cytoplasmic protein pyruvate kinase (PK) has been expressed at the cell surface in a membrane-anchored form (APK). The hybrid protein contains the NH2-terminal signal/anchor domain of a class II integral membrane protein (hemagglutinin/neuraminidase, of the paramyxovirus SV5) fused to the PK NH2 terminus. APK contains a cryptic site that is used for N-linked glycosylation but elimination of this site by site-specific mutagenesis does not prevent cell surface localization. Truncated forms of the APK molecule, with up to 80% of the PK region of APK removed, can also be expressed at the cell surface. These data suggest that neither the complete PK molecule nor its glycosylation are necessary for intracellular transport of PK to the cell surface, and it is possible that specific signals may not be needed in the ectodomain of this hybrid protein to specify cell surface localization.

  5. P185-M Protein Identification and Validation of Results in Workflows that Integrate over Various Instruments, Datasets, Search Engines

    PubMed Central

    Hufnagel, P.; Glandorf, J.; Körting, G.; Jabs, W.; Schweiger-Hufnagel, U.; Hahner, S.; Lubeck, M.; Suckau, D.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of complex proteomes often results in long protein lists, but falls short in measuring the validity of identification and quantification results on a greater number of proteins. Biological and technical replicates are mandatory, as is the combination of the MS data from various workflows (gels, 1D-LC, 2D-LC), instruments (TOF/TOF, trap, qTOF or FTMS), and search engines. We describe a database-driven study that combines two workflows, two mass spectrometers, and four search engines with protein identification following a decoy database strategy. The sample was a tryptically digested lysate (10,000 cells) of a human colorectal cancer cell line. Data from two LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF runs and a 2D-LC-ESI-trap run using capillary and nano-LC columns were submitted to the proteomics software platform ProteinScape. The combined MALDI data and the ESI data were searched using Mascot (Matrix Science), Phenyx (GeneBio), ProteinSolver (Bruker and Protagen), and Sequest (Thermo) against a decoy database generated from IPI-human in order to obtain one protein list across all workflows and search engines at a defined maximum false-positive rate of 5%. ProteinScape combined the data to one LC-MALDI and one LC-ESI dataset. The initial separate searches from the two combined datasets generated eight independent peptide lists. These were compiled into an integrated protein list using the ProteinExtractor algorithm. An initial evaluation of the generated data led to the identification of approximately 1200 proteins. Result integration on a peptide level allowed discrimination of protein isoforms that would not have been possible with a mere combination of protein lists.

  6. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  7. Hand-Held and Integrated Single-Cell Pipettes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Successful single-cell isolation is a primary step for subsequent chemical and biological analyses of single cells. Conventional single-cell isolation methods often encounter operational complexity, limited efficiency, deterioration of cell viability, incompetence in the isolation of a single-cell into nanoliter liquid, and/or inability to select single adherent cells with specific phenotypes. Here, we develop a hand-held single-cell pipet (hSCP) that is rapid, operationally simple, highly efficient, and inexpensive for unbiased isolation of single viable suspended cells directly from submicroliter cell suspensions into nanoliter droplets without the assistance of any additional equipment. An integrated SCP (iSCP) has also been developed for selective isolation of single suspended and adherent cells according to the fluorescence imaging and morphological features. The isolated single cells can be conveniently transferred into standard 96-/384-well plates, Petri dishes, or vials for cloning, PCR, and other single-cell biochemical assays. PMID:25036187

  8. Gap junction proteins: master regulators of the planarian stem cell response to tissue maintenance and injury.

    PubMed

    Peiris, T Harshani; Oviedo, Néstor J

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction (GJ) proteins are crucial mediators of cell-cell communication during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and disease. GJ proteins form plasma membrane channels that facilitate passage of small molecules across cells and modulate signaling pathways and cellular behavior in different tissues. These properties have been conserved throughout evolution, and in most invertebrates GJ proteins are known as innexins. Despite their critical relevance for physiology and disease, the mechanisms by which GJ proteins modulate cell behavior are poorly understood. This review summarizes findings from recent work that uses planarian flatworms as a paradigm to analyze GJ proteins in the complexity of the whole organism. The planarian model allows access to a large pool of adult somatic stem cells (known as neoblasts) that support physiological cell turnover and tissue regeneration. Innexin proteins are present in planarians and play a fundamental role in controlling neoblast behavior. We discuss the possibility that GJ proteins participate as cellular sensors that inform neoblasts about local and systemic physiological demands. We believe that functional analyses of GJ proteins will bring a complementary perspective to studies that focus on the temporal expression of genes. Finally, integrating functional studies along with molecular genetics and epigenetic approaches would expand our understanding of cellular regulation in vivo and greatly enhance the possibilities for rationally modulating stem cell behavior in their natural environment. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The communicating junctions, roles and dysfunctions.

  9. OmpA-like protein influences cell shape and adhesive activity of Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Murakami, Y; Nagano, K; Hasegawa, Y; Moriguchi, K; Ohno, N; Shimozato, K; Yoshimura, F

    2011-12-01

    Tannerella forsythia, a gram-negative fusiform rod, is implicated in several types of oral anaerobic infections. Most gram-negative bacteria have OmpA-like proteins that are homologous to the OmpA protein in Escherichia coli. We identified an OmpA-like protein in T. forsythia encoded by the tf1331 gene as one of the major proteins by mass spectrometric analysis. Two-dimensional, diagonal electrophoresis showed that the OmpA-like protein formed a dimeric or trimeric structure via intermolecular disulfide bonds. A biotin labeling experiment revealed that a portion of the protein was exposed on the cell surface, even though T. forsythia possesses an S-layer at the outermost cell surface. Using a tf1331-deletion mutant, we showed that the OmpA-like protein affected cell morphology. The length of the mutant cell was reduced almost by half. Cell swelling was observed in more than 40% of the mutant cells. Moreover, the mutant exhibited decreased adhesion to fibronectin, retarded autoaggregation, and reduced cell surface hydrophobicity. These results suggest that the OmpA-like protein in T. forsythia plays an important role in cellular integrity and adhesive function.

  10. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  11. Outer membrane protein functions as integrator of protein import and DNA inheritance in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Käser, Sandro; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Týč, Jiří; Vaughan, Sue; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are one of the earliest diverging eukaryotes that have fully functional mitochondria. pATOM36 is a trypanosomatid-specific essential mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been implicated in protein import. Changes in the mitochondrial proteome induced by ablation of pATOM36 and in vitro assays show that pATOM36 is required for the assembly of the archaic translocase of the outer membrane (ATOM), the functional analog of the TOM complex in other organisms. Reciprocal pull-down experiments and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that a fraction of pATOM36 interacts and colocalizes with TAC65, a previously uncharacterized essential component of the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC links the single-unit mitochondrial genome to the basal body of the flagellum and mediates the segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. RNAi experiments show that pATOM36, in line with its dual localization, is not only essential for ATOM complex assembly but also for segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. However, the two functions are distinct, as a truncated version of pATOM36 lacking the 75 C-terminal amino acids can rescue kinetoplast DNA missegregation but not the lack of ATOM complex assembly. Thus, pATOM36 has a dual function and integrates mitochondrial protein import with mitochondrial DNA inheritance. PMID:27436903

  12. Outer membrane protein functions as integrator of protein import and DNA inheritance in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Käser, Sandro; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Týč, Jiří; Vaughan, Sue; Warscheid, Bettina; Schneider, André

    2016-08-02

    Trypanosomatids are one of the earliest diverging eukaryotes that have fully functional mitochondria. pATOM36 is a trypanosomatid-specific essential mitochondrial outer membrane protein that has been implicated in protein import. Changes in the mitochondrial proteome induced by ablation of pATOM36 and in vitro assays show that pATOM36 is required for the assembly of the archaic translocase of the outer membrane (ATOM), the functional analog of the TOM complex in other organisms. Reciprocal pull-down experiments and immunofluorescence analyses demonstrate that a fraction of pATOM36 interacts and colocalizes with TAC65, a previously uncharacterized essential component of the tripartite attachment complex (TAC). The TAC links the single-unit mitochondrial genome to the basal body of the flagellum and mediates the segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. RNAi experiments show that pATOM36, in line with its dual localization, is not only essential for ATOM complex assembly but also for segregation of the replicated mitochondrial genomes. However, the two functions are distinct, as a truncated version of pATOM36 lacking the 75 C-terminal amino acids can rescue kinetoplast DNA missegregation but not the lack of ATOM complex assembly. Thus, pATOM36 has a dual function and integrates mitochondrial protein import with mitochondrial DNA inheritance.

  13. Wheat germ systems for cell-free protein expression.

    PubMed

    Harbers, Matthias

    2014-08-25

    Cell-free protein expression plays an important role in biochemical research. However, only recent developments led to new methods to rapidly synthesize preparative amounts of protein that make cell-free protein expression an attractive alternative to cell-based methods. In particular the wheat germ system provides the highest translation efficiency among eukaryotic cell-free protein expression approaches and has a very high success rate for the expression of soluble proteins of good quality. As an open in vitro method, the wheat germ system is a preferable choice for many applications in protein research including options for protein labeling and the expression of difficult-to-express proteins like membrane proteins and multiple protein complexes. Here I describe wheat germ cell-free protein expression systems and give examples how they have been used in genome-wide expression studies, preparation of labeled proteins for structural genomics and protein mass spectroscopy, automated protein synthesis, and screening of enzymatic activities. Future directions for the use of cell-free expression methods are discussed.

  14. Electromechanical integration of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kehat, Izhak; Khimovich, Leonid; Caspi, Oren; Gepstein, Amira; Shofti, Rona; Arbel, Gil; Huber, Irit; Satin, Jonathan; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Gepstein, Lior

    2004-10-01

    Cell therapy is emerging as a promising strategy for myocardial repair. This approach is hampered, however, by the lack of sources for human cardiac tissue and by the absence of direct evidence for functional integration of donor cells into host tissues. Here we investigate whether cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells can restore myocardial electromechanical properties. Cardiomyocyte cell grafts were generated from hES cells in vitro using the embryoid body differentiating system. This tissue formed structural and electromechanical connections with cultured rat cardiomyocytes. In vivo integration was shown in a large-animal model of slow heart rate. The transplanted hES cell-derived cardiomyocytes paced the hearts of swine with complete atrioventricular block, as assessed by detailed three-dimensional electrophysiological mapping and histopathological examination. These results demonstrate the potential of hES-cell cardiomyocytes to act as a rate-responsive biological pacemaker and for future myocardial regeneration strategies.

  15. [Proteins support stem cells - use of protein therapeutics in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sara Christina; Stern, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has evolved from a largely experimental therapeutic approach three decades ago to a well-established therapy today for many malignant and non-malignant disorders of the hematopoietic and the immune system. Although it is per se a therapy by transmission of cells, protein therapeutics such as growth factors and antibodies are relevant in all phases of a HSCT and substantially contribute to the success of this often only curative treatment. This review discusses HSCT with a particular focus on the protein therapeutics involved. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization of stem cells to the peripheral blood, the polyclonal anti-T-cell globulin (ATG) and the monoclonal antibodies alemtuzumab and etanercept for prophylaxis and therapy of graft versus host disease (GvHD) are highlighted. Also rituximab, palivizumab and polyclonal intravenous immunoglobulins for treating infections in post-transplant patients are discussed. Since our understanding of cell surface receptors, cytokine and signaling pathways is increasing, there will emerge new targets for directed therapy by proteins in the future. They may have the potential to further improve the success and to widen theapplication of HSCT.

  16. Integrated protein function prediction by mining function associations, sequences, and protein–protein and gene–gene interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    Motivations Protein function prediction is an important and challenging problem in bioinformatics and computational biology. Functionally relevant biological information such as protein sequences, gene expression, and protein–protein interactions has been used mostly separately for protein function prediction. One of the major challenges is how to effectively integrate multiple sources of both traditional and new information such as spatial gene–gene interaction networks generated from chromosomal conformation data together to improve protein function prediction. Results In this work, we developed three different probabilistic scores (MIS, SEQ, and NET score) to combine protein sequence, function associations, and protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks for protein function prediction. The MIS score is mainly generated from homologous proteins found by PSI-BLAST search, and also association rules between Gene Ontology terms, which are learned by mining the Swiss-Prot database. The SEQ score is generated from protein sequences. The NET score is generated from protein–protein interaction and spatial gene–gene interaction networks. These three scores were combined in a new Statistical Multiple Integrative Scoring System (SMISS) to predict protein function. We tested SMISS on the data set of 2011 Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA). The method performed substantially better than three base-line methods and an advanced method based on protein profile–sequence comparison, profile–profile comparison, and domain co-occurrence networks according to the maximum F-measure. PMID:26370280

  17. Integral edge seals for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granata, Jr., Samuel J. (Inventor); Woodle, Boyd M. (Inventor); Dunyak, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A phosphoric acid fuel cell having integral edge seals formed by an elastomer permeating an outer peripheral band contiguous with the outer peripheral edges of the cathode and anode assemblies and the matrix to form an integral edge seal which is reliable, easy to manufacture and has creep characteristics similar to the anode, cathode and matrix assemblies inboard of the seals to assure good electrical contact throughout the life of the fuel cell.

  18. Cell-free methods to produce structurally intact mammalian membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Takehiro; Shinya, Naoko; Ito, Kaori; Ishizuka-Katsura, Yoshiko; Ohsawa, Noboru; Terada, Takaho; Hirata, Kunio; Kawano, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Tomita, Taisuke; Ishibashi, Yohei; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structures of four membrane proteins, from bacteria or a unicellular alga, have been solved with samples produced by cell-free protein synthesis. In this study, for mammalian membrane protein production, we established the precipitating and soluble membrane fragment methods: membrane proteins are synthesized with the Escherichia coli cell-free system in the presence of large and small membrane fragments, respectively, and are simultaneously integrated into the lipid environments. We applied the precipitating membrane fragment method to produce various mammalian membrane proteins, including human claudins, glucosylceramide synthase, and the γ-secretase subunits. These proteins were produced at levels of about 0.1–1.0 mg per ml cell-free reaction under the initial conditions, and were obtained as precipitates by ultracentrifugation. Larger amounts of membrane proteins were produced by the soluble membrane fragment method, collected in the ultracentrifugation supernatants, and purified directly by column chromatography. For several proteins, the conditions of the membrane fragment methods were further optimized, such as by the addition of specific lipids/detergents. The functional and structural integrities of the purified proteins were confirmed by analyses of their ligand binding activities, size-exclusion chromatography profiles, and/or thermal stabilities. We successfully obtained high-quality crystals of the complex of human claudin-4 with an enterotoxin. PMID:27465719

  19. Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) demonstration test

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfeld, G.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Sanderson, R.; Abens, S.

    2000-07-01

    As concern about the environment generates interest in ultra-clean energy plants, fuel cell power plants can respond to the challenge. Fuel cells convert hydrocarbon fuels to electricity at efficiencies exceeding conventional heat engine technologies while generating extremely low emissions. Emissions of SOx and NOx are expected to be well below current and anticipated future standards. Nitrogen oxides, a product of combustion, will be extremely low in this power plant because power is produced electrochemically rather than by combustion. Due to its higher efficiencies, a fuel cell power plant also produces less carbon dioxide. Fuel cells in combination with coal gasification, are an efficient and environmentally acceptable means to utilize the abundant coal reserves both in the US and around the world. To demonstrate this technology, FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), is planning to build and test a 2-MW Fuel Cell Power Plant for operation on coal derived gas. This power plant is based on Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{trademark}) technology and will be part of a Clean Coal V IGCC project supported by the US DOE. A British Gas Lurgi (BGL) slagging fixed-bed gasification system with cold gas clean up is planned as part of a 400 MW IGCC power plant to provide a fuel gas slip stream to the fuel cell. The IGFC power plant will be built by Kentucky Pioneer Energy, A subsidiary of Global Energy, in Clark County, KY. This demonstration will result in the world's largest fuel cell power plant operating on coal derived gas. The objective of this test is to demonstrate fuel cell operation on coal derived gas at a commercial scale and to verify the efficiency and environmental benefits.

  20. Reptilian reovirus utilizes a small type III protein with an external myristylated amino terminus to mediate cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Jennifer A; Duncan, Roy

    2004-04-01

    Reptilian reovirus is one of a limited number of nonenveloped viruses that are capable of inducing cell-cell fusion. A small, hydrophobic, basic, 125-amino-acid fusion protein encoded by the first open reading frame of a bicistronic viral mRNA is responsible for this fusion activity. Sequence comparisons to previously characterized reovirus fusion proteins indicated that p14 represents a new member of the fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) protein family. Topological analysis revealed that p14 is a representative of a minor subset of integral membrane proteins, the type III proteins N(exoplasmic)/C(cytoplasmic) (N(exo)/C(cyt)), that lack a cleavable signal sequence and use an internal reverse signal-anchor sequence to direct membrane insertion and protein topology. This topology results in the unexpected, cotranslational translocation of the essential myristylated N-terminal domain of p14 across the cell membrane. The topology and structural motifs present in this novel reovirus membrane fusion protein further accentuate the diversity and unusual properties of the FAST protein family and clearly indicate that the FAST proteins represent a third distinct class of viral membrane fusion proteins.

  1. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R

    2011-11-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus-truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets.

  2. Development of integral covers on solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P.; Somberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    The electron-beam technique for evaporating a dielectric material onto solar cells is investigated. A process has been developed which will provide a highly transparent, low stress, 2 mil thick cover capable of withstanding conventional space type qualification tests including humidity, thermal shock, and thermal cycling. The covers have demonstrated the ability to withstand 10 to the 15th power 1 MeV electrons and UV irradiation with minor darkening. Investigation of the cell AR coating has produced a space qualifiable titanium oxide coating which will give an additional 6% current output over similar silicon oxide coated cells when covered by glass.

  3. An integrated optofluidic platform for Raman-activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Lau, Adrian Y; Lee, Luke P; Chan, James W

    2008-07-01

    We report on integrated optofluidic Raman-activated cell sorting (RACS) platforms that combine multichannel microfluidic devices and laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) for delivery, identification, and simultaneous sorting of individual cells. The system allows label-free cell identification based on Raman spectroscopy and automated continuous cell sorting. Two optofluidic designs using hydrodynamic focusing and pinch-flow fractionation are evaluated based on their sorting design and flow velocity effect on the laser trapping efficiency at different laser power levels. A proof-of-principle demonstration of the integrated optofluidic LTRS system for the identification and sorting of two leukemia cell lines is presented. This functional prototype lays the foundation for the development of a label-free cell sorting platform based on intrinsic Raman markers for automated sampling and sorting of a large number of individual cells in solution.

  4. Cell-free expression of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Erika; Proverbio, Davide; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free expression has emerged as a new standard for the production of membrane proteins. The reduction of expression complexity in cell-free systems eliminates central bottlenecks and allows the reliable and efficient synthesis of many different types of membrane proteins. Furthermore, the open accessibility of cell-free reactions enables the co-translational solubilization of cell-free expressed membrane proteins in a large variety of supplied additives. Hydrophobic environments can therefore be adjusted according to the requirements of individual membrane protein targets. We present different approaches for the preparative scale cell-free production of G-protein-coupled receptors using the extracts of Escherichia coli cells. We exemplify expression conditions implementing detergents, nanodiscs, or liposomes. The generated protein samples could be directly used for further functional characterization.

  5. Mechanosensitive channels and bacterial cell wall integrity: does life end with a bang or a whimper?

    PubMed

    Reuter, Marcel; Hayward, Nicholas J; Black, Susan S; Miller, Samantha; Dryden, David T F; Booth, Ian R

    2014-02-06

    Mechanogated channels are fundamental components of bacterial cells that enable retention of physical integrity during extreme increases in cell turgor. Optical tweezers combined with microfluidics have been used to study the fate of individual Escherichia coli cells lacking such channels when subjected to a bursting stress caused by increased turgor. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting and electron microscopy complement these studies. These analyses show that lysis occurs with a high probability, but the precise path differs between individual cells. By monitoring the loss of cytoplasmic green fluorescent protein, we have determined that some cells release this protein but remain phase dark (granular) consistent with the retention of the majority of large proteins. By contrast, most cells suffer cataclysmic wall failure leading to loss of granularity but with the retention of DNA and overall cell shape (protein-depleted ghosts). The time span of these events induced by hypo-osmotic shock varies but is of the order of milliseconds. The data are interpreted in terms of the timing of mechanosensitive channel gating relative to osmotically induced water influx.

  6. Escherichia coli cell-free protein synthesis and isotope labeling of mammalian proteins.

    PubMed

    Terada, Takaho; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the cell-free protein synthesis method, using an Escherichia coli cell extract. This is a cost-effective method for milligram-scale protein production and is particularly useful for the production of mammalian proteins, protein complexes, and membrane proteins that are difficult to synthesize by recombinant expression methods, using E. coli and eukaryotic cells. By adjusting the conditions of the cell-free method, zinc-binding proteins, disulfide-bonded proteins, ligand-bound proteins, etc., may also be produced. Stable isotope labeling of proteins can be accomplished by the cell-free method, simply by using stable isotope-labeled amino acid(s) in the cell-free reaction. Moreover, the cell-free protein synthesis method facilitates the avoidance of stable isotope scrambling and dilution over the recombinant expression methods and is therefore advantageous for amino acid-selective stable isotope labeling. Site-specific stable isotope labeling is also possible with a tRNA molecule specific to the UAG codon. By the cell-free protein synthesis method, coupled transcription-translation is performed from a plasmid vector or a PCR-amplified DNA fragment encoding the protein. A milligram quantity of protein can be produced with a milliliter-scale reaction solution in the dialysis mode. More than a thousand solution structures have been determined by NMR spectroscopy for uniformly labeled samples of human and mouse functional domain proteins, produced by the cell-free method. Here, we describe the practical aspects of mammalian protein production by the cell-free method for NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.

    2010-08-24

    Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

  8. A permeabilized cell system identifies the endoplasmic reticulum as a site of protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of the fate of a variety of newly synthesized proteins in the secretory pathway has provided evidence for the existence of a novel protein degradation system distinct from that of the lysosome. Although current evidence suggests that proteins degraded by this system are localized to a pre-Golgi compartment before degradation, the site of proteolysis has not been determined. A permeabilized cell system was developed to examine whether degradation by this pathway required transport out of the ER, and to define the biochemical characteristics of this process. Studies were performed on fibroblast cell lines expressing proteins known to be sensitive substrates for this degradative process, such as the chimeric integral membrane proteins, Tac-TCR alpha and Tac-TCR beta. By immunofluorescence microscopy, these proteins were found to be localized to the ER. Treatment with cycloheximide resulted in the progressive disappearance of intracellular staining without change in the ER localization of the chimeric proteins. Cells permeabilized with the pore-forming toxin streptolysin O were able to degrade these newly synthesized proteins. The protein degradation seen in permeabilized cells was representative of that seen in intact cells, as judged by the similar speed of degradation, substrate selectivity, temperature dependence, and involvement of free sulfhydryl groups. Degradation of these proteins in permeabilized cells took place in the absence of transport between the ER and the Golgi system. Moreover, degradation occurred in the absence of added ATP or cytosol, and in the presence of apyrase, GTP gamma S, or EDTA; i.e., under conditions which prevent transport of proteins out of the ER. The efficiency and selectivity of degradation of newly synthesized proteins were also conserved in an isolated ER fraction. These data indicate that the machinery responsible for pre-Golgi degradation of newly synthesized proteins exists within the ER itself, and can operate

  9. NetworkAnalyst - integrative approaches for protein–protein interaction network analysis and visual exploration

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Jianguo; Benner, Maia J.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Biological network analysis is a powerful approach to gain systems-level understanding of patterns of gene expression in different cell types, disease states and other biological/experimental conditions. Three consecutive steps are required - identification of genes or proteins of interest, network construction and network analysis and visualization. To date, researchers have to learn to use a combination of several tools to accomplish this task. In addition, interactive visualization of large networks has been primarily restricted to locally installed programs. To address these challenges, we have developed NetworkAnalyst, taking advantage of state-of-the-art web technologies, to enable high performance network analysis with rich user experience. NetworkAnalyst integrates all three steps and presents the results via a powerful online network visualization framework. Users can upload gene or protein lists, single or multiple gene expression datasets to perform comprehensive gene annotation and differential expression analysis. Significant genes are mapped to our manually curated protein-protein interaction database to construct relevant networks. The results are presented through standard web browsers for network analysis and interactive exploration. NetworkAnalyst supports common functions for network topology and module analyses. Users can easily search, zoom and highlight nodes or modules, as well as perform functional enrichment analysis on these selections. The networks can be customized with different layouts, colors or node sizes, and exported as PNG, PDF or GraphML files. Comprehensive FAQs, tutorials and context-based tips and instructions are provided. NetworkAnalyst currently supports protein-protein interaction network analysis for human and mouse and is freely available at http://www.networkanalyst.ca. PMID:24861621

  10. The integral membrane protein, ponticulin, acts as a monomer in nucleating actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Ponticulin, an F-actin binding transmembrane glycoprotein in Dictyostelium plasma membranes, was isolated by detergent extraction from cytoskeletons and purified to homogeneity. Ponticulin is an abundant membrane protein, averaging approximately 10(6) copies/cell, with an estimated surface density of approximately 300 per microns2. Ponticulin solubilized in octylglucoside exhibited hydrodynamic properties consistent with a ponticulin monomer in a spherical or slightly ellipsoidal detergent micelle with a total molecular mass of 56 +/- 6 kD. Purified ponticulin nucleated actin polymerization when reconstituted into Dictyostelium lipid vesicles, but not when a number of commercially available lipids and lipid mixtures were substituted for the endogenous lipid. The specific activity was consistent with that expected for a protein comprising 0.7 +/- 0.4%, by mass, of the plasma membrane protein. Ponticulin in octylglucoside micelles bound F- actin but did not nucleate actin assembly. Thus, ponticulin-mediated nucleation activity was sensitive to the lipid environment, a result frequently observed with transmembrane proteins. At most concentrations of Dictyostelium lipid, nucleation activity increased linearly with increasing amounts of ponticulin, suggesting that the nucleating species is a ponticulin monomer. Consistent with previous observations of lateral interactions between actin filaments and Dictyostelium plasma membranes, both ends of ponticulin-nucleated actin filaments appeared to be free for monomer assembly and disassembly. Our results indicate that ponticulin is a major membrane protein in Dictyostelium and that, in the proper lipid matrix, it is sufficient for lateral nucleation of actin assembly. To date, ponticulin is the only integral membrane protein known to directly nucleate actin polymerization. PMID:8432731

  11. Cell mechanics: integrating cell responses to mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Janmey, Paul A; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cell structure and function, and the mechanical properties of cells are essential to the mechanisms by which cells sense forces, transmit them to the cell interior or to other cells, and transduce them into chemical signals that impact a spectrum of cellular responses. Comparison of the mechanical properties of intact cells with those of the purified cytoskeletal biopolymers that are thought to dominate their elasticity reveal the extent to which the studies of purified systems can account for the mechanical properties of the much more heterogeneous and complex cell. This review summarizes selected aspects of current work on cell mechanics with an emphasis on the structures that are activated in cell-cell contacts, that regulate ion flow across the plasma membrane, and that may sense fluid flow that produces low levels of shear stress.

  12. The RCSB protein data bank: integrative view of protein, gene and 3D structural information

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter W.; Prlić, Andreas; Altunkaya, Ali; Bi, Chunxiao; Bradley, Anthony R.; Christie, Cole H.; Costanzo, Luigi Di; Duarte, Jose M.; Dutta, Shuchismita; Feng, Zukang; Green, Rachel Kramer; Goodsell, David S.; Hudson, Brian; Kalro, Tara; Lowe, Robert; Peisach, Ezra; Randle, Christopher; Rose, Alexander S.; Shao, Chenghua; Tao, Yi-Ping; Valasatava, Yana; Voigt, Maria; Westbrook, John D.; Woo, Jesse; Yang, Huangwang; Young, Jasmine Y.; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB, http://rcsb.org), the US data center for the global PDB archive, makes PDB data freely available to all users, from structural biologists to computational biologists and beyond. New tools and resources have been added to the RCSB PDB web portal in support of a ‘Structural View of Biology.’ Recent developments have improved the User experience, including the high-speed NGL Viewer that provides 3D molecular visualization in any web browser, improved support for data file download and enhanced organization of website pages for query, reporting and individual structure exploration. Structure validation information is now visible for all archival entries. PDB data have been integrated with external biological resources, including chromosomal position within the human genome; protein modifications; and metabolic pathways. PDB-101 educational materials have been reorganized into a searchable website and expanded to include new features such as the Geis Digital Archive. PMID:27794042

  13. Integration of AI-2 Based Cell-Cell Signaling with Metabolic Cues in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arindam; Herren, Christopher D.; Patel, Isha R.; Coleman, Adam; Mukhopadhyay, Suman

    2016-01-01

    The quorum sensing molecule Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is generated as a byproduct of activated methyl cycle by the action of LuxS in Escherichia coli. AI-2 is synthesized, released and later internalized in a cell-density dependent manner. Here, by mutational analysis of the genes, uvrY and csrA, we describe a regulatory circuit of accumulation and uptake of AI-2. We constructed a single-copy chromosomal luxS-lacZ fusion in a luxS + merodiploid strain and evaluated its relative expression in uvrY and csrA mutants. At the entry of stationary phase, the expression of the fusion and AI-2 accumulation was positively regulated by uvrY and negatively regulated by csrA respectively. A deletion of csrA altered message stability of the luxS transcript and CsrA protein exhibited weak binding to 5’ luxS regulatory region. DNA protein interaction and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed direct interaction of UvrY with the luxS promoter. Additionally, reduced expression of the fusion in hfq deletion mutant suggested involvement of small RNA interactions in luxS regulation. In contrast, the expression of lsrA operon involved in AI-2 uptake, is negatively regulated by uvrY and positively by csrA in a cell-density dependent manner. The dual role of csrA in AI-2 synthesis and uptake suggested a regulatory crosstalk of cell signaling with carbon regulation in Escherichia coli. We found that the cAMP-CRP mediated catabolite repression of luxS expression was uvrY dependent. This study suggests that luxS expression is complex and regulated at the level of transcription and translation. The multifactorial regulation supports the notion that cell-cell communication requires interaction and integration of multiple metabolic signals. PMID:27362507

  14. The evolution of human cells in terms of protein innovation.

    PubMed

    Sardar, Adam J; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai; Forrest, Alistair R R; Kawaji, Hideya; Gough, Julian; Rackham, Owen J L

    2014-06-01

    Humans are composed of hundreds of cell types. As the genomic DNA of each somatic cell is identical, cell type is determined by what is expressed and when. Until recently, little has been reported about the determinants of human cell identity, particularly from the joint perspective of gene evolution and expression. Here, we chart the evolutionary past of all documented human cell types via the collective histories of proteins, the principal product of gene expression. FANTOM5 data provide cell-type-specific digital expression of human protein-coding genes and the SUPERFAMILY resource is used to provide protein domain annotation. The evolutionary epoch in which each protein was created is inferred by comparison with domain annotation of all other completely sequenced genomes. Studying the distribution across epochs of genes expressed in each cell type reveals insights into human cellular evolution in terms of protein innovation. For each cell type, its history of protein innovation is charted based on the genes it expresses. Combining the histories of all cell types enables us to create a timeline of cell evolution. This timeline identifies the possibility that our common ancestor Coelomata (cavity-forming animals) provided the innovation required for the innate immune system, whereas cells which now form the brain of human have followed a trajectory of continually accumulating novel proteins since Opisthokonta (boundary of animals and fungi). We conclude that exaptation of existing domain architectures into new contexts is the dominant source of cell-type-specific domain architectures.

  15. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These intracellular bacteria establish infection by affecting cell function in both the vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Previous studies have characterized the tick transcriptome and proteome in response to A. phagocytophilum infection. However, in the postgenomic era, the integration of omics datasets through a systems biology approach allows network-based analyses to describe the complexity and functionality of biological systems such as host–pathogen interactions and the discovery of new targets for prevention and control of infectious diseases. This study reports the first systems biology integration of metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data to characterize essential metabolic pathways involved in the tick response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The ISE6 tick cells used in this study constitute a model for hemocytes involved in pathogen infection and immune response. The results showed that infection affected protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and glucose metabolic pathways in tick cells. These results supported tick–Anaplasma co-evolution by providing new evidence of how tick cells limit pathogen infection, while the pathogen benefits from the tick cell response to establish infection. Additionally, ticks benefit from A. phagocytophilum infection by increasing survival while pathogens guarantee transmission. The results suggested that A. phagocytophilum induces protein misfolding to limit the tick cell response and facilitate infection but requires protein degradation to prevent ER stress and cell apoptosis to survive in infected cells. Additionally, A. phagocytophilum may benefit from the tick cell's ability to limit bacterial infection through PEPCK inhibition leading to decreased glucose metabolism, which also results in the inhibition of cell apoptosis that increases infection of tick cells. These

  16. Integrated Metabolomics, Transcriptomics and Proteomics Identifies Metabolic Pathways Affected by Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infection in Tick Cells.

    PubMed

    Villar, Margarita; Ayllón, Nieves; Alberdi, Pilar; Moreno, Andrés; Moreno, María; Tobes, Raquel; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Weisheit, Sabine; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José

    2015-12-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These intracellular bacteria establish infection by affecting cell function in both the vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Previous studies have characterized the tick transcriptome and proteome in response to A. phagocytophilum infection. However, in the postgenomic era, the integration of omics datasets through a systems biology approach allows network-based analyses to describe the complexity and functionality of biological systems such as host-pathogen interactions and the discovery of new targets for prevention and control of infectious diseases. This study reports the first systems biology integration of metabolomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data to characterize essential metabolic pathways involved in the tick response to A. phagocytophilum infection. The ISE6 tick cells used in this study constitute a model for hemocytes involved in pathogen infection and immune response. The results showed that infection affected protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum and glucose metabolic pathways in tick cells. These results supported tick-Anaplasma co-evolution by providing new evidence of how tick cells limit pathogen infection, while the pathogen benefits from the tick cell response to establish infection. Additionally, ticks benefit from A. phagocytophilum infection by increasing survival while pathogens guarantee transmission. The results suggested that A. phagocytophilum induces protein misfolding to limit the tick cell response and facilitate infection but requires protein degradation to prevent ER stress and cell apoptosis to survive in infected cells. Additionally, A. phagocytophilum may benefit from the tick cell's ability to limit bacterial infection through PEPCK inhibition leading to decreased glucose metabolism, which also results in the inhibition of cell apoptosis that increases infection of tick cells. These results

  17. Bayesian inference for genomic data integration reduces misclassification rate in predicting protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Xing, Chuanhua; Dunson, David B

    2011-07-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential to most fundamental cellular processes. There has been increasing interest in reconstructing PPIs networks. However, several critical difficulties exist in obtaining reliable predictions. Noticeably, false positive rates can be as high as >80%. Error correction from each generating source can be both time-consuming and inefficient due to the difficulty of covering the errors from multiple levels of data processing procedures within a single test. We propose a novel Bayesian integration method, deemed nonparametric Bayes ensemble learning (NBEL), to lower the misclassification rate (both false positives and negatives) through automatically up-weighting data sources that are most informative, while down-weighting less informative and biased sources. Extensive studies indicate that NBEL is significantly more robust than the classic naïve Bayes to unreliable, error-prone and contaminated data. On a large human data set our NBEL approach predicts many more PPIs than naïve Bayes. This suggests that previous studies may have large numbers of not only false positives but also false negatives. The validation on two human PPIs datasets having high quality supports our observations. Our experiments demonstrate that it is feasible to predict high-throughput PPIs computationally with substantially reduced false positives and false negatives. The ability of predicting large numbers of PPIs both reliably and automatically may inspire people to use computational approaches to correct data errors in general, and may speed up PPIs prediction with high quality. Such a reliable prediction may provide a solid platform to other studies such as protein functions prediction and roles of PPIs in disease susceptibility.

  18. Drosophila Uri, a PP1α binding protein, is essential for viability, maintenance of DNA integrity and normal transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Jasmin; Vissi, Emese; Gross, Sascha; Szoor, Balazs; Rudenko, Andrey; Alphey, Luke; White-Cooper, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is involved in diverse cellular processes, and is targeted to substrates via interaction with many different protein binding partners. PP1 catalytic subunits (PP1c) fall into PP1α and PP1β subfamilies based on sequence analysis, however very few PP1c binding proteins have been demonstrated to discriminate between PP1α and PP1β. Results URI (unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor) is a conserved molecular chaperone implicated in a variety of cellular processes, including the transcriptional response to nutrient signalling and maintenance of DNA integrity. We show that Drosophila Uri binds PP1α with much higher affinity than PP1β, and that this ability to discriminate between PP1c forms is conserved to humans. Most Uri is cytoplasmic, however we found some protein associated with active RNAPII on chromatin. We generated a uri loss of function allele, and show that uri is essential for viability in Drosophila. uri mutants have transcriptional defects, reduced cell viability and differentiation in the germline, and accumulate DNA damage in their nuclei. Conclusion Uri is the first PP1α specific binding protein to be described in Drosophila. Uri protein plays a role in transcriptional regulation. Activity of uri is required to maintain DNA integrity and cell survival in normal development. PMID:18412953

  19. Modulation of Sertoli cell secretory function by rat round spermatid protein(s).

    PubMed

    Onoda, M; Djakiew, D

    1990-10-01

    The influence of rat round spermatid protein(s) (RSP) on protein synthesis and secretory function of Sertoli cells was used in the bicameral chamber system. Round spermatids (RS) were purified from 90-day-old rats by centrifugal elutriation. RS were incubated in a supplement-enriched culture medium that lacked exogenous proteins. The RS-conditioned media were dialysed and lyophilized to obtain RSP. Most de novo protein synthesized under basal conditions by Sertoli cells (18-day-old) was secreted into the apical chamber (apical/basal ratio: 3.42). Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, 100 ng/ml) stimulated total protein secretion from Sertoli cells by a factor of 1.54. The RSP (100 micrograms/ml) stimulated total protein secretion from Sertoli cells by a factor of 2.33. The enhancement of total Sertoli cell protein secretion by FSH and RSP additively increased by a factor of 2.82. The combined effect of FSH and RSP on total protein secretion from Sertoli cells was dose dependent and saturated at approximately 200 micrograms/ml of RSP. Polarity of total protein secretion from Sertoli cells (apical/basal ratio: 3.42) was stimulated by RSP predominantly in the apical direction (apical/basal ratio: 8.48). The modulation of radiolabeled Sertoli cell secretory proteins (ceruloplasmin, CP; sulfated glycoprotein-2, SGP-2; testins and transferrin, Tf) by cold (non-labeled) RSP was investigated by immunoprecipitation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The secretion of CP, SGP-2 and Tf was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of RSP up to a saturating concentration of between 200 and 300 micrograms/ml, whereas the secretion of Sertoli cell testins did not reach saturation at 300 micrograms/ml RSP. These results indicate that FSH and RSP independently modulate Sertoli cell protein secretion, and that Sertoli cell secretory proteins may differentially respond to RSP stimulation.

  20. Integrated fuel cell stack shunt current prevention arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Robert P.; Nowak, Michael P.

    1992-01-01

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of fuel cells juxtaposed with one another in the stack and each including a pair of plate-shaped anode and cathode electrodes that face one another, and a quantity of liquid electrolyte present at least between the electrodes. A separator plate is interposed between each two successive electrodes of adjacent ones of the fuel cells and is unified therewith into an integral separator plate. Each integral separator plate is provided with a circumferentially complete barrier that prevents flow of shunt currents onto and on an outer peripheral surface of the separator plate. This barrier consists of electrolyte-nonwettable barrier members that are accommodated, prior to the formation of the integral separator plate, in corresponding edge recesses situated at the interfaces between the electrodes and the separator plate proper. Each barrier member extends over the entire length of the associated marginal portion and is flush with the outer periphery of the integral separator plate. This barrier also prevents cell-to-cell migration of any electrolyte that may be present at the outer periphery of the integral separator plate while the latter is incorporated in the fuel cell stack.

  1. The Integral Membrane Protein Snl1p Is Genetically Linked to Yeast Nuclear Pore Complex Function

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Albert K.; Raczniak, Gregory A.; Ives, Eric B.; Wente, Susan R.

    1998-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins are predicted to play key roles in the biogenesis and function of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Revealing how the transport apparatus is assembled will be critical for understanding the mechanism of nucleocytoplasmic transport. We observed that expression of the carboxyl-terminal 200 amino acids of the nucleoporin Nup116p had no effect on wild-type yeast cells, but it rendered the nup116 null strain inviable at all temperatures and coincidentally resulted in the formation of nuclear membrane herniations at 23°C. To identify factors related to NPC function, a genetic screen for high-copy suppressors of this lethal nup116-C phenotype was conducted. One gene (designated SNL1 for suppressor of nup116-C lethal) was identified whose expression was necessary and sufficient for rescuing growth. Snl1p has a predicted molecular mass of 18.3 kDa, a putative transmembrane domain, and limited sequence similarity to Pom152p, the only previously identified yeast NPC-associated integral membrane protein. By both indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies, Snl1p was localized to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum. Membrane extraction and topology assays suggested that Snl1p was an integral membrane protein, with its carboxyl-terminal region exposed to the cytosol. With regard to genetic specificity, the nup116-C lethality was also suppressed by high-copy GLE2 and NIC96. Moreover, high-copy SNL1 suppressed the temperature sensitivity of gle2–1 and nic96-G3 mutant cells. The nic96-G3 allele was identified in a synthetic lethal genetic screen with a null allele of the closely related nucleoporin nup100. Gle2p physically associated with Nup116p in vitro, and the interaction required the N-terminal region of Nup116p. Therefore, genetic links between the role of Snl1p and at least three NPC-associated proteins were established. We suggest that Snl1p plays a stabilizing role in NPC structure and function

  2. Identifying subcellular protein localization with fluorescent protein fusions after transient expression in onion epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Nebenführ, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical functions of plant cells are carried out by proteins which act at very specific places within these cells, for example, within different organelles. Identifying the subcellular localization of proteins is therefore a useful tool to narrow down the possible functions that a novel or unknown protein may carry out. The discovery of genetically encoded fluorescent markers has made it possible to tag specific proteins and visualize them in vivo under a variety of conditions. This chapter describes a simple method to use transient expression of such fluorescently tagged proteins in onion epidermal cells to determine their subcellular localization relative to known markers.

  3. Protein conformation as a regulator of cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2014-04-14

    The dynamic regulation of cell-matrix adhesion is essential for tissue homeostasis and architecture, and thus numerous pathologies are linked to altered cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and ECM scaffold. The molecular machinery involved in cell-matrix adhesion is complex and involves both sensory and matrix-remodelling functions. In this review, we focus on how protein conformation controls the organization and dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion. The conformational changes in various adhesion machinery components are described, including examples from ECM as well as cytoplasmic proteins. The discussed mechanisms involved in the regulation of protein conformation include mechanical stress, post-translational modifications and allosteric ligand-binding. We emphasize the potential role of intrinsically disordered protein regions in these processes and discuss the role of protein networks and co-operative protein interactions in the formation and consolidation of cell-matrix adhesion and extracellular scaffolds.

  4. Stem cell signaling. An integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration: Wnt signaling and stem cell control.

    PubMed

    Clevers, Hans; Loh, Kyle M; Nusse, Roel

    2014-10-03

    Stem cells fuel tissue development, renewal, and regeneration, and these activities are controlled by the local stem cell microenvironment, the "niche." Wnt signals emanating from the niche can act as self-renewal factors for stem cells in multiple mammalian tissues. Wnt proteins are lipid-modified, which constrains them to act as short-range cellular signals. The locality of Wnt signaling dictates that stem cells exiting the Wnt signaling domain differentiate, spatially delimiting the niche in certain tissues. In some instances, stem cells may act as or generate their own niche, enabling the self-organization of patterned tissues. In this Review, we discuss the various ways by which Wnt operates in stem cell control and, in doing so, identify an integral program for tissue renewal and regeneration.

  5. NPS Solar Cell Array Tester Cubesat Flight Testing and Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NPS SOLAR CELL ARRAY TESTER CUBESAT FLIGHT TESTING AND INTEGRATION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Naval Postgraduate School Solar Cell Array Tester (NPS-SCAT) is the first CubeSat for the...Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). The NPS-SCAT mission was designed to measure solar cell performance degradation in low earth orbit . NPS-SCAT serves as

  6. Development of a new integral solar cell protective cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naselow, A. B.; Dupont, P. S.; Scott-Monck, J.

    1983-01-01

    A unique polyimide polymer has been developed which shows promise as an encapsulant for interconnected solar cell modules. Such an integral cover offers important weight and cost advantages. The polymer has been characterized on silicon solar cells with respect to electrical output and spectral response. The response of the material-coated cells to electron, low-energy proton, and vacuum-ultraviolet radiation, thermal shock and humidity tests was determined.

  7. An Integrated Framework Advancing Membrane Protein Modeling and Design

    PubMed Central

    Weitzner, Brian D.; Duran, Amanda M.; Tilley, Drew C.; Elazar, Assaf; Gray, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are critical functional molecules in the human body, constituting more than 30% of open reading frames in the human genome. Unfortunately, a myriad of difficulties in overexpression and reconstitution into membrane mimetics severely limit our ability to determine their structures. Computational tools are therefore instrumental to membrane protein structure prediction, consequently increasing our understanding of membrane protein function and their role in disease. Here, we describe a general framework facilitating membrane protein modeling and design that combines the scientific principles for membrane protein modeling with the flexible software architecture of Rosetta3. This new framework, called RosettaMP, provides a general membrane representation that interfaces with scoring, conformational sampling, and mutation routines that can be easily combined to create new protocols. To demonstrate the capabilities of this implementation, we developed four proof-of-concept applications for (1) prediction of free energy changes upon mutation; (2) high-resolution structural refinement; (3) protein-protein docking; and (4) assembly of symmetric protein complexes, all in the membrane environment. Preliminary data show that these algorithms can produce meaningful scores and structures. The data also suggest needed improvements to both sampling routines and score functions. Importantly, the applications collectively demonstrate the potential of combining the flexible nature of RosettaMP with the power of Rosetta algorithms to facilitate membrane protein modeling and design. PMID:26325167

  8. Protein Dynamics in Individual Human Cells: Experiment and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Danon, Tamar; Issaeva, Irina; Kopito, Ronen Benjamine; Perzov, Natalie; Milo, Ron; Sigal, Alex; Alon, Uri

    2009-01-01

    A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle–dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell–cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell–cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells. PMID:19381343

  9. Cell adhesion to proteins separated by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted onto a polyvinylidene difluoride membrane: a new cell-blotting technique.

    PubMed

    Seshi, B

    1994-12-02

    Cell blotting, although conceptually simple, has failed to achieve wide practical application. Described here is a new cell-blotting technique which involves cell adhesion to protein bands after separation by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (LDS-PAGE) and blotting onto polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane at 4 degrees C. Cell bands adherent on PVDF are detected using hematoxylin, or propidium iodide (PI) staining followed by viewing under ultraviolet (UV) light. The technique allows quick microscopic visualization of adherent cells composing the bands, without requiring clearing of the membrane. Representative cell adhesion proteins from different sources, i.e., plant lectins (e.g., phytohemagglutinin, PHA; concanavalin A, ConA; and wheat germ agglutinin, WGA); extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins; and integral membrane proteins (e.g., recombinant soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, rs VCAM-1) were tested for cell binding by the new cell-blotting technique using human lymphoid progenitor (NALM-6) and myeloid progenitor (KG1a) cell lines. Cell adhesion proteins retained their adhesion function in all cases tested. Specificity of cell binding on PVDF blot was demonstrated by inhibition of cell adhesion to WGA protein bands using an appropriate sugar, i.e., N-acetyl D-glucosamine. The cell blotting assay was comparable in sensitivity to Coomassie blue staining of protein bands. The ability to conduct protein extraction, separation and blotting at low temperature avoids thermal denaturation, thereby preserving the adhesion properties of the proteins. The electrophoretic/blotting system has unique detergent removal/protein renaturation properties and the ability to preserve functionally active adhesion protein complexes. The cell-blotting technique described is sufficiently robust for routine application in the investigation of novel cell adhesion proteins.

  10. Microfluidic immunomagnetic cell separation using integrated permanent micromagnets

    PubMed Central

    Osman, O.; Toru, S.; Dumas-Bouchiat, F.; Dempsey, N. M.; Haddour, N.; Zanini, L.-F.; Buret, F.; Reyne, G.; Frénéa-Robin, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to trap and sort labeled cells under flow conditions using a microfluidic device with an integrated flat micro-patterned hard magnetic film. The proposed technique is illustrated using a cell suspension containing a mixture of Jurkat cells and HEK (Human Embryonic Kidney) 293 cells. Prior to sorting experiments, the Jurkat cells were specifically labeled with immunomagnetic nanoparticles, while the HEK 293 cells were unlabeled. Droplet-based experiments demonstrated that the Jurkat cells were attracted to regions of maximum stray field flux density while the HEK 293 cells settled in random positions. When the mixture was passed through a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel containing integrated micromagnets, the labeled Jurkat cells were selectively trapped under fluid flow, while the HEK cells were eluted towards the device outlet. Increasing the flow rate produced a second eluate much enriched in Jurkat cells, as revealed by flow cytometry. The separation efficiency of this biocompatible, compact micro-fluidic separation chamber was compared with that obtained using two commercial magnetic cell separation kits. PMID:24396526

  11. Microfluidic immunomagnetic cell separation using integrated permanent micromagnets.

    PubMed

    Osman, O; Toru, S; Dumas-Bouchiat, F; Dempsey, N M; Haddour, N; Zanini, L-F; Buret, F; Reyne, G; Frénéa-Robin, M

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to trap and sort labeled cells under flow conditions using a microfluidic device with an integrated flat micro-patterned hard magnetic film. The proposed technique is illustrated using a cell suspension containing a mixture of Jurkat cells and HEK (Human Embryonic Kidney) 293 cells. Prior to sorting experiments, the Jurkat cells were specifically labeled with immunomagnetic nanoparticles, while the HEK 293 cells were unlabeled. Droplet-based experiments demonstrated that the Jurkat cells were attracted to regions of maximum stray field flux density while the HEK 293 cells settled in random positions. When the mixture was passed through a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channel containing integrated micromagnets, the labeled Jurkat cells were selectively trapped under fluid flow, while the HEK cells were eluted towards the device outlet. Increasing the flow rate produced a second eluate much enriched in Jurkat cells, as revealed by flow cytometry. The separation efficiency of this biocompatible, compact micro-fluidic separation chamber was compared with that obtained using two commercial magnetic cell separation kits.

  12. PepGMV Rep-Protein Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chapa-Oliver, Angela María; Mejía-Teniente, Laura; García-Gasca, Teresa; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon Gerardo; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo

    2012-01-01

    The Geminiviruses genome is a small, single strand DNA that replicates in the plant cell nucleus. Analogous to animal DNA viruses, Geminiviruses depend on the host replication machinery to amplify their genomes and only supply the factors required to initiate their replication. Consequently, Geminiviruses remove the cell-cycle arrest and induce the host replication machinery using an endocycle process. They encode proteins, such as the conserved replication-associated proteins (Rep) that interact with retinoblastoma-like proteins in plants and alter the cell division cycle in yeasts. Therefore, the aim of this work is to analyze the impact of Pepper Golden Mosaic Virus (PepGMV) Rep protein in mammalian cells. Results indicate that the pTracer-SV40:Rep construction obtained in this work can be used to analyze the Rep protein effect in mammalian cells in order to compare the cell cycle regulation mechanisms in plants and animals. PMID:23170183

  13. Two Drosophila melanogaster proteins related to intermediate filament proteins of vertebrate cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against a 46,000 mol wt major cytoplasmic protein from Drosophila melanogaster Kc cells. These antibodies reacted with the 46,000 and a 40,000 mol wt protein from Kc cells. Some antibodies showed cross-reaction with 55,000 (vimentin) and 52,000 mol wt (desmin) proteins from baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells that form intermediate sized filaments in vertebrate cells. In indirect immunofluorescence, the group of cross reacting antibodies stained a filamentous meshwork in the cytoplasm of vertebrate cells. In Kc cells the fluorescence seemed to be localized in a filamentous meshwork that became more obvious after the cells had flattened out on a surface. These cytoskeletal structures are heat-labile; the proteins in Kc or BHK cells rearrange after a brief heat shock, forming juxtanuclear cap structures. PMID:6795212

  14. Exploring continuous and integrated strategies for the up- and downstream processing of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Bárbara; Aguiar, Tiago; Silva, Marta M; Silva, Ricardo J S; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Pineda, Earl; Peixoto, Cristina; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Serra, Margarida; Alves, Paula M

    2015-11-10

    The integration of up- and downstream unit operations can result in the elimination of hold steps, thus decreasing the footprint, and ultimately can create robust closed system operations. This type of design is desirable for the bioprocess of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC), where high numbers of pure cells, at low volumes, need to be delivered for therapy applications. This study reports a proof of concept of the integration of a continuous perfusion culture in bioreactors with a tangential flow filtration (TFF) system for the concentration and washing of hMSC. Moreover, we have also explored a continuous alternative for concentrating hMSC. Results show that expanding cells in a continuous perfusion operation mode provided a higher expansion ratio, and led to a shift in cells' metabolism. TFF operated either in continuous or discontinuous allowed to concentrate cells, with high cell recovery (>80%) and viability (>95%); furthermore, continuous TFF permitted to operate longer with higher cell concentrations. Continuous diafiltration led to higher protein clearance (98%) with lower cell death, when comparing to discontinuous diafiltration. Overall, an integrated process allowed for a shorter process time, recovering 70% of viable hMSC (>95%), with no changes in terms of morphology, immunophenotype, proliferation capacity and multipotent differentiation potential.

  15. Communication Between the Cell Membrane and the Nucleus: Role of Protein Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect

    Lelievre, Sophie A; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-10-21

    Understanding how the information is conveyed from outside to inside the cell is a critical challenge for all biologists involved in signal transduction. The flow of information initiated by cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix contacts is mediated by the formation of adhesion complexes involving multiple proteins. Inside adhesion complexes, connective membrane skeleton (CMS) proteins are signal transducers that bind to adhesion molecules, organize the cytoskeleton, and initiate biochemical cascades. Adhesion complex-mediated signal transduction ultimately directs the formation of supramolecular structures in the cell nucleus, as illustrated by the establishment of multi complexes of DNA-bound transcription factors, and the redistribution of nuclear structural proteins to form nuclear subdomains. Recently, several CMS proteins have been observed to travel to the cell nucleus, suggesting a distinctive role for these proteins in signal transduction. This review focuses on the nuclear translocation of structural signal transducers of the membrane skeleton and also extends our analysis to possible translocation of resident nuclear proteins to the membrane skeleton. This leads us to envision the communication between spatially distant cellular compartments (i.e., membrane skeleton and cell nucleus) as a bidirectional flow of information (a dynamic reciprocity) based on subtle multilevel structural and biochemical equilibria. At one level, it is mediated by the interaction between structural signal transducers and their binding partners, at another level it may be mediated by the balance and integration of signal transducers in different cellular compartments.

  16. Self-assembly of single integral membrane proteins into soluble nanoscale phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Bayburt, Timothy H.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2003-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in pharmaceutical research is obtaining integral membrane proteins in a functional, solubilized, and monodisperse state that provides a native-like environment that maintains the spectrum of in vivo activities. Many of these integral membrane proteins are receptors, enzymes, or other macromolecular assemblies that are important drug targets. An example is the general class of proteins composed of seven-transmembrane segments (7-TM) as exemplified by the G-protein–coupled receptors. In this article, we describe a simple system for self-assembling bacteriorhodopsin, as a model protein containing 7-TM helices, with phospholipids to form a nanometer-scale soluble bilayer structure encircled by a 200 amino acid scaffold protein. The result is the single molecule incorporation of an integral membrane protein target into a soluble and monodisperse structure that allows the structural and functional tools of solution biochemistry to be applied. PMID:14573860

  17. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion.

  18. Lysosomal integral membrane protein Sidt2 plays a vital role in insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jialin; Yu, Cui; Xiong, Qianyin; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Lizhuo

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal insulin secretion results in impaired glucose tolerance and is one of the causal factors in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Sidt2, a lysosomal integral membrane protein, plays a critical role in insulin secretion. Here, we further investigate its regulation in insulin secretion. We show that Sidt2(-/-) mice exhibit weight loss, decreased postnatal survival rate with aging, increased fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance. After loading high levels of glucose in their diet, Sidt2(-/-) mice produce notably lower insulin levels at the first-phase secretion compared with Sidt2(+/+) mice. Consistent with the in vivo study, INS-1 cells treated with Sidt2 siRNA produced less insulin when loaded with 16.7 mM of glucose. Only 2 of the 13 genes, synap1 and synap3 which encode soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) proteins, showed significantly decreased expression in Sidt2(-/-) mice. In conclusion, Sdit2 may play a vital role in the regulation of insulin secretion via two SNARE proteins synap1 and syanp3.

  19. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nishi, A; Kogoma, T

    1965-10-01

    Nishi, Arasuke (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan), and Tokio Kogoma. Protein turnover in the cell cycle of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 90:884-890. 1965.-Protein metabolism and enzyme formation throughout the cell cycle were investigated in synchronized cultures of Escherichia coli. The cells showed a temporary cessation of the net increase of bulk protein and of constitutive beta-galactosidase activity during the division period. By contrast, when tested by short-term experiments performed with cells at different growth stages, the bacteria displayed a constant incorporation of labeled protein precursors into the protein fraction, even during the fission period. Similar results were obtained with respect to the capacities for induced enzyme formation. On the other hand, when the cells were previously labeled and then subjected to synchronization in a nonradioactive medium, the radioactivity of the protein fraction decreased temporarily by nearly 10% during the fission period and then regained its previous level at the beginning of the ensuing phase of growth. This indicates that the products of partial degradation of protein were again utilized for protein synthesis in the next cell cycle. It was concluded that the temporary lagging of net increase of bulk protein may be due to the partial breakdown of protein occurring during the fission period.

  20. Antibody mediated transduction of therapeutic proteins into living cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James E; Weisbart, Richard H; Nishimura, Robert N

    2005-09-16

    Protein therapy refers to the direct delivery of therapeutic proteins to cells and tissues with the goal of ameliorating or modifying a disease process. Current techniques for delivering proteins across cell membranes include taking advantage of receptor-mediated endocytosis or using protein transduction domains that penetrate directly into cells. The most commonly used protein transduction domains are small cell-penetrating peptides derived from such proteins as the HIV-1 Tat protein. A novel protein transduction domain developed as the single chain fragment (Fv) of a murine anti-DNA autoantibody, mAb 3E10, has recently been developed and used to deliver biologically active proteins to living cells in vitro. This review will provide a brief overview of the development of the Fv fragment and provide a summary of recent studies using Fv to deliver therapeutic peptides and proteins (such as a C-terminal p53 peptide, C-terminal p53 antibody fragment, full-length p53, and micro-dystrophin) to cells.

  1. Congenital heart disease protein 5 associates with CASZ1 to maintain myocardial tissue integrity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Stephen; Amin, Nirav M; Gibbs, Devin; Christine, Kathleen S; Charpentier, Marta S; Conlon, Frank L

    2014-08-01

    The identification and characterization of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the differentiation and morphogenesis of specific cell types of the developing heart are crucial to understanding the process of cardiac development and the pathology associated with human congenital heart disease. Here, we show that the cardiac transcription factor CASTOR (CASZ1) directly interacts with congenital heart disease 5 protein (CHD5), which is also known as tryptophan-rich basic protein (WRB), a gene located on chromosome 21 in the proposed region responsible for congenital heart disease in individuals with Down's syndrome. We demonstrate that loss of CHD5 in Xenopus leads to compromised myocardial integrity, improper deposition of basement membrane, and a resultant failure of hearts to undergo cell movements associated with cardiac formation. We further report that CHD5 is essential for CASZ1 function and that the CHD5-CASZ1 interaction is necessary for cardiac morphogenesis. Collectively, these results establish a role for CHD5 and CASZ1 in the early stages of vertebrate cardiac development.

  2. Uniformly cationized protein efficiently reaches the cytosol of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Futami, Midori; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Asama, Takashi; Murata, Hitoshi; Tada, Hiroko; Kosaka, Megumi; Yamada, Hidenori; Futami, Junichiro

    2012-10-17

    Protein cationization techniques are powerful protein transduction methods for mammalian cells. As we demonstrated previously, cationized proteins with limited conjugation to polyethylenimine have excellent ability to enter into cells by adsorption-mediated endocytosis [Futami, J., et al. (2005) J. Biosci. Bioeng. 99, 95-103]. In this study, we show that proteins with extensive and uniform cationization covering the protein surface reach the cytoplasm and nucleus more effectively than proteins with limited cationic polymers or proteins that are fused to cationic peptides. Although extensive modification of carboxylates results in loss of protein function, chicken avidin retains biotin-binding ability even after extensive amidation of carboxylates. Using this cationized avidin carrier system, the protein transduction ability of variously cationized avidins was investigated using biotinylated protein as a probe. The results revealed that cationized avidins bind rapidly to the cell surface followed by endocytotic uptake. Small amounts of uniformly cationized avidin showed direct penetration into the cytoplasm within a 15 min incubation. This penetration route seemed to be energy dependent and functioned under cellular physiological conditions. A biotinylated exogenous transcription factor protein that penetrated cells was demonstrated to induce target gene expression in living cells.

  3. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  4. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  5. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  7. The C. elegans UNC-23 protein, a member of the BCL-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family of chaperone regulators, interacts with HSP-1 to regulate cell attachment and maintain hypodermal integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Poupak; Rogalski, Teresa; Moerman, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the unc-23 gene in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans result in detachment and dystrophy of the anterior body wall musculature and a bent-head phenotype when grown on solid substrate. We have determined that the unc-23 gene product is the nematode ortholog of the human BAG-2 protein, a member of the Bcl-2 associated athanogene (BAG) family of molecular chaperone regulators. We show that a functional GFP-tagged UNC-23 protein is expressed throughout development in several tissues of the animal, including body wall muscle and hypodermis, and associates with adhesion complexes and attachment structures within these 2 tissues. In humans, the BAG protein family consists of 6 members that all contain a conserved 45 amino acid BAG domain near their C-termini. These proteins bind to and modulate the activity of the ATPase domain of the heat shock cognate protein 70, Hsc70. We have isolated missense mutations in the ATPase domain of the C. elegans heat shock 70 protein, HSP-1 that suppress the phenotype exhibited by unc-23(e25) mutant hermaphrodites and we show that UNC-23 and HSP-1 interact in a yeast-2-hybrid system. The interaction of UNC-23 with HSP-1 defines a role for HSP-1 function in the maintenance of muscle attachment during development. PMID:26435886

  8. Sequential Immunoprecipitation of Secretory Vesicle Proteins from Biosynthetically Labelled Cells.

    PubMed

    Guest, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    Pulse radiolabelling of cells with radioactive amino acids is a common method for studying the biosynthesis of proteins. The labelled proteins can then be immunoprecipitated and analysed by electrophoresis and imaging techniques. This chapter presents a protocol for the biosynthetic labelling and immunoprecipitation of pancreatic islet proteins which are known to be affected in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  9. A novel plant cell bioproduction platform for high-yield secretion of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Kieliszewski, Marcia J

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell suspension culture integrates the merits of whole-plant systems with those of microbial fermentation and mammalian cell culture, and has been recognized as a promising alternative biosynthetic platform for valuable proteins. However, the low protein productivity dilemma has been the bottleneck toward commercializing this technology. Here, we describe a new technology, termed hydroxyproline (Hyp)-Glyco technology, that dramatically increases the yield of secreted recombinant proteins from cultured plant cells by expressing them as fusions with a novel glycomodule tag comprising an Hyp-rich repetitive peptide (HypRP) backbone that is subsequently glycosylated through the Hyp residues. The extensive glycosylation of the HypRP tags greatly extends the serum half-life of small therapeutic proteins, such as interferon α2b or human growth hormone, without significantly impairing their bioactivities and the tag greatly enhances solubility.

  10. Transforming Lepidopteran Insect Cells for Improved Protein Processing and Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lepidopteran insect cells used with the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) are capable of synthesizing and accurately processing foreign proteins. However, proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected cells often fail to be completely processed, or are not processed in a manner that meet...

  11. Cell-Free Production of Membrane Proteins in Escherichia coli Lysates for Functional and Structural Studies.

    PubMed

    Rues, Ralf-Bernhardt; Henrich, Erik; Boland, Coilin; Caffrey, Martin; Bernhard, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The complexity of membrane protein synthesis is largely reduced in cell-free systems and it results into high success rates of target expression. Protocols for the preparation of bacterial lysates have been optimized in order to ensure reliable efficiencies in membrane protein production that are even sufficient for structural applications. The open accessibility of the semisynthetic cell-free expression reactions allows to adjust membrane protein solubilization conditions according to the optimal folding requirements of individual targets. Two basic strategies will be exemplified. The post-translational solubilization of membrane proteins in detergent micelles is most straightforward for crystallization approaches. The co-translational integration of membrane proteins into preformed nanodiscs will enable their functional characterization in a variety of natural lipid environments.

  12. Capacitive immunosensor for the detection of host cell proteins.

    PubMed

    Teeparuksapun, Kosin; Hedström, Martin; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Thavarungkul, Panote; Mattiasson, Bo

    2012-01-01

    A new analysis for monitoring host cell proteins in preparations of transgenically produced protein pharmaceuticals is described. A capacitive biosensor with a very high sensitivity is used to monitor trace amounts of host cell proteins. The sensor consists of a gold electrode, the surface of which is well insulated and on which a preparation of a population of polyclonal antibodies raised against the complete protein set-up of the host cell are immobilized. Host cell proteins are present at very low concentrations during the production of a transgenic protein. The system studied here is a model system with an enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Due to the high sensitivity, it may even be possible to dilute the samples to be analyzed, thereby reducing a negative influence from non-specific binding to the sensor surface.

  13. Polymodal Sensory Integration in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Križaj, David

    2016-01-01

    An animal's ability to perceive the external world is conditioned by its capacity to extract and encode specific features of the visual image. The output of the vertebrate retina is not a simple representation of the 2D visual map generated by photon absorptions in the photoreceptor layer. Rather, spatial, temporal, direction selectivity and color "dimensions" of the original image are distributed in the form of parallel output channels mediated by distinct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations. We propose that visual information transmitted to the brain includes additional, light-independent, inputs that reflect the functional states of the retina, anterior eye and the body. These may include the local ion microenvironment, glial metabolism and systemic parameters such as intraocular pressure, temperature and immune activation which act on ion channels that are intrinsic to RGCs. We particularly focus on light-independent mechanical inputs that are associated with physical impact, cell swelling and intraocular pressure as excessive mechanical stimuli lead to the counterintuitive experience of "pressure phosphenes" and/or debilitating blinding disease such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy. We point at recently discovered retinal mechanosensitive ion channels as examples through which molecular physiology brings together Greek phenomenology, modern neuroscience and medicine. Thus, RGC output represents a unified picture of the embodied context within which vision takes place.

  14. SynechoNET: integrated protein-protein interaction database of a model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo-Yeon; Kang, Sungsoo; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Oh, Jeehyun; Cho, Seongwoong; Bhak, Jong; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are model organisms for studying photosynthesis, carbon and nitrogen assimilation, evolution of plant plastids, and adaptability to environmental stresses. Despite many studies on cyanobacteria, there is no web-based database of their regulatory and signaling protein-protein interaction networks to date. Description We report a database and website SynechoNET that provides predicted protein-protein interactions. SynechoNET shows cyanobacterial domain-domain interactions as well as their protein-level interactions using the model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. It predicts the protein-protein interactions using public interaction databases that contain mutually complementary and redundant data. Furthermore, SynechoNET provides information on transmembrane topology, signal peptide, and domain structure in order to support the analysis of regulatory membrane proteins. Such biological information can be queried and visualized in user-friendly web interfaces that include the interactive network viewer and search pages by keyword and functional category. Conclusion SynechoNET is an integrated protein-protein interaction database designed to analyze regulatory membrane proteins in cyanobacteria. It provides a platform for biologists to extend the genomic data of cyanobacteria by predicting interaction partners, membrane association, and membrane topology of Synechocystis proteins. SynechoNET is freely available at or directly at . PMID:18315852

  15. Over-expression of secreted proteins from mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Annamarie C; Barton, William A

    2014-01-01

    Secreted mammalian proteins require the development of robust protein over-expression systems for crystallographic and biophysical studies of protein function. Due to complex disulfide bonds and distinct glycosylation patterns preventing folding and expression in prokaryotic expression hosts, many secreted proteins necessitate production in more complex eukaryotic expression systems. Here, we elaborate on the methods used to obtain high yields of purified secreted proteins from transiently or stably transfected mammalian cell lines. Among the issues discussed are the selection of appropriate expression vectors, choice of signal sequences for protein secretion, availability of fusion tags for enhancing protein stability and purification, choice of cell line, and the large-scale growth of cells in a variety of formats. PMID:24510886

  16. Proteomic characterization of integral membrane proteins using thermostatted liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah M; Wu, Christine C

    2012-01-01

    Due to the hydrophobicity and localization of integral membrane proteins, they are difficult to study using conventional biochemical methods that are compatible with proteomic analyses. This chapter describes the coupling of multiple crucial steps that lead to the optimized shotgun proteomic analysis of integral membrane proteins while maintaining empirical topology information. Namely, a membrane shaving method is utilized to separate protease accessible peptides from membrane embedded peptides and elevated temperatures during chromatographic separation is utilized to augment the recovery of hydrophobic peptides for in-line analysis using tandem mass spectrometry. This combination of steps facilitates increased identification of membrane proteins while also maintaining information regarding protein topology.

  17. Characterization of the proteins comprising the integral matrix of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryonic spicules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, C. E.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we enumerate and characterize the proteins that comprise the integral spicule matrix of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins reveals that there are 12 strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins and approximately three dozen less strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins. The majority of the proteins have acidic isoelectric points; however, there are several spicule matrix proteins that have more alkaline isoelectric points. Western blotting analysis indicates that SM50 is the spicule matrix protein with the most alkaline isoelectric point. In addition, two distinct SM30 proteins are identified in embryonic spicules, and they have apparent molecular masses of approximately 43 and 46 kDa. Comparisons between embryonic spicule matrix proteins and adult spine integral matrix proteins suggest that the embryonic 43-kDa SM30 protein is an embryonic isoform of SM30. An adult 49-kDa spine matrix protein is also identified as a possible adult isoform of SM30. Analysis of the SM30 amino acid sequences indicates that a portion of SM30 proteins is very similar to the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin proteins.

  18. Integrating complex functions: coordination of nuclear pore complex assembly and membrane expansion of the nuclear envelope requires a family of integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Schneiter, Roger; Cole, Charles N

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear envelope harbors numerous large proteinaceous channels, the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs), through which macromolecular exchange between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm occurs. This double-membrane nuclear envelope is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and thus functionally connected to such diverse processes as vesicular transport, protein maturation and lipid synthesis. Recent results obtained from studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that assembly of the nuclear pore complex is functionally dependent upon maintenance of lipid homeostasis of the ER membrane. Previous work from one of our laboratories has revealed that an integral membrane protein Apq12 is important for the assembly of functional nuclear pores. Cells lacking APQ12 are viable but cannot grow at low temperatures, have aberrant NPCs and a defect in mRNA export. Remarkably, these defects in NPC assembly can be overcome by supplementing cells with a membrane fluidizing agent, benzyl alcohol, suggesting that Apq12 impacts the flexibility of the nuclear membrane, possibly by adjusting its lipid composition when cells are shifted to a reduced temperature. Our new study now expands these findings and reveals that an essential membrane protein, Brr6, shares at least partially overlapping functions with Apq12 and is also required for assembly of functional NPCs. A third nuclear envelope membrane protein, Brl1, is related to Brr6, and is also required for NPC assembly. Because maintenance of membrane homeostasis is essential for cellular survival, the fact that these three proteins are conserved in fungi that undergo closed mitoses, but are not found in metazoans or plants, may indicate that their functions are performed by proteins unrelated at the primary sequence level to Brr6, Brl1 and Apq12 in cells that disassemble their nuclear envelopes during mitosis.

  19. Removing T-cell epitopes with computational protein design

    PubMed Central

    King, Chris; Garza, Esteban N.; Mazor, Ronit; Linehan, Jonathan L.; Pastan, Ira; Pepper, Marion; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses can make protein therapeutics ineffective or even dangerous. We describe a general computational protein design method for reducing immunogenicity by eliminating known and predicted T-cell epitopes and maximizing the content of human peptide sequences without disrupting protein structure and function. We show that the method recapitulates previous experimental results on immunogenicity reduction, and we use it to disrupt T-cell epitopes in GFP and Pseudomonas exotoxin A without disrupting function. PMID:24843166

  20. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  1. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  2. Bayesian Integration of Information in Hippocampal Place Cells

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Tamas; Franklin, Stan; Chen, Ke; Montaldi, Daniela; Trappl, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Accurate spatial localization requires a mechanism that corrects for errors, which might arise from inaccurate sensory information or neuronal noise. In this paper, we propose that Hippocampal place cells might implement such an error correction mechanism by integrating different sources of information in an approximately Bayes-optimal fashion. We compare the predictions of our model with physiological data from rats. Our results suggest that useful predictions regarding the firing fields of place cells can be made based on a single underlying principle, Bayesian cue integration, and that such predictions are possible using a remarkably small number of model parameters. PMID:24603429

  3. Repressed synthesis of ribosomal proteins generates protein-specific cell cycle and morphological phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Mamata; Bommakanti, Ananth; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Gregory, Brian; Samsel, Leigh; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2013-12-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes is coordinated with cell growth and proliferation. Distortion of the coordinated synthesis of ribosomal components affects not only ribosome formation, but also cell fate. However, the connection between ribosome biogenesis and cell fate is not well understood. To establish a model system for inquiries into these processes, we systematically analyzed cell cycle progression, cell morphology, and bud site selection after repression of 54 individual ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that repression of nine 60S r-protein genes results in arrest in the G2/M phase, whereas repression of nine other 60S and 22 40S r-protein genes causes arrest in the G1 phase. Furthermore, bud morphology changes after repression of some r-protein genes. For example, very elongated buds form after repression of seven 60S r-protein genes. These genes overlap with, but are not identical to, those causing the G2/M cell cycle phenotype. Finally, repression of most r-protein genes results in changed sites of bud formation. Strikingly, the r-proteins whose repression generates similar effects on cell cycle progression cluster in the ribosome physical structure, suggesting that different topological areas of the precursor and/or mature ribosome are mechanistically connected to separate aspects of the cell cycle.

  4. ChChd3, an Inner Mitochondrial Membrane Protein, Is Essential for Maintaining Crista Integrity and Mitochondrial Function*

    PubMed Central

    Darshi, Manjula; Mendiola, Vincent L.; Mackey, Mason R.; Murphy, Anne N.; Koller, Antonius; Perkins, Guy A.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial inner membrane (IM) serves as the site for ATP production by hosting the oxidative phosphorylation complex machinery most notably on the crista membranes. Disruption of the crista structure has been implicated in a variety of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we characterize ChChd3, a previously identified PKA substrate of unknown function (Schauble, S., King, C. C., Darshi, M., Koller, A., Shah, K., and Taylor, S. S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 14952–14959), and show that it is essential for maintaining crista integrity and mitochondrial function. In the mitochondria, ChChd3 is a peripheral protein of the IM facing the intermembrane space. RNAi knockdown of ChChd3 in HeLa cells resulted in fragmented mitochondria, reduced OPA1 protein levels and impaired fusion, and clustering of the mitochondria around the nucleus along with reduced growth rate. Both the oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates were severely restricted. Ultrastructural analysis of these cells revealed aberrant mitochondrial IM structures with fragmented and tubular cristae or loss of cristae, and reduced crista membrane. Additionally, the crista junction opening diameter was reduced to 50% suggesting remodeling of cristae in the absence of ChChd3. Analysis of the ChChd3-binding proteins revealed that ChChd3 interacts with the IM proteins mitofilin and OPA1, which regulate crista morphology, and the outer membrane protein Sam50, which regulates import and assembly of β-barrel proteins on the outer membrane. Knockdown of ChChd3 led to almost complete loss of both mitofilin and Sam50 proteins and alterations in several mitochondrial proteins, suggesting that ChChd3 is a scaffolding protein that stabilizes protein complexes involved in maintaining crista architecture and protein import and is thus essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and function. PMID:21081504

  5. Towards high-yield production of pharmaceutical proteins with plant cell suspension cultures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianfeng; Ge, Xumeng; Dolan, Maureen C

    2011-01-01

    "Molecular farming" in plants with significant advantages in cost and safety is touted as a promising platform for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. While whole-plant produced biopharmaceuticals account for a significant portion of the preclinical and clinical pipeline, plant cell suspension culture, which integrates the merits of whole-plant systems with those of microbial fermentation, is emerging as a more compliant alternative "factory". However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of plant cell bioproduction platform. This review highlights the advantages and recent progress in plant cell culture technology and outlines viable strategies at both the biological and process engineering levels for advancing the economic feasibility of plant cell-based protein production. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include non-mammalian glycosylation and genetic instability will also be discussed.

  6. Finding undetected protein associations in cell signaling by belief propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bailly-Bechet, M.; Borgs, C.; Braunstein, A.; Chayes, J.; Dagkessamanskaia, A.; François, J.-M.; Zecchina, R.

    2011-01-01

    External information propagates in the cell mainly through signaling cascades and transcriptional activation, allowing it to react to a wide spectrum of environmental changes. High-throughput experiments identify numerous molecular components of such cascades that may, however, interact through unknown partners. Some of them may be detected using data coming from the integration of a protein–protein interaction network and mRNA expression profiles. This inference problem can be mapped onto the problem of finding appropriate optimal connected subgraphs of a network defined by these datasets. The optimization procedure turns out to be computationally intractable in general. Here we present a new distributed algorithm for this task, inspired from statistical physics, and apply this scheme to alpha factor and drug perturbations data in yeast. We identify the role of the COS8 protein, a member of a gene family of previously unknown function, and validate the results by genetic experiments. The algorithm we present is specially suited for very large datasets, can run in parallel, and can be adapted to other problems in systems biology. On renowned benchmarks it outperforms other algorithms in the field. PMID:21187432

  7. Molecular cloning of the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) identifies a type II integral membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Shipp, M.A.; Richardson, N.E.; Sayre, P.H.; Brown, N.R.; Masteller, E.L.; Clayton, L.K.; Ritz, J.; Reinherz, E.L. )

    1988-07-01

    Common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) is a 100-kDa cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on most acute lymphoblastic leukemias and certain other immature lymphoid malignancies and on normal lymphoid progenitors. The latter are either uncommitted to B- or T-cell lineage or committed to only the earliest stages of B- or T-lymphocyte maturation. To elucidate the primary structure of CALLA, the authors purified the protein to homogeneity, obtained the NH{sub 2}-terminal sequence from both the intact protein and derived tryptic and V8 protease peptides and isolated CALLA cDNAs from a Nalm-6 cell line {lambda}gt10 library using redundant oligonucleotide probes. The CALLA cDNA sequence predicts a 750-amino acid integral membrane protein with a single 24-amino acid hydrophobic segment that could function as both a transmembrane region and a signal peptide. The COOH-terminal 700 amino acids, including six potential N-linked glycosylation sites compose the extracellular protein segment, whereas the 25 NM{sub 2}-terminal amino acids remaining after cleavage of the initiation methionine form the cytoplasmic tail. CALLA{sup +} cells contain CALLA transcripts of 2.7 to 5.7 kilobases with the major 5.7- and 3.7-kilobase mRNAs being preferentially expressed in specific cell types.

  8. An Arabidopsis senescence-associated protein SAG29 regulates cell viability under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Seo, Pil Joon; Park, Jung-Min; Kang, Seok Ki; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Park, Chung-Mo

    2011-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important cellular organ that perceives incoming developmental and environmental signals and integrates these signals into cellular regulatory mechanisms. It also acts as a barrier against unfavorable extracellular factors to maintain cell viability. Despite its importance for cell viability, molecular components determining cell viability and underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we show that a plasma membrane-localized MtN3 protein SAG29 regulates cell viability under high salinity in Arabidopsis. The SAG29 gene is expressed primarily in senescing plant tissues. It is induced by osmotic stresses via an abscisic acid-dependent pathway. Whereas the SAG29-overexpressing transgenic plants (35S:SAG29) exhibited an accelerated senescence and were hypersensitive to salt stress, the SAG29-deficient mutants were less sensitive to high salinity. Consistent with this, the 35S:SAG29 transgenic plants showed reduced cell viability in the roots under normal growth condition. In contrast, cell viability in the SAG29-deficient mutant roots was indistinguishable from that in the roots of control plants. Notably, the mutant roots exhibited enhanced cell viability under high salinity. Our observations indicate that the senescence-associated SAG29 protein is associated with cell viability under high salinity and other osmotic stress conditions. We propose that the SAG29 protein may serve as a molecular link that integrates environmental stress responses into senescing process.

  9. GeneSense: a new approach for human gene annotation integrated with protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongzhong; Zhang, Tianhong; Lin, Jun; Yan, Zidan; Wang, Yongren; Zheng, Weiqiang; Weng, Kevin C

    2014-03-26

    Virtually all cellular functions involve protein-protein interactions (PPIs). As an increasing number of PPIs are identified and vast amount of information accumulated, researchers are finding different ways to interrogate the data and understand the interactions in context. However, it is widely recognized that a significant portion of the data is scattered, redundant, not considered high quality, and not readily accessible to researchers in a systematic fashion. In addition, it is challenging to identify the optimal protein targets in the current PPI networks. The GeneSense server was developed to integrate gene annotation and PPI networks in an expandable architecture that incorporates selected databases with the aim to assemble, analyze, evaluate and disseminate protein-protein association information in a comprehensive and user-friendly manner. Three network models including nodenet, leafnet and loopnet are used to identify the optimal protein targets in the complex networks. GeneSense is freely available at www.biomedsense.org/genesense.php.

  10. Site-specific integration in CHO cells mediated by CRISPR/Cas9 and homology-directed DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Seong; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2015-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used mammalian hosts for production of therapeutic proteins. However, development of recombinant CHO cell lines has been hampered by unstable and variable transgene expression caused by random integration. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted gene integration into site-specific loci in CHO cells using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system and compatible donor plasmid harboring a gene of interest (GOI) and short homology arms. This strategy has enabled precise insertion of a 3.7-kb gene expression cassette at defined loci in CHO cells following a simple drug-selection, resulting in homogeneous transgene expression. Taken together, the results displayed here can help pave the way for the targeting of GOI to specific loci in CHO cells, increasing the likelihood of generating isogenic cell lines with consistent protein production. PMID:25712033

  11. Integrating genomic information with protein sequence and 3D atomic level structure at the RCSB protein data bank.

    PubMed

    Prlić, Andreas; Kalro, Tara; Bhattacharya, Roshni; Christie, Cole; Burley, Stephen K; Rose, Peter W

    2016-12-15

    The Protein Data Bank (PDB) now contains more than 120,000 three-dimensional (3D) structures of biological macromolecules. To allow an interpretation of how PDB data relates to other publicly available annotations, we developed a novel data integration platform that maps 3D structural information across various datasets. This integration bridges from the human genome across protein sequence to 3D structure space. We developed novel software solutions for data management and visualization, while incorporating new libraries for web-based visualization using SVG graphics.

  12. Retroviral Integrase Proteins and HIV-1 DNA Integration*

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Lavanya; Engelman, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Retroviral integrases catalyze two reactions, 3′-processing of viral DNA ends, followed by integration of the processed ends into chromosomal DNA. X-ray crystal structures of integrase-DNA complexes from prototype foamy virus, a member of the Spumavirus genus of Retroviridae, have revealed the structural basis of integration and how clinically relevant integrase strand transfer inhibitors work. Underscoring the translational potential of targeting virus-host interactions, small molecules that bind at the host factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75-binding site on HIV-1 integrase promote dimerization and inhibit integrase-viral DNA assembly and catalysis. Here, we review recent advances in our knowledge of HIV-1 DNA integration, as well as future research directions. PMID:23043109

  13. Protein and genome evolution in Mammalian cells for biotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Majors, Brian S; Chiang, Gisela G; Betenbaugh, Michael J

    2009-06-01

    Mutation and selection are the essential steps of evolution. Researchers have long used in vitro mutagenesis, expression, and selection techniques in laboratory bacteria and yeast cultures to evolve proteins with new properties, termed directed evolution. Unfortunately, the nature of mammalian cells makes applying these mutagenesis and whole-organism evolution techniques to mammalian protein expression systems laborious and time consuming. Mammalian evolution systems would be useful to test unique mammalian cell proteins and protein characteristics, such as complex glycosylation. Protein evolution in mammalian cells would allow for generation of novel diagnostic tools and designer polypeptides that can only be tested in a mammalian expression system. Recent advances have shown that mammalian cells of the immune system can be utilized to evolve transgenes during their natural mutagenesis processes, thus creating proteins with unique properties, such as fluorescence. On a more global level, researchers have shown that mutation systems that affect the entire genome of a mammalian cell can give rise to cells with unique phenotypes suitable for commercial processes. This review examines the advances in mammalian cell and protein evolution and the application of this work toward advances in commercial mammalian cell biotechnology.

  14. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  15. Optofluidic integrated cell sorter fabricated by femtosecond lasers.

    PubMed

    Bragheri, F; Minzioni, P; Martinez Vazquez, R; Bellini, N; Paiè, P; Mondello, C; Ramponi, R; Cristiani, I; Osellame, R

    2012-10-07

    The main trend in optofluidics is currently towards full integration of the devices, thus improving automation, compactness and portability. In this respect femtosecond laser microfabrication is a very powerful technology given its capability of producing both optical waveguides and microfluidic channels. The current challenge in biology is the possibility to perform bioassays at the single cell level to unravel the hidden complexity in nominally homogeneous populations. Here we report on a new device implementing a fully integrated fluorescence-activated cell sorter. This non-invasive device is specifically designed to operate with a limited amount of cells but with a very high selectivity in the sorting process. Characterization of the device with beads and validation with human cells are presented.

  16. An integrated strategy for the discovery of drug targets by the analysis of protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, John M.; Askovic, Srdjan; Becklin, Robert R.; Chepanoske, Cindy Lou; Ho, Yew-Seng J.; Kery, Vladimir; Lai, Shuping; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Pyne, Mike; Robbins, Paul B.; Rechenberg, Moritz Von; Richardson, Bonnie; Savage, Justin; Sheffield, Peter; Thompson, Sam; Weir, Lawrence; Widjaja, Kartika; Xu, Nafei; Zhen, Yuejun; Boniface, J. Jay

    2004-11-01

    Proteomics-based technologies have the potential to accelerate the development of drugs, but such technologies must be well integrated in order to have a positive impact. We describe, herein, a multi-step process for the discovery of protein-protein interactions. It is shown that process stages are interdependent and can influence, either positively or negatively, subsequent steps. Optimization of each step, in the context of the full process, is essential for the overall success of the experiment.

  17. HaloTag: a novel protein labeling technology for cell imaging and protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Los, Georgyi V; Encell, Lance P; McDougall, Mark G; Hartzell, Danette D; Karassina, Natasha; Zimprich, Chad; Wood, Monika G; Learish, Randy; Ohana, Rachel Friedman; Urh, Marjeta; Simpson, Dan; Mendez, Jacqui; Zimmerman, Kris; Otto, Paul; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Zhu, Ji; Darzins, Aldis; Klaubert, Dieter H; Bulleit, Robert F; Wood, Keith V

    2008-06-20

    We have designed a modular protein tagging system that allows different functionalities to be linked onto a single genetic fusion, either in solution, in living cells, or in chemically fixed cells. The protein tag (HaloTag) is a modified haloalkane dehalogenase designed to covalently bind to synthetic ligands (HaloTag ligands). The synthetic ligands comprise a chloroalkane linker attached to a variety of useful molecules, such as fluorescent dyes, affinity handles, or solid surfaces. Covalent bond formation between the protein tag and the chloroalkane linker is highly specific, occurs rapidly under physiological conditions, and is essentially irreversible. We demonstrate the utility of this system for cellular imaging and protein immobilization by analyzing multiple molecular processes associated with NF-kappaB-mediated cellular physiology, including imaging of subcellular protein translocation and capture of protein--protein and protein--DNA complexes.

  18. Disruption of endoplasmic reticulum structure and integrity in lipotoxic cell death.

    PubMed

    Borradaile, Nica M; Han, Xianlin; Harp, Jeffrey D; Gale, Sarah E; Ory, Daniel S; Schaffer, Jean E

    2006-12-01

    Cell dysfunction and death induced by lipid accumulation in nonadipose tissues, or lipotoxicity, may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity and type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms leading to lipotoxic cell death are poorly understood. We recently reported that, in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts, lipid overload induced by incubation with 500 muM palmitate leads to intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which subsequently induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death. Here, we show that palmitate also impairs ER function through a more direct mechanism. Palmitate was rapidly incorporated into saturated phospholipid and triglyceride species in microsomal membranes of CHO cells. The resulting membrane remodeling was associated with dramatic dilatation of the ER and redistribution of protein-folding chaperones to the cytosol within 5 h, indicating compromised ER membrane integrity. Increasing beta-oxidation, through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, decreased palmitate incorporation into microsomes, decreased the escape of chaperones to the cytosol, and decreased subsequent caspase activation and cell death. Thus, palmitate rapidly increases the saturated lipid content of the ER, leading to compromised ER morphology and integrity, suggesting that impairment of the structure and function of this organelle is involved in the cellular response to fatty acid overload.

  19. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of cell cycle-related proteins by F-box proteins.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nana; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-04-01

    F-box proteins, subunits of SKP1-cullin 1-F-box protein (SCF) type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes, have been validated to play a crucial role in governing various cellular processes such as cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and metastasis. Recently, a wealth of evidence has emerged that F-box proteins is critically involved in tumorigenesis in part through governing the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cell cycle proteins, and dysregulation of this process leads to aberrant cell cycle progression and ultimately, tumorigenesis. Therefore, in this review, we describe the critical role of F-box proteins in the timely regulation of cell cycle. Moreover, we discuss how F-box proteins involve in tumorigenesis via targeting cell cycle-related proteins using biochemistry studies, engineered mouse models, and pathological gene alternations. We conclude that inhibitors of F-box proteins could have promising therapeutic potentials in part through controlling of aberrant cell cycle progression for cancer therapies.

  20. Non-specific lipid transfer proteins in plants: presenting new advances and an integrated functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Xiaobo; Lu, Changming; Zeng, Xinhua; Li, Yunjing; Fu, Donghui; Wu, Gang

    2015-09-01

    Plant non-specific lipid-transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are small, basic proteins present in abundance in higher plants. They are involved in key processes of plant cytology, such as the stablization of membranes, cell wall organization, and signal transduction. nsLTPs are also known to play important roles in resistance to biotic and abiotic stress, and in plant growth and development, such as sexual reproduction, seed development and germination. The structures of plant nsLTPs contain an eight-cysteine residue conserved motif, linked by four disulfide bonds, and an internal hydrophobic cavity, which comprises the lipid-binding site. This structure endows stability and increases the ability to bind and/or carry hydrophobic molecules. There is growing interest in nsLTPs, due to their critical roles, resulting in the need for a comprehensive review of their form and function. Relevant topics include: nsLTP structure and biochemical features, their classification, identification, and characterization across species, sub-cellular localization, lipid binding and transfer ability, expression profiling, functionality, and evolution. We present advances, as well as limitations and trends, relating to the different topics of the nsLTP gene family. This review collates a large body of research pertaining to the role of nsLTPs across the plant kingdom, which has been integrated as an in depth functional analysis of this group of proteins as a whole, and their activities across multiple biochemical pathways, based on a large number of reports. This review will enhance our understanding of nsLTP activity in planta, prompting further work and insights into the roles of this multifaceted protein family in plants.

  1. Integrated atomic force microscopy techniques for analysis of biomaterials: Study of membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Laura S.

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the prominent techniques for structural studies of biological materials in physiological relevant fluidic environments. AFM has been used to resolve the three-dimensional (3D) surface structure of cells, membranes, and proteins structures. Ion channels, formed by membrane proteins, are the key structures that control the activity of all living systems. This dissertation focuses on the structural evaluation of membrane proteins through atomic force microscopy. In Part I, AFM is utilized to study one of the most prominent medical issues facing our society, Alzheimer's Disease (AD). AD is a misfolded protein disease characterized by the accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide as senile plaques, progressive neurodegeneration, and memory loss. Recent evidence suggests that AD pathology is linked to the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis mediated by toxic channel structures composed of Abeta peptides. Selectively engineered sequences of Abeta were examined by AFM to elucidate the substructures and thus activity Abeta channels. Key residues were evaluated with the intent better understand the exact nature by which these pores conduct electrical and molecular signals, which could aid in identifying potential therapeutic targets for the prevention/treatment of AD. Additionally, AFM was used to analyze brain derived Abeta and newly developed pharmacological agents to study membranes and Abeta. Part II, presents a novel technology that incorporates electrophysiology into the AFM interface, enabling simultaneous imaging and complementary conductance measurements. The activity of ion channels is studied by various techniques, including patch clamp, free standing lipid bilayers, droplet interface bilayers, and supported lipid bilayers. However, direct correlation with channel structures has remained a challenge. The integrated atomic force microscopy system presented offers a solution to this challenge. The functionality of the

  2. Membrane protein production in Escherichia coli cell-free lysates.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Erik; Hein, Christopher; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-07-08

    Cell-free protein production has become a core technology in the rapidly spreading field of synthetic biology. In particular the synthesis of membrane proteins, highly problematic proteins in conventional cellular production systems, is an ideal application for cell-free expression. A large variety of artificial as well as natural environments for the optimal co-translational folding and stabilization of membrane proteins can rationally be designed. The high success rate of cell-free membrane protein production allows to focus on individually selected targets and to modulate their functional and structural properties with appropriate supplements. The efficiency and robustness of lysates from Escherichia coli strains allow a wide diversity of applications and we summarize current strategies for the successful production of high quality membrane protein samples.

  3. Tissue-Specific Molecular Biomarker Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Analysis of Transcriptomics and Protein-Protein Interaction Data.

    PubMed

    Calimlioglu, Beste; Karagoz, Kubra; Sevimoglu, Tuba; Kilic, Elif; Gov, Esra; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2015-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a major global public health burden. A complex metabolic disease, type 2 diabetes affects multiple different tissues, demanding a "systems medicine" approach to biomarker and novel diagnostic discovery, not to mention data integration across omics-es. In the present study, transcriptomics data from different tissues including beta-cells, pancreatic islets, arterial tissue, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, liver, and skeletal muscle of 228 samples were integrated with protein-protein interaction data and genome scale metabolic models to unravel the molecular and tissue-specific biomarker signatures of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Classifying differentially expressed genes, reconstruction and topological analysis of active protein-protein interaction subnetworks indicated that genomic reprogramming depends on the type of tissue, whereas there are common signatures at different levels. Among all tissue and cell types, Mannosidase Alpha Class 1A Member 2 was the common signature at genome level, and activation-ppara reaction, which stimulates a nuclear receptor protein, was found out as the mutual reporter at metabolic level. Moreover, miR-335 and miR-16-5p came into prominence in regulation of transcription at different tissues. On the other hand, distinct signatures were observed for different tissues at the metabolome level. Various coenzyme-A derivatives were significantly enriched metabolites in pancreatic islets, whereas skeletal muscle was enriched for cholesterol, malate, L-carnitine, and several amino acids. Results have showed utmost importance concerning relations between T2D and cancer, blood coagulation, neurodegenerative diseases, and specific metabolic and signaling pathways.

  4. General Protein Diffusion Barriers create Compartments within Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schlimpert, Susan; Klein, Eric A.; Briegel, Ariane; Hughes, Velocity; Kahnt, Jörg; Bolte, Kathrin; Maier, Uwe G.; Brun, Yves V.; Jensen, Grant J.; Gitai, Zemer; Thanbichler, Martin

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In eukaryotes, the differentiation of cellular extensions such as cilia or neuronal axons depends on the partitioning of proteins to distinct plasma membrane domains by specialized diffusion barriers. However, examples of this compartmentalization strategy are still missing for prokaryotes, although complex cellular architectures are widespread among this group of organisms. This study reveals the existence of a protein-mediated membrane diffusion barrier in the stalked bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We show that the Caulobacter cell envelope is compartmentalized by macromolecular complexes that prevent the exchange of both membrane and soluble proteins between the polar stalk extension and the cell body. The barrier structures span the cross-sectional area of the stalk and comprise at least four proteins that assemble in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Their presence is critical for cellular fitness, as they minimize the effective cell volume, allowing faster adaptation to environmental changes that require de novo synthesis of envelope proteins. PMID:23201141

  5. G-CSF induces stabilization of ETS protein Fli-1 during myeloid cell development.

    PubMed

    Mora-Garcia, Patricia; Wei, Jolyn; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is a growth factor that regulates the production and function of neutrophils. G-CSF has been used to treat neutropenia in neonates, pediatric cancer patients, and patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. The regulation of transcription factors mediating G-CSF activity has not been well characterized. The goal of this study was to examine the regulation of the ETS binding protein, Friend leukemia integration site 1 (Fli-1), in myeloid cells treated with G-CSF. Fli-1 has oncogenic properties in humans and mice, and plays a role in vascular and hematopoietic cell development. We previously reported that Fli-1 and the serum response factor bind at adjacent sites within the serum response element-1 of the early growth response gene-1 promoter in the murine myeloid leukemic cell line, NFS60. We also identified that Fli-1 DNA binding increased in G-CSF-treated cells compared with untreated cells. To determine whether the change in binding activity is due to increased Fli-1 transcription or protein stability, we examined endogenous Fli-1 expression in G-CSF-treated or -untreated NFS60 cells. Our results demonstrated that levels of Fli-1 protein, but not RNA, were higher in extracts from cells treated with G-CSF. The increase in Fli-1 protein was also dependent on protein synthesis. Finally, we showed that the half-life of Fli-1 is prolonged in G-CSF-treated cells compared with control-treated cells. These results suggest that G-CSF induces stabilization of Fli-1 protein in myeloid cells, thus proposing a novel mechanism by which hematopoietic growth factors regulate transcription factors.

  6. S-100 protein-positive cells in hidrocystomas.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Takigawa, M; Inoue, K; Matsumoto, K; Yamada, M

    1986-04-01

    The histogenesis of hidrocystomas was examined by the use of immunostaining for S-100 protein. In normal sweat glands, S-100 protein was found exclusively in the secretory cells of eccrine glands, whereas this protein was not present in the other parts of eccrine glands or at any levels of the structure of apocrine glands. On the bases of this immunostaining pattern in normal sweat glands, we attempted to correlate the origin of 8 cases of hidrocystoma to the presence of S-100 protein-positive cells. S-100 protein was detected in the cells of one solitary eccrine hidrocystoma, but not in those of 2 cases of "classic", multiple-lesion type of eccrine hidrocystoma. This indicated that the former arose from the secretory portion of the eccrine gland and the latter from the eccrine ductal cells. Two of the 5 cases of apocrine hidrocystoma showed positive staining in a part of the lining cells of the cyst wall, while the other 3 cases were negative to this protein. This finding suggests that some of the tumors diagnosed morphologically as apocrine hidrocystoma differentiate in the direction of eccrine secretory cells. In addition to S-100 protein, we also surveyed for the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and all cases examined were consistently positive to this substance. The detection of S-100 protein was considered to be more helpful in classifying hidrocystomas than that of CEA.

  7. Fibrinogen Induces Alterations of Endothelial Cell Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    PATIBANDLA, PHANI K.; TYAGI, NEETU; DEAN, WILLIAM L.; TYAGI, SURESH C.; ROBERTS, ANDREW M.; LOMINADZE, DAVID

    2009-01-01

    We previously showed that an elevated content of fibrinogen (Fg) increased formation of filamentous actin and enhanced endothelial layer permeability. In the present work we tested the hypothesis that Fg binding to endothelial cells (ECs) alters expression of actin-associated endothelial tight junction proteins (TJP). Rat cardiac microvascular ECs were grown in gold plated chambers of an electrical cell-substrate impedance system, 8-well chambered, or in 12-well plates. Confluent ECs were treated with Fg (2 or 4 mg/ml), Fg (4 mg/ml) with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) kinase inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126), Fg (4 mg/ml) with anti-ICAM-1 antibody or BQ788 (endothelin type B receptor blocker), endothelin-1, endothelin-1 with BQ788, or medium alone for 24 h. Fg induced a dose-dependent decrease in EC junction integrity as determined by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Western blot analysis and RT-PCR data showed that the higher dose of Fg decreased the contents of TJPs, occludin, zona occluden-1 (ZO-1), and zona occluden-2 (ZO-2) in ECs. Fg-induced decreases in contents of the TJPs were blocked by PD98059, U0126, or anti-ICAM-1 antibody. While BQ788 inhibited endothelin-1-induced decrease in TEER, it did not affect Fg-induced decrease in TEER. These data suggest that Fg increases EC layer permeability via the MEK kinase signaling pathway by affecting occludin, ZO-1, and ZO-2, TJPs, which are bound to actin filaments. Therefore, increased binding of Fg to its major EC receptor, ICAM-1, during cardiovascular diseases may increase microvascular permeability by altering the content and possibly subcellular localization of endothelial TJPs. PMID:19507189

  8. integrating Solid State NMR and Computations in Membrane Protein Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Helical membrane protein structures are influenced by their native environment. Therefore the characterization of their structure in an environment that models as closely as possible their native environment is critical for achieving not only structural but functional understanding of these proteins. Solid state NMR spectroscopy in liquid crystalline lipid bilayers provides an excellent tool for such characterizations. Two classes of restraints can be obtained - absolute restraints that constrain the structure to a laboratory frame of reference when using uniformly oriented samples (approximately 1° of mosaic spread) and relative restraints that restrain one part of the structure with respect to another part such as torsional and distance restraints. Here, I will discuss unique restraints derived from uniformly oriented samples and the characterization of initial structures utilizing both restraint types, followed by restrained molecular dynamics refinement in the same lipid bilayer environment as that used for the experimental restraint collection. Protein examples will be taken from Influenza virus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When available comparisons of structures to those obtained using different membrane mimetic environments will be shown and the causes for structural distortions explained based on an understanding of membrane biophysics and its sophisticated influence on membrane proteins.

  9. Integral reactor system and method for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Fernandes, Neil Edward; Brown, Michael S; Cheekatamarla, Praveen; Deng, Thomas; Dimitrakopoulos, James; Litka, Anthony F

    2013-11-19

    A reactor system is integrated internally within an anode-side cavity of a fuel cell. The reactor system is configured to convert hydrocarbons to smaller species while mitigating the lower production of solid carbon. The reactor system may incorporate one or more of a pre-reforming section, an anode exhaust gas recirculation device, and a reforming section.

  10. Integral reactor system and method for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Fernandes, Neil Edward; Brown, Michael S.; Cheekatamaria, Praveen; Deng, Thomas; Dimitrakopoulos, James; Litka, Anthony F.

    2017-03-07

    A reactor system is integrated internally within an anode-side cavity of a fuel cell. The reactor system is configured to convert higher hydrocarbons to smaller species while mitigating the lower production of solid carbon. The reactor system may incorporate one or more of a pre-reforming section, an anode exhaust gas recirculation device, and a reforming section.

  11. A review of integration strategies for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiongwen; Chan, S. H.; Li, Guojun; Ho, H. K.; Li, Jun; Feng, Zhenping

    Due to increasing oil and gas demand, the depletion of fossil resources, serious global warming, efficient energy systems and new energy conversion processes are urgently needed. Fuel cells and hybrid systems have emerged as advanced thermodynamic systems with great promise in achieving high energy/power efficiency with reduced environmental loads. In particular, due to the synergistic effect of using integrated solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and classical thermodynamic cycle technologies, the efficiency of the integrated system can be significantly improved. This paper reviews different concepts/strategies for SOFC-based integration systems, which are timely transformational energy-related technologies available to overcome the threats posed by climate change and energy security.

  12. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models.

    PubMed

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-12-02

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency.

  13. Protein expression from unintegrated HIV-1 DNA introduces bias in primary in vitro post-integration latency models

    PubMed Central

    Bonczkowski, Pawel; De Scheerder, Marie-Angélique; Malatinkova, Eva; Borch, Alexandra; Melkova, Zora; Koenig, Renate; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    To understand the persistence of latently HIV-1 infected cells in virally suppressed infected patients, a number of in vitro models of HIV latency have been developed. In an attempt to mimic the in vivo situation as closely as possible, several models use primary cells and replication-competent viruses in combination with antiretroviral compounds to prevent ongoing replication. Latency is subsequently measured by HIV RNA and/or protein production after cellular activation. To discriminate between pre- and post-integration latency, integrase inhibitors are routinely used, preventing novel integrations upon cellular activation. Here, we show that this choice of antiretrovirals may still cause a bias of pre-integration latency in these models, as unintegrated HIV DNA can form and directly contribute to the levels of HIV RNA and protein production. We further show that the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors effectively suppresses the levels of episomal HIV DNA (as measured by 2-LTR circles) and decreases the levels of HIV transcription. Consequently, we show that latency levels described in models that only use integrase inhibitors may be overestimated. The inclusion of additional control conditions, such as 2-LTR quantification and the addition of reverse transcriptase inhibitors, is crucial to fully elucidate the actual levels of post-integration latency. PMID:27910923

  14. A comprehensive protein-centric ID mapping service for molecular data integration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongzhan; Suzek, Baris E.; Mazumder, Raja; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yongxing; Wu, Cathy H.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Identifier (ID) mapping establishes links between various biological databases and is an essential first step for molecular data integration and functional annotation. ID mapping allows diverse molecular data on genes and proteins to be combined and mapped to functional pathways and ontologies. We have developed comprehensive protein-centric ID mapping services providing mappings for 90 IDs derived from databases on genes, proteins, pathways, diseases, structures, protein families, protein interaction, literature, ontologies, etc. The services are widely used and have been regularly updated since 2006. Availability: www.uniprot.org/mappingandproteininformation-resource.org/pirwww/search/idmapping.shtml Contact: huang@dbi.udel.edu PMID:21478197

  15. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  16. Cell polarity proteins: common targets for tumorigenic human viruses

    PubMed Central

    Javier, RT

    2012-01-01

    Loss of polarity and disruption of cell junctions are common features of epithelial-derived cancer cells, and mounting evidence indicates that such defects have a direct function in the pathology of cancer. Supporting this idea, results with several different human tumor viruses indicate that their oncogenic potential depends in part on a common ability to inactivate key cell polarity proteins. For example, adenovirus (Ad) type 9 is unique among human Ads by causing exclusively estrogen-dependent mammary tumors in experimental animals and in having E4 region-encoded open reading frame 1 (E4-ORF1) as its primary oncogenic determinant. The 125-residue E4-ORF1 protein consists of two separate protein-interaction elements, one of which defines a PDZ domain-binding motif (PBM) required for E4-ORF1 to induce both cellular transformation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Most notably, the E4-ORF1 PBM mediates interactions with a selected group of cellular PDZ proteins, three of which include the cell polarity proteins Dlg1, PATJ and ZO-2. Data further indicate that these interactions promote disruption of cell junctions and a loss of cell polarity. In addition, one or more of the E4-ORF1-interacting cell polarity proteins, as well as the cell polarity protein Scribble, are common targets for the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 or human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax oncoproteins. Underscoring the significance of these observations, in humans, high-risk HPV and HTLV-1 are causative agents for cervical cancer and adult T-cell leukemia, respectively. Consequently, human tumor viruses should serve as powerful tools for deciphering mechanisms whereby disruption of cell junctions and loss of cell polarity contribute to the development of many human cancers. This review article discusses evidence supporting this hypothesis, with an emphasis on the human Ad E4-ORF1 oncoprotein. PMID:19029943

  17. Possible role of HIWI2 in modulating tight junction proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells through Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Suganya; Palanisamy, Karthikka; Arunachalam, Jayamuruga Pandian; Chidambaram, Subbulakshmi

    2017-03-01

    PIWI subfamily of proteins is shown to be primarily expressed in germline cells. They maintain the genomic integrity by silencing the transposable elements. Although the role of PIWI proteins in germ cells has been documented, their presence and function in somatic cells remains unclear. Intriguingly, we detected all four members of PIWI-like proteins in human ocular tissues and somatic cell lines. When HIWI2 was knocked down in retinal pigment epithelial cells, the typical honeycomb morphology was affected. Further analysis showed that the expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins, CLDN1, and TJP1 were altered in HIWI2 knockdown. Moreover, confocal imaging revealed disrupted TJP1 assembly at the TJ. Previous studies report the role of GSK3β in regulating TJ proteins. Accordingly, phospho-kinase proteome profiler array indicated increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3α/β in HIWI2 knockdown, suggesting that HIWI2 might affect TJ proteins through Akt-GSK3α/β signaling axis. Moreover, treating the HIWI2 knockdown cells with wortmannin increased the levels of TJP1 and CLDN1. Taken together, our study demonstrates the presence of PIWI-like proteins in somatic cells and the possible role of HIWI2 in preserving the functional integrity of epithelial cells probably by modulating the phosphorylation status of Akt.

  18. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  19. Tritium labelling of a cholesterol amphiphile designed for cell membrane anchoring of proteins.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Balázs; Orbán, Erika; Kele, Zoltán; Tömböly, Csaba

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane association of proteins can be achieved by the addition of lipid moieties to the polypeptide chain, and such lipid-modified proteins have important biological functions. A class of cell surface proteins contains a complex glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) glycolipid at the C-terminus, and they are accumulated in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, that is, lipid rafts. Semisynthetic lipoproteins prepared from recombinant proteins and designed lipids are valuable probes and model systems of the membrane-associated proteins. Because GPI-anchored proteins can be reinserted into the cell membrane with the retention of the biological function, they are appropriate candidates for preparing models via reduction of the structural complexity. A synthetic headgroup was added to the 3β-hydroxyl group of cholesterol, an essential lipid component of rafts, and the resulting cholesterol derivative was used as a simplified GPI mimetic. In order to quantitate the membrane integrated GPI mimetic after the exogenous addition to live cells, a tritium labelled cholesterol anchor was prepared. The radioactive label was introduced into the headgroup, and the radiolabelled GPI mimetic anchor was obtained with a specific activity of 1.37 TBq/mmol. The headgroup labelled cholesterol derivative was applied to demonstrate the sensitive detection of the cell membrane association of the anchor under in vivo conditions.

  20. The COG and COPI complexes interact to control the abundance of GEARs, a subset of Golgi integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Oka, Toshihiko; Ungar, Daniel; Hughson, Frederick M; Krieger, Monty

    2004-05-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a soluble hetero-octamer associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the Golgi. Mammalian somatic cell mutants lacking the Cog1 (ldlB) or Cog2 (ldlC) subunits exhibit pleiotropic defects in Golgi-associated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing that suggest COG is involved in the localization, transport, and/or function of multiple Golgi processing proteins. We have identified a set of COG-sensitive, integral membrane Golgi proteins called GEARs (mannosidase II, GOS-28, GS15, GPP130, CASP, giantin, and golgin-84) whose abundances were reduced in the mutant cells and, in some cases, increased in COG-overexpressing cells. In the mutants, some GEARs were abnormally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and were degraded by proteasomes. The distributions of the GEARs were altered by small interfering RNA depletion of epsilon-COP in wild-type cells under conditions in which COG-insensitive proteins were unaffected. Furthermore, synthetic phenotypes arose in mutants deficient in both epsilon-COP and either Cog1 or Cog2. COG and COPI may work in concert to ensure the proper retention or retrieval of a subset of proteins in the Golgi, and COG helps prevent the endoplasmic reticulum accumulation and degradation of some GEARs.

  1. Preparation of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins using an insect cell-free protein synthesis system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Ezure, Toru; Ando, Eiji; Nishimura, Osamu; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Tsunasawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination is one of the most significant posttranslational modifications (PTMs). To evaluate the ability of an insect cell-free protein synthesis system to carry out ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation to in vitro translated proteins, poly-Ub chain formation was studied in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system. Poly-Ub was generated in the presence of Ub aldehyde (UA), a de-ubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor. In vitro ubiquitination of the p53 tumor suppressor protein was also analyzed, and p53 was poly-ubiquitinated when Ub, UA, and Mdm2, an E3 Ub ligase (E3) for p53, were added to the in vitro reaction mixture. These results suggest that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system contains enzymatic activities capable of carrying out ubiquitination. CBB-detectable ubiquitinated p53 was easily purified from the insect cell-free protein synthesis system, allowing analysis of the Ub-conjugated proteins by mass spectrometry (MS). Lys 305 of p53 was identified as one of the Ub acceptor sites using this strategy. Thus, we conclude that the insect cell-free protein synthesis system is a powerful tool for studying various PTMs of eukaryotic proteins including ubiqutination presented here.

  2. Protein folding and conformational stress in microbial cells producing recombinant proteins: a host comparative overview

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Brigitte; Saloheimo, Markku; Rinas, Ursula; Dragosits, Martin; Rodríguez-Carmona, Escarlata; Baumann, Kristin; Giuliani, Maria; Parrilli, Ermenegilda; Branduardi, Paola; Lang, Christine; Porro, Danilo; Ferrer, Pau; Tutino, Maria Luisa; Mattanovich, Diethard; Villaverde, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Different species of microorganisms including yeasts, filamentous fungi and bacteria have been used in the past 25 years for the controlled production of foreign proteins of scientific, pharmacological or industrial interest. A major obstacle for protein production processes and a limit to overall success has been the abundance of misfolded polypeptides, which fail to reach their native conformation. The presence of misfolded or folding-reluctant protein species causes considerable stress in host cells. The characterization of such adverse conditions and the elicited cell responses have permitted to better understand the physiology and molecular biology of conformational stress. Therefore, microbial cell factories for recombinant protein production are depicted here as a source of knowledge that has considerably helped to picture the extremely rich landscape of in vivo protein folding, and the main cellular players of this complex process are described for the most important cell factories used for biotechnological purposes. PMID:18394160

  3. Discovery and Characterization of a New Cell-Penetrating Protein

    PubMed Central

    Simeon, Rudo L.; Chamoun, Ana Maria; McMillin, Thomas; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    We describe a new cell-penetrating protein, B1, capable of delivering conjugated proteins and nucleic acids into mammalian cells. B1 is a 244-amino-acid product of a single-base frameshift in the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). The molecule has a net positive charge of 43 and a very high charge-to-mass ratio of 1.5. eGFP-fused B1 potently penetrates both adherent and suspension cells with >80% of cells taking up the protein when exposed to concentrations as low as 1 μM. The protein was found to cluster in the paranuclear region of TZM-bl cells. Most importantly, we show that B1 not only facilitates cellular uptake, but allows biomolecular cargo to reach sites of biological relevance. For example, baby hamster kidney cells underwent DNA recombination when exposed to B1-tagged Cre recombinase at protein concentrations as low as 2.5 μM, indicating potent nuclear delivery of functional protein cargos. Additionally, B1 delivers non-covalently conjugated RNA and DNA across the cell membrane to cytosolic and nuclear sites accessible to the cellular translation and transcription machinery, as gauged by detection of encoded reporter functions, with efficiency comparable to commercially available cationic lipid reagents. B1 appears to utilize cell-surface glycans and multiple competing endocytic pathways to enter and traffic through cells. These studies provide both a new tool for intracellular delivery of biomolecules and insights that could aid in the design of more effective cell penetrating proteins. PMID:24047285

  4. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Mushegian, Arcady R; Elena, Santiago F

    2015-02-01

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts.

  5. DNA Methyltransferase protein synthesis is reduced in CXXC finger protein 1-deficient embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jill S; Palam, Lakshmi R; Tate, Courtney M; Sanford, Jeremy R; Wek, Ronald C; Skalnik, David G

    2009-05-01

    CXXC finger protein 1 (CFP1) binds to unmethylated CpG dinucleotides and is required for embryogenesis. CFP1 is also a component of the Setd1A and Setd1B histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells lacking CFP1 fail to differentiate, and exhibit a 70% reduction in global genomic cytosine methylation and a 50% reduction in DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) protein and activity. This study investigated the underlying mechanism for reduced DNMT1 expression in CFP1-deficient ES cells. DNMT1 transcript levels were significantly elevated in ES cells lacking CFP1, despite the observed reduction in DNMT1 protein levels. To address the posttranscriptional mechanisms by which CFP1 regulates DNMT1 protein activity, pulse/chase analyses were carried out, demonstrating a modest reduction in DNMT1 protein half-life in CFP1-deficient ES cells. Additionally, global protein synthesis was decreased in ES cells lacking CFP1, contributing to a reduction in the synthesis of DNMT1 protein. ES cells lacking CFP1 were found to contain elevated levels of phosphorylated eIF2alpha, and an accompanying reduction in translation initiation as revealed by a lower level of polyribosomes. These results reveal a novel role for CFP1 in the regulation of translation initiation, and indicate that loss of CFP1 function leads to decreased DNMT1 protein synthesis and half-life.

  6. Integrated thin film cadmium sulfide solar cell module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickelsen, R. A.; Abbott, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The design, development, fabrication and tests of flexible integrated thin-film cadmium sulfide solar cells and modules are discussed. The development of low cost and high production rate methods for interconnecting cells into large solar arrays is described. Chromium thin films were applied extensively in the deposited cell structures as a means to: (1) achieve high adherence between the cadmium sulfide films and the vacuum-metallized copper substrates, (2) obtain an ohmic contact to the cadmium sulfide films, and (3) improve the adherence of gold films as grids or contact areas.

  7. Multiwell cell culture plate format with integrated microfluidic perfusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domansky, Karel; Inman, Walker; Serdy, Jim; Griffith, Linda G.

    2006-01-01

    A new cell culture analog has been developed. It is based on the standard multiwell cell culture plate format but it provides perfused three-dimensional cell culture capability. The new capability is achieved by integrating microfluidic valves and pumps into the plate. The system provides a means to conduct high throughput assays for target validation and predictive toxicology in the drug discovery and development process. It can be also used for evaluation of long-term exposure to drugs or environmental agents or as a model to study viral hepatitis, cancer metastasis, and other diseases and pathological conditions.

  8. The Hansenula polymorpha PER8 gene encodes a novel peroxisomal integral membrane protein involved in proliferation

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We previously described the isolation of mutants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha that are defective in peroxisome biogenesis. Here, we describe the characterization of one of these mutants, per8, and the cloning of the PER8 gene. In either methanol or methylamine medium, conditions that normally induce the organelles, per8 cells contain no peroxisome-like structures and peroxisomal enzymes are located in the cytosol. The sequence of PER8 predicts that its product (Per8p) is a novel polypeptide of 34 kD, and antibodies against Per8p recognize a protein of 31 kD. Analysis of the primary sequence of Per8p revealed a 39-amino-acid cysteine-rich segment with similarity to the C3HC4 family of zinc-finger motifs. Overexpression of PER8 results in a markedly enhanced increase in peroxisome numbers. We show that Per8p is an integral membrane protein of the peroxisome and that it is concentrated in the membranes of newly formed organelles. We propose that Per8p is a component of the molecular machinery that controls the proliferation of this organelle. PMID:7844145

  9. Alpha-ketoglutarate inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis in intestinal porcine epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kang; Yin, Yulong; Li, Xilong; Xi, Pengbin; Wang, Junjun; Lei, Jian; Hou, Yongqing; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-06-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (AKG) is a key intermediate in glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows beneficial effects of AKG on clinical and experimental nutrition, particularly with respect to intestinal growth and integrity. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1) were used to test the hypothesis that AKG inhibits glutamine degradation and enhances protein synthesis. IPEC-1 cells were cultured for 3 days in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's-F12 Ham medium (DMEM-F12) containing 0, 0.2, 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG. At the end of the 3-day culture, cells were used to determine L-[U-14C]glutamine utilization, protein concentration, protein synthesis, and the total and phosphorylated levels of the mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1). Compared with 0 mM of AKG (control), 0.2 and 0.5 mM of AKG dose-dependently reduced (P<0.05) glutamine degradation and the production of glutamate, alanine and aspartate in IPEC-1 cells. Addition of 0.5 and 2 mM of AKG to culture medium enhanced protein synthesis (P<0.05) by 78 and 101% without affecting protein degradation, compared to the control group. Rapamycin (50 nM; a potent inhibitor of mTOR) attenuated the stimulatory effect of AKG on protein synthesis. Consistent with these metabolic data, the addition of 0.5 or 2 mM of AKG to culture medium increased (P<0.05) the phosphorylated levels of mTOR, S6k1 and 4E-BP1 proteins. Collectively, these results indicate that AKG can spare glutamine and activate the mTOR signaling pathway to stimulate protein synthesis in intestinal epithelial cells.

  10. Integrated optical biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Dan; Grace, Karen M.; Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.; Frayer, Daniel; Mendes, Sergio B.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a simple, highly sensitive and specific optical waveguide sensor for the detection of multivalent proteins. The optical biosensor is based on optically tagged glycolipid receptors embedded within a fluid phospholipid bilayer membrane formed upon the surface of a planar optical waveguide. Binding of multivalent cholera toxin triggers a fluorescence resonance energy transfer that results in a two-color optical change that is monitored by measurement of emitted luminescence above the waveguide surface. The sensor approach is highly sensitive and specific and requires no additional reagents and washing steps. Demonstration of protein-receptor recognition by use of planar optical waveguides provides a path forward for the development of fieldable miniaturized biosensor arrays. (c) 1999 Optical Society of America.

  11. Protein cytoskeleton and overexpression of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elisabete; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that over time in culture opossum kidney (OK) cells are endowed with increased Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and expression (Silva et al., 2006, J Membr Biol 212:163-175; Silva and Soares-da-Silva, 2007, Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 293:R1764-R1770). The present work evaluated the cytoskeleton reorganization in OK cells at passages 40 and 80 in culture and its possible relationship with membrane transport proteins and cell morphology. It is shown that OK cells with 80 passages in culture have increased size, internal complexity, and total protein expression. In OK cells with 80 passages in culture the use of in-cell western showed that ezrin/radixin/moesin complex was increased by 20%. The most abundant ankyrin-G isoform in OK cells with 40 passages was the approximately 200/220 kDa isoform, whereas in OK cells with 80 passages the most abundant isoform was the approximately 170 kDa isoform. The spectrin-betaII approximately 240 kDa isoform, the predominant isoform in OK cells with 40 passages, was marginally detected in OK cells with 80 passages. Besides Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, GLUT2, and NHE3 expression was also significantly increased in OK cells with 80 passages. It is concluded that the prolonged cell passaging of OK cells results in an interesting and valuable experimental model to analyze the reorganization of the renal cell cytoskeleton proteins and its relationship with transporter and signaling membrane proteins.

  12. Coupled Protein Diffusion and Folding in the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Minghao; Gelman, Hannah; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-01-01

    When a protein unfolds in the cell, its diffusion coefficient is affected by its increased hydrodynamic radius and by interactions of exposed hydrophobic residues with the cytoplasmic matrix, including chaperones. We characterize protein diffusion by photobleaching whole cells at a single point, and imaging the concentration change of fluorescent-labeled protein throughout the cell as a function of time. As a folded reference protein we use green fluorescent protein. The resulting region-dependent anomalous diffusion is well characterized by 2-D or 3-D diffusion equations coupled to a clustering algorithm that accounts for position-dependent diffusion. Then we study diffusion of a destabilized mutant of the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and of its stable control inside the cell. Unlike the green fluorescent protein control's diffusion coefficient, PGK's diffusion coefficient is a non-monotonic function of temperature, signaling ‘sticking’ of the protein in the cytosol as it begins to unfold. The temperature-dependent increase and subsequent decrease of the PGK diffusion coefficient in the cytosol is greater than a simple size-scaling model suggests. Chaperone binding of the unfolding protein inside the cell is one plausible candidate for even slower diffusion of PGK, and we test the plausibility of this hypothesis experimentally, although we do not rule out other candidates. PMID:25436502

  13. Proteomic analysis of cell surface proteins from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anne; Wait, Robin; Begum, Shajna; Crossett, Ben; Nagy, Judit; Brown, Katherine; Fairweather, Neil

    2005-06-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterium that causes disease of the large intestine, particularly after treatment with antibiotics. The bacterium produces two toxins (A and B) that are responsible for the pathology of the disease. In addition, a number of bacterial virulence factors associated with adhesion to the gut have previously been identified, including the cell wall protein Cwp66, the high-molecular weight surface layer protein (HMW-SLP) and the flagella. As the genome sequence predicts many other cell wall associated proteins, we have investigated the diversity of proteins in cell wall extracts, with the aim of identifying further virulence factors. We have used a number of methods to remove the proteins associated with the cell wall of C. difficile. Two of the resulting extracts, obtained using low pH glycine treatment and lysozyme digestion of the cell wall, have been analysed in detail by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. One hundred and nineteen spots, comprising 49 different proteins, have been identified. The two surface layer proteins (SLPs) are the most abundant proteins, and we have also found components of the flagellum. Interestingly, we have also determined that a number of paralogs of the HMW-SLP are expressed, and these could represent targets for further investigation as virulence factors.

  14. A New Essential Cell Division Protein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Aurora; Camarena, Laura; Cevallos, Miguel Angel; Poggio, Sebastian

    2017-04-15

    Bacterial cell division is a complex process that relies on a multiprotein complex composed of a core of widely conserved and generally essential proteins and on accessory proteins that vary in number and identity in different bacteria. The assembly of this complex and, particularly, the initiation of constriction are regulated processes that have come under intensive study. In this work, we characterize the function of DipI, a protein conserved in Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria that is essential in Caulobacter crescentus Our results show that DipI is a periplasmic protein that is recruited late to the division site and that it is required for the initiation of constriction. The recruitment of the conserved cell division proteins is not affected by the absence of DipI, but localization of DipI to the division site occurs only after a mature divisome has formed. Yeast two-hybrid analysis showed that DipI strongly interacts with the FtsQLB complex, which has been recently implicated in regulating constriction initiation. A possible role of DipI in this process is discussed.IMPORTANCE Bacterial cell division is a complex process for which most bacterial cells assemble a multiprotein complex that consists of conserved proteins and of accessory proteins that differ among bacterial groups. In this work, we describe a new cell division protein (DipI) present only in a group of bacteria but essential in Caulobacter crescentus Cells devoid of DipI cannot constrict. Although a mature divisome is required for DipI recruitment, DipI is not needed for recruiting other division proteins. These results, together with the interaction of DipI with a protein complex that has been suggested to regulate cell wall synthesis during division, suggest that DipI may be part of the regulatory mechanism that controls constriction initiation.

  15. Uniting Germline and Stem Cells: the Function of Piwi Proteins and the piRNA Pathway in Diverse Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Celina; Wang, Jianquan; Lin, Haifan

    2013-01-01

    The topipotency of the germline is the full manifestation of the pluri- and multipotency of embryonic and adult stem cells, thus the germline and stem cells must share common mechanisms that guarantee their multipotentials in development. One of the few such known shared mechanisms is represented by Piwi proteins, which constitute one of the two subfamilies of the Argonaute protein family. Piwi proteins bind to Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) that are generally 26–31 nucleotides in length. Both Piwi proteins and piRNAs are most abundantly expressed in the germline. Moreover, Piwi proteins are expressed broadly in certain types of somatic stem/progenitor cells and other somatic cells across animal phylogeny. Recent studies indicate that the Piwi-piRNA pathway mediates epigenetic programming and post-transcriptional regulation, which may be responsible for its function in germline specification, gametogenesis, stem cell maintenance, transposon silencing, and genome integrity in diverse organisms. PMID:21942366

  16. Integrating human stem cell expansion and neuronal differentiation in bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Margarida; Brito, Catarina; Costa, Eunice M; Sousa, Marcos FQ; Alves, Paula M

    2009-01-01

    Background Human stem cells are cellular resources with outstanding potential for cell therapy. However, for the fulfillment of this application, major challenges remain to be met. Of paramount importance is the development of robust systems for in vitro stem cell expansion and differentiation. In this work, we successfully developed an efficient scalable bioprocess for the fast production of human neurons. Results The expansion of undifferentiated human embryonal carcinoma stem cells (NTera2/cl.D1 cell line) as 3D-aggregates was firstly optimized in spinner vessel. The media exchange operation mode with an inoculum concentration of 4 × 105 cell/mL was the most efficient strategy tested, with a 4.6-fold increase in cell concentration achieved in 5 days. These results were validated in a bioreactor where similar profile and metabolic performance were obtained. Furthermore, characterization of the expanded population by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that NT2 cells maintained their stem cell characteristics along the bioreactor culture time. Finally, the neuronal differentiation step was integrated in the bioreactor process, by addition of retinoic acid when cells were in the middle of the exponential phase. Neurosphere composition was monitored and neuronal differentiation efficiency evaluated along the culture time. The results show that, for bioreactor cultures, we were able to increase significantly the neuronal differentiation efficiency by 10-fold while reducing drastically, by 30%, the time required for the differentiation process. Conclusion The culture systems developed herein are robust and represent one-step-forward towards the development of integrated bioprocesses, bridging stem cell expansion and differentiation in fully controlled bioreactors. PMID:19772662

  17. Microelectrodes integrated cell-chip for drug effects study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cui, Hui-Fang; Ye, Jian-Shan; Chong, Ser-Choong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Cheong, Hui-Wing

    2006-01-01

    Silicon-based microelectrode chips are useful tools for temporal recording of neurotransmitter releasing from neural cells. Both invasive and non-invasive methods are targeted by different group researchers to perform electrical stimulating on neural cells. A microfabricated microelectrodes integrated biochip will be presented in this paper, which describes the dopaminergic cells growing on the chip directly. The dopamine exocytosis can be detected non-invasively from drug incubated dopaminergic cells growing on the chip. The abovementioned silicon-based electrochemical sensor chip has been designed with an electrode array located on the bottom of reaction chamber and each electrode is individually electrical controlled. MN9D, a mouse mesencephalic dopaminergic cell line, has been grown on the surface of the biochip chamber directly. Dopamine exocytosis from the chip-grown MN9D cells was detected using amperometry technology. The amperometric detection limit of dopamine of the biochip microelectrodes was found from 0.06μM to 0.21μM (S/N=3) statistically for the electrode diameters from 10 μm to 90 μm, the level of dopamine exocytosis from MN9D cells was undetectable whithout drug incubation. In contrast, after MN9D cells were incubated with L-dopa, a dopamine precursor, K+ induced dopamine extocytosis was temporally detected. The microelectrodes integrated biochip provides a non-invasive, temporal detection of dopamine exocytosis from dopaminergic cells, and holds the potential for applications in studying the mechanisms of dopamine exocytosis, and drug screening. It also provides a tool for pharmaceutical research and drug screening on dopaminergic cells, extendably to be used for other cell culture and drug effects study.

  18. Magneto-capillary valve for integrated purification and enrichment of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    den Dulk, Remco C; Schmidt, Kristiane A; Sabatté, Gwénola; Liébana, Susana; Prins, Menno W J

    2013-01-07

    We describe the magneto-capillary valve (MCV) technology, a flexible approach for integrated biological sample preparation within the concept of stationary microfluidics. Rather than moving liquids in a microfluidic device, discrete units of liquid are present at fixed positions in the device and magnetic particles are actuated between the fluids. The MCV concept is characterized by the use of two planar surfaces at a capillary mutual distance, with specific features to confine the fluids by capillary forces, and the use of a gas or a phase-change material separating the stationary aqueous liquids. We have studied the physics of magneto-capillary valving by quantifying the magnetic force as a function of time and position, which reveals the balance of magnetic, capillary and frictional forces in the system. By purification experiments with a fluorescent tracer we have measured the amount of co-transported liquid, which is a key parameter for efficient purification. To demonstrate the versatility of the technology, several MCV device architectures were tested in a series of biological assays, showing the purification and enrichment of nucleic acids and proteins. Target recovery comparable to non-miniaturized commercial kits was observed for the extraction of DNA from human cells in buffer, using a device architecture with patterned air valves. Experiments using an enrichment module and patterned air valves demonstrate a 40-fold effective enrichment of DNA in buffer. DNA was also successfully purified from blood plasma using paraffin phase-change valves. Finally, the enrichment of a protein biomarker (prostate-specific antigen) using geometrical air valves resulted in a 7-fold increase of detection signal. The MCV technology is versatile, offers extensive freedom for the design of fully integrated systems, and is expected to be manufacturable in a cost-effective way. We conclude that the MCV technology can become an important enabling technology for point

  19. Protein kinase C activators inhibit capillary endothelial cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binds specifically to bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells (K/sub d/ = 8nM) and inhibits the proliferation (K/sub 50/ = 6 +/- 4 nM). Under similar conditions, PDBu does not inhibit the growth of bovine aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells. PDBu markedly attenuates the response of BCE cells to purified human hepatoma-derived growth factor which, in the absence of PDBu, stimulates BCE cell growth by about 3-fold. Several observations suggest that the inhibition of BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated by protein kinase C: (1) different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to the relative potencies as protein kinase C activators (12-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate > PDBu >> phorbol 12,13-diacetate >>>..beta..-phorbol; ..cap alpha..-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). (2) Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/), a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2-dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. (3) A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a Ca/sup 2 +//phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase that is activated by diC/sub 8/ and PDBu, but not by ..beta..-phorbol. These results support a role for protein kinase C in suppressing capillary endothelial cell growth and may therefore have implications in the intracellular regulation of angiogenesis.

  20. TeloPIN: a database of telomeric proteins interaction network in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhenhua; Dai, Zhiming; Xie, Xiaowei; Feng, Xuyang; Liu, Dan; Songyang, Zhou; Xiong, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Interaction network surrounding telomeres has been intensively studied during the past two decades. However, no specific resource by integrating telomere interaction information data is currently available. To facilitate the understanding of the molecular interaction network by which telomeres are associated with biological process and diseases, we have developed TeloPIN (Telomeric Proteins Interaction Network) database (http://songyanglab.sysu.edu.cn/telopin/), a novel database that points to provide comprehensive information on protein–protein, protein–DNA and protein–RNA interaction of telomeres. TeloPIN database contains four types of interaction data, including (i) protein–protein interaction (PPI) data, (ii) telomeric proteins ChIP-seq data, (iii) telomere-associated proteins data and (iv) telomeric repeat-containing RNAs (TERRA)-interacting proteins data. By analyzing these four types of interaction data, we found that 358 and 199 proteins have more than one type of interaction information in human and mouse cells, respectively. We also developed table browser and TeloChIP genome browser to help researchers with better integrated visualization of interaction data from different studies. The current release of TeloPIN database includes 1111 PPI, eight telomeric protein ChIP-seq data sets, 1391 telomere-associated proteins and 183 TERRA-interacting proteins from 92 independent studies in mammalian cells. The interaction information provided by TeloPIN database will greatly expand our knowledge of telomeric proteins interaction network. Database URL: TeloPIN database address is http://songyanglab.sysu.edu.cn/telopin. TeloPIN database is freely available to non-commercial use. PMID:25792605

  1. Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics in Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, H PETER.

    2004-08-22

    We have demonstrated the application of single-molecule imaging and ultrafast spectroscopy to probe protein conformational dynamics in solution and in lipid bilayers. Dynamic protein-protein interactions involve significant conformational motions that initiate chain reactions leading to specific cellular responses. We have carried out a single molecule study of dynamic protein-protein interactions in a GTPase intracellular signaling protein Cdc42 in complex with a downstream effector protein, WASP. We were able to probe hydrophobic interactions significant to Cdc42/WASP recognition. Single molecule fluorescence intensity and polarization measurements have revealed the dynamic and inhomogeneous nature of protein-protein interactions within the Cdc42/WASP complex that is characterized by structured distributions of conformational fluctuation rates. Conducting a single-molecule fluorescence anisotropy study of calmodulin (CaM), a regulatory protein for calcium-dependent cell signaling, we were able to probe CaM conformational dynamics at a wide time scale. In this study, CaM contains a site-specifically inserted tetra-cysteine motif that reacted with FlAsH, a biarsenic fluorescein derivative that can be rotationally locked to the host protein. The study provided direct characterization of the nanosecond motions of CaM tethered to a biologically compatible surface under physiological buffer solution. The unique technical approaches are applicable of studying single-molecule dynamics of protein conformational motions and protein-protein interactions at a wide time range without the signal convolution of probe-dye molecule motions

  2. A Photoactivatable GFP for Selective Photolabeling of Proteins and Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, George H.; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2002-09-01

    We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) that, after intense irradiation with 413-nanometer light, increases fluorescence 100 times when excited by 488-nanometer light and remains stable for days under aerobic conditions. These characteristics offer a new tool for exploring intracellular protein dynamics by tracking photoactivated molecules that are the only visible GFPs in the cell. Here, we use the photoactivatable GFP both as a free protein to measure protein diffusion across the nuclear envelope and as a chimera with a lysosomal membrane protein to demonstrate rapid interlysosomal membrane exchange.

  3. A photoactivatable GFP for selective photolabeling of proteins and cells.

    PubMed

    Patterson, George H; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2002-09-13

    We report a photoactivatable variant of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) that, after intense irradiation with 413-nanometer light, increases fluorescence 100 times when excited by 488-nanometer light and remains stable for days under aerobic conditions. These characteristics offer a new tool for exploring intracellular protein dynamics by tracking photoactivated molecules that are the only visible GFPs in the cell. Here, we use the photoactivatable GFP both as a free protein to measure protein diffusion across the nuclear envelope and as a chimera with a lysosomal membrane protein to demonstrate rapid interlysosomal membrane exchange.

  4. Protein Profiling of Bladder Urothelial Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jinghai; Ye, Fei; Cui, Miao; Lee, Peng; Wei, Chengguo; Hao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Yanbo; Lu, Zhihua; Galsky, Matthew; McBride, Russell; Wang, Li; Wang, Dongwen; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Wang, Chunxi; Zhang, David Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to detect protein changes that can assist to understand the underlying biology of bladder cancer. The data showed forty five proteins were found to be differentially expressed comparing tumors vs non-tumor tissues, of which EGFR and cdc2p34 were correlated with muscle invasion and histological grade. Ten proteins (ß-catenin, HSP70, autotaxin, Notch4, PSTPIP1, DPYD, ODC, cyclinB1, calretinin and EPO) were able to classify muscle invasive BCa (MIBC) into 2 distinct groups, with group 2 associated with poorer survival. Finally, 3 proteins (P2X7, cdc25B and TFIIH p89) were independent factors for favorable overall survival. PMID:27626805

  5. Multiscale molecular simulations of proteins in cell-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samiotakis, Antonios

    Proteins are the workhorses of all living organisms, performing a broad range of functions in the crowded cellular interior. However, little is known about how proteins function in cell-like conditions since most studies focus in dilute aqueous environments. In order to address this problem we incorporated molecular simulations and coarse-grained models that capture the protein dynamics in the cellular interior. We study the macromolecular crowding effects of cell-like environments on protein Borrelia Burgdorferi VlsE (variable major protein-like sequence-expressed), an aspherical membrane protein, and the enzyme Phosphoglycerate kinase. We show that protein conformation can be significantly perturbed under crowded cell-like conditions which, in turn, can have dramatic effects to the proteins' function. In addition, we look into the effects of mutations in the folding pathways of the topologically frustrated protein apoflavodoxin while correlation with experiments is also achieved. We further developed a multiscale simulation scheme that combines the sampling efficiency of low-resolution models with the detail of all-atomistic simulations. An algorithm that reconstructs all-atomistic conformations from coarse-grained representations was developed, in addition to an energy function that accounts for chemical interference based on the Boltzamn inversion method. The multiscale simulation scheme manages to sample all-atomistic structures of the protein Trp-cage that match very well with experiments. The folding kinetic behavior of Trp-cage was also studied in the combined presence of urea denaturant and macromolecular crowding.

  6. Applications of cell-free protein synthesis in synthetic biology: Interfacing bio-machinery with synthetic environments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Ho; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic biology is built on the synthesis, engineering, and assembly of biological parts. Proteins are the first components considered for the construction of systems with designed biological functions because proteins carry out most of the biological functions and chemical reactions inside cells. Protein synthesis is considered to comprise the most basic levels of the hierarchical structure of synthetic biology. Cell-free protein synthesis has emerged as a powerful technology that can potentially transform the concept of bioprocesses. With the ability to harness the synthetic power of biology without many of the constraints of cell-based systems, cell-free protein synthesis enables the rapid creation of protein molecules from diverse sources of genetic information. Cell-free protein synthesis is virtually free from the intrinsic constraints of cell-based methods and offers greater flexibility in system design and manipulability of biological synthetic machinery. Among its potential applications, cell-free protein synthesis can be combined with various man-made devices for rapid functional analysis of genomic sequences. This review covers recent efforts to integrate cell-free protein synthesis with various reaction devices and analytical platforms.

  7. Neuroendocrine Transdifferentiation in Human Prostate Cancer Cells: An Integrated Approach.

    PubMed

    Cerasuolo, Marianna; Paris, Debora; Iannotti, Fabio A; Melck, Dominique; Verde, Roberta; Mazzarella, Enrico; Motta, Andrea; Ligresti, Alessia

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is highly sensitive to hormone therapy because androgens are essential for prostate cancer cell growth. However, with the nearly invariable progression of this disease to androgen independence, endocrine therapy ultimately fails to control prostate cancer in most patients. Androgen-independent acquisition may involve neuroendocrine transdifferentiation, but there is little knowledge about this process, which is presently controversial. In this study, we investigated this question in a novel model of human androgen-dependent LNCaP cells cultured for long periods in hormone-deprived conditions. Strikingly, characterization of the neuroendocrine phenotype by transcriptomic, metabolomic, and other statistically integrated analyses showed how hormone-deprived LNCaP cells could transdifferentiate to a nonmalignantneuroendocrine phenotype. Notably, conditioned media from neuroendocrine-like cells affected LNCaP cell proliferation. Predictive in silico models illustrated how after an initial period, when LNCaP cell survival was compromised by an arising population of neuroendocrine-like cells, a sudden trend reversal occurred in which the neuroendocrine-like cells functioned to sustain the remaining androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. Our findings provide direct biologic and molecular support for the concept that neuroendocrine transdifferentiation in prostate cancer cell populations influences the progression to androgen independence.

  8. Membrane protein synthesis in cell-free systems: from bio-mimetic systems to bio-membranes.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Rita; Dondapati, Srujan K; Fenz, Susanne F; Schmidt, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan

    2014-08-25

    When taking up the gauntlet of studying membrane protein functionality, scientists are provided with a plethora of advantages, which can be exploited for the synthesis of these difficult-to-express proteins by utilizing cell-free protein synthesis systems. Due to their hydrophobicity, membrane proteins have exceptional demands regarding their environment to ensure correct functionality. Thus, the challenge is to find the appropriate hydrophobic support that facilitates proper membrane protein folding. So far, various modes of membrane protein synthesis have been presented. Here, we summarize current state-of-the-art methodologies of membrane protein synthesis in biomimetic-supported systems. The correct folding and functionality of membrane proteins depend in many cases on their integration into a lipid bilayer and subsequent posttranslational modification. We highlight cell-free systems utilizing the advantages of biological membranes.

  9. 3D Protein Dynamics in the Cell Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anand P; Galland, Rémi; Finch-Edmondson, Megan L; Grenci, Gianluca; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Studer, Vincent; Viasnoff, Virgile; Saunders, Timothy E

    2017-01-10

    The three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the cell nucleus plays an important role in protein dynamics and in regulating gene expression. However, protein dynamics within the 3D nucleus are poorly understood. Here, we present, to our knowledge, a novel combination of 1) single-objective based light-sheet microscopy, 2) photoconvertible proteins, and 3) fluorescence correlation microscopy, to quantitatively measure 3D protein dynamics in the nucleus. We are able to acquire >3400 autocorrelation functions at multiple spatial positions within a nucleus, without significant photobleaching, allowing us to make reliable estimates of diffusion dynamics. Using this tool, we demonstrate spatial heterogeneity in Polymerase II dynamics in live U2OS cells. Further, we provide detailed measurements of human-Yes-associated protein diffusion dynamics in a human gastric cancer epithelial cell line.

  10. Cell Polarity Proteins in Breast Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    Rejon, Carlis; Al-Masri, Maia; McCaffrey, Luke

    2016-10-01

    Breast cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer related death in women worldwide, is a heterogeneous disease with diverse subtypes that have different properties and prognoses. The developing mammary gland is a highly proliferative and invasive tissue, and some of the developmental programs may be aberrantly activated to promote breast cancer progression. In the breast, luminal epithelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity, and the failure to maintain this organizational structure, due to disruption of polarity complexes, is implicated in promoting hyperplasia and tumors. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying loss of polarity will contribute to our knowledge of the early stages leading to the pathogenesis of the disease. In this review, we will discuss recent findings that support the idea that loss of apical-basal cell polarity is a crucial step in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype. Oncogene induced loss of tissue organization shares a conserved cellular mechanism with developmental process, we will further describe the role of the individual polarity complexes, the Par, Crumbs, and Scribble, to couple cell division orientation and cell growth. We will examine symmetric or asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cell and their contribution to the development of breast cancer subtypes and cancer stem cells. Finally, we will highlight some of the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which changes in epithelial polarity programs promote invasion and metastasis through single cell and collective cell modes. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2215-2223, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Study of Signal Detection, Integration, and Propagation in Quorum Sensing at the Single Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Bassler, Bonnie; Wingreen, Ned

    2007-03-01

    Bacteria respond to their environment and to each other and accordingly adjust their gene-expression levels. Accurate signal detection, appropriate signal integration, and faithful signal propagation are essential for a cell to make correct adjustments in response to various extracellular cues. To better understand this information processing by living cells, we studied a model system -- the quorum-sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi. Quorum sensing is a process in which bacteria communicate with each other by diffusible chemical molecules, termed ``autoinducers'', to commit to coordinated developmental decisions. Three types of autoinducers are detected coincidently by three parallel receptors. The signals are then integrated into the same signaling pathway and propagated by phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the pathway components. To quantitatively measure the intracellular response, we applied a fluorescent protein reporter, whose production is regulated by a phosphorylated protein in the pathway. By single-cell microscopy, we can explore features of this information-processing circuit such as coincidence detection, signal integration, noise reduction or filtering, and especially the fidelity in signal processing achieved in the presence of inevitable fluctuations.

  12. A toolkit for graded expression of green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Giehler, Susanne; Mayr, Georg W

    2012-09-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-like proteins of different colors are important tools in cell biology. In many studies, the intracellular targeting of proteins has been determined by transiently expressing GFP fusion proteins and analyzing their intracellular localization by fluorescence microscopy. In most vectors, expression of GFP is driven by the enhancer/promoter cassette of the immediate early gene of human cytomegalovirus (hCMV). This cassette generates high levels of protein expression in most mammalian cell lines. Unfortunately, these nonphysiologically high protein levels have been repeatedly reported to artificially alter the intracellular targeting of proteins fused to GFP. To cope with this problem, we generated a multitude of attenuated GFP expression vectors by modifying the hCMV enhancer/promoter cassette. These modified vectors were transiently expressed, and the expression levels of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) alone and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) fused to another protein were determined by fluorescence microscopy and/or Western blotting. As shown in this study, we were able to (i) clearly reduce the expression of EGFP alone and (ii) reduce expression of an EYFP fusion protein down to the level of the endogenous protein, both in a graded manner.

  13. Myostatin inhibits cell proliferation and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, W E; Bhasin, S; Artaza, J; Byhower, F; Azam, M; Willard, D H; Kull, F C; Gonzalez-Cadavid, N

    2001-02-01

    Myostatin mutations in mice and cattle are associated with increased muscularity, suggesting that myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. To test the hypothesis that myostatin inhibits muscle cell growth, we examined the effects of recombinant myostatin in mouse skeletal muscle C2C12 cells. After verification of the expression of cDNA constructs in a cell-free system and in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, the human recombinant protein was expressed as the full-length (375-amino acid) myostatin in Drosophila cells (Mst375D), or the 110-amino acid carboxy-terminal protein in Escherichia coli (Mst110EC). These proteins were identified by immunoblotting and were purified. Both Mst375D and Mst110EC dose dependently inhibited cell proliferation (cell count and Formazan assay), DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation), and protein synthesis ([1-14C]leucine incorporation) in C2C12 cells. The inhibitory effects of both proteins were greater in myotubes than in myoblasts. Neither protein had any significant effects on protein degradation or apoptosis. In conclusion, recombinant myostatin proteins inhibit cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and protein synthesis in C2C12 muscle cells, suggesting that myostatin may control muscle mass by inhibiting muscle growth or regeneration.

  14. Fragile X mental retardation protein and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qurashi, Abrar; Li, Xuekun; Jin, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells, which can self-renew and produce different cell types, are regulated by both extrinsic signals and intrinsic factors. Fragile X syndrome, one of the most common forms of inherited mental retardation, is caused by the functional loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is a selective RNA-binding protein that forms a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex that associates with polyribosomes. Recently, the role of Fmrp in stem cell biology has been explored in both Drosophila and the mouse. In this chapter, we discuss the role of FMRP in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of stem cells.

  15. Survival motor neuron protein in motor neurons determines synaptic integrity in spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Tara L; Kong, Lingling; Wang, Xueyong; Osborne, Melissa A; Crowder, Melissa E; Van Meerbeke, James P; Xu, Xixi; Davis, Crystal; Wooley, Joe; Goldhamer, David J; Lutz, Cathleen M; Rich, Mark M; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2012-06-20

    The inherited motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by deficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein and results in severe muscle weakness. In SMA mice, synaptic dysfunction of both neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and central sensorimotor synapses precedes motor neuron cell death. To address whether this synaptic dysfunction is due to SMN deficiency in motor neurons, muscle, or both, we generated three lines of conditional SMA mice with tissue-specific increases in SMN expression. All three lines of mice showed increased survival, weights, and improved motor behavior. While increased SMN expression in motor neurons prevented synaptic dysfunction at the NMJ and restored motor neuron somal synapses, increased SMN expression in muscle did not affect synaptic function although it did improve myofiber size. Together these data indicate that both peripheral and central synaptic integrity are dependent on motor neurons in SMA, but SMN may have variable roles in the maintenance of these different synapses. At the NMJ, it functions at the presynaptic terminal in a cell-autonomous fashion, but may be necessary for retrograde trophic signaling to presynaptic inputs onto motor neurons. Importantly, SMN also appears to function in muscle growth and/or maintenance independent of motor neurons. Our data suggest that SMN plays distinct roles in muscle, NMJs, and motor neuron somal synapses and that restored function of SMN at all three sites will be necessary for full recovery of muscle power.

  16. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells.

    PubMed

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-06

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5' and 3' untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5' untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3' untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels.

  17. Characterization of Tight Junction Proteins in Cultured Human Urothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, Alice; Dorokhov, Nikolay; Ryerse, Jan; Klumpp, David J.; McHowat, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) are essential for normal function of epithelia, restricting paracellular diffusion and contributing to the maintainance of cell surface polarity. Superficial cells of the urothelium develop TJs, the basis for the paracellular permeability barrier of the bladder against diffusion of urinary solutes. Focusing on the superficial cell layer of stratified cell cultures of an immortalized human ureteral cell line, TEU-2 cells, we have examined the presence of TJ and TJ-associated proteins. TEU-2 cells were treated with calcium chloride and fetal bovine serum culture conditions used to induce stratification that resembles the normal transitional epithelial phenotype. Cultures were examined for TJ and TJ-associated proteins by confocal immuno-fluorescence microscopy and evaluated for TJ mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). TEU-2 cultures exhibited immunoreactivity at intercellular margins for claudins 1, 4, 5, 7, 14 and 16 whereas claudins 2, 8 and 12 were intracellular. RT-PCR corroborated the presence of these claudins at the mRNA level. The TJ-associated proteins occludin, JAM-1, and zonula occludens (ZO-1, ZO-2 and ZO-3) were localized at cell margins. We have found that numerous TJs and TJ-associated proteins are expressed in stratified TEU-2 cultures. Further, we propose TEU-2s provide a useful ureteral model for future studies on the involvement of TJs proteins in the normal and pathological physiology of the human urinary system. PMID:18553212

  18. An integrative C. elegans protein-protein interaction network with reliability assessment based on a probabilistic graphical model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Tai; Zhu, Yuan; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Zhao, Zhongying; Yan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, a large number of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are identified by different experiments. However, a comprehensive weighted PPI network, which is essential for signaling pathway inference, is not yet available in this model organism. Therefore, we firstly construct an integrative PPI network in C. elegans with 12,951 interactions involving 5039 proteins from seven molecular interaction databases. Then, a reliability score based on a probabilistic graphical model (RSPGM) is proposed to assess PPIs. It assumes that the random number of interactions between two proteins comes from the Bernoulli distribution to avoid multi-links. The main parameter of the RSPGM score contains a few latent variables which can be considered as several common properties between two proteins. Validations on high-confidence yeast datasets show that RSPGM provides more accurate evaluation than other approaches, and the PPIs in the reconstructed PPI network have higher biological relevance than that in the original network in terms of gene ontology, gene expression, essentiality and the prediction of known protein complexes. Furthermore, this weighted integrative PPI network in C. elegans is employed on inferring interaction path of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway as well. Most genes on the inferred interaction path have been validated to be Wnt pathway components. Therefore, RSPGM is essential and effective for evaluating PPIs and inferring interaction path. Finally, the PPI network with RSPGM scores can be queried and visualized on a user interactive website, which is freely available at .

  19. CHO cells in biotechnology for production of recombinant proteins: current state and further potential.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Yon; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Lee, Gyun Min

    2012-02-01

    Recombinant Chinese hamster ovary cells (rCHO) cells have been the most commonly used mammalian host for large-scale commercial production of therapeutic proteins. Recent advances in cell culture technology for rCHO cells have achieved significant improvement in protein production leading to titer of more than 10 g/L to meet the huge demand from market needs. This achievement is associated with progression in the establishment of high and stable producer and the optimization of culture process including media development. In this review article, we focus on current strategies and achievements in cell line development, mainly in vector engineering and cell engineering, for high and stable protein production in rCHO cells. The approaches that manipulate various DNA elements for gene targeting by site-specific integration and cis-acting elements to augment and stabilize gene expression are reviewed here. The genetic modulation strategy by "direct" cell engineering with growth-promoting and/or productivity-enhancing factors and omics-based approaches involved in transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics to pursue cell engineering are also presented.

  20. Use of Non-Conventional Cell Disruption Method for Extraction of Proteins from Black Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Čolnik, Maja; Primožič, Mateja; Knez, Željko; Leitgeb, Maja

    2016-01-01

    The influence of pressure and treatment time on cells disruption of different black yeasts and on activities of extracted proteins using supercritical carbon dioxide process was studied. The cells of three different black yeasts Phaeotheca triangularis, Trimatostroma salinum, and Wallemia ichthyophaga were exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (SC CO2) by varying pressure at fixed temperature (35°C). The black yeasts cell walls were disrupted, and the content of the cells was spilled into the liquid medium. The impact of SC CO2 conditions on secretion of enzymes and proteins from black yeast cells suspension was studied. The residual activity of the enzymes cellulase, β-glucosidase, α-amylase, and protease was studied by enzymatic assay. The viability of black yeast cells was determined by measuring the optical density of the cell suspension at 600 nm. The total protein concentration in the suspension was determined on UV–Vis spectrophotometer at 595 nm. The release of intracellular and extracellular products from black yeast cells was achieved. Also, the observation by an environmental scanning electron microscopy shows major morphological changes with SC CO2-treated cells. The advantages of the proposed method are in a simple use, which is also possible for heat-sensitive materials on one hand and on the other hand integration of the extraction of enzymes and their use in biocatalytical reactions. PMID:27148527

  1. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins protect human hepatoma cells during acute desiccation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Chakraborty, Nilay; Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C

    2012-12-18

    Expression of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins is highly correlated with desiccation tolerance in anhydrobiotic animals, selected land plants, and bacteria. Genes encoding two LEA proteins, one localized to the cytoplasm/nucleus (AfrLEA2) and one targeted to mitochondria (AfrLEA3m), were stably transfected into human HepG2 cells. A trehalose transporter was used for intracellular loading of this disaccharide. Cells were rapidly and uniformly desiccated to low water content (<0.12 g H(2)O/g dry weight) with a recently developed spin-drying technique. Immediately on rehydration, control cells without LEA proteins or trehalose exhibited 0% membrane integrity, compared with 98% in cells loaded with trehalose and expressing AfrLEA2 or AfrLEA3m; surprisingly, AfrLEA3m without trehalose conferred 94% protection. Cell proliferation across 7 d showed an 18-fold increase for cells dried with AfrLEA3m and trehalose, compared with 27-fold for nondried controls. LEA proteins dramatically enhance desiccation tolerance in mammalian cells and offer the opportunity for engineering biostability in the dried state.

  2. Human fallopian tube proteome shows high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenyuan; Liu, Yang; Chang, Cheng; Wu, Songfeng; Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yingjie; Zhong, Fan; Deng, Gaopi

    2016-01-01

    The object of this research was to report a draft proteome of human fallopian tube (hFT) comprises 5416 identified proteins, which could be considered as a physiological reference to complement Human Proteome Draft. The proteomic raw data and metadata were stored in an integrated proteome resources centre iProX (IPX00034300). This hFT proteome contains many hFT markers newly identified by mass spectrum. This hFT proteome comprises 660 high-, 3605 medium- and 1181 low-abundant proteins. Ribosome, cytoskeleton, vesicle and protein folding associated proteins showed obvious tendency to be higher abundance in hFT. The extraordinary high coverage of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-associated proteins were identified in this hFT proteome, which highly supported that hFT should contain a plenty of MSCs. PMID:26759384

  3. Human chymotrypsinogen B production from Pichia pastoris by integrated development of fermentation and downstream processing. Part 2. Protein recovery.

    PubMed

    Thömmes, J; Halfar, M; Gieren, H; Curvers, S; Takors, R; Brunschier, R; Kula, M R

    2001-01-01

    The purification of human chymotrypsinogen B (hCTRB) after expression and secretion by the yeast Pichia pastoris is described based on two different approaches using integrated initial recovery. Extraction employing aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) from poly(ethylene glycol) and sodium sulfate allows direct processing of cell containing yeast suspensions of 50% wet weight. The target protein is obtained partially purified in the top phase while cells and cell debris are partitioned to the bottom phase of the system. hCTRB is further purified by adsorption from the top phase to the cation exchanger SP Sepharose Big Beads and elution in a salt step. The single step isolation of hCTRB is possible by expanded bed adsorption (EBA) using a fluidized cation exchanger (Streamline SP XL). A design strategy is shown taking both target protein binding and stable fluidization of the stationary phase in cell containing suspensions into consideration. For the example of hCTRB isolation from cell containing P. pastoris suspensions, a successful use of this strategy is demonstrated. Both initial recovery strategies deliver a product that can be further purified and formulated by ultrafiltration/diafiltration followed by lyophilization, resulting in a homogeneous product. Scale-up to 30-90 L of culture suspension was shown for both methods, resulting in a product of similar quality. Comparing both strategies reveals that the two-step ATPS route is better suited for high cell density cultures, while the single step EBA method is preferred for cultures of moderate cell density. This is due to the fact that application of EBA is restricted to suspensions of 10-12.5% wet weight cell concentration, thus necessitating dilution of the original broth prior to sample application. The data presented show that integrated recovery operations are a valuable alternative to traditional processing for systems that are problematic during initial solid-liquid separation.

  4. Microfluidic cell culture systems with integrated sensors for drug screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grist, Samantha; Yu, Linfen; Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2012-03-01

    Cell-based testing is a key step in drug screening for cancer treatments. A microfluidic platform can permit more precise control of the cell culture microenvironment, such as gradients in soluble factors. These small-scale devices also permit tracking of low cell numbers. As a new screening paradigm, a microscale system for integrated cell culture and drug screening promises to provide a simple, scalable tool to apply standardized protocols used in cellular response assays. With the ability to dynamically control the microenvironment, we can create temporally varying drug profiles to mimic physiologically measured profiles. In addition, low levels of oxygen in cancerous tumors have been linked with drug resistance and decreased likelihood of successful treatment and patient survival. Our work also integrates a thin-film oxygen sensor with a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator which will in future allow us to create spatial oxygen gradients and study effects of hypoxia on cell response to drug treatment. In future, this technology promises to improve cell-based validation in the drug discovery process, decreasing the cost and increasing the speed in screening large numbers of compounds.

  5. RPE cell surface proteins in normal and dystrophic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, V.M.; Hall, M.O.

    1986-02-01

    Membrane-bound proteins in plasma membrane enriched fractions from cultured rat RPE were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Membrane proteins were characterized on three increasingly specific levels. Total protein was visualized by silver staining. A maximum of 102 separate proteins were counted in silver-stained gels. Glycoproteins were labeled with 3H-glucosamine or 3H-fucose and detected by autoradiography. Thirty-eight fucose-labeled and 61-71 glucosamine-labeled proteins were identified. All of the fucose-labeled proteins were labeled with glucosamine-derived radioactivity. Proteins exposed at the cell surface were labeled by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed radioiodination prior to preparation of membranes for two-dimensional analysis. Forty separate 125I-labeled surface proteins were resolved by two-dimensional electrophoresis/autoradiography. Comparison with the glycoprotein map showed that a number of these surface labeled proteins were glycoproteins. Two-dimensional maps of total protein, fucose-labeled, and glucosamine-labeled glycoproteins, and 125I-labeled surface proteins of membranes from dystrophic (RCS rdy-p+) and normal (Long Evans or RCS rdy+p+) RPE were compared. No differences in the total protein or surface-labeled proteins were observed. However, the results suggest that a 183K glycoprotein is more heavily glycosylated with glucosamine and fucose in normal RPE membranes as compared to membranes from dystrophic RPE.

  6. The MP65 gene is required for cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The MP65 gene of Candida albicans (orf19.1779) encodes a putative β-glucanase mannoprotein of 65 kDa, which plays a main role in a host-fungus relationship, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. In this study, we performed an extensive analysis of a mp65Δ mutant to assess the role of this protein in cell wall integrity, adherence to epithelial cells and biofilm formation. Results The mp65Δ mutant showed a high sensitivity to a range of cell wall-perturbing and degrading agents, especially Congo red, which induced morphological changes such as swelling, clumping and formation of hyphae. The mp65Δ mutant showed an activation of two MAPKs (Mkc1p and Cek1p), a high level of expression of two stress-related genes (DDR48 and SOD5), and a modulated expression of β-glucan epitopes, but no gross changes in cell wall polysaccharide composition. Interestingly, the mp65Δ mutant displayed a marked reduction in adhesion to BEC and Caco-2 cells and severe defects in biofilm formation when compared to the wild type. All of the mentioned properties were totally or partially recovered in a revertant strain, demonstrating the specificity of gene deletion. Conclusions We demonstrate that the MP65 gene of Candida albicans plays a significant role in maintaining cell wall integrity, as well as in adherence to epithelia and biofilm formation, which are major virulence attributes of this fungus. PMID:21575184

  7. Tight binding of proteins to membranes from older human cells.

    PubMed

    Truscott, Roger J W; Comte-Walters, Susana; Ablonczy, Zsolt; Schwacke, John H; Berry, Yoke; Korlimbinis, Anastasia; Friedrich, Michael G; Schey, Kevin L

    2011-12-01

    The lens is an ideal model system for the study of macromolecular aging and its consequences for cellular function, since there is no turnover of lens fibre cells. To examine biochemical processes that take place in the lens and that may also occur in other long-lived cells, membranes were isolated from defined regions of human lenses that are synthesised at different times during life, and assayed for the presence of tightly bound cytosolic proteins using quantitative iTRAQ proteomics technology. A majority of lens beta crystallins and all gamma crystallins became increasingly membrane bound with age, however, the chaperone proteins alpha A and alpha B crystallin, as well as the thermally-stable protein, βB2 crystallin, did not. Other proteins such as brain-associated signal protein 1 and paralemmin 1 became less tightly bound in the older regions of the lens. It is evident that protein-membrane interactions change significantly with age. Selected proteins that were formerly cytosolic become increasingly tightly bound to cell membranes with age and are not removed even by treatment with 7 M urea. It is likely that such processes reflect polypeptide denaturation over time and the untoward binding of proteins to membranes may alter membrane properties and contribute to impairment of communication between older cells.

  8. Global Analysis of Protein Expression of Inner Ear Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Hickox, Ann E; Wong, Ann C Y; Pak, Kwang; Strojny, Chelsee; Ramirez, Miguel; Yates, John R; Ryan, Allen F; Savas, Jeffrey N

    2017-02-01

    The mammalian inner ear (IE) subserves auditory and vestibular sensations via highly specialized cells and proteins. Sensory receptor hair cells (HCs) are necessary for transducing mechanical inputs and stimulating sensory neurons by using a host of known and as yet unknown protein machinery. To understand the protein composition of these unique postmitotic cells, in which irreversible protein degradation or damage can lead to impaired hearing and balance, we analyzed IE samples by tandem mass spectrometry to generate an unbiased, shotgun-proteomics view of protein identities and abundances. By using Pou4f3/eGFP-transgenic mice in which HCs express GFP driven by Pou4f3, we FACS purified a population of HCs to analyze and compare the HC proteome with other IE subproteomes from sensory epithelia and whole IE. We show that the mammalian HC proteome comprises hundreds of uniquely or highly expressed proteins. Our global proteomic analysis of purified HCs extends the existing HC transcriptome, revealing previously undetected gene products and isoform-specific protein expression. Comparison of our proteomic data with mouse and human databases of genetic auditory/vestibular impairments confirms the critical role of the HC proteome for normal IE function, providing a cell-specific pool of candidates for novel, important HC genes. Several proteins identified exclusively in HCs by proteomics and verified by immunohistochemistry map to human genetic deafness loci, potentially representing new deafness genes.

  9. Adenovirus dodecahedron allows large multimeric protein transduction in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fender, P; Schoehn, G; Foucaud-Gamen, J; Gout, E; Garcel, A; Drouet, E; Chroboczek, J

    2003-04-01

    Adenovirus dodecahedron is a virus-like particle composed of only two viral proteins of human adenovirus serotype 3 that are responsible for virus attachment and internalization. We show here that this dodecameric particle, devoid of genetic information, efficiently penetrates human cells and can deliver large multimeric proteins such as immunoglobulins.

  10. Understanding of Protein Synthesis in a Living Cell

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustapha, Y.; Muhammad, S.

    2006-01-01

    The assembly of proteins takes place in the cytoplasm of a cell. There are three main steps. In initiation, far left, all the necessary parts of the process are brought together by a small molecule called a ribosome. During elongation, amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, are joined to one another in a long chain. The sequence in which…

  11. Novel protein Callipygian defines the back of migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Swaney, Kristen F.; Borleis, Jane; Iglesias, Pablo A.; Devreotes, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetric protein localization is essential for cell polarity and migration. We report a novel protein, Callipygian (CynA), which localizes to the lagging edge before other proteins and becomes more tightly restricted as cells polarize; additionally, it accumulates in the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. CynA protein that is tightly localized, or “clustered,” to the cell rear is immobile, but when polarity is disrupted, it disperses throughout the membrane and responds to uniform chemoattractant stimulation by transiently localizing to the cytosol. These behaviors require a pleckstrin homology-domain membrane tether and a WD40 clustering domain, which can also direct other membrane proteins to the back. Fragments of CynA lacking the pleckstrin homology domain, which are normally found in the cytosol, localize to the lagging edge membrane when coexpressed with full-length protein, showing that CynA clustering is mediated by oligomerization. Cells lacking CynA have aberrant lateral protrusions, altered leading-edge morphology, and decreased directional persistence, whereas those overexpressing the protein display exaggerated features of polarity. Consistently, actin polymerization is inhibited at sites of CynA accumulation, thereby restricting protrusions to the opposite edge. We suggest that the mutual antagonism between CynA and regions of responsiveness creates a positive feedback loop that restricts CynA to the rear and contributes to the establishment of the cell axis. PMID:26130809

  12. Action of phenylephrine on protein synthesis in liver cells.

    PubMed Central

    Menaya, J; Parrilla, R; Ayuso, M S

    1987-01-01

    The alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine was found to inhibit protein labelling from [3H]valine in isolated liver cells. This effect is only observable under conditions of partial Ca2+ depletion and in cells displaying maximal rates of protein labelling, i.e. cells isolated from fed animals or from starved animals when incubated in the presence of alanine. The ability of phenylephrine to inhibit protein labelling at near-saturating concentrations of the amino acid precursor indicates that this alpha-agonist actually decreases the rate of protein synthesis. The possibility that phenylephrine acts by making cellular Ca2+ availability further limiting can be ruled out, since alanine stimulates protein labelling under conditions of severe Ca2+ depletion obtained by pretreatment of the cells with EGTA. The following observations indicate that the phenylephrine action may be mediated by an increase in cellular cyclic AMP content: (1) a close relationship was found between the abilities of phenylephrine to inhibit protein labelling and to increase cyclic AMP content; (2) cyclic AMP mimics the phenylephrine action only in cells partially depleted of Ca2+; (3) the alpha 1-antagonist prazosin, which inhibited the phenylephrine-mediated increase in cyclic AMP, also abolished the effect on protein synthesis. PMID:2829846

  13. Wood Contains a Cell-Wall Structural Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wuli; O'Malley, David M.; Sederoff, Ronald R.

    1992-07-01

    A pine extensin-like protein (PELP) has been localized in metabolically active cells of differentiating xylem and in mature wood of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.). This proline-rich glycosylated protein was purified from cell walls of differentiating xylem by differential solubility and gel electrophoresis. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against the deglycosylated purified protein (dPELP) and purified antibody was used for immunolocalization. Immunogold and alkaline phosphatase secondary antibody staining both show antigen in secondary cell walls of earlywood and less staining in latewood. Immunoassays of milled dry wood were developed and used to show increased availability of antigen after hydrogen fluoride or cellulase treatment and decreased antigen after chlorite treatment. The specificity of the antigen-antibody reaction was confirmed by competition assays and by preadsorption of antibody to the purified protein. We propose that extensin-like protein is present in xylem cell walls during lignification and that the protein remains as a structural component of cell walls in wood for many years after xylogenesis. We suggest that such structural proteins play important roles in the differentiation of xylem and thereby could affect the properties of wood.

  14. Integrative analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression in butyrate-treated CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Wippermann, Anna; Rupp, Oliver; Brinkrolf, Karina; Hoffrogge, Raimund; Noll, Thomas

    2016-11-24

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the versatile properties of CHO cells as the major production cell line for biopharmaceutical molecules are not entirely understood yet, although several 'omics' data facilitate the understanding of CHO cells and their reactions to environmental conditions. However, genome-wide studies of epigenetic processes such as DNA methylation are still limited. To prove the applicability and usefulness of integrating DNA methylation and gene expression data in a biotechnological context, we exemplarily analyzed the time course of cellular reactions upon butyrate addition in antibody-producing CHO cells by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing and CHO-specific cDNA microarrays. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses showed that pathways known to be affected by butyrate, including cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as pathways potentially involved in butyrate-induced hyperproductivity such as central energy metabolism and protein biosynthesis were affected. Differentially methylated regions were furthermore found to contain binding-site motifs of specific transcription factors and were hypothesized to represent regulatory regions closely connected to the cellular response to butyrate. Generally, our experiment underlines the benefit of integrating DNA methylation and gene expression data, as it provided potential novel candidate genes for rational cell line development and allowed for new insights into the butyrate effect on CHO cells.

  15. Integrating structure to protein-protein interaction networks that drive metastasis to brain and lung in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Engin, H Billur; Guney, Emre; Keskin, Ozlem; Oliva, Baldo; Gursoy, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Blocking specific protein interactions can lead to human diseases. Accordingly, protein interactions and the structural knowledge on interacting surfaces of proteins (interfaces) have an important role in predicting the genotype-phenotype relationship. We have built the phenotype specific sub-networks of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) involving the relevant genes responsible for lung and brain metastasis from primary tumor in breast cancer. First, we selected the PPIs most relevant to metastasis causing genes (seed genes), by using the "guilt-by-association" principle. Then, we modeled structures of the interactions whose complex forms are not available in Protein Databank (PDB). Finally, we mapped mutations to interface structures (real and modeled), in order to spot the interactions that might be manipulated by these mutations. Functional analyses performed on these sub-networks revealed the potential relationship between immune system-infectious diseases and lung metastasis progression, but this connection was not observed significantly in the brain metastasis. Besides, structural analyses showed that some PPI interfaces in both metastasis sub-networks are originating from microbial proteins, which in turn were mostly related with cell adhesion. Cell adhesion is a key mechanism in metastasis, therefore these PPIs may be involved in similar molecular pathways that are shared by infectious disease and metastasis. Finally, by mapping the mutations and amino acid variations on the interface regions of the proteins in the metastasis sub-networks we found evidence for some mutations to be involved in the mechanisms differentiating the type of the metastasis.

  16. Involvement of the mannose receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway of the microdomain of the integral membrane protein after enteropathogenic Escherichia coli infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Ma, Yanlei; Moyer, Mary Pat; Zhang, Peng; Shi, Chenzhang; Qin, Huanlong

    2012-04-01

    The microdomain of the integral membrane protein (MIMP) has been shown to adhere to mucin and to antagonize the adhesion of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) to epithelial cells; however, the mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we further identified the receptor of MIMP on NCM460 cells and investigated the mechanism (the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK] pathway) following the interaction of MIMP and its corresponding receptor, mannose receptor. We first identified the target receptor of MIMP on the surfaces of NCM460 cells using immunoprecipitation-mass spectrometry technology. We also verified the mannose receptor and examined the degradation and activation of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. The results indicated that MIMP adhered to NCM460 cells by binding to the mannose receptor and inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK stimulated after EPEC infection via inhibition of the Toll-like receptor 5 pathway. These findings indicated that MIMPs relieve the injury of NCM460 cells after enteropathogenic E. coli infection through the mannose receptor and inhibition of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, both of which may therefore be potential therapeutic targets for intestinal diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  17. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Sampath K; Lukowski, Chris M; Casey, Joseph R

    2016-01-15

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function.

  18. The cytoplasmic domain is essential for transport function of the integral membrane transport protein SLC4A11

    PubMed Central

    Loganathan, Sampath K.; Lukowski, Chris M.

    2015-01-01

    Large cytoplasmic domains (CD) are a common feature among integral membrane proteins. In virtually all cases, these CD have a function (e.g., binding cytoskeleton or regulatory factors) separate from that of the membrane domain (MD). Strong associations between CD and MD are rare. Here we studied SLC4A11, a membrane transport protein of corneal endothelial cells, the mutations of which cause genetic corneal blindness. SLC4A11 has a 41-kDa CD and a 57-kDa integral MD. One disease-causing mutation in the CD, R125H, manifests a catalytic defect, suggesting a role of the CD in transport function. Expressed in HEK-293 cells without the CD, MD-SLC4A11 is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, indicating a folding defect. Replacement of CD-SLC4A11 with green fluorescent protein did not rescue MD-SLC4A11, suggesting some specific role of CD-SLC4A11. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of CD-SLC4A11 is similar to that of the Cl−/HCO3− exchange protein AE1 (SLC4A1) CD. Fusion to CD-AE1 partially rescued MD-SLC4A11 to the cell surface, suggesting that the structure of CD-AE1 is similar to that of CD-SLC4A11. The CD-AE1-MD-SLC4a11 chimera, however, had no functional activity. We conclude that CD-SLC4A11 has an indispensable role in the transport function of SLC4A11. CD-SLC4A11 forms insoluble precipitates when expressed in bacteria, suggesting that the domain cannot fold properly when expressed alone. Consistent with a strong association between CD-SLC4A11 and MD-SLC4A11, these domains specifically associate when coexpressed in HEK-293 cells. We conclude that SLC4A11 is a rare integral membrane protein in which the CD has strong associations with the integral MD, which contributes to membrane transport function. PMID:26582474

  19. Enhanced Genetic Integrity in Mouse Germ Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Murphey, Patricia; McLean, Derek J.; McMahan, C. Alex; Walter, Christi A.; McCarrey, John R.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetically based diseases constitute a major human health burden, and de novo germline mutations represent a source of heritable genetic alterations that can cause such disorders in offspring. The availability of transgenic rodent systems with recoverable, mutation reporter genes has been used to assess the occurrence of spontaneous point mutations in germline cells. Previous studies using the lacI mutation reporter transgenic mouse system showed that the frequency of spontaneous mutations is significantly lower in advanced male germ cells than in somatic cell types from the same individuals. Here we used this same mutation reporter transgene system to show that female germ cells also display a mutation frequency that is lower than that in corresponding somatic cells and similar to that seen in male germ cells, indicating this is a common feature of germ cells in both sexes. In addition, we showed that statistically significant differences in mutation frequencies are evident between germ cells and somatic cells in both sexes as early as mid-fetal stages in the mouse. Finally, a comparison of the mutation frequency in a general population of early type A spermatogonia with that in a population enriched for Thy-1-positive spermatogonia suggests there is heterogeneity among the early spermatogonial population such that a subset of these cells are predestined to form true spermatogonial stem cells. Taken together, these results support the disposable soma theory, which posits that genetic integrity is normally maintained more stringently in the germ line than in the soma and suggests that this is achieved by minimizing the initial occurrence of mutations in early germline cells and their subsequent gametogenic progeny relative to that in somatic cells. PMID:23153565

  20. KRE5 Suppression Induces Cell Wall Stress and Alternative ER Stress Response Required for Maintaining Cell Wall Integrity in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Masato; Ito, Fumie; Aoyama, Toshio; Sato-Okamoto, Michiyo; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Chibana, Hiroji; Shibata, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of cell wall integrity in fungi is required for normal cell growth, division, hyphae formation, and antifungal tolerance. We observed that endoplasmic reticulum stress regulated cell wall integrity in Candida glabrata, which possesses uniquely evolved mechanisms for unfolded protein response mechanisms. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of KRE5, which encodes a predicted UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, significantly increased cell wall chitin content and decreased cell wall β-1,6-glucan content. KRE5 repression induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-related gene expression and MAP kinase pathway activation, including Slt2p and Hog1p phosphorylation, through the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Moreover, the calcineurin pathway negatively regulated cell wall integrity, but not the reduction of β-1,6-glucan content. These results indicate that KRE5 is required for maintaining both endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis and cell wall integrity, and that the calcineurin pathway acts as a regulator of chitin-glucan balance in the cell wall and as an alternative mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress in C. glabrata. PMID:27548283

  1. Expression, sorting, and segregation of Golgi proteins during germ cell differentiation in the testis

    PubMed Central

    Au, Catherine E.; Hermo, Louis; Byrne, Elliot; Smirle, Jeffrey; Fazel, Ali; Simon, Paul H. G.; Kearney, Robert E.; Cameron, Pamela H.; Smith, Charles E.; Vali, Hojatollah; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Julia; Ma, Kewei; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular basis of changes in structure, cellular location, and function of the Golgi apparatus during male germ cell differentiation is unknown. To deduce cognate Golgi proteins, we isolated germ cell Golgi fractions, and 1318 proteins were characterized, with 20 localized in situ. The most abundant protein, GL54D of unknown function, is characterized as a germ cell–specific Golgi-localized type II integral membrane glycoprotein. TM9SF3, also of unknown function, was revealed to be a universal Golgi marker for both somatic and germ cells. During acrosome formation, several Golgi proteins (GBF1, GPP34, GRASP55) localize to both the acrosome and Golgi, while GL54D, TM9SF3, and the Golgi trafficking protein TMED7/p27 are segregated from the acrosome. After acrosome formation, GL54D, TM9SF3, TMED4/p25, and TMED7/p27 continue to mark Golgi identity as it migrates away from the acrosome, while the others (GBF1, GPP34, GRASP55) remain in the acrosome and are progressively lost in later steps of differentiation. Cytoplasmic HSP70.2 and the endoplasmic reticulum luminal protein-folding enzyme PDILT are also Golgi recruited but only during acrosome formation. This resource identifies abundant Golgi proteins that are expressed differentially during mitosis, meiosis, and postacrosome Golgi migration, including the last step of differentiation. PMID:25808494

  2. Markov mean properties for cell death-related protein classification.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Lozano, Carlos; Gestal, Marcos; González-Díaz, Humberto; Dorado, Julián; Pazos, Alejandro; Munteanu, Cristian R

    2014-05-21

    The cell death (CD) is a dynamic biological function involved in physiological and pathological processes. Due to the complexity of CD, there is a demand for fast theoretical methods that can help to find new CD molecular targets. The current work presents the first classification model to predict CD-related proteins based on Markov Mean Properties. These protein descriptors have been calculated with the MInD-Prot tool using the topological information of the amino acid contact networks of the 2423 protein chains, five atom physicochemical properties and the protein 3D regions. The Machine Learning algorithms from Weka were used to find the best classification model for CD-related protein chains using all 20 attributes. The most accurate algorithm to solve this problem was K*. After several feature subset methods, the best model found is based on only 11 variables and is characterized by the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) of 0.992 and the true positive rate (TP Rate) of 88.2% (validation set). 7409 protein chains labeled with "unknown function" in the PDB Databank were analyzed with the best model in order to predict the CD-related biological activity. Thus, several proteins have been predicted to have CD-related function in Homo sapiens: 3DRX-involved in virus-host interaction biological process, protein homooligomerization; 4DWF-involved in cell differentiation, chromatin modification, DNA damage response, protein stabilization; 1IUR-involved in ATP binding, chaperone binding; 1J7D-involved in DNA double-strand break processing, histone ubiquitination, nucleotide-binding oligomerization; 1UTU-linked with DNA repair, regulation of transcription; 3EEC-participating to the cellular membrane organization, egress of virus within host cell, class mediator resulting in cell cycle arrest, negative regulation of ubiquitin-protein ligase activity involved in mitotic cell cycle and apoptotic process. Other proteins from bacteria predicted as

  3. Plasmalemmal proteins of cultured vascular endothelial cells exhibit apical-basal polarity: analysis by surface-selective iodination

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Vascular endothelium in vivo appears to function as a polarized epithelium. To determine whether cellular polarity exists at the level of the plasma membrane, we have examined cultured endothelial monolayers for evidence of differential distribution of externally disposed plasmalemmal proteins at apical and basal cell surfaces. Lactoperoxidase beads were used to selectively label the apical surfaces of confluent endothelial monolayers, the total surfaces of nonenzymatically resuspended cells, and the basal surfaces of monolayers inverted on poly-L-lysine-coated coverslips, while maintaining greater than 98% viability in all samples. Comparison of the SDS PAGE radioiodination patterns obtained for each surface revealed a number of specific bands markedly enriched on either apical or basal surface. This polarized distribution involved membrane- associated as well as integral membrane proteins and was observed in several strains of bovine aortic endothelial cells, as well as in both primary and passaged human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In contrast, two morphologically nonpolarized cell types, bovine aortic smooth muscle and mouse peritoneal macrophages, did not display differential localization of integral membrane proteins. Polarized distribution of integral membrane proteins was established before the formation of a confluent monolayer. When inverted (basal-side-up) monolayers were returned to culture, the apical-side-up pattern was reexpressed within a few days. These results demonstrate that cell surface-selective expression of plasmalemmal proteins is an intrinsic property of viable endothelial cells in vitro. This apical/basal asymmetry of membrane structure may provide a basis for polarized endothelial functions in vivo. PMID:3782302

  4. Cellular Reprogramming Using Protein and Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Bong Jong; Hong, Yean Ju; Do, Jeong Tae

    2017-01-01

    Recently, stem cells have been suggested as invaluable tools for cell therapy because of their self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potential. Thus, scientists have developed a variety of methods to generate pluripotent stem cells, from nuclear transfer technology to direct reprogramming using defined factors, or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Considering the ethical issues and efficiency, iPSCs are thought to be one of the most promising stem cells for cell therapy. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated by transduction with a virus, plasmid, RNA, or protein. Herein, we provide an overview of the current technology for iPSC generation and describe protein-based transduction technology in detail. PMID:28273812

  5. Integral and differential form of the protein folding problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, Anna

    2004-07-01

    The availability of the complete genomic sequences of many species, including human, has raised enormous expectations in medicine, pharmacology, ecology, biotechnology and forensic sciences. However, knowledge is only a first step toward understanding, and we are only at the early stage of a scientific process that might lead us to satisfy all the expectations raised by the genomic projects. In this review I will discuss the present status of computational methods that attempt to infer the unique three-dimensional structure of proteins from their amino acid sequences. Although this problem has been defined as the “holy grail” of biology, it represents only one of the many hurdles in our path towards the understanding of life at a molecular level.

  6. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  7. Cell-to-cell transfer of glial proteins to the squid giant axon: The glia- neuron protein transfer hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, RJ; Gainer, H; Barker, JL

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that glial cells synthesize proteins which are transferred to adjacent neurons was evaluated in the giant fiber of the squid (Loligo pealei). When giant fibers are separated from their neuron cell bodies and incubated in the presence of radioactive amino acids, labeled proteins appear in the glial cells and axoplasm. Labeled axonal proteins were detected by three methods: extrusion of the axoplasm from the giant fiber, autoradiography, and perfusion of the giant fiber. This protein synthesis is completely inhibited by puromycin but is not affected by chloramphenicol. The following evidence indicates that the labeled axonal proteins are not synthesized within the axon itself. (a) The axon does not contain a significant amount of ribosomes or ribosomal RNA. (b) Isolated axoplasm did not incorporate [(3)H]leucine into proteins. (c) Injection of Rnase into the giant axon did not reduce the appearance of newly synthesized proteins in the axoplasm of the giant fiber. These findings, coupled with other evidence, have led us to conclude that the adaxonal glial cells synthesize a class of proteins which are transferred to the giant axon. Analysis of the kinetics of this phenomenon indicates that some proteins are transferred to the axon within minutes of their synthesis in the glial cells. One or more of the steps in the transfer process appear to involve Ca++, since replacement of extracellular Ca++ by either Mg++ or Co++ significantly reduces the appearance of labeled proteins in the axon. A substantial fraction of newly synthesized glial proteins, possibly as much as 40 percent, are transferred to the giant axon. These proteins are heterogeneous and range in size from 12,000 to greater than 200,000 daltons. Comparisons of the amount of amino acid incorporation in glia cells and neuron cell bodies raise the possibility that the adaxonal glial cells may provide an important source of axonal proteins which is supplemental to that provided by axonal transport

  8. Bifidobacterium lactis 420 and fish oil enhance intestinal epithelial integrity in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Mokkala, Kati; Laitinen, Kirsi; Röytiö, Henna

    2016-03-01

    Increased intestinal permeability is a predisposing factor for low-grade inflammation-associated conditions, including obesity and type 2 diabetes. Dietary components may influence intestinal barrier integrity. We hypothesized that the dietary supplements Bifidobacterium lactis 420, Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil have beneficial impacts on intestinal barrier integrity. In addition, we hypothesized that the coadministration of these components results in synergistic benefits to the integrity of the intestinal barrier. To study this, we investigated the impact of cell-free culture supernatant from dietary supplements B lactis 420 and L rhamnosus HN001, and fish oil, separately and in combination, on intestinal permeability in a CaCo-2 cell model. Administered separately, both B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil significantly increased the integrity of the intestinal epithelial barrier, as determined by an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), whereas L rhamnosus did not. The TEER increase with B lactis 420 was dose dependent. Interestingly, a combination of B lactis 420 supernatant and fish oil negated the increase in TEER of the single components. mRNA expression of tight junction proteins, measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, was not altered, but the mRNA expression of myosin light chain kinase increased after fish oil treatment. To conclude, single dietary components, namely, B lactis 420 and fish oil, induced beneficial effects on intestinal barrier integrity in vitro, whereas a combination of 2 beneficial test compounds resulted in a null effect.

  9. Production of recombinant proteins in suspension-cultured plant cells.

    PubMed

    Plasson, Carole; Michel, Rémy; Lienard, David; Saint-Jore-Dupas, Claude; Sourrouille, Christophe; de March, Ghislaine Grenier; Gomord, Véronique

    2009-01-01

    Plants have emerged in the past decade as a suitable alternative to the current production systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins and, today their potential for low-cost production of high quality, much safer and biologically active mammalian proteins is largely documented. Among various plant expression systems being explored, genetically modified suspension-cultured plant cells offer a promising system for production of biopharmaceuticals. Indeed, when compared to other plant-based production platforms that have been explored, suspension-cultured plant cells have the advantage of being totally devoid of problems associated with the vagaries of weather, pest, soil and gene flow in the environment. Because of short growth cycles, the timescale needed for the production of recombinant proteins in plant cell culture can be counted in days or weeks after transformation compared to months needed for the production in transgenic plants. Moreover, recovery and purification of recombinant proteins from plant biomass is an expensive and technically challenging business that may amount to 80-94% of the final product cost. One additional advantage of plant cell culture is that the recombinant protein fused with a signal sequence can be expressed and secreted into the culture medium, and therefore recovered and purified in the absence of large quantities of contaminating proteins. Consequently, the downstream processing of proteins extracted from plant cell culture medium is less expensive, which may/does balance the higher costs of fermentation. When needed for clinical use, recombinant proteins are easily produced in suspension-cultured plant cells under certified, controllable and sterile conditions that offer improved safety and provide advantages for good manufacturing practices and regulatory compliance. In this chapter, we present basic protocols for rapid generation of transgenic suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum, Oriza sativa and Arabidopis

  10. Death by Protein Damage in Irradiated Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    molecular mechanisms that protect against ionizing radiation-induced damage evolved independently in these organisms [13]. Please cite this article in press...shield: intracellular salts provide cellular protection against ionizing radiation in the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Environ...efficient antioxidant chemical defenses, which specifically protect proteins and the functions they catalyze. In diverse prokaryotes, the

  11. Economic competitiveness of fuel cell onsite integrated energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bollenbacher, G.

    1983-01-01

    The economic competitiveness of fuel cell onsite integrated energy systems (OS/IES) in residential and commercial buildings is examined. The analysis is carried out for three different buildings with each building assumed to be at three geographic locations spanning a range of climatic conditions. Numerous design options and operating strategies are evaluated and two economic criteria are used to measure economic performance. In general the results show that fuel cell OS/IES's are competitive in most regions of the country if the OS/IES is properly designed. The preferred design is grid connected, makes effective use of the fuel cell's thermal output, and has a fuel cell powerplant sized for the building's base electrical load.

  12. Integrating fuel cell power systems into building physical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the integration of fuel cell power plants and absorption chillers to cogenerate chilled water or hot water/steam for all weather air conditioning as one possible approach to building system applications. Absorption chillers utilize thermal energy in an absorption based cycle to chill water. It is feasible to use waste heat from fuel cells to provide hydronic heating and cooling. Performance regimes will vary as a function of the supply and quality of waste heat. Respective performance characteristics of fuel cells, absorption chillers and air conditioning systems will define relationships between thermal and electrical load capacities for the combined systems. Specifically, this paper develops thermodynamic relationships between bulk electrical power and cooling/heating capacities for combined fuel cell and absorption chiller system in building applications.

  13. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  14. Epithelial bridges maintain tissue integrity during collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedula, Sri Ram Krishna; Hirata, Hiroaki; Nai, Mui Hoon; Brugués, Agustí; Toyama, Yusuke; Trepat, Xavier; Lim, Chwee Teck; Ladoux, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    The ability of skin to act as a barrier is primarily determined by the efficiency of skin cells to maintain and restore its continuity and integrity. In fact, during wound healing keratinocytes migrate collectively to maintain their cohesion despite heterogeneities in the extracellular matrix. Here, we show that monolayers of human keratinocytes migrating along functionalized micropatterned surfaces comprising alternating strips of extracellular matrix (fibronectin) and non-adherent polymer form suspended multicellular bridges over the non-adherent areas. The bridges are held together by intercellular adhesion and are subjected to considerable tension, as indicated by the presence of prominent actin bundles. We also show that a model based on force propagation through an elastic material reproduces the main features of bridge maintenance and tension distribution. Our findings suggest that multicellular bridges maintain tissue integrity during wound healing when cell-substrate interactions are weak and may prove helpful in the design of artificial scaffolds for skin regeneration.

  15. Synaptic background activity influences spatiotemporal integration in single pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bernander, O; Douglas, R J; Martin, K A; Koch, C

    1991-01-01

    The standard one-dimensional Rall cable model assumes that the electrotonic structure of neurons does not change in response to synaptic input. This model is used in a great number of both theoretical and anatomical-physiological structure-function studies. In particular, the membrane time constant, tau m, the somatic input resistance, Rin, and the electrotonic length are used to characterize single cells. However, these studies do not take into account that neurons are embedded in a network of spontaneously active cells. Synapses from these cells will contribute significantly to the membrane conductance, especially if recent evidence of very high specific membrane resistance, Rm = 100 k omega.cm2, is taken into account. We numerically simulated the electrical behavior of an anatomically reconstructed layer V cortical pyramidal cell receiving input from 4000 excitatory and 1000 inhibitory cells firing spontaneously at 0-7 Hz. We found that, over this range of synaptic background activity, tau m and Rin change by a factor of 10 (80-7 msec, 110-14 M omega) and the electrotonic length of the cell changes by a factor of 3. We show that this significantly changes the response of the cell to temporal desynchronized versus temporal synchronized synaptic input distributed throughout the neuron. Thus, the global activity of the network can control how individual cells perform spatial and temporal integration. PMID:1763072

  16. Microfluidic integrated acoustic waving for manipulation of cells and molecules.

    PubMed

    Barani, Alireza; Paktinat, Hossein; Janmaleki, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Aminollah; Mosaddegh, Peiman; Fadaei-Tehrani, Alireza; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2016-11-15

    Acoustophoresis with its simple and low-cost fabrication, rapid and localized fluid actuation, compatibility with microfluidic components, and biocompatibility for cellular studies, has been extensively integrated into microfluidics to provide on-chip microdevices for a variety of applications in biology, bioengineering and chemistry. Among different applications, noninvasive manipulation of cells and biomolecules are significantly important, which are addressed by acoustic-based microfluidics. Here in this paper, we briefly explain the principles and different configurations of acoustic wave and acoustic streaming for the manipulation of cells and molecules and overview its applications for single cell isolation, cell focusing and sorting, cell washing and patterning, cell-cell fusion and communication, and tissue engineering. We further discuss the application of acoustic-based microfluidic systems for the mixing and transport of liquids, manipulation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules, followed by explanation on the present challenges of acoustic-based microfluidics for the handling of cells and molecules, and highlighting the future directions.

  17. A spectral boundary integral method for flowing blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Isfahani, Amir H. G.; Olson, Luke N.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2010-05-01

    A spectral boundary integral method for simulating large numbers of blood cells flowing in complex geometries is developed and demonstrated. The blood cells are modeled as finite-deformation elastic membranes containing a higher viscosity fluid than the surrounding plasma, but the solver itself is independent of the particular constitutive model employed for the cell membranes. The surface integrals developed for solving the viscous flow, and thereby the motion of the massless membrane, are evaluated using an O(NlogN) particle-mesh Ewald (PME) approach. The cell shapes, which can become highly distorted under physiologic conditions, are discretized with spherical harmonics. The resolution of these global basis functions is, of course, excellent, but more importantly they facilitate an approximate de-aliasing procedure that stabilizes the simulations without adding any numerical dissipation or further restricting the permissible numerical time step. Complex geometry no-slip boundaries are included using a constraint method that is coupled into an implicit system that is solved as part of the time advancement routine. The implementation is verified against solutions for axisymmetric flows reported in the literature, and its accuracy is demonstrated by comparison against exact solutions for relaxing surface deformations. It is also used to simulate flow of blood cells at 30% volume fraction in tubes between 4.9 and 16.9 μm in diameter. For these, it is shown to reproduce the well-known non-monotonic dependence of the effective viscosity on the tube diameter.

  18. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression.

  19. Protein diffusion in plant cell plasma membranes: the cell-wall corral

    PubMed Central

    Martinière, Alexandre; Runions, John

    2013-01-01

    Studying protein diffusion informs us about how proteins interact with their environment. Work on protein diffusion over the last several decades has illustrated the complex nature of biological lipid bilayers. The plasma membrane contains an array of membrane-spanning proteins or proteins with peripheral membrane associations. Maintenance of plasma membrane microstructure can be via physical features that provide intrinsic ordering such as lipid microdomains, or from membrane-associated structures such as the cytoskeleton. Recent evidence indicates, that in the case of plant cells, the cell wall seems to be a major player in maintaining plasma membrane microstructure. This interconnection / interaction between cell-wall and plasma membrane proteins most likely plays an important role in signal transduction, cell growth, and cell physiological responses to the environment. PMID:24381579

  20. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  1. Real-time monitoring of suspension cell-cell communication using an integrated microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Yue, Wanqing; Li, Cheuk-Wing; Yao, Xinsheng; Cai, Guoping; Yang, Mengsu

    2010-09-07

    For the first time, we have developed a microfluidic device for on-chip monitoring of suspension cell-cell communication from stimulated to recipient HL-60 cells. A deformable PDMS membrane was developed as a compressive component to perform cell entrapment and exert different modes of mechanical stimulation. The number of cells trapped by this component could be modulated by flushing excessive cells towards the device outlet. The trapped cells could be triggered to release mediators by mechanical stimulation. Sandbag microstructures were used to immobilize recipient cells at well-defined positions. These recipient cells were evoked by mediators released from mechanically stimulated cells trapped in the compressive component. Normally closed microvalves were integrated to provide continuous-flow and static environment. We studied cell-cell communication between stimulated (in compressive component) and recipient (in sandbag structures) cells. Calcium oscillations were observed in some recipient cells only when a low number of cells were stimulated. Different mechanical stimulation and flow environment were also employed to study their impact on the behavior of cell-cell communication. We observed that both the duration and intensity of intracellular calcium responses increased in persistent stimulation and decreased in flowing environment. This microdevice may open up new avenues for real-time monitoring of suspension cell-cell communication, which propagates via gap-junction independent mechanism, with multiple variables under control.

  2. Development towards cell-to-cell monolithic integration of a thin-film solar cell and lithium-ion accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbo, Solomon N.; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina; Yu, Shicheng; Tempel, Hermann; Kungl, Hans; Eichel, Rüdiger-A.; Rau, Uwe; Astakhov, Oleksandr

    2016-09-01

    This work focuses on the potentials of monolithic integrated thin-film silicon solar cell and lithium ion cell in a simple cell-to-cell integration without any control electronics as a compact power solution for portable electronic devices. To demonstrate this we used triple-junction thin-film silicon solar cell connected directly to a lithium ion battery cell to charge the battery and in turn discharge the battery through the solar cell. Our results show that with appropriate voltage matching the solar cell provides efficient charging for lab-scale lithium ion storage cell. Despite the absence of any control electronics the discharge rate of the Li-ion cell through the non-illuminated solar cell can be much lower than the charging rate when the current voltage (IV) characteristics of the solar cell is matched properly to the charge-discharge characteristics of the battery. This indicates good sustainability of the ultimately simple integrated device. At the maximum power point, solar energy-to-battery charging efficiency of 8.5% which is nearly the conversion efficiency of the solar cell was obtained indicating potential for loss-free operation of the photovoltaic (PV)-battery integration. For the rest of the charging points, an average of 8.0% charging efficiency was obtained.

  3. In-cell NMR of intrinsically disordered proteins in prokaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yutaka; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Smith, Brian O

    2012-01-01

    In-cell NMR, i.e., the acquisition of heteronuclear multidimensional NMR of biomacromolecules inside living cells, is, to our knowledge, the only method for investigating the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of proteins at atomic detail in the intracellular environment. Since the inception of the method, intrinsically disordered proteins have been regarded as particular targets for in-cell NMR, due to their expected sensitivity to the molecular crowding in the intracellular environment. While both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells can be used as host cells for in-cell NMR, prokaryotic in-cell NMR, particularly employing commonly used protein overexpression systems in Escherichia coli cells, is the most accessible approach. In this chapter we describe general procedures for obtaining in-cell NMR spectra in E. coli cells.

  4. NSA2, a novel nucleolus protein regulates cell proliferation and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Heyu; Ma, Xi; Shi, Taiping; Song, Quansheng; Zhao, Hongshan; Ma, Dalong

    2010-01-01

    NSA2 (Nop seven-associated 2) was previously identified in a high throughput screen of novel human genes associated with cell proliferation, and the NSA2 protein is evolutionarily conserved across different species. In this study, we revealed that NSA2 is broadly expressed in human tissues and cultured cell lines, and located in the nucleolus of the cell. Both of the putative nuclear localization signals (NLSs) of NSA2, also overlapped with nucleolar localization signals (NoLSs), are capable of directing nucleolar accumulation. Moreover, over-expression of the NSA2 protein promoted cell growth in different cell lines and regulated the G1/S transition in the cell cycle. SiRNA silencing of the NSA2 transcript attenuated the cell growth and dramatically blocked the cell cycle in G1/S transition. Our results demonstrated that NSA2 is a nucleolar protein involved in cell proliferation and cell cycle regulation.

  5. CHD3 proteins and polycomb group proteins antagonistically determine cell identity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Ernst; Villar, Corina B R; Farrona, Sara; Reyes, José C; Hennig, Lars; Köhler, Claudia

    2009-08-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is of fundamental importance for modulating genomic activities in higher eukaryotes. The opposing activities of Polycomb group (PcG) and trithorax group (trxG) proteins are part of a chromatin-based cellular memory system ensuring the correct expression of specific transcriptional programs at defined developmental stages. The default silencing activity of PcG proteins is counteracted by trxG proteins that activate PcG target genes and prevent PcG mediated silencing activities. Therefore, the timely expression and regulation of PcG proteins and counteracting trxG proteins is likely to be of fundamental importance for establishing cell identity. Here, we report that the chromodomain/helicase/DNA-binding domain CHD3 proteins PICKLE (PKL) and PICKLE RELATED2 (PKR2) have trxG-like functions in plants and are required for the expression of many genes that are repressed by PcG proteins. The pkl mutant could partly suppress the leaf and flower phenotype of the PcG mutant curly leaf, supporting the idea that CHD3 proteins and PcG proteins antagonistically determine cell identity in plants. The direct targets of PKL in roots include the PcG genes SWINGER and EMBRYONIC FLOWER2 that encode subunits of Polycomb repressive complexes responsible for trimethylating histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3). Similar to mutants lacking PcG proteins, lack of PKL and PKR2 caused reduced H3K27me3 levels and, therefore, increased expression of a set of PcG protein target genes in roots. Thus, PKL and PKR2 are directly required for activation of PcG protein target genes and in roots are also indirectly required for repression of PcG protein target genes. Reduced PcG protein activity can lead to cell de-differentiation and callus-like tissue formation in pkl pkr2 mutants. Thus, in contrast to mammals, where PcG proteins are required to maintain pluripotency and to prevent cell differentiation, in plants PcG proteins are required to promote cell

  6. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M